BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Creston Review Nov 16, 1917

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xcrestonrev-1.0173528.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xcrestonrev-1.0173528.json
JSON-LD: xcrestonrev-1.0173528-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xcrestonrev-1.0173528-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xcrestonrev-1.0173528-rdf.json
Turtle: xcrestonrev-1.0173528-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xcrestonrev-1.0173528-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xcrestonrev-1.0173528-source.json
Full Text
xcrestonrev-1.0173528-fulltext.txt
Citation
xcrestonrev-1.0173528.ris

Full Text

 *$&  MML  .!-a'j'issnM:'5sS!Ms������ffli*  ^nvn !:^>Wia:'mwM^:':^������BVV a^^niBi . - A mmt^-mP^ ' ~'m~a*mmma*'mma^'������^trma^,mmmm*K*m^&  "*��������� ��������� ' .-..������������������^  . ���������������������, ...       . ..    . ' - -������������������ ���������  ^"^���������"    "'   ��������������������������� ���������"������������������      V!:-s^^','s.>i^-ys.;':':'������>sVs������y;;VyW^:^������sSA*fe  "'?:';?TO'%:,:'3?^S''^*WBI  ���������:>'...���������'.���������.    '.\S?r :������������������ A s;:..-:.;-.li;^-.y=lV^s7������n^''s#K*'S||S*������*  Ps^SS  I#3""V-  iMM  vyt:!^y^''^''>fr^s^^?^;s%^Mi^^  ' v.-  ���������u.  m    I  ii up..,  i.ijn i.������������^ ji jiwvy1   -VJjJj'r1 ji -fi .'"jMisy . siL'sS'.'**  WJyVry.s  l^-SV-  R>V);-y.  iv  ...i'.yj.^'?j^L'l1,Jr.J-������ .    't !^'i.ylim*mmm^amm,x^,,,,,, tif.^um   "���������.'[ ������  fiArWtf-^'^'AtP* PQPT  ~ ^au-uftii&fcB  ���������^^v? '.'^���������j^iv'^Siijr?.'--'--- Aimyafrit+Ai fmi������\j.pi.  ���������      '- '            -   *   " *    " '^JpfT'JryV:" ���������  rmxfc  r^iitii'^AA::  - I, ir I.;. ii,iin  i"*^  ;VV';At;.A:q������iii������^  er^j^n^iftlle^ Zionist Association  v*j?as bi^hte-fijli which wiUttw������ chai"Ke  :.'ejfs*'SSfi  were visitors: here on. Tuesday^  ton  Heintaking  ian.work at-  PeCnd  some seryices^ere Von Sunday g  xJO^^A:^fjW^kSP^0^WP''':'T TaP 'M  i';i*MA*Yi*-:'  Mr, and, M  VtoriVValley  election. ���������'���������'A) a.av������������������:'.'vv--:-:V"-<. ������������������; -vV���������.-.  The meeting was called by the committee named at the TJriibnisfcnieefc-  Jh^.thftf w^^^0as,7 vand' TB&Ef&ik-  OSbtuiuiM&e,*������5Z&.,; '&K:*^*&tt*n.H'*������ig-  charge ofythe^ihiieting?^mfi  briefly Vvatatiri;^    gathering and announcingifflm������$to������ffii&  I'-e-wri^na^t'h^  *5%m  Joe arid?Monrad  ~^~'me^������CGi*esli  1G.V   "  lay night forthe ������.��������������������������� ^  QuitQ.ato; %Mna white  was seea pisfefrurmg hF  Grady residence   one mbrninj  week, :������������������ but-,.before:: any, lucky" _���������,.  ^^^^^^pp^rf  tK������!^e^'^^?le^o^^M&a3  ���������bo*carvand^-Mf*.  'pa-KfekitWleo^a  i&  ���������J?  was Vto'  'J|i���������5iK^i)I^^^^^Si^Srei,,* anttVan^ex-,  ecutiye of eight members, :>' he ladled?  on Mr. Katt������v the advance  iriari for  lecturer, who spoke briefty, dwelling,  specially oh the splendid work thts*  organization  is doing bwrsS^^ ^ani,  the time being ja^d.get m behind a?v  out-and-out win thewar candidate Tp  the coming election.  and^ufcw fe w-mmuteBiaa<l---*S8~.intra?������? ���������*,,        ������������������ -,.     ^ * ��������� a~  aitr'the:Beatings���������&$&  m  vyyyv -V:-y-.*-i_..,  ^tt';,"^bi&V^fl������ptiOHiVV  m  nitftt:..A'h't';  ���������m^^sctt  :SMV r anMidJtiV;:tijgv  o.tMsfc.': . . ��������������������������� .:"..y^.--..-.ssi ������������������ ��������� - -���������:���������������������������:.���������  Tf^^^*:-..,���������������������������..���������.  ^ . ���������'-.'. -i ������������������.-...i&z  ��������� ��������� -<������������������-.  jpm|natiJi>iisi/  ,^'^ei^-i^jp^^^  of coiporar pi>nfthmen^/tt^  .. ,..;er������^^idepi^f%^::^-  August,.retrarhed* to'TFemi^ox.Pti^i^'  iere was a little  Ie  sys-y^fo^l^r  ���������^Mi&^r^M  ���������"-������������������--���������   "-   -    '-������������������- ���������"--* ''-'''wmT^mm  Ar:A^&lMiml  AAA*Ai'^&&S$$i  ApTrsmmmm  ,ArAA&;!;0mM  AAAr^'A^Ml  aa.Pone':AAP:M%$M'-  atrvv ;fchift':v Nbven^bev- ;%nTOting;fe������nCV: ;;tlie:  Greston vBoardrof Trade which V^ori-i  vehed  on  Tuesday iaiight, President  sVVTlio; .^||nmnaeia-^.!J3^  ^M^?iTM^fW^t^  p-.���������ospectiv jbjv settlers,. Jas;  m0^mismti  "who  *w^if^&'t^.-g^'^^^;������ej^*^^  tttW.sqme'i!^  ���������^:^^'^aA,AATA,'A.,-,AiAi..A-AiAA':.i&ArfiA;: "ArAA:wAAA/}vf:Wi  '������������������V^Ittr'ir^pl^lbi&hM^  board *"*��������� **"'*' *"���������''*���������***'" *  HA  Wf:  >nse*r  Miss Topper of Yahk was in, town  for the week-end, visiting Miss JLjthT  ., Tli-^*iye������^e^iss fij^i ti^^e dajjs, but  thVe hunters are kicking ana clamoring  for;.8now.;--: '���������* ' ���������'- ������������������-"���������''AAA- ?:���������'������������������'  duced strongly-worked resolution that  the meeting proceed with theVforma-  tioh of'y..tAe^O*r^toh;V-Vi&Uey.V'.TTriionist  Association. His motion wos^&|*0)i^-i-  ed in three py:'^  and carried unanimously, v VV  B^o-^proce^ing wltjk the election  of������pto&re?:MWberaS^  ..,���������   ��������� 3i������^tta^:o .   .  ,  this;- waia to Be  sure  that  any and  .--���������every-;' -r^cei^relectedjVW^ iri'A<������drd  Tfiie officers chosen are:   V  vV;VPr>sideht^-^tei%:'sM. -W;:VLee&yy--  ;-*-*"**H***^igg^  PI 'iSimW!a������--mtemm-yr!^  ;^���������'':.C^^ia^^V^-���������-^^  y", l-S^.^s^.^ornptbii,VFi ti. JacksoriiV  r  :'V;;:^j,for' men and ,WvTOititsvfprs ladies;  C: diet|pite Vthev*p^  V  that itshould .beV?������ dollar  all round,  Vvis^ng"thrall had equal franchise.  0<Tpp."XtjjS;ndt;eipi&E^ScL-tha*;R.'3F. Green,  .;-:; V ,t^.'-:'ty^d������U'^v^JEMS*srlri(^ vwi!l*be4������uffif������  V--M1tttil-aftefetfm^  '&������-mmmQpi\Jmty^  T-p^&i&i r'-mee^i^Vtihe^ej^^flM^  :: V'Vto- yaddresv rh������i^'iy^51^fer������^ridTV^fief  ' VUriiOiiiat associatidnVwill haye a series  ���������* 'of; meetings, at'f-';i^SiB������p?.lteieiai^li^  .   to -be;sid^dress^jhy local taleht, as welt  v: ^^tstdei^sat If itis tohehadi '-���������     '  I James Schofield, M.P.P.,; fo^Trailj  with a party of hunters arriye^fhfei^'  last Sunday.   The* party" is  caimpiiig:  Wyirindfefc  ii  in this country is too wild;. it wdlihot  waitvfoc him to get hisartillery^itt  *po8itiojiand,toiiix������the, range.       ' ~  ^ V5lse old-time; ^nn1>^ Idl aipp?ea  game: is'scarcer* this season than, ever:  brought in th-"^*^  ' ^���������';-r^A^':i-'^A^.~'rA:^^i}AA'Ar_.AA'::  W Biitterfiield?  StafipleiL'Si P0iT:'p:P^PP; -;.;������:V ,V������ AT:;.. T'PP. .-  v:: 'Cj^stonJipBb^st^^  ^mbn^^^^l^^;^ V' ^ ArrpA :AJ>  'xyPylfe.:-' ���������'PP-pA^PAL-.^ApPAA"  a'--:A  ' ���������AAAr  ���������J^S^e^^ii^ ^htinaly volimtary,  a������,-toi.V;iii  "Sipb^A ArpgA~^ i:'?00:rA. p". P'Ptj  busy ones   With Greston Methodiists.  ���������������������������0&%i*fjkmm-^  '0frjBs;Ji|]^j^^|&tui^V'b^  Ttiei^tnV British Gohipobiflifu i������fc the  churclb.alt Sr b-olockv  0i>V Sundry ^r..  White    will '-takeAAtli^PK^^et-^^-'  c-^ rsetyi*^ on tlifi, ^  jBya*sh^^;l?4������^s^  matter-.i^..w^Jjy������:CWB*������ap5u^:-^^  metit'*wh-*'*r:i,*&!^^  it^-i^-^j^-a������jji-si^������?^^ :-iri'; a'-vVv^Vg|gg|i  ���������V:;>^\*^-",:"M-jr  *; ���������-- *^ ^ *"���������,��������������� M tt***i  .;, t4r-:'*'.-.r^*i^'?>'W'  'V-^sV������S"WifI  "V5������V^"^������*1  the;yVs.;y@^������S������i  ;���������   ���������.:���������,:;..1,,-mt  ^������������������$&������������&l  ^i^V������-'H^^'������j!^5iMi!   U'Sltiry^i^iinr. ;i������rt������������5r ":  ���������������3E.������-iPK-TaKr--w- ������������������-.���������.���������*w������",m ��������� ���������w.v**������;  :5*'-?-������4=5SI--." --���������������������������- -     " ���������   ���������  name to  ..7-T ���������*���������  - '  ���������^Aro^is?"1^!^  ;jt^{^oti^:^i^^^^adv^if ���������".��������� ^q'  same in f all orVionvst^^^^^  r '���������^���������-':^.^,^^J*&i^i\~&^ .--iv'-i.'.'=. -...-v;' ��������������������������� '.������  'pla*i$l^$������^ AAA P  !��������� V<3reBfcdi}vVRedi Grc^ iapples ^-foit i^ev  soldiers got away-oior VS������ondayj going  by express to Nelson where thejs wjlj,  OT|ittii*asj^''^ti';'tl������^  !l^^^!a-atf������������|^^Uf?h������*^y5^  ith&na^i^ip;  itt)^ bufev^lv b^  ciated a few weeks later.   Gi-ej-^Qia^  cont^utiofevv^^me^^l^  liAA^^Pi^s,P?AA.'::A"A.!A'������������������ '-.;->'������?,!> A%zif:^���������������������������'''Ai'^.''^T ^  C-^&iEqrre^t-*^  applications for exei^^|p^;i ^1j!!^8ev  sii-wrereVin^Classt*j&a^ahd fourViW'-a*������'  :t������'*3������i,i-;vJ&2'HA ���������--^=^r.,- If-*- - ^ ',���������<. ,*-f* t >-> .....vv-..^,,: .... .-,-������.'���������������������������������.���������****-������������������:���������..,.  ipositiom to ad^imyyou; to  arrajsgemente  wa1 wrilh be^ able to  make.   If the shippere are able to get  !-^ft������H^������j^l^^'rfo-*^;atf^  will^ndi^Qr-^  do.^lrl^h.t������.htirrw ttoftsina^  ojf the ^jG.t' wiyi^e*^--.'-;..' '-^.v'. i:',v v -,��������� .������������������';.:VvvV:s':  -^--^ii^iutiupi^g^b^^tf ���������'' 'ISC wiiKji' '-ft^n' ���������'���������   feGoiaii-v  A.  .'th^P^^ndi^.,.^.-,. _  .,   mito^wim^ v^iS^awi^  ^tswii^ h^jbeeiji plap^v������n^|^0?^-E^ii;  djifiitrid.tt   TtirWeekl^ i^pcirtis.aa to the  amount 6fl>ori^icC^;;^ to be  ,sent*.to:the'^ejE������^^  mittee, wnoj'guarantee ��������� t������;;sfee!to  it  that the aniount^aj;eyxdwlyj published  ^fidfiJIli CK^iifci^f^^^^^tp^iifc this  ftonpeetion^ Pa aa -P-pAP | % PTPaPPPTtaA:-  a. Hi battle, thet^icioi'yil^pft*^^^  Of the Valley a committee ^of f our was  wtiolj&aflaSiv select cattvass^w^and fix  ft time. fojja> whirl wiii* campaign to  V'p3y|^^|  :���������;-���������:. '���������VS-y-'c^.i^VI  ���������AyArp!$A-~  TATrT$mm  Jdnei-'-'g*:v^ra?^ ___ ___^_ __       _ _  erawtion, and the other adjournea^ri t^^ are Mfeesrs; SDeers^Sta-ples  ms^eQ\^*m\mia*x^^^  ^eirstlM^yGlassV;Jl 'and^'.'aH'^thiM.iS^jPfie.';' ������������������'���������;i'-n������i-:-:!^i������s������������'������/������������' .-fiam'.AfaAj^$������������ki,  adjourned till this  class is cail<^ up.  Th^^riiaining';th^;v.yei*e-',j^j6^]^^  untilVa "medial examiatioa  toiffiiB^ms^teev' ��������� ���������<������������������������������������-.-*���������������������������������������������'-������������������- -������������������'*���������'��������� ��������� (A^^Ay.  ''���������'���������'���������'"^^'���������ii'-'sr.*^'*'-"''  the  '7Ss>  Tfee:Gh-dst!^ias s^k& &s������ th^iCSMs-:  -  ��������� ���������   -  -.'-sv.fwf���������-,"^fs>ir.t������������-.\SA5i������4j ���������:t--x.:-lzttr'''*W.'&.-*J.:2:zrv,c.  .JUmmm^^gatm^b^^^^^g^  l'jvr^"*������w*'^-*i������'^.^^c^*TO>--W''V'--j':^^ ������������������-  SB**  '^Pffi^^yfA-misQ,  <ixJ-'J  fach - \Pa^\^^Mni^tijtBx������xT'  m  talcum powder. ���������V^fe};^^l"^^se^iqC  headquartera askih'g,VifilitoS8al^  t,;;>Iteyi-:'Dr. White,   superintendent of  -tnieaions for B.C.,  will conduct the  Methodist service iat  the  church at       ^fe.^y^^^������^  i-rli-!������'!.   .'. '. ii '        '     .     i    '     . -   ��������������������������� *.J4   ���������,-   ���������   .#������������������:.<���������.   ��������� ���������.   ��������� ���������_ aA.~.a-aA-:*i'i'    A'   '   \*'A\   ��������������������������� 't '���������������������������������.__ '-���������''.������. ���������_���������=.''���������>'' Vj *.  man's  room    ...t. ..,.,.       , 4.     .,_  which, has been .collected by *-ttiem for  the Priso^fir^^pl^^^n^^^'  ^- itw. -    r^^'*t^i������f'Si*>'S  ir- ������        1 te4&wC6f Hbiy Gross Church co-c&x.,^  ^era|&i^pn'B^'������dr������p^^|i^  "*|.-|fc^i^^tl������|i^rH'= is expected  that  " .a^^iafc^aup^^beEe*,; wifi ib������s3> jonim*  l^edjamongst the arniy of: 2^000  ���������jaii^d^ans, who it is espscted, will  'inveat^i^ Victory, Bonds.      ~*  v  't^ *r.',r'j..'*������^'>.':-s;.r--jir:7y.^'.--^.-v-.^     ' ���������..-v.-?}.���������������������������,-���������;,  Local and Personal  ff'Ghurch  goers  who turned iip for  ���������service as .usual last Sunday were dis-  appointed as Bev...Mr. Wood.failed tb  a-'"appear. - We understand we will have.  W^ttigl^^  :ii. rearrangement"' has   been , mtwl������  Vwhereby  the  Methodists .willV work.  hpre and,Erickson and theV'.Preshy-  ���������   Iteriahs take Wyrindel vahd Sirdiwj."':;-  \'b'*i' '���������' ���������.',,i::>l'y>r' 5:?)^:'"' ��������� ''"W;"^' :,4Wm'-  a yThe young people are having* the  *wual Satuiday'nighl,' hdp at thevblii[������$t  ^tead academy to-iiiorrow night. Tlje  crowd from Greston is expected and  a good time is looked for. V  We hear that Mr. Blair, who Is pt-'U,  at the Reclamation Farm, had tKebad  luck to lose his splendid driving horse  brie day last week, but have not heard,  thocaneoof its demise. Tho annual  was about tho best driver In tho  Valley.   ������������������ ��������� ^   :-;���������;':;^���������',���������  Weddings of woods foremen la qnlto  the fashion thia fall. Following m  lead of Chas. Simpson wo hoar ono of  the local camp foremen will re-join tho  army of benodiots within the next  couplo of weeks. t Vv *   ;     '^'  . Mrs. Browell was a visitor at Greston on Tuesday making delivery of  the work done ny Oanyon Bed Gross  during October, which consisted of  ton suits of pyjamau.  Mr. nnd'Mm. Blair, who hrvvo been  UVing at tho Reclamation Farm flvo  months, nro expected to return to  their ranch here for tho winter about  {ho end of the month.  :fo>Mtaking8tfeti*he*ejcaps; ��������� MesdameM  McMurtrie, Smith;. Pbwns, G. Young,  Hayes, RoseV^%e^toi%^B^^"SifiitS,  ?owing meetinH^idre^beragfwelFatw  &fa*M:*tH?'my*g^  * Mrsi'G.,.Brevier of Calgary, Alta,,  Who-���������Bair/been-.here  for. a  couple of  ocTCju3l.on "-ncttod P 'Wt8BflU> Oh, /Tuesday:  of this' week, ther^i was, a tUrjijib^G, o^  23  ladles and  the!  tea,'���������"���������'over  which  Mesdamoa    <^cn^jrtK:.iaJ^..'.?|t|VlEi.  hei.  befb^������,^  ilB,TatfW?th������i6r  . to m^tvriAlly; s-^ell: the.  uahti tyiw^woot and  'WmW&  .thei&3'im'g^;ta[b^ ������,rt������������  :^ide������ot;h<ers :vi*^p^]pii^l^ >������^M  affeepvJd&heiei ^vTeiii Vroiiridsv .������������������ Of  t ��������� ^V *' V.vKt'%iJ 5; *  AAAAmmmi  P'PPBs^f  TpPrT^Mi  &PP������0$m  scwbeira'^/it^ey-WAi^loap^ViHresid  B^ideiraori*--%ii8^ named chairman  cf vSS.k?S^H  i^^pfa^i^b!^'8^^Vt^*-oM^|^  "         ' ' '"' " ~"  ""    ani-VvSvSS^S  'Ori;'1wigation','*:Mn;V-'Sta*^,-Q^^  ��������� w^ii^^-^^^t^v^  t^ imeasuteniei^  again^ast riibnth ari|lifbii^^::t>|������eVfl6w  of ��������� Sfrater; :to .;'bevVK������"viulScVtoet per: ;^.-^fl^^a  sSJBiiii^i^s^^^bsjbtiiKi^  'todofe&'lte-ABi^^ TnTAplWMi  ���������i^:i|;!s||l  were played;������nd Vthfe mgbrscOre p^ "  G^aM^i^f^, WlthMi^ Bilail4^|f-g  apd^BVan^ Bunce  makingV^^S^^g^  SatuMay.' fler ;7 daughter,"Roweiia,'  "w;hf>'<-.hA8llrbe^n' here all summer re-  turried with her, ������������������������������������>>,��������� a.a:":-:^Pa:;: ���������'���������" ������������������'���������������������������' ''-'���������.  ���������,;; The Noyember --meeting of the Wof  ; hi? n*s; I^Mb iont\M^^Jrilf fcrnoon,  Wii8 uneventful ^ind q������ii^������(weU,attondT  .������d.v; The>es9l.qn^Wjas Uig^lydevotpcl  th.revi8ing'thip!,4*ySiwvwprk.'.se9tibriof  thb fall* j fair prize list flo that exhibitors could get busy oi\ tliatjine, of  ���������wd-^u^^tl^!^  '/.'���������'��������� '���������,'' ,���������'''���������:-;���������.������������������.'���������'.'������������������,;'������������������';*'������.,*'���������>.'*'   ��������� '���������'"  i-'.-v-"-������������������"'''-������������������''���������'  : Mapagor Johnson of the P. Burns  CbjfVhad 'niiother jcar of 26 head of  bajttle uljiip-Lied^to',' the Nul������j'^ ^branch  from the Ike Lewis ranch at Sirdar  tbiday.   TK^8"������ri������k^8; a triatter'Of four  ^he^^vvyl.podsijb*!^ more.  i i A/*H������SwaniBon took Over the dutien  (pn   Bn ,  berg vbf >' Cariydri Oity.r Luneh^v wafl:  served about midnight and d^rifiiQKf  continued until almost 3 a.ntvr, l9n  cluding a raffle for a pair of chickens  tbe^prKiceeds were $56. and after paying; all expenses 9-0 remains t^A'thb  irisi   rr_  iiirthbwcabinets  -;-^^iB(^o)Dbrii^^V:";wasv  :A'Asg00m  :;���������-..���������.- *���������W?-::iJ~ \*^-~ j������r*K: Cl    "-x{^^A������    ������Wa*BT������^M*t^tlM>^fl#^  in which was  bcoj^s.V Splendid music jor  ij������^i W^ied-hy ^Mrs.V vGar^jai^^gafc^ij^e tfc^bb-jwd^T attttrial stato-  MS-^^Browell, Swanaon  and^liSiw ^bAf^all*^ ^porta^whlch    is  Garto^ ato^ii.'"^-?^?c'^' J^i^5^ ^ ??^?L*^i8  PPM  ''Mf'^fiMi  ;sWy'-;'������'*S������l  'mm  -���������'���������^���������������������������������������������'*-|r������"??Bl  'VI  West Kootenay's  i Three Candidates  From  aa  ldit.it uixfoxiiit. iti'i'.wtiou oi. Ck-eiiUm  wna a week-end visitoi1 with Wynndel friende.  Mies Florence Bathie left on Sunday  for Cranbrook, whoro ohb.^iaa,tA|kon.������  position, and will renin In until spring.  between meetings  The shipment of a  sons B.G. troops   They go by Vancouver  part of>an expbctM Vtontrihutlon of  four carloiula.   Orqat^ttflfl^W'iWM*^  and tho niunoB   of   thoso  dpnatinft  these. a������r.^UtHs' .a "Ustfof^hoHo wj^.  turned  appear  ���������in ^%i^^pp^'^,t;!.1������^;r'v*,v.  n:  t^O.V^^fiWMif,(ftt G-restqriiiiOnj.Siin)-,  .y*;.M-Wi.:SwfAri������ottv,ttnd -the family  moving - up from Sirdar tho day  previou^and are now getting nicely  iidfcWed'in their now homo. ' Both Mr.  ari4 Mra,.S.wariaon have majny Jrjobdp  'hefo Arid ���������iro"; w^loom'ea' 'as' citistenB to  !*���������������  ���������  (.'   t ',    \.'     .*mmn~**im;m *,-!������>��������� ^fi* .***><>-*'���������* t     t  Hmmiss   Poh   i^Ai.ii}���������8uiail   ranch  horac.    ApDly,,.  Mi^,,     Ttt^������S3Cd^r  For SAwfe���������Two young milch cowa,  good  puller,  fmm^^^AA^'AA^A'i  Oambkww^, KiflcUaOn.  i fv fj������������������ ���������'T*?*' '"'*'���������-<!'''��������� ���������''���������''-'.**''  Mw-'H^i fche advance man for  iSi^^W^r*''00^ fchft service In tho  {h.^IatyChurch, delivering a stir-  g'addreas ori'tho soldiors Uvea oyer-  nooai*,' mo*a parti������ula������iv In connection  with i.thO'v military Y.M.G.A. work.  H^br^tfly addressod the congregation  lliTitlu) ,Fre������.lwterlan Gliuroh in tho  uiorntiig on the same work.  Frldjiy , Crouton, ,Won*u*nra Inotltuto  Votad ^lOitoho turned ovor toServlun  Uullef; 'And anothor..810)tho Military.  YjM.G.A.. Mr* F. H.. Jackson won  'rom present appearances it (looks  if thero will, bo a;* three-cornered  fight in West JCootenay at the fedttral^  electioh   next  month: '   Nomin;4tiGiri-  day is Monday. .  * ��������� v-}P.  OnNoyember 2nd, R-. -F; Greefcucittea  late member, was  placed in thbiorunr  riing by the Unionists, -at  a  largely  attended convention in the city   of  Nelson. A weok later a renroaentJitiVe-  lot of  labor delogatert placed 4.   A.  Austin,  a Nelson   alderman,  hi'^lvct  Held,  while on the 14th, tho Ltiiifltfev ,  LilxjralH,  at a fairly\,well attfiidiftl l|  convention ut Trail, nominated*?. H.  Maxwell, of Reyelstoke; a  returned  soldier, aa their standard bearer.-:.  .The Trail convention waa the* most  exciting of the lot. at leaet -three  Lanrior candidatca allowing -their  namo toi go before tiie convention,  whilo Mr. Austin's name wa% also  submitted. '  On the first ballot Joij. Martia.jW.tn  0 votes. Nelson Winlaw, apwclN  known man ih tho Oreston valley,  got 7, Mr. Austin 20. and Mr. Mwxwell  M. On the second and final tMtfJtofe  Mr. Maxwell won out hy a show bf 40  tofta. , '       .  Tlio dulilieratlona woro ptwUMKl  oyer-hy John Keen, M.P.P. for tho  KfMiU} riding, which had a fewrdolo-  r ._���������.. _.���������,,...  Valley  ?oint8, .and Messmr*' 'HAjfeiri ��������� Staples,  lodgers and.Johnson,. worojinamed a  sneWall cbBohJiJ;tefti to':P handle   the  'mfafa&mxP'T.'^' :p-.^'~p-'���������,:!*:'''".���������'"..',!���������>���������������������������';���������������������������..*."  ^Itlformatlbrii; haaCcJomo .tovthe Board V  tb^.'t'ai^aA^w^th^'.^VoVriniMf'' of a  reglbterrd '  townslte V ' sultAble     for  ugiicultural purposes liariuot   be held '  *ji3 timbWiliinitatftfor,*moro-5than one  year,(before operation-*   must  com-  pteuo9*!tb ip������mov������>i thev timber and got  thQ,ij8ldvdand,.op-*^^tb-'settlement or  ijindwicultivatibn^i. Tha secretary was  therefore ; * in������tructod .'' tb * write  the  minister of landa at Victoria calling  attnentipnito- thot-faot;'th*tuthe Alex-  lindwllmita adioirilrigdownihaye now  been held-by ahat;gent4ieman< for con-  isldw^bly tiio^ thari^ao *^������^^that so  tfarnb.������������blrt ho*te)^<m^etartako off  th* -.. tliiibe*n������ and.laaklttff,'thw^depart-  ment. to at once see to  it, that the  relation* in-fcbte-tehalC'iire complied  with.  ���������'������������������Wo^Si-I  . r.A*;AMf  'VyA^I  '������������������!'''MM$hi\  ���������. :y.'i ,t'*-*iJ*''l  ������������������������������������ ������������������;������������������*������������������ sv' 'Stl  '^.-'���������psSnI  :"ii;,*'5;wJ!;S'4������  .'Wi'';'!������!'KI  ���������  n\ K''V*<;'3|  ������������������'���������'������������������'-���������:':'*lfi;';'������"'|  m  Mtoe8mmmm&  . :VifcvC:,.V'-'-'.'''" "  A. PA^bhyr whA-has been taking  treatment at tho Cranbrook hospital  foi- a troubte&omo ankle for a couplo  of weeks, returned tho latter  part of  ���������i,v  Olios.  Sutcliffe,   who  has  boon at  I MiovA.iWj������������th������ur* -rofcutn-m tbn Hat-  rirday fronoTtCtoil,' wh*flr4- ah* spent a  fowd^*la*it^������������Jp.  ml  Pi  .sI.Wul  'UTt'f  ::Am  m  ',: 'r/'.lil  '$m  ���������:,.,rt  j* i  Reports are to thu effect that Wyn  ndol will have two weddlngu to report  tho early parr of Dotcinber,  making  ��������� -   * * .       i  ��������� ���������   ���������  i.tm iitk'  early pa  tlji.jjn nlthrti  Rev. G. fl. and Mrn. Wood of Creo  le occupying at proaont  Trail No'  wan thbm  umuHoiriont tit^t was effective througi  out the nroVInc^."' TIW ������Wio^p<|. cbU;  loo  In n     .  amount ijbllfHJJt^JW. ohtHltirthWi' hut It  la known that it la conaldcrably In  nxcesa  of  that  collected   In N^iRnn.  probably aomowhorb above tho QfiOO  mark.  ciioacti lustttuto coiivtouor ot lied  Ocoaxj..w.Qtm+L Th������; Decorabermooting  wlUjMfeatoipbd hy a showor for the  ool^������j||lr# at Balfour..      .';  ���������; Miv;a^j|-|M^,B<^nfttt;p^^^  Wm$&&-mi?atmm^^  .m..^M     m*m������ml.*.^*.U.������m.XLMlttl--itmml-   >m.X.m.    t X.  1    ,J ��������� |^    J ^ . ^fa   f^ f^J, J (^    (fjf ,. ft ^     ^1(1^11    ^  tho Oreaton Valloy.   Tho prlKO acoroti  mvtft*.rm    mtttte'irm   iw    1*.ft'n'.'     Tn..*j,ki> ' 'ik.ji?.    T.Xv.  wero uiudc by  **rtf.'   TUt^tVaiul  Ttlv.  goto* In attendance���������none f romj Oi-ca-  )������.v Vnlley,   wo   upderataud.  ,In.,a  BtrMiooh accepting thb nomlnatloh mh<  Maxwell ia imported, to   have -come  ont.strongly on tho juamiur platAoiin.  In Raot Kootoniiy,  Dr.  Bonttnl  of  Fertile waa nominated on W^r^iiil^t  by "tho Gonoorvotlvofl* uftor anjelght  hour effort to get the Llboraia totioUi.  with thorii and at a joint cony������jrttlon'  UQntl^(itb.a Unionist atandard Iwarer.  In Ko������t Kootenay no Laurloi- Ulhoral  MiAf Bertha -* Pcobo -> returned on  Tuccday fron> a week's holiday with  Wynndel frtehda.  now  . F..W^.vA*h(ihUiuin-fO(MH������d.in a   drlvlngl horcc, which hoiiccurcd from  la yot In tho Hold, hut a Mr Ofijjbrw \n  running ,������������ , tho labor ticket, -r Dr.  ihiuutiU  Im  sum)  to  bu declared tho  Piper,    uofroahinonta   woro   vorvod | Gnlonlat candidate, and will bo aimoot I objcot to a HtUo onow to matto tho  after tho play, nml all thoroughly an \ udbcatahle In that constituency. *        ������fkorJUuntlng, rluht. >  Pto. Jack Smith,  who. roturned to  /ff6������onto*boufc4h)W������e wa&iijmws to bo  fitted with an urtlflcal log, writes that  ���������    ���������       ���������    ' ' *      "#lth tho  lo  to got  hoginnor.  