BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Creston Review Jun 14, 1935

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xcrestonrev-1.0175326.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xcrestonrev-1.0175326.json
JSON-LD: xcrestonrev-1.0175326-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xcrestonrev-1.0175326-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xcrestonrev-1.0175326-rdf.json
Turtle: xcrestonrev-1.0175326-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xcrestonrev-1.0175326-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xcrestonrev-1.0175326-source.json
Full Text
xcrestonrev-1.0175326-fulltext.txt
Citation
xcrestonrev-1.0175326.ris

Full Text

 .LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B.C.
I
f*        *
-ns-
Vol XXVI.
CRESTON, B.C., FBIDAY. JUNE 14, 1935
No. 7
prefer Swimming
- dPooFs -Filling
Big Tank to be Ready Immediately���May Have Membership
Tickets���-Fire Brigade Matters
to Fore-^Iimhd'ff Miap Pleases.
Julius Kranabetter was a Nelson visitor at the first of the week on business at
the-county
uralization.
county court in connection with nat-
seuciiie.
There was considerable variety to the
business transacted at the June meeting
���ofthe village council on Monday night,
the most-important of which was t*>~ instruct the handyman to startat once
with the filling of the swimming pool at
Exhibition park for the 1935 season.
The fire and light committee reported
with regret that it had been unable to
get promised action in connection with
resumption of fire brigade activities and
it was decided to terminate ;the services
of the present fire chief ai the end of
Juue.
The correspondence was light. The
Salvation Army got favorable consider*
ationtoits appeal for a grant to help
with its social service work, the usual
���$26 being voted. The Knights of
. Pythias will be permitted to use Exhibition park on June 30th and July 1st. and
lk.   ~vn��11c*vn   ns~   fds    1,-^J.���-,     JrmM.^,       ?_.      *.'���,���, '
818II?   }.,4 V 8888/88   W18    bu��*      ...vw.    -.mm^mm.        .mm      m.m*MM���
nection with their Dominion Day celebration, provided they pay.for the use of -
the piano and  take care of the electric
light   bill.   Reeve Jnckson will   confer
���with a trio of softball clubs to arrange
a schedule of practice nights. The roads
committee will look after the removal cf
buildings*, that project onto the street
on MyrtleiAvenue, and R. Ibbitson's request If o* a. permit to erect a 24 x v28 ft.
residence-ln the J. F. Murrell subdivision was granted.
Expenditures on highways were all
held over for another month. "These included an expenditure of $50 in connection with improving laneway connection
for the stores on the west side of Canyon
ttreet. The C P.R. divisional engineer
will be consulted to get exact information as to the railway company's road
rights in that neighborhood. Mr. Wen\
who recently acquired the former Chas.
Brousson residence and acreage on
Gp,ahdview heights offered to sell the
.ngcessaryland, Wecspedite the fxten4orv
& 'V'Sn^^
hospital for **>I5u?but^^ whii^tbis?iwas ?cpb-
sidered ?a7gc^T hiiy purchase wasVde-
'TT.ferried^?Y',;;;.v:*: 7:7YY-.^V,7? " ���?���??:"". -J a''. -J
Councillor Murrell 7 madehis position
clear; stating he would  not favor any
~ ~~.�� .3*4. l.*      8 M.'% - \m
4*Aipcii\A.i.m*7m70     'vmm       84agu.W���*>y*'       UI5..1*    SUCai
time as an estimate was secured as to
the cost of needed improvements to Park
pavilion. It was decided to have tuts
handyman secure the necessary new
posts and wire in order to make needed
repairs to the fence at Exhibition park.
Two no parking signs will be erected in
front of the town property on Barton
Avenue.
The.water, and light committee reported a new three-inch pipe was being laid
along Princess Avenue to serve the new
residences being built in that locality.
Repairs had also been made to pipe line
on Victoria Avenue. The building and
fire by-law was amended so that all
property through to the east boundary
of the town is now covered by the pro
visions of the by-law. Accounts passed
for payment totalled $408. Of this
amount $110 went to W. tmhoff, who
has completed his composite map of the
village, and $150 was to pay the half
yearly salary of the councillors.
The council has good reason to be
pleased with the new map. It is a very
fine piece of work. On a map less than
three by four feet Mr. Imhoff has very
Ciearly shewn sll the subdivisions,
blocks, lots, streets. Iane3. etc., in the
vilfage. Hitherto if any information of
this sort was wanted more than a dozen
blue prints had to be sorted over to
secure the one de-tired. A resolution ex
pressing appreciation of his efficiency
was ordered recorded on the minutes.
In connection with the swimming pool
the clerk will write some other town in
which these are operated* for information a<- to season ticket*- for families
and individuals. Notice was also given
that trouble is sure to bo encountered by
thoflo who proceed with new��� buildings or
alterations to existing structures before
securing a permit from the village.
The meeting was in charge of Reeve
F. II. Jackson, and Councillors Comfort
and Murrell were in attendance.
Mrs. S. M. Whit-taker and family of
Cranbrook, who have been holidaying
with her mother, Mrs. Hobden, left for
home the latter part of the week.
The Lister-Huscroft baseball nine took
a 17-9 beating at Canyon on Sunday
afternoon, playing against Canyon. Canyon was also winner over an indian team
by*a 10-1 margin.
A despatch from Victoria, dated June
11, informs that the B.C. government
haswritten off as loss six accounts total-*
ling $674, owing on the Lister settlement
*C*L*&   UI|VVH��VV��Ul">--��
Strawberry Cron
Starts Moving
on
M. *aarjr
R. Stevens l��*��f�� at the first of the week
via Spokane for Nanaimo He was joined at Spokane by his son, Ernest, of
Trail, who will accompany him. on a
vacation at coast points of about three
weeks.. TxT
The Lister-Huscroft Raiders softball
team had quite an easy win over Creston
Wildcats at Creston on Thursday evening. The score was 23-13. The batteries were: Creston * Wightman and Armitage; Lister, Webster and Hutts.
Wynndel and Creston Get
Shipping List June 12th, About
Three WeeksYLater than 1933
���Marketing Prospects Good.
proof storage when it is colder. The
extra space will provide storage for at
least an additional 20,000 boxes and with
the old and new storage space the Exchange will now be able to handle Mcintosh Reds, for instance, direct from
orchard to storage and get away from
spoilage caused by being left too long in
the orchard. The building will have a
trussed roof, getting away entirely from
beams in the upper story. It is expected
tenders for the addition will be called for
before the month is out.
Bricttsoh
Tom Alton spent a few days last week
at his home in Fernie.
Mr. and Mrs. S. Cochrane were Cranbrook visitors on Monday.     V
Mrp. E. Kopenick left at the middle of
the week on a visit with Nelson friends
Mr. and Mrs. N. Swain were Spokane
visitors a few days at the end of the week.
. Carl and Alton Neumann of Goatfell
camp spent Sunday at their home at
Erickson^
Walter Dodds of Tye, who has been
home for a few days, returned to Tye on
Wednesday.
Dr. J. Olivier, of Creston, school health
oTificer, made his annual inspection of
Erickson school on Friday. ....
- Mj^.Madplin^^utnai^vBA.^whoJias
spj��nt ^th?^^*reeW
turned'wV^ccuv<��
Mrs. H. Langston left onfTWednesday'
last on a two-weeks' vacation which she
is^spend'ng at "Seattle,  Vancouver and
"\"*i#*f-.or"p   '..���".-. ������''... ���
Mrs. Jas. Carr and family were visitors
st Cranbrook on Wednesday on the occasion of the visit to that city of the
Barnes circus.
Mr and Mrs. L. T. Leveque and their
niece, Edith Tomlinson, left on Wednesday for Edmonton, Alberta, where they
will visit friends for a couple of weeks.
There was some real excitment about
noon on Monday when the gas shovel
working on the highway hit the Sullivan
Creek irrigation pipe at a point near the
schrol corner. E. E. Cartwright was
promptly on the job and with a crew of
workman and had the damage repaired by
noon, Tuqsday.
The Juna meeting of Erickson Ladies-
Hospital Auxiliary was held at the home
of Mrs. Bell on Wednesday last. After
business matters were disposed of the
members went to the Bide-a-Wee tourist
camp for tea and an inspection of the
whole camp, guests of Mrs. K. Knott,
enjoyed the tea and hos-
The 1935 strawberry crop in Creston
valley commenced filing on Wednesday
when the Co-Operative Fruit Growers at
Wynndei had an initial shipment oi seven
crates from four?of -jlhe early ranches in
that section, and: Lsng,* Allan & Long,
Limited, report an-outgo ' of ten crates
from Reed & Mather's at Alice Siding,
another early producer.' The fruit was
of fip-tt-class quality-and much superior
in appearance' to tl%?coast berries local
stores have been handling the "past ten
days. The season .-j|s three weeks later
than last year, when a few crates went
out as early as May 727th.
At Wynndel the;outlook is for a crop
possibly 30 per eenrfer- in excess of 1934,
provided favorable /$reather in encountered.   Just at present unirrigated lands
are needing rain.   F?or the bigger tonnage
the Wynndel Co-G|��erative Fruit Grower" 2?e w*?H prepared having enlarged
their pre cooling 'plans to a capacity  of
handling seven- caps'," as -compared
four in past seasons.   Further improvement is made in  that the plant is now
electrically operated;? The old plant was
the brine type, but"It is being kept up to
standard in caseoi^any   mishap on the
���juice" supply?   '  7 7 7
Interviewe I Wednesday C. W. Allan,
Managing director of Long, Allan&Long,
Limited, reports a?, larger than last year
tonnage of berries signed up. Mr. Allan,
who is just back from a tour of the principal prairie wholesale centres, advises
that crop conditions, have never appeared
more favorable.? 'Jobbers and brokers are
particularly optomistic as to prospects
for the season. 7'V J, "-;.--:-
The latest advices are that shipments
of coast berries, whiebhave been on now
for a matter otlfao weeks, will hit. the
peak about, Juhefe?l^feh or 20th. This in
formatiohfcoup|^jwjfcth the fact that the
coast crop "has b||^tstibstantially reduces!
aa;a--r^ul*tvoifc����$|^^
TOllrin th^pplni^
very favorable Teacticeri-.on the market
prospects: of the Creston valley berry
crop. -���.WV.YY
Long, Allan & Long, Limited, announce
that they^ will?conduct their usual shipping serviced at Erickson, Creston, i��ccd
& Mather's siding arid Wynndel.
Alice SWiitg
Donald Phillips is at present undergoing treatment at Crestnn hospital.
W. A. Pease is busy  with the erection
of a bay shed on his (Beaser) ranch.
New Selling Firm
Now Incorporated
Greston Products, Limited, Gets
Charter���Capitalized at $10,-
000.00���Directors Named and
Warehouse Facilities Arranged
Mr. and Mrs. Floer and Mrs. Pease
were holidaying at Cranbrook on Wednesday.
Miss Opal LaBelle of Creston spent a
few days at Lakeview last week, s guest
of Miss Elsa Willis.
W. F. Armstrong and family were combining business with attending the circus
at Cranbrook on Wednesday.
So far as can be learned the first harvest of strawberries for this season was
at the John Kelly ranch on Sunday.
ijroroon bsisiIu, who u&s besu iiO.iiG ior
with I about three weeks, left on  Friday to resume his mining work at   Duparquet,
Quebec.
Jack Miller's new home at Lakeview is
nearing completion and the interior finishing will be under way at the end of
the week.
The strawberry shipping season got
under way Wednesday morning, with
Reed & Mather ranch taking the honors
for first shippers. They had ten crates.
Their crop is being handled by Long,
Allan & Long who will have the same
shipping facilities as last year.
Mrs. F. W. Ash was hostess at a miscellaneous shower,  honoring Miss Joan
Hilton, whose marriage takes place next
week.   It took the form of a social afternoon with tea served* about 4 o'clock.
Mrs. Collis. and Mrs. Hilton ..poured, and
Misses  "Mtargair^.Blincb, Dora   Nickel
and^atet"^ay|ie?asdsted;   After tea the
^&est of saiohbrYfcn^^eseitBd V with ja
basketful of useful gifts? which she suitably acknowledged    The room was prettily decorated with peonies and roses.
About twenty guests were present. .J
Buy New Grader
Add to Warehouse
Hmf'mJiSi.MigefSmZl
The last issue of the B.C. Gazette,
published at Victoria, gives notice of the
incorporation of Creston's third selling
agency which will be known as Creston
Products. Limited, with an authorized
capital of $10,000, divided into 10,000
shares of one dollar each. According tb
the Gazette the objects for which the
company is established are:
To carry on the business of buying,
selling, trading and wholesale, and retail
dealing   and   dealers  in goods, wares,
merchandise, farm machinery and equipment, and other personal property whatsoever    kind    and      description,   and
particularly fruit, vegetables,  and farm
and market-garden products of all kinds
and descriptions
To provide facilities for the handling,
packing, grading storage, warehousing,
carriage, and distribution of all or any of
the aforesaid.
T*-t  -i-s^-r*-* j"***!"*-  *?"8-*"*a V>����r��'��*��/>��!��c*i   r\�� "nrAronAiiao-
Ja, "U��    VMKJIjr      VM     <M*��'W    mmfim&mim.mmm~mi     W-      ^f =**. ^-=^ ��a��-^^"
men and stores of goods, wares, merchandise, fruit, vegetables, farm machinery
and equipment, farm and market-garden
products of all kinds and description."
To carry on the business of public and
private carriers by road, water, railway,
or otherwise howsoever.
To carry on a general trading business,
and to act as general merchants, commission merchants, genera! agents*
importers and exporters.
Generally to carry on any other
business or undertaking competent to a
company incorporated under the
"Company Act" and amending Acts.
To allot the shares of the Company as
fully or partly paid up as the whole or
part of the purchase price of any property, wares, chattels or rights purchased
.by the Company, or for service or other
valuable consideration.
The board of directors of the new
firm are P. Ri' Truseottv F. H. Jackson,
W. SJ. Avefy, Frank* Celli and Robert
Stewart:7YT:-.;., 7.;-;rV?,_.: v^VY ?.....
TYNowthatral!6 the incorporation form-
aUties havs^ts^en cbinplied with a general
meeting is to be held-this week at which
all the other preliminary details will be
disposed of and a start niade 03 the
erection of a suitable warehouse on a site
which has been secured oh-the main
highway on the east side of the village.
Co-Op. Fruit Exchange Modernizing Equipment and Putting
on 50-Foot Extension���Grader
Most   Modern  Manufactured.
M&ter
Jos. W. Boll of Kimberley was horo for
tho weekend looking after his farm interests in this area.
A. Daus and Herman Sommerfeld ore
busy with tho erection of quite commod-
iouB now hay barns.
Dr. Olivier of Creaton, school health
olllccr, was* on an official inspection of
the Liuterund HuKcroftschoola thin \vt-tsU.
D.J. McKee loft at the first of the
week for Vancouver where ho la havlng
Homo adjustments made to his artificial
Ing.'.../ ������ ���J". '-���>.;��� :   ���������!,.
Many Listorltos wcironotod In tho largo
crowd dut on Saturday night for tho
������Merry Widow" at the Grand Theatre,
Crouton.
AH very much
pitality.
Cranbrook Courier:   Previous to early
morning service in the Catholic  Church,
Yahk. a quoit wedding was solemnized
Friday, May 81, when Father Harmann,
of Cranbrook,  united in marriage  Miss
P. Charbonneau of Creston, and Mr.  E
Cardnal, of Arrow Creek,   Mrs. S. J.
McCartnejr and Mi��a. John Lorenzo attended as witnesses.   Following the ceremony the bridal party wero gupsts a   the
home of Mra, McCartney, where wedding
breakfast was served.   Later,  Mr.  and
Mrs. Cardnal left on a motor trip through
the States and on their rot im will tnko
up residence in the Arrow Creek district.
The tea given at the Bido-a-Weo tourist camp on Wednosday last, under  tho
direction of Mrs. K Knott, was a success
with more than 50 pooplo from Creston,
Canyon, Lister and Erickaon  attending.
The hostess was assisted by Mrs. Putnam,   president   of   Erlolc-ion   Ladle*-'
Hospital Auxiliary,and Mrs. W. V. Jackson, president 01 the Lvi(ion Women's
Auxiliary,; tho proceeds being divided between theae two organizations.   Tea was
served under tho troos where tables were
spread and attractively, decorated with
flowers    After this tho guest*1  Inspected
tho cabins and ground*, and woro pleawd
Erickson can  boat't such a modorn ahd
attractive   tourist    camp.   Bldo-a-Woe
now has E-ix doublo and four single cub*
ina, with a, large garugc,   Thu   garage
and tho two now buibIo cnblns will complete the building on tho property ns tho
owners find thomfiolvoB unable to satlfl-
factorlly handle moro,   Tlie first tout-Jots
roglstored on March 2nd and ftrd from
Calgary and Pinchor Crook, Alberto, ro*
spectlvolyv and conaldoring; thc late aoas-
on vlnltors roitlBtratton*- havi boen qulto
numorouii ovor since.
The best equipped and largest fruit
handhng war.house of any point outside
the Okanagan is what Creston Co-Operative Frnit Exchange will boast when
new equipment on order, and addition to
the warehtuse authorized at a directors
meeting on Tuesday are completed and
in oper tion by ��aily August.
The new grader is a full size Cutler
rotary machine, recognized as the best
and latest developmen in packing house
equipment. In addition to grading the
machine also has a wiper which removes
all dust, spray residue, aphis marks and
along with wiping also polishes the fruit.
In houses where the wiper has been u ed
it is claimed that It steps up the grades
by at least 10 per cent.
The grader has a length of 96 feet ovor
all. Coming from the dump boxoa the
apples roll out onto a table and the sorters grade the fruit Into Extra Fancy,
Fancy and C. Grade. Each grade is
placed on a conveyor belt of its own
Each belt feeds into carrier cups which
carry one apple each, travelling over
scales so that when the individual apples
reach a point on the acalo Identical with
its own weight the apple la automatically
tipped off and rolls into a bin.
Thore are 48 of thoseblns-***24 on either
side of the machino.���nnd the -machine io
divided into three soctlonB, one each for
Os, Fancy nnd Extra Fancy, with tt return bolt which brings the apples that
failed to got clearance on tho firat trip
out. All tho bins rotate which keeps the
supply well within reach of the packer.
Another advantage to this type of Brad er
ia that it reduces to a minimum tho matter of ��tom puncture and bruise. A 2
h,p. rac-tor!** used on the drive, a one
h p. motor on tho flortor while a throe
h.p. motor is required to handle tho
wiper.' ' ������-��������� ,
Tho addition to the prooont warohouse
will bo on tho east sido oxtundlng towards tho Rodgprs mill. It will bo two
t-tory high and 60 f-aot square It is to
bo fully Inaulatod which provldou cool
storage in tho warmer weather und Ci-uat-
Stan. Gregory is the latest auto owner.
He has just purchased a Studebaker
sedan.
Mrs. M. Young of Creston wasa visitor last week with her daughter, Mrs.
Rumsey.
Holy Communion will be dispensed at
the Anglican Church service on Sunday,
16th, at 11 a.m.
Mrs. J.*W. and Miss M. Hamilton of
Creston were Wynndel visitors last week,
guests of Mrs. E. Hulme.
