BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Creston Review Sep 22, 1933

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xcrestonrev-1.0174945.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xcrestonrev-1.0174945.json
JSON-LD: xcrestonrev-1.0174945-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xcrestonrev-1.0174945-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xcrestonrev-1.0174945-rdf.json
Turtle: xcrestonrev-1.0174945-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xcrestonrev-1.0174945-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xcrestonrev-1.0174945-source.json
Full Text
xcrestonrev-1.0174945-fulltext.txt
Citation
xcrestonrev-1.0174945.ris

Full Text

 ;,���������;������������������.;;��������� [���������:j. ^:  I  amml   mm. :'      l '  'laaaT     mST"    ������a������     ''^iai  tS8 . BBI ai*Ba! a'  ^rl-'-'N^i  BBS    , BH      - IBB        .4  -A  wxm  Vol. XXIV  CRESTON, B. CM FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,  1933  No. 26  Fakiiig Hospital  Out of Charity  Names Hospital Committee to  Devise Ways and Means-  Will Back Council Objection  to .Canyon   Street   Pole  Line  day, when apple markets were discussed  and a resolution passed" not to pick  apples at less than one cent a pound.  A. F. Rudd took this resolution around  on Sunday to get the signatures of the  growers..  Cranbrook Courier: R C. Eakin, of  Wynndel; was a visitor to Cranbrook  bveriihe week end, coming here to record  a mineral claim. Mr. 13������Rm wan formerly city superintendent and was in charge  of the steam plant here before Cranbrook  went over to hvdro electric-  C.C.F. Active  Creston C.C.F. Club held a members'  meeting in MurrelTs Hall on Thursday  evening, at wuicli SO .members were  present. Messrs. J. Compton, E Wick-  strom, E. Johnson and Dr. Warren were  elected to the executive. John Murrell  and R. Penson wero appointed delegates  to the district council;, with J. Compton  as substitute. The balance of the meeting was given-over ro the adoption of by  laws, finance arrangements and  insiruc-  tingdelegates re nominating candidates.  John Murrell was at Cranbrook on  Friday and Saturday attending an organization meeting of the C.C.F. in_that  city. A.-* a result of the meeting a *Jran  brook C.C.F. Club has been formed, to  work in conjunction' with the Socialist  party in .forwarding C.C.F. work in Cran-  orook constituency. A strong delegation  attended from Kimberley, and returned  there with every hope-of forming a group  In tbs  rithiifz tli������j new few days.  Wynndel W.I.7.-  Loses President  Removal to Nelson Necessitates  Retirement���������Fall Fair Committee   Convenors    Named���������  After a two months' vacation during  July and August, regular sessions of  Creston Board of Trade were resumed  on Tuesday night, last -sdtb .s. turnout of  thirteen members, and with president W.  L. Sell In. the ehsir. The rasstin" yss  uneventful, though proceedings warmed  up toward t;he close when the Canyon  street pole line resolution was under dis  cussion.  In the openii*,������ section the members  were in genial iiood, and in graceful  terms adopted votes of thanks to J. D.  Farris.^superintendent of Creston Electric  ju/igiit vowpany, Limited, for ihe big fin  provement he and the staff have made  in the appearance of the vacant lot next  the power, house, -which has been put  into lawn and planted to flowers.  F. V. Staples .was kindly remembered  for his untiring effort, particularly in th?  finance department, in securing the co -  struetion of the ebsninunity swimming  pool. And on presenting an interim  report on the Kootenay Lake regatta at  Boswell in July, which event netted  Creston hospital $20,~John Murrell and  H. A. Powell, the board's regatta committee, were tendered a vote of thanks.  To further assist the hospital management in financing the institution the  board went on record as favoring a committee of six "to devise ways and means?  of taking the hospital out of charity.'  F. V. Staples and Chas. Murreii were  named as two members from the board,  and the hospital directors will be asked  to name two. the Women's Hospiiai  Auxiliary and  the  village ^council   one  F. H. Jackson introduced the West  Kootenay Power 7 & Light Company's  Canyon street pple line construction by  reading a letter from P. Philip, deputy  minister of public works^^jW^rhhad^eBit  -**-*>.Ml^fcB������j ^-T^^5^alX^^*>g^^^a>^^������^.���������^*^iBa^>^^^r������^^������^^; BgaaS^i"* A^jamamma^^^^m^^^^^my^^^  sent tne council earlier m the^montn^'tri^  . which  Mr:  Philip wanted to know what  the.v'llagr had to say about the proposed  construct ion,; with Mr.  Jackson insisting  that the bo rd shouid-'back up the stand  taken by the council.  "Some   members   intimated   that    th?  matter- was-purely  a municipal one ar.d  that the board should adopt  a hands oh  policy,   but  on, a very  thorough and, at  times   somewhat   warm,    discussion,    a  ��������� motion    submitted    by    John    Murrell.  seconded by Chas. Murrell. was adopted.  It reads:   4*That the board support any  objection that  the village commissioner?  make to the erection of this pole line on  the grounds of traffic obstruction. "And  further,  that should  the said line turn  out  to. be a  high  voltage  line that this  board should  be notified of any further  change of plans."  mifi-rD  ���������em w we  S m%AM ' W   H33 @ fa  nil  iuitmI  m   ynfLiur  1-  WiV. Provide Almost 2000 Horsepower���������pain 70 Feet High, 136-Foot Spillway  ���������180 Gars Csmei&t and Gravel Used-rrTook 100 Men Out of Unemolovment  rt^^ital Coms-asCiee is St-rack  JWTf  ������~^ _   a.a\jfmnrm%.  it*-?  Wynndel Women's Institute met in  September session at the United Church  on Thursday afternoon, with a turnout  of 21 members and four visitors, an j the  president,. Mrs. F. C.Robinson, in the  chair. ,  Hospital and fall fair matters took up  most of the time of the business section  of the meeting, with the following named  to look after the work of special committees at the fair on September 20th:  Mrs. Towson. convenor of tea room committee; Mrs. V. Johnson in charge of the  sale of hot uogs; IsSrs. O. Davidge, candy  sale; Mrs. R. Andestad, bran tub; Mrs.  E. Hackett, linen chest raffle; Mrs. '  Hulme, electric iron raffle.  The president reported the hospital  benefit dance on Labor Day evening a  great social and financial success, After  paying all expenses there is a balance of  ������42.40. In connection with future  dances it was decided to have tickets  with W.W.I, stamped on them, in two  colors, for admission of ladies and  gentlemen.  In reply to the Institute letter of enquiry as to what rooms were available  for furnishing the hospital board.replied  that all ground floor rooms' had been -  allocated but th-*t the Institute could  have first choice of the four rooms on the  second floor. Mrs. Jx G Abbott and  Mrs. M. Wigen. along with the directors,  were made the hospital c mmittee and  weregiv^n fuii power- to do whatever  purchasing is necessary.  Due to her early removal to "Nelson to  reside Mrs. F. C. Robin-son, president,  tendered her resignation by letter, which  was re d. On behalf of the members  Mr?. Slingby expressed a sincere appreciation of -the unselfish and practical  ;work, done by Mrs. Robinson since   tak- - ���������'  4*"i-*-J?rt'j^  that-resignation arid-expression ...oljfegret  at unavoidable'removal- from  Wynnde!  .  and appreciation of her fine rwork   be  ���������recbr^eaAln-the:minutes7';-:":;'.:,7 .-:-U-itr7:.:...7;:  At the..<lose of the business meeting a  very practical paper, which might be  titled, "Helpful Hints for a Better Fair,"  prepared by W. J. Cooper, was read, and  heavily concurred in. The tea hostesses  were Mesdames T. Slingsby, Towson,  Wall and E*. Uri, and the freewill offering  was $1. ,.  (1)' Goat River canyon at low water stage. (2). Arch Dam, with water storage for developing almost 2000  h.p. Lower right shows pits under construction for three turbines. (3). Goat River canyon at flood stage.  Picture shows water going over 40-foot dam completed prior to spring floods. At top, right,'concrete mixing  plant .    ��������� , _. .  WynmdeS  Mri   and   Mrs. T.    Moriey    and  N.  Appeiion   of   Coleman,    Alberta,   were  visitors here, guests .of  G. Appenon and  Mr. and Mrs. Sapello.  Miss Aiice Carr of Fernie was a visitor  here last week, a guest of Mrs. C. Ogilvie  Mrs. Smith of St. Paul, Minn., is here  on a visit with her sister and brother,  Mrs Ringheim and T. Sulem.  Mrs. C, Pedersen left last week for  Portland; Crcgon, on. a visit with her  mother.  J. Wendt left last week for Saskatchewan making the trip by auto in company  with J. Howell.  Mrs. Hadad and Mrs. Reid of Cranbrook were auto visitors here, guests of  MrB. R. Dalbom.  Mrs. A. Mnckie of Boswell was a  visitor here Inst week, a guest of Mrs.  R.,Andestad.  Misses E. Towson und B. Hulme left  last wcel< for Willow Point.  A. E. Towson and E, Hulme were uto  visitors nt Gray Creek on Sunday.  Mra. R. An dent ml and son, Adrian,  were Boswell visitors during; the wceh-  ������nd.  Tho September meeting of tho Woman's  Auxiliary was held nt the home of Mrs.  J. Wood on Wednesday last. Sale of  work discussed and date fixed for November. Turkey sapper discusHod. plana  made to have Lhilil^uly next month, and  arrangements made tor eartering.  A. F. Rudd rooeived word last week of  tho marriage of his daughter, Miss Zolma,  of Lowiaton,-'Idaho, to Claude Slick of  tho same city. The bride formerly resided nt Wynndel, leaving hem last  Hpring. .'i Mr. and - Mt**J Slick will reside  ut Lowihton.'.-  '���������(!���������':']';.'��������� <���������.���������:,<  Meeting of C.F.C.A. was held iu Liu;  annex of the community hull on Satur-  Arriving home in 1929 from a tour of  the fruit distr cts of Washington and the  Okanagan a progressive local orchardist  voiced the sentiments of very mar.y  others when he tersely remarked, "it  Creston Valley had ample water ar.d  hydro light and power this district would  be the equal to anything I've seen in two  weeks' travel.  In the intervening years the irrigation  systems have come at Canyon, Erickson,  East C eston and Wynndel, and today  practically all of the valley has the long  wanted water supply. Next month the  abundance of electric light and power  will be available from the very-complete  tadro-plantof West Kootenay Power &  Light Compa y, Limited, at the Goat  River canyon, about four milcB east of  Creaton..,. ^   .        '���������'   .,  On this development construction of  the big dam was completed late last  month. Transmission lines have been  erected throughout the area to be served,  and work of erecting the power house  and installing the machines! now well  along.  Dam Has 136'Foot Spillway.  It is a reinforced concrete arch dam,  across n 120������foot gorge. It is just over  70 feet high, with 4-foot top, 12-foot  base, nnd has a spillway of 186 feet.  The upstream side is perpendicular, but  the downriver side has a uniform slope  from near the top to 12-foot foundation  which rests on bedrock 12 feet below  normal river bottom.  On the east side of the dam is a 9xi7  foot. fcri-mhTnek who** Boimiim prevent  tho river's floating debris from getting  Into the turbines, ft foot hendgnte ia  provided at inlet, to a Bteel penstock, six  feet in diameter, which taken the water  from "the dam to the turbines on.a 70-foot  drop. <���������     .      '���������.���������..'������������������������������������-',     -,  Construction of pits for the turbines  is now completed. Thoro will bo three  of ihoHOF-ettingH, two of which will have  unitH of flOO borRopower nnd ono of 250  horsepower capacity. Tlitfy sawiiiiatol-  ling at. present, one 800 h.p; and one of  2B0 h.p, capacity..;. >-.. --,'^7;���������',',���������.'���������  BuiiW.0*F<i>V^ ; ,  LastOBt rocdrds indicate that the low  water stream flow in ������00 puhloiifeet per,  Hoeond, nnd roughly RpeiitylfciLjjdio dam  ,will p rovide-41: nfcnd viiv^tng^fvonli 70 -.to>W  deep at. the Rplllwny, nnd' extending up  Ktrtium to a point 150 Usvl ubovo Ifie  traffic bridge  Preceding the construction of the main  dam work was commenced late in November on the erection of a coffer dam  needed to dispose of the Goat waters  while the foundation of the cement  structure was being pla ed. 'This leirip-  0*rary structure was a hewn timber affair,  ������0 feet across, 20 feet high, 20 feet wide,  with 10-foot flume on"the wefjfc side, and  a 70 foot wing dnm to make positively  sure all the water coming down the river j  was taken care of by  he flume. ' 1  Rock fill for the coffer dam wai readily '.  available from the rock excavation on  the east ������ide; extensive excavation beinfi  necessary to secure the desired anchorage j  for the big cement f-tructure. On the'  west side many hundreds of yards of '  rock are still in sight from similar opera- j  tions on the west shore  For the Fafc location of t e dam dia  mond"drilling was used to determine  character of rock foundation under river  bed, and also the east and west abutments.  180 Cars Cement, Gravel. Sand  Into the main dam has gone more than  30 cars of cement and 150 carloads of  gravel and sand. These two latter ma  terials entne in from Bonnington and  wero dumped at the RadgeJs siding at  Canyon where storage was provided for  1500 square yards of gravel���������providing  ample assurance that these commodities  would not bo lacking if rail transport  was tied up for a few days.  From the rnllwiiy tho gravel travelled  by truck over a half mile of.lt ho com  fjnny'H Bpecinlly constructed rortd, beinfT  oaded at the track with a gas shovel of  1M yard capacity. At a point'oppottite  the domsite the trucks dumped their  cargo Into a big hoppor, from which it  won' onto a belt conveyor down the hill-  Pldo into the mixing plant.  This structure has a storage capacity  for three carloads of cement, 200 yards  of gravel and 100 yards of Hand. It Ih  equipped with n one.yard con oro to mixer,  operated by gas engines From tho mixer  theconcreto Went ont on'to the dam by  chu e. dropping into biij-fgiea for distribution ncro������B tho top, whor<*> a ������quad\of  -workmen tatmped It In with rodfl and  footwork.    . ,':,.;''���������'��������� i1--"-  Employed Over 100 Men  ���������''1^Iflv.wri',',"durlnB the springs ldigh   -water,  whori work on dam and powei* noun-*- was  out, of the qui^lion  i\u\ t-oim>Ui>y had at  leant GO mon nt work in various capaci  ties, and at the peak of thp season's  operations 101 men were on the payroll  A Kdhler light plant was in use for some  weeks, to enable a night shift to operate  in safety on ropk work, to assure completion of the foundation of the main  dam before tha appearance of spring  flood waters. ���������>   ;>  Temperatures ranging from 10 to 25  below zero, and lasting about a week.  caused a suspension of operations tern  pbrarily as it was impossible in that sort  of weather,for the men to carry on some  features of construction. The exfcremp  cold also provided ice conditions at the  coffer'dam that slowed up work, a*? it  was necessary to kepp a space of about  eight feet at the dam front clear of ice  to permit the diver to cany on underwater operations.  In addition to purchasing the old hotel  building at Erickson for the accommoda-  ti6n of a limited number of the company's  own regular staff' of workmen, tho company has erected ar the dam Bite an office  and warehouse, compressor room, black*  wmith shop and other structures.  