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Creston Review Nov 15, 1935

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 '".  '-' "ti-.''  I    " <:,t'Y.*  * fc��������� >< /.  J Provincial ilbrdW  * -;���������-  apl 36 J}  'lyicT&nis ^n f  /-*i ���������  LJt-LJjj  JULPH  ������3? T?"VT"_Rllirr  JL m        AS    rtfrf V .H. i mM mwm4 ������ V  "  Vol. XX v I  CBESTON, B.C.,   FRIDAY; NOVEMBER 15,  1935  No. 29  Fire Destroys  Pa__.gSI.ed,  iV - "   ���������*-    j-t        f ���������     i*"  Long, Allah & Long, Limited,  Warehouse at. Erickson , E^rey  to Flakes-���������Everything, is Lost  Including. 12,000 Boxes Apples  Fruit warehouses covering  about 350 x 40 feet, along with  fully modern packing house  equipment and some 12,000 boxes  of apples went up in smoke at  Erickson on Saturday when fire  completely destroyed the extensive fruit packing, shipping and  warehousing plant of Long, Allan  & Long, Limited.  How the fire started is still a  mystery. It was noticed about  12.30 by some of the shed employees whp promptly raised an  alarm, ana equally promptly  phoned Creston for the village fire  fighting equipment, which was  quickly rushed to the blaze.  With quite a moderate  blowing out of the northeast  flames spread rapidly and  though- a large number  volunteer, fire4fighter.were promptly on the scene the blaze had  gained such control that nothing  could be salvaged. The heat was  so intense that the C.P.R. depot  was seriously, threatened but the  "of the  ing house equipmeut and supplies,  including their new Cutler rotary  grader,-which was only installed  this fall.  In an interview with C. W.  Allan, he stated that ''The orehardists interests will be protected  to the fullest extent and that no  grower has occasion to worry.''  The firm is now employing the  packing crew in town where they  are at present putting up a bench  pack, but expect to start running  a grader some time this week, in  order to finish up> the balance of  the season's pack of about 35,000  boxes of apples.  Mr. Allan also states that he is  now working on plans for a new  warehouse on the same site at  Erickson, and , will commence  building as soon as possible. The  shed will be fully modern and will  have greater storage capacity  than the former building. He  will have everything in readiness  for the 1936 season. The firm  will hold a meeting of the growers  some time in the near future to  fully explain the situation.  Creston Observes  Armistice Day  Weather Unpropitious and Cenotaph Exercises are Curtailed-  Light Attendance at Dinner���������  Large Crowd at Dance.  gale  the  al-  of  volunteers  chemical   i*i������ -  Wll.ll  the  from  rw j   vyrestoil  Wynn&ei  Mr. and Mrs. E. Andestad and Miss  H. Andestad were Nelson visitors last  week.  Mr. and Mrs. Stan. O'Genski of Slocan  were auto visitors, guests of Mr. and  Mrs. E. Uri.  t-agiu-c*  were able to save it, although  t he waiting room and office were  badly scorched. The contents of  the-*l*eight shed and the household effects of the agent, T. W.  Bundy, were removed without  damage. :Y^,      &^ .. ...  ���������?-F-our *���������* -i^fri'gfe-ratii|j^t*^������:'  were on the siding waiting "to" be  loaded* were " also destroyed, but  one car loaded with apples was  safely removed from the danger  zone. Cranbrook was promptly  advised of the fire and a light  engine was rushed to Erickson  but arrived too late to save the  empties, which were coupled and  were too heavy ' for the fire  fighters to shift out of danger.  So fast did the flames spread that  some of the employees were unable to? re-enter the building to  save their hats and coats.  Three buildings went up in the  confiagation. These included the  old Crestla'nd Fruit Company  warehouse; purchased two years  ago by LongiTN Allan & Long,  adjoining whic'i was the firms  original7 main building, arid the  third structure hwas owned by  Putnam Y& Cartwright. Along  with the buildings the firm  su ffered complete loss of all pack-  Burch were auto  for the Armistice  Mr. and Mrs. A W.  visitors to Cranbrook  weekend holiday.  Misses Mary Abbott and Hilda Hagen  were weekend visitors at Robson, guests  of Mr. and Mrs. Berry.  The November meeting of the Women's  Insti* ute will be held at the church at  2.30 p.m., Thursday 21$t..  ~Jt_r. and  TtlSttflttim  In tyre's parents.  Melntyre and son, of  have-returned home. '  'RIDGE dud  Whist Drive  Under the auspices of the  Catholic Ladies' League,  King George Hotel  Dining Room  CRESTON  Thurs., Nov. 21  Cards at EIGHT p.m.  PLEASING PRIZES  LUNCH  Admission        35c.  ,',",''���������'../.';'."-.���������'.'     'Sup^iYintil^-tjlcd.,  Principal and Mrs. M_rteHo and young-  daughter returned on Monday from  Trail where they were visitors at the  Armistice weekend,  H. A. Bathie and son while hunting  one day last week bagged about the largest white tail d**>er ever shot in this ������* is-  trict. : It had 25 points, and weighed  about 300 pounds.  The November meeting of the Ladies'  Aid was held at the home of Mrs. J. G.  Abbott. A'fruit contest was won by  Miss Agnes Crane. Wool was carded  and a baby comforter was made for a  needy person.  The military whist in aid of the  Christmas tree fund wias a splendid sue  cess, $20 being realized for&this good  causes The winners were VC. Wilson,  Miss M.. Rogers and Mr. and Mrs. J.  Pascuzzo, the latter three of Sirdar. Consolation honors were annexed by J.  Hulme, A. Benedetti, M. Hackett and  Mary Abbott. The goose donateu by  Mrs. Hulme was won by C. Ostrensky,  who held the lucky ticket. Alf. Edgar  won the capserol which was raffled by the  Women's Institute. Dancing brought  the evening to a close, with music by A.  and R. Andestad, J. Hulme, F. Hagen  and Miss Taiarico of Sirdar The entertainment was in charge of Mrs. M. Hagen  Although the weather was anything  but favorable there was a splendid turnout of returned men-eild a representative  gathering of citizens'.for the morning  exercises at the cenotaph. The number  attending the dinner*, was below the  standard of the last appearance around  the festive board, but the turnout at the  dance was excellent, the crowd at Park  pavillion being estimated as just over 300.  Due the inclemency;^jf the weather the  service at the monument was brief but  none the less genuine. Bugler Cox  sounded the tisuaT^iiallSi' Cease Fire,  Reveille and Last Post. The invocation  was by Rev. J. A. T.McLagan, and Rev.  R. E. M. YerburghYspoke briefly but  fittingly. The band,"?%hich headed the  parade to the monument as well as to  the cemetery, played the accompaniment  for O Canada, "O-G<x_,0ur Help in Ages  Past," and the national anthem. The  benediction was by Rev. A. H. Walker,  who- also introduced This fellow clerics.  After the service atVthe cenotaph the  ex-service men paraded to * he cemetery  where the graves of all fallen comrades  were decorated. ",?���������    ? $  At 12.30 the annual'dinner was served  at the Creston Cafe 7with the new manager and chef, ��������� HaroldYBeninger, providing: ah excellent spread and with equally  efficient service. ? John Bird, president  of the Legion, presidedin happy fashion,  and after full justice? had been done the  excellent menu there was the usual  round of toasts and responses.  s-The King*" was?repiied to with a vigorous rendering of the national anthem  "The Province," waa ??introduced; by C  B. Twigg, and replied^toby Frank Putnam, M.P.P. T'������THis?^e^vices.'',was proposed  by H.   AYPc^well,: iwith a response  by Chas. TMboreJTYGofc Mallandaine handled the ?^**Vi'*AtertFa."Ysi*ith responses by  R. Skilljcorn, H������*CarwB?:andRev. R.E M.  Yerburgh. ? Striping ^tji^t^to the - exr  "-cHfJfSh^E^ -the^,  omen^sAi^ was'  In^fi1&:*t^st?|^.,'ih'e"*: auxiliary.  Groceteria trimmed the High School  boys 41-16.. From the spectators'  angle this was the best game of the  evening. Groceteria showed the form  which carried them to the championship  last season. Play was fast with High  School lacking in weight and height.  Scoring for the winners was distributed  with Herb? Couling leading with 12  points.' Few shots were*"' missed by the  grocery hands. For High School LaBelle  led with six -points and along with  Truscott and Gus Morabito were the  pick of the losers.   Teams:  Imperial Groceteria���������H. Couling 12,  Payne 7, Downes, Bill Bourdon 9, Bus  ttoss, Kirk 2, Speers 4, Nickel.   Total 41.  High School���������LaBelle 6, Gus Morabito 4. Goplin 3. York 2. Truscott,  Rogers, Avery 1, Weir.   Total 16..  Organ for Arrow  Creek School  .Women's Institute Makes Donation to Help with Payment���������  Hear Talk on Ethiopian War  ���������Further Move re Cemetery.  In the final, Loallo vs. Cardinal, Dale  wa3 the star of the fruit men, making  the playf with Maddess. For Cardinals,  the D. Corrie-Cobus-Crawford combination was as good as ever but due the  lack of teamwork by tbe other members  of the squad they found it difficult to  find their opponents' b sket. Corrie  accounted for eight of the 15 points  scoren.   Teams:  Loallo���������Maddess 3. Scott, Dale 1,  Young 2, S. Nastasi 4, F. Bourdon 10,  A Nastasi.    Total 20.  Cardinals���������Corrie 8. Hurford-3, Cobus  3. Crawford 2, Morabito, Phillips,  Walde.   Total 15.  The men's teams in the league have  named D. Todd to act as their representative on the league executive. ^The  ladies are due to name their representative before the end of the week. >  Bosweii  expects to leave  ex..  which?:^^iHtrc^'^dTl^?3f0h1- Hall  arid  rejHi^7-i^^y?Wii|v^?lJa^sOT. During  the speechmaking 7vocal numbers were  gi veii by 7 JbhhfHall and j 3.TB. Holder,  and the community singing was heartily  entered into by all present;  The Tdaywas^concluded *n splendid  fashion with the usual dance for which  splendid music was provided by the Imperial orchestra of Cranbrook, who were  even more popular on?this occasion than  on their first appearance a year ago The  Legion Women's Auxiliary provided a  fine supper Which was served expeditiously by Legion members, and during  the evening the Auxiliary had a drawing  for a cushion on which ratHe tickets had  been sold. Miss Cooke, matron at  hospitol drew the winning ticket. No  which was held by Bert Lowther.  the  97,  Hi Reps., L������all������  Groceteria Win  and    Mrs     Hulme,  Chribtma** tree fund.  convenors    of    the  ������2������tf*B������irJS������ro  Mr. and Mrs. H Armstrong of Cran-  btook spent a couple of days here, guests  of Mrs. Speaker.  MiflB Muriel "Thurston, who haa boon  at Toronto for the past year, arrived  home on Sunday.  *  Mrs. Frod Speaker, who haa boon visiting at Cranbrook the past two weeks,  arrived home Monday,  Mrs. J. Murphv was hostecs to Christ  Church Ladies' Guild at the November  meeting on Tuesday last.  J. IS. Brown, tho new public scht ol inspector, was horo on his scmi*nnnual  visit at Erickson, school at tho first of  tho week.  Mr. and Mrs. Algor, Mrn Adams and  MIbb Munn of Loh Angolos, Calif., who  havo been visiting with Mra. MeKelvio,  loft for home the miter part of tho wotfrk.  Thc Novcrribt-r mooting of Krlclcpon  Ludicm' Hospital .Auxiliary wan held at  thc home of Mr**/-Palfreyman on Friday  evening. Plana woro dlacunsGd for tho  Now Year ball. Mrn. Baldwin was  named secretary for tho balance of the  year, replacing Misa Edith Palfreyman  who in leaving, nnd who was accorded n  hearty vote of thanks for her f-pk-ndtd  work tho paat two yearn.  Loallo Hand Cardinals Surprise  Beating���������High Reps. Continue  Winning   Streak -~ Groceteria  Shows Some Oldtime Form.  Friday night's Commercial League  basketball was witnessed by the largest  crowd seen in the hall this season: Play  was faBt with all the teams playing bang  up ball till the final whistle. There,was  one upset, Loallo dishing up a 20-15  beating to tho flashy Cardinals. Groceteria showed up well displaying fine  combination to get the High School bo-ya  16-41. The High Rep gins disposed of  C rent on Motors 24-9 V V  In thc first clash which brought High  Reps, and Creston Motors into action,  hard checking was in evidence throughout and tho score did not indicate the  play by any moans. High Reps, did not  display the brand of ball shown in previous games, due the hard checking of  tin* opposition. Helen Staples played a  steady gamo at guard, as woll as scoring  seven points. Motors showed to good  advantage with tho scoring honors  evenly divided. ��������� All the Motors material ployed steadily cjiecpt Dot Wcight-  mann, who was passing the bull fur too  carelessly throughout the gUmo; Tho  teamB*'v,< ���������������������������<...  High Reps���������Nell Payne 9, Theo  TonipkinB 4, Hare, Ruby Fainter -1,  StaploH 7, Beryl Palmer, MniHoForgiWon.  Marion, Coopor, Doris Hendy, Tiuhna  Erickson. Total 24.  CrdBton Motors���������Browell 2, Armitngo  2, VnnAckoron, D. MacDonald, Avery  2, Wlghtmnnn, IC Pay no 1, H, Moore.  Total 9.  In    the    second     fixture     Xmporinl  i-'? Clifford  Bebbington  ^shortly for Rochester  The school at Sanca was opened last  with a good attendance.  S. Spence was in Boswell at the weekend, disposing of a veal he has just  killed.  K. Wallace, who has been confined to  his house, is now able to be about   as  iiaiinl  UOUUti  4. *  Mr. and Mrs. S. Gullett are visiting  "with Mrs. Ike Lewis,- prior^to leaving for  %^'-:���������:J-^.*--'r<ii;;v^..-,. v. -  .- W.~ Mackie was'"hauling" apples to  Atbara last week. The packing shed  operated a few hours on Saturday.  Eric Bainbridge has returned from a  trip over his trap line. Prospects look  good for the season. Numerous tracks  have been seen.  The Nelson-Creston freight truck will  only make two trips weekly during the  winter, arrivin^at Boswell from Nelson  Tuesday and Friday.  P. Garvie of Sanca left on Friday for  the coattt. He will, in future, make his  home there. Mrs. Garvie and the children will follow later.  Stanley Bebbington was a recent  visitor from Salmo at his home in  Boswell. He met with a minor accident  while employed in the mine.  Up to the present no deer have been  shot in this district. There are very  few tracks low down, but many are in  evidence on tbe high ridges.  C. Scbaub of Lomond, Alberta, has  purchased the ranch from Mr. and Mra.  S. Gullett. He moved in with his wife  and son, Kenneth, last week.  Stanley Hepher has left for Salmo  where he will take up the position he  relinquished in the spring to take a  position with the forestry department.  C. Holden is laid up with a sprained  ankle and.is unable to leave the -house.  Hit* neighbors organized a bee to dig his  potatoes. About 30 per cent, of the  crop was lost by frost.  Remembrance Day exercises wore  held tn Memorial Hall Mo-day evening,  under the auspices of the Farmers Institute. S3 people enjoyed an evening of  military whist. B. H. Smith was maBter  of ceremonies.  ��������� ��������� '     " ��������� ��������� ' ���������: l ��������� "'  A new industry, as yet in its infancy,  is springing up in Boswell. A number  of the ranchers are putting up crystallized fruit in fancy packages for the  C rhtrnaB trade. Some of the containers are made of pine needles, which  makos an attractive gift. The demand  this year far exceeds the supply.  Another year, no doubt, they will go in  for this on a larger scale.  Tlio annual general meeting of Bos-  woll Memorial Hall was hold on Saturday evening. H. L. Hepher, president  of the retiring board, was in the chair.  In an effort to economize little was  accomplished during last year* Tho now  fence built around the grounds was the  only work done. Little headway was  imuiu ut fmuiuuug tho put elmtu; of a new  piano, which is bably needed, A  resolution to amalgamate the Memorial  Hall Socioty with tho Farmers' Inntl-  tuto was rejected. The following woro  erected to tho board of directors for tho  ensuing year: President, A. Macklo;  secretary-treasurer, K��������� Wallace; executive.     Mlnse������  S.   Cummings    and    B,  The'? November   meeting   of Creston  and   District- Women's    Institute   was  held at the home of the president,   Mrs.  H. W. MacLaren Yon  Friday  afternoon.  The    president"    was    in     charge.   16  members^  and ^ two   visitors  were in  attendance.   Correspondence was light.  The government   grant was received  from the minister of agriculture, also a -  letter of congratulation fjrom the   pro-   ������  vinci.ai    superintendent,-* -Mrs,     Mae-  Lachaln,   ? congratulating     the     local  institute on work done this year.   The  secretary is to send a letter of thanks to  all those helping with the school fair.   -  Prizes for the winners at the school  fair-were discussed. They will be the  same as last year and the secretary will  issue the prize money as soon as possible.  Community welfare was discussed and  milk will be continued for babies for  another month. Christmas boxes were  medtioned and will be supplied to local  children now in Vancouver.  A donation of $10 was made to help  with the purchase of an organ for Arrow  Creek school, on request of Principal  Kolthammer, who also asked for magazines that could be used for supplementary reading in that school. Storm windows will be purchased by the Institute  for their ward at Creston hospital.  Following the business  session Rev.  A.  H. Walker was guest speaker and  gave ari enlightening talk on the Ethiopian war.   He,followed this up with a  discussion of current events, including  Creston's need of a new  cemetery.   He  had the latter question well in hand and  discussed it from all angles.   A vote of  thanks was tendered the speaker.   The  cemetery committee  will send out circular letters to all local bodies and  to  outlying points calling a  public meeting.  The tea hostesses werej&rs. MacLaren  and Mrs. Vigne.   Tea money was generous,  and will go to the crippled children's work.   The December meeting will  .l^jKfeM?!^^l4aW'^^^n^-s--~J-*~*' ������������������ -**-���������"  -  <*������*'  4Hm������  mm93*aSm*~  *ammg  ._ Harry Webster has "just taken delivery  of a light delivery truck.  Principal Page of Alice Siding school  was at his home at- Rossland for the  weekend.   -  George Willis is home from Eholt,  where he has been employed for the past  few months.  Mr. and Mrs. John Spratt have moved  into their new residence on which construction w:s rushed following the disastrous fire of November 3rd.  At the meeting of Alice Siding Social  club at Mrs- John. Marshall's it was decided to have a dance Saturday, 16th,  at the home of Mrs. Marshall.  Harry Mather, Bob Parkin and Arthur  Constable had a successful hunting trip  over the weekend, each bringing home a  deer. Frank Martin and Frank Travis  were not so successful. In the duck  hunting Jim Taylor had all the weekend  luck. *  Davies, nnd J. Johnstone. A vote of  thanks was tendered thc retiring  directors and the librarians.  Under the auspices  of   Creston  High Schoot, in  Park Pavilion  CRESTON  Dancing at NINE p.m..  MUSIC by  .-    .      ���������    J!X\.:r.\<  mlS four ices  ORCHESTRA  Admission  50c.  Supper Included.  '.'I.JiU.  ���������,w ~*t;-  THE   REVIEW.   CBEST03ST,   B.   ������������������ft  Edw������ rtl $hta r������j  ggjgj^AfM ran m. |s������  llUff* "  l_:  ^ ���������ei*^     NOURISHED      ^^ ���������**<������.  MORE CANADIAN  CHILDREN  THAN  ANY OTHER  CORN  A product of    The CANADA STARCH CO.. Limited  WORLD HAPPENINGS  BRIEFLY TOLD  Convicted from fingerprints on a  mirror they had stolen, three middle-  aged men. were sentenced at Bombay  to imprisonment of from one to three  years.  Ontario department of education  has ordered compulsory teaching of  civics in all public and high schools  In the province, starting? in October.  A hew text book will be ready soon.  Business is better all over Canada  and the morale of the west is improved, Robert O. McCulloch of Gait,  Ont., president of the Mutual Life  Assurance Company of Canada, said  In an interview in Victoria.  A pearl the size of a pigeon's egg  and said to be capable of protecting  its wearer from all danger was part  of the loot recently taken from the  tomb of a Manchu prince near Peiping by grave robbers.  Liady Byng of "Vimy, widow of the  former commander of the Canadian  Corps, Lord Byng, who died last  June, has informed "Dominion headquarters of the Canadian Lr.gion she  will take part is the Vimy pilgrimage in July next year.  Successful use of an instrument  which, bores through the brain to the  skull pan and burns away tissues  producing a fluid that causes "hydrocephalus, a condition causing infants  to become idiots, is announced by Dr.  Tracy J. Putnan, of Boston Children's  hospital.  Nearly $27,000,000 of new ordinary  life insurance, a slight increase as  compared with the same month last  year, was sold in Canada and Newfoundland in August according .to returns of the Life Insurance Sales  Research Bureau, Toronto. Of the  total, sales in Saskatchewan were  $996,000.  Grows Huge Grape Vine  German Boy Planted Riding Switch  "Left By Customer  Thirty-five years ago a Br. Dick of  Diamond Creek, Victoria, was out  riding near Heidelberg, Germany. He  left his riding switch, behind at a  smithy's where he was having his  pony shod. The smithy's lad recognized the switch as a grape vine cutting. He planted it in his cottage.  Now it has grown to a full vine 35  yards long extending over the fence  across a line and along the eastern  wall of a hotel.  Liner Gangway Blocked  To Shorten Ocean Trip  Irish Free State Plans Ship-to-Shore  "Planes  London will be brought within  three days of New York when civil  aviation plans which are being devised by the government of the Irish  Free State come into operation���������  possibly next year.  The scheme aims at a service of  high-speed aircraft of the Douglas  type, to intercept;;, the big Atlantic  liners off the west coast of Ireland  and to speed the passengers to London, with the saving of a full day of  travel time.  With ships off the type of tlie Queen  Mary and Normandie the Anglo-  Irish air ferry will make London and  New York a matter of a mere weekend trip.  From Galway on the west coast  of Ireland to Southampton by liner  is at present a full day's journey,  with an additional two hours to London. The new air link would bring  Galway within three hours of London.  It is proposed to use amphibian  machines.  From Dublin the idea Is to form a  new air link not only with London  but also with Paris, Brussels, and  Berlin.  SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON  ���������OCTOBER 13  THE STORY OF JEREMIAH  Passengers At Southampton Held Up  By Thousands Of Bees  Thousands of bees held up passengers about to embark on the liner  Moldavia at Southampton, England.  The bees settled down comfortably  at the foot of the passenger gangway and defied attempts to move raphy and geological formation  them. A hose "was tried, but this  merely incited the bees, and caused  them to buzz in clouds, scattering  onlookers. Eventually order was restored, and embarkation proceeded.  Alberta's Coal Reserves  Alberta's coal reserves total 40,-  200,000,000 tons and lie buried in  1,717 square miles of provincial soil,  Sir Montague Barlow, one-man commission investigating collieries, was  toid. Dr. J. A. Allan, head of the  geology department, University of  Alberta,   explained   Alberta's   topog-  A recent check showed that only  25 of the 1,100 Gideon Bibles placed  in one Detroit hotel in 1928 remain  in their rooms.  England To' Receive Relic  Armada Jewel Has Been Given To  Art Collection Fund  The Armada jewel, one of the most  beautiful relics of Queen Elizabeth's  time, is to return to Britain. It was  bought at a saleroom in London for  2,700 guineas, and it was announced  that it had been given by Lord  Wakefield to the National Art Collection Fund. The jewel formed part  of the Pierpont Morgan collection of  miniatures. It will go to the Victoria and Albert Museum, Kensington, London.  HARVESTING IN SASKATCHEWAN AT 20 BELOW t  D. E. Warford, of Sawtelle, Calif.,  lays claim to being the most tattooed  man in America.  IN UP-TO-DATE  STABLES  ���������Old Reliable MinarcVs  Wtien. horaea come la to stable with wire-  cuts or saddle boils, or cows hsvs caked  u<kl������r. tbe thine to do ts eat thai Minardi  bottle at once, as Mi. Do\v<l of Qlenboro,  Manitoba, knows. He writes)  "I like your Minard's Liniment. Liko to  hnve it In tlio house. I havo found your  "Minimi's Liniment especially gtood tor  Tbnrbed wire cuts on Ijaraeo."  A family doctor prepared Minard's Liniment  ���������over 60 years ago. Still Invaluable In  ���������very  stable  and  evury  hnu**. Ut*  Just about the middle of December, *  one of the most unique and interesting annual harvests to' be garnered  on the North American Continent  will be in full swing. No! Not wheat  ���������but Mineral Salts. The scene will  be Little Mahitou Lake, Watroiis,  Saskatchewan. The harvesters will  be the employees of the Department  of Natural Resources of Saskatchewan; and the harvest itself will consist of the tiny crystals of mineral  salt which form ln Little Manitou  Lake each year at "freeze-up." It is  one of the essential conditions that  the harvest be completed within a  period of ten days.   When the Prairie  winter comes in real earnest, and the  thermometer shivers down to 20 below zero, the Departmental men,  warmly attired, and wearing waist-  high rubber boots, gather up these  crystals with specially constructed  shovels, and store them in the Government warehouse at Watrous, from.  where they are later distributed. The  medicinal qualities of this saline lake,  known for many years, are becoming  more and more widely recognized,  and as a consequence these harvesting operations are assuming ever-  increasing proportions, and the Lake  is proving to be one of the Province's  most important natural resources.  m^jJ^^  |)"liw-f'  25 feet of while* or colourftd  paper for kitchen use���������coverluff  nbelven, lining drawer*, eta,  **'       nkwvtou. ON-r/Jtio  ^&^LS-&&mo������c������, -/t^L.  steico  Crochet  Jjour Qatj  Scraps of  (tWool  Onlo an  6tfi//u  Golden text: To whomsoever I shall  send thee thou shalt go, and whatsoever I shall command thee thou shalt  speak.   Jeremiah 1:7.  Lesson: Jeremiah 1:1-10; 6:10, 11;  8:18; 26:1-24; Chapters 36, 37, 38.  Devotional Reading: Psalm 26:1-7.  Explanations And Comments  Courageous Speaking Enjoined,  Jeremiah 1:6-10. ln the thirteenth  year of Joslah's reign (about. 626  B.C.), Jeremiah, the son of a priest,  became conscious of a divine call to  the prophetic office. It is natural to  understand that he had long meditated upon his country's sins and had  felt impelled to denounce them, but  was most reluctant to undertake the  task. The inward struggle which  took place in his sensitive and shrinking heart when something- different  from his ordinary consciousness made  him certain that he was destined to  be the prophet of woe, be tells in the  form of a dialogue between God and  himself.  "Ah, "Lord Jehovah! behold I know  not how to speak; for I am a child,"  He was not a child in years but he  lacked experience, he feared he had  not the ability to speak, he distrusted  himself. In the jargon of to-day, he  had an inferiority complex. "Say not,  I am a child" was the answer to his  troubled thoughts that came to him;  "for to whomsoever I shall send thee  thou shalt go, and whatsoever I shall  command thee thou shalt speak. Be  not afraid because of them; for I am  with thee to deliver thee."  The commission which Jeremiah received waa to be "over the nations  and over the kingdoms, to pluck up  and to break down, and to destroy  and to overthrow, to build and to  plant." His task was to be destructive and constructive. He must strive  to make the people give up their  vices and weaknesses which were  making for internal corruption and  for political destruction, and to implant in their hearts new ideals of  righteousness.  The Courageous Speaker Threatened, Jeremiah 26:8-11. During the 40  years of Jeremiah's ministry, his was  the task of setting himself in opposition to all the currents of his time,  for Judah believed that she would  escape the impending doom, that  Jerusalem was" inviolable because it  held the temple, that the nation could  not perish. Jeremiah had to warn  her that her only possible course was  to surrender to Babylon. At some  great feast, doubtless ^he^^e people  were gathered at .Jerusalem, Jeremiah uttered the warning recorded in  the first seven verses of chapter 26.  The Courage of Convictions, 26:  12-15. Jeremiah's defense was that  his message had come to him from  God, and he urged them to amend  their ways and doings, and to obey  the voice of Jehovah. If they would  do this, Jehovah would avert the evil  which he had pronounced upon them.  Prophecy, then was regarded as conditional; a change of conduct could  prevent the threatened punishment.  Busy Year For Sun  More Eclipses In 1935 Than For Past  180 Years  The sun this year presents its  greatest show of eclipses for the past  130 years. The moon will have passed  between the sun and the earth no  fewer than five times, and the moon  will be in the earth's shadow twice.  This according to Professor Alfred H.  Joy, secretary of the Mount Wilson  Observatory, is the greatest number  of eclipses possible in one year. Not  since 1805 have the sun's rays been  obscured so often, states Reuter's  correspondent in Pasadena. It will  be only the second time since 1255  that there have been five solar  eclipses in one year, and there will  not be another such number until the  year 2485.  nan.  ((Persian  PATTERN    5439  Even though you have nothing on hand but tiny scraps of wool, you  can'fashion this lovely afghan. And tho wool may bo of different wolghts.  Each block���������4% inches square���������oan bo done in different' colors. And what  a jeweled offoct you havo when donet It doos indeed look like a colorful  oriental tapestry. Doing oach block ln different colors, too, malcos tho work  -more fascinating for each Is an advonturo, Besides an afghan you can  muko lovely pillow topa or cliuii: -sets. Can't you see what a lovely and inexpensive Xmas gift these would bo?  In pattern 6430 you will find complete instructions for making tho  afghan shown as woll ao pillow tops and chair sets; an Illustration of tho  block and of tho stitches needed; material requirements.  To obtain thin pattorn send 20 contu In atampa or coin (coin preferred)  to Hou-icliold Arts Dcpt, Wlnnlpog Newspaper Union, 176 McDormot Ave.  .IC., Winnipeg.  Thore iu uo Alice BrooltN put-turn hook puhllslie4  Making Ten-Year Tour  Not  Bicyclists From Sumatra I>o  Believe In Speed  Two Sumatran cyclists who do not  bolieve in tho modern craze for speed  havo arrived at Bombay on a ton-  year tour of tho world. Thoy started  from their home in Sumatra In July,  1931, and havo taken over threc-and-  a-half ycara to complete 5,000 miles  on their bicycles. Thoy mado fairly  long stops in Indo-Chlna, Slam and  Burma and in various parts of India  in order ot learn the language and  study tho people and their religion.  By 103C, tho United States public  debt is expeetad to total *34,2l*>8,000,-  000; approximately $270 for every  man, woman and child In the country.  Soviet sclontlHte are building a  telescope which will havo thti third  IargCNt lens In the world. 2118  ROYAL  WE1 fi ^eSs7 jfr js  give you perfect  breads, rolls,  coffee cake and  RalslnBread and Buns ftlvetemptin_  ���������ariety to your menu. See page 13 of  Royal Yeast Bak������ Boole for recipe.  Tha whole family will like these  tender Parker House Rolls. Recipe  in Royal Yeast Bake Book, page 12.  It's easy to snake thia delicious  Coffee Cake. Recipe on page 12,  Royal Yeast Bake Book.  1~~IGHT, tasty Dread is  -*** largely a matter of perfect leavening. That's why  it is so important to use dependable yeast. With Royal  Yeast Cakes you can be sure  of full leavening power eyery  time. Each Royal Yeast  Cake is protected by a special airtight wrapper. They  keep in perfect condition  for months.  Ttvolfclpful  ^mmm Booklets. . m  $&       FREE!  The "Royal Yeast  Bake Book" .tells  all about the art  of brendmaklnft  and gives tested  recipes. "Ths  Royal Road to  Better Health"  expla'ns how the  regular use of  Royal Yeast Cakes  ': as u food will Improve your health.  BOY  MADE-IN-  CANADA GOODS  STANDAUO BRANDS LIMITED  Prater Are., and Liberty St., Toronto. Ont.  Send me, free, the "noyurVuastBukellook"  ���������nd "Tbe Royal Road to Better Health."  Name-  Street.  Town-  ���������PrOY.���������rf  Out Of "Polities  Henry Ford said in an interview  published in Tho Detroit News that  ho is not Intcrcatod in any "Ford for  prealdont"' boom, or in politics generally. Discussing tho business outlook, tho motor magnate said: "1  am not a prophet but I havo tho  fooling" that business and wage tronds  will bo up, and I do not believe tho  political campaign of next year will  havo any appreciable offoct on business, ono way or tho other."  A SAFti  OINTMENT  Soothmqy  L/t--.". - ..������������������. n ������������������������������������ i ������������������������' ������������������ '������������������������������������ * <���������������������������������' -.  \S.Sv,99e{imthm),tittetitH,  (".*��������� THE   KEVXEW.   CRESTON.   B.    0.