Miss Edna Baxter of Cranbrook is a
visitor with hor brother-in-law and sister,
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Burch.
Miss Lois Martell, who has been a patient at Creston hospital the past month,
is expected home this week
Guy Cooper of Rossland^ was a visitor
Willi  Uib  purc-iiio,   lyxi*.  nim   jlvj-io.  Aotitcy
Cooper, making the trip by motor cycle.
erihtendent of Women's Iustitutes in
B.C.. was a visitor here Wednesday last,
speaking at the meeting of Wynndel institute. She was a guest of Mr. and
Mrs. J. G. Abbott.   .
The strawberry shipping season opened
Wednesday morning when the Co- Op.
Fruit Growers had seven crates for shipment���from the E. and Peter Andestad, Matt. Hagen and Carl Pedersen
ranches. In 1934 the first crates went
oat about May 26th.
The sympathy of the community goes
out to Mr, and Mrs. Ashely Cooper in
the death of their daughter, Miss Ruth
Florence, which took place at Harbor-
view hospital, Seattle, after a lingering
illness, on June 4th. Deceased has been
a resident of that city for many years.
She was born in Montreal in 1895, and
is the eldest of a family of twelve and is
predeceased by one sister, Ethelwyn
Garnet of Chicago.
Little Mias Mary Franklin was a patient at Creaton hospital last week. Mrs.
P. Andestad is a patient at the vC rest on
hospital this week.
E. Uri, manager of Wynndel Co Operative Fruifc Growers Association, left by
auto on Tuesday on a business visit to
prairie wholesale contreB.
Mr. nnd Mra. Norman Shaw and family
of Calgary, Albert**!, are enjoying n visit
with the latter'e brother, Gus. Apponen,
and with Mr  and   Mrs. Hugo  Seppala.
Miss Ailoen and Mr. Mile Apponen of
Coleman, Alberta, are visiting their
brother, Gus. Apponon and Mr. and Mrs.
H. Seppala.
H. F. Robson returned from Cranbrook
last weelc. Ho reports Mrs Robe on pro-
cre-iBinK nicely from hor recent operation
at St. Eugene hospital.
Strawberries are expected for shipment
at the middle ot tho week. A much
noodod rain fell on Monday, which will
help crop conditions considerably.
Tho Juno meeting of tho ladloa' aid
was at tho home of Mrs. J. G. Abbott on.
Thursday la��t.   Tho meeting-" have boon
diucontinued until uftcr tho berry ��eac*on.'
Tho Juno meeting of tho Womon'a Institute will bo ht-ld on Thursday. 20th.
at 2.80 p.m Tho prize Itofc for tho fall
fair and flower Hhow la being complied
and it \a hopod to havo mime ready for
printing this wook.
Mm. V, S, MeLaehluii of Victoria, oup-
Another Great Game I
I IRRY
Montana
vs.
^afMka **|**W^,   MUM
*"""""*��� y""V*"*k��'
at
Exhibition Park
CRESTON
on
as %��.<%��%} p.mt. THE   REVIEW,   CRESTON,   B.    C.  =       i  LEGAL RIGHT 0  PROVINCES TO  TAX INCOMES  Ottawa.���������A province has a legal  right to collect income tax, Finance  Minister E. N. Rhodes told the House  of Commons when T. L. Church  (Cons., Toronto East) expressed,  alarm at the prospect of Ontario  duplicating the federal impost and  abolishing municipal income taxes.  The finance minister expressed  hope that before long a settlement  would be reached on the over-lapping  of provincial and federal taxation  fields. It had been on the agenda of  the Dominion-provincial conference  scheduled for last fall but not held.  The house gave third reading to  two bills implementing sections, of  the last budget. All changes in the  tariff and income tax were enacted  into legislation without prolonged  debate. Prom the day the budget was  presented until approved the actual  debate in the house has been less  than in any recent year.  The Toronto member suggested  Canada follow the lead of the "United  States and publish income figures. A  Washintgon investigation, he said,  disclosed shocking conditions of millionaires escaping taxation and he  believed a similar situation* might be  found in Canada.  Mr. Rhodes did not reply.  Hon.  W.  E> Euler   (Lib.,  Waterloo  North.)   objected to continued   duplication and multiplication   on   share-  WWf  l.m.n. ror 1-aar wages  Evidence Of Manufacturers Not  Treating Employees Fairly  Hamilton, Ont.���������Question of whether  or not the Canadian Manufacturers'  Association should frown on "improper wages" featured the association's 64th annual convention here.  Discussion followed the report of  the executive council. A. J. Roden,  Toronto, introduced the subject in  the section of the industrial relations' committee report which recommended the association should still  adhere to its traditional policy of  insisting wages, hours and conditions  of employment generally should be  agreed upon between employers and  employees.  This was urged in connection with  the Ontario Industrial Standards  Act, which had been opposed by the  association.  ''In theory the tradition is right,  but it does not always work out in  practice," Mr. Roden said. "Some  firms abuse this method of engaging  employees and pay a very low scale  of wages. Perhaps the time has  come when decent firms should be  protected against ones which buy  labor at a cheap price."  E. C. Burton, Toronto, supported  Roden, declaring there was too much  evidence of manufacturers not treating employees fairly.  "It is time something was done in  this regard," he said, in urging passage of a resolution which would  state members were not in favor of  countenancing unfair wages.  Melville   White,   Toronto,   thought  the word  "agreement"   covered   the  matter, but Mr. Burton pointed out  holders of companies.    He protested j an employer COuld agree to pay low  the present system was "an absolute! wao.es.  SEES THE KINO  ���������Bar        tn- -���������"���������"I   - ���������".���������"***-��������� ���������-  may ra iax rree  la*  Proposal  To  Exempt Members "And  Senators From Income Tax  Ottawa.���������Finance Minister E. N.  Rhodes may Introduce a bill later  this session to exempt the indemnities of members and senators from  income tax. To absolve members  from the charge of legislating for  themselves, the bill will not apply to  the   present  parliament.  When the house was discussing  income tax changes, Hon. J. L. Ralston, Liberal financial critic, suggested members should be allowed exemptions for living expenses in Ottawa. He claimed it was unjust to  tax members for the full indemnity  when it was necessary for them to  spend most of it to earn it.  The finance minister agreed but  went further. Ha believed ihe $4,000  indemnity should be exempt trom  income tax and was prepared to  recommend a change in the law to  the incoming parliament.  if  BH HHB H ...^*,.  Jt-JTHUVAL  injustice," even though it was practiced by the former Liberal government.  Drouth At The Coast  Here we see Mr. Stanley Baldwin  returning to Downing Street through  the garden gate after his audience  with the King. Mr. Baldwin is.expected to   take   over   the   duties   of  Donald   is   to   retire   because   of   ill-  Penalties Are Reduced  "What I referred to was the 'take  it or leave it* type of employment,"  Mr. Roden remarked.  After   Alexander   Donald,   Hamilton;   Elmer Davis, Kingston;   W. C.  Coulter,   Toronto,    and    others   had  spoken, the convention passed a mo-  Crops   On   South   Vancouver Island   tiOI1 instructing the resolutions corn-  Suffer From Lack Of Moisture         mittee   to   frame  a  motion   on   the  Victoria.���������Scorched by the sun and  point,  dried  by  the   wind,    southern   Van-j    ZZJTSZFSZZSt ������yLt\ M^y Applications Received  Crops   in   many   areas   are   parched  and  withered   from  the  three-month  JL*-    *���������������.*- -T*_^- -nv*   c��������� -rt -V*. .��������� f*.  i*+S\ mm. aVt-.   A WW "t^ *W.^Tf%  UlU'St. XII       luS-liy        CdOCO        8JU*;jr        Urt������v  been   reduced   50   to   75   per   cent.,  while in others they are pronounced  bounced    approximately    38,000    in  "uiries had been received iit> to June  Will Try f ������r New Record  Sir Malcolm Campbell To Make Attempt To Better Automobile  Record In July  Ijondon.���������Sir    Malcolm    Campbell,  premiership shortly as Premier Mac-1 British  sportsman,   will   attempt to  better his own world's automobile  speed record at Salt Lake City in  July, he announced.  Speaking before an advertising  club luncheon gathering, Campbell  said he would leave for Utah tn JuTy  for a new record attempt that month.  He lifted the record to 276.816 miles  per hour at Daytona Beach March 7.  "It's impossible to rely in the future on the beach if you wish to do  anything in the region of 300 miles  an hour," the sportsman said. "*Y������-ii  must have 100 per cent, perfect conditions for high speed. We are now  carrying out further tests for our attempt in July."  To  No Shortage Of Reeraits For Royal  Air Force  "London.���������The     air     ministry    an-  complete failures.  Much uncultivated land is bone  dry to a depth of one to three feet,  while in some places thc dvouth  has reached the hard pan. A three-  inch coating of dust protects the  moisture on well-cultivated "berry  plantations and orchards, but how  long before the heat will dry it out is  a matter of conjecture.  1 for tradesmen and mechanics for  the Royal Air Force. More than  8,500 inquiries had been received for  pilots, officers and airmen. None of  these so far had been accepted or interviewed.  The ministry said it was too early  yet to give details regarding the  origin of the recruits. The inquiries  came  after  the  announcement of a  Senate      Adopts      Amendment  Weights And Measure Bill -  Ottawa. ��������� Minimum penalties for  false or unjust weights -under the  weights and measure bill increasing  the punishment for short weights  were reduced by an amendment  adopted by the senate banking and  commerce committee.  Maximum    penalties    provided   in  the  amending measure were  passed)  without change. |  For a first offence,   an.   individual  engaged in trade would be liable under the   amendment   to   a  minimum,  fine of $10 and a minimum of $50 for   Church Of England Jtejects Move To  a   subsequent   offence.    Th  OF NEW IMF!  N.R.A. PROPOSAL  Washington���������With President Roosevelt's midget N.R.A. proposal heading toward quick congressional approval, Senator Robinson of Arkansas, "Democratic leader, predicted no  further legislation on the subject at.  this session.  His statement, conditioned by an  assertion unforeseen conditions might  make a further move necessary,  capped a day in which the United  States capital sought to gauge conflicting indications of the administration's intention.  "If N.R.A. is extended with the  exception of those features and provisions held invalid by the court,".  Robinson told reporters, "I do not  now expect further legislation on the  subject during the present session."  Meanwhile Donald R. Richiberg,  N.R.A. chief, left a discussion with  President Roosevelt saying he did not  expect to head the temporary N.R.A^  contemplated by the president.  A generally prevailing opinion was  that the president was keeping in  mind his expressed intention of obtaining for the federal government  clear constitutional authority for  dealing with national social and economic problems, a question he said  must be decided by "the United  States as a whole."  Meanwhile, before * the senate  foreign relations committee, the administration program for reciprocal  tariff treaties was challenged as an  unconstitutional delegation of legislature power by Senator Arthur  Vandenberg, Michigan Republican,  who maintained his point was proved  by the N.R.A. decision.  Frowns On Divorce  Some    plowed    fields    are    dreary  stretches   of   dusty gray-brown.    5nj rapid expansion in the air force  some of them, seed which was sown  a month ago has not yet germinated.  New Title Gazetted  John Buchan Is Now Baron Tweedsmuir Of Elsfield  London. ��������� The barony conferred  upon John Buchan, governor-gcneral-  designate of Canada, was officially  gazetted as "Baron Tweedsmuir of  Elsfield."  Thc title Tweedsmuir recognizes  thc distinguished author's youthful  associations with the village of that  name on the Tweed. Elsfield Manor  ln the county of Oxford is his home.  U.S. Air Bas������s  Washington.���������Without a whisper  of opposition, the house of representatives penned swift approval on  a bill to give the army blanket  authority to dot the United States  with strategic air bases to provide  ���������nen.r.e-t'me traininsr for the air force  and war-time defence against invasion. The measure now goes to  the senate.  x lit: Oiii as  received from the commons had provided for a minimum fine of $50 for  a first offence and $100 for a subsequent infraction.   The maxima stand  ai-    Tl"!fSf5    *t\y    "*���������    -fi������������������*    <r.4rfa-nr*m\    nnr*.    SJ5"Kfi  for a subsequent infraction. I   .  In the case of a corporation, the  minimum for a first offence -was reduced from $500 to $100 and for a  subsequent infraction from $1,000 to  $500. The maxima set out in the  measure of $500 for a first offence  and $5,000 for a subsequent infraction remain.  Change Ruling  Breach Of Contract  London.���������A move to permit divorce  and re-marriage in the Church of  England, and to urge civil authorities  to make divorce laws more liberal,  went down to defeat 91-26 before the  Church of England synod.  The proposal was introduced by a  minority group pf bishops, led by  Rt. Rev. Ernest William Barnes,  bishop of Birmingham. Its sponsors  urged since divorce was permitted by  the civil laws, the church no longer  had any need to frown upon it in all  cases.  THE FIRST OF THE JUBILEE DRIVES  Minimum Wage Act  Ottawa.���������With an added provision  respecting wages due an employee,  tho senate banking and commerce  committee approved the re-drafted  minimum wage bill. Tho clause inserted provides that in any prosecution of an employer for broach of tho  net, tho court may order payment to  tho employee concerned of tho  amount of wages proved to bo unpaid or short paid.  Japs Hold Discussion  Paris. ��������� Nine Japanese ambas  sadors and ministers in European  capitals met here in a secret conference, reportedly to discuss to  what extent Japan would participate  in European affairs. Japanese  sources refused even to admit it  was a "conference," preferring quite  simply to call it "a discussion."  Tarllf  CliangoH  Ottawn.���������Rlncf* A up. 1, 1030, there  havo boon 471 Increase** In tho tariff  schedule by act of parliament and  four by order-in-councll with 300 do-  crcu'-e'- by parliament and seven by  order-in-councll, according to a return tabled ln tho Houno of Common--. Tins information was requowt-  ed by J. P. Poullot (Liberal, Tomi-  ncouata).  Earthquake Toll In India  London.���������Salvage oporatlonti in tho  earthquake-stricken city of Quotta,  India, havo boon Indefinitely Rnspond-  od, thc India oiilco announced, bo-  causo of tho "appalling atonch," Official ostimatos placed tho donths in the  Quotta area at 50,000, with 20,000  dead in Quotta itself. Population of  tho city was moro than 00,000.  May Ihhiio Rtoulc Permit**  Ottawa.���������Permits will bo issued  for tho Importation of cattle, sheep  and othor ruminants nnd awlno into  Canada from Scotland, on and after  ���������Tuno 20, providing no outbreak of  disease occura there among Much  anlmala in tho meantime, It was announced by tho department of agriculture, 2102  Earl Of  Egmont,   Sued  By  Calgary  Nurse, Settles Bill  Calgary. ��������� Alberta's millionaire  ranchman, the Earl of Egmont, sued  for $86 by Miss Zita Kerchoff, a Calgary nurse, has settled for an "unspecified sum." it -was announced in  the district court.  Judge W. A. Macdonald, who ruled  there had been a breach of contract,  was advised of the settlement.  Miss Kerchoff claimed she wasi  entitled to $86 from the 21-year-old  earl, representing a "waiting fee"  prior to the birth of Viscount Perceval last year. She was dismissed  before the heir to the Egmont fortune was born.  Wheat In Storage  Canadian Wheat In Storage At End  Of May .Shows Decrease  Ottawa.���������Canadian wheat in storo  for the week ended May 31 amounted to 202,120,349 bushels, a decrease  of 2,067,128 bushels compared with  the previous week, the Dominion  bureau of statistics reported. On  the corresponding date last year the  visible supply was 200,336,042  bushels.  Canadian wheat in the United  States amounted to 9,370,703 bushels,  a net decrease of 824,322 bushels  against tho previous week, and an  increase of 4,118,502 bushels compared with the same period last  year.  Eight-Hour  Bay  Bill  Ottawa..���������Tho eight-hour clay bill,  riddled with amendments by tho sen-  ato banking and commerce committee,; was given third reading tn tho  upper house. It will go back to the  Horo Is a happy plofcuro of Thoir Majeatlea tho King and Qucon greet- COmmonM for concurrence lu tho  ing Dame Helen awyno Vaughan and tho Earl Jelllcoo when thoy passed changes, chief of which Is a rcduc-  Hydo Park on tho nrat of tho four atato driven around London na part of tloia in time for bringing employees  tlio Silver .Tublloo celebration*-,. Seventy thousand children lined tho route I in the railway running trades uncloe  through Miiriobono unci tfuvo tho Skint** ami Quuvm a tumulluou', welcome,*    Ltt. j,HovU.km<4,  Social Credit Campaign  Calgary,���������William Aberhart, Alborta Social Credit League leader,  said In an address hero that a group  of Manitoba men had informod him  thoy woro raising funds to enable  him and other Social Credit speakers  to fly to Manitoba as soon as Alborta  schools close. Mr. Aberhart Is principal of Crescent Heights high school  in "Calgary. THE   BEYDEW.   CRESTON,   B.   O.  til  SEABREEZE  ,,-?-:     QU/VKER  a re   th e   _Q N lf?<:o rn  ?a Md??; t r l p | c- .-;S-c- ale d ���������  for   crispy c ri^n'clvy?  QUAi^  Valuable coupon  its evtry package.  Quaker  Corn Flakes  MISS ALADDIN  Christine Whiting Parmenter  Author   Oi  "Ono Wide  River To Cross"  "The Unknown Port",  Etc.  CHAPTER IV.���������Continued  Thus before they slept that night,  "the two young people knew that they  ���������were to go "out West". The arguments pro and con had waged for a  .good two hours, Aunt Louise protesting vigorously to the very last that  "her nephew woud return East with  the manners "of a bear."  "And I warn you too, young man,",  ���������she asserted grimly, "that you won't  find life on a ranch the romantic  dream you're picturing to- yourself  -at present.    As for your-sister���������"  At this point words failed her and  ahe ended with a tragic gesture  "Which caused even Nance tc smile a  little. There was no doubt whatever  that Aunt Louise could perceive no  virtue in what she termed "this  wild, ridiculous scheme of Jack's";  and even Aunt Judy suggested with  some reluctance that if the boy must  go, it -might be wise, for him. to go  alone.  "All right," he retorted, impatient  at what seemed a deadlock, "if Sis  Is too much of a hot-house flower to  (stand transplanting���������if she can't put  up with a few hardships a time like  this, I will go alone, though possibly���������"  He hesitated, and his father ended  for him:  "You're thinking   that   it's  Nancy    whom    Cousin     Columbine  really wants to come?"  Jack nodded.  ''She anight not pay my carfare if  I went alone, Dad."  "So I! yougo, it locks as if I'd  have to," said the girl bitterly. "I  suppose if I get unbearably fed up  with everything I can walk back,"  "Two thousand miles on the hoof!"  grinned her brother, though, perfectly aware that she spoke with sarcasm. "That's whore your pioneer  blood shows up, my dear! If you find  our aged rolativo too impossible you  can turn hitch-hiker. See hero! I  promise solemnly that if you can't  ���������stand the job after a month or two,  we'll hitch-hike back together. The  experiment won't cost bad a cent;  and the chances are we'll have a  whale ofa good time."  "Good"time!" sputtered his paternal aunt; when Mother interrupted:  "But, Louise, can you see any  especially good times for the children  if they stay at home?"  