Power for all work is from gas engines  which operate cement mixer.'S portable  camprespors used on drilling as well as  the hoist which was used extensively on  the high line that transported the forest-  hewn timbers of the coffer dam and the  rock excavated from the dam silo.  Greatly Relieved Unemployment  The company was fortunate In having  the Goat River canyon development  come just at tho time construction of the  mammoth Corra Linn dam of the com-  pony was completed, and were thus nblo  to place the local work in **horgo of G. F.  Chapman, thoir genoral superintendent  of construction, with whom ham boon  nsBOoiatcd R. G Smith, general foreman;  A. C. Parker, mapter mechanic, and R.  T; Graham, concrete foreman.  With tho exception of about half a  dozen of their own apocially trained staff,  Went, Kootenay Power & Light Company  havo employed nothing but local labor,  with a preference for married men, and  thia extensive contraction job was the  means of making unemployment practically unknown In thp district la-it winter.  From tho men employed an well as the  general public, who through buslnoHH rotations or ns aightseera as work prog roRB-  ed have como in contact with Mr. Chapman and his staff, high prnl-n- In heard of  tho co'-uUk-nnioii iihown ;iinl (-omU^U^  extended  wSirilat-  Mr. and Mrs. R. Dennis have left for  Nelson for a few days. .  The water gauge at Slough bridge reads  3.91, a fall of .44 for the week.  Misses Rosie and Annie Pascuzzo were  visitors to Creston at the end of the  week, making the trip'by car. >*  Haymaking is still held up on account  of the unsettled weather.  Mr. and Mrs. Eric Ramsden and child  of Trail are here for  a few days, tbe  guests of Mr. and Mrs. John Talerico.  Mr, and Mrs. John Harlow and little  daughter, of Nelson, are spending their  vacation at the home cf the latter's  parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Wilson.  Mr. Kontz of Kimberley was a business visitor to Sirdar during tho week  proceeding up the lake aa far aa Crawfoi d  Bay.  Frank Hamilton, along with Dr. Collin, were Creston visitors on Saturday.  Good progress is being made on the  highway, all endeavors being concentrated on the heavy fill between Sirdar and  Atbara.  Sydney Rogers is at present substituting as teacher at Wynndel, taking the  place of Mr. McGregor, who is on the  sick list.  George Cam, accompanied by hip*  daughter, Lily, arrived from Trail to  spend a few days at their home here.  Tho apple   growers of Boswell are to  load   their  fruit   at tho quarry Biding,  Atbara.   Lumber has   arrived  for  the  loading stagings.  Joe Lombardo has left for Nelson,  where ho will be employed in future.  John McDiarmid, who spent the week  end at tho homo of Mr. and Mrs. J. S.  Wilson, left for bin home m Nelson on  Tuesday.  Art. Lombardo, who m employed at  tho Borosoto ranch, was home for a few  houra the end of tho week. Louis Miller,  also. employed there, returned home  awaiting better weather for haymaking.  Mr, und Mrs. VanAckeran and Mim;  Ethel, with Phonso Iluygenn of Canyon,  Wuiu   V'hiU.kt,   Ut   L'iu   i.ituHi   of   Ml'. tUlkt  Mra. .1. S..Wilf������>ii 6n Sunday. ���������^mmimiWkimm, SMIm  THE   KEV1EW,;: CBEBTOK, ! B.   .a'  *W/   k*. a-KAAjr. 1   lrk.n������C4  17 J.1*CJL*C*'   MJ?\MJg&  SWEEPING REFORMS TO B*S MADE IN LONDON POLICE  Only Domestic  Animal Of Unknown  Race In Siberia  An unknown race of white people,  four hundred strong and almost isolated from the rest of the world, live  in the farthest north of the frozen  land of Siberia, on the shore of the  Arctic Ocean.  They are possibly descendants of  marooned Arctic navigators of the  sixteenth century, who were lost  while questing for the northern route  ** o Zmdi^t. i  To the north they are hemmed in;  by  the  Polar   Sea.  Behind   them  on (  all   sides   is   a   barren,   snow-bound, 1  trackless domain, as vast as a continent.  The people can neither read nor  write. They have no bread and no  means of baking- it. They have never  seen milk, butter, or- beef, for cows  p.nd cattle are unknown. They have  never seen deer, horses, or fowl���������not  even a cat.  Potatoes and vegetables are utterly  unknown   and  onlu those  who  have  travelled  to   barter  their   white   fox  furs have ever seen a living tree.  Their  one   domestic   animal  is   the  dog. Nowhere else on earth is the dog |  more important or held in higher re- \  gard.    For  without the sled-dog, life j  would be utterly impossible to these ; According to a white paper on police reform published in the British capital, sweeping- changes in administra  people. ; tion and organization of the London. Police "S"orce are expected shortly. Publication of the paper followed sensa  In the white wilderness of the tun-   tional  charges by Police Commissioner Lord Trenchard of widespread agitation and "insubordination" \vlthin th*  dra of the coast even reindeer cannot   force  GflI*���������i������Illfl������r Mot������S"  By Gordon Lindsay Smith  Before finally disposing of the sowing and planting end of the flower  garden, it is well to check over the  varieties and types in order to make  sure that all requirements have baert  complied with. One's garden shculd  be balanced. That is, there must be  variety of colors, shaded corners, a3  well as hot, dry ones, planted with  something suitable, plenty of tall  things,    some    scented   blooms   like?  uvuCno axiva inwuuauu.        \.v.ut.ii.uu.<=u.  bloom from June until frost, fences  and vegetable^ garden screened with  tall, bushy things and annual climbers  and a fair showing of the new and  vastly improved both single"and double flowers.  An Intensive-Vegetable Gardens ���������  It is really remarkable the amount  of vegetables that can he produced in  a plot twenty feet square. Sufficient  tomatoes for a small family will be  orr.r\������rri <-������n e?v r>y 'ei������"ht slants. Thnse~  of course, should be staked and may  be set in eighteen inches apart. The  stakes are six feet long and are driven in close to the plant when th&  latter is set out. Pinch off all side  shoots, training the jingle main stem  along the pole and tying it about  every foot. Each week during the  growing season the plants should bo  inspected and all side shoots nipped  off. In between where the ������omatbes  are going to be planted, grow lettuce,  using an early and late type, and a* so  The proposals include drastic curtailment of time which police officers will be permitted to spend at meet-! ^e ^     variety whieh will supply the  live. But the dog can be fed on the   ings of the police federation,  the Police Trades Union.  This organization was severely criticized by Lord Trench- j ^^   during   the   late   summer   and  fish  caught   in  the  Indigirka  River,'      -     -        ��������� - -���������        - -  -��������� - - -    _..-*.,.     -���������..,_���������  along the course of which the settle-   Arch watching unemployed demonstrations.  ment extends.  rd.   Our pictures show Lord Trenchard on the left, and a  group of London "Bobbies"  standing under the Marble { G&riy. fgn   one or two rows of beans  Dogs and thei- mi;ters live mainly  on frozen fish. Even in summer it has  but to be buried a foot deep in earth  to freeze.  Every family has a team of three  or four dogs, and the better-off have  Buried With Military Rites  Gallant Old War Horse Was Favorite  Of U.S. Marines  The sod is green over a new grave  te^mTof"Tmm^n to eig'hteenT ^ey  at *** navy *'ard te Portsmouth, New  draw the sleds which carry deadwdod  HamPsh*e- When the gallant warrior  lying there was laid to rest, eight  rifles cracked a military salute and a  bugle rent the morning air.  Two Hundred Years Old  Just Two Times Two  for fuel and ice from the river and  without them, hunting and trapping  would be impossible.  A team usually consists of eight or  twelve dogs, in pairs, with, a single  Harpsichord In Spite Of Great Age   Farmer's Contract Looked Good But  . Still Retains Tone ��������� | Was Impossible To Fulfil  A      music-maker     of    undisputed j     Early in the eighteenth century a  sweetness,, in spite of great age, was   farmer   made   a   contract   which   he  recently taken    to   Montreal.    Eight  thought was a good one for him. He  feet long, more than four' feet wide   undertook to deliver for the sum of  and nearly two feet deep,  the mon- j ������5 two grains of rye on the foiiow-  ster weighs 670 pounds, but for all that  ^S Monday, four grains a week later,  It is the grave of "Old Tom," gal- j finds no difficulty in moving around. 1 eight grains the week after that, and  lant old war horse which died at the! formal heat is required for its well- ! s������n on for a year. All went well for  leader, haraessed* to a light sled put:venerable age of 41' being and there    should    toe    no    ex- j some weeks,  tout presently he found  together with, straps sad without a^ ������ld Tom������ favorite n"^ years ^^ tremes of temperature. When It is'that his final,delivery at the end of  single nail. The leader of the team jthe United States marine corps, was added it is 200 years old, the further the year would require more rye than  must understand all orders and know j born in New York city in 1892' on information that it is a harpsichord was sown in the whole of England. A  how to play the part of captain. j New Year's ������-ay. will occasion no surprise. It is boxed ! lawsuit took place over the contract  Two years later he "enlisted" with  Should a white partridge or a white j  fox rise from the snow and go away j  as the sled approaches, the entire  string of dogs, howling and barking,  will start in chase. The' leader dashes  in the opposite direction, digs in his  claws, and pulls the team back.  At the same time he barks loudly,  as if making out that the bird or fox  really went the other way. ^A good  dog leader is worth a fabulous sum  to these poor people���������fifty roubles, or  five pounds.  No whip is used in driving, but the  driver keeps his team keen by continuous cries: "Norakh-norakh!"���������to the  left;   "Poz-za���������poz-za!"���������forward..  The dogs have greater endurance  than the reindeer, and can draw a  sled fifty miles in a day. Races are  sometimes held and a team will gallop a short distance at twc.������nty-five  miles an hour.  Once the dogs have been over the  ground, they will never lose their  way.  the leathernecks.  During the Spanish-American war,  he learned tbe taste of war and heard  the whine of bullets, for "Old Tom"  was wounded in a battle.  He recovered, and again saw active  service, particularly at Guantanamo  and San Juan Hill, where Theodore  Roosevelt and his Rough Riders won  undying fame.  At Ol' Tom's burial 80 marines  rigidly stood at attention; it was  these marines who since 1928 paid for  his apples, sugar and fine hay that  kept him contented and happy until  his last days.  en  runners,  and is  the  property o*.  the Society of Ancient   Instruments,  What the farmer had not realized was  that though twice two are,four, two  ���������National Broadcasting Company. It is multiplied by itself fifty-two times  travelling with five Frenchmen with comes to nearly ten thousand billion.  Henri Cassadesus in charge. They This number of grains of rye would  play on the harpsichord, supported by   represent about 8,000 million bushels  virginals, psalteries, lutes and a dumber of other 17th century instruments.  An Inexpensive Sport  Wellesley College finds girl students going for the less expensive  sports, riding and golfing declining as  Greater Than the King  An acre of rye produces about ten  bushels, so <one can work out just how  many acres would have been required  to fulfil the contract. Another famous "two times" case was that of the  blacksmith who undertook to shoe a  horse for a payment of one farthing  for the first nail, a half-penny for the  second, a penny for the third, and tap  tennis takes a spurt. Some pedestrl  ,  ans will contend that if dull times  on* At *"? si.^fc  this seems ^.te  continue long enough a golden discov-  a reasonable  charge���������but try work-  Nothing In Old Stories  'Last  Spike"    Linking  Probably Plain Iron  The "last spike*" that was driven  at Craigellachie to mark the linking  of the east and west construction of  the Canadian Pacific Railway was  probably just plain iron���������tho same as  a million other .spikes used in thc construction.  E. C. Boyes of Craigellachie hoard  ttorics about tho "last spike" being  gold and being removed after tho  ceremony. Boyes askod the C.P.R.  about the spike and what happened  to It.  As far as railway officials could  learn, Boyes said, the spike was juat  an ordinary spike. It wasn't ovon removed immediately after thc coro-  mnony but probably disappeared an  r.r-nip Iron yearn later when rcpnlrr.  were being made.  Abbott  Of   Westminster   Once  Took  Advantage Of Superiority  Dr. Joseph Armitage Robinson, who  once dared to cross opinion with King  Edward is dead.  As Dean of Westminster Dr\ Robinson had been largely responsible  for the arrangements of King Edward's coronation. King Edward la  C.P.R. Was Baid ta have had some differences  with Robinson over the coronation  plans and said "Please remember I  am King of England."  To this Dr. Robinson replied "Remember, Sire, I am tho Abbot of  Westminster."  This instance was a reminder that  in earlier times thc Abbot of Westminster was practically superior to  tho King.  I inp* it out'  ery must come���������that trained walking      & *  Is one of the most satisfying and re  wardfui sports of all.  A model of a honeycomb nearly  six feet widef has been installed in  the Institute of Bee Research in Berlin, Germany.  Hothouse strawberries picked at  Warsash, Hampshire, England, have  been sold for $6.00 a pound.  London paid an average of $1,600  to its policemen last year.  [  ���������   FANCIFUL FABLES   ���������  It haa been decided in court that  birds have a legal right to newt In  trees. This mui*-t be a great relief to  the birds.  W.    N.    U.    1005  Most. F.veryborty Plnyw  Husbands who have been deaertod  by wives for bridge parties all winter, remarks St. Thomas Times-Journal, will now get thoir own back by  deserting thoir wlvon for golf all summer. It. may be noted, says the Kingston Whig-Standard, that quite a few  husbands play bridge and that some  wives uluo play golf.  Helpfulness cannot bo ntandardlsscd.  Giving until it hurts In not a truo  measure of charity. Somo are carder  hurt than othorn.  Scotland In to havo an air -fl-o-at*  are advisable as    these    yield    very  heavily for the amount of space taken,  up. Make two plantings about two or  three weeks apart. Fifteen inches is  sufficient  space  between rows.   Carrots  and   beets  will  give  very  gocd  returns and should have from twelve  to fifteen inches between rows. Spinach is also a heavy yielder and as it  comes  on   early  is  out  of  the  way  before   the   later   vegetables   require  full room. On this account it, as well  as lettuce and radish, can be planted  In between the rows of carrots, beans  beets and tomatoes. Swiss Chard will  supply   a   huge   quantity   of   greens  frbm ten to fifteen feet of row. The  inner stalks are used like asparagus  and  the leaves like spinach.  Onions  could be included in the small garden  and only need about eight inches between rows. Corn takes up quite a lot  of room but as it is never quite so  good as when taken fresh from the  garden,   it  is well  to  include  it.   It  yields an  average  of  three  cobs   to  every two stalks,    and   it   may   be  planted in hills about a foot spart.  