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Creston Review Dec 11, 1914

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 REVIEW  No. 47  CRESTON, B. C, #Rli>������Y, DECpiBER II, 1914  6th Year  .  Local and Personal  Presbytenon  next.  bazaar  on   Tuesday  KITCHENER  ��������� Eleven more shopping days before  Christmas,  A. Duperry left Tuesday on a. business trip to Nelson.  B & B Plates, &c, see Creston Mercantile Co. advt. on Page 8.  Methodist Sunday School Christmas  entertainment on Monday, Dec. 21st.  _  Mr. Patch of the circulation department of the Nelson News, was in town  Tuesday.  Birth���������At Canyon City, on. Dec. 4,  to Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Edwards, a  daughter.  Ufr. aad Mrs. C. Romano -were visiting with Nelson friends the latter part  of the week.  The Presbyterian Sunday School  Christmas entertainment will be held  *wn'Pfcc SSh-d. "~   ~~  WAcrarSD to Borrow $1,500.00 at  15 per-e������^t. interest���������^AsHtETsrCooPEas,  Wynndel, B.C. _  The* --qpen -season fox* deer closes on  Monday at sundown. The woods are  full of hunters these days.  To date the contribution boxes of  the Creston Red Cross Auxiliary have  netted the. Society over $8.  Get 5 IVb. of mixed Butternuts, Walnuts and Hazelnuts for the Christmas  season, $1 delivered.���������Rev.J.E.Healey,  Brickson. __ . .  Mrs. Ghas. Fransson of Sirdar  visiting Mrs. V.* Olson one day  week.  was  lost  Creston School  Report for Nov.  The station at Kitchener, is a thing  of the past, is it being closed up for an  indefinite time, Mr. Burgess, the agent  is being transferred to K. C. Ii,  V. Olson says that it is great sport  to shoot deer, but it is not so funny to  bring them home; and Vic knows fbr  he had a trial of it this week.  Messrs. Hayden and Trotter of Creston came out to our city the" other  day to spend the balance of the season  after the elusive deer.  Messrs. Leodbeater and Sinclair of  Erickson are up at the meadows looking after venison, to help out their  winters larder.  Mr. Burgess has disposed of his poultry, full blood fancy Rhode Island  Reds, Mr. Corry being the lucky purchaser.  Mrs. 0. Andeen is in Cranbrook this  week on business.  F. Nelson mode a flying trip to Yahk  last Sunday.  S. A. Reid. our trapper, came down  from his Kid Creek camp this week,  and��������� reports seeing the largest bear  track that he ever saw in his life. We  feel sure that Red has not been drinking anything but water.  The Klingensmith Bro's. are camped two miles west of Kitchener, meeting with fair success in their occupation of deer hunting.'  M. McLeod of Erickeon is the ssa-  san's boss big game hunter. He came  in from Yahk on Monday with three  fine deer, .  on Monday to? assume" the post of accountant with, the Canyon City Lumber Co. here. * <���������  Creston had its coldest snap to date  on Wednesday morning when 11 above  -~4$ero   was    shown.   Cranbrook   ther-  -mometer stood at 19 below   the same  day.  R. Hellew of Vancouver, superinten-  ' dent of the Dominion Express Co. and  F. Smith,   route  agent  of the same  concern, wdre in Creston officially on  Friday., ;..,:.? -���������    ���������-     ���������*  The new four-foot walk Including a  hand rail, leading from the street up  tb Christ Church is completed, making  easy both ingress and egress from the  edifice-���������something sadly lacking heretofore.  Board and Room Wanted���������Li good  home for three girls, aged 7, 6 and 11  years, who will attend CreBton school  this wlntor. Write George. Bonar,  Yahk, B,0;  Business Is down to the usual winter  basis ati, the Fruit Growers* Union,  Miss Bradley, stenographer, retiring  from duty on Saturday. She will,remain ln CreBton till after Christmas.  Rev. G. W. Blake was at Nelson on  Tucsday.condncting a prosbyterlal visitation of the congregation of St.  