'Every one turned to her in surprise; while Aunt Louise responded:  "Surely, Margaret, you don't approve of this idea?"  '������������������Not wholly; but I've a feeling  that both. Jack and Nancy will be  happier in absolutely new surroundings for a time. It's not easy for  young folks to adjust themselves to  such radical changes as we'll have  to make. Of course I shall worry  about Nance; but if She's too unhappy I think we can manage to  bring her back without the necessity of hitch-hiking! What do you  say, Nance?"  It was then that Nancy, glancing  at her father as if for help, saw  something in his face that made her  heart contract. Por the first time  she realized what this catastrophe  had done to Dad, Why, he looked  old! she thought in consternation.  He looked worried���������frightfully worried; and all this talk was worrying  him still more. Yet here she was  hesitating to accept a chance to earn  her living just because the thought  of doing something hard���������going so  far away, seemed unendurable. What  had Jack called her the other night?  A parlor ornament? Well, he was  right, wasn't he? That's about all  she measured up to. For one swift,  illuminating moment the girl saw  herself as others saw her, and was  honestly appalled. Dad would never  admit it, but her absence and Jack's  would be a help just now. Ail this  and more went through her mind in  a revealing flash before she answered  with new-born bravery.  "Of course I'm going! I had to  get used to the idea, that's all. It  may not be very exciting at Cousin  Columbine's, Mother, but it'll be���������be  interesting, won't it���������seeing new  things and places? Let's not talk  any more. It's settled as far as I'm  concerned. Come on, Jack, we'd better make a list of things to take."  - m m mmmjmtmimmm  oW     kram    -���������a* ���������  WUULEJ KU5 BE  WITHOUT SASKASAL"  Soys Regina Woman  facflges-ffea @oae*Caa EatAnytklmg  Mead this letter: "For several years I  had been troubled with indigestion,  and could eat very few foods which  agreed -with me. ' A friend of -mine  ���������suggested that I try Saskasal, which,  2 did, and it has entirely- cured xae  and now I can eat anything, I would  not be without a bottle of Saskasal in  my home, and I hope others map-  benefit as I have done when, "they know  of your wonderful remedy in. Saskasal." Saskasal is Nature's own Mineral Salts. Its alkaline action neutralizes over-acidity in the blood and  thus makes it a valuable natural remedy in all cases of Constipation,  Rheumatism, Liver and Kidney  troubles, Indigestion, Biliousness. ^  At AU Drtfs Stores���������-69c  JXiiXi.  J.UlgCb  JfUUMM.  nightgowns," spoke up the little  brother; so, after all, the discussion  ended on a smile.  CHAPTER V.  TIRED ana IRRITABLE  DO you feel  weak and  nervous? Is your  housework a burden? Take Lydia  E; Plnkhnm's  Vegctable Compound. Mcei. Mi  A.Kcllyof  Woodstock.New  Brunswick, says*  **I was weak nnd rundown; A  neighbor brought: me your Vegetable Compound. It helped me so  much that I am taking it now al  the Change."    7  Git a bottle NOW. It may bo Just  the medicine YOU ncctlj  Waking suddenly at a nerve-racking jolt, Nancy sat up, wondering in  that first startled instant, where she  could be. Then her brain cleared  and she realized that she was aboard  a train headed for Colorado, and  wondered if they had run into something, and if she ought to waken  Jack or get up and put on her  clothes. Surely there had been no  such jolt the night before. For a  moment she listened tensely in expectation of some confusion; then  raised the window shade, peering out  into the dim, grey light of early  morning.  The train had stopped before a  station and her car was directly opposite the brightly lighted restaur-J  ant. Nancy could see a girl of about  her own aged dressed in a crisp,  white uniform, serving somo trainmen at a lunch counter. She wondered if the waitress had been up all  night or was just beginning her day's  work. Probably the latter, for sho  looked fresh enough���������but what a  ghastly hour to go to work.  A. man and woman carrying suitcases emerged from the waiting  room, and a moment later Nance  felt them brush by her section,  speaking to tho porter in hushed  voices. A cheerful time to bo starting on a journey, sho thought ironically, but perhaps out horo whoro tho  distances woro no great, ono had to  start whon ono could.  There followed another jolt. Evidently tho engine had beon detached  and was coupHn*"** on again. Tho  wheels turned slowly, and then faster. Nance strained hor eyoa to  catch tho name of tho station-  Dodge City���������und shivering a little,  pulled down the shade and snuggled  under tho blankets.  So thoy wero etlll in Kansas.  Kannasl Tho idea that oho could be  thoro was incredible to Nancy Nelnon. Why, Kansas had alwaya seemed as far away ao tho North Polo���������-\  and   fully   aa   unattractive!    People  lived there, of course, but not people  quite like themselves. At least, that  was how the girl had thought about  it; yet that waitress in the lunch  room looked���������why she looked every  bit as up-to-date as the girls behind  the lunch counters at Thompson's  Spa on Washington Street in Boston.  This comparison brought a wave  of homesickness, to the unwilling  exile. What a three weeks it had  been since Jack received those telegrams from Cousin Columbine! Such  a hectic time. Aunt Judy starting  off for Europe with those crazy  Spear girls. Hurried trips to Edge-  mere with Mother. Packing. Deciding what to take and what to  leave behind. Getting- tickets and  reservations. And those last awful  moments at the South Station with  Phil wanting to know how they  made the sections into beds and asking a thousand foolish questions���������  Mother smiling unnaturally to keep  from, crying-���������Aunt Louise arriving  at almost the last second with a box  of candy, and Dad, his face so terribly set and stern.   .   .   .  Just to recall it made Nance shudder. Even Jack had lost his enthusiasm, for a time and hadn't talked much until the train left Worcester. But a meal in the diner had  restored his courage, and since then  he'd been the jolliest of companions.  m.. 8 .3H,4.      H..V1M4      Unfaw.      L.M..W     mm.S*.*m  OUtt     M10.\XMJ.  8.     tCOiUICU      UEIWS     "WW      ������UVO  her brother really was. Not once  had he compared her tb a hothouse  flower or a parlor ornament. Not  even when he caught her winking  away some tears as the train pulled  OUt. 8 8 8  Nancy slept after a while, but not  for long. It was Jack who wakened  her, slipping down from the upper  berth and snapping up the window  shade.  "Wake up, sis!" he commanded in  an excited whisper. "Look where  we are! Why, that's���������that must he  prairie !'*  It was!  Nancy sat up, almost as excited  as her brother. Prairie! Miles and  miles and miles of it, stretching endlessly into a far horizon.   Neither of  thens. had dimly realized ths vast=  ness of those great plains they were  to cross���������plains which lay dappled  by morning sunlight, softly undulating, as far as their astonished eyes  could reach.  "For the first time since starting on  this journey, Nancy forgot her homesickness and was thrilled. She drew  a breath born of both Tamazement  and delight. To one whose entire  life had been spent either in a  crowded city or surrounded by the  sheltering, green hills of New England, such limitless space was Almost unbelievable. For a tune she  watched this unfamiliar world slip  by, too awed for anything save exclamations. It all seemed wonderful:  a herd bf grazing cattle���������a clump  of cottonwoods beside an irrigating  ditch���������a schoolhouse set in curious  isolation considering its purpose; and  in the distance patches of green  about some lonely ranch.  Even Jack was silent, too interested, perhaps, to comment; but at  last he said: "Let's dress, Nancy.  I want to get out and sniff this air  at-the next station. Breakfast's at  Syracuse anyhow, and say! I think  the sun looks brighter here than it  does at home."  This was no idle guess. The sun  was brighter���������the air more sparkling. Nancy admitted that she had  never breathed such air. They cut  short their breakfast in order to have  more moments to pace the platform.  "And in no time now," said Jack as  the  I  ������  o   .  More/!  Cheap  Mustard *rMe/89  "What's the trouble now, Anne?"  "B made up my usual fried and  tested Pickle recipes, but a friend  of mir-> told -Tne to use Bulk  Mustard, it was cheaper. I did.  It spoiled the lot I"  ������������������Thafstoo bad, Anne. You'll stick  to Keen's after this 1 It is the pure  mustard, so you always know just  how much to use and you need  never waste or spoil anythinfl."  d.s.f. MUSTARD  Made from seed grown especially io the  fens of England. The shdIs~or hulls are  removed, all the virtue bean* is the inner  part of the seed A superfine grinding  as&kcs she fall >&vea������>ead~ly available.  Ia original tins for aa little as 10c     n$  Colman-Kean (Canada) Limited  1G00 Amhqa-at Straal Montreal, Qua,  didn't   suppose   they   carried  kids like that in these days."  (To Be Continued)  their  Don't Let;  Mosquitoes  .dQSSjfc fit (Bl      ^L  Jfa, Bjfl    ****| j"! **9       ****{  %maiI VtfiiBB* Mafkliar-ln-fty-8  ^y_^||rHM| j^       ^g^ tmmmt M     W -m������w  mm m������   <N������*������ Wmim*   Mm    mmm  Take ''Mecca*" along in readinesa  ,���������and If you do tfot stung*, shnply  -rub tho spot with Mocco. Stops  tho itching; and reduces swelling.  Better still���������omear   the   exposed  /porta with "Mecca" as A preventa-  'tlvo "Skectera", Black Fllee, etc.,  ,  hate "Mecca."  Mecca Ointment is sold by nil Dru-r-  eiBtu���������*J������o, 35o (Tube), 0oo and *".1.0(">.  taey  swuug    reiUCLtmUy    ������,uua.iu.  train again, "we'll be in Colorado,  wonder who  Cousin  Columbine  will  send to meet us."  Nance smiled.  "Do you remember her first letter?  t was to sit quietly in the station  until called for!"  "So you were! Do you suppose  they'll keep up waiting long? Gee,  Nance! 1 just can't realize that this  long trip is nearly over."  Neither could Nance; but all too  soon they found themselves waiting  their turn to leave the train. Goodbyes to friendly fellow passengers  had been spoken. A smiling porter  had brushed away the cinders.  Nancy, standing behind Jack in the  narrow   passage,   realized   suddenly  M.X M.    8.U.    T-__J_     _1,.*_T-J_-^    1m~���������    ��������� ��������� ���������������.-���������������-_  uiav   uic   iicuauo   v;iuivixui5   uci   ^ivvjiioi.-  book were trembling. Indeed, all the  fear that had gripped her on leaving  home was back again as she emerged into the sunlight and joined her  brother on the platform.  Jacx"*, smxiiug a negavive *.o an approaching red cap,, rescued their bags  from a pile of luggage, and moved  toward the station���������a beautiful station that made Nance think of an  English manor house. To the west,  against an unbelievably blue sky,  towered snow-capped Pike's Peak,  seeming so near in the clear atmosphere, that the girl felt she could  reach out and touch it.  "This place certainly looks civilized enough," she observed breathlessly as Jack dropped the bags and  stood looking about in search of the  expected escort.  "Civilized!" Her brother laughed.  "What did you tnlnk you'd see?  Wild Indians? Of course it's civilized;  but���������For   tho   love   o*   Mike,  jLNttuuu,   jajom.   mem:  Nanco looked, An Indian squaw  was coming toward them, her shoulders covered by a gay, striped shawl,  a wee black-eyed papoose strapped  to her back. Said Jack, as she disappeared around a corner: "That  relic of old times must havo been  ordered for our especial benefit,    X  Little Helps For This Week  "Thou shalt love they neighbor as  thyself." Matthew 19:19.  So others shall  Take patience, labor to their  heart and hand,  From thy hand, and thy heart,  and thy brave cheer,  And God's grace magnify  through thee to all.  The least flower with a brimming cup may stand,  And share its dewdrop with  another near.  What is meant by our neighbor we  cannot doubt, it is everyone with  whom, we are brought into contact.  First of all he is literally our neighbor who is next to us in our own  family and household. Then it is he  who is close to us in our own neighborhood, cur own town, in our own  street. With these all charity begins. To love and be kind to these  is the beginning of all true religion.  But besides these, as our Lord  teaches, is the one who is thrown  across our path by the changes and  chances of life, he or she whosoever  it be that we have means of helping,  the unfortunate stranger we may  meet in travelling, the friend whom  no one else cares to look after.  Landlocked Hungary's first Custom House in a seaport has just been  opened in the Italian port of Flume  on the Adriatic. 2102  wr   B H^B Br   L Baa mv  Add an equal amount of  cream, or sweat oil, to Min*  mtti'w. and apply tha mixture  once dail/. A simple treatment which will  Cleat- up Y&m skBm I  Sea2s5?3<:  ������>^mfm\'f9. ���������n*-**!*"-"** |" "la*.������,  ' *c:A- 'friX&'m*  ���������''**'��������� ������.0.*1 'dlOB  x&u?  ������W-#SfWW������W|^  I '^'i't^^-^^^^r^^s/^^^^Kti*^**^*' rj.l^^tL,-U-^l:*f.*-'i!,?Jv'-'rfl.'Y\*^'-?,i*v--^'^1 '.^-.f-f .--A-*.,t,' **���������  N������mv-?v;  atXaajt  MMlMBlmEM;.  Weffeboases At Calg-affy, Edmonton* Regin* wwd WlrniSgiag*' CRESTOK REVXEW  .-S-^-'r-f.  '������������������mj  Lcjfig distance  JJ^: calls  get quick  results  "I use the long-distance telephone instead of writing letters,  because long-distance calls get  quick results," said Mr. Keen.  "In one conversation you can  ask questions and get answers.  You eliminate the wait that an  exchange of letters makes necessary And in my business,  prompt action is essential."  Mr. Keen is a successful business man. Ke knows that tomorrow may be too late, so he  telephones today.  his letter would cost. The need  truly is great and wiih Creston on  the eve of a very considerable development no . more opportune  time could be chosen for at least  securing information as to probable cost.  .  Kootenay TeleDhone  m* m.  ,, Ltd.  **fi*iTs ��������� *^    8=^ z^= 2^ ^^^r* ?% ***���������  ncvicvf  co Issued every Friday at Creston, B.C  Subscription: $2.50 a year in advance  $3.00 to U.S. points.  C. F. HAYES, Editor and Owner  CRESTON, B.C.,  FRIDAY, JUNE 13  HOME   BREW  Now that the valley orchard ist  has got through electing representatives and a delegate to serve  locally, the next thrill will come  some time after June  19th when  balloting will take place for the  three members to constitute the  1935-36 B.C. Tree Fruit Board.  With the three present members  definitely    in   the field  and announcement by Roger F. Borrett  of Keiowna that he will also be a  candidate, an election is assured,  and if the choice of the board of  market governors is confined to  the four gentlemen mentioned the  Creston-Boswell  district growers  need not He awake o' nights fearful of the outcome of the poll.  Messrs.    Haskins,    Barrat    and  Hembling of the old board have  shown  themselves   quite sympathetic to  the needs and  special  circumstances of the local marketing situation,  and certainly  Mr.  Borrett has a working knowledge  of the local deal as it was he who  acted for the board here when the  regulations became effective last  September.   And   with    W.   G.  Littlejohn as the local representative to recall the 1934 griefs and  how to avoid them in  1935, the  position  of the   Boswell-Creston  orehardists could hardly be better  insofar as Tree FTuit Board treatment goes.    As to  who will fare  best   at   the poll   the Review's  guess is that the old  board will  likely    be   returned.    In    these  parts, at any rate, they have the  advantage   of   being   personally  known, and people have a weakness, when it comes to voting, for  sticking to those they know, despite  some   imperfections,  rather  than take a chance on strangers.  !M  . -i  tiWmVmW  HANDY FLASK  This advertisement is not published or displayed by the L,iquor Control Board or by  The government^of British Columbia.  of talent locally for effort of this  sort if those who can direct it will  only lend a hand. Thisis Canada's holiday and every Canadian  should be interested in making  the occasion worthy of the  dominion.  and this feature was much en-  Sirmfan*  are still against  business visitor  Every   five years   the department of agriculture conducts an  orchard survey of the  province.  This being the year it would facilitate the   work   if   every owner  took stock  and counted up  the  number of each variety he has in  h.s orchard.    Trees are grouped  under three headings as to  age:  Young trees, from one   to   five  years   old;    trees   coming   into  During last week death claimed two who played a part in the  erection of Creston into a village  municipality in 1924. They were  Robert Baird, inspector of muni-  Weather conditions  -fishing in this vicinity.  Charles Wilson was a  on Saturday to Boswell.  Vito Carnevella and Gino Buraga -were  visitors to Creston, Saturday.  T. Maiahoff of Tye wasa business visitor at Nelson over the weekend.  George Sukeroff left for his home at  .Trout .Lake where he spent the weekend.  John Webb of Calgary is spending- a  few days the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. S.  Wilson.  Miss Hazel McCartney of Yahk was  the guest of Annie Passeuzzo for a few  days this past week.  A platform the length of seven cars  has been constructed at the Quarry sid-  oearmg, ironi six to i,en years o d;  and bearing tre**s, over ten years  old. The work will be carried out  in this area by C. B. Twigg, who  will visit all owners of orchards  throughout the district during the  summer months. The accurate  information is of practical value  to the owner and is well worth  the effort in obtaining it, as it  helps in figuring out all estimate*-,  costs and materials necessary in  carrying out the work and keeping track of the expense of the  many items that enter into the  annual routine of operating an  orchard. The ready information  thus on hand will be much appreciated by the official who has to  take the census, and minimizes  the* delay of all parties concerned.  In pointing out the advantages  that   will  accrue to the village  when it can boast a hall of ampie  spaciousness   to    take    care   of  entertainments, dances and  winter indoor sports,   "Citizen"  did  himself proud   in   his  letter to  the Review last week.    It is to be  hoped, however,  that the paragraph relating to the remodelling  of   Park   pavilion and it being  "cheaper in  the end to erect a  building suitable in every respect  to presentand near-future needs,"  will not be interpreted  to  mean  that it is up to the village to forget the pavilion, as  it  were, and  get on with the erection of a new  and fully modern entertainment  arena.   While such a move might  have the support of some of the  taxpayers  the Review   is  sufficiently   practical   to   know their  number wouid be small and there  is therefore, no hope whatever of  such an undert. king being sponsored  by  the municipal author-  it -ies.   However, lack of municipal backing docs not   make  the  proposed  new  building any   thc  lent* a nccospity ~ nor one beyond  the mean**- of the aggregate of all  thoHe who are interested in such  a venture ���������and- the Review hopes  "Citizen" and thoso who are in  sympathy   with    the   effort   he  ('hampiotiH will mako Home move  to ascertain jiiRt what a suitable  t*ito and building  an outlined in  cipalities, and Baron  was governor-general  of  Canada  at thkt time: and being on a tour  of western  Canada very kindly  consented to make a stop at Creston for a civic reception and to  swear in H. S.  McCreath, F.  H.  Jackson and E. C. Gibbs as the  first     village    council.    It    was  Creston's first close contact with  the representative of royalty and  the meeting was pleasurable for  all concerned.    