Along the fences one can grow melons,   cucumbers,   pole  beans,   squash  and similar trailing things.  These Require Warmth:���������There are  certain flowers and vegetables which  must not be set outside or the seed  sown until the weather turns warm  and there is no longer danger of frost.  Of  course,  in  some sections  of the  country some of these things cannot  be considered, but most of them can,  as  the  farther north  one  goes  tho  longer are the summer days and the  greater  rapidity  of growth.  In  the  flower ltne these hot weather things,  in the order of planting run about as  follows: Gladiolus, Dahlia and Cannas  in bulbs, or tubers and Asters, Petunias  and many other bedding plants  which cannot stand frost. The three  first named should be planted about  three times as deep as the diameter  of the*~bulbs or tubers, and tho Dahlias,  especially should he staked. In  the bedding plant group, it is advisable to secure or grow ln the hot bed  and    cold    frame    stout    branching  plants, leather than too tall ones, tn  transplanting, expose to sun as little  as  possible,   water well  and  add, a  pinch of commercial fertilizer dissolved ln water to the nearby mil.  In tho vegetable group will come  tomatoes ,tlio main planting of cnb~  bago, egg plants, lima beans, water  and music melon, cucumbers and celery. The main planting of tho lnttor  ���������should not go In much before July  otherwise It will como on too early  for -fall ubo or storage. Cos lottuco,  Chinese cabbage and othor fall salad  crops are planted in June and July  and the oamo Is true of table turnip?.  Seeing Isn't always believing; one  eees lots of people ono can't believe,  *  "i  Haiti'* 10BB ooflfo-** crop Ih expected  to total 70.S80.000 pound*..  r-'"  ���������*H  ������������������������..������������.M������.������^M������,^m^������m.���������...... :$���������<;���������:  TOTT ,:KE1PEWS ;.: CRESTOH,  A*.  ���������a  -Am  +~m.      -*���������  mm jgrn m~t'4������m tCt ���������f 4%.  A.' km* &r *������ kmt S? >  Mhm-1  ^mm.  .AA  m  S-������ AW  History CJf The Arctic ^egapiigi  I-  TSJ������  A.  ^9 %jr \nr ���������      <���������������  I^J o*1* **���������* -*> #Hf  Aw  aft.'������B.&&  ���������fa **"���������  in    Arctic  Greatest reindeer trek  history nears its end.  Its story is a thrilling saga. ,,.  Lapp and Eskimo reindeer punchers battled cold and blizzards and  starvation and wolves for three and  -"������ half-year:; in^a zn.sroy feat which  Will mean permanent food supplies  for dwindling Eskimo population of  the northern rim of Canada.  It now looks as if 3,000 reindeer,  a sturdy animal easily domesticated,  wiii be successfully delivered at the  government's new reindeer reserve  east of the Mackenzie, delta early  next year.  Back in 1926 the plight of the  Canadian Eskimos reached a point  where Ottawa., decided the northern  native must . have permanent food  (supplies. Eskimos faced decimina-  tion. Caribou migration had taken  heavy toll. Porsild brothers, two Arctic biologists, were employed to sur-  very Canadian reindeer /ranching  prospects. They finally recommended an area 15,000 square miles in  size, just east of the Mackenzie's  great northern delta. There deer moss  abounds and many other natural advantages were reported.  Three years later, when investigations were complete, Ottawa contracted with Lomen brothers, Alaskan reindeer pioneers, for delivery of  8,000 Alaskan deer. The Lomen firm  was offered $60 each for deer delivered on the Mackenzie reserve.  Within six months a herd of 3,000  healthy animals had been rounded up  in the Euckland Valley on the west  coast of Alaska, fully 1,800 miles  by coast line from the northern Canada border. The herd started its slow  trek east, with native herders and  sturdy shepherd dogs following a  route fixed hy an aeroplane survey.  They thought they could reach Can-  ouS,   iu   4   year   auu   tx.   flau.      Aucau*y  three years and a naif have passed  and It will toe another year before  the herd Is delivered at the reserv.  Ski-ing reindeer punchers--more  than once faced death.  .They took their wives and children  with them.  One child died.      v. . . .   ���������  They  had   3,000   adult   deer  when  they started.  Wolves, storms and pressing food  needs cut 1,000 from that total. But  sturdy skiers reached Canadian territory this spring with 2,000 of the  original herd and 300 young deer.  Wolves frequently cut into th������ big  herd, killed off 100 deer in one winter.  Wolves would raid the herd, kill six  or seven animals, stop to devour what  they wanted and come back for more.  Two years ago more than 500 reindeer were lost in a storm. Herders  pursued them, ran short of food and  subsisted for a week on a cup of flour  and bits of hard dough scraped from  their equipment. It was six months  before the lost deer were finally re-  turnd to the herd.  Tom Wood, Eskimo camp manager,  was lost for three days in a storm. In  Uiat country temperatures are often  as cold as 70 below zero for days at a  time. It Is an unpeopled uncharted  waste, terror of Eskimo and white  explorer alike. Wood faced death. He  Is a man of intelligence who had been  to a mission school ln Alaska. His  strength ebbing, the Eskimo fell to  his knees In the storm. *  He prayed to God.  Today  he  says  that,   through  tho  wtorm, he saw the dim figure  of a  woman.  He struggled to his feet pressed on,  found a white trapper's igloo. Tho  trappar's wife, by chance, had stopped outdoors for n, few moment:,** and  the Eskimo had seen her. She had not  seen Wood.  But tho Eskimo had seen tho woman and feels It was God who ansi-  wered his  prayer.  .Eskimos wore reindeer skins  throughout the long journey. It Is  ulmos-t impossible to freeze in fcuch  clothing. They v/ore forced to akl rapidly to round up straggling deer,  found themselves perspiring In sub-  aero weather. Their double parkas  were damp with perspiration for days  but  the  Eskimos and  Lapps  pulled  through.  It was a terrible trip. Two crews  of herders were forced to quit. Now  near, Herschel island the herd is in  charge of Andrew Bahr; veteran Lapp  boaa, and Tom Wood, Alaskan Eskimo, camp manager. There are three  other Lapp herders and three Eskimos, besides families of Eskimos and  Lapps. vWhen they arrived there the  Eskimos asked only for hymn books  and Bibles. They were glad to be  alive.  When the deer reach the new reserve next year the gbvernnxnt plans  to domesticate the animals, teach  Eskimos "to take care of them,-aa  farmers would care for work horses  more Ships From Churchill  Volume Of Tra������5c Expected To .*Ex-  :���������'���������-���������-,;;;. ^647, T"aat,v;pf LastYearV-  i At least twice as many ships as  last 'year /wiiliioad at the port of  Churcniii duririsr the present season,  .according to information received by  the Saskatchewan traffic ccunc'I "at a  meeting held in vSaskatoon.  Last season 10 boats visited the  port. It was "��������� announced that ; the  Dalgleish Steamship    Company    had  iinw   arrnnirori   -FriT>   rrto   ���������������������������,*���������   x���������������-,*-     ti'm ���������  ;S.S. Pennyworth to load at Glasgow  July 17, Newcastle-on-Tyne July 25,  and at Antwerp July 28. The company expressed/ willingness to open  the season one month earlier than  last year if the underwriters were  willing to extend the open dates for  hull and machinery insurance in the  same manner as Lloyd's were willing  to" underwrite import and export ear-  o-*' ..;  Regarding ocean freight rates to  ; Churchill, announcement   was   made  Jm\    A-m'AA'm-A'Vk i *% "������������������%  Ad  mm.  Jk-*W JL   %m* LfimmmmmUr *W W*������  *"3""**5*   ������>���������** at**** "E  ���������mm.?       ��������� ���������  %/%/��������������� B I  '���������*���������������  S m7*>m>^mA.  U   xxs.  A. JN;:e-w ^*n? ar To Be \A/aged In  Jbftort To Exterminate .Locusts  0id( Practice Becomes New  or rnlik cows;  The SsJ-imo has bothjt,mt the Dalgleish Company was prepared to accept the same ocean rates  from. British and continental points  as now applied to Montreal. This was  the same arrangement a-s was made  last; year. .7  In a fresh war which science is  waging against locusts, the insect  pests which cause such widespread  destruction," the speed.of air transport is now playing a valuable part,  new again. That can be said of the f Experts at the British war office  use of insoluble grits in the poultry chemical department on Salsbury  rations. For a time there was a swim? ��������� ^ain are studying methods by which  Need Of Hard GritsTIn Poultry Rations Again Stressed  practics-  ������Ha������r"*arkttV\ A  Am*\mtmmi*m'*m.A Am  animals in one, for the reindeer can  haul a 250-pound burden und provide  a.milk supply for the natives as they  -3,.     J_    _^_J.1,_^_     rt.....������>    nmm^      AAar.t.a '  Vt\J>    .X.   UVA mJUXZA aa    B^uiuyc   OUU - A.iapna,.    ';  Supervision will be strict  so  that \  Eskimos will not kill off the precious       The relation of, the reduced marine  herd and, in time, it is expected that, insurance rates recently ohtained by ,  farms in    the    rrnna^ia"    Arctic will! ^e Saskatchewan government    ccn-  equal those of Norway's far northern  Lapplanders.  Canadians Are Healthy  Record Health Year In Canada In  19S2  The year 1932 was a record health  year in Canada, in the face of Increasingly unfavorable business conditions. This is indicated by the very  low    death    rate,    which    prevailed  sured in the industrial department of  the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. This large cross-section of the  Canadian population gives a true  health picture of the~ population in  general, it was said. The death rate  of these insured Canadians last year  was 7.7 per 1,000, a decline of 4.3 per  cent, from the previous minimum, recorded in 1931.  tract by negotiation with Lloyd's to  the development! of export traffic in  flour, mlllstuffs, livestock and packing house and dairy products was  considered by the council.  Import tonnage of various commodities during the coming season  was considered in detail. The opinion of the meeting was that the total  volume of import traffic would "ccn-  siderably exceed the 1932 tonnage.  George H. Smith, traffic representative of the Hudson Bay Route, who  acted as secretary of the sheeting  also reported that arrangements were  being completed to take care of anticipated large movement of livestock  through Churchill to Birkenhead and  Cardiff markets. *  away from the use of insoluble grits,  authorities claiming that because it  did not dissolve in the crop, gizzard  or intestine of the chicken it had no  value and should be omitted from the  ration. Only soluble stones that furnished lime or other minerals were  recommended.  Now it has become evident that  chickens must have a hard grit if  they are to do well. That does not  mean that minerals are not needed in  the ration, but it does mean that a  hard grit must also be provided. This  is especially true with, chickens raised  in confinement where they*cannot possibly pick up stones and rock fragments from  the soil of the range.  The insoluble grit acts as teeth for  the chickens in the gizzard. It helps  to grind up food and therefore has a  tendency to prevent crop bound/cpn-  ditions. The presence of the grit  makes the gizzard hard and muscular  insuring healthy action of the ntire  system.  locust swarms may be exterminated  while on the wing, and it was in connection -with these experiments, just  lately, that it was desired to obtain  as quickly as possible a considerable  number of live locusts.  To meet this demand .the government of Kenya shipped several crates  of insects to London by Imperial Airways. Only seven days after having  been   put  on   board  an   air-liner   st  KT.J..I.I      4.1...    ������-. *��������� * ~ % .a-j-   ~m  ^iuiuui,   buc  :uv;vista   were   uui'.'ttueu iss.  the London airport, and were senfe  immediately to the research laboratories on Salisbury Plain.  Mere it was found that, though a  certain number had died on the ioij-r-  ney, there were sufficient' lef t alive to  provide material for a number of Im-  m\r*-m*-n*4. ������-.n~+r. A..mlm.*. ..-._������ *.* ^..ImtmX.  ^SVJ> V������***W      WWO������m9,      UU&JUg      0JUXC     mfa       nM^vu  the insects were placed in wlnd-tun-  aeis and subjected to a spraying treatment with creosote, and also with  sodium arsenite dust.  Strange Coincidence  present  experi  ments is to discover improved methods for dealing with the locust  plague in Africa, and more particularly to evolve methods -whereby  Wheat Loader Gets Same Car Twice  aeroplanes  can attack locusts when  ^they are on the wing and destroy  them by releasing clouds of chemicals  which are found to be most deadly  in their effect.    African    administra-  | tions are collaborating actively in thia  On "Different Occasions  K. H. Johnson, Alberta wheat pool  agent at Conrlch. is wondering wher  it is going to happen again.  Oh August 23, 1932, Johnson loaded, . . . .   , .  .  -    ., '     r-nm.^m      ...   m-    ���������   new campaign, which is a matter of  a railway car, No. 504457,-with No. 2 ,.      f,    . j. *.    .*.  ���������-"ew Lignt un jcvoiauon  wheat for Vancouver. On September  27, 1932, he was loaded No. 2 wheat |  again for "Vancouver when he noti������-������-������d i  Amateur Broadcasting  ouripAuitsu   iuciaiuu   vr*   ������3cuuaai������   J5XGS-  sages Developed In France  An automatic . radio, immensely  simplifying the process of sending-  rnessages, has been developed in  France. The apparatus can be operated by anyone knowing how to  read, obviating the necessity of a  trained wireless operator. It works by  means of knobs, which are turned like  the knobs on a radio receiving set.  The letters of the alphabet and various signals are printed on a dial turned by a knob, messages thus being  spelled out.  it was car No. 504457. J  Co-incidence  it  might  have vbeen,, !  _. ��������� but sow Johnson is talking about his  Discover  Brain  Of  Gorilla  Of  Very Udouble������  He loaded  car  No.  504485  High Type with No. 2 wheat for Vancouver Jan-  ^Discovery- in ^gorilla of a brain I ^^ 9  ^ a ^ dayg &      car No>  of higher type than ever before found'5044g5 came back again to he Soadsd  with No. 2 wheat for Vancouver.  considerable importance to them, seeing that during the past few years ft  is reckoned the damage caused by locusts had amounted to more than ������6,������  000.000.  in an animal���������nearer the human  brain weight than any similar ape's  brain on record-r-^was announced by  the Smithsonian institution. <  Ifc sheds new light on the evolution  of the animal brain upward toward  "the human level, thought giving no  direct evidence of relationship of men  and monkeys. The brain belonged to  Okero, little three-year-old baby gorilla, that died several months ago at  Odds against the same car returning to the same shipping^point to be  loaded with the same wheat for same  destination in the same crop year are  in the thousands.  Result Of Old Feud  Vegetables are being dried by a  new process in Sweden to preserve  essential vltamine contents.  Butter Conference Suggested  -Suggestion  that  a  conference  between   Canadian   and   New   Zealand i  the Washington zoo. It was studied  representatives  of   affected   interests j ^ ���������      ���������  by  Dr.   C.   J.   Connolly,   of  Catholic  be held inNJ^ZeatenaJn^  owners are gradually talcing it away  from them. They are fighting for it  with fire.  