Paul's church. He will also tako both  sorvlcoB In the Nelson church on Sun-  day.  ,T. Radford of Now Westminister,  who has boon on a tour of tho province  looking for u location for it jewelry  storo, wan In Creston tlie oarly part of  tho week, but for the present will not  start in business here.  Attorney General Bowser and Minister of Lands Ross aro spwiding next  week In Kootonay and Boundary.  They are not stopping off at Creston  but if yoa wish to poo Ilium ho at the  station for tho oastbound train on Friday next.  fho Superintendent of Farmers' In-  . stitutc-i for IJ.fy hao'acknowledjjed tho  receipt of $C0 from the Oroston Farmers'institute for tlie Institute patrl-  otic fund, which In now over $11,000, Including tho contributions from tho  Women's Institute.  Tho November meeting of the Farmers' Institute "will bo held on Friday  evening next, Doc, 18, at ft o'clock. At  ���������"-*��������������� ~s r^Sir        **^" W* W* Ws*"  O. J.  were  Wigen  and  F. J. May  Creston callers on Monday.  News like everything else is frozen  up, and there's -nothing doing.  The skating is good now, if the  weather holds good the flats should be  thickly populated with skaters on  Sunday.  Don't forget the school concert on  the 18th, it is going to be good. The  program will consist of songs,, recitations, dialogues and drills by the pupils  Messrs. F. J. May, D. Butterfleld and  J. Johnson have contributed songs,  there will also be songs by some of the  ladles. Messrs .T. and D. and Miss P.  Butterfleld and Mr. J. Johnson will  present' a humorous sketch in I act  and 2 scenes entitled "Joshiah's Pro-  Iiosal" which will keep  the audience  dughing from  the time the   curtain  rises. ,  Division I: Superior���������S. McDonald  Principal.  Perfect Attendance���������Erma Hayden,  Mabel Huscroft, J-ssie Miller, Elmer  Dew, Robert Maxwell, Lyda Johnson,  Blanche Hendron',Vida Gobbett,Percy  Boffey, Lionel Forrester, Norman  Trotter, Bert Hobden, Zella Johnson.  Advanced Course (High School)���������  Alice Heath, __all& Johnson, Alex. Lidgate, Muriel Knott* Jennie Nichols.  Elementary Course (High School)���������  Edna Healey, Bert Arrowsmith.  Entrance Class (Public School):  Arithmetic���������Norman Trotter and Ron-  <uu -iiugavc, ru������u.i uuSC-OIv.  Spelling���������Katie Boffay, Lyda Johnson, Erma Hayden. .  Grammar���������Ronald Lidgate, Mabel  Huscroft, Norman Trotter.  Geography���������Ronald Lidgate. Norman Trotter, Blanche Hendron.  Nature Study���������Nornian Trotter, Lyda Johnson, Vida Gobbett.  British History���������Blanche Hendron,  Vida Gobbett. Bert Hobden.  Canadian History���������Ronald Lidgate.  Bert Hobden, Mabel Huscroft.  Literature���������Norman Trotter and  Percy Boifey and Bert Hobden.  Drawing���������Lyda Johnson, Bert Hobden, Percy Boffey.  Composition���������Vida Gobbett, Lyda  Johnson, Erma Hayden.  Division II.���������E.- Sparkes, Teacher. -'  Perfect Attendance���������Almeda Attridge, Helen Barton, Esther Bradley,  Lillian Cherrington-, Ruth Compton,  Mary Dew, Katberine Heald, Muriel  Hobden, Hazel Hobden, Evelyn Miller  Helen Moran, . Mary Parker, Vera  Parker, Bert Boffey,--Teddy Blake^  Delize_"Mn������\v*e?-_i Lionel' Moore- and  Orin Hayden.  Junior 4th���������Lillian Cherrington,  Helen Moran, Harold Gobbett, Muriel  Hobden, Alice Embree, Mary Parker.  .Senior 3rd���������Mary Dew, Dorothy  Carpenter, . Rose Cherrington, Orin  Hayden, Denzel Maxwell.  Junior 3rd���������-Helen Barton-, Vera Parker, Almeda Attridge, Ruth Compton,  Amanda Marl&nd.    Y  CANYON CITY  Dr. Henderson -of Creston paid a  visit on Friday last to Canyon City.  Sickness prevails among several babes.  E. D. Shackelton, C.P.R. conductor  was a recent visitor. He had not been  in Canyon City ior three years and  was greatly surprised at the improvements.  W. Browell has purchased a new  horse from W. Mudie of Port Hill.  