Before conceding  Creston a charter of  incorporation the late Mr. Baird made a personal visit here to assure himself  that self-government was desirable and the wish of a considerable majority of the  taxpayers,  and in going about to determine  these    questions one   could  not  help but be impressed with his  thoroughness, and  determination  to hear from those for and against municipilization.   And the records at the town hall show that  since incorporation he has maintained an equally zealous watch  over the conduct of village affairs  insofar as he was responsible.    In  his   passing B;C,   municipalities  have iost a very competent and  conscientious advisor.  Byng,  who  in2 for tlle loading of ties.  Deer are so plentiful in this district, as  to become a menace* to'the crops of the  ranchers and are unusually tame.  ���������J VV m\mmi ������������������������  After the success that attended  the local celebration in connection   with   the    King's   Jubilee,  everyone is looking forward to the  observance   of   Dominion   Day,  July lst, the activities on which  occasion will be in charge of committees   from   the    local    lodge  Knights   of Pythias.    In taking  on this work, after an effort to  unite all community organizations  in the handling of it failed, the  Pythians are to be commended.,  and it is to be hoped  that any  who have bright ideas as to how  to make the day_ an even bigger  succeps than Jubilee day will pasa  the information along to the committee in charge. The racing,water  sports and   baseball  and softball  will  provide   considerable entertainment but to round out the  afternoon   flomething   to replace  thc maypole- nnd barbeciir? is  desired,    If   Park   pavilion is not  taken   for serving   tea, a likely  attraction would some competitive vaudeville turns  (juvenile or  adult) or it might be arranged  to  have some amateur boxing such  an W. FergviHon directed for tho  Legion   ho   Hucceaeifully on    the  ICing'H birLSiday.   Thoro is plenty  George and Gordon Blumenauer of  Cranbrook were the guests of Mr. and  Mrs. Fred Marteiio for a few days.  The crops on the various ranches are  now coming along id fine shape, but a  little rain would not come amiss at this  Mrs James Passeuzzo left for Seattle  by train on Wednesday morning to visit  her sister who is seriously ill in hospstal  there.  C. Neil of Kuskanook is at -oreaent an  inmate of the St. Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook, where he is undergoing an operation.  Operations at the Bayonne mine are  still being retarded by the snow on the  higher reaches, but a large crew is still  engaged.  Mrs. R. Blumenauer and Bobby of  Cranbrook spent a few days here the  guest of Mrs. Martin, leaving for home  on Thursday morning.  The tie making outfit at Goat Creek  are shipping a considerable amount of  ties at present and another truck will be  operating this week hauling.  George Cady of the Schaefer-Hitchock  Lumber Company, Nelson,-, was *---= ���������  here on business this week in connection with tie loading operations at Atbara.  Many softball fans made the trip to  Boswell to witness the game between the  Bosw-sll and Sirdar teams. Many stayed  over to take in the dance held that evening.  Mr. and Mrs, F^yling have arrived at  KiiBkanook whero they have taken a  lease on the Lodge which they will run  this suanmer. Mr. Fryling was a resident some years ugo.  The water ns indicated by guage at  Slouch bridge reads 16.60 a rise of 1.10  for the week. The previous day's reading is the same as today's. Conditions  now are veering more to a constant lowering of the wtateK1.  Mr. nnd Mrs. T. Rogers left by train  on Wednesday morning for Spokane  whero Mrs. Rogers entered horjpitnl to  undergo nn operation. It ia learned with  vogr t that Mrs, 'Robots Ih seriously ill  einco tho operation.  Sirdnr Roftbull team journoyod to Boswell on tho holiday to moot Boswell tenuis  In a return match, but the loenla wero  vanquished 10-25 Sirdar scorned to bo  out of form and put up piny Inconflist-  etnt with their playin-j of the prtflt fow  jjumofl.   'Foams:  "floawcll���������C. Lombardo. D. .Takoman,  P. Mackie, D. Malloy, W. Mackio, A.  Johnson, A. Mackie. Lloyd Cummingii,  J Aficott.  Sirdar���������,1. MUlor, J, Rogers, P, Mar-  t-ollo, D. lloUon.D. Pauncu/KO.B. Ingram,  S. Roger**, V. Chorbo, and V. Oharbo.  Scorn 10-25 in fnvor of Bunwell, Umpire A. NmvlnHi. Previous to tho game  u i>l<!,.lo wiih hold under nice wcj&th*?r con  ditions  joyed.  *i Creston High School boys and girls  soitbaii teams accompanied by many of  their supporters/ made a visit here on  Friday to tackle the local teams.   The  ?irls team lost to Sirdar to the tune of  1-9 with Sirdar showing the more brilliant playing. The visitors obviously  were short of practice. Agnes Crane and  Nell Payne were the pick of the visiting  players, while Rosie Pelle, and^ Irene  Passeuzzo were conspicuous for the Sirdar team. Umpires were A. Nastasi and  A. Robertson.   Teams:  Creston���������Helen Staples. A. Crane,  Nell Payne, P. Dodds," D. Hagen and  Messrs.-York, Goplin, Truscott and  Avery.  Sirdar���������F. Marteiio, M. Passeuzzo,  R. Pelle, D. Rogers, Irene Passc-izzo E.  Pelle, L. Ingram, C. Passeuzzo, A. Passeuzzo. |     -.<������������������������������������   .  In the game between Creston High  School and Sirdar Boys a strenuous and  exciting display was put up by both sides  being at a tie at the eighth inning but a  brilliant flash by Don Bolton broke the  tie and gave Sirdar the verdict. Clifford  York and Godfrey Vijme were *he pick  of the visitors while Syd. Rogers, who  hit a home run, and Bert Ingram and  Don Bolton, the latter especially in the  last innings, were the best for Sirdar.  The score was 26-25.   The teams:  Creston���������L. McLaren, S. Nastasi, C  Goplin, G.   Morabito, W. LaBelle, C.  York, R. Avery, G. Vigne, D.  Truscott.  Sirdar���������B. Miller, D. Bolton, S. Rogers, F. Marteiio, D Passeuzzo, B. Ingram, 3. Rogers, V. "Cherbo, M. Cherbo,'  P. Cherbo. _  Umpires were u. Benedetti  Nastasi The game was attended by a  considerable number of spectators both  locally and from Creston.  R  jeai e,s  Five and Ten-Acre Blocks  Improved and Unimproved  Easy Terms  J. Q. Cotineli  Box 11.  CRESTON  A  usimo i ��������� vnur*CK  CRESTON  REV. M. G. PERCIVAL- Minister.  Blacksmith  Work  Horseshoeing  Acetylene Welding  ^Machine Work" ?  ������������r_.-i.^*__5 b������ ~_������_~s���������_  x ructur ixt-f^uirui*;  au  Fully modern shop to handle  Kiuus ui  wum.  SUNDAY. JUNE re  CRESTON���������-8.30 a.m., Holy Communion. 10.30 am., Sunday School.  7.30 p.m.. Evensong  CAMP LISTER���������3.00 p.m., Evensong.  WYNNDEL���������11.00 a.m.. Holy Communion.  We specialize in shoeing lame  horses.  Satisfaction  work.  guaranteed  on all  Harvey Blacksmith Shop  Opposite Gommsrcla'. Hotel  -fl**-*  The Consolidated Mining &       i  1 Smelting Company of Canada, Ltd. 1  TRAIL,   BRITISH COLUMBIA ������  Manufacturers of  ELEPHANT BRAND COMMERCIAL  FERTILIZERS  |      Ammonium Phosphates.   Sulphate of Ammonia  | Superphosphates Complete Fertilizers.  g Producers and Refiners of  I TADANAC BRAND METALS  %      Gold, Silver, Lead, Zinc, Cadmium, Bismuth  ���������f ��������� _  To Send Money  use the Money Orders  sold at all branches of this  Bank.  They are safe, cheap and  convenient, and are  readily cashed in all parts  of the world* r  JL JL JLJlw  Ca    w. w   m   <*K<aw������mb'   A   *������k*f       "1i"t������    m\   "Ilk VV 1***  ANAjJIAN   BANK,  OF COMMERCE  Croston Brunch  --Cl,....  *��������������� J* ;  mng-er eHEsS^ON HEV1EW  ��������� ia������"^ ;-'������������������������������������*  rand Theat^  FRIDAY-SATY.  JUNE 14-15  \jeorge  in  House of  said'  with  BORIS KAILOFF  LORETTA YOUNG  ROBERT YOUNG  Canyon  er are here on business and are occupying  one of the Senesael cabins.  J. Malosky, minning engineer, Cranbrook, was here looking over the R. J.  Long mining claims up Goat River.  Darcy McGee, timekeeper at the airport, has been transferred to Yahk national defence camp, where he is acting as  storekeeper.  The airport Nighthawks softball team  played Canyon Sunday evening and* won  37-4. On Monday evening the Nighl-  "hflivks nlav*1^ Ya^k and wero beaten  10-4.  ���������' i -    "' "*���������J'  - Samuelson brothers shipped five carloads of C..P.K. posts to points on the  prairie . during the past w ek. - G. A.  Hunt-loaded out two cars of commercial  posts for.'prairie points.  The dance itt Hunt's hall by the'Pine  Katz softball club-on Friday was well  attended. Several .were here from Creston, Canyon and Yahk. Music was by  Mrs. Blair, piano; C. Sturdy, coronet;  A. Goplin, drums.  The Creston Wildcats softball team  played Kitchener Pine Katz on the local  diamond on Wednesday, Creston winning  16-6. Th e Pine Katz played Yahk Dumb  Doras on Friday, winning 44-41. On  Sunday the Pine Katz played Canyon,  the latter winning 34-16. Batteries were:  Kitchener���������Helen Oja and Hazel McGonegal. Canyon���������-Emma Simister and  Dot Palmer .^.  -M^M  ammmmm������mm\mm^JKBl  FRIDAY and SATURDAY SPECiAliS  $0% more suds  means  47% less work  2*7  Bin !���������  per Pkt.  SATURDAY ONLY  i  A.D. Poehm, who has been working  at the ranch for the past month, has returned to his home in Nelson.  Clarence Tedford has finished the truck  hall of the Gunnar Larson logs to the  C. O. Rodgers sawmill at Creston.  Mr. and Mrs. C. Blair are away on a  week's holiday with friends at Nelson  and at the hot springs at Ainsworth.  Mr. and Mrs. Glen Messinger who left  some months ago for Oregon, have returned and will again make their permanent home at their ranch at Canyon.  J. B. Lobb and Mrs. Holland and  daughter of Clifton, Ontario, arrived on  Monday for a three weeks holiday visit  with Mr. and Mrs. A. Halstead. The  two former are brother and sister of Mrs.  Halstead.  Geo. Niblow, jr., left last week for Salmo, where he has secured employment.  He pitched his first game for the Salmo  baseball team who played Nelson on  Sunday. Salmo lost by one run in a ten-  inning contest.  The residence of Supt. S. G. Parker at  the power plant has been modernized  with the installation of a domestic water  supply which has been piped in from a  spring located on the higher ground back  of his residence.  S. G. Parker, plant superintendent for  West Kootenay 4Bo!Wc*$tL,'Eh t Company,  at Qoat river canyon, repo.ts a steady  drop in the water flow over the crest of  the dam, and is of the opinion the high  water season on the Goat is over.   For  ���������al-l*^     f.i-w**.    ������s\mm.i    Ol*������4n^f*t    VftaT*    V>8*������������������    "K'J'-iy!     'Ka'JilM'Mff  VllC"*    JJCXOV   ICf*     mJ\MMS.%M%m*^fS9   lt������    ftsncr    fcr������*>*J.    UUTXU^  from 60 to 70 visitors to witness the min-  ature Niagara at the dam.  Wynndel Institute Meets  A special meeting of Wynndel Women's  Institute was held at the church on Wednesday afternoon last. The president,  Mrs. Slingsby, was in the chair, and introduced the speaker, Mrs. V. S. Mc*  Lachlan, superintendent of institutes,  who outlined the origin of the institute  smd its objects and work carried out.  She gave a vivid description of her trip  through the Peace River country. She  then spoke on handicrafts with a demonstration of spinning on a suspended spindle and showed variaus specimens of  knitting and yarns dyed with vegesable  and chemical dyes. A hearty vote of  thanks was accorded her for her address.  Refreshments were served by the members along with ice cream. 24 members  and five visitors were present.  Dairy  lb,"  utter  PJiinon  Ulfl}J-pU  ���������  8  99  H ���������an Bh  per Pkt.  MAKES CLOTHES  LAST  LONGER  Green Peas,fresh Stock, 3 lbs .25  New Potatoes, 4 lbs. . .25  Bunch Carrots* 3 for . ���������25 _  New Cabbage, per lb. .07 f  Micnener  A. R Barrow was a business visitor at  Creston, Monday.  MiBS Nellie Parslow, who is employed  at Creston, was visiting her parents here  a few days last week.  Mrs. D. F. Putnam, and sons, Frank  and Wayne, spent the weekend with her  mother, Mrs. C. Senesael.  C. McBride and F. Baker of Vancouv-  Local and Personal  Sunday's baseball fixture at Exhibition  park is a game between Libby, Montana,  and Creston, with play to start at 2.30  p.m.  The weather still continues warm and  cool almost day by day. An instalment  of the needed rain came on Wednesday  with a fall of* .11 of an inch. A dust laying shower was encountered on Monday.  '** Mrs. *A. W-~ -Millen arrived home on  Wednesday from Cranbrook, where she  has been a patient in St* Eugene hospital for the past few weeks. Friends will  be glad to hear she is making a very satisfactory recovery.  ^CRESTON DISTRICT now available  for a real live man to take over sale and  distribution of Watkins Products, serving many satisfied customers. Must  have car. For further information apply  1350 Hornby St., Vancouver, B.C.  "The Merry Widow" drew a capacity  house at the Grand on Saturday. The  management regrets the film did not  arrive in time.for the advertised Friday  evening show, caused disappointment to  quite a few who came in from points  down the lake.  The ladies are reminded of the demonstration at the West Kootenay Power &  Light Company store on Saturday afternoon to from 2 to 6 o'clock. The New  Type coffee maker will be demonstrated  and all are asked to come in and see how  it works and taste the delicious coffee it  makes.  F Hurdford of Mission "City arrived  on Friday to take the position of ledger-  keeper at the Bank of Commerce. Mr.  Dunning of Vancouver was expected to  take on this work, but at the last minute the change was made to the former.  ATTENTION, GROWERS���������I will  attend a public meeting to be held in  Murrell's hall, Saturday, June 15th, for  the growers of the valley to receive resolutions or suggestions for the nominating convention to be held at Kelowna,  June 19th.   W. KEIRN, delegate.  G H. Kelly of Creston Drug & Book  Store got back on Wednesday from an  extensive health holiday trip be had been  on for the past two months at points in  California and Mexico, and is again feeling bis oldtime self. He was accompanied by bis father-in-law, Mr. Slater of  New Westminister, who returned with  him.  A. Carrie, the well known Nelson  architect, was a visitor to Creston on  Wednesday. He has charge of preparing  the plans for the new postoffiee building  and was making ajL; examination of the  site. His work is^oout : completed1 and  it is exp eted tenders wil! be called  quickly. The Carrie plans call for a two  story building with - full basement.  Janitor's quarters are provided on tbe  second floor.  Jas. Anderson of Vancouver, who has  charge of the extensive Alexander state  interests in B.C.. was a visitor to Cres  ton yesterday and made an inspection of  the crops and dyke construction work at  the  'Reclamation  farm,   in   which his  clients are heavily interested.    Mr. Anderson  spoke highly of the construction  carried  on by the Christensen brotners  and was well pleased with the splendid  growth the   grain crops show.   He is  strongly  of  the opinion  the Kootenay  River high water stage is now past  and  has the utmost confidence in the farm  and Reclamation Company dykes  being  entirely out of danger. **  .*...m .A.t.t.A'.^.t,.^,  -*���������-*.-+���������-*���������    ���������������.    ���������*,    fm ,m.    ,+    -t.^i,^,  ��������� A.A. A. A. A. A-A. A. A. A.^-A-A.  PHONE 21  A WORD ABOUT SERVICE  Service is what the customer pays for and expects to  receive. We take pride in our ability to render customers  unfailing, dependable service month In and month out, maintaining a standard of reliability for which it has been known  for over 30 years. A progressive policy of continually striv-  ing to better serve this community is the watch-word of this  pioneer firm.  n.  iri-u  RE  A  ft  n  COAL,  WOOD,  FLOUR,  "FEED  1 WW  fe.  m..  a.  ~m-mjM^  A.  -A.  A.  ..A..A-A.A.4V.  +..m.~m~m..*..m.A������,  >m%.  Jmmm.  Jk.  A.  .*.  EK  ���������  aary  Creston Scores  Win Over CCC  OOif  ear  ������* EO&NOBWiGAL &RBGESI  It is most importiant to have good meats for  healthy, active "bodies, And it is most ioiportant to  obtain good meats at economical -prices to keep within  the family budget. We are always on the job to make  yourshopping satisfactory.  1  PHONE 2  *r*^r"������*^r,i������,������*  *8y*'^8**y' y *y * .* **8y���������w y  ay ' w' w ' y' .' ^" 8y  'v,8|,t,>,?,������'r������,������p*-'*'������'' <**  .AmAm.JkmJk.mm\m.m.M..M.mA..AmM.mA.A..4  ea 19  aa  88  Bl,  ������  as  88  81  88  BB  81  88  B8  88  88 '  U  88  Every Day of the Year  Good dairy butter offers you greater value  for your money than Creamery. Our  members are supplying the better quality  butter���������firm, sweet flavored and nourishing.  By buying this batter you are helping along  the dairy industry and keeping your dollars  at home.  armors  Score is 7-4���������-Locals Never in  Danger After Early Innings���������-  ���������Cherrington Fitches Effectively���������Hitting is Timely.  w  It took Creston four innings to get acquainted with the pitching corps of the  CCC aggregation from near Copeland,  Idaho, in Sunday's encounter at Exhibition Park, and after that the result of  the game was never in doubt, the locals  taking the game hy a score of 7-4.  With Cherrington pitching in his old-  time form the visitorn were never really  dangerous but things looked bad in the  third when tbo first two up reaiched first  safely, but were left stranded as the  CrcBton Hurler took the next throe on  the strikeout route. For tho day Cherrington disposed of ten by tho fanning  proooBB. The batting honors wont to  Herb Couling who clouted out a triple to  deep centre In tho sixth. LaBelle had a  dqublo to hla credit. Sneers hnd ������** gr������nt  day at firot base handling a number of  high and wide throws without mishap.  McKelvey had a great day in right field,  handling everything that came out that  way an flatlafactorlly as la customary  with his former porfoimances at the initial corner.  CCC CRESTON  Pawmno, c.  0   R.Mlllor, If 1  Logmnge, 2b -.1   LaBelle, 3b..._. I  PI  WE   MOVE EVERYTHING!  LET US DO YOUR MOVING  Plenty of Dry Wood.     Any Length.  creston~Transfer  P.O. BOX 79 ALBERT DAVIES PHONE 13  ' .. ^. i ,ji   y> <m  ,iy|iy'".   ay   .'.'tT  aj ��������� ajt "y .'"'f   '|"(*|    ������ t     ffT'T'T'T'T'T'T'-f*���������*'*"-'*'*'"*'���������***  4  i  4  4  alratsfir  8\������**������������ai������������8i������B������WK������������������������������M������a8n������������a^n,alaBa8BaBB Bl.B-.M.t������,NI n'uif^jM^iJSi^'SSji^*'^^.".^ ",.."* mm .*".*" *-.."������������������������ m 8. ��������� 8188 aa   Jt������  Haw, cf 1  Harris, bb..,., ,.. X  Hardie If .������0  Bnnlco, rf 0  LiroB, 8b 0  Elder, lb,.... ������0  MncDonnld, 2b.. ..2  Couling, bb 2  Hale, c .,..0  McKolvoy, rf 1  Spoors. \h  ...0  Pnyno, cf....... ,0  Enrlent, p."..'.""......!   Cherrington, p 0  Hnroy, p ������0  WARM WEATHER NEEDS  CREAMS, LOTIONS AND OINTMENTS  for Sunburn  MOSQUITO CREAMS AND LOTIONS  KATOL STICKS���������for  flies,  mosquitos  and other insects  FLY KILL���������a reliable spray  f$    Lime  Juice, Montserrat  Fruit Punch-assorted  flavors.  js   Creston Drug & Bfcok Store  ,'���������:  aEO.;i-L'K.BO^  ^nksar'Tmititi: THE   REVIEW.   CRESTON.   B.   C  HOW    TO    MAKE    ICED    TEA  Infuse six heaping teaspoons ������F Salada Black Tea In a plnS of fresh boiling  water. After six minutes strain liquid into two-quart container. While hot, add  "1% cups of granulated sugar and the juice of 2 lemons. Stir well until sugar is  dissolved / fill container with cold water. Do not allow tea to coof before Gilding  the cold water/ otherwise liquid will become cloudy. Serve with chipped ice.  rerished In The Desert  funerals  \Vithout Ji* lowers  Within recent months the writer has attended a number of funerals,  joining with other friends and loved ones In paying respect to a deceased  friend. Some of these funeral services have been "held quietly and simply in  the home, with only a few of the nearest relatives and closest friends of the  departed one present; others have been held in churches iri order that the  larger circle of the deceased's friends and associates in his or her life's  activities might be present, or where the religious tenets of the departed  might be properly observed.. In one case "just a few persons were present,  people who had voluntarily made small contributions to prevent the remains  of the one -who had passed on from being consigned to the potter's field.  