Embittered Forest Dwellers In England Blaraed For Fires  It is-said that the constantly recurring fires in Ashdown Forest are  the result of a feud that dates from  the time of Henry the Eighth, who  gave the peasant grazing and other  forest rights for tending the deeer  he hunted.  The feud is being waged, according  to the many people who have been  spoken to, by embittered forest dwellers.  These men feel that the forest is  University of America.  to iron out difficulties concerning the j  Importing of butter from the southern dominion into Canada, was made  Might Come Cheaper  "Your teeth are in bad shape," said  in a resolution adopted by the annual  The pineapple will not grow where  the frost bites.  the dentist.    "You    should    have    a  bridge put in at once."  "How much will a bridge cost?"  "About seventy-five dollars."  "Say, doctor, can't I get alon^- with  a small culvert?"  meeting of the British Columbia division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association in Vancouver.  Russia  estimates  that its  present  population is 127,000,000.  SOVIET TRADE DELEGATION LEAVES ENGLAND  W������    N.    U.    1005  They have lit fires in Ashdown Forest for many years, but recent abor-  mally dry weather has given the fire-  raisers greater opportunities for destruction this year.  Nearly   2,000   acres   belonging   to  wealthy people have been set alight  | during the past few weeks. Aehdown  j Forest   covers   approximately   7,500  acres.  A reporter discussed the motives  for each fire, and dlscovred specific  reasons in each case.  One of the Ashdown Forest conservators who spoke of the feud declared:  "In the olden days many smugglers hid In tho forest and spent  their lives defying law and order. Tho  same spirit seems to live on.  "These fires are being lit through  sheer 'cusscdncfls*! Tho board of conservators represents tho parliament  of Ashdown Forest and administers  law and order. It la therefore thc natural enemy of the meh of tho forest,  and Is defied."  Inquiry From Jamaica  A letter was received recently by  the Rejfjlna Board of Trade from  Kingston, Jamaica, asking if any  Saskatchewan factories could quote  prices on -orango crates knocked down  into bundlea. "If tbwy make egg b:*x-  es they can surely make otang������  crates,' 'aaya the letter.  I  Two hours after the Brltl'di engineers from Russia reached England tho Russian Trade Delegation In London The rat population of tho world Is  left for Moscow without being 'able to arrange a now trade pact with tho British Government. Th������ group nKtimated nt 10,000,000,000 iu������ corn-  above shows the Soviet AmbaHHa'lor to England, m! Malsky, on the oxtromo loft, while the head of the delegation,  pared   to  some   2,000,000,000  human  M. O-seruUi, is shown holding a boupuut of /lowers.  ! being*.  I ;1  I:.'  s  9    is  1.1*1  H  11"      ���������������  A stranger iff!  her own  home town������-  no xelepiioiae  "I never dreamed how much  my telephone meant to me  until we were without it for  awhile," said Mrs- Baker.  "There were no friendly chats  over the wire, no invitations.  I was cut off from everyone���������  a stranger in my own home  town. I'm certain!***' ���������"'lad we  have a telephone again*"  ���������'Enquirer/' unless the writer is  man enough to sign his name.  Nobody pays any attention to a  nom de plume,  Christianity in, action: that's  what the p ograxnme of the C.C.F,  really means. We welcome any  constructive criticism, but no  mud slinging is necessary.  /-���������TT a. r%     m ������TT-r������ nm T  v^xi-niiG. IvjLUrvrvjCjJuxj.  Replying to Mr. Murrell  For a man who proclaims his  program as ''Christianity in  action," Mr. Murrell at once establishes his reputation as a sorry  sort of hypQcrite by displaying so  *���������*-% *-*���������*��������� WW  rxuilitjiiuj  LIMITED  fr*m  loll  W*S  much that is unchristian  Om'-m-.mm    BjVbWj"*  THE CRESTON REVIEW  Issued every Friday at Creston, B.C  Subscription: $2.50 a year in advance.  S3.00 to U.S. points.  C. F. HAYES, Editor and Owner  CRESTON, B.C.,  FRIDAY, SEPT. 22  LETTEKS TO THE EOiTuR   i  Mr. Mmtrrell is Feeved  Sir. ���������I would suggest that you}  use a higher stand ai d of entieisins  than those that have appeared in  your paper up to the present time,  and especially ih the closing sentence of yonr editorial of September 8th.  * Your suggestion that campaign  funds aae available, and that we  are concealing the fact, is too  despicable to bother with. The  natural, conclusion, however, is  that the two major political  parties have been dependent upon  these funds for so long that the  type of politician we now have  cannot understand men and  women being willing to clean up  the mess that the last twenty  years of misrule have got us into  without financial profit to themselves. . ��������� !.   ��������� I -  The present system, which requires a candidate to pay his  election expenses and then reimburse himself by extending patronage favors, is wrong.  Then, too, Mr. Editor, refuse  to publish letters like that signed  BJB  Thc  well   known   "Pen-  mans" make, a full line of  sizes    to    choose  They    have    the  fronts.    Stocked  following   colors:  Blue.   Wine   and  offending paragraph in the Review, which simply observed that  ���������4-1��������� 4\m __*t*������V* *I������*P        aJ. afc.*  cue... new poiti/icai i���������vacac������vioii  which is certainly putting on a  wonderful front for an organization that would have you believe  it has no campaign funds."  If Mr. Murrell believes so  strongly in "Christianity in  action" why his unchristian reference to the old parties and the  suggestion that their standard  bearers reinburse themselves On  election expenses by "extending  patronage favors."  If the Review's suggestion that  the C.C.F. probably has camgaign  funds is "too despicable to bother  with," what must one think of  Mr. MurrelPs sugge tion that Col.  Lister, for instance, as a representative of one of the two major  political parties, has been "rein-  bursing himself by extending  patronage favors."  If Mr. Murrell would convince  that the C.C.F. has no campaign  funds why not deny their existence  in straightforward christian terms.  And if Mr. Murrell is unable to!  ,|do this why should he expect  people to believe his C.C.F. candidate will not also "reinburse  himself by extending patronage  favors" should the C.C.F. gain  power.?  After all we are all human, ana  if we may take Mr. Murrell as  the average type of C.C.F. follower, we would advise him to lay off  writing letters such as the above  if ha would convince Review  readers that he and his co-workers  in the new federation really are  the holier-than-t ou sort of cits-ens he would make them out to  be.  Mr. Murrell's reference to mud  slinging is equally . unfortunate.  If anything of this sort has been  carried on it must have been done  by the C.C.F. Up to the present  neither of the "two major political parties" have had any sort of  a public gathering. So far as the  Review is concerned, as well as  "Enquirer," the request of both is  for full information as to how the |  federation proposes to apply their  curealls.  And it may not come amiss to  remind Mr. Murrell that when it  comes to unselfish effort at cleaning  up a mess his reputation does not  assay real high. Last fall there  was a "mess" in connection with  the local power situation but it is  not of record that on that occasion,  at any rate, that he was quite so  public spirited as the above letter  might indicate.  absence of bitterness. But it stiii  j*Q*ustbe said that the voter with  the open mind who went to the  iCUV/IU      JUfiCGMMg       i������      Ol.il 1     doniuft  with "Enquirer" about the 'how'  and 'when.'  And it would appear that Cres- j  ton is not the only point where  the people have gone away uninformed. Recently J. S. Woods-  worth,president of the Federation,  has been addressing meetings in  the Okanasan. and has not been I  any more successful in fully en-!  lightening his hearers.  Speaking editorially the Vernon  News says, in part: "His broad  objectives as stated, are the very  same broad objectives as are subscribed to by the Conservative  and the Liberal parties. The  difficulty comes when to them is  entrusted the reins of the government. And there was nothing in  Mr. Woodsworth's utterances  which indi.ates that should he be  returned  ner sister, Miss Agnes, who wore white  angel skin, while the beet man wars Lief  Jensen. Following ih& ceremony the  wedding party returned to the bride's  home where a reception was held.  Both couples are well known in Cres-  ton's, younger  set  and have the  best  (wishes of their many friends for a happy  1 and successful future.  Penticton has a school enrollment of almost 1-000. Of this  376 is at the high school.  Salmon Arm public school opened with an attendance of 177  The high school enrollment is 118.  ������  WE HAVE A COMPLETE STOCK OF  "A"  1  BATTERIES  mm,  ���������4  ww  P*-*!  mmf^ft  km  ���������4  1.  2-Volt Air Cell  DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE  CENTRAL   MOTORS  Canyon St. FORD CRESTON  ���������������'������'*'  'W^W'W  ^���������v^p^a^^my.  ���������mwm>wwk,mw tr'm,wmwvmwm~m,m*wmw,w v 't^'y-i  turned at a general election with j -  ssifScient majority to enact any | ������  constitutional measures he desires, |J������  that he could produce the magic  formula which will unlock the  door, provide everyone with Work,  food, shelter, raiment and the  necessities of life which are the  reasonable aspiration of every  well born Canadian."  Maione���������Biccum  Biccum��������� Werre  ������������������"���������nt at mt m mrw.  ������-*��������������� AA*m rr~kfhi       in*   #** afAr-anm* Rr>4.hx  ^fa.KFV     a  Am.   %r-%a*wMa-.. ������VV,    ��������� ���������-    >^-������������������������--g������ ���������'    ��������� ��������� ���������   }&  MAGAZINES.  BOOKS.       NOVELS 10c each  MUSIC  m7^H7S7"T'  ^      Stationery and Office Supplies  Cupid was unusually busy at Creston  at the weekend, with two weddings to  his   credit  on   Saturday.   The  first   of  these happy events was at 10 a.m., at  Hoiy Cross   Church, when Rev. Father j jug"  L. Choinel joined  in   holy matrimony i f*  Miss    Marietta    Catherine, 'youngest  daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Maione,  with Mr. Norris Raymond Biccum, in  the presence of many friends of the c n-  tracting parties    The bride was given !.���������  marriaj-je by  her  father,   entering   the  church  to the strain1*- of Mendellsoh n's  wedding mar h played by  Mrs. J.- P  Ross, with the ehoiru also assisting, and  Mrs. C. O.  Rodgers providing ^beautiful  floral decoration for the altar,    rhe bride  wore a costume of; back satin crepe with  iong veii and wreath and carried a boquet  of   gladiol.a,    She*  was    attended   by  Elinore Nastasi, who Costume was flowered georgette crepe' and  boquet of white  asters.    Arthur Hurry o was "best   man.  The groom's gift to the bride was a birth  stone ring, and to the bridesmaid a compact.   Following the ceremony a wedding  dinner and reception  was held at the  bride's home, with dance in   the evening  for which music was supplied   by   the  Walde orchestra.   And among the out of  town guests were noticed Misses C. and  M   and Mr.  G.   Romano,   Cranbrook;  D .Caruso, Kimberley;  Mrs. Pelle and  Mr. Walker of Sirdar, and Mr. and Mrs.  John Lorenzo. J. Jones, A. Briedo, Yahk.  The second ceremony was in the early  afternoon at St. Paul's Lutheran parson  age where the pastor. Rev. C. Basse,  officiated at the marriage of Miss Cora  Buelah, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.  Biccum, to Walter Eugene���������Were of  Arrow Creek. The bride was gowned in  white silk with  vol. and was assisted by  g CRESTOH DRUG k BOOK  GEO. O. KE&L������XiY  THE  IfcMISLALaX-  STORE  ���������&mr&l���������&������fS&:  A^mjA^t^^f^^Amm^m^k.m>mm^mmmmmamm,AWmmAmmmmm  A   A.A.A,m\.m\,A.  a   a-A   a   A-^.ft.iftnUj ,A.m\.���������   a.a   a..a.  a    a  Choice Local Fresh Kilted Beef  Local Lamb asset Mutton-  Grain fed Pork jtojfl Veal  Spare Ribs Tripe Liver Hearts  Corned Beef Tongues Pickled'Pork  Whitefish Salmon Halibut Cod  Finnan Haddie      Kippers  ml    __.'     __     .'   I,,    , ���������_        ������n -~��������� Amwmm. ���������^b*"b"*bTbV        '^Bi      ���������"���������""ft        Mmmm    H^b S3    ' faa*V ' "Bat  wmm\       mmmf MS        '   *****   ",        2'  fmgwmmmm^      kwrn     tWO   ^^Ssmm^.     mmm.     ""a    ^*E*""*""*Ba a^B"""*. ^"""""""!*>     '*""""""\'  "^^^      ^^^������   """"2""""*i.      f ���������box    ���������*"*   g_a   MTSt' "E9        _***SL "**  *^*S^*ZL     "^      *******    S!mmlmmmm\    I"""*.,    ^5    = ��������� -'n-"*t =2   Ha Ammp'^wmm.    Ammr-^a\    IU.M1A     I^WBI    "BB     "W      wmmm      "bTObjib,   "sU    ~>TWL a"sW "ajW        mmmM  aMHBtsl  BURNSft CubvbP Aw Y, LIU  PHONE 2  ���������w'w'w,.^''B'������������'iB''V'|i>'v*v*viiitf'^'g'^*������j'g'yyyy^.'yBj ���������������r*,y^ ww  mm^imnmnmVwmm'imtnm^  M  5  Try Our Service���������You'll Like It!  ���������D  from.  zipper  in the  White.  Black.  PRICtU at  $1.6  EACH  Siill Looltitig for klkna mui&Y.S.  Work ready wh n  promised.  Charges reasonable.  Satisfaction guaranteed.  j&a /iWmSi^wWis&iSff  Shoe and   Harness  Renairina  FORM No. 18.  (Section 89.)  | GSVHYGUIR QAR A  3 SQUARE OH AL I  * You paid good money for it; you take great pride in it, so  why not give it a square deal. Keep it well greased and oiled.  Keep the motor tuned up; keep the entire car well tightened  and adjusted���������then it will perform like new throughout the  life of the car. It will be a constant source of enjoyment and  satisfaction.   LET US DO YOUR WORK.  CRESTON IffiOTOlRS  CANYON STREET at BARTON AVE.  GRESTON  -tyfta-aPftatffta^  On Thursday night, for the  third time, Creston citizens had  the opportunity to learn the aims  and objects of the Co-Operative  Commonwealth Federation, in a  masterly address by Dr. Lylc Telford of Vancouver, who can well  be said to be British Columbia's  foremost exponent of the new  party's platform.  Like  Wm.'   Irvine/   Thursday  niKht's   speaker  entertained   his  ������...-.- H^.������v...n.HM >-������������������������&' audience nnd there wan a pleaeing  V. MAWSON  CJU2STON    :  LAND ACT  Notice of Intention to Apply io  Purchase Land  In the Nolaon Land Recording District  '   of West Kootenay nnd situate on west  side of Slocan River,   ttt Shoroncrea,  B.C.  TAKE NOTICE that Wm. J. G. Oliver  of Shoreacres, B.C.; occupation ���������rancher;  intendf* to apply ror permission to purch-  iiho tho following described land**.:  Commencing at a poat planted on weat  Bide of Slocan River on the lino between  D.L. 802A and D.L, 808 about aix chains  onnt cf tho north-woBt corner of S 1*. 2 of  D.L. 802A; thonco 20 chains wetit;  thence 20 chains north; thonco 25 chnlno  moro or leas cant; thonco eiouth followinK  wnt-t bank of Hlocitn River to pout of  commencement; and containing 4t) tierer,  moro or lo������������  WTLLTAM .T. O. OLIVER,  Dated Aiiguf-t 7, 1988. Applicant.  Do Not Lose Interest   by  delaying  savings.  TF you cnnivot   viplt  us   personally,  send your deposits by -mail*   Have  ftft-d NnUsfactio-rt of knowing that your  -aaoiaey   is" safely   -pt'otccecd   aud   io  earning interest iCKularlv.  