llttud ^Jtn an iirtmcailog, writ  >^4,bAk\\ iu*i ^boop toau|np*id 1v  pedal apbciMhiuo: and lu able  about onltfpt-bliy woll for a hoj  Ny>w'th������t'^h������i-fal|- 1f������o*lc la all pretty  well caught up thoa^i who havo In  vci'ttd In a huutaru llccnao would not  Mxmmtmwmm* mmmm. mm mnmmumimto******  m^���������tx.-^.^.. ��������� r**n*fimv*-t**.: ���������ft-fa^uA.*^ x,**^^^���������  rti'WffllliilfltflMiP"-*'*1'^"'-'"  >WMiWWlilW|i*l  mmmm*0mmmmtm%Hx*mmsm tn  mmmmmmam*\m*.mlmm%\minti*m**m  ..-.w**, ,:.j^.jf.3..v.ia.t^j,^,Jra.^iai,.,lgJ4.MJt Wm.  4MlHf"'J������'l|l������),������ W*j***������������ tit* ������"M< W-UHf* tl*������������W^i jj4i������ I ������*.i**. Ji*  ^^������l..-*#^~^,.,Z*..s>*B'--r^.-.'.������.l^^ Spill  iff  TAP .'������������������-./���������  |A. BRIGttTgTaBjGCO OF THE?|^BST|^#$nr.  I0|���������ENm PER PLUG  m**a*****������mm*tmm  *-���������(-'������������������  W i^  >������* >A ^'^   -svn  "fl  4 ^S^hhI  1W������  L  T11K  AMARANTH  "CLUB  ��������� BY ���������  J.   W.   *��������� .TUB A V11Uj>>  WARD. LOCK &CO.. UASiTftD  ���������ss  (Continued.-)  CHAPTER XVIII.  A Dead Man's Message  Banister King gave the caretaker  and his wife a look lhat was all the'  more expressive because it was given in silence. And Bryson, getting  no words from him, repeated his  own.  "Dead, sir! Dead. And likewise-  buried!"  was  ���������week," added  keys pfvit in his purse. And now he  unlocked it, and ������lld back the door,  and let a collection of letters w and  circulars, and papers and odd documents fall out, and as he stooped to  gather them up he saw Avory's card,  and tiie few Hues which the dead .man  had hurriedly -pencilled on it.  King left '��������� the letters and papers  lying where they had fallen and carried the card into his sitting V room-.  He looked at the pencilled lines  some time before he -read tliem.  Wheiv he rcaci them he did not Immediately'"-: comprehend, their significance. But when he remembered  what had happened, remembered  that Avory had died within a few  hours of writing them, he saw that  in this bit of card he held something  which if not an absolute clue to the  solution of the mystery of Avory's  death, was at a!ny rate a contribution  to one.  This is what Avory had hastily  scribbled:  "Something lias happened at the A.  Club tonight which gives me a hold  on Barthelemy. He and von Roon  arc in B.'s house now. I am going  to insist on seeing both. As there's  an element of risk, if I ana. not home  7  "Yesterday  Mrs. Bryson,  King had found his key by that  time and without comment he let  himself into his chambers and set  down on his table a small case in  which was carefully packed the old  vase which he had been to Italy to  6ecure. He stood for a moment staring about him; -when he was away  from home nobody was allowed^ to  -enter his rooms; everything was just  as he had left it nearly three weeks  previouslv. He put his- hands in his  pockets, whistled thoughtfully, and  walked outside again to Bryson.  "What was it?*' he asked abruptly.  "Sudden?"  Bryson shook his head and jerked  his thumb at his wife. N,v  "Uncommon sudden, sir/' he answered.    "She found him."  "Which he was lying in that there  bed as if he was a-sleeping the sleep  of the innocent," said Mrs. Bryson  mournfully. "But I knowed he was  dead, and went down to Bryson and  says so. 'Rubbish!' says Bryson.  But there weren't no deceiving me,  Mr. King, having seen as many dead  'uns as live 'uns���������speaking compara-  tivelv."  "Hadn't been ill, then:" asked  King.  "Not for a minute,     sir,"    replied  by a reasonable hour, you will know  that I -went  there at  two-thirty.  R.  A."  There was no date to this, but  King had no doubt that it was written on the morning of Avory's death.  He picked up the. newspaper account  of the inquest and rapidly ran over  the evidence of the attendant at the  Amaranth. Yes���������Avory had spent  most his time there that midnight iu  the lounge which opened off the entrance hall. That meant he was  watching for something or somebody.  He hud left the club, said the attendant, at two o'clock, when everybody else did.    But, afterwards?  King reconstructed that afterwards  in a fashion of his o\vn. He might  be right, he might be wrong: but  this is what he believed to have occured:  1. After Avory left the club he  saw something which strengthened  his suspicions about it and Barthelemy.  2" Finding that Barthelemy and von  Roon were together in Barthelcmy's  house, he decided to attempt an immediate interview.  3. But first he ran to Jermyn Street  and finding him-���������King���������out, he slipped the pencilled card in the letter  box.  4. Then he  obtained   entrance    to  Manitoba Adapted  For Stock Raising  Many Varieties of Live Stock Feed  Grown in.Manitoba\.'.  The Mamtoba'''department of agriculture has-just issued an...interesting  booklet on Live Stock Raising from  which the following extract dealing  With the many varieties of live stock  feed grown in that province has been  taken.  .The naturally rich Manitoba soil  yields an .abundant growth of wild  forage plants-of many kinds. These  possess uncommon natural fattening  qualities and Manitoba cattle grazing  or. them require much less finishing  than is necessary in almost any other part of the continent, Kentucky  Blue Grass grows iu profusion and  here as in its native state it is worthy  of the name Of the king of pasture  grasses. A near relative, known as  Canadian Blue Grass, is also to bc  foxind everywhere. Knot Root Grass,  Wild Timothy and the well-known  Red Top also grow in profusion, also  the slender wheat gra'ss now commonly known in Manitoba as "Western Rye Grass. There is also the  Western Wheat Grass, commonly  known as Blue-joint, which is of unusual hardiness.  For.hay purposes and winter feeding, wild grasses arc abundant in all  parts of the province and furnish the  whole hay crop "for thousands of  Manitoba farmers. Western Rye  Grass is probably the best of these  and grows to perfection under almost  any conditions.    The Western     Rye  Grass, sown alone, has yielded at the  rate of 6,800 pounds to the. acre. Under cultivation it grows  easily    and  be readily understood by any practical farmer or stock man.  The average yield of oats in Manitoba m the last ten years, taking the  poor years with the good and���������good  farming with poor farming, has been  over thirty-eight bushels to the acre.  That is the average; but crops of  sixty bushels arc very common, crops  of \ seventy-five to eighty bushels are  quite frequent, while a crop of one  hundred bushels or even more is not  considered any great noveltv.  What has been said of "" oats is  equally true of parley., . Manitoba  barley is very light hulled, weighs  very heavy, and analysis shows it to  contain food values that can hardly  bc equalled anywhere else.  Storing Vegetables  For the Winter  Valuable  Hints for   Keeping   Vegetables Fresh During Winter  Months  _ With the food problem so acute it-  is important that every vegetable  shotild be stored. This applies not  only to ripened vegetables, but to immature cabbage, cauliflower, etc.,  wliich can be stored and used as  green feed for hens .during the winter months when other green stuff-is  not available.    . *  There afe a_ few general principles  in storing Svhich have to be remembered, namely: (1) Protection from  frost; (2) keeping them cool in order  to prevent decay; (3) keeping them  relatively moist, in order to prevent  excessive evaporation, and wilting;  (4) avoid a wet and stagnant atmosphere, as this is likely to engender  rot,   particularly when   the   tempera  E^i' &*������ ^^"^r^^Unre. is too high;   (5)  protect -  from  s.   a -minute,     sir,      -~r    ^    .,   ,        ,   ,  Bryson. "I sec him the day before��������� cawndemy s nouse^  he was as well as what we are now.] ��������� However long he stopped  Went off in his sleep, d'ye see, sir.  "Art failure���������that's jwhat the doctor  said. And, of course, the coroner  and jury they said the same. Natural  causes���������that's   what  thc  verdict  was.  "There was an inquest, then?" said  King.  "Whicli we've kep' all the __ newspapers with the pieces about it," observed Mrs. Bryson. " 'Bryson,' I  says to my husband, 'we'll keep these  here 'cause Mr. King'll no doubt like  to see them .when he comes home.'  "Downstairs they are, all together and  tied up with  black tape,     xfes."  "I should like to sec them," said  King.  He took    the    newspapers    which  Bryson  promptly  brought    to    him,  and sitting down  in    his    strangely  silent room (it seemed to him unus-  ally silent,    for    some unaacountable  reason)  read all that they could tell  him.    He got no clue, no idea from  them;  the only fact that  seemed  at  all important to his mind was    that  Avory  spent  his  last  houru  at    the  Amaranth  Club.    According to    thc  evidence of    the      attendant,    those  hours were innocent enough���������and yet  there was some significance in    the  fact thajt they were spent there. For  King  remembered    Avory's    intense  interest in what he believed to    be  the secret of the club and of Barthelemy, and it required little to sug-  frest to him that circumstances might  lave arisen during his absence which  would make it highly convenient   to  Barthelemy   or     to     somebody     unknown, to get Avory out of the way.  In  spite  of    the    medical    evidcncci  King had no fixed belief that Avory  had died from heart trouble.  Hc laid the newspapers aside at  last, after marking two ot three passages for further consideration, and  began lo attend to the small affairs  awaiting his attention. First of all,  therr������ were his letters. Being an mint t;.ehi'.d and solitary man :*.������* Avory  himself  woh,  King had   few    corres-  fKindents beyond tlio people who hnd  >ool<s or pictures nr curiosities to offer hiin. Nevertheless, he. knew there  would h<* Mtrrs in hi������; boy, nnd he  proceeded to deal with theni, Kc-  ���������-fi-lti'* in this as in many other  shintf**, King had invented for him-  ���������.<-!f .jiul h.������������l attached to I tin outer  .'. ..'..-A .:���������   '��������� V.' r   *vv-     -"hv-h.  \if -tridfdf- himself, nobody eould  t.jiitj'ei' v.ith from without or unlock  from v.itliiu. He had hpctit a good  d'-al of tinu* and n loi of ingenuity  in perfV.- tinu it. Nobody, he. Haiti,  fonlr. get into that letter hox, made  of fi \r lifrlit >>'<'l, even il" Ihey rot  into hit* rooms, loi lie had aho in-  vai.f'l  ii>;  lock, and  <*arricd   llu*   '���������.���������.<������  there,  whatever took Jiiace, Avory came  away. w������^j|it quietly\to bed and���������died  in his sleep,  King summed up thc situation in a  question.  Was Richard Avory murdered?  There was no need to* ask the further question���������who murdered him? If  he was done to death in some skilful  and diabolically^ clever fashion, there  was no doubt in King's mind as to  the doer of thc deed. But���������was he  murdered?  King was a member of a small and  very exclusive club of men of his own  sort���������students, savants. scientists,  collectors, thinkers, observers, searchers into strange things. This club  was housed in very quiet rooms iu  the neighborhood of Hanover Square  ���������Its great recommendation # to its  members was that if you wished to  bc absolutely quiet there you could  gratify your wish; if.you desired con--  genial company you could get it.  Every member of that club was a  Somebody in something, a specialist,  a dependable man. And King, thinking of one member, a famous medical man, celebrated as the author of  a standard work on toxicology, went  round to the club that afternoon at  an hour when hc knew the man  wculd bc there, and after some finesc,  contrived to get hold of him in a  corner.  "I want to ask vou a plain question," said King. "If you like, I'll  tell you afterwards why I ask it. This  is thc question: Is it possible to give  a man poison which (first) he would  not detect at the time, (second)  would not take effect for a few hours,  and (third) would leave no trace in  his body?"  The great man considered matters  for a moment.    Then hc nodded.  "Yes," he answered.    "It is."  (To Be Continued.)  ly ..and. cures perfectly. It has another big advantage, being easily got  rid of from land required for other  purposes. Its 'feeding value has  proved a big surprise to many American farmers who came to this country knowing little, if anything, of  wild grasses iu.the thickly settled  districts from which they came.  Among the cultivated grasses  which are giving fine satisfaction in  Manitoba are timothy, awul ess brome  grass and red top, meadow fresque  and tall oat grass. The reason for  this is simple. To begin with, they  have a soil which is unequalled anywhere in richness, they get the early ���������  spring starting rains as soon as the]  winter snow has gone, and the frozen  moisture coming up when the hot  sun comes. But most important is  the long hours of clear sunlight,  which makes for dapid full growth.  Clovers and other leguminous,  plants are also proving the exceeding fertility of Manitoba soil, and  their adaptability to Manitoba conditions. It has been proved in most  parts of the province that the soil is  particularly adapted for alfalfa. Experiments at Brandon havc shown an  average crop of over five tons to the  acre, and farmers from all over the.  province testify to thc success they  have had with it. Broad red clover  and alsike are also much grown by  good -farmers, and like every other  fodder, yield fine crops.  The large crops of oats and barley that can be grown on'rrafanitoba  land form one of the great natural  advantages of the province for the  raising of beef cattle and feed stock  of every kind, as well as for dairying. A mixture of oats, barley and  alfalfa makes an ideal, fefcd which is  very popular, and is fed by many of  the most successful farmers in the  province.  Manitoba oats have a feeding value  superior to oats grown Almost anywhere else, mainly because of their  exceedingly light hull and plumbncss  of kernel. They weigh more to Jjlic  measured bushel than oats grown in  any of the states. The average weight  of Manitoba oats is thirty-eight  pounds to thc bushel, und oats weighing forty pounds and over are often  to be seen. In the middle western  States thc average weight of oats is  from thirty to thirty-four pounds.  The, difference in feeding value    will  T  heating, for heating is the natural^ re  suit of the    accumulation    of    much  fresh vegetable matter.  It is well to store roots in moist  sand. Beets, carrots and -Dars'nips  will keep all winter without withering  if the temperature is kept low enough  to prevent sprouting. Others may be  kept in dry, cool places. Cabbage  and cauliflower may be pulled entire  and stood in wet sand, or the heads,  may be removed, wrapped Separately  in paper, and placed in a cool cellar,  The Revenue From-Poultry  Annual Income in   Saskatchewan Is  About Bight Million Dollars  That this province is, admirably  suited fory poultry raising, possessing  as, it docs many advantages not to  be found in other -(parts of vlhe Dominion, is the opinion of Professor  R.-.K.' Baker, who is Jn charge of the  poultry department o��������� the University  of: Saskatchewan. The professor has  returned from a convention of poultry men of the western provinces  which was *. ecently held in British  Columbia,     v  Much education, was. of course,  still required to make the ordinary  farmer a practical and profitable  rajser of poultry, but some remarkable progress was already - being  made. The great necessity was tov  show the farmer the necessity of ������e-  lection of' his poultry so that the  birds he feeds will give him a reasonable return for the feed he gives  them, andi next in importance, - was  the study of v practical rations to reduce as much as possible the chicken's H.C. of L.  Much work in -holh those directions w������fs being dotae by the poultry  department of the university.  Professor Baker stated that the  value of the poultry business in this  province amounted to about $7,000,-  000 or $8,000,000 a year and he was  sure this could be greatly increased.  There is much room for improvement  in ;both the production and the marketing of the products* of the poultry  business in Saskatchewan. The work  -at".���������������������������the!'university had of late sol  been as complete as might have been  owing to war conditions, but when  matters Were readjusted more satisfactorily operations could be undertaken.-���������Saskatoon Star.  Tree Talk  Interesting Paragraphs by the Canadian Forestry Association  About nine million acres out of a  total of 210 million acres in Quebec  province are "junder agricultural development., The, chief crop of ��������� the  remaining: 200 million acres  is    and  Celery and Brussels sprouts are pack-|wiH alwaysbe timber for the reason  ed tightly together, upright, in-sand,   that the soil is unfitted for tillage.  ������������������-���������-������������������--���������      ��������� ������������������  - v More than two-thirds of the tech  nical forester,--' in Canada in 1914  have seen military service at the  front. The enlistment of forest rangers has. likewise been heavy,  The^ use of hydro-aeroplanes for  detection of forest fires is being considered by certain governmental and  private interests in,Canada.  In order to save for thc Indians of  Canada their large timber holdings  against loss ���������t>y forest fires, the Indian department at Ottawa is obliging licensees to pile :vud hum thei.-  slash after! taking the lc-gs out of the  woods. . The precaution will save  numerous bad fires. *y  While: Canada^spends about four  millions yearly in studying agricultural .problems, only a trifling mm  has been thus far on the study of  forest problems. More than two-  thirds of the whole of Canada is  better adapted for tree growing than  anything else and will pay profits according to* the scientific care bestoW-*  ed on it. /  This sand should be kept moist, but  iiey.er ..allow water to.get; onto the  celery leaves, asv. rot- will' probably  develop.  It will be noted that in every instance a cool cellar is specified. This  is not possible where a furnace is in  the same compartment.- Divide the  cellar into two parts���������one for the.  furnace and one for the vegetables.  Keep thc window in the vegetable  cellar open as late as it is safe to do  so. At all times, however, see that  there is plenty of fresh air and keep  the temperature down.-���������W.  Canada's Lumber Industry  The report upon the. production of  lumber, lath and shingles in Canada  for thc year 1916, prepared by the  forestry branch of the department of  the interior, "will give statistics 'of'  production by 2,(509 mills operating  in Canada during the calendar year  1916. The number of mills reporting  decreased by 630 as compared with  1915. The value of the lumber, lath  and shingle output for 1916 was as.  follows: Lumber. $58,365,349; Jath,  $1,743,940; shingles, $5,962,933; total  $66,072,222.        '  Canada cut in 1916 3,490,550 feel  board measure of lumber, a decrease  of 9.2 Tier cent, as compared with  1915.  Thc cut decreased in all the eastern provinces, and increased in all  the western provinces as compared  with 1915, British Columbia 'making  thc most pronounced gain.  Wfi r**\**.m   ���������������������������.������������������i.w -���������>  Doctor���������Havc you been thc victim  of an assault?  Patient���������No> sir. 1! simply fainted  and was brought to by a in ember of  the First .Aid to thc Injured Society.  ���������London Opinion.  Co-operative Marketing of Poultr-f  In order to put tiie riiarketing of  poultry on a good basis, two poultry  killing stations have been established in Saskatchewan, one at Regina  and one at Saskatoon. At these sta-.  tions experts supervise the killing,  plucking, grading and packing of  thc birds and advance payments are  made to the senders in accordance  with the grade, the final payment of  thc balance being made when talcs  have been made. Thc system of  gathering poultry hi fairly large  quantities and placing them on liie  market through these stations give/  the farmers a belter chance oi disv  posing of their fowl at the highest  pritio.  W.      N.      U.     WVh  Girl Students' Occupations  The ttislc of self-snt������port among tlte  women students of the University of  Kansas includes everything from  cooking for harvest hands to washing  little white dogs while in school, says  the Topcka Capital. The most common method in 'practice iH doing  housework for faculty women. One  woman \vorks> for u professor's family while sin- in in Kehool and Rpi>nd������-  Iwr v-*c-itinn������*. helninor Ih'1. fanners'  wives eoolc tor harvesters.  A few furnish themselves with a  little pocket money by playing the  piano for gymnasium clftsseH. Another solved the jn'oblcni of making  money last vacation hy making pcu-  iiunttt for Ihe Santa Vv. railway. Two  room mates who wanted to decorate  their iooiusj but lathed Ihe. funds,  have been giving a little, white dog a  *   ->jI> * -.. ���������( '<���������#���������-!������������������      mtrnttXttf.    tt !,.,<���������    Jl' >    f,    ; ��������� ��������� ���������  *���������   -  iiionlli,  "Reclpatli" stands for sugar quality that ss the vcsult bf  modem "equipment and methods, backed by 60 yjava  experience and a determination to produce nothing unworthy  of the name "REDPATH",  m m 2 and B IbiCnrjon*-^-  Ut* Hit* oii ������mu ttuu iw. ������>������-.-,������������  \\Fm\*%JSl0%  *k * Mi "MfctV* *%j*  MMM  "Let Redpath Sweeten it"  1  <  j#*nv*������% tr*  t%t* mmf**  <Zjjs*  \tmtSk  V-fif  '-"far  tf^af*  *MSmTn#lM������mtmim������>m***ii!>  "" ' *������������������������"���������-"'""*������"���������"*' XmUM^mmmmim^tm.m.^ ^M,^,^j,,rrfflfrrfTn,|rr ���������^^'"���������^"f.^^gmDflll^^  ^,4 UlimW** MiiiiJUi  ,,..^...,-i..^r...u^l.A.t.i;-.to,il;i--.^ ���������.'"'���������.'���������"v 'rAA-'i'AAA'AATArA'rA^ArA'rr "s''-VVsW'''y;->-:'-,.V---s :TvAA.r':-:'r ���������AAA'iA'ArA^iir^f^&  ������^JTTTPjP:i: .VV'-v! pP������: %^^^^^gff0^^m  ���������m^PTpPPkPiP'AA: APMS:: .-!'!!i":^".'^'??������^^f.f^M^i^^^  ~ir   ' i mi i iii���������">11,"*, "* ;V;''" ������������������:'.:;' ��������� ���������   ��������� '-A'��������� *''���������' '���������'���������'���������'���������'���������''��������� AA,'������������?"���������''��������� "���������'���������- -''^'i''-'"ff-''''--'.,-s:ff'"ssa������5sfe'^  j Seems a ;yei-jr large nuimbter of -cups  t8 !get from a-pound of tea;   But  that v proves   the   fine   quality  of  :$fe&- .K6se; Tea, '���������:vi&icft goes- further and tastes  better because; it consists chiefly of rich, strong  vt<Msi^^ '������������������ districtv of ; Assam in!;  ::N6i?^m-;Iri^ia^! < ��������� v-  -:Sj  J "p Every woman should know the comfort, arid experi-  B 1 ence the relief of a reliable remedy that can be de-  P pended upon to right conditions which cause head-  p ache* dizziness, languor, nausea and constipation.  At  such times, nothing is so safe, so sure ana speedy as  The Numerous Dialects as Found in  P'PP-':a;'a O^anadav. -v!v!:-  My" coriimentvbn the English spokV  en t*;y oversea troops brings me. an  interesting letter from a Canadian  Scot^, -'Canada/'-' he points biit, "is a  vast r^nelting-pot of all'.. nationalities,  and a| a:rule these different races,  y.'heri :Shcy 'come to the country, live  in communities,! from which they  gradually drift .away-���������I speakj of  course, of thoisessettling on the land."  ���������The native Canadian ti ever gives the  subject a thought; as it applies-to  all, from the Galician to the Scot;  but since your question refers to th*e  latter, let us consider him a moment,  and we will:see that he does not always remain "Scotch." Go "to Glengarry in Ontario, and you will find  it more Scotch than many���������parts of.  