In the vast majority of cases there -were flowers in profusion, wreaths,  emblems, sprays, dozens and scores of them, representing an expenditure of  many dollars. And the thought constantly protruded itself whether such  lavish display of floral tokens was right, in good taste, even in keeping with  our Christian beliefs. It could not be questioned that in many, probably  most, instances these flowers were sent out of love or 'a sincere respect for  the deceased. Equally true, no doubt, in numerous instances flowers were  Bent because it has become the custom to send them.  As a matter of fact, as in the case of weddings, the tendency seems to  be in the direction of making funerals more and more elaborate, more expensive, more and moire something of a spectacle. The quiet and simplicity  in funerals of former days has largely passed, until now it has become a  source of heavy expense and consequent worry to people who are not blessed  with, an over-abundance of this world's goods. Yet because of prevailing  custom, nobody wishes to appear mean in the eyes of others when called  upon to discharge the last duty to a loved one.  Many people think of these things, believe present customs are wrong,  but seldom openly express themselves. In a recent spirited article entitled  "Decent Christian Burial", Marian J. Castle attacked the extravagance attending funerals. She showed how sums spent on flowers, tombstones,  pomp and ceremony, often impoverish the living families of the deceased.  She wisely inferred that the dead might be happier if the funds showered  upon their inanimate bodies were used instead to brighten the lot of the  living.  "Discussing this same subject, Alma Hedin, sister of Sven Hedin, the  famous Swedish explorer, says it is in the spirit of the times in her country to seek the simplest and at the same time the most dignified memorial  for those we have loved. She outlines various steps taken in this direction,  including the provision of funeral insurance through the agency of a society,  which takes charge of all funeral arrangements, which are the same for  every individual. Payment can be made to the society at any time during  the lifetime of the insured, the premium being smaller for the young than  for the old. The highest premium, is paid by those who are over 70, and  is about $75 in all. This provides for a dignified funeral of a kind that  might otherwise tax the resources of the bereaved family, especially when  the deceased happend to be the breadwinner.  In Sweden, too, they have had since 1921 an organization called-the  Flower Fund, formed to honor the dead "in a more worthy and more lasting manner" than with ornate floral tributes for the bier. Instead of sending an expensive wreath, the friends of the deceased remit the money to  the Flower Fund, which sends to the bereaved family a simple memorial  message in the name of the giver, The amount contributed remains a confidence between the donor and the Fund.  It was decided that the money received in this way should be applied  to obtaining houses with small apartments for old people in straitened circumstances. When three and a half years had passed, the Flower Fund  erected a large building on a site donated by the city of Stockholm. Soon  a second house rose by the side of the first, and before long six additional  houses were built. By this means the Fund provides for more than a thousand old people. These pay a lower rent than they would pay elsewhere  and receive care if they are ill. Otherwise they are quite free, and there is  nothing institutional about the place.   It is like a private home.  There is a restaurant in each building where residents can buy' lunch  or dinner for a quarter of a dollar. They may have meals sent to their  aooms or prepare them in the small kitchen that accompanies each, apartment. Food can be purchased in the building, and there is also a laundry  and a bakery. The old people seem, to be happy under these arrangements,  for there are always more applications than can be filled.  Swedish death notices often contain a line asking that the Flower Fund  be remembered. Sometimes another charity is named, for the example Is  contagious. The important thing is not that the money is donated to a  single cause but that tho memorial be given a forin that will honor the  dead by benefiting the living.  Docs this Swedish idea not offer a suggestion to the people of othor  countries? Can wc not make our tributes to our deceased loved ones  something more lasting than quickly withered blossoms?  Bodies Of Man And Woman Found  On Scorching Sands Of Sahara  A searching pa.rty found the bodies  of an Englishwoman and an Englishman on the scorching Sahara sands  recently and rescued two Frenchmen near death from thirst.  The woman, Mrs. Knight, widow  of an English aviator who committed  suicide recently at Agadez, French  West Africa, had slashed her wrist  apparently in an attempt to end her  torture from thirst and heat.  A party of four���������Mrs. Knight,  Peyton, an English resident of  Switzerland, and two Frenchmen,  Kneehret and Chavexus���������left Agadez  by truck May 22 for Tamanrasset,  Tawarek. After the quartette were  missing four days a searching party  left Agadez for them.    It found the  CIGARETTE PAPERS  POIS S^laE)  "BOOKLET ~  Frenchmen in a serious condition beside the truck near a dried-up river  bed.  WHY HIS HEADACHES  CEASED  Wsfe Put [Kruschen in His  Coffee  He could not understand why the  headaches he had been subject to  suddenly ceased. His wife told him,  and he at once sat down and wrote  t\\P-    frmXtmvciTintr     tat-i-ar"   1.8 IV       .V..V it ^.^g        i^.V������^_Jt  s  "I am 62 years of age, and ever  since I was a boy of ten years, I was  subject to very bad headaches. But  two years ago the headaches stopped  ���������for what reason I did not know. I  was surprised when one day my wife  told me I had been using Kruschen  Salts in my coffee for over two  years. I am stiii using them, as I  know of nothing finer for the system."���������J. T.  Headaches can nearly always be  traced to a disordered stomach, and  to the unsuspected retention in the  system of stagnating waste material  which poisons the blood. Remove  these poisons���������prevent them forming again���������and you'll never have to  worry any more. And that is just  how Kruschen Salts brings swift and  lasting relief from headaches. Kruschen Salts aid Nature to cleanse your  body completely of all clogging  waste matter.'   ?;V:     -  Remedy Is Elusive  Medical   World   Endeavors   To   Discover   Virus   For   Treating  Common Colds  There is a virus that has something to do with the common cold  and that's what so far has eluded  the medical world. When it is discovered what that virus is, then the  cold may be squelched.  '"The germs of the common cold  are well known," Dr. E. C. Sewall,  of San Francisco, told the convention of the American Laryngologi-  cai Association in Toronto, "although  I believe there is a virus which is  not yet known. This virus, in my  opinion, is the product of all* these  germs that go to cause the common  cold."  Persons -who suffer from frequent  colds are probably suffering from the  same cold all the time, he said. He  said a cold creates an immunity of  six months or so.  "This,**' he said, *'is probably the  reason for the endemic source of  colds. These people carry the  source of infection in chronic sinus  trouble and spread infection to  other people."  Officers To Retire  "three   Assistant   commissioners   Oi  R.C.M.P. To Retire On January  .���������1st Next  Royal Canadian Mounted Police  announced impending retirement of  three assistant commissioners, A J.  Cawdron of Ottawa, C. Junget of  Halifax and J. W. Phillips of Vancouver. They will be granted leave  from. July 1 and retired next Jan. 1.  Assistant Commissioner Junget  was engaged in the North West  Mounted Police in 1899 and passed  through the non-commissioned ranks  until he was appointed inspector in  1907. He became superintendent in  192^ and. assistant commissioner >u  1932. He is now officer commanding  ������������H" division at Halifax.  Assistant Commissioner Phillips,  officer commanding "E" division at  Vancouver, joined the North "West  Mounted Police in 1898 and passed  through the non-commissioned ranks.  He was appointed inspector in 1913,  superintendent in 1931 and assistant  commissioner in 1934.  Special Adviser  Lord Weir To Assist In Expanding  Royal Air Force  Lord "Weir, great war aeronautics  expert and an international authority on aviation, was named by the  "British government as its special  adviser in the work of expanding  the Royal Air Force.  Stanley Baldwin, lord president of  the council, announced the appointment to the House of Commons in  outlining plans for the tripling of  the British air force during the next  two years.  Lord Weir will be known as the  government's official counsellor of  aviation.  Long Service Medal  Old Member Of Mounted Police Re  ceives Official Recognition  As official recognition of his long  service with the Northwest Mounted  Police in the -west's early days came  to special Constable ("Gentleman  Joe") McKay at Prince Albert when  he was presented with the long service medal.  Forwarded from headquarters of  the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,  Ottawa, the medal was presented to  Mr. McKay by Inspector F. W.  Schutz, officer commanding this subdivision. Mr. McKay retired many  years ago.  "Gentleman Joe" is said to have  fired the first shot in the Riel rebellion, 50 years ago at the Duck  Lake fight.  Political Science Association  Would Abolish Military Aviation  Londoners  Vote  For  Limitation  Of  Armaments  Universal abolition of military  aviation and limitation of armaments  were favored by an overwhelming  majority in -a. straw-vote conducted  by the League of Nations union in  Greater London, the union announced.  On these questions and on tha  question of supporting the league  and forbidding the manufacture of  arms for profit, the vote favored the  proposals by 1,400,000 to 100,000.  "Londoners voted 1,375,061 to 88,-  521 for use of economic sanctions  against an aggressor, whatever the  nation might be, and 872,275 to 386,-  664 for use of military sanctions if  they were found necessary.  A coast highway connecting Tunis  and Egypt has been, ordered by Mussolini.  When a man Is down his enemies  stop kicking and Ma friends begin.  Tho ancient capital of Slam, Ayu-  thia, has been hidden in tlio jungle  for four centuries.  R. H. Coats, Dominion   Statistician,  Is Elected President  R. H. Coats, Dominion statistician,  Ottawa, was elected president of the  Canadian Political   Science   Association, meeting at Kingston.   He succeeds   D.  A. MacGibbon,   board   of  grain      commissioners,       Winnipeg.  Other officers are: Vice-president, H.  Laureys, school  of  higher  commercial  studies, Montreal;   J.  C.  Hem-  moon,    McGill    University;    W.    C.  Keirstcad, University of Now Brunswick;    W.    I,   Mackintosh,   Queen's  University.     Speakers   included   R.  McQueen, University   of   Saskatchewan, who   spoke   on "Economic  Aspects of Federalism."  Ruling Is Clarified       "  Naturalized     Germans    In    Canada  Exempt From Military Service  In Homeland  German residents in the Dominion  are exempt   from   compulsory   military  service in their homeland^  according   to   an   official   declaration  from Berlin which gives an interpretation of Chancellor   Hitler's   recent  speech in the Reichstag, In which he  dealt    with    military    service.      It  states that Germans   who   are   naturalized  or have   made   their   permanent homes   in   foreign  countries  will not be compelled to return to  Germany to serve in tho army.  Young Lambs Make Trip  Long  Jaunt   Did   Not   Appear   To  Harm Them  Young lambs are good "trailers"..  Recently the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, moved its ewe  flock to summer pasture at Beaver  Creek and the ewes, with lambs at  foot, made 10 miles the first day  and completed the journey easily tho  second. Some of these lambs were  no more than four days old.  "The long jaunt did not appear to  hurt the lambs a bit," said Dean A.  M. Shaw, "and after their 10 mile  trip they were fresh and perky. Of  course, the weather was cool, but thp  observation Is of particular interest  to ranchers and B.C. sheepmen whon  moving their stock from, winter to  summer range."  -'..���������;'! ".:  ��������� ��������� - ���������'".".."��������� ������������������ ���������**���������  It is better to havo an open mind  than an open mouth.  Railway Pigeon Section  Tho Nagoya Railway Bureau of  Japan is to start a "pigeon section"  at an estimated cost of nearly $1,000,  Ninety-five birds will bo purchased  at flrst, and after several years-  breeding thoy will bo distributed to  all the Railway Bureaus in tho country. Tho plan in to provide an auxiliary nyntem of communication which  will bo called Into service when all  othor moans havo beon destroyed,  Wil  mm  lllll  *mm  tow  :!**������  if������  THIRD CLASS  Anxious thore nhould bo no .dispute  over hor oatate of .1100,000, the late  Mrs. Fredorlca Cook ol? London,  hlngland, dlnposod of ii In u will *>"  1W,000 word***. 2102  Apply to your local  utitmnt or ti.  ,   11<H Mnln Htrmtst  (Tel. 94-206)  WINNIWIO  m  ^flifUalae  ' fti jh a a  Cony publlo rooms and cabinet  4. excellent food and plonty  of It . . flood nun dooka . .  Happy days of sport and fun  W������mtmmXmm,vTCmmm-mi,mmamMmm,mfmmi.Kmm." mmmtK^mimmmm%mi^0mmmtmim%w*i  . . fine satoady ships.  mwm.mmmm.mimm. Mi .wm. nn... ii>riiiii.ii.iiiniii^wi8liiwiiii>������a��������� '  SaMlMg-Fridays from IWnntrana1 to PLY-  NIOUYH.   IIAVnif-,   LONDON,   and  to  . *ifi-|>-AU*ir,     LIVeftPOOL,     ������iSUiS������OV**.  Third Clunk Ocean Rut*���������$82.00 ono <wny.  ''.-'. i     . I"' '"   -T-,.���������"������������������--���������7,���������","..,.:,:..,.,:.,...,^jm     III    1,1..     ���������l��������� Ml|        ., y. ��������� .    ,. . I,    ,  .. ������������������    , , , ) ,, ,,,    I   ,     , ��������� !'W  ;*���������������?  <-</:  //^������������������^:  THE   REVIEW.   CRESTON,   B.   C  L.'-A* ��������� ������������������  WORLD HAPPENINGS  BRIEFLY TOLD  Vimy Pilgrimage Becomes  Great Peace Movement  The 400th anniversary of the first  printed English Bible will be celebrated next October 4.. it has been  announced.  The U.S. bureau of agricultural  economics has estimated the total  wheat area for harvest this- year in  26 countries at 190,954,000 acres,  compared with 185,276,000 acres in  1934 and 191,132,000 acres in 1933.  Britain has accepted the Sultan of  Jahore's ������500,000 gift, offered as a  silver jubilee contribution to  strengthen the Singapore naval base,  Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald  told the Commons.  The United States treasury summed up its financial situation for the  first 11 months of the year ending in  June and discovered it had gone "in  the red" $3,133,471,295 during that  time.  Soviet Russia's policy 'in the Far  East will be one "unbending as  steel" in ail matters regarding defence of the country's interests,  Karl Radek said in an article in the  official newspaper Izviestia.  The venom of the black widow  spider is good for relieving the pain  of angina pectoris. Its use for this  was described to the American In-  sttiute of Homeopathy by Dr. Linn J.  Boyd, of the Homeopathic College.  The Countess of Bessborough handed over to the board of trustees of  the King George Silver Jubilee $237,-  799 and records of promises that will  bring total contributions of the fund  to $420,529=  The government has no immediate  plans for amending its annuities  branch, Minister of Labor W. A.  Gordon announced in the House of  Commons. The present maximum  is $1,2.00 and the interest rate i.Vz  per cent.  Alexander Korda, head of London  Film Productions, has acquired the  sole official world rights for producing a film, version of the late Col. T.  E. Lawrence's book, "Revolt in the  Desert," it was announced in London.  Well Qualified Fpr Post  Recovery Obstacles  United States Writer  Calls For Ifce-  ciprdcal Trade Efforts  Commercial policies of the United  States were described by Peter  Molyneaux, editor of the Texas  weekly and a trustee of the Carne-  grave, Mr. de Vaiera's administra-  peace, as "the greatest obstacle to  world recovery." Writings in "International Conciliation," a publication of the endowment, he said:  "I mean the policy embodied in  the rates of the Hawley-Smoot tariff  act, the policy exemplified by the  American attitude on war debts, the  policy which prompted the almost  unanimous 'enactment by congress of  the Johnson Foreign Security Boycott act, the policy which every  foreign country encounters at our  shores and along our borders when  it attempts to ship its goods to us  in exchange for our own."  Molyneaux called the reciprocal  trade efforts of Secretary of State  Cordell Hull a step in the "right  direction." Currency stabilisation  was held "absolutely essential to  world recovery" and he added that  so long as the United States pursues its present policies "any las-ting  of international exchange will bo impossible." ^  ^irl Trains Football Team  Teacher Lcuiry^d Gamo By Watching  Hf ^���������iirotliers "Play  So effecty'i^ has Miss B. Casey,  BchoolmlstretWof Bradford School at  Bradford, EngUM^l, trained hor football team of b**������yl that they havo  won second place in tho leaguo for  tho second successive year. Miss  Casey learned tho game by watching  hor brothers play, and is horoelf a  good hockey player. She uses blackboard akctchen Ir*. Illustrating now  plays to hor team, who havo scored  55 goals, while competing teams  produced only eight.  Registrations    Of    Ex-Service    Men  Pouring In To Canadian Legion  The Vimy and Battlefields Pilgrimage of the Canadian Legion of  the British Empire Service League  of which the Yfamous Padre of the  Canadian Corps, Canon Scott bf  Quebec, is Pilgrim No. 1, has already  received 548 applications from ex-  service men, despite the fact that  the ships arranged jointly by the  Cunard White Star and Canadian  Pacific lines do not sail from Montreal .until' July 15th" and 16th, next  year, 1936. In addition twelve hundred applications have been received  by the government from ex-service  men in the Civil Service for leave  for the duration of the Pilgrimage.  This event is going to be one of  world significance. It is a Peace  Movement on a colossal scale. It is  anticipated that over 25,000 Canadians���������ex-soldiers, their wives, children/fathers, mothers, sisters and  brothers���������will visit the cemeteries,  the battlefields, and attend the unveiling of the Canadian? Memorial at  Vimy Ridge.  The all-inclusive cost of the entire  trip���������as outlined below���������is $160.00.  Sail from Montreal, July 15th or  16th, 1836; arrive-France, July 24th;  visiting graves, battlefields, towns in  France and Belgium, (ships held in  French port), July 24th, 25th, 26th;  unveiling Vimy Ridge Canadian Government War Memorial, July 26th;  arrival England ��������� London Tilbury  docks���������(ships held four days), July  27th; London (four days), July 27th-  30th; arrival in Canada (Montreal),  August 8th.  