THE'-CAN AIM AN" BANK  mkmm   mmmm XaVkaGaMUaT ^B*BjaV^ajS8������i    aaWafeafata   ^������3 aalsa    aj������>*Ja*aLa\������������������'    B������*BVlVaa������L>    .TtIl nlilr   ^5 affwiWBj"^Sialat    jfrlliilrt   ^f JBai^^JiaTl  OF COMMERCE  Capital Paid Up $20,OOOjO0O  Kciiervci Fttnd $20,000/HX),.  Creston Brunch  IL' L TPorbco, MB-nBUicr THIS   CKKSXOK   BKV1KW  Woiideri  td&ieAFi*  Show Staged st Park Pavilion  Includes School Fair���������Water  Sports at Swimming Pool at 3  p.m.���������Serve Refreshments=  Mr. and Mrs. A. CS-. Mensinger have  mtved into their new home, .on, the 20-  acre tract recently purchased in the Connell subdivision*  Dick Penson has been elected one of  ihe delegates to attend the CC.������: norni-"  nating convention to be held shortly in  Nelson. '.'"'7-7:7 --'  Major Moody of Claresholm, Alberta,  made another trip to the Erickson district by truck this week, and went back  with a load of 120 boxes of apples.  shipping ihe "Wealthy <  apples on the J. W.  ind Mcintosh Red  Bell  (Malthouse)  Park pavilion is a hive of industry to  day as a corps of workers from Creston  aEd District Wcrs������2's lisststute ������-re active  with Its cloeoration aad other details In  connection with the annual flower show  which will open at 2.30 p.m., Saturday,  with president W. L. Bell of the board of  trade, scheduled to deliver the customary  address.  Along; with the display of blooms will  go a school fair in which exhibits are expected from most of the schools in the  valley. Awards are to be made in 22  classes in which competition is provided  from Grades one to eight. Mrs. W.  Fraser will be in charge of this section,  and the judging will be done by Inapec-  *"*-#VS#     F4*? an -nmm wlfAm*** '  kt\Jm       *T*Ufc������������Xal ***.*������&���������  Substernal prizes are being offered in  almost three dozen sections for garden  flowers ana house plants, and as tbe season has been a good one for gardening a  rare display of blooms in most all the  clas *?s is looked for. Mesdames M*!lan  daine, Hayes and Murrell are in charge  of staging the display which is a guarantee that the large array oi blooms will be  seen to the best ad vantage. In this class  the Jndging will be done by J...B. Holder  and C. B. Twigg.  An outdoor attraction of interest will  be. Creston's first-ever water gala to be  staged at the community swimming pool.  with W. J. Truscott and F. V. Staples ih  charge. There will be eight events, for  all of 4&hich at ractive cash prizes wiii be  given, as follows: Long dive. Under  water swim. Relay race, two laps, starting at deep end, touching rope and return. 1933 beginners* race, heats, from  deep end to shallow. Diving, beys and  girls, juniors, under ten years; seniors,  over ten years. "Diving for plates (8),  Diving through inner tube.   Greasy pole.  The admission to grounds and building  is free, but the Institute ladies are operating a tea room and refreshment booth,  with ice cream, and a generous patronage  in this department is hoped for. The tea  committee is Mrs. W. H. Crawford and  Mrs. Mallandaine, with Mrs. R. Stevens  and Mrs. (Rev ) Walker sn charge of the  decorating, aud Mrs. Cherrington handling the health exhibits.  emtAmmmmmm-m - if*B&mUr  Ammum mmmm . ��������� ~*aar mm.m .  place,   which   are  to   be   shipped   to  Kimberl8**r. - j,j  The rain at the end of the week has  been disastrous to alfalfa growers in tbe  Huscroft section particularly, where the  second crop h{������d just been cut and considerable of it iBsccsed to the wet.  ���������**        ��������� ..-;.���������  The Fred Powers pen at the egg laying  contest at Brandon, Man., is now making  & much better showing. It has steadily  climbed until it .is now In fourth place,  and has the^econd and third best indi-  vidial layers in the contest.  pple picking got back into  Tuesday, having been held  Thursday to Mpn-  ���������Mr. sii*3 -sJits* "������&*}y$Tt- Sii"H-if of "Lethbridge, AlKerta.' are here on a: visit with  the former's parents, Mrv and: Mrs.  Peter Burns.   '7       7 7.7*7,-  A. A. Bond has completed the plastering at the Creston hospital, and has taken  a similar contract-on the new residence  of T. H. Wilson at Erickson.  Mcintosh a  f nil swing on  up by the rains from  day afternoon.  Repairs are completed to the old Canyon bridge, and the road was opened to  traffic Jate last week.  An organization meeting of the C.C.F.  was held ot the Community hall, Canyon,  on Monday evening, at which a Canyon  V*.-J..p". vJlub was formed with j? . Knott  as president. M. Samuelson and Mr.  Simister were- appointed secretary-treasurer and vice-president respectively,  and Messrs. Searle and H. Young appointed to the executive. M. Samuelson  will represent Canyon at the district  council. A membership of 11 wag enrolled and a drive for edditional members  will be made immediately. R. Penson  and John Murrell of Greston Club were  present and addressed the meeting on  C.G.F. subjects.   ������������������ ' '.  Sirdar  ������gA������cS���������&on  _ present  Mr.  ouil  on a  aa . o.  " Among the several parties of hunters  from outside points are noted Messrs.  Biackwood, "Watson and Burden of Nelson. Dick Bevan of Creston, and Dr,  Coglin of Trail with Frank Hamilton,  Simpson and Derbyshire of Crawford  Bay, and several others.  Another accident between an Alberta  car and a truck occurred near here, no  one was injured, but the car received  considerable damage to the front and  mud guards.  The hunting season opened in a much  more restricted form this year no doubt  in consequence of the presence of the new  game warden. So far bags are much  below the average.  M essrs. Fred Smith, A. Lepage and '-J&  White, who: are employed at Fort Steele,'  were business visitore here on Thursday  .lasfc.^'7". 77777-7:-''7' " "��������� -"::- "7'7: :"'  MF. and Mrs. Wuv Slean and son,  Billy, of Corbin, who have been on a  visit at the home of Mrs. Slean's parents,  Mr. and Mrs. N.P. Molander, returned  home on Thursday.  Mrs. E. Driffil isia visitor with relatives  and friends at Creston this week.  Mr. Norman of Fort Steele and Cyril  Senesael. who is employed there, were  business visitors "at Kitchener during the  week. ."-*;  Miss Beatrice Molander- and brothers  Richard, left on. Th*orsd������iy by auto on a  visit with their sister, Mrs. Slean, at  Corbin.  --��������� Mr. and Mrs. H. Glen-tents of Erickson  were visiting here at the weekend, guests  of Wm. Orchard.     7 ���������       . *  Mrs. Herbert Bohan and daughter,  Mary, were visiting with Cranbrook  friends over the weekend", returning on  Monday.  - Mr. and Mrs Frank Hueson and  daughter, Sheila, who have been on a  visit with friends at Edmonton, and  Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, returned home on Saturday.  There will be a meeting in the sctiool-  house-at 10.30 a.m., Sunday, 24th, before  church service, to organize 7 a Sunday  school* Everybody interested is invited  to attend. ���������.-."���������  Reg. Hull, at one time ledgerkeeper at  the.Bank of Commerce, and later with  Paulson* Mason in the pole business at  Kitchener, was married aft Spokane on  September 11th, the bride being Miss  Gladys Snow of Bellingham, Wash. Reg.  is now with a pole company at Vancouver.  7 .7"--.7-:. :77"..- ''   .  Frank Putnam,CF Hayes and F. "V.  Staples were at South Slocan on Monday  night for a meeting of the Slocan Valley  Liberal Association executive at which  plans were laid for the campaign. Liberals in that section are exceptionally  optimistic as.to victory on November  2nd.    . 7 -������������������ ���������  J-'-. :-;������������������������������������ '-.;���������-.���������-������������������'��������� ���������'���������   ���������  ���������  Ronald Gibbs, who has been renewing  acquaintance in Creston the past week,  *~*.~ a   ���������-.     B-^-W' ,'as.".4---���������.'J���������   T8v.���������a������*.m.*.���������   ..._   %M*.-.  ICli. JLUl*      U1S     UOliati      111   t CUVlCMIII  VU    ..aymmf  day. He has been a gueat- off Mr. s������d  Mrs. F. W. Ash who." on Friday night,  gave a party at which there was a very  happy reunion of of Ron's old school  friends. '''��������� -j-:.  At the final sitting of the Voters list  court of revision on Tuesday a total of  31 new names were added, and word to  hand yesterday is to tbe effect that in  Nelscn-Greston riding there sTre 6677  voters, a few less thanhalf coming from  the old Creston riding, and just over 800  at Creston polling division.  SCHOOL BOOKS WAITED- Have  you any unused school books, su*.table  for the public school giades? These can  be distributed to excelent advantage at  some of the rural schools, and if left at  the JSeview^oTrnce we will -see that tb-sy  are turned over to those needing them.  A prompt response will be appreciated.  Creston Lodge L.O.B. A. bad an officia,  Visit from Mrs. Beckett ot Vancouver!  grand mistress of the order, at a special  meeting of the local lodge on Saturday  afternoon, which was in charge of Mrs.  Downes. worthy mistress. In her address  on L.O.B.A. work in the province the  visitor complimented the local ladies on  the emci*������ncy shown in.a'1 departments.  At the close of lodge there was lunch and  a social hour at the home of Mrs. J. P.  Johnston.  Chas. Moore is at present a patient in  Creston hospital, suffering with a dislocated shoulder and a fractured shoulder  blade and a very bad shaking up which  he sustained an a runaway mishap on  Frida-jrwhile returning from town with  an eropfcy'deiBoer&t. The rattle o* *������ tirs  chain on a passing auto which had the  inside horse covered started the team on  the rampage and when turning tbe Crawford corner Mr. Moore was thrown out  and narrowly missed landing on a boulder on the roadside at that point.  At a reorganisation meeting en Friday  evening, the retiring executive of Creston  Basketball League made tentative arrangements for tbe forthcoming season.  A committee was appointed to wait on  the village council and discover on what  terms j-*ark* pavilion will be granted for  the use of the league. -Warning was  given that those intending to organize  teams should make their arrangements  now. Teams are limited to eight playing  members, each team having two delegates  on the league executive. The secretary,  Mrs. Levirs, is authorized to receive  applications for both men's and women's  leagues.  Student pastor N. G. Smith of Creston  Presbyterian  Church, left on   Monday  morning for his home in Ontario, for a  short vacation before resuming his studies  at Knox College, Toronto.   On Friday  night he was entertained at a sendo  reception at the church by the choir and  the young people's society, of which he  was p; esident, and was presented with a  most suitable gift by the choir.   Games,  music and lunch were tbe fe**iur s of a  most   enjoyable evening.   Both in and  out of the pulpit Mr. Smith  made a  splendid impression and he has the best  wishes cf all for the best- of success in His  chosen profession.  /;  ,~~)      mi  nnniigii  ^tm\W ^mW ������������������ee ~~~~s~~-r 0 mm  ERICKSON  Mrs. Thos. Wilson is at  visit   with   her parents,  Tingley, in Vancouver.  Frank Putnam was a visitor at South  Slocan on Monday, where he spoke at a  well attended Liberal .xajly .at_ Crescent  Valley. .   ���������    . 7--'~' -���������-7"- ���������"rv-K,,  Robert Burns of Lethbridge, Alberta,  is the new mechanic at the Connell  Motors, and comes well recommended" as  a -mechanic.  ������������������������������������" Mrs. -:' M:���������.-.- E. Bridges of Cranbrook ���������  spent a few days the, past week a guest  of Mrs. F. Clark.  The Anglican Sunday school resumed  operations on Sunday last after the July-  August vacation."  . Ray Crisler is away at Vancouver on  a business visit for a few weeks.  Mr. Jackson of Wycliffe is a visitor in  the Erickson district at present, a guest  of W. H. Kemp.  Lome Craig is this week opening a  barber shop.in what was formerly the  office of the Crisler garage.  ���������>' -   .     ���������'.-���������...j,���������������������������,--. ,-..  . Misses Edith and Olive Kemp of Cam-  rose, Alberta, spent the weekend here,  guests of their uncle, W. H. Kemp.  Mrs. Spedding and Mrs. Baldwin and  children have recently returned from a  ��������� vacation with Alberta friends.  A rather strange  i near litre iiic"   ulaO tins  sight was  observed  WL/^rnnrlol  ������ ���������-  m.  ������-.-^s ~-.  in innumerable small frogs hopping all  over the highway. This was just after  the heavy rains on Friday night.  A*  A. H. Wilson of Nelson, who is working-  this territory for the Beatty Brothers,  Limited, Was a weekend guest with his  father-in-law, George Hurry. ,  Mrs. Bollinger, who has been on a vis^it  at Nelson, returned home last w**ek.  Rev. C. Baase wiii riot: be here for  Lutheran Church service on Sunday  afternoon. His next visit will be on  October 1st.  Some from the Lister-Huscroft section  were out at the weekend trying the  shooting on the flats at Creston, and had  fair luck with the ducks.       i  Kootenay Telephone Company have  changed the phone at Lister Trading &  Supply Company store from a party line  to the one-party phone.  The Raiders' softball team is putting  on a dance at the schoolhouse tonight  with Canyon orchestra music and an  admission of 25 and 36 cents.  A. H. Bernard is busy harvesting and  Change     of    ownership     of  Your   Cash   Stores,   operating at  Wynndel   and   Creston,  into eifect  October 1st,  Corrie,   formerly  of the  Wholesale  takes  firm  new  wil]    go  when A.  Western  Company   at  both    stores;  will be known  over  as  Canada  Fernie,  Ihe  Corrie &  Sons,! .and''-1^^^  f qwiag Your C^sh  ptores will! be^||f'J  payable to them.  Local and Personal ������  Miss M- Carr, matron at Creston Valley Public Hospital,- was a weekend  visitor with friends in" Nelson.  FOR SALE���������4-year old Jersey-Shorthorn cow. milking, good butter cow, will  freshen in May, $30.   A. Brady. Creston.  Mrs. O. Parry underwent an operation  at Creston hospital on Monday, and is  mskirrig a sati-*x**ct.or.iii -recovery.������������������-. During  her illness Miss Gregory oi Cranbrook is  in charge of Creston beauty parlor. 7  Rev.7C. Baase was:,a visitor at Kimberley, Cranbrook and Yahk "on Sunday,  at all of which points he took Lutheran  Church services.7 He. is "spending the  balance of the - month vi itsng at. other  points in the Pass.' **>--J>  WANTED���������Applications for the position of cook and housekeeper at Creston  'Valley Public Hospital will be received  by the undersigned up to Saturday/September 30th-, 1933. Salary. S30, H. A.  Powell, Secretary.   ..-'������.���������'  The rain which set^n on Thursday last  continued at intervals until Monday  afternoon and has provided at least an  inch of welcome moisture, coming at the  right time to put size Into the apples on  unirrigated lands.  Miss Burdick, a missionary from Formosa, will-give an address in St. Stephen's Presbyterian Church on Wednesday, September 27th, at 8 p.m. All interested in missionary work are cordially  invited ,to attend the meeting. ,  Dr. Cougiin of.Trail; who was here for  the Rotary conclave on Wednesday last,  remained over until Saturday and in  company with his old friend, R. S.  Bevan, had a couple of days duck shooting on the flats at Kootenay Landing.  Cranbrook Courier: Vincent Liddi-  cott, local carpenter and contractor, is at  present at Creston working on Borne  buildings being erected there. The fruit  metropolis is enjoying considerable building activity at the.present time, it is  said.  