A. E. Samuelson is making cedar  poles for the 0. C. Lumber Company.  J. J. Home of Nakusp, representing  the B. C. Nursery Company, was hers  last week taking orders for stock.  The annual meeting of the Conservative Association of Canyon City will  be held in the school basement on Saturday, Dec. 19.  1  Mrs. Gordon' Langdon and son left  for Michigan a few days ago. Gordon  is going to work his father's farm.  Mrs. Langdon was one of the Bret  women to settle in Canyon City, about  seven years ago.  Canyon City -school attendance has  reached as high as forty this term.  Should this number be continuous an  assistant will be necessary.  -The soft snow recently has aided the  deer hunters greatly.  - H. White secured a four-point buck.  This is his second one.  CRANBROOK  LETTERS TO THE EDITOR  Faulty Inspection  Editor Review:  Sir,���������Of late considerable attention  has beon drawn to the prosecution of  a local Arm by the fruit Inspection  officials, resulting In a conviction under  the Fruit Sale Act.  Tno shlpmont of fruit in' question  was duly Inspected hero, but upon Its  arrival at Its. destination or at a point  en routo sufficient evidence Is collected  to bring abont a prosecution.  Wherein Hcb tho practical uso of the  first inspection, ior 1������ not the local Inspection sufficient to pass a shipment  to its destination.  Perhaps a discussion along those  linos may bo of interest. What do my  fellow ranchers think.  Preston, Dfjc. 0. lNTism_8Ti-D.  Urn tAmi-iu--.-.1-- ui.  mm. .*������..������    mr,.  * **f*.'^,XKfX.t.x^t.m  mm.;  .,...   ...Ml ..A*.  m iMtnAr  on Nursery Stock, to bo followed by a  gonoral discussion of tho subject  Who Will Grade?  __���������  Run-bit- TXxwiuw:  Sitt,���������The Nelson News of the 4th  Dooombor publishes an artiolo upon  apple exhibits and otatomenta mode by  Mr. Clark, chief Dominion Bruit Inspector for B.C, and Alborta.  I gather from tho reading of tho  oamo that in tho future tho individual  paokor will  be  held responsible for  -.���������*!.,..  IIV������ll(JlUUIIlfi,.  My query is, Who will, undor thoso  circumstances grade tho apples P Will  tho grower allow tho packer to grade  his fruit for him ?  ���������       ������������������ '���������������     it...     -.7-.4 1.1,,^ *������l^  *4U14,     ��������������� ...       ���������������,-"������������������       *- - -   -   -  -' -     fc ' ' ���������   ' -    -    V*  r-"-������������* ttin m0.unrin������\h{\1t*r hnlrtt* nlftf-ed  W ������...���������................      A ��������� _, ._  on tho shoulders of a paokor?  Oreston, Doc. 7. A Pao-kmr.  Division III.���������Miss  O.   E.  Munro,  .Teacher.  rPerfect Attendance���������Alta Attridge,  Harry Pollett, Ruth Lidgate, Eva  Holmes, Arnold Baines, Eunice Moore  Henry Brown.  Second Reader���������Arthur Stanley,  Susie Hurry, Eunice Moore, Ben Embree, Henry brown.  First Reader���������Ruth Lidgate, Louise  Bevan, Arthur Dew, Eva Holmes,  Harry Benny.  Senior 2nd Primer-���������Walter Learoy,  Alta Attridge, Harry Compton, Marion Ash, Hairy Pollett.  Division    IV.���������Miss    P.    Waddy,  Teacher.  Perfect Attendance���������Iv in Compton,  Robert Crawford, Robert Hetherington, Charles Holmes, Elson Lidgate,  Keith Lidgate, Robert Moore, Julius  Moran, Dudley Wilson, Evelyn Hurry  Junior 2nd Primer���������Marguerite  Crawford, Robert Crawford, Robert  Hothei-ington, Frank Maione, Merle  Rold. ���������";*  First Primer Div. A���������Evolyn Hurry  Maggie Broderick, Donald Spiers, Mildred Maione, Fred Pay no.  Fii-st Pft'-iiior Div. B���������Charles Holmes, Irvln Oompton, Harvey Gobbett,  Lily Wilson.  First Primer Div. C���������Boatrioo Scott,  Frank Parker, Elsori Lidgate, Evolyn,  Bevan, Julius Moran.  Postmaster Henderson states that  the Christmas mail for the Old Country "was asheavy. thisyear as formerly.  ^Fojir liorsei^werelcilled on theC P.  R. tracks, near the "Cranbrook S������u_h>&  Door Co. on Monday night last.  G. S. Hougham is the new secretary  of the Agricultural Society for 1015.  On Dec. 1st the Herald newspaper  came under the control of Messrs.  Thompson and Sullivan, who have  leased the plant from Mrs. Deaue.  The poultry show on Friday had  over 400 entrie8,jind the quality of the  birds shown has"never been surpassed.  The Farmers, Institute aregoing to  'try oiit the public market proposition  and will hold markets on Dec. 10, 24  and 31st. ,  Sixteen Cranbrook school boys have  just received badges for their work in  cultivating potatoe areas this year.  Each boy looked after, one-tenth of ah  acre. "    .   . ���������  Cranbrook Loyal Orange Lodge will  be presided over by R. S. Garrett for  the next twelve*, months, 1014* saw  quite a nice gain in membership in thc  lodgo here.  Crompton Popular  We are possibly stealing a march 00  Nelse Brown by publishing the extract  below from -a- letter   to . Postmaster  t 1  Gibbs under date of Nov. 27th, hut we  feel sure~'tfie letter will read good to  our-eubsciibers, particularly the many  friends of Lieut. Crompton, who'is one  of the most popular officers' with the  Second Contingent at Victoria. After  expressingthe appreciation of the boys  for the send off Creston gave them,  Nelse writes:  "I want to say that our treatment.,  has been very good and I sincerely believe our ofScers are doing the best in  their power to get for us the best  treatment possible, and I wish to say  of our friend Lieut. Crompton that he  is from our point of view, the best  officer in the company. Everyone of  our company consisting of over 100  men speaks well of him and are proud  of him.  At present we are getting three  square meals a day; not like mother  used to make, but good plain meals. ���������  We are not tied down as some people  imagine, but are given all the leave  we ask for, except when on duty.  WTe have running exercise in the  morniugfrom 7 to 7.45; breakfast at  8; con'ipahy drill from 9 to 12; and  route marches or extended order drill  from 2 to 4.30. From then until 10 p.  m, our time is our own and can get  passes until later if good reason is given. Also, week-end passes may be  procured for a certain number each  week.  We are trying to make D Company  the best of the 30th Battallion, and  ofScei-s.__nd-caen.are working together  with that end in view   '   Sincerely Yours,  N.. A. BROWN  -v - - *j*^-*    -** ,  NELSON  Great Navy Victory  Thursday's war nows is the most  satisfactory to liand Xo_* many days?  On Wednesday a British squadron  undor A4miral Sturdoo engaged a  Gorman squadron off the > Falkland  Inlands in tho south faoino and tho  Gorman armored cruisers Sohar.i-  horst and Qnoisonau and tho pro-  tooted oruiser Leipzig woro sunk  ���������    * ^ m      0*  0, 11 *\     *. 00**  WlMl    Ur    4U-K-     OX     *-,Out/    ������������>���������,*-. ,_,._u  lintiHii   Nil-I**   -wort.    imi.    ttuituuniy  damaged.  ALICE SIDING  The third at homo of tho Social Club  will be hold to-night at Scotty Todds'  commencing at 8.80 prompt.  W. A. Pease and P. peykin . are  away on a door hunt and will be on  the job until sundown Tuesday unless  thoy succeed in fringing down tho  number allowed thorn . by law boforo  that time.  School closes on Friday afternoon  noxt. Thoro will bo no closing concert  this term.  John Stooo Smith and Mr. Petorson  secured a deer on Thursday last while  out hunting below Mother & Hold's  ranch.  John Miller Is busy logging over  about threo acres of his ranch so as to  havo it roady for cultivation noxt  spring.  < Tha snow and cold weather of Wad.  nasday and Thursday has got tho  ranchers busy rounding up thoir cattle, uomo novonty-flvo hood were running on the meadow across tho slough  ......     ,1   ,    _-.-....