After prolonged negotiations, the  Atlantic Conference granted- an  ocean rate of $120.00 return-���������the  lowest rate possible to obtain. Staterooms (3rd class) and the regular  menue will be provided. Freedom of  the ship will be granted. Cabin Class  will be available to those wishing to  ^mmr...     V>-S������-*%������*������w������      mmm*4.~m~.' X>8mm,m^.       ���������������>������.*������. **~������^1~,.mm  ������*c*jr      MMM^MMXAfM      labCQ. X   8\7Cli9C      i. &MXMSZMMJL UCi  too that Ocean Travel accommodation to-day is vastly superior to that  of 1914-1919.  The remaining $40.00 of the $160.00  is to provide for rail and road transport in France, billeting accommodation and meals in France and beds  and breakfasts for four days in England. Passports will also be provided for France, Belgium and England, and accident insurance will  also be provided in respect to those  passengers acceptable to the Insurance Companies for this purpose. In  addition, an official badge, beret,  haversack _and guide book will be  provided, xnis indicates exactly how  the amount quoted is made up.  Railway ticket agents/Ocean Line  agents and Land Tour Companies are  supplied with full information and  application forms to take care of the  many who will be participating in  the Pilgrimage.  The Legion -will not profit by this  venture. The organization expenses  will be taken care of through ordinary commissions; Any balance that  may remain in the special Pilgrimage bank account, after organizing  expenses are met, will be placed in  a special fund and allocated to such  veteran purposes as the National  Pilgrimage Committee may designate. Commissions have no bearing  on the price of the ticket. The  ocean rate is set by the Atlantic  Conference of Steamship Lines and  commissions are also set by the  same body so that whether commissions are accepted or not the price  of the ticket remains the same.  The potentialities of this Pilgrimage stagger the imagination. Never  before in the history of the world  has a nation so far removed from  the scene of hostilities left so many  of its dead burled in foreign soil in  a Battle for Freedom. In a War to  end War, Canada sent 500,000 troops  to France. Sixty thousand are buried  there to-day in cemeteries from  Ypres to Albert���������from Etaples to  Mens. On Sunday, July 26th, thousands of Canadians and a brilliant  entourage of the representatives of  all nations, will gather on Canadian  soil at Vimy Ridge to unveil Canada's War Memorial ��������� completed  after seventeen years of unremitting  labour.  This memorial, designed by Walter  S. Allward, a Canadian, is erected  by tho Canadian Government on  Vimy Ridge Y_ dedicated by tho  French Government to tho Dominion  of Canada���������as "That bit of foreign  soil that will forever remain Canada."  Major General, Tho Honourable S.  O. Mewburn, C.M.G., chairman of the  Canadian Battlefields Momorial Commission, has tlie assurance tliat the  Government will co-oporato and,participate In tho '.unveiling-', ceremonies,  at the tlmo of this Pilgrimage  New U.S. Minister To Canada Highly  Spoken Of  Norman Armour, the new Minister  to Canada from the United States,  received complimentary send-offs.  The New York Herald Tribune, having spoken highly of his training  and temperament, said: "Mr. Armour  has the useful���������and for a diplomat,  the rare���������quality of being a 'good  mixer'. Incidentally, warm sympathy for the Canadian people and a  keen sense of the importance of Canadian-American relations adds to his  other qualifications for this post."  The New York Times, having remarked that the appointment of-Mr.  Armour is a merited promotion and  also a recognition of the importance  of the Canadian post, went on to say:  "His appointment to Canada 'regularizes' the position and gives fresh  assurance to Canada that we are  sending a representatives of our best  in American cultural background as  well ag in acquaintance -with world  affairs. It is highly important that  we should have especially competent  diplomats in posts nearest our own  borders, among neighbors with whom  we have most  in common."  SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON  JUNE 16  CHRISTIAN STEWARDSHIP  PATTERN   PRICES  REDUCED  FROM  20c. to   15c,  For years the price lias been  20c. for the splendid patterns  we have supplied to our readers. We now offer the same  service at less cost���������which will  UC     gUUU     AX87YV.9      %.\J     Cfci-X.  Fashion    Books    also    will  FcdUCCu   ifGIii   *SuC.   to   15c.  be  Golden text: It ia required in  stewards that a man be found faithful.    I. Corinthians 4:2.  Devotional reading: Psalm 96:1-8.  Explanations And Comments  Pride of Possessions May Lead To  Forgetfuiness of God, Deuteronomy  8:11-7. The children of Israel are  about to enter the Promised Land  after their long wilderness wandering, and Moses, their leader, fears  that they may there become so prosperous that they will be in danger of  forgetting God and of failing to keep  his commandments. Against this  temptation to pride (lest their heart  be "lifted up") because of fine  houses, numerous flocks and herds,  and abundance of silver and gold,  Moses    warns    them,    and    reminds  +Ytf>m      fvP     1T,V><������<-        +V������*v������.       mvmn        ^Ln>"! ������������������������������,-.  ������ ,_    ������.������    ,������������.���������������      +*m^.������      vv������c     vjru\j,    vruu  brought them out of bondage in the  land of Egypt, and led them through  the great and terrible wilderness. He  stops to recall the dangers of that  wilderness, the serpents and scorpions, the lack of water, and how  fresh -water and manna were given  them that they might realize their  dependence upon God.  It is God who Gives Power to  Acquire Wealth, Deuteronomy 8:18.  "The first and fundamental principle  of stewardship lies in God's ownership of all things. The God who  created life in the beginning has a  priority claim upon all life. There  can be no property either without  society or without God; neither  would there be value to property  without society or without the" God  who guarantees all life" (Stewardship Lessons).  God Loves a Cheerful Giver, H.  Corinthians 9; 6-8. Generosity in giving will enrich one's own life, Paul  wrote the Corinthians. A man who  hoards the greater part of his supply  of wheat, being loth to part with it,  would have a scanty harvest from  the smaller amount sown, and the  hoarded grain, if kept too long,  would spoil. It is from a bountiful  sowing that a bountiful harvest is  reaped, whether of wheat or of good  deeds.  Little hmnc.yz fa Science j  i  Recipes For This Wcsk  (By Betty Barclay)"  ORANGE VITAMIN  SALAD  ��������� ��������� (Serves 4):  4 to 6 small oranges  Lettuce  % cup grated coconut  y2 cup grated carrots  Pare oranges and cut in thin slices.  Cu*--   slices   in   halves*    On lettuce- \  covered salad plates, arrange a circle  of orange slices, being generous with  fruit.    Sprinkle with grated coconut  and   grated   carrot.    Serve   at   once  with mayonnaise,  into which  %   as  much orange   juice   has   been   thoroughly blended.  ���������'������������������:t      v C"HLOBINEf *;''V?  CBy Gordon H. Guest, MJLf  'Ph?9'rf'a������ ������s a greenish yellow gas-  which possesses a very disagreeable-  odor. When breathed it has a very  irritating action upon the membranes of the nose and throat, producing coughing, inflammation, and  even death. Hence it is quite rightly  called a poisonous gas. Chlorine-  may be easily condensed to a golden  yellow liquid, and as such is stored.  in strong leadlined cylinders holding*  from about forty to sixty pounds. It  was the first poison gas used in the  World War. The first attack was-  made by the Germans on April 22,  1915. They concealed tanks of  liquid chlorine in the front line  trenches and the substance was used  in the form of gas clouds. As chlorine is about two and a half time&  as heavy as air, the clouds were car-  m*������f������*3 S*mm*+^m       *.**U.���������, m**mmmsm.m mmmm. -*S *"U .-- J.1_ ���������. __-*!  J  ������������������'"'��������� "���������������������* cue ������**j(jLua ������y Ju& wind.  When there is one part of chlorine  to ten thousand parts of air, the  struggle for breath becomes acute,  and a man would probably be put  out of action in about five mintues.  Chlorine, in the presence of water,  is a powerful bleaching and disinfecting agent. It is used in commerce for bleaching cotton, linen,  wood pulp, and flour, but cannot be-  used for wool or silk because it  hardens and destroys these materials. The bleaching of cotton fabrics and wood pulp for paper require-  in North America alone more than  six hundred tons of chlorine per day.  The bleaching process is carried out  in water solution and either chlorine  water, or bleaching powder dissolved  in water, is used.  Chlorine is also used in preparing  certain chlorine compounds such as  chloroform and .carbon tetrachloride  (used in fire extinguishers). It ia  also used in the preparation of many  compounds which are needed in the  explosive and dye industries.  Liquid chlorine is used in -water  purification and since its introduction for chlorinating water supplies,  typhoid fever has been reduced to a  minimum in many of the great cities  of the world. Recently liquid chlorine has been used in recovering gold  from its ores, and also in recovering  tin from old tin cans and scrap tin.  plate.  One of the most important com*  pounds of chlorine is hydrochloric:  acid gas. A water solution of this  gas is called hydrochloric acid or  muriatic acid. This acid is an important component of the gastric  juice of man and of animals, the gas-  ���������f-rrrrn  sic juice of raas -containing  0.2 to 0.4 per cent., while that of  dogs contain-"- about 0.6 per cent.  The acid,plays an important part in  digestion. "*"'  Dominion Drama Festival  London's Empire Stadium, at Wembley Parle can seat 100,000 wpec tutor/*, which is moro than Rome's  famous Colosseum hold.  Novel Transportation  A method of transporting wounded pcr-ion-** on ������������������ntrotchorB ntif-pendcfl  under tlio wings and fuselage of an  aoroplano waa auccossfuly tried out  at Moscow. Throe red cross doctors  who voluntporod for the experiment  woro tied In strotchor***, with oval  aluminum covers. Ono was suspended from each wing and ono under  tho fusolago. 2102  ALMOND  WAFERS  % cup butter  Flavoring of vanilla  Va cup confectioners' sugar  Few grains of salt  % cup sweet milk  Scant cup bread flour  Grated sweet almonds.  Cream the butter and add the  sugar slowly, then the salt. Add the  milk as slowly as possible, not more  than a drop at a time. Then add  the flour and the flavoring. Spread  in a very thin sheet on the bottom,  of an inverted roasting pan. Sprinkle over with the grated almonds.  Mark in three-inch squares and bako  in a very slow oven until delicately  browned. Cut the squares apart  with a sharp knife and roll them up  while warm. They may bo filled  with whipped cream for serving.  '���������SHIRTWAISTS'-   DRESS   ENJOYING   POPULARITY���������JUST   THE  THING TO HAVE WITH YOU  ON VACATIONS  By Ellen Worth  Another smart "ahlrtwaisty" dress  with modish,hosom front.  ' You'll   note   the   back   yoke   and  sleeves cut in one-piece, which makes  it so quickly fashioned.  And the front paneled skirt with  its plaits, gives all tho fulnesi. desired this season.  Moat washing silks, rayons and  cottons aro suitable for this simple  to sow dress.  Style No. 050 ia designed for olKe-*)  14, 16, 18 years, 36, 38, 40 and 42-  lnchos bust. Size 36 requires 3%  yards of 30-lnck materia!.  Patterns 15c each. Address mall  orders to: Pattorn Department, Winnipeg Nowspapor Union, 175 McDor-  mot Ave, XQ., Winnipeg.  The latest Fashion Magazine Is  bettor than over. Entirely illustrated  in color you will find it a vory  stimulating fashion edition. Thore  aro clothes for cruising and clothes to  brighten tho lives of stay-at-homes.  Many delightful,little modelu for tho  nmallor members of tho family. Of  course, pattern*!  aro   obtainable  for  tho   designs   lllustratod.     Send   for       , *,,... ^  your copy   today,   the   price   in   15      An ounce   of   loyalty  Hi  worth a  cents. [pound of clovorno'm  A  Royal  Charter  Has  Been  Issued  To Assure Perpetuation  To assure perpetuation of the Dominion Drama Festival after the departure of the Earl of Bessborough,  a royal charter has been issued, it  was announced by Hon. C. H. Cahan,  secretary of state. The corporation  will be under the name of "The Governors of the Dominion Drama Festival.."  In a statement Mr. Cahan said the  charter was being issued as a memorial to His Majesty's Silver Jubilee.  The charter recited the stimulation  of interest in and the encouragement  of the dramatic art in Canada tho  festival had provided.  The charter gave the new body  power to hold real and pergonal  estate and to receive grants. It cannot hold moro than $25,000 In real  estate. Provision was made, tho  statement explained, for appointment of general and district officers,  granting prizes and awards on such  conditions as might be prescribed.  Children's Orchestra  Reciprocal Judgments  Fine Provinces Take  Advantage OI  Dominion Legislation  Judgments of Alberta courts became enforceable in Ontario as tho  Ontario cabinet passed an order-in-  councll taking advantage of the reciprocal judgments enforcement act.  Alberta took similar action to make  Ontario judgments enforceable there,  a short tlmo ago.  Five provinces have taken advantage of the Dominion leglHlatlon  which applies to both oupremo court  and county court decisions. Thoy  wero British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Alberta, New BrunHwluk and  Ontario.  Kansas   Organi-eation    Of   05    Tota  May Take Trip To Japan  Thomas Bruce knows what to do  wLth children who Insist upon making loud noises���������put them in a symphony orchestra.  His organization, the Kannas City  tot symphony, with 05 children  ranging In ago from four to nine,  has proved ao popular plans aro  being mado to take It to .Tapan in  1936, Bruco said.  Tho children, some of whom started training for tho orchestra when  only two yenr������ old, play mi eh difll-  cult plccos ao RachmanlnofE'H ' 'Prelude". Thoy also tako turns at  directing.  Bobb (to ofllco boy, who it. half an  hour lute)*���������You should havo been In  hero at 8 o'clock.  Office Boy���������Why, what happened t  ���������m  Mt:i THE   EEVHSW.   CEEST0N.   B.   C  HOW    TO  AKE    ICED    TE  Infuse six heaping taaspoons of Sa8ada Black Tea in e ping ������J fresh boiling  water. After six minutes strain liquid into two-quart container. While hot, add  11A cups of granulated sugar and the juice of 2 lemons. Stir well until sugar Is  dissolved ; fill container with cold water. De not allow tee to coot before adding  fine cold wafer/ otherwise liquid will become cloudy. Serve with chipped ice.  Funerals Witkout Flowers  Within recent months the writer has attended a number of funerals,  joining with other friends and loved ones in paying respect to a deceased  friend. Some of these funeral services have been held quietly and simply in  the home, with only a few of the nearest relatives and closest friends of the  departed one present; others have been held In churches ih order that the  larger circle of the deceased's friends and associates in his or her life's  activities might be present, or where the religious tenets of the departed  might be properly observed, In one case just a few persons were present,  people who had voluntarily made small contributions to prevent the remains  of the one who had passed on from being consigned to the potter's field.  In the vast majority of cases there were flowers in profusion, wreaths,  emblems, sprays, dozens and scores of them, representing an expenditure of  many dollars. And the thought constantly protruded itself whether such  lavish display of floral tokens was right, in good taste, even in keeping with  our Christian beliefs. It could not be questioned that in many, probably  most, instances these flowers were sent out of love or "a sincere respect for  the deceased. Equally true, no doubt, in numerous instances flowers were  sent because it has become the custom to send them.  As a matter of fact, as in the case of weddings, the tendency seems to  be in the direction of making funerals more and more elaborate, more expensive, more and more something of a spectacle. The quiet and simplicity  In funerals of former days has largely passed, until now it has become a  source of heavy expense and consequent worry to people who are not blessed  with an over-abundance of this world's goods. Yet because of prevailing  custom, nobody wishes to appear mean in the eyes of others when called  upon to discharge the last duty to a loved one.  Many people think of these things, believe present customs are wrong,  but seldom openly express themselves. In a recent spirited article entitled  "Decent Christian Burial", Marian J. Castle attacked the extravagance attending funerals. She showed how stuns spent on flowers, tombstones,  pomp and ceremony, often impoverish the living families of the deceased.  She wisely inferred that the dead might be happier if the funds showered  upon their inanimate bodies were used instead to brighten -the lot of the  living.  Discussing this same subject, Alma Hedin, sister of Sven Hedin, the  famous Swedish explorer, say3 it is in the spirit of the times in her country to seek the simplest and at th.e same time the most dignified memorial  for those we have loved. She outlines various steps taken in this direction,  including the provision of funeral insurance through the agency of a society,  which takes charge of all funeral arrangements, which are the same for  every individual. Payment can be made to the society at any time during  the lifetime of the insured, the premium being smaller for the young than  for the old. The highest premium is paid by those who are over 70, and  is about $75 in all. This provides for a dignified funeral of a kind that  might otherwise tax the resources of the bereaved family, especially when  the deceased happend to be the breadwinner.  In Sweden, too, they have had since 1921 an organization called the  Flower Fund, formed to honor the dead "in a more worthy and more lasting manner" than with ornate floral tributes for the bier. Instead of sending an expensive wreath, the friends of the deceased remit the money to  the Flower Fund, which sends to the bereaved family a simple memorial  message in the name of the giver. The amount contributed remains a confidence between the donor and the Fund.  It was decided that the money received in this way should be applied  to obtaining houses with small apartments for old people In straitened circumstances. When three and a half years had passed, the Flower Fund  erected a large building on a site donated by the city of Stockholm. Soon  a second house rose by the side of the first, and before long six additional  houses were built. By this means the Fund provides for more than a thousand old people. These pay a lower rent than they would pay elsewhere  and receive care if they are ill. Otherwise they are quite free, and there is  nothing institutional about the place,   It is like a private home.  There is a restaurant in each building whero residents can buy lunch  or dinner for a quarter of a dollar. They may have meals sent to their  rooms or prepare them in the small kitchen that accompanies each apartment. Food can be purchased in the building, and there is also a laundry  and a bakery. The old people seem to be happy under these arrangements,  for there are always more applications than can be filled.  Swedish death notices often contain a line asking that the Flower Fund  be remembered. Sometimes another charity is named, for the example is  contagious. The important thing is not that the money is donated to a  single cause but that the memorial be given a form, that will honor the  dead by benefiting the living.  