Creston egg shippers are finding the  competition keener than ever on the  Fernie market, due, in part, to the C.P.R.  recently cutting the express rates almost  in half on eggs, butter and meats at all  points between Lethbridge, and the coal  town.  Mrs. Itobt. King of Oxford, N.S., Is a  Creston visitor this month, agueat of her  brother and Bister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.  C. W. Lowther. She; come via Chicago,  and will visit nt points in Oregon and  Washington, before returning to tho  maritime--.  Several more enrollments have taken  filace nt Creston public school pinco tho  all term commenced on September 5th,  nnd total attendance is now close to 240.  If the rate of increase is maintained noxt  year an additional teacher and room will  bo required.  Tho shooting aooson opened on Friday  with quite an exodus ot hunters, but with  finer weather on Sunday tho migration  of sportflmon was very heavy. : Tho kill  of ducltBWtia quite heavy wMi a C-.'W  gecBo aloo lukc-a-a. Gr .una :ippc������r to be  flcaocer than ever this ueiispn,'    ,  ^FO# QUICK SALE^1028 sodan car  .'aw'tyecoRHotflf^ , $126.  .���������liuVwoo'l heater, $14. $0 Wheelbarrow,  /Most now, $B. > .Run* .JbcPi.. W, Bullough School of Music,'Creston.  9>m  'T Rj^YS TO PAYCASH AY THE IMPERIAL  %  Kiuuuav Specials  *r������*~mmm*lkj  <aW ~-mmrA% %A "T  Jp#  Sugar Krisp.   .  CHIiCKEN HADDIE. 2 tins  Lily Brand.    1-lb.  "i���������    *^  55  size:  SAIR DATES, 2 lbs.  For Cooking and Eating. .,.  SALT, 3^ lbs., bag   Canadian.  g   TEA, 2 lbs.  1   Braid's Blue Label.  .25  k BAGON, 2 lbs.,.     38 Cello pkg Half-poundc*. ffi  5 HERRING, 2 tins     .25 |  ������ Connor's.   In Tomato Sauce. n  1 CHEESE THINS, 2 pkgs  .31   ������  S Educator, Toasted. . '     ���������    ' s  J������*������*4'--ta---'-'$^t^m^  guW  t-ai^B BS A^gdSu^mmW L^SmLy  Economy    and    convenience  weather we invite you to try our  GOOD DRY LWm  aa^BV^tV^^>M>AaAa>A������Aa������I^^A������a#ilA ��������� As,tt^,afta^ssk*iAwAa-i������lfca|^  during   the   hot  With our equipment we are prepared to take care  all your transfer needs.  G/QGPtmm}    GwaVALL  of  H. S. MCCREATH  OOA,1L,    WOOD,       FliOUJR.   FEISiO  >  * j^)-+>.0vi0-rw ������   >  i   .   s   i'   i' 'ii ' i  "f   | ..x-iir-~*T-"^*-,*l~-^-'"*''li'*,**r,'T'**'������,"**~i**r*'r*y"*r*T-T-Tr--r  4UA.A.A������*AmA..A>.mm.AaA>.mmaA.m. * .  Be \Wm\M^0 BBlWw'tLv S.  k^ik.Jfc.A.A .A'J JL.A. A.A<.#..aT8,.A. A.A*A. Ai.J-|.. J  B^cW^&MaffLW^SS    m^mwWmwivmWmlWW  Consult us.   W'P are equipped to give you the bes  ���������service at the lowest cost.   Specializing in  Heavy Draying, and Light Delivery.  ���������**'    CRESTON TRANS  PC BOX 7H  ALBERT DAVIES  PHONE 13  i  ���������^mAAAmaimm  1 ,  i^.'<s*i|pri  Hgi -r^pr-a- sy -||-^->r^'iiiMgfi^|-i-al^-8j ^k)t( im^A^fk'mmmuA m\mfkMUw'mAymm^'mA \%~\\mAmn ^ mp lf-^j--l|-j|p--^---^���������-^���������jy���������^y���������-p ������������������y -y-, ^ -.y���������������^ p s J  r i  7  THE    REVIEW,   CBESTON,B.    a7  Where Dogs  Al"aO      I*ran*-ra.af-*al**'f *-fl| **! *i"  Only Domestic Animal Of Unknown  Race In Siberia  An unknown race of white people,  four hundred strong- and almost isolated from the rest of the world, live  in the farthest north of the frozen  land of Siberia, on the shore of the  Arctic  Ocean.  They are possibly descendants, of  marooned Arctic navigators of the  sixteenth century, who were lost  while questing- for the northern route  to India.  To the north they are hemmed in  by the Polar Sea. Behind them on  all sides is a barren, snow-bound,  trackless domain, as vast as a conti-  The people can neither read nor  write. They have no bread and no  means of baking it. They have never  seen milk, butter, or beef, for cows  and cattle are unknown. They havo  never seen deer, horses, or fowl���������not  even a cat.  Potatoes and vegetables are utterly  unknown, and only those who have  travelled to barter their white fox  furs have ever seen a living tree.  Their  one  domestic   animal  is   the  dog. Nowhere else on earth is the dog  more important or held in higher regard.    For  without   the sled-dog-, life |  would  be utterly impossible to  these ;  people.  In the white wilderness of the tun- i  dra. of the coast even reindeer cannot  live,  But the dog can be fed oh the  SWEEPING REFORMS TO BE MADE IN LONDON POLICE  S ������������������'     Sm\  iM,^auat^-BB-   ���������- ������.. <    MBS %J-  Accordins- to n. xvhit<������ naner on poUc*** reform. nubli=ho,d in. '���������-he 'R-"-'-'oh notiifoi   qnwan'ncr r>*iflnm>������ in administra-  %_������ - ~ - a   m mm        j~ j~   ��������� ��������� ���������  * ^r   i^-���������*rf������ ������.    mm ma -m. m. ������������������        m~. mmm���������p mrmtm^mm.   %^ VS.      *���������* A       *m-a*mmSm.       mmmmum A ^mmmjmmmt.       WMHr* mtt.mra m       mj   ��������� T   ^mt ^m^rmmmmy^^        -mm i .".1 *" " *^.  ^J������3       iii       n-AAA. ��������� M.,\ M. B M. (J \a^  %m\t  tion and organization of the London Police Force are expected shortly. Publication of the paper followed sensa- j  tional  charges by Police Commissioner Lord Trenchard of widespread agitation and "insubordination" within the |  force.    The proposals include drastic curtailment of time  which police officers will be permitted to spend at meet- I  ings of the police federation,  the Police Trades Union. This organization was severely criticized hy Lord Trench-  fish   caught   in   the  Indigirka  River, \ ard.   Our pictures show Lord Trenchard on the left, and a group  of London "Bobbies"  standing under the Marble  along the course of which the settle- ��������� Arch watching unemployed demonstrations,  ment extends. ! ���������  Dogs and the'r masters live mainly  on frozen fish. Even in summer it has  but to be buried a foot deep in earth  to freeze.  Every family has a team of three  or four dogs, and the better-off have  Buried With Military Rites  Two Huifcdre-I Years Old  Just Two Times Two  vaiiant via itar Jtiorse was favorite   Harpsichord In Spite  Of  Great Age   Farmer's Contract Looked Good But  Of "C.S. Marines J still Retains Tone j Was Impossible To Fulfil   _...     The sod is Sreen over a new grave j     A      music-maker      of     undisputed;     Early in the eighteenth century a  teams of from ten to eighteen. They at the nfvy va*d in Portsmouth, New J sweetness, in spite of great age, was farmer made a contract which he  draw the sleds which carry deadwood i HamPshire. When the gallant warrior | recentiy taken to Montreal. Eight thought was a good one for him. He  for fuel and ice from the river and ilymg there was laid to rest, eight j feet long, more than four feet wide undertook to deliver-for the sum of  without them, hunting and trappjng ? rxfies cracked a military salute and a > and nearly two feet deep, the mon- j ������5 two grains of rye on the follow-  would be impossible. | bu^le rent the morning air. ster weighs 670 pounds, but for all that, tog Monday, four grains a week later,  A team usually consists of eight or \ It: 1S the &rave of "old Tom," gal- I finds no difficulty in moving around, eight grains the week after that, and  twelve dogs, in pairs, with, a single ;lailt old war horjse which died at the j Normal heat is required for its well- son on for a year. All went well for  leader, harnessed to a light sled, put j venerable &&* of 41. " being and there   should   be   no    ex-.^^e weeks,  but presently he found  together with straps arid ^itiiout *������ i ******* Tom, favorite many years with j tremes of temperature. "When it is! that his final delivery at tne end of  single nail. The leader of the team j ^3xe United States marine corps, was j a<jaed it is 200 years old, the further j the year would require more rye tha**;  must understand all orders, and know j bom in 'New' York  city in  1892������  on , information that: it is a harpsichord   was sown in the whole of England. A  'enlisted*' with  how to play the part of captain. i New Year's Day-  Should a white partridge or a white I     Two years later he  fox rise from the snow and go away j the teathernecks.  as the sled approaches, the entire' Durin������ tixe Spanish-American war,  string of dogs, howling and barking, | he learned the taste of war and heard  will start in chase. The leader dashes   tbe whine of "Duilefcs- for "oia Tom"  in the opposite direction, digs in his  claws, and pulls the team back.  At the same time he barks loudly,  as if making out that the bird or fox  really went the other way. A good  dog leader is worth a fabulous sum  to these poor people���������fifty roubles, or  Ave pounds.  No whip is used in driving, but the  driver keeps his team keen by continuous cries: "Norakh-norakh!"���������to the  left;   "Poz-za���������poz-za!"���������forward..  The dogs have greater endurance  than the reindeer, and can draw a  Bled fifty miles in a day. Races are  sometimes held and a team will gallop a short distance at twc-sity-flve  miles an hour.  Once the dogs have been over the  gnound, they will never lose their  way.  will occasion no surprise. If is boxed lawsuit took place over the contract,  on runners, and is the property of ! What the farmer had not realized was  the Society of Ancient Instruments, Jtba* though twice two are four, two  National Broadcasting Company. It is ' multiplied by itself fifty-two times  travelling with five Frenchmen with ' comes to nearly ten thousand billion.  Henri Cassadesus in charge. They  play on the harpsichord, supported by  virginals* psalteries, lutes and a number of other 17th century instru-  rr-ients.  was wounded in a battle.  He recovered, and again, saw active  service, particularly at Guantanamo  and San Juan Hill, where Theodore  Roosevelt and his Rough Riders won  undying fame.  At   Oi'   Tom's   burial   80   marines  rigidly stood at    attention;    it   was  these marines who since 1928 paid for   "7"I7 1Z~T������   "~a     T������      ~* ~������*--~~-  ,   _       . *     ..   .   sports, riding and golfing declining as  his apples, sugar and fine hay that' ������  An Inexpensive Sport  Wellesley   College    finds  girl  students  going  for  the   less  expensive  kept him. contented and happy until  his last days.  Greater Than the King  Abbott   Of   Westminster   Once   Took  Advantage Of Superiority  Dr. Joseph Armitage Robinson, who  once dared to cross opinion with King  Edward is dead.  As Dean of Westminster Dr. Robinson   had   been   largely   responsible  for   the   arrangements   of  King   Edward's   coronation.   King   Edward   is  "Last    Spike"   Linking    C.P.R.  Wans  Baid t0 have   ,lad   some    differences  Nothing In Old Stories  tennis takes a spurt. Some pedestrians will contend that if dull times  continue long enough a golden discovery must come���������that trained walking  Is one of the most satisfying and re-  wardful sports of all.  A model of a honeycomb nearly  Bix feet wide has been installed in  the Institute of Bee Research in Berlin, Germany.  This number of grains of rye would  represent about 8,000 million bushels.  An acre of rye produces about ten  bushels, so one can work out just how  many acres would have been required  to fulfil the contract." Another famous "two times" case was that of the  blacksmith who undertook to shoe a  horse for a ���������> payment of one farthing  for the first nail, a half-penny for tho  second, a penny for the third, and so  on. At first sight this seems quite  a reasonable charge���������but try working it out!  Hothouse strawberries picked at  Warsash, Hampshire, England, have  been sold for ?6.00 a pound.  London paid an average of $1,600  to its policemen last year.  Probulbly Plain Iron  with Robinson   over   the   coronation  The "last spike'"  that was driven  Plans  and said  "Please  remember I  at Craigellachie to mark the linking  of the east and west construction of  tho Canadian Pacific Railway was  probably just plain iron���������the same as  a million othor spikes used in the con-  Btruction.  E. C. Boyes of Craigellachie heard  stories about the "last spike" being  gold and being removed after tho  ceremony. Boyes asked the C.P.R.  about the npilco- and what happened  to it.  As far as railway officials could  learn, Boyes said, tho splko was just  ������n ordinary spike. It wasn't even removed Immediately after the ceremony but probably disappeared as  scrap iron ycar.i later when repairs  \t'f-y4.  i)(>in<v  jur'.dt:.  It has boon decided in court that  bfrdM have a legal right to neat ln  trort-H. This must bo a great relief to  the bird'i.  ���������������..������*,���������--,������������������������  .       .  ..-,.���������      |T ^   III|_.|[ ��������� |-TII|-..I  W.    N.    TT.     1005  am King of England."  To this Dr. Robinson replied "Remember, Sire, I am the Abbot of  Westminster."  This instance was a i*emindcr that  In earlier times the Abbot of Westminster was practically superior to  thc King:.  Most Evorybody Plays  Husbands who havo been deserted  by. wives for bridge parties all winter, remarks St, Thomas Times-Journal, will now get their own back by  deserting their wives for golf all summer. It may bo noted, says the Kingston Whig-Standard, that quite a fow  husbands play bridge and that some  wiven also piny E*olf.  ���������   FANCIFUL FABLES   ���������  I-IelpfulnoKH cannot bo standardized.  Giving until It hurts In not a truo  measure of charity. Somo are easier  hurt than othor a.  Scotland Is to have an air fleet.  .Gardening Notes  By Gordon Lindsay Smith  "Before finally disposing of the sowing and planting end of the flower  garden,) it is well to check over the  varieties and types in order to make  sure that all requirements have been  complied with. One's garden shculd  be balanced. That is, there must be  variety of colors, shaded corners, as  well as hot, dry ones, planted with  something suitable, plenty of tall  things, some scented blooms like  Stocks and Nicotlana, continued  bloom from June until frost, fences  and vegetable garden screened with  tall, bushy things and annual climbers  and a fair showing of the new and  vastly improved both single and double flowers.  An Intensive Vegetable Garden: ���������  It is really remarkable the amount  of vegetables that can be produced in  a plot twenty feet square.  Sufficient  tomatoes for a small family will be  grown on six or eight-plants. Thsse,  of course, should be staked and may.  be set in eighteen inches apart. Tho  stakes are six feet long and are driven  in  close  to  the plant when  tho  latter is set out.   Pinch   off   all   side  shootSj, training the single main stem  along   the   pole   and  tying   it  about  every   foot.   Each   week   during   the  growing season the plants should ha  inspected and all side shoots nipped  off.  In between where tu���������  tomatoes  are going to be planted, grow lettuce,  using an early and late type, and a* so  the Cos variety which will supply the  table   during   the   late   summer  and  early fall. One or two rows of beans  are advisable as    these    yield    very  heavily for the amount of space taken  up. Make two plantings about two or  three weeks  apart. Fifteen inches is  sufficient  space  between   rows.   Carrots and   beets  will  give  very  gocd  returns and should have from twelve  to fifteen inches between rows. Spinach is also a heavy yielder and as it  comes   on   early  is  out  of   the  way  before   the   later   vegetables   require  full. room. On this account it, as well  as lettuce and radish, can be planted  In between, the rows of carrots, beans  beets aad tomatoes. Swiss Chard -sril!  supply   a   huge   quantity   of   greens  from ten to fifteen feet of row. The  inner stalk's are used like asparagus  and  the leaves like spinach.  