Scotland. Gaelic is freely spoken in  some districts, and many of the old^  er people speak indifferent English.  Parts of Nova Scotia and Ptince Edward Island, a thousand miles east,*  are! equally "Stotch." Visit the country on either side of the St. Lawrence  river between Quebec City and the.  Gulf; and you will find Macdonalds,  Macphersons, MacGregors, Campbells and' Gordonsrahd very'..few"*-of  them can converse iti anything but  'Habitant' French; they are the remnants of a Highland regiment dis-  b*mded about 1763."���������Westminster  Gazette.  pAAAAmms^mm  --���������.'���������= ���������~::y-:.-"A:^,vL-:di^-:ifUf.iiw.m  I ^ vfe^  ^/iiiiiuinnjHiiiiMHuiiiHiijiiiHuiuijjiuiiiiiitiHiiiiiuiisuiinutuniuHmuiiMnHiHiiuv'S  N  Good Scouts  s During the past *s!s!y yearsi millions of Women have found them  most helpful in toning and strengthening the System, and for rega-  : Jatlng the stomach, iiver and bowels. These famous pills are entirely  A vegetable and contain no harmful or habit-forming drugs. Use them  i with entire confidence for they cause ho unpleasant aftereffects, and  Wortia a Guinea aBoxVV^vy''  Prepared only.by ThttmtmsBeedsam, St. Helens.Lancashire. England.  Sold everywhere m Canada aad V. 3. Asierica.  la bases, 25 coats.  Minard's Liniment Cures Burns, Etc.  Spoils or Heirlooms ?  Advertisements very often provide  interesting sidelights on matters in  Germany. The following extraordin-:  ary one appears in a Dutch paper:  "Large collection of old pictures,  Dutch, German, Flemish. Jtalian,  Spanish, French and English, and in  addition old Gobelins and rare, Persian carpets for sale. Above at present time in i Germany not far from  the Dutch frontier."  v The advertisement closes by informing "only solvent buyers" to address themselves to a box number in  care of a firm at Cologne. Has some  wealthy Fatherlander decided ,to sell  his heirlooms for food or is some  aristocratic burglar- from Belgium  endeavoring  to  unload  his  spoils?  fe no -mors nscsssary  than Smallpox*;. Arm?  experience has desmonsstratol  the almost smlrsculoua eitt.  '������sacy,--Mdharmle8SBess,oJ AnUtypboW Vaccination.  Be vaccinated NOW by your physician, yoa and  yoar family.   It is more vltsal thara house Insiirance.  - jlsfc your pbj^Sclaa, druggist, or sesodfo*   Have  aroa bad TypholAi'? telling of Typhoid "*Beclne,  ���������^^ *>ii^tsfiMrsray.ai8d-da!Sse?fr(Ha'IyrfeoWCsrs!er?������  THE CUTTE6IMMHUiTORY, BERKELEY, CAfc.  MOBUCIMO VACCINBS -kOEOUMS UHBStt U. 8. 0OV.UCKHM  THE NSW FRtNCH ftCMEDV.NaT. No2 jtf.8  mmF'.*gmm t^ J* SS #*!' roi  V**&ia *?ieac*B  treat success, CURES CHRONIC WEAKNESS. LOST VIGO*  *- VIM, KIDNEY.   BLADDER. DISEASES.  BLOOD   POISON,  ' KLE9.. EITHER NO. DRUGGISTS Of MAIL SI. POST 4 CTS  fOOOERA CO, W; BBSKMANJST.NBW VORKOrUVMAS BROS.  rORONTO.    WRITE FOR PREE BOOK TO DR. LE CLERd  MitDiCo. fiAviissrocfeBD. Hampsteao, Condosveno;  tRVNEWDRAGREtTASTELKS-SIPORMOt!-    EASV TO T������R|  THEK.&F80N TaII^w  VISE THAT: TRADE  MARKED WORD ' TUSRAPION ' IS OH  HRlT.'OOyT.STAMr APtflXED TO M.V CtSNUlMK PACKBT*  The Soul of & Piano it the  Action.    Insist on th*  Otto Higel Piana Action  Lead   Caps   Found  in Shipment   of  Nails to Sweden  Accidental discovery that wire nails  in. a consignment for Sweden were  covered-with lead caps caused the  customs authorities to hold up .a  shipment of 300, cases of the naiis.  The smashing; of! one of the cases  by a passing truck on a Brooklyn  pier led to the discovery. It was  said there was enough lead on each  nail ~for the manufacture of a rifle  bullet, and tliat. the application for  shipping license contained no mention of the lead, simply stating that  the case contained wire nails.  The cases had been standing on a  dock for about three weeks. The  investigation will seek to determine  whether the lead was placed on the  nails as a# subterfuge to get needed  war material to Germany or whether  it was there for some Jegitimate purpose. The lead caps arc'described  as fitting loosely and easily removable.  wmm^0mit^  on  Horses,  Cattle, &c,   quickly  cured by  EGYPTIAN   IJNiMENT  For Sale by AH Dealers  Douglas  *   Co.,   Prop'rs,   Napanee.   Ont.  (Free  Sample  oa   Request) ~  v A dispatch from Lexington, Mass.,  says that/windfall apples will not be  left~to rot on the ground in the orchards of that # town this year. The  Boy Scouts will make daily collections and send the fruit to.-Boston  for distribution among the poor.  This sound economical plan has been  worked out from the suggestion of a  local official. The fruit, growers  -have agreed to it, and as a result  many bushels of good fruit will be  saved that would otherwise go to  waste.���������Providence Journal.  We    believe    MINARD'S    LINIMENT is the best:  Mathias  Foley, Oil City, Ont.  Joseph  Snow, Norway, Me.  Charles  Whooten,   Mulgravc,   N.S.  Rev.   R.   O.   Armstrong,   Mulgrave,  .N.S.  Pierre   Landers,     Sen.,   Pokemouche,  N.S.  Minimize The Fire  PerilBU  ������������������.-jar- -PCjMAMSS^m.  AA*AA������m3W$0k  :;pm^mm^m  AAiAAAfrA^^lfi&^mA  . 'A'ArAAAA'Aammtdm  TTTp-Apppmsmm  A.P:rAAA;AAAAp3������m&&  ���������  ���������-.:--.���������. s-y.ss-^.yiKSsssJiSgftjj-i  ���������AA:- ������������������ A:A.A :.-:r&T&&3x%ml  .-..���������.-ivy" <a': ^P^m^^i^MmM  .������������������A-'���������-.'.Z'A'A<'ti*&mgm\  :'���������:-.' SS-"'-.-..    ":.::..:.::.:^Art;j������^������PjfB  A:. ���������.yy.-V-VV'vWs-y^^gl  A.ArArr-AAmimmm  :A..A^r"A'Ar^mmm  r:'::A\. .ArA'-A:AAA^i^^sm  r'A-AAA&m^i  : ���������y.y''%-'^v:.-rt;s^^Sffii  ���������'..-. 'VV;^-"^i'f^'^sMI  ���������AAA- A'AA0%kgwL  -p. pAmmm  ��������� '��������� yvV-S*sSMSs^^  ':pAAAP$Sg%M!  ������������������ A:A,AA'A'i$!!&������������  ' PPTppP:0������Mll  ArTAPAA^mm  ... .r--.-'t/vs{f.(Si-^-'rl  '-.'������������������ A-. ���������ys.'y.yVr^^^I  ' ''Ar.::.; yiVyi^sSsSl  ���������:}':. .���������-���������:"r>..^v������,:M  ��������� -   ������������������...���������::'. ..-.���������_.<!. J-iS.y^V-.ifl  '���������AaTAAAW$0>������$1  '������������������'. PTAArWSm  ���������A"A 'AyAAt&iMl  ���������-.'���������<*;  Chemically Self-Extiagoishing  "SilehtSOOs"  The Matches With ''Np  Aftetglow  t������  EDDY is tbe only Canadian  maker of these matches, every  ���������tick oi which has been Ueated  with a chemical solution whieh V  positively ensures the match  becoming dead wood" onca it  has been lighted and blown  out,  Look for ths words "Chemically self-extinguishing" on the  box.- .AA .  ��������� AArAAimi  AAAA&*  ..- - ���������is-v--.;/-!i'B  VyyV^rfgSS-l  y.-'VQ3ffisPf|  ::-A.iy--:^^'fm  i:'--Y?.-ty&?M  ���������-..- Y-tf.S?'-.-.^!  -���������V-sS^sgSf  'V!-VV������!f^  ��������� -..rr .^yyy.yvjSgs.  ���������  - "���������sv/'.kyys-Jv'.W  . -V-s-;y yyssyS-'xs!''/;  .���������.    .���������.V;--:-'-V������SSfS!  --���������:���������'..   ;:''-sVS5?������|jgi  .,.;sS������i  i-its.7.^ss'.t?-$g  MONEY ORDERS  Remit"~by. Dominion Express Money Order,  If lost .or. stolen, 'you net your money back.  He Was Willing  A tramp asked a gentlcmau for a  few pence to buy some bread.  "Can't you go into any business  that is more profitable than this?" he  was asked.  "I'd like to open a bank if I could  only* gel the tools," answered the  tramp.  Minard's  Liniment  Relieves  Neuralgia.  Its Virtue Cannot Be Described.���������  No one can explain thc subtle power  that Dr. Thomas' Electric Oil possesses. The" originator was himself  surprised by the wonderful qualities  that his compound possessed. That  he was. the benefactor of humnaity is  shown by the myriads that rise in  praise of this' wonderful Oil. So  familiar is everyone with it that it  is prized as a household medicine  everywhere.^   -  A Disappointment,   v  Polly���������-She admits    she is  lerrihly  disappointed in hcr husband.  Doily���������-What's the matter with  liim?  Polly���������Oh, shc married him to reform uim, and now she finds lie  doesn't need it. ���������  Restricts Use of Milk and Cream  The consumption of milk or cream  pure or mixed with- tea, coffee, chocolate or any other ��������� preparation, is  forbidden after October 1, aftcr the  hour o*f 9 o'clock in thc morning in  all cafes, restaurants, tea rooms and  lunch houses throughout France, by  an order issued in Paris by the'minister of provisions. Railroad lunch  rooms are excepted from the ruling.  Warts on the hands is a disfigure-  " Would"GivesTffim the^ Lie  Rounder���������This gas bill is only 20  cents  Clerk���������Well, sir?  Rounder���������-Better make it $4.20. My  wife keeps the bills and I've been  writing her that during her-'absence  I've spent all my evenings at home.  NERVOKTOJBLE  The nerve system is the governing  system of the whole body, controlling the heart, lungs,  digestion,   and  brain;  so it is not    surprising    that  nervous  disturbances    should    cause  acute distress.    The  first  stages    of  nervous  debility arc noted    by irritability and  restlessness,    in    which  thc victims seem to be oppressed by  their  nerves.      The   matter  requires  immediate attention, for nothing but  suitable  treatment    will    prevent ^ a  complete breakdown.      The    victim,  however, need not despair for    even  severe nervous    disorders    may    be  cured by improving the condition  of  thc blood. It is because Dr. Williams'  Pink  Pills  actually make new,    rich  blood that this medicine has    cured  extreme nervous disorders after    all  other treatment had failed. The nerves  thrive on  the  new blood  made  by these pills; the appetite improves,  digestion is better, sleeplessness   no  longer troubles    the    former    nerve  shattered vittim, and life    generally  takes on a cheerful aspect.      Every  sufferer from nerve troubles, no matter how slight, should lose no   time  in giving Dr. Williams*. Pink Pills a  fair  trial,  thus  regaining their    old-  time health and comfort.  You  can get Dr. Williams'    Pink  Pills through any dealer in medicine,  Canadian Fish for King's Table  Special ''interest* has been taken in  London in the shipment of Canadian  fish to British troops, who much enjoy the change from all meat ration, J  and it has been marked .by the request from the' kingi who asked Ma?  jor Hughie Green, in charge*-of y theft-oxen fish supplies, to send various  samples and varieties, to His Majesty  at Windsor Castle.  Impurities of the Blood Counteracted.���������Impurities in the blood come  from defects iii the action of ' the  liver.' They are revealed by pimples  and unsightly blotches on the skin.  They must be treated inwardly, and  for this purpose there is no more effective compound to be used than  Parmelee's Vegetable Pills. They  act directly on the liver and by setting up healthy processes have a  beneficial effect upon the;, blood, so  that impurities  are eliminated.  ��������� ���������IIWlWl   I*    III    iiiwi-*uw  To Avoid Waste  COOn   COTTON JR00I   COMPOUND  Azof*, rellaih regulating tttsd*.  fW     Anld tg l)j������..^.jJJJJi ttk  strength.   No. -1%. {Vn.X ������Q  Ko. 3. S3 per box.   BoV  dnisiZUts. or sent pirottSd itt  plain package on receipt oi  priCj*r,, Free pamphlet.��������� ���������Addreaf >  Toronto,Ofi. (F*ww^������#TaBaWJ  'AAApmmm  -V'v;-;a������M5r  AA; W-MB*  ���������':A'A>.*'X$Mtr  '.AAA'm^m  r:-������A, jJsS'aMI  s'--y'v:-'s'-'*wca;l  ������������������||^s  'iiivlIsM  A::rAA������M$������5S  mciit that troubles many ladies. Hol- 0r by.mail at 50 cents a box or six  loway's Corn Cure ivill remove   the boxes for $2.50 from The  Dr.  Wil-  blcnuslies without pain.    Dairying in Alberta  CHEWING TOBAGGG  Simply Pino* It In Tho Mouth  B���������twaott Lowoi* Lip and Gum.  Tliis is tho way to get oil the fkivoi  and aatlr.faction out of every pinch of  Co���������>*>'''���������ih?.T,^���������l������������������ O^eTfliir*" Tohrvrrn.  Vou tiec,- "Copenlingeu" is made of  lhe hest, old, high fitivored leaf tobacco.  The Huufl! process���������by which the leaf  lobacco Is converted into tiny graiim,  nud iiclcnllficallv prepared ��������� retains  nil the good of the tobacco.  Those who are trylug'-Copeiih-tKen"  for the fi*mt time, should remember to  uiic only u miiull (uiuutity, utidtopluce  the pinch in the mouth between tha  1/,...������..   11m    ������-. ,1    tl.  -Attempt; nt chewiug it.  "It'll tho rsott cccr.cn-Jci!  III. . ..x  ���������1 ������  m.x.%t mm  W.     N.     U.     1170  One Cieamciy Muhiifucluicb 3,000,000  Pounds of Butter  Edmonton, the capital city of Alberta, possesses in the Edmonton  City Dairy, one of the larpfcst, if not  the Largest creamery in Canada. Its  output of butter last ycar reached  three million pounds,' which is approximately one-third of the total  f-.u������T'Ut of Ihr, ?r?r.tr.r.ry l.ut'.Ci' of '.V.c  province. It also manufactured about  200,000 pounds of cheese. This Is a  new branch of its industry, a beginning having been ma do Jin this line  three years ago, but continual progress is being maintained, and it !���������  expected that this year's output will  be double that of last year. There it  a big local demand for all the cheese  niRiuifucturcc) by the creamery, and  jjuy t������u11'iii.** ti* ci-jcuy mmi(;iic uitcr  by the Adjoining province,of British  Co!uu'tu!a. T!.j> dl.jiy .tint .sui>i>lic������  a large poiti i> <.f the milk con-mined by the iiihj������l>t(;mu of the city of  Edmonton.  liauis' Medicine Co., Brockville, Ont.  Seven, at Leant  Now this is bur amliitioiij  We'll say it, frank aud bluut-  A nice long row of fiprurea  With n. dollar mark in front.  jJwnmiAamnwnJM  : ?2Z������ei^*\Jtm\>'������*rJm^  THIS' jr������*r^5F^  Food Controller Offers Some Timely  Suggestions  The food controller is informed  that avoidable waste of valuable orchard and gardcji products is taking  place in'many towns and villages of  Canada.  In order to prevent this waste an  appeal is made to -the mayors,  reeves and officers of the respective  municipalities to take ��������� immediate  steps to conserve such products as  cannot be made use of by the producers or disposed of through thc  usual channels.  To accomplish this object the following  suggestions  are* made:  1. Citizens are urged (a) to use  every means in their power to conserve for their own use their full  requirements of fruits and vegetables;  (b) to dispose of any surplus they  may have throiiRh the usual channels of trade, or turn such surplus  over to a local conservation committee.  2. That the head of every municipality organized from representatives of the various local societies,  organizations and religious denominations, a civic conservation committee to take charge of thc usuciiibliiiK  of all surplus orchard    and    garden  fuoducts tliat may be donated by thc  ndlvidual citizens by enlisting the  co-operation of the public and high  school teachers, ulilizin-*-; parties organized from amongst the pupils, aided by conveyances donated for the  purpose by the citizens.  3. That the various conservation |  coiumiucci-i make inuucdiulc una  adequate nrr.-ingcuirtil'*. for the safe  storing of all such surplus products  until snch time an they can be disposed of to the various charitable organizations or soldiers' homes or sold  by such committee to those unable  to purhciac at regular ptictft, or ilU-  posed of thronph the rrf;ul;u* trade  channels and tne proceeds of nil  rtiich Hair-- donated to thc Red C-.<>>.<.  or similar organization* as the discretion of the commitlr-s shall direct.  it it urjt-rd that the widrnt poi-  sihlo publicity bc kivcu lo thin up-  I [usul and tlic e;aiu:;t co-operation of  ' #1!  citlreuf  enlisted   in  iin brbuU.  ������������������: Smart"!V'V-'vv. .'>>������������������:.....������������������!  The Anzac read tile advertisement  on the door, and strolled in.  "I want ter speak ter a pal o':  mine,"  lie said.  "Ah, yes. Be seated, my dear good  sir."' '  Then in a dreamy voice the mediuu������  began to ring up the Beyond.  "I am in touch with the person yot  want," hfc said at last, "He tells m������  that he has made a lot of friends. Already; he has met Cromwell, Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, Henry Irving, Mark Twain, Balzac and a scort  of others." -  "Gee!" muttered the Australian.  "Jim alius was a hustler. 'E ain't bin  dead an hour yet!"���������London Answers.  s-^'.Vi-'W'l  rrfMm  ���������'v'Vy!^S-  AAPrm  llll  You Look As  YOU FEEL  You know w������H enough  when your liver is  loafing.  Constipation is the fir-st  warning; then you begin  to "feel m������an aU over."  Your akin *oon got* the  fend news, it grows dis!!,  yellow, muddy and unsightly.  Violent purgatives are not  what you ncea���������iu-st the  gentle help of tnis old-  time standard remedy*  pA'f-fcl  'V.'WUl  ������������������.'��������� '-"���������''' i.'-  ������������������:���������:��������� Vs>.,|  PA'']  Apt]  PT(\  ������*nutfi*  bauarat   *$tgn������t������r*  Colorleso faces often show  tho absence of Iron In tho  blood.  ���������nr&-er7t������ 8r#tri SriSSs  will help this condition*  WlJj^JWjmjIitWIjJ^^  "���������"'"^"  ^^xM^ttt^imMmm^f^^^mmmmmxtmt^  (M������s\ 'fj^'j-flW'giiaiM'fijtr *^iftili^lMiliiltlMa''if*fc'1^tt'*iii *1  ^i>������������������^������*������*������������������^^ THE CRESTON REVIEW  J' ' Af. J  THE GRESTON REVIEW  Issued every Friday ,at Oreston, B.C.  Subscription: $2 a year in advance.;  $2.50 to United States points.  C. P. Hates. Owner and Editor.  ORESTON, .B.C.m FRIDAY. NOV. 16  Unionists 32<&as������y  Unionist government in letters so  bold thau he who runs may read.  And.a careful reading of the  papers goes to show that the  genuine Unionist spirit that permeates'this section is just as strong*  ly in ~ evidence in all the other  provinces of the Dominion, except  Quebec���������and even there it is very  much alive and gaining strength  daily.  individual fortunes does not hang  on the outcome of' these meetings,  and with the general good feeling  that prevails in these limes the  venture looks safe.  Our citizenb have the time and  the inclination to turn out to these  affairs, and right now oan stand all  the entertainment and education  the gatherings will afford. Gentlemen of the Liberal and Unionist  associations, what is your pleasure?  Opponents of the Unionist cause  in Creston Valley were handed a  few more knockout drops on Saturday night, when at a well-attended and thoroughly representative  citizens meeting the Creston Valley Unionist Association was enthusiastically organized.  The officers and executive of the  new organization appear elsewhere.  A glance over the names of those  chosen to direct the destinies of the  .association not only convinces that  it is an absolutely non-partizan  institution, biit also assures that  the Unionist campaign at the south  end of the West Kootenay riding  will be vigorously prosecuted along  lines that will meet with the  endors&tion of all elements in the  constituency.  The organization meeting was  open to alL 200 invitations were  sent out to that number of electors  to lend a hand in effecting its  formation That the gathering so  constituted, in a section where  political feeling invariably runs  high, should produce an association  that so nicely represents the three  old political parties in the male  members elected, as well as lady  members of American, Irish and  Scotch Canadian persuasion, is  surely the best possible indication  that Unionism has taken a firm  grip on the intellects of all classes  in the community.  Upward of 50 of those entitled  to vote next month signed the  membership roll, and of those at  least 80 paid their dues to the  treasurer. This fact is notable in  two ways. Neither of the old  political associations can boast as  large a membership after several  years of existence, while those  signing on with the Unionists did  so    in   the   fail   knowledge  O&kfsmds Fi-r&i  A.1- _ X.  tJUH,U  patronage is taboo at Ottawa now [  and that a pajd-up membership  did not entitle them to consideration directly or indirectly for  prospective or future government  favors���������a little detail old-line  associations used for the Teverse  purpose when gunning fer new  members oftentimes.  While some of the Laurier  Liberals seem to be still deluding  themselves that their cause is  right, Saturday night's good work  iitid the every wheae-prevalent let's-  forget- party - till-we-win - the -war  spirit makes it unmistakably plain  tliat tho handwriting is on the  wall, and the characters inscribed  thereon  spell out vfctory  for the  Now that it seems assured that  the Unionist candidate   in   West  Kootenay  will be   opposed  by .a  Laurier   Liberal    The    Review  would like to suggest that those  members of   the   Creston   Valley  Liberal Association who intend to  support the Laurier candidate-confer with  the Unionist Association  executive  and  arrange for a series  of joint meetings at all the   points  iin the Valley  at  which  say three  speakers from each  side  be given  fifteen or twenty minutes each to  set forth and discuss  the  pros and  cons of the Unionist  and  Laurier  platforms.  This is the time of year when we  all have at least the evenings to  ourselves and this fact, combined  with the fondness all our citizens  have to hear their neighbors clash  in friendly debate on the foremost  issues of the day will assure crowded houses wherever these meetings  are staged.  Besides iu this way the electorate  would get both sides of the campaign put up to them in readily  understandable language and thus  be in a much better position to  intelligently decide how to mai'k  their ballot than if the only statement of case they have is from the  rival candidates on different  otjeasions.  This offer will, we feel sure,  appeal forcibly to the Laurierites:  At present ���������they are rather up  against it for a paper, or medium of  any sort, to adequately disseminate  the gospel according-^ to their  illustrious leader. TJiese joint  meetings should serve such a purpose   ideally���������rand   the   : Unionist  ent  t nave to pay half the ���������  . i���������n  licuxx  any incidental expenses.  After the outlying points have  been favored and the speakers have  taken their opponents' measure  and developed their oratorical  talents to some degree, a final  meeting might be arranged for  Creston, with a. moderate admission fee charge, with everything  over expenses going to the Red  Cross Society.  In Creston Valley where amateur politicians prefer to bet rather  than fight (or argue intelligently,  all too often), it is quite safe to try  out these joint meetings we are  assured. The fate of the empire,  the success of the Victory Loan,  nor the making or   losing of any  The appearance of the names of  two   of   the   Valley's  progressive  Socialists on the executive   of the  newly-organized Unionist Association���������and   with  a  labor  man   already announced as a candidate in  the constituency ���������may  come  as a  surprise to some Review readers.  We   fancy,   however,    the    intelligence will not  take the breath  away from many of our subscribers;  most likely only a few of those who  still  cling   to    Laurier  and   with  whom,   most  likely,   the wish was  father to  the hope  that   such   a  tangible   tribute  to the  cause  of  Union     Government'    would   not  eventuate.  As the situation develops overseas from day to day and in view  of revelations as to Hun conspiracies that are being con*Ma*itly mad?  from sources of unquestioned reliability in hitherto neutral nations  how any red-blooded Canadian can  still stand out and sing my party  'tis of thee i3 beyond our com prehension.  And   the  support   of   the   progressive    Socialists     to   the   new  Union      administration    will     be  whole-hearted,   and   in the highest  degree patriotic.    