/���?y>
URGE LARGE SCALE
EMIGRATION PLAN
TO THE DOMINIONS
Newcastle-On-Tyne, England.-r-The
conference on emigration to the empire concluded after preparing a
written case for a government-assisted emigration scheme.
The brief, which a deputation will
present to the government, urges a
large-scale emigration scheme would
help solve unemployment * at home
and abroad. Financial assistance
would be repaid by saving unemployment relief.
Establishment of Van empire development and eih'gration board with
statutory powers is advocated and it
is suggested the annual budget
should provide grants to settlers.
The plan will be submitted to the
cabinet by the lord mayor of. Newcastle, R. S. Dalgleisb, and a deputation of members of parliament and
representatives of emigration authorities from all parts of the country.
Cop'es of the statement afterward
will be circulated to Ybomiriion premiers, high commissioners and agents-
general, with a letter from the lord
mayor of Newcastle appealing for
their co-operation in an effort to
bring\ about theY biggest move ever
made for the repopulation of the empire by families and coromunities
from the United Kingdom-.
N$w Gold Strike
Made On North Arm Of Great
Slave Lake
_WmontonY-YAL new gold strike
west of Yellowknife bay on the north
arm of Great^Slavei- lake.was revealed, to :the^ world= when .Dr.. Fred Jolliffe, of the federal geological survey, flew cut of the north after a
summer spent in the northwest territories. ? ���}.. >. ';7'--T'-;
"The strike was made September
15 several m'les from the Burwash
discovery," said Dr. Jolliffe. -
He refused to divulge the name of
the prospector -who made thei strike
pending the filing? of his bflffcial report when he returns to department
of mines headquarters at Ottawa.
Dr. Jolliffe and his party of 15
student assistants from the University of Alberta, explored an area of
roughly 10,000 square miles on the
north shore of Great Slave lake and
found that 2,800 square miles of the
district was underlined by pre-Cam-
bian sediments and volcanics, relatively favorable for the occurrence of
gold and silver deposits.
Dr. Jolliffe left Sept. 24 for Ottawa.
A Quiet Session
Prince Edward Island's House Of
Assembly Meets
Chariottetown.��� Another chapter
was written into the history of British parliamentary procedure when
Prince Edward Island's House of Assembly, filled with 30 "Liberal members, met and carried on the affairs
of state without an official opposition.
It was not a house of "yes-men,"
however. At least two government
supporters served notice on Premier
Walter I>ea that they were not going
to be a rubber-stamp for cabinet-
directed policies.
When the money bill, the most important legislation of the special one-
day session, was being studied in
committee under the guidance of the
premier, W. H. Dennis, Prince, and
H.H. Cox, King's, raised objection to
Canada's smallest province providing
for $3,000,000 expenditure to refund
loans and carry on public works. To
give the cabinet this authority two
months after taking office would be
going directly against the policy of
retrenchment which placed them in
power, the critics contended.
Absence of an official opposing
party helped to speed the work of the
session and at an early hour the
governor, accompanied by his secretary and aide-de-camp, returned to
give His Majesty's assent to the bills
passed. #
The house was prorogued to meet
ordinarily in March, 1936.
AL-l*"*-!- 11~__ - O i	
ituuiisu i-iauoii oysteni
Stage Sham Air Raid
Fleet Of Giant Bombers Visit Island
Of Malta.
Valetta, Malta.���-A fleet of giant
bombers and other aircraft droned
over Malta in a sham air raid recently, with this tiny British island
outpost plunged in darkness and eerie
silence.
Promptly at J):30 p.m., every bouse,
street-and traffic light blinked out.
Simultaneously, the twinkling lights
of British warships riding at anchor
In the harbor went off.
Thousands of citizens thronged the
historic bastions of Valetta and the
seafront during the raid.
Acting-Governor Luke surveyed
the operations. Aerial and military
authorities said they were well
pleased with the island's loyal cooperation.
Coining* Ethiopian Money
Rome.���Italy is already coining
���Ethiopian thalcrs, for use following
the incursion of Italian forces into
Ethiopia. Employees of the mint
said the coins are to bo used by the
military and civil governors which
Italy plans to install in Ethiop'a, to
pay off tribesmen who seek worlc
under Italian domination,
Moro Wheat In Store
Ottawa.���Tho Dominion bureau of
ftatiHticfl reported Canadian wheat
ln .store for the week ended Sept. 20
amounted to 220,802,570 bushels, an
incroaso of 13,008,380 over tho previous -week. The vislblo supply for
thn corresponding' week ]aat year was
*523,-3**tO,20Q bushela.
New Decree  Is  Effective In  Soviet
Russia
Moscow. ������ A government decree
abolished the ration system of selling
some prime food products, cutting
prices in open commercial shops.  *
The decree constitutes an important step toward liquidation of the
present double sales system whereby
workers make purchases in "closed"
ration shops and the general public
buys in open shops.
Prices **6f the two have differed
widely, workers getting the benefit
of extremely low rates.
The decree abolished ration shop
, sale of -meat,?: jfo|far, fish, butter and
potatoes- and[. threw ? all buying of
these products into open shops, substituting- one fixed price -for the previous double price systeini
The new price scale reduced beef
more than 50 per cent. It now will
sell from five rubles up per kilogram. Sugar will be four rubles and
52 kopecks per kilogram as compared
with 6.50, and butter was reduced
from 24 rubles per kilogram to 15.
To prevent speculation, it was announced, no purchaser will be permitted to buy at one time more than
two kilograms of meat; two of sugar;
a half kilogram of butter or three
kilograms of fish.
FILIPINO PRESIDENT
By an overwhelming majority, Senator Manuel Quezon, above, was
elected first President of the new
Philippines Commonwealth. Vice-
President Garner, . of the United
States, will attend the inauguration
exercises on November 15, when
Q-iezon will take office for six years.
Farewell Banquet
Govemcr-Gcnsrai Aim Oounfess Of
Bess&orough Are .Honored
Ottawa.���A farewell banquet was
given by the government of Canada
to the Governor-General and Countess of Bessborough.
The term of office of the Earl of
Bessborough as the king's representative in Canada expires shortly.
It was an affectionate farewell at
which, in addition to Sir George Perley, -who presided, there was a distinguished gathering of representatives of the state, the diplomatic
corps, the churchy the judiciary arid
the civil service with their wives.
Responding to the toast proposed
by Sir George Perley, the governor-
general dwelt on the happy relations
he had enjoyed during his four years
in Canada.
Hours Of Labor Set
legislation   Will   Be   Brought   Into
Effect October 5
Ottawa.���Legislation for limitation
of the. hours of labor in certain industrial undertakings in Canada will
be brought into effect on Oct. 5.
Regulations for the carrying out of
the measure have been drafted.
Based on a 1919 convention of the
international labor organization of
the League of Nations, the legislation
constitutes part of the reform program brought down by the government at the last session of parliament.
Would Defend Record
����iiajilll8iM.lM.��.��
If Speed Prestige Threatened Campbell Will Raco Again
London. ��� Sir Malcolm Campbell
and his Bluebird are through with
breaking records unless some
foreigner gives them a new mark to
shoot at.
Sir Malcolm announced at a dinner
in his honor that ho had had his fill
of blistering speeds, but that thoro
was still a groat deal of lightning In
his racing car that might bo coaxed
out If Britain's speed prcstlgo was
throatoned.
The Federal Vote
Results Should Be Quickly Available
After Closing Of Poll?
Ottawa.���Although various adaptations of proportional representation
and the single transferable vote are
used in some provincial elections the
Dominion general election Oct. 14
will be conducted on the traditional
single-vote system,.
Electors will have only one choice
between the contending candidates.
They will mark an *"X" opposite the
name of the candidate they favor and
the candidate with the largest number of ��'X*s" will he elected. There
are no second or third choices.
With the single-vote system in
operation throughout the Dominion
on election day results, will be available probably; -for * iJdl constituencies
. withto^a^fi^f^ix^^iMmi'%mia3ing--of
the _*.b*"is.V^V7V:2;YYV VV' '7-? ���?
Veregin Resigns
No Longer Head Of Brotherhood Of
Doukhobors
Saskatoon.���Peter Veregin, for 10
years president of the Christian Community of the Universal Brotherhood
of Doukhobors in Canada, stated here
that he had severed all connection
with the community. He declared
that he stood now as a private Canadian citizen. He had no intention of
leaving the country, he said.
Mr. Veregin, who has been virtual
ruler of the sect in Canada since the
death of his father in a British Col-
*i��vy\"U*i��      t^a-tltrroir     <w **->-_ si A-*-k*aT>        aft*** _��*1     *t*-i.e_     "V**"** ���*���*���_
UtXtU*((��       �� mJttAJ. V* CJVJ* CAWAMt'lAVp        *?C*��Val       U\/       .a__.CA.X��
tendered his resignation about six
months ago. He would not disclose
any reason for his action. He is now
on his way to Montreal. *
A*��a&"ma_,     "WaV_fcM888.a> ..mMm&mm   ' ��� *mm:*m*mmm ���
_*ajutnu*c_ muh in iiud J<tuau
Typhoon Kills 48 And About 100
Are Missing
Tokyo.���A typhoon which whirled
freakishly and destructively across
Japan, from Kagoshima to Wendai,
killed at least 48 persons, and about
100 were missing.
Several ports in the inland sea reported, that fishing craft were missing, and the steamer Tonegawa
Maru, with a crew of 13 and 19 passengers, also was missing.
The typhoon was the fifth death-
dealing storm, in three months over
Japan proper.
Installing McGill Principal
Montreal.���It is expected at. least
24 Canadian universities arid colleges
wiil be represented at the installation of Professor A. E. Morgan as
principal of McGill University Oct.
6. Dr. Robert C. Wallace, president
of University of Alberta, Edmonton,
will be in attendance.
Honesty Was Rewarded
Delivery Boy Returns Valuable Bonds
And Gets Good Job
New York.���From the lowly plane
of delivery boy of "coffee and���" at
"53,15 a week, young Albert Correri
vaulted to a remunerative position in
Wall street.
Correri's role in "the street's" newest success story was Yeast when he
picked from the gutter acjgacket of
bonds valued at $166^)06 ai_3 ��� returned them to the pwnet^.7 C- F. Grun-
wald, vice-president of: C. F. Childs
and Co., Wall street brokers, owners
of - ths bonds, announced Correri
would start work in the cashier's department of the brokerage firm.
Correri, who is 22, may also get a
reward. ���
TO STRENGTHEN
NAVY AND AIR
FORCE IN BRITAIN
London.���Prime Minister Baldwin
intends to outline measures to
strengthen both the navy and the air
force when he addresses the Conservative party at its annual confer-,
ence at Bournemouth.
George Lansbury, Labor leader in
the House of Commons in an address
declared Britain and other nations
were on the brink of a war in which
it would be "Christian against Christian, Mohammedan against Mohammedan, Jew against Jew���all praying
to the same God for Victory. '
"I cannot bow to that sort of
thing," the leader said.. "The way
out is for some nation, and I want
it to be Britain, to blaze, a new-
trail."
Athens.���The semi-official Athens
news agency announced information
from a German source indicated arrangements had been completed at
Instanbul for Greek and Turkish warships and planes to start manoeuvres
in the Dardanelles and that two Roumanian torpedo boats would also
participate.
It has been reported Greece is prepared to support Great Britain in any
Mediterranean activity which might
become necessary at the outbreak of
Italo-Ethiopian warfare*
Greek newspapers hailed the arrival of British ships in Greek ports,
saying that the people of Greece have
come to regard the annual British
naval manoeuvres in Mediterranean
waters as a welcome tradition.
Mussolini Opposed
Siege Of lucknow
Ten    People     Alive     To    CeleWate
Thrilling Event
London.���Ten people in different
parts of the world celebrate one of
the most thrilling incidents in the
modern history of the British Empire,
the siege- of Lucknow in the Indian
mutiny.