Does this Swedish Idea not offer a suggestion to the people of other  countries? Can we not make our tributes to our deceased loved ones  something more lasting tlmn quickly withered blossoms?  Perished Iii The Desert  Bodies Ot Man And ".Vomau Fouad  On Scorching Sands Of Sahara  A searching party found the bodies  of an Englishwoman and an Englishman on the scorching Sahara sands  recently and rescued two Frenchmen near death from thirst.  The woman, Mrs. Knight, widow  of an English aviator who committed  suicide recently at Agadez, French  West Africa, had slashed her wrist  apparently in an attempt to end her  torture from, thirst and heat.  A party of four���������Mrs. Knight,  Peyton, an English resident of  Switzerland, and two Frenchmen,  Kneebret and Chavexus���������left Agadez  by truck May 22 for Tamanrasset,  Tawarek. After the quartette were  missing four days a searching party  left Agadez for them. It found the  Frenchmen in a serious condition beside the truck near a dried-up river  bed.  CIGARETTE PAPERS  AUTOMATIC  BOOKLET  WHY HIS HEADACHES  CEASED  ****������������������*"��������������� |"���������" "***  Wit������ Put Kruschesi isi His  Coffee  He could not understand why the  headaches he had been subject to  suddenly ceased. His wife told him,  and he at once sat down and wrote  the following letter:���������  "I am 62 years of age, and ever  since I was a boy of ten years, I was  subject to very bad headaches. But  two years ago the headaches stopped  ���������for what reason I did not know. I  was surprised when one day my wife  told me I had been using Kruschen  Remedy Is Elusive  Medical   World   Endeavors   To   Discover   Virus   For   Treating  Common Colds  There is a virus that has something to do with the common cold  and that's what so far has eluded  the medical world. When it is dis  covered what that virus is, then the  cold may be squelched.  "The germs of the common cold  are well known," Dr. E. C. Sewall,  of San Francisco, told the convention of the American Laryngologi-  cal Association in Toronto, "although.  I believe there is a virus which is  not yet "known. This virus, in my  opinion, is the product of all* these  germs that go to cause the common  cold."  Persons who suffer from frequent  colds are probably suffering from, the  a���������i4.c   ������������������   ������,,.   mmmmfe^mm   *^������   ���������.������*������   +������,~   same cold all the time, he said.   He  Salts   in   my   coffee   for   over   two       .. . ��������� , *  years.     I am still using them, as I   said & cold creates an immunity of  know of nothing finer for  the sys-1 six months or so.  Officers To Retire  tern."���������J. T.  Headaches can nearly always be  traced to a disordered stomach, and  to the unsuspected retention in the  system of stagnating waste material  which poisons the blood. Remove  these poisons���������prevent them, forming again���������and you'll never have to  worry any more. And that is just  how Kruschen Salts brings swift and  lasting relief from, headaches. Kruschen Salts aid Nature to cleanse your  body completely of all clogging  waste matter."   ?~j '��������� ' "-  "This," he said, "is probably the  reason for the endemic source of  colds. These people carry the  source of infection in chronic sinus  trouble and spread infection to  other people."  Three   Assistant   Commissioners   Of  ***~*.C.5������.P. To "Retire Oa Jammi-v  1st Next  Royal Canadian Mounted Police  announced impending retirement of  three assistant commissioners, A J.  Cawdron of Ottawa, C. Junget of  Halifax and J. W. Phillips of Vancouver. They will be granted leave  from July 1 and retired next Jan. 1.  Assistant Commissioner Junget  was engaged in the North. West  Mounted Police in 1899 and passed  through the non-commissioned ranks  until he was appointed inspector in  1907. He became superintendent in  1922 and assistant eonnntssloner io  1932. He is now officer commanding  "H" division at Halifax.  Assistant Commissioner Phillips,  officer commanding "E" division at  Vancouver, joined the North. West  Mounted Police in 1898 and passed  through the non-commissioned ranks.  Ke was appointed inspector in 1913,  superintendent in 1931 and assistant  commissioner in 1934.  Special Adviser  "Lord Weir To Assist In Jiixpanding  "Royal Air Force  Lord Weir, great war aeronautics  expert and an international authority on aviation, was named hy the  British government as its special  adviser in the work of expanding  the Royal Air Force.  Stanley Baldwin, lord president of  the council,  announced the appoint  ment to the House of Commons   in years ago  Long Service Medal  Old Member Of Mounted Police Receives Official Recognition  An official recognition of his long  service with the Northwest Mounted  Police in the west's early days came  io special Constable ("Gentleraan  Joe") McKay at Prince Albert when  he was presented with, the long service medal.  Forwarded from headquarters of  the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,  Ottawa, the medal was presented to  Mr. McKay by Inspector F. W.  Schutz, officer commanding this subdivision.    Mr.  McKay retired many  outlining plans for the tripling of  the British air force during the next  two years.  Lord Weir will be known as the  government's official counsellor of  aviation.  "Gentleman Joe" is said to have  fired the first shot in the Riel rebellion, 50 years ago at the Duck  Lake fight.  Would Abolish Military Aviation  "Londoners Vote  For  Limitation  Of  Armaments  Universal abolition of -military  aviation and limitation of armaments  were favored by an overwhelming  majority in a straw-vote conducted  by the League of Nations union in  Greater London, the union announced.  On these questions and oh ths  question of supporting the league  and forbidding the manufacture of  arms for profit, the vote favored the  proposals by 1,400,000 to 100,000.  Londoners voted 1,375,061 to 88,-  521 for use of economic sanctions  against an aggressor, whatever the  nation might be, and 872,275 to 386,-  664 for use of military sanctions if  they were found necessary.  Political Science Association  A coast highway connecting Tunis  and Egypt has been ordered by Mussolini.  When a man Is down his enemies  elop kicking and hla frlcnda begin.  Tho ancient capital of Slam, Ayu-  thla, has been hidden in the jungle  for four centuries.  R. H. Coats, Dominion   Statistician,  Is Elected President  R. H. Coats, Dominion statistician,  Ottawa, was elected president of the  Canadian Political   Science   Association, meeting at Kingston.    He succeeds   D. A.  MacGibbon,   board   of  grain      commissioners,       Winnipeg.  Other officers are: Vice-president, H.  Laureys, school   of   higher   commercial  studies,   Montreal;   J.   C.   Hem-  moon,    McGill   University;    W.    C.  Kcirstcad, University of Now Brunswick;    W.    I.    Mackintosh,   Quoon's  University.      Speakers    included   R.  McQueen, University   of   Saskatchewan, who   spoko  on "Economic  As-  pocts of Federalism.'-  Ruling Is Clarified  Naturalized     Germans    In    Canada  "Exempt From MUitary Service  In Homeland  German residents in the Dominion  are exempt   from   compulsory   military service in their homeland,  according   to   an   official   declaration  from Berlin which gives an interpretation of Chancellor  Hitler's   recent  speech In the Reichstag, in which he  dealt    with    military    service.      It  states that Germans   who   aro   naturalized  or have   made   their   permanent homes  in   foreign  countries  will not be compelled to return to  Germany to serve in the army.  Young Lambs Make Trip  Long  Jaunt   Did   Not   Appear   To  Harm Them  Young lambs are good "trailers"*  Recently the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, moved its ewe  flock to summer pasture at Beaver  Creek and the ewes, with lambs at  foot, made 10 miles the flrst day  and completed the journey easily the  second. Some of these lambs were  no more than four days old.  "The long jaunt did not appear to  hurt the lambs a bit," said Dean A.  M. Shaw, "and after their 10 mile  trip they were fresh and perky. Of  course, the weather was cool, but thp  observation is of particular interest  to ranchers and B.C. sheepmen when  moving their stock from, winter to  summer range."  It la bettor to have an open mind  than an open -mouth.  Railway Pigeon Section  Tho Nagoya Railway Bureau of  Japan is to start a- "pigeon section"  at an estimated cost of nearly if 1,000.  Ninety-five birds will bo purchased  at first, and after several yoarB"  breeding thoy will bo distributed to  all tho Railway Bureaus in tho country. Tho plan is to provide an auxiliary oyntem of communication which  will bo called into service when all  other moans have beon destroyed,  >.������  m  I' lK,  " H J  Q  J.1,1  M i  r'i*fefiriviii''*"fci'i**,c;  OTTrmr_^  ir'.1-- "i  CIA  aC*"J7  Apply to your local  f       '<*/?*������' or to  ,   370 Main Street  Cicl. ">4-2������6>  WINNIM",****  m  Anxious thoro ohould bo no,dispute  over hor estate of $100,000, the late  Mrs. Froddrlca Cook of" London,  Hngland, dlapoaed of It In a will of  05,000 words. 2102  mm  Coay public rooms nnd cabins  ������, exoollowt food and plonty  of It . .good sun dooka . .  happy days of sport and fun  m . fln������ -steady shins.  mWmmmmmmmmimmmmimmmrtnmmm^mi'^tmlmm^^ '  SalUti* Friday* from Montreal to PLYMOUTH,   HAVNkV   M������NK>ON,   and   to  DELFAOTw     B-BVCRP-a-Ol.,     CHJISaOW.  Third Claw Ocean Rata���������-982.00 one way.  _������lJJ������Y  iw     ���������- \m>     mw      n wp paj    , n   ^ ^pr^���������R"'^Biw'**''i'"'aaw^1������^^^,,|ip(1WJ^w||T,^^j|���������.|i^  "WKfc'ri v,-.'.T. 'f'lf'". ���������"T"-ni"i  :.':-."...-~ ::":���������-::-!'-���������.:. ���������.���������i..',.::ur.i-.;..,.-...Ji..������. M.r..; ^'iiMJtiilliiiriiilMfgiftiiiiiii',,^!!!),!] sa  f /   /. J  /���������iS  THE   REVIEW.    CRESTON,  r*s*ryE*C������nn/VXT        "Q  WORLD HAPPENINGS  BRIEFLY TOLD  Vimy Pilgrimage Becomes  Great Peace Movement  The 400th anniversary of the first  printed English Bible will be celebrated next October 4, it has been  announced.  The U.S. bureau of agricultural  economics has a2stlmated the total  wheat area for harvest this-year in  26 countries at 190,954,000 acres,  compared with 185,276,000 acres in  1934 and 191,132,000 acres in 1933.  Britain has accepted the Sultan of  Jahore's ������500,000 gift, offered as a  silver jubilee contribution to  strengthen the Singapore naval base,  Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald  told the Commons.  The United States treasury summed up its financial situation for the  first 11 months of the year ending in  June and discovered it had gone "in  the red" $3,133,471,295 during that  time.  Soviet Russia's policy 'in the Far  East will be one "unbending as  steel" in all matters regarding defence of the country's interests,  Karl Radek said in an article in the  official newspaper Izvestia.  The venom of the black widow  spider is good for relieving the pain  of angina pectoris. Its use for this  was described to the American In-  sttiute of Homeopathy by Dr. Linn J.  Boyd, of the Homeopathic College.  The Countess of Bessborough handed over to the board of trustees of  the King George Silver Jubilee $237,-  799 and records of promises that will  bring total contributions of the fund  to $420,529.  The government has no immediate  plans for amending its annuities  branch, Minister of Labor W. A.  Gordon announced in the House of  Commons. The present maximum  is $1,200 and the interest rate 4%  per cent.  Alexander Korda, Head of London  Film Productions, has acquired the  sole official world rights for producing a film version of the late Col. T.  E. Lawrence's book, "Revolt in the  Desert," it was announced in London.  ���������  Well Qualified For Post  * nnA,raa>v  8^������*������V T S.. Jf  Obstacles  United States Writer  Calls For Reciprocal Trade Efforts  Commercial policies of the United  States were described by Peter  Molyneaux, editor of the Texas  weekly and a trustee of the Carne-  grave, Mr. de Vaiera's administra-  peace, as "the greatest obstacle to  world recovery." Writings in "International Conciliation," a publication of the endowment, he said:  *T mean the policy embodied in  the rates of the Hawley-Smoot tariff  act, the policy exemplified by the  American attitude on war debts, the  policy which prompted the almost  unanimous "enactment by congress of  the Johnson Foreign Security Boycott act, the policy which every  foreign country encounters at our  shores and along our borders when  it attempts to ship its goods to us  in exchange for our own."  Molyneaux called the reciprocal  trade efforts of Secretary of State  Cordell Hull a step in the "right  direction." Currency stabilftsation  was held "absolutely essential to  world recovery" and he added that  so long as the United States pursues its present policies "any lasting  of International exchange will be impossible." v  Girl Trains Football Team  Teacher Learned Gamo By patching  Her "Brothers Play  So effective has Miss B. Casey,  schoolmistress of Bradford School at  Bradford, England, trained her football team of boys that thoy havo  won second place in tho league for  tho second successive year. Miss  Casey learned tho gamo by watching  her brothers play, and Is herself a  good hockey player. Sho uses blackboard sketehon In Illustrating new  plays to her team, who havo scored  65 goals, while compotlng teams  produced only olght.  Registrations    Of    Ex-Service    Men  Pouring In To Canadian Legion  The Vimy and Battlefields Pilgrimage of the Canadian Legion of  the British Empire Service League  of which the ^famous Padre of the  Canadian Corps, Canon Scott of  Quebec, is Pilgrim No. 1, has already  received 548 applications from ex-  service men, despite the fact that  the ships arranged jointly by the  Cunard White Star and Canadian  Pacific lines do not sail from Montreal ui)ti2 July. 15th" and 16th, next  year, 1936. In addition twelve hundred applications have been received  by the government from ex-service  men in the Civil Service for leave  for the duration of the Pilgrimage.  This event is going to be one of  world significance. It is a Peace  Movement oh a colossal scale. It is  anticipated that over 25,000 Canadians���������ex-soldiers, their wives, children, fathers, mothers, sisters and  brothers���������will visit the cemeteries,  the battlefields, and attend the unveiling of the Canadian" Memorial at  Vimy Ridge.  The all-incmsiYe cost of the entire  trip���������as outlined below���������is $160.00.  Sail from Montreal, July 15th or  16th, 1936; arrive France, July 24th;  visiting graves, battlefields, towns in  France and Belgium, (ships held in  French port), July 24th, 25th, 26th;  unveiling Vimy Ridge Canadian Government War Memorial, July 26th;  arrival England ��������� London Tilbury  docks���������(ships held four days), July  27th; London (four days), July 27th-  30th; arrival in Canada (Montreal),  August 8th.  After prolonged negotiations, the  Atlantic Conference granted- an  ocean rate of $120.00 return���������the  lowest rate possible to obtain. Staterooms (3rd class) and the regular  menue will be provided. Freedom of  the ship will be granted. Cabin Class  will be available to those wishing to  pay higher ratesi Please remember  too that Ocean Travel accommodation to-day is vastly superior to that  of 1914-1919.  The remaining $40.00 of the $160.00  is to provide for rail and road transport in France, billeting accommodation and meals in France and beds  and breakfasts for four .days in England. Passports -will also be provided for France, Belgium and England, and accident insurance will  also be provided in respect to those  passengers acceptable to? the Insurance Companies for this purpose. In  addition, an official badge, beret,  haversack and guide book will be  provided. This indicates exactly how?  the amount quoted is made up.  Railway ticket agents, Ocean Line  agents and Land Tour Companies are  supplied with full information and  application forms to take care of the  many who will be participating in  the Pilgrimage.  The Legion -wiii not profit by this  venture. The organization expenses  will be taken care .of. through ordinary commissions.- Any balance that  may remain in the special Pilgrimage bank account, after organizing  expenses are met, will be placed in  a special fund and allocated to such  veteran purposes as the National  Pilgrimage Committee may designate. Commissions have no bearing  on the price of the ticket. The  ocean rate is set by the Atlantic  Conference of Steamship Lines and  commissions are also set by the  same body so that whether commissions are accepted or not the price  of the ticket remains the same.  The potentialities of this Pilgrimage stagger the imagination. Never  before in the history of the world  has a nation so far removed from  the scene of hostilities left so many  of its dead burled in foreign soil ln  n, Battle for Freedom. In a War to  end War, Canada sent 500,000 troops  to France. Sixty thousand are burled  there to-day in cemeteries from  Ypres to Albert���������from Etaples to  Mons. On Sunday, July 26th, thousands of Canadians and a brilliant  entourage of the representatives of  all nations, will gather on Canadian  soil at Vimy Ridge to unveil Canada's "War Memorial ��������� completed  after seventeen years of unremitting  labour.  This memorial, designed by Walter  S. Allward, a Canadian, is erected  by the Canadian Government on  Vimy Ridge ��������� dedicated by tho  French Government to tho Dominion  of Canada���������as "That bit of foreign  soil that will forever remain Canada."  Major General, The Honourable S.  C. Mowburn, C.M.G., chairman of tho  Canadian Battlefields Memorial Commission, has tho assurance that the  Government will co-operate and participate in tho unveiling ceremonies,  at tho tlmo of this Pilgrimage.  New U.S. Minister To Canada Highly  Spoken Of  Norman Armo-ur, the new Minister  to Canada from the United States,  received complimentary send-offs.  The -New York Herald Tribune, having spoken highly of his training  and temperament, said: "M"**- Armour  has the useful���������and for a diplomat,  the rare���������quality of being a 'good  mixer'. Incidentally, warm sympathy for the Canadian people .and a  keen sense of the importance of Canadian-American relations adds to his  other qualifications for this post."  The New York Times, having remarked that the appointment of ��������� Mr.  Armour is a merited promotion and  also a recognition of the importance  of the Canadian post, went on to say:  "His appointment to Canada 'regularizes' the. position and gives fresh  assurance to Canada that we are  sending a representatives of our best  in American cultural background as  well as in acquaintance with world  affairs. It is highly important that  we should have especially competent  diplomats in posts nearest our own  borders, among neighbors with whom  we have  most  in common."  PATTERN   PRICES  REDUCED  FROM 20c*. to   15c,  For years "the price has been  20c. for the splendid patterns  we have supplied to our readers. We now offer the same  service at less cost���������which will  he good news to all.  Fashion Books ass������ wii! be  reduced from 20c. to 15c.  SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON  JUNE 16  CHRISTIAN STEWARDSHIP  Golden text: It is required in  stewards that a man be found faithful.    I. Corinthians 4:2.  Devotional reading: Psalm 96:1-8.  FEit  .JearBejs  !������  tn-.m-jjj-j.  Vhomaa  mffmm%?U.Wm.%i  Explanations And Comments  Pride of Possessions May Lead To  Forgetfuiness of God, Deuteronomy  8:llr*7. The children of Israel are  about to enter the Promised Land  after their long wilderness wandering, and Moses, their leader, fears  that they may there become so prosperous that they will be in danger of  forgetting God and of failing to keep  his commandments. Against this  temptation to pride (lest their heart  be "lifted up") because of fine  houses, numerous flocks and herds,  and abundance of silver and gold,  Moses warns them, and reminds  them of what they owe God, who  brought them out of "bondage in the  land of Egypt, and led them through  the great and terrible wilderness. He  stops to recall the dangers of that  wilderness, the serpents and sc&rp-  ions, the lack of water, and how  fresh water and manna were given  them that they might realize their  dependence upon God.  