There arecertain  well    defined     and    fundamental  principles for  which   these people  have stood for many  years.    They  adhere to those principles as firmly  today as ever.    But  they   are not  the type of  citizens to   waste the  strength  and  the  resources of the  nation by internal strife when the  enemy is literally   pounding at the  gates.    We believe   that  they are  willing to  accept   any  reasonable  terras for   a cessation  of internal  political struggles Until the enemy  is forced^to surrender..   After, that  date thsy wiU push for  the fulfillment of their own legitimate demands with ail  the vigor at their  disposal.    In   the   meantime they  will   carry   on   their, educational  work,   and   will   give   the Union  Goverrimeiit whole hearted support  so long as its actions  and  conduct  warrant that, support.  This same spirit permeates every  class of political thought in Canada, and is rolling up recruits to the  Unionist cause by thousands every  day. To argue that sueh a cause  will not triumph on December 17th  were as wasteful of time as trying  to demonstrate that the earth is  flat, or looking for the lost Charlie  Ross, or the manP who hit Bill  Patterson.  i     -...  Your Plain Duty  Your Dnty as a citizen of Canada is plain, definite,  and now imperative.  Your sons and your neighbors' sons have gone and  are still going "over there" to fight for their country and  their homes and for you and yours.  They cannot tight without the food that Canada has  to sell. Our Government looks to you to buy this food.  Your duty is to lend���������not give���������this money.  It is more than duty���������more than patriotism���������it is a  privilege to buy VTOTORY BONDS.  Thc money you invest in VICTORY BONDS will  help win the war, help keep our soldiers fed, clothed,  armed and protected���������help keep your country safe and  drivo Kaiaorism out of tho world forever.  The Govoi-nr/icnt of C:vnadii gunmnta������K to pay your  money hack in five, ton or twenty years, whichever terms  yon may choose. It pays you interest every six months.  Any and all of the resonrccH of the country are behind  t his guarantee.  Until December Lstyou tun buy VICTORY BONDS  .",t :���������!������������.' Iv.vV, u,u\ you <yui buy them on the partial payment plan if you wish. Buy all you can, ami see that  all your inonclH buy.  BSuy st Bond  Men's, Boys'  Youths  We have them in Overs  and 3-hole Lace Rubbers.  Ladies. Misses  Children's  We  have these in  Over-  rubbers and Overshoes.  Right now our stock of these is exceptionally complete with all sizes. We unhesitatingly recommend them  ���������they are the Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co. goods,  and undoubtedly the best on the market.  Ladies and gentlemen of thc  Creston Vallov and regions round  about, we have with us this week,  and continuing in our midst until  Decern her 1st, Canada's Viotory  Loan.  Canada requires !$150,000,000 of  Canadian money to spend in Canada to make sure this courtry does  not fail in any respect in discharging her full dutyin helping remove  from oil' tho face of the earth forever tlio atrooious militaristic  world-dominating pro pagan ud a of  tho unspeakable Hun.  Every facility is provided that  folks of ordinary means can in this  way help win tho war. $50 Victory Bonds aro offered, oven, and  on the instalment plan, the buyer  having six months iu which to  mako his payments, and tho bond  pays 5$> por cent, intoreat from  Deoember 1st.  Not only is tho Viotory Bond  obtainable on favorable terms, and  pays a gilt edge rate of interest,  hut it is a form of security that is  as good, and bettor, thau a bunk  noto of tho same denomination.  Right now business houses aro  advertising that thoy will aooopt  Viotory Bonds ao oaoh and givo  you baok tho interest that is duo  on them, while any bank, loan  oompany, etc, will roadliy ox-  '.'hfv,"*'* -������<������������>!> niotmy for mioh a bond  any time presented.  Th��������� $150,000,000 will all bn,  spent in Canada, ho that, nationally  m peaking,  yw.i  are merely tnkitig  EN'S WfciAR  HEAVY UNDERWEAR, the well-known Hewson make  fine, all-wool garments., from $3 to $3.50 per suit, and  a full range of sizes.  HEAVY TOP SHIRTS, in all sizes and weights, from  $1.50 to $3.50 each.    The best value to be had to-day.  1  ****  ���������   ���������-.--. ifc. ��������� ,---".   '-���������.'-'���������   '   -. y  is urged bythe GOverhmerit-^-it has done ITS part, we are doing OURS���������  will you do YOURS ? V^  OUR part is to grow the very best trees possible, to see they are true-  to name, to care for them in every while they are in! our nursery, and to  deliver to yon,upright, clean healthy,'! well-calipered tr^es with magnificent root system, well packed, all charges paid,-at your neai est station  or dock. . We sincerely think that this is OUR part.        ;V.    .  YOUR part is to get! your order ready without delay so that you can  plant next. Spring arid to ORDER !E ARL.Y. Early orders ar* better for  us AND BETTER FOR YOU. It is humanly impossible _to give the  same attention and care, to late orders as those placed' six or twelve  morsths in advance. V' ,P ..V !':v':"���������V VVy.:>!  Will you write^us today for any information, and giying us an idea of  your requirements? Our services and adytce are cheerfully yours.  Our lai'ge general and Fruit Catalogue, our. ttose Catalogue, our J?rsce  List sire yoVirs for the a*iMng���������they contain valuable-planting and general  information. Do not delay���������write to-day, or see our local representative  Andrew Miller. - :. " - -s        v  British Columbia Nurseries Giimpaiiy, Limited  1493 Seventh Ave. WM Vancouuer, B.C.     Nursery at Sardls  ue  the flioney out of one pocket and  putting it in another���������and getting  5i per cent, interest all the while,  in the bargain. The security he-  hind Canada's Victory Bonds consists of all the resources and all the  assets of all the people  of Canada.  The Creston Valley has been  moderately blessed this year. Canada calls on its citizens for high  and noble service. On some it calls  for service in the field; on others  for service, at home; on all, it calls  for financial support. The people  of Canada will surely respond  eagerly to the call for subscriptions  to the Viotory Loan.  Buy at least one Bond, and more  if possible.  ROBT, LAMONT  NOTARY PUBLIC  INSURANCE   ���������    REAL. ESTATE  DEALER IN COAL.  / A " ��������� ���������  CRESTON   -   -   B.C.  Fernie citizens came across with  close to $600 for the Britiah Red  Cross on "OurDay" last month. Some  Austrians, a few Italians and four  English-speaking subjects wero tho  only ones who refused* to contribute.  News: With October showing it  total ot 40,075 tons���������or practically  B0,000 tons���������of oro roeolvod at tho Consolidated smelter in Trail, all records  for tho Inst two years huvo been sent  glimmering for any single month's  rccoipts.. m  Free Proust It is surprising how  few inuu In tho employ of the Crow's  Nest Pass Ooal Co. como under the  first call for military servi'io. It Ib  estimated that not ovor B0 at both  Michel and Conl Crook camps nro  eligible for tho first call. \  At Cranbrook the othor day tho  manager of tho browovy was lot oil on  a charge of manufacturing hnor ovor  2 j>cr fci-i-it. thf*-. Judf;**'. HiMmluj** that  tho prosocutlon failed to provo that  tlio bottle in which tho boor wuh put  woro clean boforo thoy wore flllod.  Trail Nowb: Tho month of October  wan tho first one in which tho now  inmiMomont tax wan effective throughout tho province. Tho amount ool-  loctod in Nelson in givo;) out at $1ftK.  Tn Trail no oillcial stutwuont of tho  IMIlOMllut,.".. .'.I.,.''. ..'   JVl.t.:''.!V������>������������    ������������<������fcl������.  1h known that it is considerably in  oxco������A of th.it collected In Ni'Wnn,  probably uotnowhore above tho C!KM>  mark.  Synopsis of Coal Mining  Regulations  Coal mining rights of the Dominion,  in Manitoba, Saskatchewan nnd Alborta, the Yukon Torritory, theNorth- ,  West Territories and in a portion of  tho Province of British Columbia, may  be loused for a term of twenty-ono  years ronowul for a further term of  12 years at an annual rental of $1 an  aero. Not more than 2.600 acres will  ho loiiKod to ono applicant.  Application for a leaso must bo made  by the applicant in person to the Agent  or Sub-Agont of tho district In which  the rights applied for aro situatod.  In surveyed territory tho land must  bo described by sections, or legal subdivisions oj sections, and in unsurvoy-  ed territory tho tract applied for Bhall  bo staked out by tho applicant himself  Each application must bo accompanied by a fee of tyR which will ho refunded if tho rights applied for aro not  availablo, but not otherwise A royalty  shall be paid on tho merchantable output of tho mine at tho rato of llvo cents  per ton.  Tho person oporatingtho mino shal^  furnish tho Agent with sworn return's  accounting for tho full quantity of  merchantable conl mined and pay tho  roy-iHy theronn. Tf tho ooal mining  rights' aro not being operated, snob  returns should bo furnished at least  onco a yoar.  Tho louse will include tho coal  mining rights only.  For full Information application  should bo mado to tho Soerotary of tho  Department of tho Interior, Ottawa,  or to any agent oir Sub-Agent of  Dominion Lands.  VV j    VV .   JJUJJ Jx , *j  tho Interior.  .*!#.������u ,  -������������l..(���������*.,  fl  \m  .4  N.Vi.���������Unuiit,hori-/.eri pobllcuilun of thlr.  advertisement will not bo paid for.  tliliBiti'in  'l..������W^t^lji,,M.^w,H,ll.,MI���������^1,,i,,|,lvl^1i^|lt)ht.)'1|||||i  iwiiimiijiiiiiiiiji  IjjMIITTjljW^^ !ssr  Mr..A������  -*v>1  ,*���������>.<,  ^Pti^k  _i * -<        ,    ��������� "*'">    f "  * *  ' "*^-.-J*t'"T ,- * ^.t   ^    ���������<���������*���������*���������*"    " "   "* r  ^     ? ���������" 1 , ^ ~ . *, j /!   "*    .    . .. .     js.      ���������?     fc      ���������* *h, ���������**...    -3V. "'  ,K  OS  THE  CBESTON REVIEW  ������ "f*     m   rp,  ^   IjV-^-*  a������������  HUNTJERS!   ATTENTION!  Respond Welllto  Air  **w&������  \s*  A  HEAVY  Mjfi*<^  These are the sort you have been looking for in past seasons.  Warranted genuine Jack Buck, and  specially made for hunters wear and  comfort.  We have your size. They will stand  the hardest wear indefinitely.  We want you to see these.  Drop  in.  F. H.  JACKSON  GENERAL MERCHANT  CRESTON  SHIP US YOUR 'CREAM  tsutterfat now 45c. ib.  f.o.b. Nelson  WRITE US FOR SHIPPING TAGS  BOX 1192 -,  Creamery Co.  NELSON. B.C.  lamp:  We carry a complete  stock of  Lumber, Lath  When in need of anything in this line call  and   get   our  prices,  Canyon City Lumber Company  LIMITED  \*Jr JT.!' ��������� V** \**i l\������JJrYX.l������������MrfJrV^^  SIR EDMUND WALKER.  C.V.O.. IX.D., D,C.L, President  SIR JOHN AIRD; General Munaaw  H V, P. JONES, A������'t Gen'l. M������nagef  Capital Paid Up. $15,000,000 jTReservc Fund. . $J3,500,ooo  Consult the Manager regarding current  accounts,  collections, loans and  the other facilities offered  by, this Bank. ������-  0. G. BENNETT Onager Croston Brunch  . With a full bouse at the Auditorium  Monday night, Capt. Pearson of the  Military Y.M.C.A., held the audience  almost spellbound for an hour or more  While he. described the work of the  Canadian boys in the front line in  France, and what the Y.M.C.A." is  doing in its wonderful work for them.  It was the most interesting addresses  on the war yetTheard in Creston���������and  we have hadtj several of them. How  the audience appreciated it is shown  by the generous collection taken at  the end.  Capt. Pearson took his hearers to  the Y.M.C.A. huts i within a~ few  hundred yards of the German line in  Prance and drew word pictures of onr ������������������js  fathers, brothers and'friends iri France  that riveted the atteniinn-of all. Story  after story was told of -incidents in the  life, and-through it all Capt. Pearson  ���������- hardly mentioned himself at all.  He had a story to tell, a gripping  live story. He knew how to present it  -and did so. It was a story that none  of-us had heard before in just that  way���������the way that counts. Luck of  space prevents an" extended account,  but that'the captain had the audience  with hiin was certain. Among other  things, he told of the using of phonographs when the men caine in after  days in the wet trenches, and boW the  records were worn down smooth, so  much were they appreciated nnd used.  Also of the cinema machine-? that .so  resembled real movie machines that  they were called Fords*, the men as-k-  ing to get out the little Fold when  they came in for coffee on 1 %\ armth  after heart-breaking da> s.  One feature that watt not much  touched on at Monday i-k������;hi.'.-j gathering was the fact that the Military  Y.M.C.A. is equipped for and actually  does a large amount of Ked Cross  work. By request it cares for all  "walking cases" coming out of the  trenches, many of those slightly  wounded not wi&hing to be reported  by.tbe Ked Cross and thus get in the  casualty lists, which makes loved ones  across the seas ;:nduly anxious.  Such cases are attended to  by tho  Y. until they are removed and sent to  military   headquarters or  hospital if  necessary, the Y. gladly undei taking I  and looking after such   men as a part j  of _their   duty.     The    Y.    therefore  actually deals   with a larger number:  of soldiers than  the Red   Cross? its-If,  important as the latter  undoubtedly  is.  At the close of Capt. Pearson's address Mr. Hatt, who looks after the  business end of these visits, made nn  appeal for funds to help on the good  work, and up"till noon to-day the  cash oontributed at the meeting plus  the sums promised, and which will be  paid in within ."the next few weeks,  runs up to the1-*7 respectable total of  55300, and a *ea������vass<of the Canvon  Oity, Erickson, Alice Sidinpr Wynndel  uri?* Sirdar.* centres is uot, yet, completed.  E. C. Gibbs was selected as the local  treasurer, and those who care can  make their payments in instalments  spread over the next twelve months.  As a voluntary effort nothing in War  work is quite so important as the  Y.M.C.A. activities and no response  can be too generous for such a magnificent work as the Y. is doing���������absolutely free in every detail to tho men  in khaki. "���������  Capt. Pearson appeared here under  board of trade auspices, but tho president being professionally detained  the chair was ably, filled by Rev. M.  W. Lees. Tiie meeting was brighten-  ,ed up considerably by the Creston  orchestra, which rendered a number  of selections during the evening.  ���������''m\\\W.-JTMrs'r-.  IS THE WORLD'S BEST?  It is manufactured  tobacco in its purest  form. " \*  It  has  flavor.,  pleasing  _-M  It is tobacco scien-  ti  tor man s use.  ���������***���������"*"  HI  _ *   ' ' P t~  Transfer, Livery and Feed Stables  Sleighs and Cutters.      Team Sleighs  Single and Double Harness and Supplies  Several  Sets   of  J^UV/VUU  AAauu  Harness  Coal and Wood Fo������- Sale.  iUBoGREATH  ** m-m.     It s- *~      <- * t     **sl      x.^rvm, u _      ~3"4 -**-*-* ***���������     '  Sirdar Ave. _  Kaslo council will double the dog  taxes this year. The licence fee for a  gentleman dog will be $5 now;.  The Golden district contributed  $3,071 to the Patriotic Fund for the  twelve months ended Oct. Hist.  fJ.U-   d- I    has'been  shut  smelter  has a lady assistant  Grand Forks  city clerk.  , Tbus far .thia year 158 mines haye  sent ore to .the -Trail smelter.  Phoenix miners put  up $1,603  tho Patriotic Fund in October.  for  There are 240 telephones at Trail���������  double thc mimbpr in use two years  ago. ;,-���������;���������. ���������  At .Grand Forks M. T. Jarvis was  flned $50, for carrying a gun without  a license.  Trail Roman Catholics havo just let  tho contract, for tho erection of a new  $7000 church.  Tho sawmill at Bonners Ferry expects to run until almost tho beginning of the yoar.  Knolo*fi   leading    hotel,    thc   Kin  George, has  raised tho.price of me  from 116 to 60 cento.  ing  ���������'ale  Tenders aro bolng called for tho  erection of a now two-room public  school at Now Donyor.  The mines at Rossland arc supplying  almost ono half of the ores handled at  Trail (���������moltor.nt. present.  inxarranging to  fund In  Tho Oity of Nelson  Invest $110,000  of ita winking  tho Victory Loan Bond**.  Groenwood schools bed an attendance of 110 pupils last month. 22 of  thuuo aro In tho high bchool.  Btrawborrlon Ii\ bloom and dandelions in blossom woro In evidence in  the Salrno country lat.1. wtwok.  Aid. Robb and J. W. Ooaklo will  comidlo L\u*' voLonf littt for the Kanio  section of W������������t Kootenay, while Jan.  Ooupland of BohwoII will have ehnrge  of tho work along Kootenay Lake.  at Grnnd Forks  down   the past  two  weeks djie to a shortage of coke.  Deer are reported to be veiy scarce  in the Fernie country this season tind  yery little hunting is being done.  FernieVr.vieis arc re.idy for winter.  23' skips have been elected to bead  that number of rinks this season.  3. A.-Austin, a-Nel*.on aldermat-**-,,  may run as a labor candidate in West  Soottutty iu lu������ pending eSecvion.  Mr. Bfggs, the labor candidate in  East Kootenay. wants his backers to  dig up $3000 to finance his  campaign.  The pupils at Grand Forks cleaned  up $64.10 from the sale of vegetables  from" the puplic school garden this  year.  "This year the Okanagan raised 3700  carloads of exportable produce. Of  that amount 2,000 carloads were  apples. -  A couple of nights last week the  moving picture theatre at Trail wus  not large enough to hold the crowds  seeking admission.  The price of coal has been raised 25c  per ton at Fernie to meet the raise in  wages caused by the recent investigation into the cost of living.  Father  Lambot,   the    well-known  Kootenay Indianr priest. Fort   Steele,1  is progret(8ing favorably to recovery  after a long and severe Jllheiss.  The largest- individual carload of  apples to leave Penticton was shipped  out last week by the Fruit Growers'  Union.    The car .contained 1345 boxes.  Fornio Free Press: Up till noon  Friday 877 mon have boon examined,  of whom 181 are in Class A. Cf these  114 have applied for exemption and  40 haye reported for seryice.  The principal of Penticton's scat of  learning complaint- that parents are  lax in seeing to it that the boys  attend pchool. In sqime rooms the  girls otitnumber tho boys four to One.  Cranbrook" has a now $l-a-ycar rod  and gun club, with Mayor Clnpp as  president. It will get aftor the  uutborJtioR to stock some of the  streams in that section with young  Iish.  Nelson will install a now $0,600  motor at the power plant and when it  is ready for business, about tlio end  of tho month, tho city street cats will  run.-jj-ftln.  Hotolkeopor Drow of Kimberley  was lost week fined $50, and had  taken from him 91700 worth of liquor,  for hr-vlnjr fn hl������ ������-������r'������>������<������"������!f*iT> ���������y.rirt- of  tho  "wot"  goods 'than  IJ.O.'s   now  FOE BAD COLDS  AND COUGH  rup White Pine  anu Tar  Contains, xvo .opiates or  habit forming drugs.  One teaspoonful every  three   or   lour   hours.  t  Is pleasant to take and"  very effective.  i  i  G  Creston Drug & Book Go.  Phone 67  CRESTON  ��������� m  I  A<1  m  Is there any  Meat in the  House?  This is the first question'that presents itself  to the housewife if an  unexpected visitor drops  iu'for a meal. But why  worry?  Shamrock Brand  Hants [and Bacon  Finest  Quality  Cqpkcd Ham  Ktimch Meat  Bologna, &c.  aro  always   to   bo   had  here.    In meats nothing  quit** 0*1 Uillb 'Bhuunoc-k  products.  pi  ���������.is,.'  V  "dry*' law allows,  '��������� ' t   '��������� ���������-  GrocErrwa tUnna���������Don't ordor  thaw* '������������tU you ������o0 Tm������ Rbvihw  sampler* and prices. Our ronrcaontjv-  tlve will call. The lot wo havo thlu  year, la,tho boss ever. Patronise the  nomo pHnter, and oavo money.  Thonpl)h-o which arc being whipped  irom ine, uit'iou aprayeit nrciiarun at  Mlrr<)r I^ako, aro showing a nmrkod  .i,i|������ntvij-ij������M������>i/ both in him* uiui tirade  over thoso shipped hint year. Only a  v*ry ������*m������ll porcentM-re are ������howing  scab.  ena B B ETTkA B tTmt  ' -H b ���������&. II R^'H^ dL_D  ^BSJg^mr      tGJJ^Ht    wj    ^sm mm      wf   ^E^^f  & CO., Ltd.  mmt mm tm. mm    rn.0m.mm,  St^*%J*t\Mi*        * *Jr,H  mm rn.mt.mmm ~m m..  MVB  'V A**L������"**u/  *gi������*t^rc<i ChcRtor WhiU������ Hoar,  Waldo King. 157W*, for m������wI������'c. Foe  $:������.    MatthcvvH' llanch, Alice Hiding. i  ,    .       ,.  j-    -.t .     -    ',   .*-*��������� ���������>-fW "--'  v. <Vl"    -      *���������>.*���������"   "���������   m   A *~'<w    ���������  -    -j " f   ^-   .  , ^l-������  z'  (THE REVTKW. CRT"���������"  oa������*  fn.  German Children to Fight.  The recent great wastage of men  on thc German fronts is officially recognized inadvertently by military  authorities, who have just issued notices at Munich ar-d Cologne that  they will accept in future volunteer  boys aged 15 for the army.  This order account* for the recent  influx into Switzerland of German  boys sent for safety by their parents.  German supervision of the Swiss  frontier lately has been redoubled'  especially facin.ee Basle.  BABY'S OWN TABLETS  PRIZED BY MOTHERS  Mrs. Henry Vanreader, Rodney,  Ont.. writes: *'I have used Baby's  Own Tablets fcr the past five years  and prize them very much. They  have proved of such value to me that  I always keep them in thc honse."  Once a mother bas used Baby's Own  Tablets she wo-.rld use nothing else.  They are thorough but mild in action \  and never fail to make the sickly \  baby well.'   They are  cine dealers or by nidii dt -^ vcuis ; s  a box from Tho Dr. Williams' Medi- j |  cine Co., Brockville, Ont.  Huge program  Some 50 Ships Valued at $25,000,000  For Coast Yards  British Columbia's shipbuilding  program provide^ for the construction of some 117,000 gross tons of  commercial shipping, which .will have  a total carrying capacity of nearly  485,000 tons. The value of these ships  some 50 in all. is in the neighborhood  . of $25,000,000.  While this estimate of construction of tonnage is only approximate,  it includes practically every ship of  importance in freight-carrying  There are, however,* a number of  small ships being built, such as fish-  ������-htg- boatSj which have not been included. With these the total gross  tonnage would be about  150,000.  All the ships forming a part of the  present program if shipbuilding are  taken in account. Some of the ships  are already in the water, some are  scarcely begun, but the amount of  tonnage given represents definite contracts onlv.  WJitaiuuipi>AU������ vi ������.jvh,i.������-;  Greatly Increased  Believed That It Has Direct Relation  to High Price of Wheat  and Potatoes  The increasingly impottant pait  rice is playing in feeding thc people,  of the United States is shown in fig-  u������es compiled by thc United Stales  iood administration.  The production for 1914-1915  amounted to l,Ob4,.?O5,0OO pounds,  with a per capita consumption of  11.34 pounds. This was increased in  the 1916-1917 crop to 1,831,590,000  pounds, with a per capita consumption of 17.33 pound?.  The large increase in consumption  during* thc past year undoubtedly has  direct relation to the high price of  potatoes and wheat.  The rice crop of India for the past  year showed an increase of 1,255.000  tons.  !  Miller's Worm Powders will not  only expel worms from the system,  but will induce healthful conditions  of the system under which worms  can no longer thrive. Worms keep  a child iu a continual state of restlessness and pain, and there can be  no comfort foi* the little one until  the cause, of suffering be removed,  which can be easily done by the use  of these powders, than which there  is nothing- more effetcive.  ���������-i**-**.fr* e..������..o^������.������������.^..������..a..j,������������������.^tM������..j������  Where is Berehtold?  e sold by  medi- \ j    PAIN?     NOT A BIT I  nail  at   ^*>  cents ; f  LIFT YOUR CORNS  GR CALLUSES OFF  None to Spare  "Phew, but it's hot!"  Sizzle, mopping his brow.  Bobby?"  "Out  flying  his    kite,"  Sizzle.  "Tell him to stop it at once," roared Mr. Sizzle. "The idea of using up  what little breeze there is in such  nonsense I"  said Mr.  --Wliere\5  said  Mrs.  Minard's  Liniment  for  Sale  where.  Every-  In "Perfect SesVf Qjmst Jars  These are the finest  preserving jars made ;  and hold 3 pounds; ol  "Grown Syrup".  Your grocer also has  ''Crown Syruj>" in 2,5i  10 and 20 pound tins*  Write for free Gook Book.  THE CANADA STARCH CO. LIMITED.  MONTREAL.     .  [gill!lll!IIHIIilIHIIUIIIIIIIllIIIIIIIUI8IllliliIlllllilll!lllHllllll!IllilllllllIH!ilHllIIIII!lllilii  !   :  The Greatest  Incendiary of  History  Drops Out of Sight  'Who  caused  the   wa  .?"  Already  No humbug!     Apply few drops  then  just  lift them  away  with fingers.  the man whose hand actually set the  match to the tinder is all but forgotten. But Austria-Hungary today  starving and suffering untold hardships,   may   remember.  lt was Count Berehtold, A.ustro-  Hungarian premier and minister of  foreign affairs, who actually started  thc ^conflagration. Creature of the  Prussian system, relying on Prussian  backing in his determination to ride  rough-shod over Balkan independence, Berehtold precipitated the war  which otherwise, might have been  postponed.  Berehtold dropped from sight when  the blaze he had started raged far  beyond his control. He retired to  private life, doubtless thankful for  thc obscurity which soon descended  Upon him. Probably no one outside  of Austria and comparatively few  in Austria know today the whereabouts or the activities of the greatest incendiary of history.���������Cleveland  Plain   Dealer.  ^.mm*~������..*..  >���������������>'������--���������*.���������-���������������"���������������*��������� ������������������������������������������������������������>������������������ ���������>*���������������.���������������������������������.���������������������. *..*..*..m,.m������  His Excuse  A   man   who Js   steadily   employed  finally had a day oft*, and decided to  go fishing,  taking his  luncheon with  htm.  When  he  reached  thc creek hc  discovered  that  hc had  dropped  the  lunch packet somewhere on the road  and  hastened  back  to  look    for  it.  Presently hc met a husky negro, who  was looking happy and  picking    his  teeth. "Did you hnd anything on the  road as you came along?" asked thc  gentleman.    "No: sah," answered thc  negro. "I     didn't     find    .nothing.  Couldn't a dog have found it and cat  it up?"  This new drug is an ether compound discovered by a Cincinnati  chemist. It is called free-  zone, and can now be obtained in tiny bottles as  here shown at very little  cost from any drug  store. Junt ask for free-  zone. Apply a drop or  two directly upon a tender corn or callus and instantly the soreness disappears. Shortly you will  find the corn or callus so  loose that you can lift it  off, root and all, with the  fingers.  Not a twinge of pain,  soreness or irritation; not  even the slightest smarting, either when applying  freezone or afterwards.  This drug doesn't eat  up the corn.or callus, but  shrivels them so they  loosen and comc right  out. It is no humbug*! It  works like a charn:. For  a few cents you can get  rid of every hard corn, soft corn or  corn between the toes, as well as  painful calluses on bottom of your  feet. It never disappoints and never  burns, bites or inflames. If your  druggist hasn't any freezone yet,  tell him to get a little bottle for you  from his wholesale house.  Wound Up  A member of parliament had emptied thc room with an interminable  speech. Looking around - at the  empty benches, he remarked to a  bored friend, "I am speaking to posterity."  "If you go on like this," growled  the friend, "you *will see your audience  before  you."  Catarrh Cannot he Cured  with LOCAL APPLICATIONS, as they  ..asnnot reach the scat of the disease. Catarrh  (s a, local disease, greatly influenced by constitutional conditions. - and in order to cure it  you must take an internal remedy. Hall's-  Catarrh Cure is taken internally and acta  through the" blood on the mucous surfaces  A>f the system. Hall's Catarrh Cure was pre-  :cribed by one of the best physicians in this  country ior years. Xt is composed of sotr.c  Df ijg* best tonics known, combined with  Some of the best blood, pursers. The perfect combination of the ingredients in Hall's  Catarrh Cure is what produces such wonderful results in catarrhal conditions. Send for  testimonials, free.  F.  J.   CHENEY  &  CO.,   Props.,   Toledo,  O.  All Dru&g*tsts,  75c.  Hall's Family Pills  for constipation.  An Historical Occasion  FOR EXPERT PERSONAL ATTENTION  CONSIGN YOUR ^RAIN-  NOTIFY  | Jas. Richardson & Sons, Ltd. |  S             THE OLD RELIABLE COMMISSION  MERCHANTS i  5                             TRACK  BUYERS AND  EXPORTERS ������  ������������ Sf  S                                       ���������v    -                    .Established   1857 jjS  5   Top Prices, Careful Checking of Grades,     Liberal    Advances    and g  S                           Prompt Adjustments. We are Biff Buyers of g  1 Oats/Barley, Flax and Rye |  Phone   or   Wire  Our Nearest Office  for  Prices Any  Your  Grain In   Shipped.  Time   After  WESTERN, OFFICES  Grain 'ExcKaiig*. Winnipeg  Grain  Exchange,  Calgary  Canada   Building,   Saskatoon  LONO DISTANCE PHONES  Mala  832?  Main   2S6S  Sa41     >  Wllllli!llHIIinillBlISUIlllUBfUlllllllllfli:illllllllllini!lllilllfilIII!IBIIIIilfilg;iHlllllIllllll|l  I  THERE'S  NO DOUBT  ABOUT  POSTUM  AS A  HEALTH  IMPROVEMENT  OVER  TEA   ������' COFFEE  KCEKCro*-**,  *_T^  inw'timi ���������im.'.'HJii  W.      N.  U  m������  Neutrals   Supply   Germany  Believed That   Great   Quantities   of  Butter Were Shipped by Denmark and Holland  Of tlic total of animal fats used  in 1916 in Denmark for the manufacture of margarine, 90.9 per cent, was  imported from the United States.  The total Danish production of  mai'garine in 1916 waa 124,781.620  pounds, according to data received  by the United States food administration. The substitution of this  margarine for butter allowed the exportation of all the butter produced,  except 8.6 per cent., much of this  exportation  going into   Germany.  Holland, also a dairy country, in  1916 produced 396,828,000 pounds of  margarine, of which 330,690.000  pounds were exported. Of the 154,-  322,000 pounds of Holland butter  produced the exportations amounted  lo 92,593,200 pounds. Huu greatly  ���������these exports were to _ Germany's  bcucfil, can only be surmised.  Minard's  Liniment  Cures  Dandruff.  Pacifism a Dr-sam  If the pacifist is charged with fur-  llu-ring a silualiitu which will prolong    \\if    ,'.;.>'   ;iiid    ij'j.'.t    lhc   Inc.'.     of  ihousnih-h- of our soldiers and billions  of onr wealth, hc i:> virtuously^indignant.  Yet, is not that thc truth?  if it Is irur that the latitude and  ������������������>.predion of hc pacifist arc calculated to create a miNapprelit-nsiou in  Germany oi tlic American faith and  purpoHC in lhc war aud therefore to  prolong the war al llu: exprnf.i* of  iiv.".; and money, i:' not this average  parti-ii .i Manor ���������>' tin- woi'M character?  fi ih time lu im.I. cnu other ii'.in!'-  Iv iu thc tare aiul call things hy their  right  n:niii"������.���������Si    Paul  Pioneer' T'rcug.  _ Thc first and one of the very few  times in which the British parliament  voluntarily transferred its authority  to the king was in the . remarkable  case of Major John Barnardi. who  died in Newgate prison, London, 181  years ago. Barnardi, a soldier, was  arrested in 1696 and charged with  complicity in a plot to assassinate  King William III. Eight persons  were executed for their part in thc  conspiracy, but there was little evidence against Barnardi and five other suspects. Rather than bring them  to trial or admit them to bail, as  the law provided, parliament authorized the imprisonment of the men for  one. year. At the expiration of that  period it was.-extended for another  year. At the expiration of that period it was extended for another year,  and then for a third, when parliament  passed an act authorizing an act  providing for the confmment of Barnardi and his companions "during His  Majesty's pleasure."  Asthma Overcome. * 'The triumph  over asthma has assuredly comc.  Dr. J. D. Kellogg's Asthma Remedy  has proved the most positive blessing the victim of asthmatic attacks'  has ever known. Letters received  from thousands who have tried it  form a testimonial which leaves uo  room for( doubt that here Is a real  remedy. Get it today from your dealer.  Better  than any other cocoa  on the market���������and better because  only the finest and most expensive  products are used in the manufacture of Cowan's Perfection Cocoa.  'A-G  Electricity from Lignite  Owing to the possibility of shortage of coa-l for next winter's ��������� fuel  attention ir. being drawn to a report  made some years ago by an engineer  in (he    employ    of the Saskatchewan  ffovernment, who suggested that thc  icst way to develop the lignite fields  of Saskatchewan would be to establish a central power plant located  right in the. centre of the lignite bed  and distribute power nil over the  province. His scheme was to burn  tin lip-nit p in rrtort.-;, 'ir*. 5'" now dr-nc*  with the saints grade of coal in Germany and elsewhere, and use tho gas  so developed to produce the electric  energy.  flHt>r IHO  -Two Uy������a. for ��������� LIUtlni# g  6 WlOVlOO ^������;^;;r'������rTiw-in,M.jiM ���������  The Real Naval Problem  The real problem is to sweep thc  U-boats from the sea. That is purely  a naval problem, and the American  fleet is now joined witlttj the British  and French armaments for that solution. The allied fleets must solve it  for thc moral as well as the military  effect that must be., produced upon  Germany.���������From the Providence  Journal.  A safe and sure, medicine fur -a  child troubled_wilh worms is Mollier  Graves' Worm  Exterminator.  His Mangy Old Affe  One of the most horrible things  about the crime of the kaiser is that  he was no longer ..a.��������� "young fighting  kaiser" when hc drew his sword upon  mankind. He was an old man, a  grandfather. Every lust save the  blood-lust must have died in him. It  may be that hc ia like the man-eating  tiger, indifferent to the taste of.human flesh as long as his teeth and  claws are equal to the task of pulling down otlier denizens of the jun-  ple, but turning in his mangy old aga  into a man-cater.���������Mail and. Empire.  Vj������* -tut- ttyp*���������oruiuiliitoa H  M-rstldN.    iri)������Ui-ll������rrfniie������-a  ] Uisujorrm,   Mnjln  J UfttJui liiiiliVoVyVidr'io"i\n*7'������mr*\is iii'ur  ��������� Ti������U. ������nd Mltli "!i������������ii������������n������������f>������ulM.il)r.  1.. W rP* r"tt-   W cms: ear uvt mv.  !* HoM-u tinig en a Opt!c-.Wl:������rf.3 uxt by Mull.  Aik MurlM tf������ r)*m*it 0*., OhUif���������, Ui fit* Ink ,.  IIIMHIIIIIMIIIIIMllllllllllllllllllJIIIJIIItlltlllllllllllliMlll'r  Veneered Wild Man  , .Persistent itnbrocding of provincial  ideas; the making of vanity a virtue  and ol* sclf-prair.e a system; formulating unquestioning obdience to  power into a .national religion���������  these things h.'ivc made the ruling  caste of Germany, not great men,  but veneered wild men, The ruling  ca������te h:is become a powcrfid and uu-  '���������Miwd aninv'1, etulm'd with the liif^h  Intelligence of a man grafied on to  the  low  instincts  of a  beast.  It is not the human folk of Germany that the human government of  democratic America is fighting. It is  the Frankenstein inonstci' that is  blightin*-; Germany, and that linn  gone forth into the world lo slay  and to Hlakc its lust.���������Miuii--a*iulih  Journal.  Melting  Down  Statues  A  Itcrliu    di-,s|..i(t ii     icporiuj tliilt it  has    been    decided    to    melt    down  bronze statue*, for nitiniiinn purno*u������������.  r-W you are it martyr to l'nins in  the Back, Urhtnry or Bladder  Troubles, Brick Duut "Oepoaiti',  Paluful Urination, Swollen Joints or  any of the various aymptoms of Kidney  Trouble, take *  Hi  1E3?T V V '^SS  TontMie,  ���������''t1,������   ,l V ��������� 'r*l'"'������  I   "ft   ...   .LL:.,..   ������-.  ��������� wtw*lr^������my[^*,  ^^jt^x^^^^  itiiiiiiii-^^  mmammm  mmssm  mmam  mm  -   i     .'��������� . \  ���������:-���������-,- wwra^jit:������������4li(*'i&'lfete^^  wm**Mtmm*mm**mm**mwmi*m*mmmmtm**mmimm  v,:-ilr.'.-.-iiiaiii'*^i'iijarrt'-n n^iif.'iy y^rti'.n^^i if i.U'jJHi'ftiti������iin imni mi *������ inrawnyiinrirtii  innmiwip'i'in ���������������������������miflnii wi ���������_ , ���������-, -_.��������� __-_,  Stf*������*j'*^K^i ^r^tfy j*^JV^������sr^.l';iV.n ^^i'^jj .Jj) jt*>*j.t..."W* J3*i.,n- r*.j.sj<j-,>iM.v������������..- ^"UT^JVft  3b  /sr*!  ��������� .tf. <������������������  ���������*f.     J?P������<?fiX'',% r* -, *��������� 'i,_ ;��������� r  ;{*���������,  CM CHANGE FOR DEMOCRACY  IS FOR ALLIES 10 WIN THE WAR  ** - _\        * m-mmmm^m.y^r.mm*K*mm. m*   -���������������������������������������������������������������.. ���������.-, ������������������  a: coneuct?  BETWEEN two ..opposed systems  m*l~  tin J ,m  wm^imsm  ">tX.~XV-  amcmmmmt  :MwJ  ���������*/ '*-���������������  \  ������lihu Root Declares That the Entry of-the United States Into the  ���������*War haa been Grasped as the One and Only Chance for the  ? Preservation of their System of Government    -  t*--  iUihur Root, addressing the. confer-  ���������fettce of American' Bar association  delegates at Saratoga Springs recently, likened Germany to a burglar in the house.  '1'There-can be no talk of peace and  security of democracy with Germany in her present position," Mr.  Root said. "If Germany had succeeded in what she started out to  Ho, and had come out with her power' unbroken, and we Had been unable to defend our right and had not  held Germany down in the last five  months, hcr heel would have been  ������r������ our neck.  "The effect of our entry into the  ���������war is that we have surrendered  some of the liberty we have asserted. Our property must bfc invested  in.war protection. Wc cannot have  free democracy and "war, and the  result is that if you live in the presence of military autocracy -you cannot make democracy. If you retain  democracy j-xm must kill autocracy.  "���������"Our entrance into this war has  been grasped at as thc one chance  for the preservation of our system  of government and our independence  an lndcpen-delit court, and the right  of American manhood to assert im-  -dividual,right against all power, and  continue the free jrepublic 'which our  fathers-handed down to us. Our. suc-  cessfuy prbsecution poi vfsthe * war vis  thby only^ way we can make that  chance successful. We are in war,  and -: the principle for which we fight  is*;liberty, V independence, and oiir  American life. v.     ���������������������������-.'���������"..   '' ��������� 'PAp  "It has become perfectly evident,"  Mr." Root said, "thatVjhis is. acon-  iKct bet-$jeen ~^o ^bpi^  evitably :Vp#pbaed, S i-ystems-|of a,:\g|pv>-  emmenJSiygdf ,.^pljfey������* sof '.policieis������$ P 6i:  human ^society. .It has become perfectly evident that our war was  brought;, on, withV.a, gur;eose, jo^sjtab-.  Iish a "military It has. be  come perfectly evident that more  than a generation of careful -preparation hadVbetehVrriade for^ thisV -very  thing, and that the democracies of  the -world,vyrejoicing, ~ inV.]?eacey and  prosperity, in political freedom, and  in individual liberty, were. in', great  measure Vand in differing degree nn->  prepared;; to meet this attackT upon  them.  ; P'P '.���������,...". aa :. v  "Slowlyl they have gathered to the  support of-the pfiiiciple of their lives  the principle upon which they live,  against: theV adverse attack on this  -grinciplei .the domination1 of wmch  meansVihe death of democracy Vand  the everlasting V destruction of the  uystexn bf ^individual liberty of which  we are the high priests of .the bar. ,,  "So long as there exists a great  and powerful military autocracy  which has the purpose to secure  domination by military force, so long  (republics,V}���������., democracies, countries  which* preserve individual freedom  and individual rights, countries which  subordinate government to freedom,  must be at* the mercy of autocracy.  As well go to sleep with a burglar  sitting in'your fr^nt hall as to talk  afcbut the; peace and security of a  democracy, with Germany still comr  petent to pursue, its career of domination.'    "i-'{ ':.'���������'���������'"''���������.''���������  "We arc in the fight, and the  stake for which wc fight is liberty,"  Mr. Root added, "and it is our bar,  which stands at the door through  which oppression must enter. It is  tiot so easy for the farmer to sec  there will be a difference in his  crops, or in the sale vof them; for  the manufacturer to see that anyone will stop wearing clothes or  allocs or using machinery, but it is  easy for us to see that with the domination of .that military system that  subordinates thc law, that makes  .the bar, but a clog "to an administrative system of government, and  leaves to. the bench no independence  ���������It is easy for the lawyer to see that  everything he has contended for   of  individual iiberty and the supremacy  of the law over executive power���������  will be attacked and destroyed if, wc  do not succeed iu this war."  " Sin Without Trace  .������  JZ^~J!HMflR:iW FORCE* TO  *"* **-*-**"*"      THEIR ENTIRE TACHSOFfl  cally-^omplete  Uo  German Method    of    Covering  Murders'at Sea  Thc German government is reported in press despatches as disclaiming responsibility for Count Lux-  burg's plan for sinking neutral and  other merchant vessels,' "leaving no  traces," on the ground that the proposal emanated from a single German diplomat and was not" in fact  adopted by the higher authorities.  Two circumstances���������aside from the  fac^ that no official German', state-  men can any longer be regarded as  presumptively true���������render this explanation eminently unconvincing.  (1) Count Luxburg's matter-of-  course manner of using sthe concise  phrase "spurlos versenken" strongly  suggests that he was referring to a  practice already familiar to the authorities whom .he was addressing.  (2) There is abundant evidence  that it has for some months been a  common German practice to attempt  to prevent any survivors from ��������� escaping, yfrom  .torpedoed.vessels.    At  the    meeting  Vbf the    "International  Conference V of; M'erohant SeamenV  in  London in August a report (published in The London Times) was made:  .shptjv-ing twelve known cases  during;  the    months    April-July    in    which  crews  leaving" sinking  ships in  lLEe-'-  :.boats.y~^e^y>attacke'd,, usually byV'gun-  $rfe viiivf ou iK |of vthesfe vcases V-j-be V ships  ���������Svsre't ':Po������p.|SfeutralV^atibiia.iityv;'';pther  iiwta-fiee*^6f V the; Sarnie practice -have  since been reported.   The case of the  Belgian Prince is the most illumin-  atih-^; example' of������the art' of "spurlos  versenken." Firing on small boats is,  of course, a loose and frequently ineffective, method, since it-is difficult  to be sure .that all of the crew have  been.killed by the_ fire.    The  boats,  ;pf *;theVBelgiian vPriiic^! accordiiigly^  were reridered uselessrand the cre*w,  deprived   of    their    lifeboats,    were  placed on the deck of the submarine*;  which shortly after submerged. sXJnr  luckily for the German designs; -three  put of the   crew .ofv;fbrtyffour were  able to keep afloat until picked    up  by a passing vessel.  "Spurlpsigkeit".  is after ;all; ''ay^omewhat difificultl'ideal  to attain Vt6���������which is tiie    "contemporary German equivalent  of ."Murder will out."-������������������Prof.-A.  Q.  L'ovejoy  in New York TriDune.  Many have looked, from early    in  the  war,  to  see it end through  the  collapse of Austria.    The proximate  cause  of this   three   years'   tragedy  was   Vienna,  but  the ultimate  cause  was Berlin. The ultimatum to Serbia  alone could never have ������et the stage  for it.    Degrees of guilt in such    a  case do not particularly matter. Nor  can   the    most     even-handed justice  apportion degrees of suffering.   Austria at least has  reached the    point  w'here  her suffering is  greater  than  her guilt.    Whoever wins, she loses.  Thus it is that her desire for peace  has  grown  so  keen  that    she    will  make almost ?.ny sacrifices to attain  it.    Probably the terms suggested by  the pope represent the  minimum   of  her concessions.      Whether they do  or not,  she cannot now  escape   the  fear that a worse thing is to befall.  Thc  onward sweep of    the    Italian  troops  has  brought  her  to  a  lively  realization of her peril.    The reported evacuation of Trieste by the inhabitants reveals    the    apprehension  that this sweep cannot be stayed.    If  the Italians cauld takc Monte Santo  they ought to be able to take Monte  Harmada.    Aftfer  that  the  deluge.  -.  Whether    or    not    Trieste    falls,  whether or not Vienna is threatened,  the military failure    of    Austria    is  fairly complete. By nothing short of  i a miracle could the Austrian troops  resume the offensive.   The best'they  eould hope for would be a lingering  defence,    a retirement as  costly    as  possible to the enemy.    But there arc  other things to bc considered.      All  accounts agree that the internal condition of the  empire is terrible.    It  is  doubted if the people  could survive    another    winter    of   privation.  There is something akin  to ��������� despair  among the loyal    adherents of    the  H ouse of Hapsburg, something akin  to revolution among the Slavic subjects of that house.      The revolt in  f3ohemia    has    been   xhecked,'* not  tiuslied.     The    government    cannot  trust  many of its  own  soldiers P. to  fight against their brothers in blood.  ^Resentment at' German'    dictation is  growing  among  all. classes.  Austria  has been staunch tb her allyj but at  fearful costV She has been held partly by honor, partly by fear.''But "the.  .first motive can weigh little now in  view of  "the   -wholly  Selfish policy  ENisMY FRONT  LINES ARE BATTERED  TO PIECES  A Recently Captured German Document Tells of the Manner in  , Which the AIIiesi Regularly Break Down Defences of Enemy  By Heavy Artillery Before the Battle Actually Begins   : J^ o    The terrific power of the    Anglo';  ''  French bombardments is forcing ,ihc "���������  Germa'n high" command "to revise its -  entire tactics of defence on the west  front. A few months ago, the enemy  still relied  on  earthworks,    trenches  ���������and deep underground shelters to repel  our assaults. XJnder  the smashing    violence  of thc    Anglo-French,  War Prisoners  Brutally Used by Hun*  Inhuman   -Treatment     of      Russian  Prisoners by the Huns  Another  chapter is  added  to     the  story of the. tortures of German pri-      _ __       Son camps by a Russian soldier, whe-j-bombardments in Flandersr in ICham  escaped by tunneling with a knife un  der thc electrically charged fence  along the Autwery-Ro^endaal line, lt  has been forwarded to the U.S. state  department from Petrograd.  Brutal treatment and poor and insufficient food have cost Gennanv  the labor of thousands of priFoners.  