The oldest survivor of the siege is
C. G. Palmer, a resident of British
Columbia; the youngest Arthur
Dashwood, 78, living in London.
Dashwood's mother gave him birth
in the residency at Lucknow, where
17 people were herded in one room
during the siege. Despite her ordeal,
Mrs. Dashwood lived for more than
70 years.
RECEIVING THIB KING'S CUP
Another Loaf Competition
Montreal.,���Third annual competition for the moat beautiful autumn
tinted maple loaf Is announced by
tho Canadian government through
tho Canadian travel bureau. First
priico will bo fjttOO. -      ,       2118
Report From Italy Of Some Opposition To War Plans
Paris. ��� French newspapers reprinted a story from The London
Referee saying Prince Umberto, heir
to the Italian throne, is opposed
to Premier Benito Mussolini's conflict
with Ethiopia, ,-
(This report was described as utterly false in Rome and_ London by
authoritative Italian spokesmen.)
There is a possibility, the story
said ,of General Italo Balbo, governor
of Libya and Italian air hero, leading a revolt against II Duce.
"Balbo, whose relations with the
royal family are excellent, is ��� also
opposed to the Ethiopian campaign,"
the story asserted. "A large number
of Italian superior officers share his
view."
Sentry Killed By Lions
Five Belonging To Emperor Selassie
Make Dasli For Freedom
Add!s Ababa.���Five of Emperor
Haile Selassie's big lions escaped,
killed one sentry, and injured five
more.
In this rush for freedom they devoured several of the Emperor'a
pedigreed Australian sheep and killed
two horses.
Colonel Mekouria, the commander
of the imperial guard, seized a machine gun and shot all five beasts in
succession.
Pilot T. Rose, driving a MIIob Falcon machine, won tho King's Cup Air
Raco "round tho British Isles"' this year, nnd Ih nhown rocelvlng tho coveted
trophy from tho lianas of Sir Phillip CunlilYe-Liotor.
Insurance Premiums Higher
British Vessels Passing Through Sucx
Canal Must Pay Moro
Singapore.���Fear of trouble developing in tlie Mediterranean was
reflected here when marine insurance
companies warned special premiums
for "war risks" must be paid by British vessels returning to England
through the Suez canal.
To escape payment of tho war risk
premiums British ships must go all
tho way around the Capo of Good
Hopo.
Gordon Bennett Trophy
Warsaw.���Tho Polish balloon Pol-
onla was awarded the Gordon Bennett trophy aa the winner of tho 27th
Bennett international races that began hero Sop. 15. Tho Polonia, one
of the 13 entries, travelled about
1,007 miles after a flight of 58 hours
and 54 minutes. It was officially announced. It reached an altitude oif
10,732 foot. Another Polish balloon,
the Waraaw, wan nocond. ���������PIB1I1IWIHII  MMpiBili  CRESTOH REVIEW  "My telephone  gives me  a sense pf  security"  "It's a relief to see a telephone  in our house again," said Mrs  Pinkfield. "It gives me a sense  of security.  "When we were without a telephone, I used to wonder how  we'd Jget word quickly to  the doctor if someone in the  house took sick, or what we'd  do about sending for help in  case of fire or burglary.  "But those days of worry have  gone. I feel safer with a telephone in the home."  Kootenay Telephone  Co*? Ltd.  Canyon School Report  HIGH SCHOOL���������Miss Magee.Principal.  First Quarter: Normal Entrance-  Ethel VanAckeren 78, Adam Johnson 50.  Grade 12���������Anne Gartland 72. Grade 11  ���������June Browell 62.5, Raymond Humble  62, Bruce Niblow 62, Frank Clayton 59.  Grade 10���������Douglas Sinclair 74, Clarence  Burns 72, Florence Spencer 70, Charles  Kolthammer 68, Earl Browell 66, Grace  Bond 59, Thelma Earnhardt 53.5.  Grade 9���������Harry Kam 66, Helen Humble  64, Joyce Clayton* 62, Pearl Gillespie  57.5, Thomas Tedford 50. Albert Bothamley 48.  PUBLIC SCHOOL���������J. T. Hunden,  Principal.  Enrolment, 42.  Average attendance, 39.93'  Proficiency: Grade 8���������Mary Nygaard.  Grade 7-���������Kenneth Kolthammer. Grade  6���������Emma Floer and Miriam Spencer  equal.   Grade 5���������Sam Kamo.  Perfect attendance���������Eddie Kamo,  Mary Nygaard, Borg Olson, Iris Bothamley, Kenneth Kolthammer, Carl  Nygaard, Vivian Osborne, Emma Floer,  Richard Hale, Miriam Spencer, Alex.  Huclack. Hazel Jarvis, Sam Kamo, Ira  Olson, Alva Osborne, Elva Strong*.  Division 2���������Miss F. Knott, teacher.  Enrolment. 43.  Average attendance 41.2.  Proficiency:   Grade  4���������Annie-  Grade 3���������Jim Spencer.   Grade 2-  Kamo.   Grade la���������Tony Floer.  lb���������Lucille Jarvis.  Perfect attendance���������Guy Browell,  Harold Floer, Alfred Hawkins, Kari  Solheim, R,ose Strong, Esther Jarvis  Eddie Moberg, Jim Spencer, Jean Hale,  Alfred Kamo. Ralph Kamo, Alfred  Olson, Avis Osborne. Lloyd Strong.  AGE GOVERNMENT  GUARANTEED  3 ST  Hook.  -Alfred  Grade  October Public  ooiuui _aepor i  Hospital Erects  Nurses' Home  ���������pedal quality old rye of Rn������  flavor, thoroughly matured tn  oak for seven years.  n0UMlY  #moo  13 OZ.  ���������f _*������������  1  25 OZ.  *&75  40 OZ.  This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by  The government of British Columbia.  Grade 5, with Enrolment of 40,  Largest Enrolment ��������� Division  7 Has Best Attendance Record  ���������Attendance Uniformly Good  Structure Will be 28 x 26 Feet-  Two Story High���������Stucco Finish Match Hospital���������Modernly  Planned and Equipped.  Division 1���������E. Marriott, Principal.  Enrolment, 32.  Average attendance, 28.86.  Proficiency: Grade 8���������Jack Hall,  Kenneth Hester, Milda Sorge. Grade 7  ���������Jack Bell, Arthena LaBell,  Bill Vigne.  Perfect attendance���������Jack Bell, Margaret Donaldson, Marguerite Grant,  Kenneth Hester, Irene Pridham, Melda  Sorge. Bob Vigne, Phyllis Wiltse.  Division 2���������B. Crawford," teacher.  Proficiency: Grade 7���������Charlotte  Wilks. Edward Davis, Bob Weir. Grade  6���������Jean Bunt, * Carolyn Jones, He'en  Dzvigola.  Perfect attendance���������Barbara Cartwright, Olga Hurack, Esther Ostendorf,  Alva Sorge, Vera Watson, Robert Weir,  Charlotte Wilks, George Bodrdon, Jean  Bunt. Audrey Cooper, Bert Crosby, Carolyn Jones, Russel Martin, Jean Pridham. Dorothea Schmidt, Marion Staples,  Audrey Newton.  Division 3���������Miss Wade, teacher.  Enrolment, 40.  Average attendance, 36.85.  Proficiency: Grade 5���������Teddy Olivier,  Byron Wiltse, Bertha Gardiner.  Perfect attendance���������Joan Anderson,  Donald Andrews, Harley Brady, Kenneth French, Leslie Harris, Anna Kinkade, Agnes Lovestrom. Leona Love  strom, June Maxwell, Teddy Olivier.  Harry Ostendorf, Arvin Sorge, Richard  Staples, Ernest Tunk, Banbara Newton.  Division 4���������Miss H. Moore, teacher.  Enrolment, 30.  Average attendance, 27.78.  Proficiency: Grade 4���������Lewis Millin,  Joyce Arrowsmith and Bob Ibbitson  equal.  Perfect attendance���������Rita Archambault, Allan Comfort, Raymond Cooper.  Victor Cellis, Patsy Forbes, Richard  Hood, Eunice Hughe?. Bobby Ibbitson,  Rose Kinkade. Beth Leavitt, Henry  LeMoigne, Bill MacDonald, Lewis  Millin, Rut-sell Pridham, James Walker,  Kenneth Weir.  Division 5���������Misu G. Webster, teacher.  Enrolment, 29.  Averaue attendance���������27.3.  Proficiency: Grade 3���������Laurel Keirn,  Lorna Bell, Laura Werro, Kathleen  Joyce.  Perfect attendance���������Gerald Alderson,  Lorna Bell, George Donaldson, Freddie  Hurack, Laurel Keirn, Kathleen Joyce,  Dorothea Powell, Jimmie Rogers. Ronald Scobie, Leslie Timmons, Laura  Werre, Helen, Turk.  Division 6���������Miss H. Hobden, teacher.  Enrolment, 33.  Average attendance, 30.69.  Proficiency: Grade 2���������Betty GilchriBt,  Mnrylin Wnrrrn, Phyllis Wilks.  Perfect attendance���������Rodger Archambault, Brui:������ Arrows-mill), Dolores Blc-  '���������um. Rose Cellis, Dorothy Dickinson,  Koith HoHter, Merle Hughes, Jonnio  Kinkade, Andy Leavitt, Alico Love-  ritrom. Lyle Mawson, Sylvof-ter Schmidt,  Morylln Warren; Pliy'.lfa Will****-.  Divinion 7���������Minn l'**.*" Holmes, toucher.  Enrolment, .'IB.  Average! attendance, 33.2d.  Proficiency: Grade 1 Mny VFod-  l*from, Raymond C'nrlepy, Kate Sttren-  i-on, Dorothy Hilton, June Maione.  Perfect attendance���������.luck Anderson,  Stephen Hronin. Colin ChrintU*, Muriel  GilchriHt, May He<lntr<>m, Row* Leavitt,  (.'corgi* Ldwih, Marjorie MucDonuld,  Fhyllin Mornliifn, Kathleen Martin.  Jimmie Read, Lawrence Komiinr*. Harriet Sli'ifer. Jenrmle VitrtHeiir, Lurry  Walker, Eugene Oreiifl.,  Lnvern  Sell In*  11'IUt ,  The many friends of Creston Valley  hospital have read with interest the  brief announcement in last week's  Review that a Nurses' Home will be  built immediately. The building as  planned will be two stories, having  living room 16 x 12 feet with fireplace;  five bedrooms, kitchenette, bathroom,  modern sanitation and a verandah 26 x 6  j fee:*.. The contract calls for interior  finish of plaster, and tbe same stucco  exterior finish as the main hospital  building.  The need for such a building has been  felt for many months. In the interests of  efficiency - it i_T essential to have, the  nursing staff in a separate building, and  there will also be a cash saving monthly  of rent for outside quarters. Another  important purpose is served ih that the  change will make available two more  wards for patients, and add ten per cent,  tp hospital accomodation, which is often  taxed to capacity.  Some idea of the growth of hospital  work can be gathered from a study of  figures. Less than three years ago there  was one full time and one nart-tim  nurse, now the nursing staff comprises  four steadily employed. Hospital days  in 1934 showed a 98 per cent increase  over hospital days in 1933, and in the  10 months of 1935 there have been 3393  hospital days compared to 3235 hospital  days in the whole of 1934. October,  with 440 hospital days, was the busiest  month in the institution's history.  Surgical operations, major and minor,  also show a large increase.  These figures, though interesting in  themselves, do not show the most important advances made by the institution.  In the matter of service and equipment  betterments have been made steadily  since the time of incorporation, and es  pecially since the present building was  opened. A glance through the register  will show that the hospital's reputation  | for service has spread far outside the  borders of the district.  The  financing   of continued   service  betterments, and expansion of facilities,  is a different  problem.   In  the case  of  the Nurses' Home, as in the  building of  the hospital, the  need must be met before the necessary finance ia available.  From the point of view of  dollars and  cents, the hospital is probably the most  important business in the town, for it  circulates all the money received from  local patients, and also many thousands  of dollars annually, received from  outside sources, such as government  grants,  public work**. Workmen's Compensation  Board, National Defense, C.P.R.    an i  transients, which . money would not  be  spent here, wore hospital facilities unobtainable.   Even   tho membership drive  of last winter brought into Creston some  $900 from outside tho district.  It is hoped that tho people In tho district from Yahk to Crawford Boy will  rally to tho support of the hospital, as in  the past; so that tho expense of building  and furnishing the Nurses' Home may  be met.  Syd Rogers, Joe Brogan and Harry  Dickson attended the basketball game in  Creston on Friday evening.  Charles Wilson was a Creston visitor  Saturday. John Andino was a business  visitor there the same day.  The hunting over the fiats for the past  several days has been exceptionally good  with ideal weather conditions.  Arthur Lombardo of Trail, along with  a party of friends from there, spent the  weekend hunting over the flats.  Joe Karpowich of Sanca wasa bus  iness visitor Wednesday,   looking  over  his stock of hay cut on the flats.  A. L. Palmer, road superintendent,  Creston, was a business visitor here  Tuesday, and proceeded to Gray Creek.  Syd. Rogers was home from Glenlily  for the weekend, and brought with him  as uuests Joe Brogan and Harry Dickson  of Yahk.  Cranbrook's city owned tourist  park reports 2141 autos carrying  6546 passengers during the 1935  season, for a revenue of about  $2000.  LAND AOT  Notice of Intention to Apply  to Lease Land.  Five and  Improved  Ten-Acre Blocks  Unimproved*  r.-nm\  Easy Terms.  J.  G/ Gonnell  Sivilai4  Bob Stewart left for Calgary whero he  will spend n few dayH.  Irene Karpowich of Sanca Is spending  the weekend hero with friends.  Tie loading operations at Quarry siding*  Atbara, has been brisk this last week,  and is expected to continue this way over   Bathe winter.  AV H. Piggott, C.P.R. tie inspector,  Wynndel, was a business visitor Tuesday in connection with tie loading operations at Atbara.  A. Hepher, secretary of the Boswell  Fruit Growers, was at Atbara Thursday,  arranging insulation; ot fruit cars going  to eastern seaports.* *:-      -**."���������  George Everall, who has been timekeeper at the road camp here for a considerable time, has resigned He is at  Rossland at present.  Mr. Dean, fruit inspector from Nelson,  was a business visitor to Atbara on Friday in connection with the heating of  fruit cars being loaded.|r;  The compressor and other tools, which  have been in use at the new bridge at  Boulder Creek, have been taken to the  road widening operations east of Sirdar  A fall of snow, which seemed localized  around Kuskanook Mountain, fell on  Friday afternoon. On Saturday morning it had become general and to a depth  of two inches.  / ������������������'���������'.  Messrs. Coe and Carne, of Creston,  were visiting several of the ranchers here,  this week in their official capacity of  Tree Fruit Board inspector and fruit  inspector respectively.  R Moule, who is engaged in hauling  ties from Sanca to Atbara, has taken a  lease on the Colombo home and moved  his furniture and family in on Saturday.  There are no houses empty here now.  Wednesday last saw geese in large  numbers in flight all day and well on  into the night. Many of them were  taken by the hunters who were fortunate  enough to be in the vicinity  hat day.  Slim Smythe, Bo. Harkness and Chas.  arrived on Friday from Nelson to spend  some time hunting. While here the  party will make its headquarters at the  former's houseboat, near Kootenay  Landing.  