Onions  could be included in the small garden  and only need about eight inches between rows. Corn takes up quite a lot.  of room but as it is never quite so  good as when taken fresh from the  garden,   it  is  well to  include  it.   It  yields  an. average of  three  cobs   to  every two stalks,    and    it    may    be  planted in hills about a foot spart.  Along the fences-one can grow mel- '  ons,   cucumbers,  pole  beans,   squash,  and similar trailing things.  These Require Warmth:���������There are  certain flowers and vegetables which  must not be set .outside or the seed  sown until the weather turns warm  and there is no longer danger of frost.  Of course, in some sections of the  country some of these things cannot  be considered, but most of them can,  as the farther north one goes the  longer are tho summer days and tho  greater rapidity of growth. In the  flower line these hot weather things,  in the order of planting run about as  follows: Gladiolus, Dahlia and Cannas  In bulbs, or tubers and Asters, Petunias and many other bedding plants  which cannot stand frost. The three  first named should be planted about  three times as deep as the diameter  of tho bulbs or tubers, nnd the Dahlias, especially should be staked. In  the bedding plant group, it is advisable to secure or grow ln the hot bed  and cold frame stout branching  plants, rather than too tall ones. In  transplanting, expose to sun as little  as possible, water well and add a  pinch of commercial fertilizer dissolved in water to the nearby j������11.  In tho vegetable group wiil come  tomatoes ,tho main planting of cabbage, egg plants, lima beans, water  and music melon, cucumbers and celery. The main planting of tho latter  should not go In much before July  otherwise it will como on, too early  for fall use or storage. Cos lettuce,  Chinese cabbage and other fall salad  crops are planted ln June and July  and the same Is truo of table turnip*-.  Seeing Isn't always believing; one.  Keen lots of pooplo ono can't believe,  Haitl'M 1038 coffee crop is expected  to total 70,380,000 pound*.  \  ^A  mmmm  Mi  ���������i   m  ������.***JtMM*,,.*4W**������<W*  liiiliiiiiiiliif ni  tee  m  aaa-si  am  the  Review,  creston. 'b.  a  /  "v**7-  jFCeincleer Trek In Trie  Greatest   Kemd  History* Of Tne Arctic Regions  Is  Now --'-N earing  An  End  Greatest reindeer trek in Arctic  history nears its end.  Its story is a thrilling saga.  Lapp and Eskimo reindeer punchers battled cold and blizzards and  Starvation and wolves for three and  a half years in a mercy feat which  wilL mean permanent food supplies  "for dwindling Eskimo population of  the northern rim of Canada.  It now looks as if 8,000 reindeer,  a sturdy animal easily domesticated,  will be successfully delivered at the  government's new reindeer reserve  east   of   the   Mackenzie   delta   early  *-"*��������� *-*���������������������������������*'     *j>m*������ >���������������  *mAAm.*-tam. %y\m-%A>A.m-  Back in 1926 the plight of the  , Canadian Eskimos reached a point  where Ottawa decided the northern  native must have permanent focd  supplies. Eskimos faced decicaina-  tion. Caribou migration had taken  fccavy tell. Porsild brothers, two Arctic biologists, were employed to sur-  very Canadian reindeer ranching  prospects.     They finally recommend-  but  the  Eskimos  and LaPP**  pulled  through.  It whs a terrible trip. Two crews  of herders were forced to quit. Now  More Ships From Churchill  Volume  O? Traiffic Expected To Exceed That Of Last Year  At least twice - as many ships as  last year will load at the port of  Charchril during the present season,  according to. information received by  the Saskatchewan traffic ccunc-l at a  meeting held in Saskatoon.  Last season 10 boats visited the  port.     It   was   announced   that   the  Aeroplane Will Be Used Xn  AJM^ Warl o J3e \^/ageel In  Effort To E  *,.    . Sj  jL^xterminate jLujocixsis  Old Practice Becomes New  near Kersehel Island the herd is in S DaWsh Steamship;   Company   had  charge of Andrew Balir, veteran Lapp  now armn^ed for the first boat, the  bos3, and Tom Wood, Alaskan Eskimo, camp manager. There are three  .other Lapp herders and three Eskimos, besides families of Eskimos and  Lapps. -When they arrived there the  Eskimos asked only for hymn books  and Bibles. They were glad to be  alive.  When the deer reach the new. reserve next year the governmnt plans  to domesticate the animals, teach.  Eskimos to take care of them, &s  farmers would care for work horses  or milk cows. The Eskimo has both  animals is one, for the reindeer can  haul a 250-pound burden and provide  a milk supply for the natives as they  do in northern Europe and Alaska.  S.S."Pennyworth to load at Glasgow  July 17, Newcastle-on-Tyne July 25,  and at Antwerp July 28. The company expressed willingness to open  the season one month earlier than  last year if the underwriters were  willing to extend the open dates for  hull and machinery insurance in the  same manner as Lloyd's were willing  to underwrite import and export cargo.      ,,; '���������;���������':   7 \     \'~  Regarding ocean freight rates to  Churchill, announcement -was made  that the Dalgleish Cpmpany was prepared to accept the same ocean rates  frcm. British, and continental points  as now applied to Montreal. This was  the same arrangement as was made  Need Of Hard Grits In Poultry Rations Again Stressed  Sonne  tun.es  old  practices   uscosis  In a fresh war which science is  waging against locusts, the insect  pests which cause such widespread  destruction, the speed of air transport is now playing a valuable part.  Experts   at  the  British  war office  new again. That can be said of the f  use of insoluble grits in the poultry  chemical/, department    on    Salsbury  rations. For a time there was a swing  plain are studying methods by which  locust swarms may be exterminated  while on the wing, and it was in connection with these experiments, just  lately, that it was desired to obtain  away from the use of insoluble grits,  authorities claiming that because it  did not, dissolve in the crop,' gizzard  or intestine of the chicken it had no  value and should be omitted from the'as quickly as possible a considerable  ration. Only soluble stones that fur-   number of live locusts.  Dished lime  or other minerals were j     To meet this demand the govern-  recommended. i meat of Kenya shipped several crates  Now  it  has  become   evident   that j of insects to London by Imperial Air-  chickens must have  a hard grit  if  wsiys- Only seven days after having  Supervision will  be strict so * that,lasfc year  theyxare to do well. That does not  mean that minerals are not needed in  the ration, but it does mean that a  hard grit must also be provided. This  is especially true with chickens raised  in confinement where they cannot pos-  great northern delta. There deer moss  abounds and many other natural advantages were reported.  Three years later, when investigations were complete,. Ottawa, contracted with Lomen brothers, Alaskan reindeer pioneers, for delivery of  3,000 Alaskan deer. The Lomen firm  was offered $60 each for deer delivered on the Mackenzie reserve.  Within six months a herd of 3,000  healthy animals had been rounded up  Ln the Buckland Valley on the west  coast of Alaska, fully 1,800 miles  by coast line from the northern Canada border. The herd started its slow  trek east, with native herders and  sturdy shepherd dogs following a  route fixed by an aeroplane survey.  They thought they could reach Canada in  a 3'ear and a half.    Already  uaj. cc   y cat c   auu  Canadians Are Healthy  Record  Health  fear  In   Canada  In  X.99/P  The year 1932 was a record health  year" in Canada, in the face of increasingly unfavorable business conditions. This is indicated by the very  WW  Ifm v. V &.Xmm.mm  it   Mstbii   uave   posacu  and it  will  be  another year before  the herd is delivered at the reserv.  Ski-ing' reindeer punchers more  than once faced death.  They took their wives and childre*a  with them.  One child died.  They had 3,000 adult "Seer when  they started.  Wolves, storms and pressing food  needs cut 1,000 from, that total. But  sturdy skiers reached Canadian territory this spring with 2,000 of the  original herd and 300 young deer.  Wolves frequently cut into the big  herd, killed off 100 deer in one winter.  Wolves would raid the herd, kill six  or seven animals, stop to devour, what  they wanted and come back for more.  Two years ago more than 500 reindeer were lost in a storm. Herders  pursued them, ran short of food and  subsisted for a week on a cup of flour  and bits of hard dough scraped from  their equipment. It was six months  before the lost deer were finally re-  turnd to the herd.  Tom Wood, Eskimo camp manager,  was lost for three days in a storm. In  that country tenciperatures are often  as cold as 70 below zero for days at a  time. It is an unpeopled uncharted  waste, terror of Eskimo and white  explorer alike. Wood faced death. He  Is a man of intelligence who had been  to a mission school in Alaska. His  ���������strength ebbing, the Eskimo fell to  his knees In tho storm.  He prayed to God.  Today he says that, through tho  storm, ho saw the d������m flffuro of a  woman.  Ho struggled to his feet pressed on,  found a whlto trapper's igloo. The  trapper's wife, by chance, had stepped outdoors for a few moments and  the Eskimo had seen her. She had not  oeen Wood.'  But the Eskimo had seen the woman and. feels It was God who answered his prayer.  Eskimos woro reindeer skins  throughout the long journey. It Is  iilmoyt impouuiblc to freeze in such  clothing. They woro forced to ski rapidly to round up straggling doer,  found themselves perspiring in RUb-  -sero weather. Thoir double parkas  wero damp with perspiration for days  among nearly 1,250,000 Canadians insured in the industrial department of  the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. This large cross-section of the  Canadian population gives a true  health picture of the population in  general, it was said. The death rate  of these insured Canadians last year  Was 7.7 per 1,000," a decline of 4.3 per  cent, from the previous minimum recorded in 1931.  Eskimos. will not kill off the precious  herd and, in time, it is expected that', insurance rates recently obtained by ,  ed an area 15,000 square miles in, farms in the' Canadian Arctic will toe Saskatchewan government c:n-'  size,   just   east   of   the   Mackenzie^; equal those of Norway������s far northern  tract by negotiation with Lloyd's to  the development - of export traffic xia  flour, millstuffs, livestock and packing house and dairy products was  considered by the council.  Import tonnage of various commodities during the coming season  was considered in detail. The opinion of the meeting was that the total  volume of import traffic would considerably exceed the 1932 tonnage.  George H. Smith, traffic representative of the Hudson Bay Route, who  acted as secretary of the meeting  also reported that arrangements were  being completed to take care of anticipated large movement of livestock  through Churchill to Birkenhead and  Cardiff markets.  The relation of the reduced marine ' sibly P:ck ������P stones and rock frag-  ments from  the soil of the vange.  The insoluble grit acts as teeth for  +h>*  f.V,'r.1r  A-n e������    .v.  ������-*������������  ������./������     ****-   *������*���������������>������������������  to grinc* up food and therefore has a  tendency to prevent crop bound eruditions. The presence of the grit  makes the gizzard hard and.muscular  insuring healthy action of th-  system.  been put on board an air-liner at  Nairobi, the locusts were unloaded at  the London airport, and were sent  immediately to the research laboratories on Salisbury Plain.  . Here it was found that, though a  certain number had died on the journey, there were sufficient left alive to  provide material for a number of important tests, during some of which  the Insects were placed in wind-tunnels and subjected to a spraying treatment with creosote, and also with  sodium, arsenite dust.  The idea of the present experiments is to discover improved methods for dealing with, the locust  plague in Africa, and more particularly to evolve methods whereby,  aeroplanes can attack locusts when  they are on the wing and destroy  ������-H*������r������i by releasing clouds of chemicals  New Light On Evolution  Strange Coincidence  Wheat Loader Gets Same Car Twice  On Different Occasions       t  K. H. Johnson, Alberta wheat pool      ... _      .������*.. *. ^    j, .  .     .   _.      ...       ���������     *���������   .        ^L       which are found to be most deadly  agent at Connch, Is wondering wher   ta ^ effecfc     ^^   adm|nJsteft_  it is going to happen again. !    ' ...       .. -..    ,   ,_ ...  ^    a 4. nr,  JJ~n   -f. ,    j,  ,   tions are collaborating actively in this  On August 23, 1932, Johnson loaded . . . r ��������� **        ������  '    -_'.__      ...   ,._    _   new campaign, which is a matter of  a railway car, No. 504457, with No. 2 I . ,      f.    . '       ������. ���������      ' *    a.*. _' i.  ...-,, -        ^v������a     ^     I considerable importance to them, see-  wheat for Vancouver. On September i,      ...   .    .      .. ��������� ^       ,.^1������������ i*.  '���������������   -������o������  *. .    .* ^ ^-r     ������     i.    * ; Ing- that during the past few years it  27, 1932, he was loaded No. 2 wheat!. &     .        .... - - -���������.. ,~  ���������    ,    _     ... .       . ..     , ��������� is recKonea tne aamage causea oy lo-  agaln for Vancouver when he noticed        i^. ������   -.a a.,.      ������  ,. n    _T     ,_���������..-��������� , custs had amounted to more than ������6,-  it was car No. 504457. '  Amateur Broadcasting  SimpUfied M-dthod  Of  Sending  Messages "Developed In - fSranica..'  An automatic radio, immensely  simplifying the process of sending  messages, has been developed !n  Prance. The apparatus can be operated by anyone knowing how to  read, obviating the necessity of a  trained wireless operator. It works by  means of knobs, which are turned like  the knobs on a radio receiving set.  The letters of the alphabet and various signals are printed on a dial turned by a knob, messages thus being  spelled out,  Co-incidence  it might  have   been,,  but now Johnson is talkine- about his  Discover  Brain  Of   Gorilla  Of   very   ���������double,.   He loaded  car No.  504485  _ High Type with No. 2 wheat for Vancouver Jan-  Discovery in a, gorilla of a brain. ^^ Q  And a few days &go c3lT No.  of higher type than ever before found 5044g5 ^ me ba6k -^ to be loaded  human i with NtK 2 wheat for Vancouver/  in   aa    animal���������nearer    the  brain weight than any similar ape's  brain on record���������was '������������������ announced by  the Smithsonian institution.  It sheds new light on the evolution  of the. animal brain upward toward ^^5^^  the human level, thought giving no  direct evidence of relationship of men  and monkeys. The brain belonged to  Okero, little three-year-old baby gor  Odds against the same car returning to the same shipping point to be  loaded with the same wheat for same  000.000.  Result Of Old Feud  Embittered Forest Dwellers In England Blamed For Fires  It is said that the constantly recurring fires in Ashdown Forest are  the result of a feud that dates from,  the time of  Henry  the  Eighth, who  destination in the same crop year are  gave the peasant grazing and other  forest rights  for  tending  the  deeer  he hunted.  .. The feud is being waged, according  to the many people who have been  spoken to, by embittered forest dw������i=  Butter Conference Suggested  Suggestion that  a  conference  be  ilia, that died several months ago at  tween   Canadian   and  New   Zealand i "������~~  the Washington zoo. It was studied representatives  of  affected  interests.    Thege men feel thBt ^ totemt ijS  by  Dr.  C.  J.  Connolly,   of  Catholic  be held in New Zealand in an attempt | ^^ heritage>    &nd    ^^    property  Vegetables- are being dried by a  new process in Sweden to preserve  essential vitamlne contents.  University of America.  a  The pineapple will not grow where  the frost bites.  Might Gome, Cheaper  "Your teeth >re in bad shape,"  the dentist.    "You    should" have  bridge put in at once."  "How much will a bridge cost?"  "About seventy-five dollars."  "Say, doctor, can't I get aim* with  a small culvert?"  to iron out difficulties concerning the ���������  importing of butter from the southern dominion into Canada, was made  sai3 in a resolution adopted by the annual  meeting of the British Columbia division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association in Vancouver.  Russia  estimates  that  its  present  population is 127,000,000. v  SOVIET TRADE DELEGATION LEAVES ENGLAND  ���������W.    N.    U.    1005  .owners are gradually taking it away  from them. They are fighting for it  with fire.  They have lit fires in Ashdown Forest for many years, but recent abor-  mally dry weather has given the fire-  raisers greater opportunities for destruction this year.  Nearly 2,000 acres belonging to  wealthy people have been set alight  during the past few weeks. Ashdown  Forest covers approximately 7,500  acres. N  A reporter discussed thc motives  for each fire, and discovred specific  reasons in each case.  One of the Ashdown Forest conservators who spoke of the feud do-  clarcd:  "In tho olden days many smugglers hid in the forest and -spent  their lives defying law and order. Tho  samo spirit seems to live on.  "These fires are being lit through  sheer 'cussedness'! The board of conservators represents tho parliament  of Ashdown Forest and administers  law and order. It is therefore tho natural enemy of the men of the forest,  and is defied,"  Inquiry From ������VnJvu\ica  A letter was received recently by  the Regina Board of Trade from  Kingston, Jamaica, "asking If any  Saskatchewan factories could quote  prices on orange crates knocked down  Into huni-tla***-, "If th<������y mnlr������������ -pr; breves thoy can surely make ornnga  crates,' 'saya the letter.  }  Two houra aftor the British onglnoora from Russia reached England tho Russian Trade Delegation in Ijondbn The rat population of the world is  loft for Moscow without being ab!o to arrange a now trade pact with tho British Government. The group estimated at 10,000,000,000 tin com*  above shows tho Soviet Ambassador to England, M. Maisky, on the extreme left, while tho bead of tho delegation, pared  to some   2,000,000,000  human  M. Ozerflkl, Is shown holding a boupuet of flowers.  4  being*. ���������nai  HH  *%%*  u  n  wy.uy.y iw'i y yy.ua.nju. ap.  ���������VS'T'  aw^y^qy^y������a.^|wa������qya8*By ^i^^^nr^y i^u'w^y nyp ���������^y^-na^y n \mp wi^mT-^^^m**^wmm--^mwmr-mr  ft  i-'t  i'"t  H '  r  "  ;.  I  *"���������****>������"���������*-*i~5 SS SmS^a^m mm&mmSmfmASS'S"������L* ma9B������pmA  mmmflKMLWp    &%WGm ������PB7ET-������eVafmv W������9    WwS  Take advantage of these before the market goes up again.  PINEAPPLE, Sliced. 3 tins   ������ .29   \  LUX FLAKES per pkt.     .09  MATCHES. Owl Brand, 3 boxes    .25  TOILET SOAP. Witch Hazel, 3 cakes     .19  TEA, Blue Ribbon, per lb ;.... 43  VINEGAR, White, Heintz, gallon      .85  RANCHERS  For best results with your fall Pigs use our HOG MASH���������a  splendid balanced ration that will give results.  aa^ aa  ������- m\~ m.  uresion vaney uo-uparanvs mm.  Local audi Personal  WANTED���������Do you want to earn $30?  If so, enquire Review oflice.  FOR SALE���������Choice of two good Jerseys, quiet, heavy producers. W. H.  Hilton, Creston.      .  WANTED���������Dog, six months o? over,  Airedale preferred. J. C. Martin (Alice  Siding), Creston,  FOR SALE���������Pigs, six weeks old, Yorkshires, $3 each. J. W. Parkin (Alice  Siding). Creston.  FOR SALE���������Young pigs, ready now,  $3 each. R. Stewart & Son (Alice  Siding), Creston.  You get the best in waders when you  buy the Goodrich Troutking brand. For  sale by V. Mawson.  Mrs. W. Belanger of Jaftray is a visitor  this week with her parents, Mr. and  Mrs. Geo. Johnson.  Mrs. F. V. Staples is a visitor with  Nelson friends th**> we**-'*' taWno- ������*-������ th**  ��������� ^ AammP-mrmm        * a A At ���������*> ^������v������     ���������   *��������������������� m%- mw **# *��������� a* A     ������<aaB������B������g     ��������������� m-m       mtmm m.  fall fair in that city.  Phone 12  mJ&XS^Zmi't S-WV  a.m. . P..A. P . A ,a .a_r  A.A ..lft ��������� m m m. ���������  ��������� a,. a   a   m.m..a\.a^.^.^^.^.mri  i^.a.  calibre  R. T.  m--.  M  AaVCM. %s  m em  &0  Plot Much Time Left-  Get Your Places Wired Now  First-ctass work and materia!���������and you are helping home  trade.   Prices as low as the lowest.  Free Estimates for any requirements in electrical work or  repairs. Call in and see us, or Phone 77X and leave your  message.  i  3 5 ^S.  JUST AROUND THE CORNER  *  k  m  r  ������  -*���������  0  9-  m  ���������  r  IP  ^nrioyriC@l������l@flf I  We have secured s*pace temporarily in the store owned by  Ivlr. S. A. Speers to display ELECTRICAL appliances. We  have for sale  Hot Point Ranges  Westinghouse  Refrigera tors  tr- i *������*������������������__*-.���������_  ^se;:%;r������: ������i:svsr=-.  Refrigerators  Washing Machines  Radios  and an assortment of  Floor and Table  Lamps  We invite you to call and inspect the above  Electrial Appliances.  > PHONE 3  Qoieney rower  CRESTON,   B.C.  Oe Lti  CANYON ROAD I  y������'T"Br ���������?��������� v*y >'T'f'T,y>'������i>'t'--'v*f,y  *yy wy vy  j*~~*iiiiag*"~'S'*S"*--~"-^^  it)  WE ARE OFFERING FOR  QUICK SALE  SIX PIECES of  HORROCK'S  Heavy weight, spun from long staple  Egyptian cotton which combines long  wear with easy washing qualities. Very  special���������  30 inches wide, at per yard ��������� ��������� 1 T^c.  36 inches wade, at per yard   Buy now for  future   needs", as  this  price  is  fully   five  cents   per   yard  "under the market.  CRESTON MERCANTILE  COIVl aPAINS-V ���������   SJTo*  titJu. ..'  .ii I.7a^������w'.u1Uuacci������>wii^������w  RIFLES   FOR   SALE���������-.308  Savage,   and   8   m.m.   German.  Millner, Camp Lister.  WANTED���������Buggy, with top, must be  in good shape and priced right for cash  Enquire Review Office.  rrfjM ���������**���������}���������**  <J������i.-".."i-������.*������.iB   ;n  <**nA  -m*   ���������***���������**     mm    A** mm>       Wt**.*.*^*** K/ * - ���������**��������� *-Q mm m A -       Amm        mm, mm*** mm  condition, cost $80.   Reasonable price.  Mrs.    ohn Watson, Creston.  FOR SALE���������Mullin's pressed steel  boat, in good shape, suitable for outboard  motor, ������20    J. B. Holder, Erickson.  Miss Ruth Compton of Nelson was a  visitor at the first of the week with her  parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Compton.  Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Cherrington and  Ron. James, left on Saturday by auto for  a few days' holiday at Calgary, Aiberta  Archie Muir has returned from Kuskanook. where he has spent the summer,  and ia busy these days at duck hunting.  Mrs. G. Johnson and .Mrs. Jas. Carr  left on Wednesday for Nelson where they  ar   spending a couple of days at the fair.  Local garages raised the prsce of gasoline from the old reliable 37 J^ cents to  40 cents per gallon the latter part of the  week.  FOR SALE���������Heifer, part Jersey, due  to freshen early in year. Also young  Yorkshire sow. Geo. Jacks. Camp  Lister.  Miss Edith Couling left on Sunday on  her usual two weeks' vaction .which will  be spent at Ainsworth and with friends  at Vernon. ..      . -  Provincial police officer R B. and Mrs.  McKay have taken the bungalow on  Victoria Avenue vacated by Mr and  Mrs. Fortin.  Rev. A. O. Thomson, the new Presbyterian pastor, is expected to arrive from  Victoria for his opening service on Sunday, October 1st.  Next Sunday will be rally day with  Trinity United Church Sunday school,  and the parents are invited to attend the  special exercises.  Trinity United Church young people  officially open tbe 1933 fall season with a  chicken.supppr at the church basement  this (Thursday) evening.  Miss Mary Dew of Priest River,  Idaho, and formerly of Erickso is renewing acquaintances in the district, a  guest of Mrs. M. J. Boyd.  COW FOR SALE���������Young, gentle  milch cow (Jersey-Shorthorn), in full milk.  A first-claw cream and butter cow, $45.  Mrs. M; Nathorat, V/ynndel.  J. Hallett, colporteur of the British  and Foreign Bible Society, Vancouver,  will speak at the Full Gospel Tabernacle  this (Friday) evening at S o'clock.  R. Carne of Sunshine Bay arrived on  Friday and will assist W. V. Jackson  with fruit inspection work during the  rush.   He will be located at Creston.  FOR SALE���������Well bred Yorkshire  pigs, ready September 13th, $2 each.  Also six cords dry wood. Jeff. Collis  (Alice Siding), Creston.   Phone 53X.  Revenues in gathered at Creston office  of the provincial police in August were  just under $500, and of this total receipts  under the Motor Vehicles Act was $306.  Cranbrook    Courier:   Archie   Corrie,  who haa charge of the branch of Your  Cash Store at Creston,   Ib  moving his'  family thore from Cranbrook this week  Mr. nnd Mrs. Simms and daughter,  Zella, of Kimberley, were weekend guests  of Mr. and Mrs. R. B. McKay, with tho  latter remaining for a few days this week.  Oscar Burden of Crawford Bay and C.  D.   Blackwood   of   Nclnon   have   their  houseboat  anchored   at   the   mouth of  1 Summit Creek for   a  fow  days'   duck  hunting.  Enroll for a course* in Designing. Pattern Designing, Dressmaking, Flowors,  etc. Clnr-sos three evenings a week, also  Wednesday afternoons. Enquire MiBs  Lil    Lewis.  II. Goddurd. who has opent tho summer horo with his cousin, D, Lonrmonth,  Is this wcok returning to bis homo in  Quebec where he will romnln at loaut for  tho winter. - /  Boyd & Craig havo taken the cotibmut  to Ut up tho second floor of tho now Imperial Groceteria building into a couplo  of throe-room apartment suites, with an  office at the front.  Al. the meeting of thohoHpttnl directors  on Wodnoaday evonlng last II, A. Powell  witn eltoMt-u Hticrotnry trbaauror In place  of It. M. Chandler, who had roslgnod at  thc end of Auguttt.  A party of Spokane hunters have Just  completed the erection of a tidy looking  40:tl6-foot cabin at the Reclamation  Farm which will be headquarters during  the shooting season.  The stork was, partial to boys in his  visits in the district in August, a total of  three newcomers being all of the male  persuasion. One death and three marriages were recorded.  FOR SALE, OR TRADE FOR FRUIT  ~-l|>*^yai.rd    duuS|������    boa,    water    pOW���������r  washing machine, and Coleman gasoline  1 am p. Also Chevrolet truck and bicycle.  Enquire Review Office.  Rev. T. Scott cf Grand Forks, a former  rector of Christ Church, is a patient at  the hospital In tliuv towu to which he  was hurriedly taken on Wednesday last  for an operation for appendicitis.  Mrs. S. A. and Miss Betty Speers left  on Monday for Calgary, Alberta, where  the latter has been enrolled for the term  at Mount Royal College, Mrs. Speers  returning the latter part of the week  Mrs. Jos. Hills has just received a  letter from her son, Edward, at Cranbrook, announcing his marriage to Miss  Nfla Hint?? of Creston early last month.  They are .making their home at Cranbrook.  If you want to see the best the district  can produce in flowers and house plants  visit the flower show at Park pfeviHon-  Saturday afternoon.   The  admission is  r-iii i:   ***������fi������B-a*r:i    T*9E0KAff*S ������  REV, F. G. M. STORY, Pastor.  BUNOAY, iSSPT. 2*t  KITCHENER, SCHOOL���������10.30 a.m.  Subject. "The Four Beasts of  Daniel." Illustrated - y large draw-^  ings.  ARROW CREEK SCHOOL���������3.00 p.m.  Subject, "The Church jj-ispensatiun."  CRESTON���������7.30 p.m.;   Subject, "The  Smiting Stone, or Battle of Armageddon."  MID-WEEK SERVICES���������Tuesday and  Frid*y, 8 p.m.  EVERYBODY WELCOME.  TENSERS FOR SCHOOL WOOD  uuui  mo  ttuuw  . 3  Suva  liue  Sealed tenders will be received tip to  Saturday. September 23,1933, for a supply of Fifty cords 3-foot dry or green Fir  or Tamarac stove wood, for .Creston  schools. Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. For ������H other infor������  mation apply GEO. NICKEL, Secretary, Creston.  sports.  At the meeting of the board of trade  on Tuesday night last the regatta committee submitted a balance sheet that  showed a profit of $20 to the Creston  hospital as a result of the water carnival  in July.  Up to the first of the week the number  of American hunters, principully from  Spokane, who have taken out shooting  licenses at Creston, is somewhat larger  than a year ags. Some of them were in  a week before the season opened getting  cabins, etc., in shape.  G. Horstead of Nelson has been named  returning officer for Helson^Creston in  the provincial election on November  2nd. Nomination takes place atNelson,  October 12th. With all three candidates  residing in the Creston district the fixing  of Nelson as place of nomination is not  proving popular. ,  CHRIST CHURCH  CRESTON  REV. M. C. PERCIVAL, Minister.  SUNDAY, 9������Pr. 2*t  CRESTON���������8 a.m.s Hol-y Communion.  11 a.m., Matlne and Uommumcn.  Everything  for  tSie  tr "*r -      ������l       8  tTwamWmm'mmAW'   I  G. Sinclair  Greston Hardware  A.P..A.A   A.*, A.  M^^^A^^hAa4^M^h������4fc������jfeMt^te.feM#Mt4fea  ��������� aT������.a������.A.^rA. A.Ar<������nA. A. A. Am A. A,.  '    Phone 8  ROSS' MEAT MARKET  ��������� "A "******���������*"- ^atf-" **"*"������***"*- ��������� w ��������� SaBar   ma HwavaB^aes sss   s  J. I>. ROSS  We deliver  'AfBA  MEA TS Appetizingly Attractive  WITH TRUE FLAVOR.   We have  Local LAMB, PORK, VEAL, BEEF  Chicken Fries and Fowl. Homemade Sausage  Hamburger ground while you wait  Get THEATRE TICKETS HERE with $1 Cash purchases  mt.m,.ar.mi.m,.mfmV,m,.m.wimwmfmmi, ������.y.^.  ���������m'm'm'm'm'wm'wwwwwwwwm'm'wwww  BWaBljA^jfaWaB  -*- -^ - ^- - **��������� r 'Mm~ - A - #*������������������ ~ ^ I Mm - 'Mm ri ^ "I  ***BtaittavVaWB%aa*a4BthBWBflMka*^*aAh������J^a^LW  SEE OUR DISPLA Y of  ii  in DOVE and FAIRY  vWe have a large range of colors  suitable for  Ladies', Men's  and Children's  Sweaters  i  When your knitting is completed  with Monarch Yarns your greatest  satisfaction is in having a garment-  that .Js a credit to the care and  time you have spent on your work.  rQII 0 All IftflJTjffTi  Sized 24 to 26 $ .95  .,;���������.     7  Steed .28 to 34 ' , IM  SA       d DB'B F>  CL  m      aim.,������     (a%jy   JL       Mmmmpml   1���������^   *7^������. ****  Dry Goods.       Clothing.       Hardware.       Furniture  'T  a ^v-t^r^^y^^-^^yf^^i^^^^^^^^  ."^t,..,^^t.M.M^M.V^  hmh  iiS^i^'^'LS'M^I^^  ,|i*ai ilHilRtif \i

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xcrestonrev.1-0174945/manifest

Comment

Related Items