he says. One labor battalion on the  western front, consisting of 2,000  men, has been reduced by starvation,"  exposure, beatings and death to less  than 500. The daily rations for a  prisoner, he reported, consisted of a  small amount of bread and turnip  soup, the soup enriched occasionally  by a bit of horse meat.  The unfit, thc wounded and those  who have lost members of their body  w-ere kept in invalid camps until they  died, but never, hc says, returned to  camps in Germany because the officers in command feared the pyscho-  logical effect upon the people of the  sight of the maimed men, often little  more than animated skeletons.  Stern and implacable methods were  used to compel prisoners to work  Ingenious tortures _ that ended only  short of death were inflicted on some,  while others were shot -outright. Punishments varied from enforced standing at attention for a day at a time  without food, to beating with rifle  butts and to hours.of suspension in  the rir, with ropes being tied to  wrists,  while piisoners'    hand  s   were  held behind the bodies, the result be-  mxx.mm-VjL-       juv tvxxxjxxj ������t.xxxaxx     xjmjxxt-y      ���������&    t0    tllTOW    tllC    WClgllt    Oil    tllC    Utl-  which  Germany has pursued toward   naturally  twisted^ muscles    of    arms  her:     and    the     second  must  weieb   and shoulders.    Such  methods in his  Pigeons for Perahing  Carrier   Pigeons   to   Aid   American  Army in France  Major-Gcueral Pershing, commanding the United States army in  France, has asked for thousands of  carrier pigeons . to assist American  aeroplane observers in sending thcir  reports and maps; of German . positions back to headquarters.  All French fortresses for many  years have had their pigeon lofts.  The employment of ..birds with" such  remarkable homing qualities in connection with aeroplanes is new, however. Birds :are bred in lofts behind  the French iihes and 'trained to return to these lofts. The aviators  taket he birds up, and when far over  the German lines they fasten to the  pigeon's legs any map or report  which ihey desire to return' quickly  to French headquarters, aud the  birds almost invariably-get back with  great rapidity. It is said that the  French havc even succeeded in' train-  ing pigeons to return to movable  lofts, which follow the lines of the  advancing troops, although, . of  course, the lofts arc not moved far  , from their original locality.  her;    and    the    second must.���������������������������weigh,  less than it did before 'm Germany herself began to vshow , signs of failing  power.    There is    every reason why  Austria    should    make   , a    separate.  peace.V-V.'"V   TT':a'a.-rPT-PPA^   .'.  ������������������,....., ^.y...  .,, Ever since he came to. the throne  the emperor, Charles, has been ahxi-  busy^o end the war. He dislikes and  distrusts! the German emperor.      He  has  no wish to  play    the    German  game at the'expense of the Hapsburg  monarchy. He realizes that the stoppage of the enormous \vaste" in moii-  ey and men, the inauguration of    a  policy  of internal-reforms,  the' satisfaction  of the  political  aspirations  "of y the: non-Gei-man  races    are     the  only ' alternatives   to  the  dissolution  of the empire.    If Austria was willing.to offer the Trentino to Italy to.  prevent her entrance into  the    war,  she ���������������������������'���������will quite conceivably be willing  to make p-reater concessions to bring  peace.      The  more  she  delays    the  harder the  task  of  saving anything  will be.    Threatened  men  live long,  and disintegrating nations    show    a  remarkable   force   of. cohesion.     But  there is a point at wliich-the will as  well as the power to resist ends. Has  Austria reached  that point?    Is  she  on the verge of utter collapse?   Wc  may not have to wait    many    days  for the answer to these'questions.-���������  Philadelphia-Public  Ledger.  Great Silent Hero  on  has  'MM  V.V.V.V,  Wm$M8r  P*,.V.V.* _  lif  m  MM  ft&i  m  I'wiy  nm  #  [.V.V.'.VAV.VA'.'.V.'.V  lv;-:������x#\x������:v:  A"Z in 1 Shoo Polialr-" i* mado for every lists. Tor Block Shoes*  "2 in 1 Black" (p������������to) nnd"2in 1 BluckCombination*(pa������teand  Hnulcl)j for White Shoes, "2 In I Whito Cnko" (cuke) one!  *���������?, in 1 Wlill* iJtmttUV (li'miM)t forT*n ,Sl.rtf#, "S tn 1 Ton" (?.**���������������***���������>  and "il in I V*n C'ombini.tion'' (patto and liquid).  lOc Black-Whitc-Tan lOc  P. F. DALLEY CO. OF CANADA LTD.,   ������      Hamllion, Cmi.  m^ifi^m^li^X^^lll^^'g^MiMI.'i^l^  tAlj*"3l^V.*lW������������i.'lvSW������.ll*5:!������������t������l>������������^  Heroic Sergeant   Who    Pushed  Until Object Was Attained  The Paris "Petit Journal"  brought before France thc story  of great unknown heroes of the. war,  and its latest contribution deals with  a heroic .sergeant "just one of those  men who go quietly by in the march  to thc front without dash or gaiety���������  a bull dog of" the British breed. Iu  thc attack on Langcmarck, tho Britisher saw his ofliccr fall, and not  recognizing any one of superior  rank than himself took command of  thc company, and in a:'quiet, business-like fashion, said, "Our work  is to go-on till \\6 are ordered to  halt." The order did not come till  the third line of the cnemj' was successfully pierced. Just on the eve of  the victory, a bullet struck the sergeant to the ground. His place,  however, was taken by a soldier and  that, company finished with every  German within sight put out'of business.. The Journal remarks, "It is  thanks to such acts that J.angemarck  was seized, crossed, and left behind.'*  ���������1 ...���������;���������.i   .���������. -���������������������������  Diplomatic Retorts  The American ambassador's conversations with the kaiser recall lhe  niiei-dote of the encounter between :\  British ambassador and Napoleon  Bonaparte, during a short truce���������a  peace it was called al tho. timo~-br-  twecn England and thc Corsjcan  fuc (.ah r. Iji 'wi .iii'i'y i;imivci '���������'-  tion, Napoleon said to the ambassador, "I will make war on F.ugland."  "That is your affair, ������ir,"# replied Hie  ambassador. "I will annihilate her."  added the emperor. "That, sir, is  our affair," observed the ambassador  with a fine, enurdy how.���������Chrif'thin  Seience Monitor.  own battalion, once 2,000 strong, had  reduced it to 350 at the. time hc escaped.  British Relations With U. S.  Campaign of Education to Create   a  Better Understanding Is  Advocated  _ In the light of this, huge conflagration we can idl of us, on both aides  of thc Atlantic, tv-tr ^t their true  value the tiumper3* boundary disputes, the irrational and manufactured controversies, that for so long  kept Great Biitain and the United  States apart. They have now come  together undcr_ the stress of an unprecedented crisis, but a crisis that  w ill infjillibly recur if the3* again, fall  apart. Far beyond anything else,  the peace of the world denends on  a working union between its great  democracies, and especially between  the United States and the ' British  empire. There will or there will not  be a "next time" very largely as  these two vast, federations succeed  or* fail in shaping their future policies in common. But among the  self - governing English - speaking  peoples policy follows Opinion. It is  not enough that their respective governments should act in common.  They must be buttressed by that informed opinion which can only  spring from knowledge. The United  St.ales and the. Kritish empire must  lelirn to know one.#another. .They  must be made conscious througli all  their diversified millions of that  central unity of ideals aud instinctive ways of looking at things., and  forms of government and society  that bind theni closer than the-peoples of any oilier two politically separated entities on earth. A .simultaneous campaign ou education in  tho United States on Great Britain  and the British empire, and in Great  Britain on the history and daily life  and institutions and temper of the  American commonwealth, would be  a contribution of the first moment,  not merely to their present comradeship in arms, but to their destinies  hereafter.���������1'roiu  the  London  Times.  pagne and Verdun, he revised that  view. In a recently captured eneinv  army order the German command  itself admits how fallacious hopes  built on sand and concrete proved.  The document begins bv plain-  lively recording the fact that the  German front -lines ' are regularly  battered to pieces by our artillery  before the actual battle begins. Power of defensive, it says, depends ou  the possibility of hiding the means  of (defense. Trenches, shelters, machine guns emplacements, and batteries once photographed, by the Anglo-French airmen are doomed to  certain destruction by their artiller*-,.  Under such fire it is hopeless to attempt to repair damage. An entirely  new principle of defense is needed  and the order proceeds to explain.  Fdrthe"old system of position-?  on which the enemy artillery can  register and which ihe enemy can  therefore destroy there must be one  substituted. A zone of defense organized in depth is recommended towards the rear. This system, with  its defences hidden' as much as possible from the enemy observation  and troops echeloned in depth in  such a manner that their lines, thin  in front, become progressively denser towards the rear, ought to enable us to pass from the defensive  tot he offensive with troops occupying thicklier held positions in the  rear.  But how are  men    echeloned    in  depth towards^ the rear to be hidden  from observation of our airmen and  gunners, which admittedly is the all-  important thing? The order explains  that this is to be done by abandoning  the  trenches    and     retiring     to  'shell crater nests' held by groups of  men  with machine guns.      This  instruction has particular application to  the ground such as that upon which  Anglo-French  armies   are    fighting.  Shell  craters redoubts arc to be ar-  ranged in depth like a square of thc  same   color   on   a    chess board and  their protective capacity is to be increased by running a system of littlt-  chambers. The chambers' are carried  on timbers like    galleries in a mine  into  their  sides  and  where  possible  connecting one    shell hole with   another by    timbered-up    passages thc  essential    point being that seen from  above these shal^be nothing to distinguish them from any of the thousands    of    shell craters  surrounding  them.     V.     " ' /  ! The  earth  burrowed    out  of    the  organized craters is to be thrown into the neighboring unused craters or  if possible spread on the ground between.   "Thus," says the   order, "wc  shall  obtain    shelters    which    from  without look like ordinary shell craters and: will be safe from .an    observation."    If the ground Is so wet  that it is' impossible to, dig galleries  the troops must be content with such  shelters  as  unimproved  craters  provide. .The  front line,  or   organized  crater' should be protected    by -wire  entanglements. in    au irregular   pattern,    so    arranged    as to afford no  clue to the situation    of thc    crater  line. .,-���������������������������  t The importance of the document  lies not only in the new tactics it  prescribes but in the. frank recognition of thc effectiveness of thc  work of our guns and our alrtncn%  but above all. our airmen. If a thing  can be registered by.- our airmen'.-"!  cameras it will be destroyed, is the  axiom from which th6 wholev order  starts. The moral for'its i's'easy to  draw.  Spuds on a Tomato Vine  Joseph M. Stephenson, st:cr������Mai*y of  the agricultural preparedness league,  of^Seranton, which has beeu encouraging the fanners to plant increased  acreage this year owing lo the .war,  has succeeded . in growing tomatoes  and  pol.Moes on  the same vino.  Early in the. spring Mr. Stephenson took live healthy tomato plants  aud a like number'of potato plants  and grafted theni. The hybrid plants  thrived, and lo date Al) fine large ripe  tomatoes have been picked Iroiu one  of thc plants, while investigation of  the  root  of  the   same  plant revealed  National Boots  ;i     cluster     of  drdpliia   Wfi'itri]  line   pot-itor-  Quietly  Satirical  "What     dirty     bands     you  Johnny,"   >���������;ii������I   liis    le.-uln r.  would   you   say   if   I   came   to  lhat   wav?"  "I   v-.uhhrt   -.ay     notliin'."  Johnny.     "I'd   be   loo   polite."  Phil-i  hav<",  "What,  school  replied  First  Supply  on Sale in   Fra.nce   in  ���������'���������/Week': v ������������������."������������������:..-  The tivst supply of "national boots"  will be on sale throughout France in  the first week in October. All retailers, to whom a fair rate of profit  vill bc assured,"'must -bind themselves not to charge more than the fixed official price. They must keep a  register of the names of purchasers  and must display lhe goods,with attractive price labels attached in their  store windows.  Half a million, pair-of. boots will  be ready by the beginning of November; The price of men's shoes will  b<; 28 fruncii while boots for women  will bring 23 francs. These prices  ave about half those now charged  for a similar quality of goods.  No iiui ley tor German i-i(t������  The German war food department  announces that no barley will bc  available this winter for fc������(HnR pigs,  as It is needed for human consumption.  *^-\H  {^%  * "/l  o -'���������fl  j*" i  ���������*r*l  iSP  '���������'.'- .'''; v^".r'.*''s''''f  .���������;-''^';.'^'i"##|  ��������� v^wVify'v-1  . VVyi-'^iill  ���������������������������'PPpN'll  - 'A.Pr'APM  PPPp'tfM  ���������:;<"'l'tf&;*|  ���������' .���������'���������.���������'.',"���������'. A'XpJ  w.   n.   u.   nn  m  ' Is  .1 H Wobatcr 11 lho weathor \m nt nil light.  I of Wynndel ������u������d W, Uolanftcr doing I G-cnyon tnxlderinh*t.  MMiii'iliiitiiiiii'iM  .j-l'.,i. ������������������f!ti:.,*'A **.-:i*,.'.e.  ilfMwriSMini-nirTBTritr *r~~���������- ,-)i .^^^^-.^^^t^^.^^^-^^.^^.^^^^^^M^M^.  | <h1 buck to duty Almoat any tlm* now.  , .^^^ W^ApTrk  W������0PPT  W&ffiP-^r---.  $j:w'������:.r...,:. ,- -;  "gi^fi..-.;.::'.  Pt'ls't-Vss'y '-���������  M&0A-  -\&r&^PA:/'  ^y'p-pp;:'.  iliv  Wrir  m  IrM  '������������������ftS3^'^mmM^  es:  ���������ermaxi Children to Fight  The recent great wastage of men  on thc German fronts is officially recognized inadvertently by military  authorities, who have just issued notices at Munich an,d Cologne that  they will accept in future volunteer  boys aged 15  for the army.  This order accounts for the recent  influx   into   Switzerland   of     German  boys sent for safety by their parents.  German  supervision    of  frontier lately has    been  especially  facing  Basle.  Huge Prograin  Some 50 Ships Valued at $25,000,000  For Coast Yards        V  British Columbia's ':. shipbuilding  program provides for the construction of some 117,000 gross ton's ' of  commercial shipping, which will have  a total carrying capacity of    nearly  Consumption of Rice  G^       Increased  Believed'That It Has Direct Relation  to High Price of Wheat  and Potatoes  The   increasingly    important    part  rice is playing in feeding the people;  of the United States'-is-'shown in figures compiled by the  United  States  food administration.  The production for 1914-1915  amounted to 1,064,205,000 pounds;  wi^h a per capita consumption of  11.34 pounds. This was increased in  the 1916-1917 crop to 1,831,590,000  pounds, with a per capita consumption of 17.33 pounds.  Thc large increase in consumption  during the past year undoubtedly has  direct relation to the high price of  potatoes aud wheat.  The vice crop of India for thc past  year .showed an increase of 1,255,000  tons.  The Great Body Builder  Miller's  Worm   Powders  will    not  only  expel  worms  from   the  system,  BABY'S OWN TABLETS  PRIZED BY MOTHERS  Mr?.   Henry     Yanreader,     Rodney,  writes:  "1  have    used     Baby's  -185,000 tons.   The value of these ships  some 50.in .all, is in the neighborhood  the    Swiss [ of $25,000,000.  redoubled*. While this estimate of 'construe--  | tion of tonnage is only approximate,  it includes practically every ship of  importance in "freight-carrying  There are, however, a number of  small ships being built, such as. fishing boats, which havc not been included. -Vviih these the total gross  tonnage, would  be about 150,000.  All the ships forming a part of the  present program if shipbuilding are  taken in account. Some of the ships  are already in the water, some are  scarcely begun, but the amount of i gizzle  tonnage given represents definite con- I <j'v���������  tracts onlv.  Ont  Own Tablets for the past five years  and prize them very much. They  have proved of <uch value' to me that  I always keep them in thc house/'  Once a mother has used Baby's Own  Tablets  she would use  nothing  else, j ,.,   They are thorough but mild in action \ ^.*^*^*..o..*..*^*.^^m9..*.^.m..t.^.^.^.^���������t..t.^..���������^,.t���������t  and never fail  to make    the     sickly 1,1  baby well."   They are  cine  dealers  or  by  a box from The Dr. Williams' Medi- ��������� I  cine Co., Brockville,  Ont. { ���������   :  J    f  I    2  but will induce healthful conditions  of the. system tinder which worms  can no longer thrive. Worms keep  a child in a continual state of restlessness and pain, -and there can be  no ��������� comfort for the little one until  the cause of suffering be removed;  which can be easily done by the use  of these powders.-than which there  is nothing more effetcive.  None to Spare  "Phew., but it's hot!"  Sizzle, mopping his brow.  Bobby?"  "Out  flying  his    kite,"  said Mr.  "Where'te  said  Mrs.  uake the sickly t.?  re sold by medi- \ I  mail  at  25  cents \ f  Where is Berehtold?  PAIN?   NOT A BIT!  LIFT YOUR CORNS  GB CALLUSES OFF  f  Tell him to slop it at once." roared Mr. Sizzle. "Thc idea of using up  what little breeze there is in such  nonsense 1"  Minard's  Liniment for  where.  Sale   Every-  In "Perfect Seal" Quart Ja?s  These /are the finest  preserving jars made ;  -..and..-hold. 3- pounds of  "Grown Syrup".  '���������'������������������' i '��������������������������� .'.  Your grocer also has  ''Grown Syrup" in 2,5,  10 and 20 pound tins.  Write for free Cook Book.  THE CANADA STARCH CO. LIMITED,  MONTREAL. > B  -/  liiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiBSiSi  i  The  Greatest  Incendiary of  History ; i  Drops Out of Sight j I  "Who caused thc war?" Already -1  the man whose hand actually set the  match to the tinder is all but forgotten. But Austria-Hungary today  starving and suffering untold hardships,   may   remember.  lt was Count Berehtold, Austro-  Hungarian premier and minister of  foreign affairs, who actually started  thc conflagration. Creature ot the  Prussian system, relying on Prussian  backing in his determination  to  ride  t UU^j ll���������'T������*t\J<'V������. V* K   v- *. j^j������������*������*-h���������j. k������        ������.������.<i_������^������^-������,*������w.  ence, Berehtold precipitated the war  which otherwise, might have been  postponed.  Berehtold dropped from sight when  the blaze he had started raged far  beyond his control. He retired to  private life, doubtless thankful for  the obscurity which soon descended  upon him. Probably no one outside  of Austria and comparatively few  in Austria know today the whereabouts or the activities of thc greatest incendiary of histor}*.���������Cleveland  Plain   Dealer.  No humbug!     Apply few drops   I  then just  lift them  away =  with fingers. ?  .*..*..*..*..*.^m*.^^*mm..mmm^m mm*..*..*..*.. *���������*.,%..*..*..*..*���������%,  His Excuse  A   man   who js   steadily   employed  finally had a day off, and decided to  go fishing, taking his luncheon with  him.  When hc  reached the creek he  discovered  that  he had  dropped  thc  lunch packet somewhere on the road  and   hastened  back  to  look     for  it.  Presently he met a husky negro, who  was  looking happy and  picking    his  teeth. "Did you iind anything on  thc  road as you came along?" asked the  gentleman.    "No/ sah." answered thc  negro. "I     didn't    find    .nothing.  Couldn't a dog have found it and cat  it up:"  This new drug is an ether compound discovered by a Cincinnati  chemist. It is called free-  zone, and can now be obtained in tiny bottles as  here shown at very little  cost from any drug  store. Just 'ask for free-  zone. Apply a drop 01  two directly upon a tender corn or callus and instantly the soreness disappears. Shortly you will  find the corn or callus so  loose that you can lift it  off, root and all, with the  fingers.  Not a twinge oi pain,  soreness or irritation; not  even the slightest smarting, either when applying  freezone or afterwards.  This drug doesn't eat  up the corn or callus, but  shrivels them so they  loosen and comc right  out. It is no humbug4! It  works like a charm. For  a few cents you can get  rid -of every hard corn, soft corn or  corn between the toes, as well as  painful calluses on bottom of your  feet. It never disappoints and never  burns, bites or inflame9. If your  druggist hasn't any freezone yet,  tell him to get a little bottle for you  from his wholesale house.  Wound Up  A member of parliament had emptied the room with an interminable  speech. Looking around ��������� at the  empty benches, he remarked to a  bored friend, "I am speaking to posterity."  "If you go on like this," growled  the friend, "you--will see your audience  before you."  Catarrh Cannot be Cured  witix LOCAL APPLICATIONS, as they  ..asnnot reach the seat of the disease. Catarrh  (s a local disease, greatly influenced by con-  jUitutional conditions, and in order - to cure it  you must take an internal remedy. Hall's.  Catarrh Cure is taken internally and acta  throueh the" blood on the mucous surfaces  ii the system. Hail's Catarrh Cure -tvas f������re-  :cribed by one of the bests physicians in this  country for years. It is composed of some  of tjj������ best tonics known, combined with  Some of the best blood, purifiers. The perfect combination of the ingredients in Hall's  Catarrh Cure is what produces such wonderful results in catarrhal conditions. Send for  testimonials, free.  F.  J.   CHENEY & CO.,   Props.,  Toledo,  O.  All  Druggists,  75c  Hall's  Family  Pills for constipation.  ! *=  IB  1   K  FOR EXPERT PERSONAL ATTENTION  CONSIGN YOUR .GRAIN-  NOTIFY  I Jas. Richardson & Sons, Ltd. I  I THE OLD RELIABLE COMMISSION  MERCHANTS ������  5 TRACK  BUYERS AND EXPORTERS ������  s        .     ��������� s  S    . __ Established   1857 SS  g   Top Prices, Careful Checking of Grades,     Liberal    Advances    and    g  5 Prompt Adjustments. We are Big Buyers of 3  I Oats, Barley* Flax and Rye |  Phone   or   Wire  S  am-  ss  S  Our Nearest Office  for  Prices  Any  Your Grain It,  Shipped.  Time   After  WESTERN, OFFICES  Grain Exchang������, Winnipeg  Grain  Exchange,  Calgary  Canada   Building,   Saskatoon  LONG DISTANCE PHONES  Main' 8331  Main   3308  3241     /  niiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimHiiiiiitiiiilf  An Historical Occasion  THERE'S  NO DOUBT  I        ABOUT  VM-*. jM-m* acta waam \t at is, m  POSTUM  HEALTH  IMPROVEMENT  OVER  TEA   6' COFFEE  ^gfS*  was  tsgssm^  W.     N.     U  1179  Neutrals   Supply   Germany  Believed That   Great   Quantities   of  Butter Were Shipped by Denmark and Holland  Of thc total of animal fats used  in 1916 in Denmark for the manufacture of margarine, 90.9 per cent, was  imported from the United States.  The total Danish production of  margarine, in 1916 was 124,781.620  pound-?, according to data received  by thc United States food administration. The substitution of this  margarine for butter allowed the exportation of all the butter produced,  except 8.6 per cent., much of this  exportation  going into  Germany.  