Boswell Fruit Growers have res umed  the shippin-- of fruit from Quarry siding  Atbara. TheBe cars,' aa they are for ex*  port, have to be insulated with heavy  paper. A car was loaded Friday the first  since the cold spell,  Fred Smythe and Jack Townacnd of  Nelson are hunting here this week making thoir headquarters at Kootenay  Landing. This partV brought in a vory  nice buck deer on Thursday, and have  met with good luck with othor game,  Thoso who attendee! the military whist  at Wynndel to secure funds for tho  Chriatmai*. troo woro Mios Margaret  Rogers, Mr. and Mrs. J. PaacuKzo, Mr.  ond Mrs. L. Andcrsqn, Miss Sylvia Taiarico, Frank Hamilton. Frod Smythe,  Joe Taiarico, Art. Kutlodgo, Charles  Lombardo. Many'others were present  from tho rond camp.  Box 11.  CRESTON  In Nelson Land Recording District of  Kootenay District, and situate on the  east shore of Kootenay Lake, fronting  on Lot 2637, Kootenay District. ',.-*���������  Take notice that S. A. Speers of Creston, B.C., occupation, merchant, intends  to apply for a lease of the following  described lands: Commencing at a post  planted at the N.W. corner Of Parcel A,  Lot 2637 Kootenay District. Plan  20620-1, thence west 5 chains; thence  south 5 chains more or less to H.W.M.  of Kootenay Lake; thence following  H.W.M. easterly 5 chains more or less*,  to poi *.t of commencement, and containing 2.5 acres more or less.  SAMUEL ARTHUR SPEERS.  Dated September 23rd, 1935..  ���������El  We are in a position to supply  your requirements in  Rough and Dressed 1 and 2 Dimension, Boards  and Spruce Shiplap.  KILN DRIED FLOORLNG  Gyproc, Shingles, Cement.  Our prices are right.'- You get the grade you  order and full measure.  ;���������**  ���������.  !GHAS.O.ROPGBRS |  : CRESTON B  ��������� m<  j"j������a������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���������>��������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������' ?esaaaaBBSsaesb-r9seVss������aB.Baaa-ja*a������������������������������������������������������������������������ aa.NMa-,81**!***  ^9&t&4,-7sti&*&t&t&*&t&t&t&mi&  jS . ��������� . %  ������       The Consolidated Mining &       |  | Smelting Company of Canada, Ltd. 1  & TRAIL.,   BRITISH OOLUMBIA S  Manufacturers of  I ELEPHANT BRAND COMMERCIAL  I FERTILIZERS  I Ammonium Phosphates.   Sulphate of Ammonia  | Superphosphates         Complete Fertilizers.  I Producers and Refiners of  I TADANAC BRAND METALS  3 Gold, Silver, Lead, Zinc, Cadmium, Bismuth  "*s _.  m%^m\w*mm������tmAimtWwvmm\w*m  .Tames S. Wilson and Jna. Nannnrino  were bus-mess visitors to CreBton Tuesday.  Dr. Shaw and Gordon Gronfell of Nelnon were among those hunting horo thia  week.  The water as Indicated  Slougl* bridge read** .05, a  the we������'k.  hy  rail  guage nt  of .05 for  ��������� ���������/*"*"��������� i i*r*_i<""*'""r ''ir"*������i it ii**_/***��������������� i  CHRIST CHURCH  CRESTON  REV. R. E. M YERBURGH, Minister  SUNDAY. NOV. IT  CRESTON���������8 a.m:, Holy Communion;  7.30 p.m., Evonnong.  WYNNDEL*--! I a.m. Holy Communion.  LISTER - 3 p.m. Evonnong and Sermon.  IWMBBMf  l^ffl*-**fi____^  Mortgage Xiitetest  "DE ready to meet the pay**  ������������������*~J ment when it falls due.  Begin now by depositing regularly in a Saviiig*. Accout^  TN addition to the interest thus  "'*��������� provided for, youa will probably have something as jprcll  to apply on the principal.     _s  r"Hl_  "aifMMI _������-_M  _*���������*���������������__ "Mfc        _V>*~_h,       _V *���������*!���������*���������<%���������_#���������*__,    _l*~-lL"_U~~*~_i  OF COMMERCE  **   **v wmyrT'  *"     "*-.,.  Creston Branch  vr*  ���������-c'l....  ���������*** J������,  imager  tKwmmj ui ami  I  -i.****,  Friday & Saturday  NOV. 15- 16  ���������        ���������   SHIRLEY! You've won  our   hearts again���������only  more so.  This time the fulness oj your love  rebuilds our faith in all that  goes to  make life a jo-yons  adventure.  Shirley Temple  in her Greatest Picture���������  "Our Little Girl"  with  Rosemary Ames  Joel McCrea,    Lyle Talbot  Erin O'Brien-Moore  Recently a couple of moose have been  seen in the Lister-Hnscroft district and  hunters are advised there is nb open  season on moose, and the minimum fine  for killing one illegally is $250.00.  and Personal  A. Gilroy. cashier at the Bank of Commerce, was as; his home at WillOW Point  at the weekend.  Jas. Cherrington, who is employed at  Nelson, spent the Armistice weekend at  his home in Creston. 7  Mrs. A. Mackie of Boswell is renewing  acquaintances in Creston this week, a  guest of Mrs. Jas. Cook.  rvf   rYim\-mr.mm. 4-r\          .*��������� ... \mm. vw,  Mrs. Bain  on a visit with her brother, H. H. Wilks,  feft for home on Tuesday.  FOR RENT���������In Creston, six-room  furnished house, good location. Apply  Mrs. E. J. Strong, Canyon.  Mr. and Mrs. Jack Annable of Nelson  were Creston visitors during the week,  guests of Mr. and Mrs G. R. John.  Chimneys built and repaired, plastering  and repairing*. Jcieasonabte prices. Apply  J. M. Ross, general delivery, Creston.  Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Argue and son,  Jim, of Cranbrook, were Armistice weekend visitors with Mr. and Mrs. C. H.  Hare.  The regular meeting of Cre.ton Hospital Women's Auxiliary will be on  Thursday, 21st, at 3 p.m., in the United  Church hall.; _Y. ��������� _      '  The local B.I. organization have  another talented speaker duetto speak  here on Tuesday evening, at 8 o'clock in  theUnited Church hall, in A. Cooper of  Victoria, whose subject will - be  ���������-���������Economics of the Divine Law."   ���������  G. P. Salter of Vancouver, trustee-  in-bankruptcy in connection with the  redyking of the Reclamation Farm, was  here on official business at the first of the  week. He is more than pleased with the  way work is proceeding on the dyking at  the south end of the farm.     ..  Auctioneer Jas. Compton was successful in disposing of 15 of the 21 head of  horses H. J. Irving shipped in from Lethbridge, Alberta, and which were -auctioned on Tuesday. Prices ranged-from  $55 to $125, and buyers were here from  Crawford Bay. Kitchener and Nelson.  J. Hi Hughes of Vancduuer,? B.C. superintendent for the Bank of Commerce,  made his official visit to the 'Creston  branch at the end of the week, and made  an'inspection of the two dyking projects.  He succeeds C. G. Bennett, who a couple  of months ago took over the management of the branch at Penticton.  A miscellaneous shower was given in  honor of Mr. and Mrs. A. Montgomery,  nee Reetha Phillips, at the United  Church basement Friday evening by a  group of her friends at Trinity Church.  The evening was spent with music and  contests, with a vsumptuous lunch to  round off proceedings. The couple were  the recipients of a nice collection of useful gifts.  The hockey fans had a representative  turnout at a meeting on Tuesday night  at the Commercial Hotel at which Cres  ton Hockey Club was 'organized for this  seas-n with Doug. Corrie, president and  Homer Eddy, secretary-treasurer The  intention is to put in an open air rink,  which will be well lighted, and  membership tickets will be sold and dances held to help raise needed funds.  The Rep. teams from Creston High  Sehool basketball club journeyed to  Fernie on Saturday for the first game in  the East Kootenay High School League.  The girls' came through with a 24-11  win. The boys were up against stonewall opposition in a Fernie team that has  been winner for somo years, and lost  34-11. Dave Todd. Principal March  bank and Miss Norgrove of -the teaching  staff accompanied the teams and transportation was provined by F. Staples,  A Dickenson and Cliff. York. The  teams were suitably entertained with a  lunch and dance after the games, and all  report an enjoyable trip. The teams included: Girls���������Ruby Palmer. Theo  Tompkins, Ruth Hare, Helen Staples  Thelma Erickson, Nell Payne. Boys���������  Wilf. LaBelle, Gus. Morabito, Sam Nastasi, Des. Truscott, Jim RogeTs, Chet.  Goplin, Cliff. York.  FRI DAY and SATUR DAY SPECIALS  3 lbs.  E  Braid's Nectar  CUP and" &AUCER  ROLLED  Robin Hood  PLAIN  CHINA  19c.  29c.  CHEESE  Burns9 GOLDENLOAF  1  2  lb. pkt. *;���������'.   15c.  1-lb. pkt. -    29c.  LEMOMS* FB������msh, fi*  n  m  NOTICE���������To our Scandanavian and Norweigia������ customers:     Order your Stockfish, etc. for  Christintias NOW, and don't be disappointed  it-  John Apolizer has shifted his tractor  to Sanca Crepk where?he is employed by  Moat & Christie who have a contract at  saw log cutting at that point.  The ladies' committee in charge of the  Christmas concert and tree start the  series of whist and bridge drives tonight,  Friday, in order to raise funds to finance  the occasion.  \ West Kootenay Power & Light Company, Limited, have discontinued channel improvement work at Goat River  canyon and work wiil not be resumed,  posssibly until spring.  Mrs. Bradbury and daughter, Clara  who have been visiting with the former's  father, R. Turner, for some months past.  have just left for England, where they are  to make their home in future..  Mr. and Mrs.- Ingram, who have been  on the Hurl ranch for some time, have  moved to Arrow Creek. The Jarvis  family have vacated the former Kemp  place to take possession of the house  vacated by the Ingrams.  B������'4_a-_-W_-A_*^_A_fe_.^_Bu_y_^__4aV_B_A__i-Uh__k_������J__M_^k_^afe������_ABa-  ������A.. _>..<>.A._i.,A.->.<>.  ^Jflf %UpWM$USi  B mWmW S3 SB m JS?  at EGOMQM8GAL PR8GESI  It is most important to have good meats for  healthy, active bodies. And it is most important to  obtain good meats at economical prices to keep within  the family budget. We are always on the job to make  your shopping satisfactory.  MOO  ^AlipA  llO&UUlf!  PHONE 2  lAstetp  Mr. and Mrs. Reed of Red Deer.  Alberta, arrived on Thursday on a visit  with their son and  daughter-in-law, Mr.  U..     A. *���������    O. 1  M.M.,vy.    MM....      JL.CCU.  tm.AmM  H. Alverson of Calgary, Alberta, superintendent for Midland & Pacific Grain  Corporation, was a business visitor at  the local elevator at the first of the week.  M'r and Mrs, D. Corrie and young  daughter, with Miss L. "Lewis and Ray  Truscott were motor visitors to Nelson  for the weekend. Mrs. Corrie and  daughter are remaining for a few days.  Misses Edith Avery, Anne Bale and  Esther Vasseur, and Bob Currie ann P.R.  Truscott represented Trinity Church  Y.P, at a Kootenay United Church  young people's conference at Nelson on  Monday.  The Catholic Ladies' League have the  second of their fierieF of bridge and whist  drives at the King George. Hotel dining  room on Thursday evening, Nov. 21st.  The admission is 35 cents, and there will  be a good lunch and prizes;  Remember the Presbyterian Ladies'  Aid sale of work at the United Church  basement Saturday afternoon, Nov.  16th. 8 to 5.30 o'clock. Plain and fancy  sewing, home cooking, candy, etc., with  afternoon tea.   AH welcome.  UHehenev  TO - NIGHT'S  ______ *���������  Three Great Games  Park Pavilion  CRESTON  Friday, Nov. 15  Miss Jean McCreath, school principal,  was at her home at Creston for the weekend.    -  Frank Pymn of the Cranbrook forestry  office was a business visitor here on  Monday.  E. Lazenby, superintendent or N.D.  camps, Yahk, was a business visitor on  Monday.  John Nelson of Trail is here at present on a visit with his parents, Mr. and  Mrs. Chas. Nelson  C. Senesael and A Lepage have finish  ed digging ditch for H   H.   Redmile's  water system to his residence.  S. Peterson and L. Loggis, who have  been up Leadville doing assessment work  on their claims, have returned.  A. E. McBride, ������C. Hanson and L.  Nowlin were Spokane visitors a few days  last week, returning on Sunday.  Mrs. G. Young, who has been on a  ten-day .visit with her sister. Mrs.. E,  Driffil, returned to Creston, Tuesday.  Ron. Stewart of Erickson. who was  out camping at Cracker jack Creek, had  the good fortune to get a seven-point  buck on Monday.  Mrs. B. Johnoon haa returned from  Spokane, having been called "there, some  weeks ago due the illneBS and subsequent  death of her sister, Mra. Gus. Berg.  50 men arrived from Calgary, Alberta,  Inst week and are located at the nirport.  Another 60 also arrived for tho Goatfell  East N.D camp. More are expected  this week. Ed. Farrell and Andy Anderson have been promoted to gang bosses.  The school childrefi had a holiday on  Monday���������Remembrance Day���������but the  teachers spent the holiday here.  - Mr. and ..Mrs. B.'-B. Stallwood of  Nelson were .-weekend, visitors with the  latter's parents. Col. and Mrs. Lister.  The Armistice sale of poppies in Lister-  Huscroft was pretty well up to the  standard of 19?4.   $11 worth was soid.  - Public school inspector J. E. Brown  paid his first official visit to Lister and  Huscroft schools at the end of the week.  With the arrival of snow deer hunting  h as improved arid a few hunters are reported as fortunate enough to get a  supply of venison.  Mr and Mrs. Larry Andreason of  Potlach. Idaho, were visitors at the  home of Mrs. Andreason's parents, Col.  andMrs Fred Lister.  Lister Trading & Supply Company.  Limited, is this week taking into stock a  part carload of Royal Household flour  and the other well known  Ogilvie lines.  In connection with the moose recently  seen in this section the local game  guardiaiuadvises there is no open season  on these animals, and anyone shooting  them is liable to a fine of $250.00  Elmer Huscroft has returned from  Wynndel where he has been for some  days doing fall ploughing on a tract of  dyked land which hia father, John  Huscroft, has Becured at the north end  of the Creston Reclamation Company  project.  .m.m.A.m.m. .v.a. .<  -A.A.A.A. ������..A.A.A���������A. A. A.A. A.A.a. *..\. A. A. A. A. A. A. A. <fc-  Now is the Time to Fill Your Coal  Bins for ^he Winter Months.    Try  JeVmfmWtl Coml  Coal That's Coal���������Clean and Clinker less.  CRESTON   TRANSFER  P.O. BOX 79  ALBER-T DAVIES  PHONE 13  H'fr'������lrvi������,ii|all������'>'>'aj'ry������ltli8'f������*y<F.fr������,T,������'������'y**)"T,f*'y,������,<-T-T*y������  t#w  V  First Game 7.30 p.m.  s  Review vs. Pharmacy  High School vs. Cardinals  hitermctlite Reps. vs. Wynndol  Admission .  .  CwVm*n$OM  Miss Popg-y Murphy of Erickson waa n  weekend visitor with Miss Grace Bond.  Mra. Murk ham of Watroua, Sask., is  nt present on a visit with her neioe, Mra.  Roy Browell.  - Cliff Reynolds is still a patient at Crouton hospital, but Is making a very satisfactory recovery. "  f.-JM.-A..