It is God who Gives Power to  Acquire Wealth, Deuteronomy 8:18.  "The first and fundamental principle  of stewardship lies in God's ownership of all things. The God who  created life in the beginning has a  priority claim upon all life. There  can be no property either -without  society or without God; neither  would there be value to property  without society or without the God  who guarantees all life" (Stewardship Lessons).  God Loves a Cheerful Gi\Ter, H.  Corinthians 9;6-8. Generosity in giving will enrich one's own life, Paul  wrote the Corinthians. A man -who  hoards the greater part of his supply  of wheat, being loth to part with it,  would have a scanty harvest from  the smaller amount sown, and the  hoarded grain, if kept too long,  would spoil. It is from a bountiful  sowing that a bountiful harvest is  reaped, whether of wheat or of good  deeds.  Recipes For Tbis Week  (By Betty Barclay)'  ORANGE VITAMIN SALAD  - V'V_     (Serves 4)    7 ���������\:y.,  4 to 6 small oranges  .. Lettuce"������������������'.'  "Ji cup grated coconut  x/z cup grated carrots  Pare oranges and cut in thin slices.  Cut   slices   in   halves.     On lettuce-  covered salad plates, arrange a circle  of orange slices, being generous with  fruit.    Sprinkle with grated coconut  and   grated   carrot.    Serve   at   once  with mayonnaise,  into  which   Va.   as  much orange   juice   has   been   thoroughly blended.  '���������'��������� *���������?���������      .^CHDLOlMNE'Y'Yjj  (By Gordon H. Guest, M.A.y  Chlorine is a greenish yellow gas-  which possesses a very disagreeable-  odor.   When breathed it has a very  irritating   action   upon    the    membranes of the nose and throat, producing  coughing,  inflammation,  and:  even death.   Hence it is quite rightly  called   a   poisonous   gas.     Chlorine-  may be easily condensed to a golden  yellow liquid, and as such is stored.  in strong leadlined cylinders holding-  from about forty to sixty pounds. It  was the first poison gas used in the-  World War.    TJie   first   attack  was-  made by  the   Germans on April 22,  1915.      They    concealed    tanks    of"  liquid  chlorine    in    tlie    front   line-  trenches and the substance was used  in the form of gas clouds.   As chlorine  is about two  and a half times-  as heavy as air, the clouds were carried over the ground   by   the wind.  When there is one part of chlorine-  to ten thousand   parts   of   air,   the-  struggle for breath, becomes   acute,  and a man would probably be put  out of action in about five mintues.  Chlorine, in the presence of waterr  is a powerful bleaching and disinfecting- agent. It is used in commerce for bleaching cotton, linenp  wood pulp, and flour, but cannot boused for wool or silk because it  hardens and destroys these materials. The bleaching of cotton fabrics and wood *pul"*"������ for ""-aper require1  in North America alone more than,  six hundred tons of chlorine per day.  The bleaching process is carried out  in water solution and either chlorine  water, or bleaching powder dissolved  Chlorine is also used in preparing  certain chlorine compounds such a&  chloroform and .carbon tetrachloride  (used   in   fire  extinguishers).    It is-  also used in the preparation of many  compounds which are needed in the  explosive and dye industries.  -   Liquid chlorine   is   used   in  -water  purification  and   since   its  introduction for chlorinating water supplies,  typhoid fever nas been reduced to a  minimum in many of the great cities  of the world.    Recently liquid chlor-.  ine has been used in recovering gold  from its ores, and also in recovering  tin from old tin cans and scrap tin.  plate.  One of the most important compounds of chlorine is hydrochloric  acid gas. A water solution of this  gas is called hydrochloric acid or  muriatic acid. This acid is an important component of the gastric  juice of man and of animals, the gas-  trier* juice of man - containing - from.  0.2 to 0.4 per cent., while that of  dogs contains about 0.6 per cent.  Tne acid plays an inaportantp^rt iu  digestion.  Dominion Drama Festival  ALMOND WAFERS  %  %  %  London's Empire Stadium at Wembley Park can neat 100,000 spectators, which lu more limn Home's  famous ColoBfleum held.  Novel Transportation  A method of transporting wounded persona on ntrotcho'rfl nunpendod  under tho wings and fuselage of an  aoroplano was ouccoaafuly tried out  at Moscow* Throe red cross doctors  who voluntpcrod for tho experiment  woro tlod In Btrotchoro, with oval  aluminum covers. One was suspended from'each "wing and one under  tho fusolago.  ��������� 2102  "SHIRTWAISTS^   DRESS   ENJOY  ING   POPULARITY���������JUST   THE  THING TO HAVE WITH YOU  ON VACATIONS  By Ellen Worth  Another smart "shlrtwaisty" dress  with modish Jjosom front.  ' You'll   note   the   back   yoke   and  sleeves cut in one-piece, which makes  it so quickly fashioned.  And the' front paneled skirt with  its plaits, gives all tlio fulness desired this season.  Most washing silks, rayons and  cottons are suitable for this simplo  to sew dress.  Style No. 650 is designed for sizes  14, 16, 18 years, 36, 38, 40 and 42-  lnches bust. Size 86 requires 3%  yards of 89-inch, material.  Patterns 15c each. Address mail  orders to: Pattern Department, Winnipeg Newspaper Union, 175 McDor-  mot Ave. E��������� Winnipeg.  Tho latest Fashion Magazine la  bottor than ovor. Entirely illustrated  in color you will find it a vory  stimulating fashion cdLtlon. Thoro  aro clothoa for cruising and clothes to  brighten tlio lives of stay-at-homca,  Many delightful little models for the  smaller members of the family. Of  course, patterns aro obtainable for  tho dcolgnu Illustrated. Bond for  your copy today, tho prico l& 15  cents.  cup butter  Flavoring of vanilla  cup confectioners' sugar  Few grains of salt  cup sweet milk  Scant cup bread flour  Grated sweet almonds.  Cream the butter and add the  sugar slowly, then the salt. Add the  milk as slowly as possible, not more  than a drop at a time. Then add  the flour and the flavoring. Spread  in a very thin sheet on the bottom  of an inverted roasting pan. Sprinkle over with the grated almonds.  Mark in three-inch squares and bako  in a very slow oven until delicately  browned. Cut the squares apart  with a sharp knife and roll them up  while warm. They may be filled  with whipped cream for serving.  A  Royal  Charter  Has  Been  Issued  To Assure Perpetuation  To assure perpetuation of the Dominion Drama "Festival after the departure of the Earl of Bessborough,  a royal charter has been issued, it  was announced by Hon. C. H. Cahan,  secretary of state. The corporation  will be under the name of "The Governors of the Dominion Drama Festival.."  In a statement Mr. Cahan said the  charter was being issued as a memorial to His Majesty's Silver Jubilee.  The charter recited the stimulation  of interest in and the encouragement  of the dramatic art in Canada tbe  festival had provided.  The charter gave the new body  power to hold real and persona!  estate and to receive grants. It cannot hold more than $25,000 In real  estate. Provision was made, tho  statement explained, for appointment of general and district officers,  granting prizes and awards on such  conditions as might be proscribed.  Children's Orchestra  , Reciprocal Judgments  Fine Provinces Tako Advantage Of  Dominion Legislation  Judgments of Alberta courts became enforceable in Ontario as the  Ontario cabinet passed an order-lu-  council taking advantage of the reciprocal judgments enforcement act.  Alberta took similar action to make  Ontario judgments enforceable there,  a short tlmo ago.  Five provinces havo taken advantage of tho Dominion legislation  which applies to both supremo court  and county court decisions. Thoy  woro British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Alborta, Now Brunswick and  Ontario.  Kansas   Organization   Of   95    Tots  May Tako Trip To Japan  Thomas Bruco knows what to do  with children who insist upon .making loud noises���������put them in a sym-  . phony orchestra.  His organization, tho Kansas City  tot symphony, with 95 children,  ranging In ago from four to nine,  has proved so popular plans aro  being made to take it to Japan in  1930, Bruce said.  Tho children, somo of whom started training for tho orchestra when  only two years old, play such difficult pieces as Rachmaninoff's "Pro;  hide". They also tako turns at  directing.  An   ounce   of  loyalty  pound of - clevorncHH.  In  worth a  Boss (to ofllco boy, who i������ half an  hour latoy���������You should have been in  hero at 8 o'clock.  Office Boy���������Why, what happened T. mmmmmmmmmmiimm  mtmmmmtm  mm  *������BW|ir������3iJirflflii Mifflin "^^  CTUESTOBS MSYIEW  mm.m-mm-m.. *.-mm    -. _ mm . mm    jm . m.    ....a.     m. .  .m-m.*.  ,m.m.**.������.  ������4k*A������4l)M.A*  a. <*.*.. A.  a.  [tmtoln  iiiuuriuci  NOW OPEN   FOR  BUSINESS  First-class repairs to all kinds of Boots and Shoes  Ten years in the Shoe Repair business at Calgary.  We specialize in Ladies' fine shoes.  Best Quality material.    Fair prices.  I W. C. COURTNEY, Prop  Next Door to  LIQUOR STORE  t1 ������,������'������l������'f������'V'*' v������ y^'^'ar*** 8>"v"^>"w  *������������������������������'*<���������>*  ������8r ���������w>-w.* wr'wwwwr'wt  ^^^A^wfciJuA.  ./n.m.tt. m.4k,<������..m.m.+~m.A.m.m\,  ���������  t  ���������  w  ���������  *������  ft  A Demonstration of the  NEW TYPE  MA  an  *���������  will be held at our store  Local and rersonai  who get possession  riyo eo s/;r p.m.  Please make every effort to call and taste this  delicious coffee and see how it is made.  West Kootenay Power & Light  [ 6AUY0B STREET     CRESTON,    B.C.  0.,U(l.  PHONE 38  ��������� *.|8.������    afc   A. A.  ���������>.*i*.A.������i >.������>,���������������  Jb>  ��������� A.O.  ��������� A.*. A.  THE* FRIENDLY STO/?������  .A���������<fc.A. A.A. a>.A  *���������  YOU'LL BE WELL PLEASED  ���������to make this year shopping headquarters for many other  \ reasons besides the economy it means. Complete variety of  *    stock, fine quality, and satisfying service are all factors that  make this store most desirable.  >  ���������  *  ���������  ���������  >  SPAGHETTI, 5-!lis box. saoh.. 31c,  TEA, Malkin's Best, per  lb   SOAP CHIPS, XXX, 2 lbs   ALL BRAN, pkg   WRITING PADS, good quality paper, each  Large Size.  WE DELIVER  $  .51  .22  .21  .16  Creston Valley Co-Operative Assn.  Phone 12 CRESTON  , ���������������*'���������������  *������������������������'������**��������� www4* *������*-*i>*yw><*������*������yv���������*>���������*���������  ��������� wr'Wf" w ww w 'w'wwwwm-^m-mr'-m-w^  mssm^szmH^&smmsw  ^ii'Ufwm.i'iny-8jw*'r.T iu.,!-.  SPECIAL FOR OUR CUSTOMERS  Eg ���������   B   Ifll        I    II E1B  Uf-mLlUN  dLhs^i\ci  YOU S������A Y  2-^8  ONLY  And get, postpaid, a genuine Carlton Blanket, size  about 60 x 80 inches, guaranteed all wool by one of Canada's  largest blanket manufacturers. You choose the one you want  from these four beautiful colors: Rose, Blue, Gold, or Green.  All Blankets are finished at both ends with lustrous satin  bindings to match.    It offers you an exceptionally fine value.  The amount of every purchase you make in our store  will be punched on a card. When you have bought $2.00  worth of Proctor & Gamble products listed below and $8.00  worth of groceries, your card will be completely punched.  Ivory Soap. Ivory Flakes. Cal ay. Chip/to, Oxydoh  Kirk's Coco Hardwater Castile, P and G White Naotha  Soap, Cri&co.  | This Offer Expires JUNE 30, 1935.  FOR RBNT-^Furnished house, sir  rooms.   Mrs. 13. J Strong, Creston.  Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Moore were weekend visitors with friends in Spokane.  PIGS FOR SALE-r-Choiee stock,  $4.50 each.   Ron. H. Stewart.  Creston.  Fresh tomatoes and cucumbersnat all  times at Moores'  Greenhouse, Creston.  Mrs. Best left yesterday for a few  days' visit with   friends   in   Spokane.  Mrs. Jas. Cook is renewing acquaintances in Nelnon this week, leaving on  Wednesday,  Mrs. C. H. Hare returned on Saturday  from a three works' visit with friends in  "Winnipeg, Man.  A. Walde of the Palm confectionery  and bakery, is on a business visit at  Fernie this week.  FOR SALE���������1929 Chevrolet Six  coach, excellent condition. R. B.  Robinson, Creston.  FOR SALE���������Snap, Model T Ford engine mounted for power plant. $7 cash.  D. V. West, Boswell.  PIGS FOR SALE���������White Yorkshires,  will be ready June 18th. R. Stewart &  Son (Alice Siding), Creston.  Miss Edith Meyer of Toronto, arrived  at the end of the week, on a holiday  visit with Mr. and Mrs. SY A. Speers.  Murdoch McLeod, Registered Optometrist, will be at .Fred Klingensmith's,  Creston, at 3 pm., Saturday, June 15th.  WANTED���������Boy for fruit ranch at  Wynndel, three or four months, $10 a  month and board. Enquire Review  Office.  The June meeting of Greston Hospital  Women's Auxiliary will be held on Thursday, 20th, at the United  Church hall, a  3 p.m.  LOST���������Shepherd dog, dark tan with  white ring around neck, IH years old.  If found notify Carl Klockmann, Porthill,  Idaho.  W. B. Martin, who has been holidaying for the past three weeks, resumed his  duties as C.P.R, agent on Monday  morning.  Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Armstrong and  son. "Chuck," of Trail, spent the weekend with the former's father, A. E.  Davies.  Mrs. E. C. F. Murrell and Mrs. R.  Stevens retnrned on Thursday from a  two weeks'* visit with friends at Nakusp  and Kaslo.  At the village council meeting on Monday night the handyman was instructed  to start filling the swimming pool at the  earliest possible   ate."  A very large number of Creston people  were motor visitors to 7 Cranbrook on  Wednesday. The Al. G. Barnes circus  showed in that town that day.  B������rs. J. ^"7*.. ssid "Mis1* "*^*7 H grvnl!ton.  with the former's nephew, John Richardson of Erickson, were visitors at Cranbrook at the middle of the week.  Creston handily disposed of the CCC  camp team from Copeland, Idaho, in  Sunday's baseball fixture. .The score  was 7-4, with Cherrington hurling for the  locals.  At the June meeting of Creston board  of trade on Tuesday night it was decided to discontinue regular meetings for  July and August.* The executive will  look after any urgent business  You will be surprised how little it will  cost to paper that room. An estimate  will cost you nothing. Do it now, before  your visitors arrive. R. G. Penson, interior decorating and painting.  The board of trade has been advised  that the Vancouver business men have  postponed their tour of inspection of the  interior and it will be September before  they will be making the jaunt.  Plans are shaping up satisfactorily for  Creston's Dominion Day celebration on  Monday, July 1st. Several new features  are beino* inphided -to make the celebration much more attractive.  The Grand has another outstanding  offering for Friday and Saturday night  of this week, in "The House of Roth-  child," with that sterling English pcreen  star, George Arlips, In the leading role.  Lister-Huscroft Raiders had the best of  the return softball game at Exhibition  park Thursday evening, trimming the  ladies' Wildcat team 30-23. The local  battery was Dot Wightman, and E.  Armitage.  WANTED���������For month of July will  rent an old model Ford with high clear  ance, and will rent or buy battery radio.  All must b*) in good condition. Will buy  two boxes good cooking apples. Miss  Hanson, Creston.  At a meeting of tho directors of Creaton Co-Operative Fruit Exchange last  week, it waa decided to proceed with the  erection of a 50 x 60-foot two-otory addition to the present warehouse, and to  purchase a new rotary grader.  here l������st week, and  at July 1st.  The very latest in shoe repair shop service is being -provided by A. C Courtney  of Calgary, Alberta, who has opened out  in that line in the former Ross meat market, next the liquor store. The shop is  modernly equipped throughout, includ-  in g  an electric finisher and   polishing  Supplies  Apiarists, we are now carrying most everything you will  be needing in your operation**  this season. Our stock includes:  Wire Excluders.  Supers.  See Brushes.  Hive Tools.  No. I Frames.  VsUb.  Cloth Netting.  Wired Foundation.  The swarming season is at  hand.   Be prepared.  machine. Mr. Courtney utilizes the  Compto process which eliminates nails or  sewing on ladies fine shoes or any fine  footwear. He guarantees satisfaction  and prices are moderate.  Mr. and Mrs. F. V. Staples. Mr. and/  Mrs. G. W. Allan, Mr and Mrs Chas.  Davis (Rykerts), and Messrs. W. L..Beii,  R. J. Forbes, R. Walmsley, A. Walde,  H. B. Johnson and A. L. Palmer, along  with Mr. McNamara, customs officer at  Porthill, made up a bus party that were  visitors at Spokane Friday evening.  Qa������c-k->4*Ma-"u^  5 ������������������'���������':������������������������������������ I  i   : :������������������-.���������-   |  i  Let's &������$  Fishing  Trout season opens June  1st, except Summit Creek,  which opens July .1st.  Complete line of Tackle  has arrived, including  Wei and Dry   Trout  Flies. See my window  for complete display.  8  G. Sinclair  Greston Hardware  w  g  s V MAWSON  I CRESTON               s  ��������� 88,  a ���������   ��������� '  ��������� .   ���������  ��������� ���������  E* 8 a' a-tnrcnravrcrirav aaie tfirirmnni������ ��������� ��������� raia.mtmoog  .WM'lafl'Mi^^  I  1  IT PAYS TO PAYCASH AT THEIMFEMM  3  i  I  5  1  Friday-Saturday Specials  BETTER GROCERIES FOR LESS MONEY  ORANGE MARMALADE. Aylmer, 4-lh. tins $.58  BAmBYBEETS, Whole, Royal City, 2 tins ���������    .35  Choice quality, , _   v  CORN SYRUPiEdwardsburg, Sib, tins .��������� .19  Lily White. |  SPAGHETTI, Canadian Beauty, 2 tins Y_  .21     |  Cooked. ������  CONDENSED MILK, Eagle Brand. 2tins...- .45     |  SHINE UP WITH |  Flaw Easy FLOOR WAX, tin    .29   |  Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Oar Specialty  FRUITS AND VEGETABLES     RHONE 20     DAILY DELIVERY  \ , *j  Time to Guard Against  Flying Pests!  Get Your Screen Doors on  Regular Sizes, $2.95  Early  | CRESTON MERCANTILE  COSVIPAfiSSY   LTD.  GROCERIES  HARDWARE  [tfM#������������%[!^a������i^  CHEST CLINIC-DR. A. S. Lamb  Travelling Provincial Medical Health  Ofllcer and Chest SpocinllBto, will, hold a  Chest Clinic in the Creaton Valley  Genernl Hospital, Croston, fromYNoon  June 1.1th to Noon Juuo 14th. EJxamin-  ationa ut this Clinic are free. Those  wishing n consultation are naked to  mako arrangements through their family  doctor.  Another snlo of orchard property is re*  ported thin week. It is tho five acres on  which (he houno stands nf tho ranch of  Mm Joh. WUnon, now of Oldh, Alborto.  The buyers are Mr. and Mrs. G. Ander-  non of Lethbridge, Alborta, who woro  Window &Gi������mTS6n&r adjustable in length, and  made to fit standard windows.  ffittivantxati Sophism Wfo*e for &&&?>&  jsgftsS Wiwtf&wr&m Best quality 16 Mesh. Will  wear well and ejive splendid protection. From 24 to  36 inches wide.  SCREEN DOOR HINGES, CATCHES,  SPRmGS,mid HOOKS S: EYES  FOR YOUR PAINT JOB we have a good quality Paint that will cover and wear well. In White  only, and you will save by buying by the gallon.  Priced at $2.95.  Dry Goods.       Clothing.      Hardware.      Furniture  ^ ii i^i^i ��������� iy* ui|M ��������� *tii- unfLfvm'im [oil ruy-n n|i v ���������*-*������ -em* ������4jfMm^ irtM** tWn wi-y wwy**r m* i|n "aw irjm- r ���������������* ������������������" -gi1 vm "r |***M''**||f'*'8,*-M*"J8y

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xcrestonrev.1-0175326/manifest

Comment

Related Items