Holland, also a dairy country, in  1916 produced 396,828,000 pounds of  margarine, of which 330,690,000  pounds were exported. Of lhc 154,-  322,000 pounds of Holland butter  produced the exportalious amounted  to 92.593,200 pounds. I low greatly  ���������these exports were to Germany's  Lcucfil, can only be surmised.  *.M-mtm*tm,.*m..������������������.- h- .���������������������������������.���������-,  Minard's Liniment  Cures  Dandruff.  PacifiBm a Dream  If the  pacifist is charged with  furthering   .i  situation   which     will   pio-  lt',:f',     tht'     l\ .1 1     .llll)     <'������<.��������������� I     lhc    lll'C.S      <'l  thoiisairHs oi our soldiers and billions  of (Jin wealth, he it. virtuously indig-  naiit.   Yet, is not that the truth?  If it Is true that thc latitude and  -���������M-rey-ibm of hr pacifist are calculated to ���������������������������'(���������at-* a misapurchension iu  Germany of the American faith and  pin-pour in Ihe war aud therefore to  iMoloiH', the war at the exprnne of  \\\rri and money, is not this average  partus* ,i tia'tur ol the woi.M chur-  :u*tfr?  ,      ii i*> limi' t<* h.-.h eai ii other frankly iu thc tare and call thin'-;-, by their  Hit  n.ini-**.- -S*    Paul l'tonrrr  <*. j-sij.  Thc first and one of the very few  times in which thc British parliament  voluntarily transferred its authority  to thc king was in the . remarkable  case of Major John Barnardi, who  died in Newgate prison, London, 181  years ago. Barnardi, a soldier, was  arrested in 1696 and charged with  complicity in a plot to assassinate  King William III. Eight persons  were executed for their part in thc  conspiracy, but there was little evidence against Barnardi and five other suspects. Rather than bring them  to trial or admit them to bail, as  the law provided, parliament authorized the imprisonment of thc men for  one ycar. At the expiratiou of that  period it was. extended for another  year. At thc expiration of that period it was extended for another year,  and then for a third, when parliament  passed an act authorizing an act  providing for the confinment of B.'ir-  nnrdi and his companions "during His  Majesty's pleasure."  Asthma Overcome. * The triumph  over asthma lias assuredly comc.  Dr. J. D. Kellogg's Asthma Remedy  has proved thc" most positive blessing the victim of asthmatic attack?  has ever known. Letters received  from thousands who havc tried it  form a testimonial which leaves no  room for doubt that here Is a real  remedy. Get it today from vour dealer.  Ju*9 Vi L ��������������� M  than any other cocoa  on the market���������-and better because  only the finest and most expensive  products are used in the manufacture of Cowan's Perfection Cocoa.  &-������  i  Electricity from Lignite  Owing to the possibility of shortage of coal for next winter's ... fuel  attenlion ir, being drawn to a report  made some years ago by rj,n engineer  in the employ of the Saskatchewan  government, who suggested that thc  hesl way to develop tlic lignite ficld.s  of Srt������ik:ttchev.*:in would be to establish a central power plant located  right in the. centre of the lignite bed  and distribute power all ovcr the  province. His scheme vyas to burn  thi 1 l.^r nit c In i f ti������i't.--. :\.i \, "ji������������������*.���������,,- d(.;ic  with the same grade of coal in tier-  nmny and elsewhere, and nfic the gas  so developed lo produce the tflcelric  energy.  The Real Naval Problem  The real problem is to sweep the  U-boats from the sea. That is purely  a naval problem, and the American  ilcct is now joined witlij the British  and French armaments for that solution. The allied lleets must solve it  for thc moral as well as. thc military  effect that: must be, produced upon  Germany.���������From the Providence  Journal.  A safe and sure medicine for -a  child trouhled_with worms is Mother  Graves' Worm  Exterminator.  His Mangy Old Affe  One of the most horrible things  about the crime of the kaiser is that  he was ho longer a "young fighting  kaiser" when he drew hia sword upon  mankind.    Hc  was an old  man,    a  fjrandfather. Every lust save the  )lood-lust must have died in him. \.  may be lhat hc is like the man-eating  tiger, indifferent to the taste of.Jui-  man flesh as long as his teeth nnd  claws are equal to thc task, of ^idling down other denizens of the jungle, but turning in his mangy old age  into a man-eater.���������-Mail and. Empire.  A4f MP %%Sm% """"ll'lltl'lHIIIIIIHIIIIIIIII.i'lU  p\iinr mo -rwo Kvmm ior m Mutim* ������  E   iuiUVIIUU  vv'ttHxtxtf Hrt>xt~}.tq\t\x\*i<Hi H  a *"'������������������"���������*-"r *r������ii<i������.   in������������ui-iti>ifrmiii������������-ff  U ll-)'h,r',^,.M,nJ!f'���������.,", * *>������orlt -U'jfAtj-uentg  Q U/kH iut imioli of yulir lovhiv u*t# *M iu.  C 'iYi&t-ti ������nii lrltli th������ uunj*. toaii)Mrity.  J? flttiA ������t Uriifl btici Ojilc*! MUjico ot by Walt. H  g Aik Murlu Im RiM������-(y C������.. Ohltlf ���������. f������f h������$ lull ti  -VllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllMJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII.I V  *r a  "t  Veneered Wild Man  ,# I'crsisteul. imbrecding of provincial  ideas; the making of vanity a virtue  aud of self-praise a system; formulating unquestioning ohdieuce lo  power into a . nn tional religion���������  these things have made the ruling  caste of Germany, not great men,  but veneered wild men. The ruling  ca������:te has beronif a powerful and un-  '4'tJMf.jl   .i.i*jjjiM*|     ojj/-]{,jj<|   jj'i.tj   \\,it   \\\,y\t  Intelligence of a man grafted on to  Ihr low instincts  of a beast.  It is not the human folk of Germany thai the human government of  democratic. America is lighting. It Is  the Frunkcnblcin monster that is  blight in i.: Germany, and that. luia  gone forth into the world to slay  and to slake its hud,���������.Minnrapolis  lournal.  Melting  Down  Statues  A Sleriiu (Un|>.j1<h icpt.ru tliat tt  bas been decided to melt down  broiiy*' kitalne', for nmnhion ptirpo^fs.  ���������VIC you w"0 * wortyr.to Pnhis in  ��������� r" the Back, Urluory or Bladder  ���������-���������* Troublea, Brick Dtiut D^poaitu,  Painful Urination, Swollen Joints or  any of tho various symptoms of Kidusy  Trouble, take *  tmtmatfzmammimmmMmmimm  >...*���������  - ���������~,'*-.'^:>'-,m-!.;:i^~^^^^  iiiiiiiiimi^^  r^t m miriiif m^'-n' i-,->'Yf rn, nvr>i,r nrnih'ft i 'ii-aMiis-ftftfttfifMt^irii^liffcfrt *i  m  m HE ONE ClftNCE FOR DEMOCRACY  ISI0R4ULIE!  A^ GOWL1CT   BETWEEN   TWO   OPPOSED   SYSTEMS  \  lilihu Root JDectares, That the Entry of the United States Int<5 the  ^War ha* been Grasped as the One and Only Chance for the  Preservation of their System of Government  ������Hhtt Root,, addressing thS confer-  cnpe of American Bar association  delegates at Saratoga Springs recently, likened Germany to a burster iu the house.  ''There can be no talk of peace and  security of democracy with Germany in her present position," Mr.  Root said. "If Germany had succeeded, in what she started out to  ifloi and had come out with lier power" unbroken, and we had been unable to defend our right and had not  held Germany down in the last five  mbnths, her heel would have been  on our neck.  "The effect of our entry into the  "war is that wc have surrendered  some of the liberty w& have asserted. Our property mpst bfe invested  in,war protection. Wc cannot have  free democracy and "war, and the  result is that if you live in the presence of military autocracy you cannot make democracy. If you retain  democracy you must kill autocracy.  *��������� "Our entrance into this war has  been grasped at as thc one chance  for the preservation of our system  of goyernment and pur independence  an mdepen^ntV court, and the right  of America^ manhood ; to assert in^  -dividual. right against all power, and  continue the free ^republic which our  fathers-handed down to us. Our. suc-  eessfullprosecution nof'^/thie *y war vis  tliVVbiHyV-way 'we can make that  chance successful. We are in war,  andPtli& principle forwhichwe-fight  is*" liberty,:V independence, and pur  American life; .   .'���������' .''/?%  "It has become! perfectly evident,"  Mr. Root said, "thatVthis is a..-.conflict' bet-ween two pjSppsed,'-J&ii&Pin-;.  cvitably ^opposed, .A sys'tems;ipf P igpY-***:  crnmen|si;5bf v.|lplit^ apf policies^ a pf?  human --society*.������������������"."��������� It Has become perfectly evident that our Ayar was  brough|.:.jpm w  Iish' aVmilita  conic perfectly evident that more  than a generation of careful preparation h������dV been-made forV'thisy very  thing, *and that the democracies of  the world,: ^rejoicing-a iiv peace. and  prosperity* in -political freedom^ and  in individual liberty, were in \ great  measure?ahd in differingydegreeun-  prepared^ to; -meet this attack "upon  theim.   :P P- ';.-  "Sld**#iyfthey haye gathered '^t������ '/the.  support of the principle of their lives  the pnnpiple upon which    they live,  against:; the adverse attack    on    this  principle^ -the domination    of which  ,   means P.lies death of democracy    and.  the    everlasting,  destruction    of the  system- of 'individual liberty of which  we are:, the high priests of the bar. ,.  "So long as    there exists a    great  and    powerful,    military    autocracy  which has the purpose      to    secure  domination by military force, so long  republics, ������������������;    democratics,       countries  which preserve    individual    freedom  and individual" rights, countries which  subordinate  government to freedom,  must be at- the mercy of autocracy.  As welt go to sleep with; a burglar  sitting in your fr^nt hall as to talk  about the peace and security of    a  "  democracy with  Germany still competent to pursue its career of domination,      i A:  "We arc in the fight, and the  stake for which we fight is liberty,"  Mr. Root added, "and it is our bar  which stands at the door through  which oppression must enter. It is  ���������not ao easy for thc farmer to sec  there will be >a difference' in his  cvbps, or in the sale of them; for  the manufacturer to sec that anyone will Stop wearing clothes, or  ihoes or using machinery, but it is  fi'asy for us to see that with the domination of .that military system that  subordinates the law, that makes  .the bar /but a clog to an administrative system of government, and  leaves to the bench no independence  -it is easy for thc lawyer to see that  individual liberty and the supremacy  of the law over executive power���������  will be attacked and destroyed if we  do not succeed in this war."  t.  Sin Without Trace  -*>  Up  German Method    of    Covering  Murders' at Sea  The German government is reported in press despatches as disclaiming responsibility for Count Lux-  burg's plan for sinking neutral and  other merchant vessels; "leaving no  traces," on the ground that the proposal emanated from a single German diplomat and was uot in fact  adopted by the higher -authorities.  Two circumstances���������aside from _the  fact that no official German state-  men can any longer be regarded as  presumptively true���������render this explanation eminently unconvincing.  (1) Count Luxburg's matter-of-  course manner of using "the concise  phrase "spurlos versenken" strongly  suggests that he was referring to a  practice already familiar to the authorities whom -he was a.ddressing.  (2) There is abundant evidence  that it has for some months-been a  common German practice to attempt  to prevent any smyivorsfromV escaping, .from ��������� torpedoed .vessels. At  the meeting' Vbf the International  Conference of- Mferohant SeamenP in  London in August a report (publish-?  ed iiv The London Times) was made  ^slip^ring twelve known cases during  the "months April-July in which  crews leaving sinking ships in lifeboats weijfe .^attacked, usually byv gun-  *fi:^yinVfc$ ships  '.jwefef &;f|^|neutfal;-Vhatib.haiity;*' pther  infeliaticeis^df > theV same practice-'have  since been reported. The case of the  Belgian Prince is the most illuminating example' of-the^art-- of "spurlos  versenkeri'.*7 Firing on small boats is,  of .course, a loose and frequently ineffective, method. since: it is difficult  to be sure .that all of the crew have  been kiiied by the fire. The boats,  of ythe^Belgian;;Princ^V iaccprdingly;  were rendered uselessrand the crew',  deprived of their lifeboats, were  placed on the deck of the submarine,  which shortly after submergedV iXjsi-  luckily for the German designs,'-threie  out of the crew -of. forlyrfottr were  able to keep afloat until picked up  by a passing vessel. "Spurlosigkeit"  is after all, a. somewhat difficult"ideal  to" jattaiii1 to���������which is the contemporary German equivalent of "Murder will out."���������Prof. A. Q.' L'ovejoy  in New York Tribune*  Pigeons for Pershing  course, the. lpits arc  everything he has contended for   ofi from their original locality.  Carrier 'Pigeons   to   Aid   American  Army in France  Major-Gcneral Pershing, commanding the United States army in  France, has asked for thousands of  carrier pigeons . to assist American  aeroplane observers in. sending then-  reports and.maps of German positions back to headquarters.  All French fortresses for many  years have had their pigeon lofts.  Thc employment of thirds with su'ch  remarkable homing .qualities in connection with aeroplanes is new, however. Birds are bred in lofts behind  the French lines and'trained to return to these lofts. The aviators  taket he birds up, and when far over  thc German lines they fasten to the  pigeon's legs any map or report  which they desire, to return' quickly  to French headquarters, and the  birds almost invariably ������������������get back with  great rapidity. It is said ' that the  French have even succeeded inV training pigeons to return to movable  lofts, wliich follow thc lines of the  advancing troops, although, of  thc lofts arc  not moved far  Will Austria Collapse?  } The Military Failure   of*" the ~Two-  " Parted Kingdom Practi-  -   cally Complete  Many have looked, from early in  the war, to see it end through the  collapse of Austria. The proximate  cause of this three years' tragedy  was Vienna, but the ultimate cause  was Berlin. The ultimatum to Serbia  alone could never have s������et the stage  for it. Degrees of guilt in such a  case do not particularly matter. -Nor  can the most even-handed justice  apportion degrees of suffering. Austria at least has reached ihe point  where her suffering is greater than  her guilt. Whoever wins, she loses.  Thus it is that her desire for peace  has grown so keen that she will  make almost any sacrifices to attain  it. Probably the terms suggested by  the pope represent the minimum of  her concessions. Whether they do  or uot, she cannot now escape the  fear that a worse thing is to befall.  Thc onward sweep of the Italian  troops has brought her to a lively  realization of her peril. The reported evacuation of Trieste by the inhabitants reveals the apprehension  that this sweep cannot be stayed. If  the Italians cauld takc Monte Santo  they ought to be able to take Monte  Harmada. After that the deluge.  - Whether or not Trieste falls,  whether or not Vicuna is threatened,  the military failure of Austria is  fairly complete. By nothing short of  a miracle could the Austrian troops  resume the offensive. The best "they  could hope for would be a lingering  defence, a retirement as costly as  possible to the enemy. But there arc  other things to be considered. All  accounts agree that the internal condition of the empire is terrible. It  is doubted if the people could survive another winter of privation.  There is something akin : to - despair  iamong the loyal:���������.: adherents of the  Mouse of Hapsburg, something akin  to revolution among the Slavic subjects of that house. The revolt in  ���������Bohemia has been checked,1* not  crushed. The government cannot  trust many of its own soldiers 'to  fight against their brothers in blood..  -Resentment at' German: dictation is  growing among all classes. Austria  has been staunch to her ally, but at  fearful cost. She has been held partlyby honor, partly by fear.-.'-But the  .first motive can weigh little now in  view of -the* -'.wholly-, selfish policy  which Germany has-pursued toward  her;- and the second must weigh  less than it did before Germany herself began to .show .signs of 'failing  power. There is every reason why  Austria should make a separate  .peace.'aP-.TT'-TTTa'A'. -V.;V,yVv,.- .-Vv-.-.���������<.. ���������,  ���������Ever since he came to the throne  the emperor, Charles, has been anxious tp end the war. Efe dislikes and  -distrustsV the German emperor.      He  lias  ho  -ivish  to  play    the  _German  game at the expense of the Jtiapsburg  monarchy. He realizes that the stoppage of vthe;:;enprm6u'sVwast'e":in.. money and metij tiie inauguration ;of    a  policy  of  internal-reforms,  the" satisfaction   of  the  political  aspirations.  ;bf tbe  non-German V races    are    the  only   alternatives   to  the  dissolution  of the empire.    If Austria was willing, to offer the Trentinb to Italy to.  prevent her entrance into the    war,  she will quite conceivably be willing  to make greater concessions to bring  peace.      The  more  she  delays    the  harder  the  task  of  saving  anything  will be.    Threatened .men live long,  and  disintegrating nations    show    a  remarkable   force   of, cohesion.     But  there is a point at which- the will as  well as the power to resist ends. Has  Austria reached that point?.   Is  shc  on the verge of utter collapse?   Wc  may not have to wait    many    days  for the answer to these'questions.���������  Philadelphia.;Public  Ledger.  km ME FORCED TO  ENTIRE TACTICS OF   .... i..&.:i*^&,���������i  ENEMY FRONT  LINES ARE BATTERED  TO PIECES  ^TMi0.pA&^^^^  Tp:PPAT-PTP^^$iMi:^M  A Recently Captured German Document Tells oi the Manner in  Which the Allies Regularly Break Down Defences of Enemy,   :.^^:r.-:-:.^:^^^^^^\  '    ���������AAArrAAAAsAA'rr&sZpZmi  ' PPpPp^rpM&M������0m  'SPP  ' "*lr  By Heavy Artillery Before the Battle Actually Begins   : _n o    War Prisoners  Brutally Used by Huns  The  Anglo  <��������� :������**���������-;  Inhuman     Treatment     of      Russian  Prisoners by the Huns  Another  chapter  is  added  to     the  story of the, tortures of German pri-      _        ^   Son camps by a Russian soldier, whe-j-bombardments in Flandersr in Cham'  escaped by tunneling with a knife un  der the electrically charged fence  along the Antwery-Ro^endaal line. It  has been forwarded to the U.S. state  department from Petrograd.  Brutal treatment and poor and insufficient food have cost Germany  the labor of thousands of priponcrs,  he says. One labor battalion on the  western front, consisting of 2,000  men, has been reduced by starvation,*  exposure, beatings and death to less  than 500. The daily rations for a  prisoner, he reported, consisted of a  small amount of bread and turnip  soup, the soup enriched occasionally  by a bit of horse meat.  The unfit, thc wounded and those  who have lost members of their body  w*ere kept in invalid camps until they  died, but never, he says, returned to  camps in Germany because the officers' in com maud feared the pyscho-  logical effect upon the people of the  sight of the maimed men, often little  more than animated skeletons.  .Stern and implacable methods were  /used to compel prisoners to work  Ingenious ���������tortures that ended only  short'- of deathywere inflicted on some,  while others Avere shot ���������<pu.trighti Punishments varied from enforced standing .at attention for a day at a -time  without food, toy beating with rifle  butts and to hours ^ of suspension in  the air, with ropes being* tied to  wrists, while prisoners' hands were  held behind the bodies, the result being to throw the weight on the'-unnaturally- twisted muscles of "arms  and shoulders:    Such methods in his  . terrific power of ���������the ^-0��������� .,,.  French bombardments is forcing the f  German high* command "to revise its 5  entire tactics of defence on the west P.  front. Al few months ago,- the enemy  still relied on earthworks, trenches-;  and deep underground shelters to re-h  pel our assaults. "Under the smash- ���������'������������������..���������:,ar aAAAx^simss^m  ing    violence  of  the    AngIo-FVenchiVV;^-r:v;^ii^^^|  r,. ���������r?"������������������;���������-���������:,T'TPP00SlM M  '- ������������������-.��������� ���������~.'~%'&&������''13i&  '���������A:AAA:'-^iA'(AA^S^T,  ��������� '���������'::��������� s"y'y'".yy-'-f'.:^7&*S**  r-A;,A::AAir$i������mm  ���������A'A:Sr:^-ftA&tm  '���������:.'''  '.���������*���������'-.:.''    "' ���������������������������"'''l,-t'^^^'^^''-fiW.'^^'fjWB|  '-'-:'-��������� PP....: ���������".;"���������-*',' V:K*--i r^*;'y'*.'.'i'''*)i^a������J**������ii*^""  .. :rrAA.'VAAty~0mimtlSm  . '.'..���������_������������������.. ���������.���������;*-��������������������������� .���������,rt-fA.-itP.\.;'.-^v;--xi.jsjJK**M  .'���������.   ���������/'��������� ���������   ' ^''.v^^'i'^^^V^^fr I  '<>::���������. .'- .*-;^.^^vv^^^^?������P*  PApTpp^mmm  own battalion, once 2,000 stroiig, had  reducedit; to 330 at:���������the.Vtime'- hfeyes-  cape'd; ���������  pagne and Verdun,    he revised   that  view.   In a" recently captured enemy  army order the    German    command V  itself admits    how    fallacious hopes |  built on sand and concrete proved. "V  The  document    begins  bv*   plaintively recording    the  fact  that    the   ���������  German  front   ' lines    are    regularly V  battered  to  pieces  by  our    artillery  before the actual battle begins. Power of defensive, it says, depends  on  ���������*  the  possibility  of  hiding  the  means VP  of defense.    Trenches, shelters,    ma-:  chine guns emplacements,    and bat-V -  teries ouce photographed, by the An-vVV  glo-French airmen are    doomed    to  certain destruction by their artillery:  Under such fire it is hopeless to at- ���������  tempt to repair damage.   An entirely  new principle of defense  is    needed  and the order proceeds to explain.:  y For the 'old   VsyStem of    positions  on which the    enemy    artillery    can ''������������������;  .register and    whiclrsthe enemy .can.  therefore destroy there must "T be one  substituted.  A  zone  of defense    organized in depth is recommended towards the rear;-  This system;- -with  its defences hidden' as much as pos- V  sible from the.   enemy    observation V  and troops  echeloned: in    depth 'in .  sUch a manner that their lines, thiu  irt  front, -become  progressively-denser .towards  the  rear,  ought to  eh-;  able  us  to pass* from  the defensive'  tot he offensive with trobps occupy-y  ing thicklier held positions    in    the  Tftixr.  -/.���������;....;...'. .-,'���������.'.' V VVV'sV ":'y.. "������������������',.. ���������'!.-..' '.PPa  ; But hp.w are men echeloned : in-,  depth to'wards thc rear to be hiddenV;  from observation of bur airmen and  is the all-  ���������.;���������'.-������������������'.���������' *i?'Si-i*^Mj  Ar rr^A.yA'.-^h,-^.* i  -'������������������': ���������-���������5;'-,VK&*eSrSjl  :.-���������:��������� ~ AfAS'i'A^PA  PP&Mm$  ���������... :< v ���������-.;���������-'cy^-V'^*^  iy:'?.^;^^^|  -������������������ ;;:������/;5������������^B  AAAApf&mm  AAprAAp#$m.  ���������' ~:AAp0������$W%$ti  '.>"-'vyV-':"S;f^iS2l;  '.pii������g$%$t-  fiii  ;vyvlii^i  Britiali Relations With U. S.  Campaign of Education to Create  nderstanding Is  Advotated  pmm  ������riiTin*������p<! ; -wrhir  ViirH  tw";*-f.o������ii-.������   ..ji.v\jJ^ '  T>f.X*.m>~,      It-,  .X*t*x\.^X       <XJ 1  Great Silent Hero  on  has  mms  *fcZ?'imm|'wT^m K^ ''' ' f^M'"^^w"'w,i^*^^^^wfcJWi^M*'*l'^fc*i'  A "2 in 1 Shoe Poliali i������ made for every tne. For liluck Shoet,  "ii m ������ btack vpaetoi una "win * iiUct.coinomuuon (pauowia  liquid); for White Shoca, *'Z In 1 Whlto Cake** (cuke) and  -8 in 1 White Liquid" (liquid)i for Tan Sbocit *"Z in I Tun" (n#tte)  nnd "31 in t T������n Cfimbln"������t^on,���������, (panto und liquid).  