*mm. m~A . a.a.a.a.a.a.a.a. a-a_<..a.^���������A-a-a-a_a-a.a-a., a-^^-a. ^-^r^-ftrf i^-*,-*   ���������*-  *>  No Job Too Large or Too Small  Keajnie  of Nelson  has  ies Marion ��������� Parker  Miss  Gladys  boon a visitor with  tho pne-t fow days.  Andy Iloglund, Gub Oberg and  the  Jarvis boyo have talten a log Rawing contract on tho Winlaw limit;  Mr. Blakoy has  roturnocl   from tho  Brairlo whero he * haa been working with  to truck on tho icrulTi hta.ll.  New Stock has arrived  the following colors  in  WfilTE'  MAROON  BLACK  PHONE 21  ���������and be sure your requirments are taken care of promptly and efficiently. TRAINED  MEN OF EXPERIENCE AT YOUR  SERVICE  H   S   MrCRFATH  COAL,   WOOD,       FLOUR,   FEED  4  4  Hyp n nyjaj whmh wHjUfl *w ny iajiM^i������, la^) ���������*i'iayTrl|mrM'WfciJTiM������wt-MM-if m, v~Mfft.ni/ 'laitoiray^'Myi'Mi I'Mf* ������i| '���������'Mij'w Am m ww * ta>iMiiM������ tiir~"^ir**'*ia**-^aM'^'������y-*Sy^*mr'**~>0'���������*--%!���������  _  aa  of Boy Scouts aro now  instruction in firat aid work under  of   Scoutmaotor   Adam  Johnson.  Canyon troo  Yg '  tho   direction  tnlcini  ������>  iiiCuD  31 SpIiZS) e  1   V. MAWSON   j  5 CRESTON j  Ql ��������� 81 ��������� *��������������������������������������������� ������������a* ������ ������.���������* N'MVbI N.MA'Bl'amaM'CM.MaV.lalal.tl  NEW GOODS  We are constantly adding new lines to our  stock** TOILET GOODS, ST A TIONER Y.  CANDY and FANCY GOODS���������and at  prices which you expect to pay.  It is not too early to think of CHRISTMAS  GIFTS. We have many articles suitable for  gift purposes.  -q  Si  I  fc:  \si esion  Drug & Book Store  ,Y. A. BARBOUK, MOM.  {.���������������������������������������������,aliaa-aa|a8M>.M8,aaj������%%*.*��������� WM*n (������*MMlN.M������JiN.MMRf)���������**������al**lllla|JHi.g������.������.������������������ ������������������������ ������������������It***���������������l������lill.������l��������������������� THE   KEVESW.   CRESTON,   B.   <&  Eii W������ B'filsbiBi'Q  MORE CANADIAN  CHILDREN  THAN  AHY OTHER  CORN  SYRUP  A product trf    Tbe CANADA STARCH CO.. Limited  WORLD HAPPENINGS  BRIEFLY TOLD  Convicted from fingerprints on a  mirror they had stolen, three middle-  aged men were sentenced at Bombay  to imprisonment of from, one to three  years.  Ontario department of education  has -ordered compulsory teaching- of  civics in all public and high schools  In the province, starting tn October.  A new text book will be ready soon.  Business is better all over Canada  and the morale of the west is improved, Robert O. McCulloch of Galt.j  Ont., president of the Mutual Life  Assurance Company of Canada, said  in an interview in Victoria.  A pearl the size of a pigeon's egg  and said to.be capable of protecting  Its wearer from all danger was part  of ****"**��������� loot recently ta*ken from the  tomb of a Manchu prince near Peiping by grave robbers.  Lady Byng of Vimy, widow of the  former commander of the Canadian  Corps, Lord Byng, who died last  June, has informed Dominion headquarters of the Canadian Legion she  will take part in the Vimy pilgrimage in July next year.  Successful use of an instrument  which bores through the brain to the  skull pan and burns away tissues  producing a fluid that causes hydrocephalus, a condition causing infants  to become idiots, is announced by Dr.  Tracy J. Putnan, of Boston Children's  hospital.  Nearly $27,000,000 of new ordinary  life insurance, a slight increase as  compared with the same month last  year, was sold in Canada and Newfoundland in August according to returns of the Life Insurance Sales  Research Bureau, Toronto. Of the  total, sales in Saskatchewan were  $996,000.  Grows Huge Grape Vine  German Boy Planted Riding  Switch  "Left By Customer  Thirty-five years ago a Dr. Dick of  Diamond Creek, Victoria, was out  riding near Heidelberg, Germany. He  left his riding switch behind at a  smithy's -where he was having his(  pony shod. The smithy's lad recognized the switch as a grape vine cutting. He planted it in his cottage.  Now it has grown to a full vine 35  yards long extending over the fence  across a line and along the eastern  wall of a hotel.  Oner Gangway Blocked  Passengers At Southampton Held Up  By Thousands Of Bees  Thousands of bees held up passengers about to embark on the liner  Moldavia at Southampton, England.  The bees settled down comfortably  at the foot of the passenger gangway and defied attempts to move  them. A hose was tried, but this  merely incited the bees, and caused  them to buzz in clouds, scattering  onlookers. Eventually order was restored, and embarkation proceeded.  To Shorten Ocean Trip  Irish Free State Plans Ship-to-Shore  ?> 'Planes .-.."���������  London will Y be brought within  three days of New York when civil  aviation plans which are being devised by. the government of the Irish  Free State come into operation���������  possibly next year."  The scheme aims at a service * of  high-speed aircraft of the Douglas  type, to intercept the big Atlantic  liners of. the west coast of Ireland  and to speed the passengers to London, with the saving of a full day of  travel time.  With ships of the type of the Queen  Mary and Normandie the Anglo-  Irish air ferry will make London and  New York a matter of a mere weekend trip.  From. Galway on the west coast  of Ireland to Southampton by liner  is at present a full day's journey,  with an additional two hours to London. The new air link would bring  Galway within three hours of London.  It is proposed to use amphibian  machines.  From Dublin the idea is to form a  new air link not only with London  but also with Paris, Brussels, and  Berlin.  SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON  OCTOBER 13  THE STORY OF JEREMIAH  Alberta's Coal Reserves  Alberta's coal reserves total 40,-  200,000,000 tons and lie buried in  1,717 square miles of provincial soil,  Sir Montague Barlow, one-man commission Investigating collieries, was  told. Dr. J. A. Allan, head of the  geology department, "University of  Alberta, explained Alberta's topography and geological formation.  A recent check showed that only  25 of the 1,100 GSideon Bibles placed  in one Detroit hotel in 1928 remain  in their rooms.  England To Receive Relic  Armada Jewel Has Been Given To  Art Collection Fund  The Armada jewel, one of the most  beautiful relics of Queen Elizabeth's  time, is to return to Britain. It was  bought at a saleroom in London for  2,700 guineas, and it was announced  that it had been given by Lord  Wakefield to the National Art Collection Fund. The jewel formed part  of the Pierpont Morgan collection of  miniatures. It will go to the Victoria and Albert Museum, Kensington, London.  HARVESTING IN SASKATCHEWAN AT 20 BELOW!  Just about the middle of December, j  one of the most unique and interesting annual harvests to be garnered  on the North American Continent  will be in full swing. No! Not wheat  ���������but Mineral Salts. The scene will  be Little Manitou Lake, Watrous,  Saskatchewan. The harvesters will  be the employees of the Department  of Natural Resources of Saskatchewan; and the harvest itself will consist of the tiny crystals of mineral  salt which form in Little Manitou  Lake each year at "freeze-up." It is  one of the essential conditions that  the harvest be completed within a  period of ten days.   When the Prairie  winter comes in real earnest, and the  thermometer shivers down to 20. below zero,, the Departmental men,  warmly attired, and wearing waist-  high rubber boots, gather up these  crystals with specially constructed  shovels, and store them in the Government warehouse at Watrous, from  where they are later distributed. The  medicinal qualities of this saline lake,  known for many years, are becoming  more and more widely recognized,  and as a consequence these harvesting operations are assuming ever-  increasing proportions, and the Lake  is proving to be one of the Province's  most important natural resources.  Golden text: To whomsoever I shall  send thee thou shalt go, and whatsoever I shall command thee thou shalt  speak.   Jeremiah 1:7.  Lesson: Jeremiah 1:1-10; 6:10, 11;  8:18; 26:1-24; Chapters 36, 37, 38.  Devotional Reading: Psalm 26:1-7.  Explanations And Comments  Courageous Speaking Enjoined,  Jeremiah 1:6-10. In the thirteenth  year of Josiah's reign (about 626  B.C.), Jeremiah, the son of a priest,  became conscious of a divine call to  the prophetic office. It is natural to  understand that he had long meditated upon his country's sins and had  felt impelled to denounce them, but  was most reluctant to undertake the  task. The inward struggle which  took place in his sensitive and shrinking heart when something different  from his ordinary consciousness made  him certain that he was destined to  be the prophet of woe, he tells in the  form of a dialogue between God and  himself.  "Ah, Lord Jehovah! behold I know  not how tb speak; for I am a child,"  He was not a child in years but he  lacked experience, he feared he had  not the ability to speak, he distrusted  himself. In the jargon of to-day, he  had an inferiority complex. "Say not,  j I am a child" "was the answer to his  troubled thoughts that came to him;  "for to whomsoever I shall send thee  thou shalt go, and whatsoever I shall  command thee thou shalt speak. Be  ���������not afraid because of them; for I am  with thee to deliver thee."  The commission which Jeremiah received was to be "over the nations  and over the kingdoms, to pluck up  and to break down, and to destroy  and to overthrow, to build and to  plant." His task was to be destructive and constructive. He must strive  to make the people give up their  vices and weaknesses which were  making for internal corruption and  for political destruction, and to implant in their hearts new ideals of  righteousness.  Tho Courageous Speaker Threatened, Jeremiah 26:8-11. During the 40  years of Jeremiah's ministry, his was  the task of setting himself in opposition to all the currents of Jais time,  for Judah believed that she -would  escaps the impending doom, that  Jerusalem was inviolable because it  held the temple, that the nation could  not perish. Jeremiah had to warn  her that her only possible course was  to surrender to Babylon. At some  great feast, doubtless when the people  were gathered* at iJerusalem, Jeremiah uttered the warning recorded in  the first seven verses of chapter 26.  The Courage of Convictions, 26:  12-15. Jeremiah's defense was that  his message had come to him from  God, and he urged them to amend  their ways and doings, and to obey  the voice of Jehovah. If they would  do this, Jehovah, would avert the evil  which he had pronounced upon them.  Prophecy, then was regarded as conditional; a change of conduct could  prevent the threatened punishment.  D. E. Warford, of Sawtelle, Calif.,  lays claim to being the most tattooed  man in America.  IN UP-TO-DATE  ���������Old Reliable Minard'a  When horaea coma in to atable with -wire-  cute or ���������addlo boils, or cowa have caked  udder, the thins: to do It trot th* Minora'*  bottle at once, tu Mr. Dowd of Glenboroi  Manitoba, knows. Ha writes:  "I Ilka your Mlnurd. Liniment. Like to  havo it in the house. I have found your  Minimi's Liniment especially cocxl for  burled wire cuts on horses."  A. family doctor prepared Ml nurd's Liniment  over CO year* ago. Still invaluable In  ���������very stable and every house. SO  ^r&44j-&&tG-&<3& -rry^ti-.  iSSrmmS  90 feet of whlto or coloured  paper for kitchen use���������cover'a***  ���������helves, lining drawer*, etc  G$$$MAm ^������,MfflfflS  HAMILTON. ONTABJO  6y  (brocket  TJour Qau  Scraps of  \Wool  , Unlo an.  Offy/iaa  \\PerUan  Qardm  Busy Year For Sun  More Eclipses In 1935 Than For Past  ISO Years  The sun this year presents its  greatest show of eclipses for the past  130 years. The moon will have passed  between the sim and the earth no  fewer than five times, and the moon  will be In the earth's shadow twice.  This according to Professor Alfred H.  Joy, secretary of the Mount Wilson  Observatory, is the greatest number  of eclipses possible in one year. Not  since 1805 have the sun's rays been  obscured bo often, states Router's  correspondent in Pasadena. It will  be only tho second time since 1255  that there have been five solar  eclipses in one year, and there will  not be another such number until .the  year 2485.  PATTERN    5439  Even though you havo nothing on hand but tiny scraps of wool, you  can fashion tbl������ lovely afghan. And tho wool may be of different weights.  Each block���������_"/_ inches square���������can bo done In dlfforont colors. And what  a .owolod effect you have whon dono! It does indood look like a colorful  oriental tapestry. Doing each, block in difforeht colors, too, makes tho worlc  more fascinating for each is an adventure. Besides an afghan you can  make lovely pillow tops or chair note. Can't you ace what a lovely and Inexpensive Xmao gift those would bo? '  In pattorn 5489 you will find complete instructions for making tho  afghan shown as well as pillow tops and chair nots; an Illustration of tho  block and of tho ot itches needed; -material requirements.  To obtain tills pattern nond 20 cents in stamps or coin (coin preferred)  to HouHOhold Arts Dopt., Winnipeg Nowspaper Union, 175 MoDormot Avo.  IB., Winnipeg.  Thoro la no Alleo BroolcN |>attorn book puhllNheA  Making Ten-Year Tour  Bicyclists    From   Sumatra   Do   Not  Believe In Speed  Two Sumatran cyclists who do not  bolieve in the modern craze for speed  havo arrived at Bombay on a ten-  year tour of tho world. They started  from thoir home in Sumatra in July,  1931, and have takon ovor three-and-  a-half yearn to aomploto 5,000 milen  on their bicycles. Thoy made fairly |  lpng stops in Indo-China, Slam and  Burma and ln various parts of India  In order ot learn tho language and  study tho people and thoir religion.  By 1030, the "United States public  debt in expected to total ,���������'"���������341,253,000,-  000 j approximately *p270 for every  man, woman and child in tho country.  YEftST CAKES  give you perfect  breads* rolls,  coffee cake and  buns. ���������*  RalslcBrea-andBuns ������ire tempting  variety to your menu. See p_a_ 13 of  Royal Yeast Bale* Book for recipe.  Th* whole family will like these  tender "Parker House Rolls. Recipe  in. Royal Yeast Bake Book, page 12.  It'a easy to make this delicious  Coffee Cake. Recipe on page 12.  Royal Yeast Bake Book.  IIGHT, tasty bread is  J largely a matter of perfect leavening. That's'why  it is so important to use de-  pe7idable yeast. With Royal  Yeast Cakes you can he sure  of f uli leavening power every  time. Each Royal Yeast*  Cake is protected by a special airtight wrapper. They  keep in perfect condition  for months.  Two Helpful  Booklets.. m  Y  FREE!  The "Royal Yeast  Bake Book" tells  all about the art  of breadmaklna  and  dives  tested  recipes. ������������������Tli������  Royal Road to  Better Health"  explains how the  regular use of  ,.   Royal Yeast Cakes  s. as a food will lm������  ' prove your health.  BUY MADE-IN-  CANADA  GOODS  STANDARD BRANDS LIMITED  Franer Ave., ond Liberty St.,Toronto. Ont.  Send me. free, the "Royal Yeuit Hake nook"  ���������mi "The Royal Road to "Better Health."  Na i*������f   ���������  Street.  Town.  -tprov.,  Out Of Politich  Henry Ford aald in an interview  published in Tho Detroit News that  ho ia not interested in any "Ford for  president'*" boom, or in politics generally. Discussing the business outlook, tho motor magnate said: "I  am not a prophet but I havo the  feeling that business and wago trends  will bo up, and I do not believe tho  political campaign of next year will  havo any appreciable offoct on buol-  noss, one way or tho other."  Soviet -aclontlsti*) are building a  tolescopo which will havo tho third  lurgoMt lens in tho world. 2118  A SAf-i  OINTMENT  Soathiiiiq  I/a tiling  Bjiwftcfimnif  25c,3-Sc<4ui.o*J.30c,J(4 THE   REVIEW.- CBESTO^.   B.    O.  /  HO  URGE LARGE SCALE  EMIGRATION PLAN  a THE DOMINIONS  Newcastle-On-Tyne, England.-���������The  conference on emigration to the empire concluded after preparing a  written case for a government-assisted emigration scheme.  The brief, which| a* deputation will  , present Yto 7 tlte goyeri^agntj urges a  large-scale emigration scheme would  help solve unemployment at home  and abrpadV ���������J^ancial 7_^istance  would be repaid by saving unemploy-  ment relief. *  Establishment of an empire development and em'gration board with  statutory powers is advocated and it  is suggested the annual budget  should, provide grants to. settlers.  The plan will be submitted to the,  cabinet, by the lord mayor of Newcastle, B. S. Dalgleish, and a deputation of members of parliament and  representatives of emigration authorities from all parts of the country.  Cop'es of the statement afterward  will be circulated to Dominion premiers, high commissioners and agents-  general, with a letter from the.lord  mayor of Newcastle, appealing for  their co-operation in an effort: to  bring about the biggest move ever  made for the repopulation of the empire by families and communities  from the United Kingdom.  New Gold Strike  A Quiet Session  Prince   Edward   Island's   Rouse   Of  Assembly Meets  Charlottetown. ��������� Another chapter  was written into the history of British parliamentary procedure "when  Prince Edward Island's House of Assembly, filled with 30 Liberal members, met and carried on! the affairs  of state without an official opposition.  It was not a house of "yes-men,"  however. At least two government  supporters served notice on Premier  Walter Lea that they were not going  to Be a rubber-stamp for cabinet-  directed policies.  When the money bill, the most important legislation of the special one-  day session, was being studied in  committee -under the guidance of the  premier, W. H. Dennis, Prince, and  H. H. Cox, King's, raised objection to  Canada's smallest province providing  for $3,000,000 expenditure to refund  loans and carry on public works. To  give the cabinet this authority two  months after taking office would be  going directly against the policy of  retrenchment which placed them in  power, the critics contended.  Absence of an official opposing  party helped to speed the work of the  session and at an early hour the  governor, accompanied by his secretary and aide-de-camp, returned to  give His Majesty's assent to the bills  passed.  The house was prorogued to meet  ordinarily in March, 1936.  FILIPINO PRESIDENT  Made    On    North    Arm    Of    Great  ��������� Slave Lake ?V;?  Edmonton.���������-Ary ri&w   gold    strike  west of YeUowknife bay on the north"  arm. of Great Slave lake was reveal  ed to the world when Dr. Fred Jol  liffe,  of the iederai   geological   survey,  flew dut cf the north  after a  summer spent in the northwest territories.  "The strike was made September  15 several nr'les 'from *the Burwash  discovery,"  said Dr. Jolliffe.  He refused to divulge the name of  the prospector whA.jmade_jie'.'|trilj:e  pending the filing of his official report when he returns to department  of mines headquarters at Ottawa.   ...  Dr. Jolliffe and his party of 15  student assistants from the University of Alberta, explored an area of  roughly 10,000 square miles on the  north shore of Great Slave lake and  found that 2,800 square miles of the  district was underlined by pre-Cam-  bian sediments and volcanics, relatively favorable for the occurrence of  gold  and  silver deposits.  Dr. Jolliffe left Sept. 24 for Ottawa.  By an overwhelming majority, Senator Manuel Quezon, above, -was  elected first President of the new  Philippines Commonwealth. Vice-  President Garner, of the United  States, -will attend the inauguration  exercises on November 15, when  Quezon will take office for six years.  The Federal Vote  Farewell Banquet  Of  Governor-General  And   Countess  Bessborough Are Honored  Ottawa.���������A farewell banquet was  given by the government of Canada  tb the GovernorTGeneral and Countess of Bessborough.  The term of office of the Earl of  Bessborough as the king's representative in Canada expires shortly.  It was an affectionate farewell at  which, in addition to Sir George Perley, who presided, there was a distinguished gathering of representatives of the state, the diplomatic  corps, the church, the judiciary and  the civil service with their wives.  7 Responding to the toast proposed  by Sir George Perley, the governor-  general dwelt on the happy relations  he had enjoyed during his four years  in Canada.  Stage Sham Air Raid  Fleet Of Giant Bombers Visit Island  Of Malta  Valetta, Malta.���������A fleet of. giant  bombers and other aircraft droned  over Malta in a sham air raid recently, with thia tiny British island  outpost plunged in darkness and eerie  silence.  Promptly at 9:30 p.m., every house,  street and traffic, light blinked out.  Simultaneously, the, twinkling lights  of Britten warships riding at anchor  in the harbor went off.  Thousands of citizens thronged the  historic bastions of Valetta and the  seafront during the raid.  Acting-Governor Luke surveyed  the operations. Aerial and military  authorities said thoy -were well  pleased with the Island's loyal cooperation.  Abolish Ration System  New  Decree Is  Effective  In  Soviet  Russia  Moscow. ��������� A government decree  abolished the ration system of gelling  some prime food products, cutting  prices in open commercial shops.  The decree constitutes an important step toward liquidation of the  present double sales system whereby  workers make purchases in "closed"  ration shops and the general public  buys in open shops.  Prices of the two have differed  widely, workers. getting the benefit  of extremely low rates.  The decree abolished ration shop  ^sale of ~meatir_fugar,** fishi- butter and  potatoes * and 'throw* all buying of  these products into open shops, substituting One .fixed price for the previous double price system.  The new price scale reduced beef  more than 50 per cent. It now will  sell from five rubles up per kilogram. Sugar will be four rubles and  52 kopecks per kilogram as compared  with 6.50, and butter was reduced  from 24 rubles per kilogram to 15.  To prevent speculation, it was announced, no purchaser will be per-  mitted^to Tbuy at one time more than  two kilograms of meat; two of sugar;  a half kilogram of butter or three  kilograms of fish.  Results Should Be Quickly Available  After Closing Of Polls  Ottawa.���������Although various adaptations of proportional representation  and the single transferable vote are  used in some provincial elections the  Dominion general election Oct. 14  will be conducted on the traditional  single-vote system.  Electors will have only one choice  ^between the contending candidates.  They will mark an "X" opposite the  name of the candidate they favor and  the candidate -with the largest number of "X's" willYbe^nelected. There  are no second or third choices.  With the single-vote system in  operation throughout ��������� the Dominion  on election day results will be available probably for? allY constituencies  within a-_W:lw)ii^;<5$*"^ of  the;" pons.;V::^;.:Y?::77v7-'Y;Y';:T ���������        ...'���������  Veregin Resigns  No Longer Head Of Brotherhood Of  Doukhobors  Saskatoon.���������Peter Veregip, for 10  years president bf the Christian Community of the Universal Brotherhood  of Doukhobors in Canada, stated here  that h.e had severed all connection  with the community. He declared  that he stood now as a private Canadian citizen. He had no intention of  leaving the country, he said.  Mr. Veregin, who has been virtual  ruler, of the sect in Canada since the  death, of his father in a British Columbia railway accident, said he had  tendered his resignation about six  months ago. He would not disclose  any reason for his action. He is now  on his way to Montreal.  TO STRENGTHEN  NAVY AND AIR  FORGE IN BRITAIN  Coining Ethiopian Money  Rome.'���������Italy is already coining  Ethiopian thalors, for use following  tho incursion of Italian forces Into  Ethiopia. Emplnyoos of tho mint  said tho coins aro to be used by tho  military and civil governors which  Italy plans to Install In Ethiopia, to  pay oif tribesmen who seek work  under Italian domination.  I  Hours Of Labor Set  Legislation Will Be Brought Into  Effect October 5  Ottawa.���������-Legislation for limitation  of the hours of labor in certain industrial undertakings in Canada will  bo brought into, effect on Oct. 5.  Regulations for the carrying out of  the measure have been drafted.  Based on a 1919 convention of the  International labor organization of  the League of Nations, the legislation  constitutes part of tho reform program brought down by the government at the last session of parliament.  Morn ..Wheat Iwi Store  Ottawa. The Dominion bureau  of  ftatifltlcs reported Canadian wheat  In Htore for the,-weoU, ended Sept. 20  amounted to'. 220,802,87-0 bushels, an  lmtro--.se I of lJl,fl{*"8,380 oyer the preview* wook. The vlalfelo auppiy for  tho corrosppndipg wook UiHt year was  **j3,*j_q,2Qo bushels.  Would Defend Record  mVm 18888,1 n 8818*   *  If Speed Prestige Threatened Campbell Will Race Again  London. ��������� Sir Malcolm Campbell  and his Bluebird aro through with  breaking records unless some  foreigner gives thom a new mark to  shoot at.  Sir Malcolm announced at a dinner  in his honor that ho had had his fill  of blistering (speeds, but that thoro  waa at 111 a great deal of lightning In  his racing ��������� car that might ,bo coaxed  out if Britain's speed prostlgo . was  threatened.  Another Storm Hits Japan  Typhoon Kills 48 And About 100  Are Missing . ���������     '  Tokyo.���������A typhoon which whirled  freakishly and destructively across  Japan, from Kagoshima to Wendai,  killed at least 48 persons, and about  100 were missing.  Several ports in the inland sea reported that fishing craft were missing, and the steamer Tonegawa  Maru, with a crew of 13 and 19 passengers, also was missing.  The typhoon was the fifth death-  dealing storm, in three months over  Japan proper.  London^���������prime Minister Baldwin  intends to outline measures to  strengthen both the navy and the air  force when he addresses the Conservative party at its annual conference at Bournemouth.  George Lansbury, Labor leader in  the House of Commons in an address  declared Britain and other nations  were on the brink of a war in which,  it would be ''Christian against Christian, Mohammedan against Mohammedan, Jew against Jew-���������all praying  to the same God for Victory.  "T cannot bow to that sort of  thing," the leader said. "The way  out is for some nation, and I want  it to be Britain, to blaze a new-  trail."  Athens.���������The semi-official Athens  news agency announced information  from a German source indicated arrangements had been completed at  Instanbul for Greek and Turkish warships and planes to -start manoeuvres  in the Dardanelles and that two Roumanian torpedo boats would also  participate.  It has been reported Greece is prepared to support Great Britain in any  Mediterranean activity which might  become necessary at the outbreak of  Italo-Ethiopian warfare.  Greek newspapers   hailed  Use    *tr-  Installing McGill Principal  Montreal.���������It is expected at least  24 Canadian universities and colleges  will be represented at the installation of Professor A. E. Morgan as  principal of McGill University Oct.  5. Dr. Robert C. Wallace, president  of University of Alberta, Edmonton,  will be in attendance.  Honesty Was Rewarded  Delivery Boy Returns Valuable Bonds  And Gets Good Job  New York.���������From the lowly plane  of delivery boy of "coffee and���������" at  $3.15 a week, young Albert Correri  vaulted to a remunerative position in  Wall street.  Correri* s role in "the street's" newr  est success story was cast -when he  picked^from the gutter jt packet of  bonds; iralued at ^iSO.ddOpSuid returned them to the ownersV ���������������.**?". -.Gfrim-*'  wald, vice-president of C. 5". ������bhilds  and Co., Wall street brokers, owners  of the bonds, announced Co*rreri  would start work in the cashier's department of the brokerage firm.  Correri, who is 22, may also get a  reward.  rival of British ships in Greek ports,  saying that the people of Greece have  come to regard the annual British  naval manoeuvres in Mediterranean  waters as a welcome tradition.  Siege Of Lucknow  Ten    People     Alive     To    Celebrate  Thrilling Event  London.���������-Ten people in different  parts of the world celebrate one of  the most thrilling incidents in the  modern history of the British Empire,  the siege of Lucknow in the Indian  mutiny.  The oldest survivor of the siege is  C. G, Palmer, a resident of British  Columbia; the youngest Arthur  Das-hwood, 78, living in London.  