fcOc Black���������Whita���������Tan t6c  F. F. DALLEY CO. OP CANADA LTD.,   -      Hamlllon, Con.  Heroic Sergeant   Who    Pushed  Until Object Waa Attained  The Paris "Petit Journal"  brought before; Fiance the story  of great unknown heroes of the war,  and its latest contribution deals with  a heroic sergeant "just one of those  men who go quietly by in the march  to the front without dash or gaiety���������  a bull dog of the British breed. In  the attack on Langcmarck, the. Britisher saw his officer fall, and not  recognizing any one. of superior  rank than himself took command of  the company, and in ai 'quiet, business-like fashion, said, "Our work  \d to go on till we arc ordered to  halt." The order did not come till  thc third line of, the enemy was successfully pierced. Just on the eve of  thc victory, a bullet struck  the  ser-  fjeant. to the ground. Ills place.  lowever, was taken by a soldier and  that company finished with every  German within sight put out of business. The Journal remarks, "It is  thanks to such acts that Lnngcuiurck  was' seized, crossed, and loft behind."  "j; *" . ���������      v '    *  Diplomatic Retorts  Tlm.Amcric.au ambassador's conversations with the kaiser recall ,',ny  anecdote of thc encounter between ;i  British ambassador and Napoleon  Uounparte, durjnrr a short truce���������:i  peace it was uaticii at tlu: liuu:���������between England and the Corsieau  fire-cat cr. In an angry convers-i-  tion, Napoleon said to thc ambassador,- "I will make war on England."  "That i:* your affair, sir," rrplicd [Iw.  ambassador. "I will annihilate her."  added the emperor. "That, sir, is  our affal.'," obzictved the ambassador  with a fitic, courtly how.���������Christian  Scif>tior   Monitor.  Iu the light of this huge conflagration we can all of its, on both sides  of ^ thc- Atlantic, rate at their true  yahie. the trumpery** boundary disputes, the irrational and manufactured controversies, that for so" long  kept Great Britain and the United  States . apart. / They have now come  together under the stress of an unprecedented . crisis, but a crisis that  will infallibly recur if they again, fall  apart. Far beyond anything else,  the peace of the world depends on  a working union between its great  democracies, and especially between  the United States and the 'British  empire. There will or there will not  be a "next lime" very largely as  these two vast federations succeed  or fail in shaping their future policies in common. But among the  self - governing English - speaking  peoples policy follows opinion. It is  not enough that their respective governments should act' in common.  They must be. .buttressed by that' informed opinion . which can only  spring from knowledge. Thc United  States and the. British empire must  l*~*"am to know one . another. . Thev  must be riiade conscious through all  their diversified millions of that  central unity of ideals and instinctive ways of looking at things, and  forms of government and society  that bind them closer than the'peoples of any other two politically separated entities on earth. A 'simultaneous campaign on education in  the United States on Great Britain  anil thc British empire, and in Great  Britain on the history and daily life  ami institutions and temper of the  Aniet*i'*'i'* commonwealth, would be  a contribution of the first moment,  not merely to their present comradeship in arms, but to their destinies  hereafter.���������From the London  Times.  important thing? The order explains  that ..this is to be done by ^bandon^ y  ing  the; trenches V and    retiring    to v  'shell crater nests' held by groups of  men  with machine guns.      This  in- ..:',  struction has particular application to  a i the ground such as that upon -wliich Vy  Anglo-French'- armies   are ''������������������"��������� fightlhg".--;.  Shell craters redoubts are to be: ar-:  fangedviii depth like a square of the  same    color   on    a    chess board and  their protective capacity is to,he in-.  creased;by runriing;Aa j-jy^tepi .ofylittle;yy  'chambersV; The" chambersV;are::#ar^  m&m  ���������, ,, mfm^$  'on'timbers;, like, '���������gallerics^in-^a-Vnijri^  into  their sides  and  where  possible '''-,-*-;';';--'"SvSi  connecting one1 shellVholc -withV aii-,  otlier- by V;;ytinibered-up; V.passages tho V  Essential point beingythat-sieehVfrom" ���������  above these; shall>be -nothing tpVdis^V  tinguish thcrit .from any <of the thou-V;.  sands of shell "craters surrounding:  them.     . '*   ..'-.-/  The  earth burrowed    out of    the  organized craters is to be thrown im y  to the neighboring unused craters' ot *  if possible spread, on the ground between.   "Thus," says the   order, "wc  shall  obtain    shelters    which    from  without look like ordinary shell craters and will be safe from ah    observation."    If the ground Is so wet  that it is' impossible to. dig galleries  the troops must be content with such  shelters  as unimproved  craters provide.    The  front line,  or   organized  crater should be protected    by '-scire  entanglements. in    an  irregular   pattern,    so    arranged    as to affordf no  clue to thc situation    of the    crater  line.  The importance of thc document  lies not only in the new tactics it  prescribes but in the frank recognition of the effectiveness of the  work of our guns and our alrmem  but aboye all, our airmen. If a thing  can be registered by- our airmen';*'  cameras it will bc destroyed, !������'������������������"��������� the  axiom front which th6 whole order  starts. Thc moral for us is easy to  draw.  A-'TTTPTTmmi  '���������*-..   ������������������    .A.'������������������'���������: rAASxXiSiXWM  " "      lii^l  ���������AA<A:':i!'!i>:i!'!jgfl  , . tlVMlXtm  '*v.-v'i'>.'-Kj*Kl  ���������rA-A'tA;'A'iifi  :p-'&&������mM  :ai|lr  ������������������-.���������rAr'A'M',  ���������'���������'>��������� ���������'������������������:v-^%i'  ���������: AAAA*r<m  ���������AApAptftii  : AyA'^iA'Fw  Pp$0������  'Vs':':'VVy.J$!  V'<   y;",V*5*'-'lf  ,'.':: "; .'���������''���������!.,^?i';;j?'������?J  '���������A\A,AAfii  Vv'vSSf  National Boots  '.j-r i'-  m  Spuds on a Tomato Vine  Joseph M. Sl-pheuson, secretary of  lho agricultural preparedness league,  of Scranton, which has beeu rnconr-  aging the farmers to plant, increased  :u:r'*���������)}.���������'��������� thi;; year owing to th;. ->va.*.  has succceiled in growing tomatoes  and potatoes on the same vino.  Karly in the spring Mr. Stephenson took five healthy tomato plants  ami :��������� like numbi'r'of t������������>t:jt-> ���������ih'.nt:*,  and grafted thru). The hybrid plants  thrived, and to date M) Tine larg.- ripe  tomatoes have bci-n picked from one  of thc  plants,   while,  investi^-..tti������>ii   of  I'll-     '('���������ul      ii!     i'u       .',./ll(       Jil.ilil      J j   i (  ,|<( (1  a cluster of line potatoes,-���������Philadelphia   K<:i"onl.  Quietly  Satirical  "What     dirty     hand**.     y<M. Imve,  jolinuy,"   r .t i������I   hh    iculwi-. "What  wiiuhl yon s.i\ ii I raiu<* t.������* m'Iio<>|  that   u;iv'"  "I   vvniildn't   s;iy     uofhi.i'." r^itlied  bllililiv "I'd     !���������<      liii.    Iiiililf"  First  Supply on Sale in . France  ���������a, Weekj::V...'";'  The first supply of "national boots"  will be on sale throughout France in  the lirst week in October. All retailers, to whom a fair rate of profit  vill bc assured, must bind themselves not to charge more than the fixed official price. Thev must keep a  register of the names of purchasers  and must display the goods, with attractive price labels attached in their  store  windows.  Half a million pair of boots will  be reidy hy the beginning of November. The price of men's shoes will  be 28 francs while boots for women  will briurr 23 franc?. Tl"������:se prices  ���������ave -ihoiit hall* ������hn<f now rhanr*-.'  ior a si.uilar quality of goods.  >ii  ���������'."���������iW.  .. '.'ll  '.f.'l'-tl  ��������� H  ., i  ;iV*  >.ry\  "Pi;\  No  Barley for German Plff  The German war food dcpartim-nt  announccH that no barley will be  available this winter for feeding pigs.  as it is nctdrd for human consumption.  ar?  w  hi  ir  119A  I  ���������  ������mmm i|Spfc~v-  fe,iV*.*>-.''   . ������������������-   ���������  'IK-'  ������������������'^jv.i-.-O.*., -   ���������  mm-    ���������  Mesitioa  i  A general meeting of the  Creston Valley Liberal  Association will be held  in SPEEKS' KAIX, on  at 8 p.m.  BUSINESS:  To organize for  the coming campaign.  Local and Personal  5 Imperial gallons of VRoyalite for  $1.75, at Creston Mercantile Co., Ltd.  Victor Mawson left on Monday for  Trail, -where he expects to secure a  permanent situation.  The Ptesbyterian ladies have their  annual bazaar, sale of -work and tea,  on Thursday, Dec. 6th.  - Mrs. R. Buckmen, who has sj>ent a  couple of weeks with Creston friends,  returned -to Trail on Saturday.  Mrs. J- W. Dow left on Tuesday for  Wardner, to spend a few days with  her daughter, Mrs. T. W. Bundy.  Save money, bring your can and  -get it filled with Royalite Coal Oil for  $r.50.���������Creston Mercantile Co. Ltd.  The Creston Valley liberal Association meets in Speers* Hail on "J-uesday,  Noy. 20th, at 8 p.m., to organize for  the coming campaign.  Frank and Daysley Buses *���������������_  passengers west on Monday for Nelson or Trait, where they expect to  strike a job for the winter.  E. C. Hunt, Grand Forks, who is  looking after the-horticultural department work in this section, is {paying  the Valley ranchers^a visit thus week.  Whist drive and da&ze at the Auditorium to-oight. Cards from 8 to 10,  and dancing from 10 to 12, with music  by the Creston orchestra. Gents 50c.,  ladies25c  W. Woods, a St. Mary's prairie  farmer, at Cr&n!>ro������k5 was - here on  Tuesday, intent on 'purchasing a few  head of cattle to winter ������a his ranch  at that point.  .'���������Wnnwrw^ ChLABS���������^All the standard  sizes in stock, or will cut it to special  sizes. Or, if you prefer, bring the  -sash along and we will - put the glass  in for you as Well.���������-S. A. Speers.  R. M. Reid, former C.P.B. agent  here, is in charge: of the Canadian.  Northern depot at Drumheller* Alta.  This fcowy ia northwest of Calgary,  and is quite a large coal-producing  centre.  Rev. M. W. Lees heads the newly-  Organized Creston Valley Unionist  Association, with E. C. Gibbs, aa  secretary, and a strong executive.  There are at least 30 paid up members  for a starter.  The Bed Cross had another hangup  attendanee at the sewing meeting on  Tuesday afternoon, when the workers  -specialized largely on trench caps.  The 10-cent tea served produced $3.00  for this good work.  Hand Painted China���������A fine new  stock of it just opened. The real  thing for Christmas gifts, and on  payments of a small deposit we will  set any article aside to be called for  later.���������F. H. Jackson.  Fob Sale���������One horse, 4 years old,  weighs 1800 lbs.; one muae, in foal. 0  years old, weighs 1140 lbs.; one colt, 7  months old. Also harness, wagon,  rack and sleighs. See Sam Woo or  Sue On Yen, Creston.  v;l.Sevea^'^sfc^  Apply C. Ba.AiB, Reclamation Forna.  a db^3AB]-"Pvrm  workers,J- $5~: ieiMh,^-VicT6R   Oabb,  Creston.  Coal ia cheaper than wood. Buy it  off the car at $7.25 per ton delivered.  ���������B.Iiamont.':.  ���������Mrs. Remington, who has spent the  East few weeks at BnrniiB, returned  ome on Wednesday.  B. Walmsley and F. Belanger were  Nelson visitors the latter part of the  week, Returning on Saturday.  Morning service only at Christ  Church on Sunday, with celebration  of Holy Communion at ttiej close.  ]Len Mawson, who is in charge of  the. section crew at Marysviile, was a  week-end visitor at^his home here.  Mrs. ������*amb of Fernie was a weekend visitor with Mrs. Mead at the  Creston Hotel, returning on Tuesday.  Fruit Ranch Fob Rknt���������Entry in  March. Colt for sale, six months old;  also a_ milch cow. For purticuhvra,  apply JJ. Scott, Creston.  J. M. Doyle, Calgary, the travelling  manager the P. Burns Co., spent a  couple of days l\ere this week  with the local  manager, G\ Johnson.  The school trustees have their  November meeting on Monday night.  The local seat of learning has an  attendance of 120 scholars at present.  V Dave Scott, who has been helping  with the prairie harvest at VEoiig  Coulee, in southern Alberta, the past  ten week^Vcaine home on Saturday.  In the Bection be was workibg the  wheat is averaging 25 bnsbels to the  acre. PpA:.upTr  C.P.R. Supt. Harsliaw advises the  Creston board of trade that he has  the heated-car siarvice ^estiori itnder  in vestigation and in a few days ah-  nouneojment is Vibftpected that some  sort of a sorvlce in this line ista he  put on. TP"-' ^'a' ������������������.������������������-' .;'-*:-'.     -..'������������������-  4U1.  rtt..~i.  Viaia.  Creston Methodists will  have their  annual fowl supper and    social   in.  Sneers'   Hall,  on    Monday  evening,  Nov, 28th���������not the 20th as previously  adyertised.  The first of the winter's coal supply  came in last week, when both H. S.  McCreath and B. Lamont received a  cat* each; It is selling at $7.25 de-  layered off the car.  Ales. Lidgate is a visitor at Camrose  this week. It is a side-door pullman  trip, he having gone up there as stoker  in a coupleof cars of apples the Union  loaded out to that.point on Saturday.  Guarantors of the Canadian Patriotic Fund are respectfully reminded  that the end of the local branch's year,  is on November 30th, and Treasurer  Bennett is anxious to close the books  on that date with all the money promised paid in.  ssisfci-at postpSlee ia-  spector, Vancoiiver, paid the Cresfcon  office an oflftfci^l yisit on Tuesday lost,  finding things th the beat possible  shape. He states that few offices in  B.O". Vequal VOrestob for all-round  efficient conduct.  Miss Amy Ebbutt of the nursing  staff &t the Nelson hospital, who  underwent an operation for appendicitis at that institution a couple of  weeks ago, Is spending a c������uple uJ  weeks at her home here. Mrs. Ebbutt  returned with her, ou Sunday.  When the canvass is completed it is  confidently espeetjed that Creston  Valley will have guaranteed $500 for  Y.M.C.A. work, as a result of the  Capt. Pearson lecture in the Auditorium on Monday night/There was a  capacity crowd out to hear him.  For the winter months the bar at  the King George \ Hotel has been  shifted, from its old location to the  rotunda; where the smokes and wet  goods are now* dispensed over what  was formerly the office counter, The  new arrangement will effect a considerable saving in fuel.  Next week we Will have with us the  annual bazaar of Christ ' Church;  which is announced for the Parish  Hall on W-ainesday afternoon. In  the evening there will be whist and  dancing, and for the latter the Canyon  City orchestra Will furnish the music.  A large attendance is looked for.  Messrs. Or. JL. M. Young and. C. F.  Hayes haYe just. been, notified of "their  appointments as enumerators to commie the yoter8 4ist.:for the Creston  Valley for the federal election next  month. The former will ��������� cover the  territory east of Fourth Street as fa***  east as Goatfell, while the latter will  enumerate West of Fourth Street to  Kootenay ^Landing, including Corn  Creek.   The work must be completed  ti 'rvy  : Several   months  ag^  White  and   Striped  Pl^  Erig  We have meeiyed  about 20 pieces of the aboye^  will be pleased with the excellent valu^  Price  22 1-2 and 25 c, per  wide widths.  m  Men's, Women's and Children's  CHILDKElSr'S-^Siie 22, $1; 24, $1.10; 26, $1.15  28, $1.20; 30, $1.25; 32, ^1.25.  LADIES' Combinations in sizes 36, 38, 40, at  $1.45, $1.60,' $1,65, $2.25. -  MEN'S Combinations, in standard makes, from  $2.25 to $4.50 per garment.  If you want Underwear for any member of  the family we have it in stock.  ifiilft  About  $500  is  still! this month and the first draft of the  J lists posted on Dec. 4th.     ������.  mtrn*.  T"���������  Tlia MonsTES. oa FraA-scs oners for rustic Suascripdan  T  l*s Victory Loan  ���������^  ^f|^li ���������"9"^.':-': '������������������ AT .VVtwoeO* ... A*Ar'   ',*"-   '^'^���������';   t,    ,-.���������-.  $150,000,000 5������% Gold Bonds :'\ ���������**;���������  .  t  t  Iss?, as fc3!o������s:  Bearing interest from December 1st. WIT, find W������ea in iliiree JmsLtun^e^ the choice of Which :i. optional with t!������;t  5 year Bonds dnev*be6embi*r. lit, .1022  ��������� -.       ���������   10 year -Boiids due December-1st, 1927  - SO year-Bonds due; December lit, 1937  Thia Loan, la authorised under Act of the Parliament-of Canada; and both -principal and Interest are a charga upon the Consolidated Revenue Fund.  The amount of this Issue la (150,000.000; exclusive of the ahiount (if anyV paid by the surrender ofbonds of-previous issues.   The Minister of Finance  however, reserves the right to allot the whole or*ny part of the amount subscribed in excess of $180.000,000..  PRESBYTESWAM WM  SERVICES  Sunday, Nov.  Morning Praise and Preaching  Service 11.15 a.m.  SUBJECT:   The Power and  Beauty of Love.  ���������v"Sho hath done what she could."  Service at Wynndel, 2 p.m.  Special Evening Service at 7.30  SUBJECT: A Big Contractor  in Action.  fcjolo hy Mrw. icono.  Sunday School at 10.80 a.m.  Tha Proceeds of this Loan will ba used for War purposes .only, and wUl bo spent -wholly In Canada.  Principal and Intercat payabla 8n Gold  - Denomlnatlonas   W0, $100, ������S0e and' $1,000  .SubscripUona must be In sums of $00 or multiples thereof. ' ���������  " Principal payable without charse ui the Office of the Minister of Finance and Receiver General at Ottawa, or at the Office of tbe Assistant Receiver  General at Halifax, St. John, Charlottetown, Montreal, Toronto, Wlnntpee. Regina, Calgary and Victoria.  Interest payable, without charge, half-yearly, June 1st and December 1st, at any branch In Canada of any Chartered Bank.  Bearer or Registered BoncRa  _'    '    Jl, ...      ' Bonds-may _be registered as to.principal or ai to prindpidl and Inteitati  ��������� Scrip certificates, non-negotiable, or payable, to bearer, in accordance with the choice of the applicant for regittered or bearer bonds, will be issued after  allotment in exchange for provisional receipts. ��������� When these scrip certificates have bean paid In full, and payment endorsed thereon by the bank receiving the money  they mny be exchanged.for bonds, when prepared, with coupons attached, payable to bearer, or registered as to principal, or for fully registeredTbonds when  prepared, without coupons, in accordance Twith the application.  Delivery of interim certificates and of definitive bonds will be mode throuah the Chartered Banks.  ; ���������    Bearer bonds with coupons, will be issued in denominations of $80.. $100., WOO., and $1,000. and may be registered a* to princlrml only.   Fully p'-jIb-  terccl bo-ds, the interest on which la p?ud direct to the owner by Government cheque, will be Issued in denominations of $1,000., $6,000. or nny i.-athorlsMd'  multiple of $5,000. '������������������   -���������,������������������. "'   .*  ' ..';.....,  Subject to the payment of 25 cchts for each new bond I'aucd, holders of fully rsoUtered bonda without "^pons. wlU have the right to csoii^t into l>ond������  of the denomination of $1,000 with-coupons, and holder's of bonds with coupons will have too right to convert Into fully registered bonds of authorised denoro-  lnattom without coupons, r.t any time, on application to the Minister of finance.  . ���������'-'Surrender ol Bonds    .;���������  -. Hold"-* of Dominion of Coot-da pebentur* Stock, due October 1st, 1010, and bonds ol tha three preceding Dominion of Canada V.'nr Umu Imucs,  have, the privilege of surrendering their bonds In part payment for subscriptions to bond* of. this issue, under the following conditions.���������  .' Debenture Stock, due October    1st, 1010, at Par and Accrued Interest.  '      ' ��������� ..x.  ' ' War Loan Bonds, duo December 1st, 108$, at 91H and Accrued Interest.  C*1m* above will be accepted In part payment fo* oonda ol any of tlw thrao maturities of thia Issue)  *  War1 Loan Bonds, due "October Ut. 1031, at L. ���������  War Loan Bonds, due March   1st; 10A7, at 04. ^and Accrued Interest.  - 0TM and Accrued Interest.,  ,m ... . w������-. uUo mmvu.Hi,, .v.,., j-vOO.   and Accrued Interest.  .  (These will be accepted in part payment for bonda oi tha 1037 maturity,ONLV of this Issue.)  Bonds of the various maturities nf t.hl9 Issue will, in the event of future issqas of like maturity, or longer, made by the Government, other limit liuuea  made abroad, he accepted at par and accrued Interest, as the equivalent of cash fc* the purpose of subscription-to such issues.  Issue  Price   Pair  90% on March Ut, 101$  *>% on April 1st, 101ft  80% <A May    1st, 1018  Tr** from taa������������~lncludln$ any Income ������ax~������mpo*������4 In -puvauonoa of laglala-ilott an������i������t������4 by tha Parllauaant of Canada.  Payment to be mad* aa foUowat  ' ���������   10% on December 1st, 1017  10% on January 2nd, 1018 .  30% on Psbruary 1st, 1018  .. AJfpllball year'slnteres*-. willlw paid on 1st June, 1018. ..'-.,���������  .   Th������ Bonda tkef*-cfot������ #^  5.01% on tmxas 20 yemr Bonds  5.G8% on -Ikta 10 ypmit Bomfio -  B.81% on ih**    IS rear Bomilt  All paymetita are to ba mada to a Chartered Bank for tlio credit of tiie Mlnlstar of Plnance.   VaUura tn pay any Instalment wbtn due will reiuler (irevlous  r>������vin*-nM liable to iorfelture, and the allotment .tiO. cancellation.   bubs.ripUons accomp������uil*d by a deposit of Ut% ol th* amount aubaalbcd^ mu������t be fjJiwui.ir.-l  tt.ni.tii t i.i<r t.ixuittiu ui u Cl.wi.(-'j-j.J r.-ijl..   A������<j' ./*vj.Uj Iu Ct.jj*.G~ i* tr.y Cti^rtirci Cr.r.1: xr'.lx fwr-"t* csttsrlf-tlt-ss tsd ltvi.t rr~������1.f!'>~*! sr*<"-lr'-"-  In cue at partial allotments the surplus deposit will ba appltsd toward paymant of tha amount due on tha January lustalment.  S.-btcilptlAns may be paid In full on January Snd, 1010. or on nitty, instalment due data thereafter under dlaoount at the rate ������f HH% per annum.   Umirr  this provldon layments of the balance of subscription* may be mada ������a follows I ' '*" ,  .���������'  .:f  '  If paid on January SJnd,  If paid on February li  If paid on March 1st,  1010, at th������ -rata'  If paid on Vsbruary 1st, 1016, at tha rata  If paid on March 1st,       """  If paid oo April 1st,  101B, at tlia -rata  1010, at the fata  ftO.lQTOH p*r  )-0.-M0M0 par  90.73374 p������r  *.000flO par  Si  100,  100,  00.  00.  ^plication may ba obtained front any branch In Canada *>t mny Cbarttrad Bank, or from any Victory Loan CotamltUMr. or  of iUo Loau villi be kept at tl>������ Dopartin-int of ruian������, Ottawa.  s will b������ made In dua course for tha listing of this latua on tha Montraal aud Toronto ������tock Rs*cluuig*s.  Porms of application may.ba obtained froi  l'\if.   lMHjk������  Apnllcuilon  member thereof,  -       -      |.-..- -  ..������������������! ��������� r... r......:. |..l^....rL.- ���������\\r^ ������������������y>niJ'ii-sl'r in ..."ijfe.'"uu.i-      ViT.ii.h-' ' T ' -  OtTAWi. NovawtxH- llth. 1017.  M  ilit*iiimi\\MiiT\rmihi���������XlSI,]i\'\',^fiit  ***miiXmmmm������ammmli m*><imltm1*t'mimX*>mm,,tm*mMm^  JNiHMlWMWNWl^^  x-.^.-^^#.^v.^  <amwmt*mmm.*HMt0***m  mmmmmmV,l,*Mmi*-mmmmt  47  mmmmi  ,lW��������� ���������fl,������*.������-.j|. uHtJJUVKHI  ,������.������!. .'**!���������*���������*��������������� Mr WiH*.tit!. A<n&���������������t,-9 U. **'^" --fc1*** if 'tfc*^.^' Px\t% >V* V  ^fft  *<v>V**r-l<**VMM*'������H-ix'  ���������^nw.'^Aw^'j;5jr������!^.:.*ili::������.44,.,.j,,*-  ���������^rm*m*^MLM^*mhm^-irft*^

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xcrestonrev.1-0173528/manifest

Comment

Related Items