Dashwood's mother gave him birth  in the residency at Lucknow, where  .17 people were ^herded in one room  during the siege. Despite her ordeal,  Mra. Dashwood lived for more than  70 years.  Mussolini Opposed  Report From Italy Of Some Opposition To War Plans  Paris. ��������� French newspapers reprinted a story from The London  Referee saying Prince Umberto, heir  to the Italian throne, is opposed  to Premier Benito Mussolini's conflict  with Ethiopia. _  (This report was described as utterly false in Rome and London by  authoritative? Italian spokesmen.)   V  There is a possibility, the story  said ,of General Italo Balbo, governor  of Libya and Italian air hero, leading a revolt against II Duce.  "Balbo, whose relations with the  royal family are excellent, is also  opposed to the Ethiopian campaign,"  the story asserted. "A large number  of Italian superior officers share his  view."  RECEIVING THE KING'S CUP  Another Leuf Competition  Montreal.���������Third annual competition for tho most beautiful autumn  tintod maple loaf la announced by  the Canadian government through  tho Canadian travel bureau. First  prize will bo JP100. ��������� 2118  Pilot T. Rose, driving a Miles Falcon -machine, won tho King's Cup Air  Race "round tho British Isles'*��������� thia year, and is ohown receiving tho coveted  trophy from tho hands of Sir Phillip Cunliffo-Llatoi*.  Sentry Killed By Lions  Five Belonging To Emperor Selossio  Make Dash For Freedom  Add.'s Ababa.���������Five of Emperor  Haile Selassie's big lions escaped,  killed one sentry, and injured five  more.  In this rush for freedom they devoured several of the Emperor's  pedigreed Australian sheep and killed  two horses.  Colonel Mekourla, the commander  of tho imperial guard, seized a machine gun and shot all five beasts In  succession.  Insurance Premiums Higher  li   i.i i - - r-ii  ' m  British Vessels Passing Through Sucjb  Canal Must Pay More  Singapore.���������Fear of trouble developing in tlie Mediterranean was  reflected hero when marine insurance  companies warned special premiums  for "war risks" must be paid by British vessels returning to England  through the Suez canal.  To escape payment of the war risk  premiums British ships must go all  tho way around   the   Capo of Good  Gordon Bennett Trophy  Warsaw,���������Tho Polish balloon Pol-  onln was awarded tho Gordon Bennett trophy tin the winner of thc 27th  Bonnett international races that began horo Sep. 15, Tho Polonla, ona  of tho 13 entries, travelled about  1,007 miles of tor a flight of B8 hours  and 54 minutes, it was officially announced. It reached an altitude oi?  10,732 feet. Another Polish balloon,  tho Wnrnaw, was second, CRESTOH REVIEW  \     ***  ���������j^-***- m.*. m-Jk..^-*_.-*-*.���������*..*._ M..^.-m.r+. ,*.-*.   mm   jm^m.   m.   *.  m.   ^.m.   m.   *..*..*..**.. m..*. m.������-m..m.. m..^..m..JM.m.^..m.m..m..m.m.m..m..mM   m.. m..m..A.. m..A. m.-*..*.  LOWER PRICES  Don't take our word for it. Come.  Compare. You can prove to your own satisfaction  that the CO-OP. prices are the most attractive in  town by making your own comparisons. You are  always welcome whether or not you wish' to buy.  MEAT SPECIALS  PORK SAUSAGES,  per lb.. .......    1 $ .10  PORK CHOPS, Trimmed, lb.  .18  BEEF SHORT RIBS, lb.       ....     .07  Grocery Specials  utter, 3 lbs.  next games are at Creston. when Kimberley boys and girls will be here.  Mr. and Mrs. Ted Winchcombe of  Nelson were renewing acquaintances in  Creston at the weekend,, guests of Mr.  and Mrs A. Goplin. Since selling his  barber chop here about three years ago.  Ted has been in business at Win-field and  No. 1 Creamery.  PALM OLIVE SOAP, 5 cakes $ :23  ;  MOLASSES, 2s, each    .18  |  Sugar House.  MATCHES, carton 3 boxes 2$  Redbird.  RAISINS, Sultanas, 2 lbs 26  Bulk. ���������;-".-���������       --V . .,7  N VALLEY CO OPERATIV  To all those who in any way assisted  with the removal of the contents of the  freight shed and the removal of furniture and household effects from the station  and for the help in saving the depot  building at Erickson in Saturday's disastrous fire we wish to extend our sincereat  thanks. The care shown both in taking  out and returning the furniture is particularly appreciated. Mr. a-.d Mrs. T. W.  BUNDY.  Kelowna, and has recently opened out a  butcher shop and grocery at Nelson.  The fire equipment was rushed to  Erickson at noon on Saturday for the  disastrous , blaze that completely destroyed the fruit warehouses ' of Long.  Allan & Long, Limited. The chemical  engine did good work in preventing the  blaze wiping out the C.P.R. station.  i>  THS FRIENOL.Y STORE  RHONE 12  WE OSUVBR  m^m^mmqy^.^mmmm^mm'^.  ,������,������'������'r*,������lrrrv������l������l������,*'t"il *������������������ w/mm'Wfvm,wmwmm"9m*w>m,wr'  y   ^ii m'a^i ia������<aj)n a^n ������"^r������i������ 'WVW 9 lyvyyiy^v  .*..m..m.jk. rnm-,mi..m..A~m . m*m .0k..m.  .m.m.m.m ������������������������������>,*.������,���������������������,  ���������A^^A^^JuaWA^h^M^aVAMa���������  IT PAYS TO KEEP YOUR SHOES IN REPAIR  Most of the people you meet for the first tithe today judge you on  appearance. If you look well groomed and neat they instantly think of you  as successful.  Few things give a man or woman a shabby appearance so much as shoes  that need repairing.-   And few things can be corrected at so little cost.  If your shoes need attention, don't neglect them We'll do a good fob  for you here, at small cost.  Next door to Liquor Store, Creston  ���������ar'yi*������"iy**������'������"y ���������  ������'8>-g  <?��������� w ���������<*���������<* vm-m'  "w ���������������" m '"9  ���������m ' ������,y*i'**y^  m.m.m.m.tw. >,������i* m.������..m* m. m ������. ������,t m, m.*..m���������m. a m.tk.Wh m.m,m.^..m.m.jw.  Save Time and Work  It's  decidedly   economical to own a  General Electric Washer. Fpr less than  two cent's wortu o*. rlectricuy, ycu can  do a week's washing and do it better  than by any othe ��������� method. Your  clothes are cleaner a d fresher���������and  they last ever so much longer. In fact,  what you save by this modern home-  laundering will soon pay for the G.-neral  Electric Washer you buy.  You also save in. time and energy. A  General Electric Washer puts an end to  old fashioned laborious methods, doe***' a  week's washing in an amazingly short  time, and gives you new leisure each  Monday.  By choosing a General Electric Washer  you are assured of long faithful performance���������and the greatest value for your  investment. Prices are exceedingly  reasonable and we offer you convenient  terms of payment.  IJIGHT ������E������ COW ESTRAY  STRAYED from Canyon district  about the first of November light red  cow, sawed-off hor__, horns turning in.  Reward to party giving information leading to recovery. JOHN NYGAARD,  Canyon.  Local and Personal  j West Kootenay Power & Light Go., Ltd.  ���������  CMiYOH STREET     CRESTON,    B.C.  PHONE 31  v*r*v���������������"'������������������'���������������*������*������ "g-^1  '������ www  ">���������������**>'  ���������wwm 'ww  ���������m. y *****<���������������*"I*'*r*'****^**r*^,'r-  e^i^m&z-^imm^-'r^smfs^s  3-B_���������e_'llHI''l*���������li   I I    IIWW IH UHa ,1,111,ttjJUIii-!���������   mm.  Why Sacrifice Your Night's Rest  ���������by continuing to jise wornout^ Springs   and  Mattresses when at these   ^  L  Exceptionally Low Prices such Comfort and Good Value can be  obtained.  Extra Savings  n  A Low-priced 3 piece Bedroom Outfit  Windsor Style Bedstead of Steel with 2-inch round posts in Walnut enamel  finish. Cable Spring mounted on strong angle steel frame. A serviceable Mattress filled with npw clean cotton and Art Ticking cover with  Roll Edge*.  3 Pieces complete, $18.95  An  Outstanding Value���������the Challenger  Mattress  Soft new clean white cotton filling built in layers so it will not ma*-, pack or  become lumpy.   Built for years of comfort.   $10.45.  Walnut Enamel Steel Bedstead  ���������has oval or Windsor shaped top and 10-inch decornted centre nan el.  Round post. High Riser Cable Spring with tubular aides and malleable  corner caatingH, fndw trussed for oxtru titrengUi. Strong Cable fabric  Spring. "Economy" Mattresa, covered in Art Ticking and Roll Edge  finish.  3 Pieces Complete, $24.75  If der-ircd tlif-KK- i>i<*c(!H can bo purchased separately.  Bedstead,  $10.25.    Spring,  $8.00.  Economy Mattress, $6.95  CIJITCTOM MFIJPIiyTIi F  GROGERIES  H-a*-\>' BVB It <r^ 6^9 T       ELa, D mJ *  HARDWARE  \-mmm<:'': '4tm.:j .'..im&z.''*mWm������&'JmWr*wli  ���������TfT'?#l^*#flff**Tl.I 'T^*^*^*^-' frwflyMff^w>*Tf iy  Painting and Paper Hanging at  moderate prices.    R. G. Penson.  FOR SALE���������Men's skates with boots,  size 9, $3.    M. Kelsey. Erickson.  JSirs. Jas. Maxwell has been on  a visit  ������������_*.������      .������������-....m������������      ������������.������       -mm. mrm**.rmm.mJ.m m^^mm ...^      mm...  week.  FOR SALE���������Large size grain cutting  machine, in good shape, $20. Fred K.  Smith.  Mr. and Mrs. W. Fraser were Armistice weekend    visitors with   friends in  Nelson.  PIGS FOR SALE-���������Good stock, ready  Nov. 20th. $4.60 cash. Ron..H. Stewart,  Phone 42T. Creston.  With a showing of 94.6 attendance  shield for October Tat Creston school was  wo by Division 7, in charge of Miss E.  V. Holmes.  "New Year's evc7 December 31st, has  been booked for the ?annual hospital  benefit dahce by Erickson Ladies' Hospital Auxiliary. 7 Y     -    - - i?  Phone Moores' Greenhouse for Mums.  Carnations pnd Snapdragons, some of  which will be on display at Imperial  Groceteria.   Visitors welcome.  The Junior W.A. of Christ Church  had fair patronage for the usual bean  supper at the Parish hall on Friday  night.   The cash intake was about $20.  Al's Four Aces orchestra will play for  the High School Literary Society dance  at Park pavillion next Friday evening.  November 22nd. The admission is 60  cents. '.  LAND FOR SALE^-Well watered,  partly timbered, first-class agricultural  land for sale at $20 per acre. Also ten  acres orchard for $1,200. R. Sinclair  Smith, Creston.  When doing ^our Christmas shopping  have in mind the sale of fancy work and  home cooking on December 14th, under  the auspices of the Catholic Ladies'  League, Creston.     -  Creston got its .first ground level snow  on Monday, when about ah inch of the  white mantle came down during the  morning. Mild weather since then has  taken it away, however.  Murdoch McLeod. Registered Optometrist, of Vancouver, will be at Fred  "Klingensmith's,Creston, all day Monday,  November 18th. Why not have comfortable and perfect sight.  Commencing Monday, Nov. 18th,  Floyd Walde, agent for Spic and Span  Cleaners, announces there will be a  Thirty-Day Special. Suits and Drceses,  $1 each. All other dry cleaning 20*%  discount on regular prices.  Armistice poppy sales, which were in  charge of the Women'** Auxiliary to  Creston Legion were woll up to expectations despite the unfovorable weather  th at prevailed. " The ladies report wreath  Bal<?a as better than in 1984.  Mr. and Mrs. T. Goodwin got away on  Friday for their usual winter sojourn at  points In southern California, making  general headquarters, ������*������ uaual, nt Long  Beach. They npent the weekend at  Coour d'Alone ein route south.  For tho last wook in October and the  -flrst week in.Novombcr Crorton fuel  dealers   report   sales of coal that nro  fneater than for October, November and  )Gcombor in any ordinary year. Tho  demand for wood has also been  oxtenBivo,  The sacrament of tho Lord's Supper  will be disponmed at the Presbyterian  Cb Mitre*,* at the morning ac*rvlco tit 11.30.  Sunday, November 17th, with preparatory Hcrvlco thia (Friday) evening at eight.  Thtr-'pnutor'H subject. Sunday morning  will be "The Secret of Victory,"  Crouton high echoo),basketball teams  got an even brfuk in thoir first gamen in  the lfittat Kootenay longuo at Fernie on  Saturday. Tho glrla* aquad won 24*11,  but the boy������ wore trimmed J14-11,   Tho  Creston Branch   of  tbe  British  Israel Federation announces  A. GOOPER  of VICTORIA  Who will speak on  "ECONOMICS OF THE  DWIHELAW"  United Church Hall  CRESTON  Tues., Nov. 19  EIGHT p.m.  All Welcome,    Collection.  SILVERWARE  and  DINNERWARE  To show our appreciation for your  valued patronage, we wish to an-  ounce that in future, beautiful aud  UBeful dinnerware and silverware will  be given away by us absolutely  FREEI  Every time you make a Cash Purchase of 26c or more,, you will receive  coupons, which entitle you to your  choice of beautiful dinnerware and  silverware.  Drop in any time and let us.explain  how the plan works-���������no obligation  whatever. ..'"'''"  - The Coupons are FREE���������you  are  entitled to thera���������start saving NOW!  G. Sinclair  Creston Hardware  ������ff\2~tSPm\gS?m%*P*4  it P>.\Y$ TO PAYmVAS/f AT THE IMPERIAL  FR.DAY-SATURDAY SPECIALS  s  i  I Baby Strained Vegetables.^!? -35 f  %     Heinz. 8 Varieties.   Limit 8 to customer. %  Just what babyTneedsi,.    j:-y.t '[.,/���������-, ,7 v v���������vY '/vm-  CARBOMG SOAP, Jiimfoo, 4 cakes ..    ..    .$ .19     |  Toilet Soap> Pure Antiseptic. 2  WHEAT and BICE PUFFS, 1 pkg. of each..    .29     1  Large size packages. S  PORK & BEAJMS, Iilil}y%ll).tins,2 tins        .18     |  SHEtLED WALNUTS, 1-lb. CeUo wrapped    .31      |  Light broken pieces.   Clean and Fresh. ������  TEA-BISK, package...      ........ V   .30     \  Makes perfect Biscuits in 30minutes. Y %  MATCHES, Owly3-box carton....:.......���������_......Yl,      .25  Complete stock of all necessities for that Christmas Cake.  fc������^i_*^_������<<_-fc^_ala������*_L*aAfc.^_fc_a������_Bk*Ja^������kjft_������__k^_^*  M^kjM^B������rf^MMMMIiMhABJaM*a4BmK4HkM4uUBW*_Ka*l  M^������aAa_J^MiA_l  ���������Jla_^  7  *i  ONA  YARNS  Start today  to  turn spare time  iiato money by knitting* your own  SWEATERS  ***' ��������� ��������� ���������        ���������. ,   Y'' ' ' ���������  Children's Outdoor Wear  A choice ol SO Colors  Monarch Yarns contain more yards to the ounce.  Are dependable for many washings.  Colors arc tub-fast and sun-fast.  1. ...     ' ���������   , ���������'  Knitting Books, each  .' !....  $ *25  Tweed, Andulasian and Radiant, ounce...   .25  Monarch Dove Yarn, ounce     *18  /k km^L ;|���������*   W~i    H"^     B^__T     ^%  4\  i  I*-  Dry Goods.       Clothing.      Hardware.       Furniture   <

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