-!,  Kyxxxty, **X  mtxxi   i.wwr..  A. Miller and P. Pay kin divided tho  carcu-is of one deer between thom aa  the spoil of adavs hunt lust wook. Tlie  animal Won shot about 8.30 a.m. but lt  was attor it p. iu. Oelore tliuy louatca  him���������several iiiii.w. utu.'__ oi --������������- _.���������..������,--  hews' ranoh.  Coasting on the sidewalks is now  prohibited in all ports of the city.'  - The local relief society will be glad  to receive any discarded toys or sleighs  which may be used for Christmas boxes. -,. ,  Transfer-men are giving the use of  their teams free to "the city to facilitate  relief work.  Christmas presents to the Old Country are largely in cash this year,"according to poBt office employees. *  The first Red Orpington to be shown  in the province was on display at this  year s poultry show.  Payments but of the Patriotic Fund  will be $415 for December. So far  $2,400 has been raised here.  Nineteen men are camped on the  courthouse grounds awaiting a ohance  to file on pre-emptions to be thrown  open in the Slocan valley this Thursday.  Potatoes were deoidedly scarce at  Saturday's market. Meat, butter,' eggs  and applos wero not In keeping witb  tho strong demand for them.  Parties wishing to buy thoir.Christmas poultry on the hoof and fatten It  to their own liking before killing, wow-  in considerable evidoncc at Saturday'*  markot.  G-po-d V/ork  At an executive meeting of  tho Canyon City Conservative  Association, held at Canyon  City on Saturday night last, a  resolution was forwarded to  tho chairman of the Redistribution Committee, Creston,  expressing fcheir views on redistribution.  The feeling of tho members  \*m">. 4-V������4-      f^m+rs *-*$��������� jr\w*       t>%> /%*--��������� 1 rt    *r* f\4  VV-t-VO fll������_M' %m/l %4m3VKtSS UUVUtU      -iUlr  be attached to another riding;  in the event of a split thoy  would like to see Creston Valley havo a member ot its own,  thus dividing Ymir in two.  f.*i  t.\  _--^^_l-.jr^^i^M^.;;Ke3as^^;a3K^^  ^ffSXmmmgxxmmiimtmimm^  *im****mmmmmiim  St*S__-!*^^i__i___i_! ^-���������jj^jSmW. f^-^*ty'^**^<rJ.-**Zi;. rm.  f  I  I  i <  ���������THE REVIEW* 'GRESTON; B. a  T*_M������������  ?2steatiSS^  We unneeitatingly  ffeeommeiidi Magic -Etalring  Powder as being the best, purest  and most healthful bakiag p������w������  der that it it possible te produce*  CONTAINS NO ALUM  All ingredient* are plainly printed  on the laheh  EW.GltUTTCO.iT^  TORONTO. O NIT. I  wnsTMiPEG mjicmi^M.  Gun Bases Found Near Paris  Ac*ordlng to several wounded British soldiers in tlie American Women's  Hospital at Paignton, the discovery  was made of concrete gim bases nearer Paris than tlu German army got  in General von Kluck's advance.  They explain this iu the same way  as the finding of concrete bases before Namur and Maubeuge and near  Soissons, saying .it is believed that  tlie Germans bought or rented certain stretches of land years before  the war and then got exact measurements of the ranges, which is the  reason their artillery tire was so effective.  Minard's  Cows.  Liniment Cures Garget in  Japan Wants Russian Alliance  ���������'Geraeral Oba, the Japanese military  attache with the coniiuanuer-in-Ci-ie-,  says the Times' Petrograd correspondent, "'after aa imperial audience at  Tsarkoe-Selo. gave a statement to the  Bourse Gazette frankly expressing his  earnest wish to convert the Russo-  Japanese entente into a ofrinal alliance. Such an alllar*. Genera! Oba  said, would be warmly welcomed by  the Japanese government and people.  '���������General Oha said he believed the  moment had arrived to conclude such  an alliance, and that M. Sanzonoff,  the Russian foreign minister; M. Is-  wolsky, the Russian ambassador to  France, and Baron Mot ono, Japanese  ambassador to Russia, were doing  their utmost to strengthen the bonds  of friendship between Japan and  Russia."  Many mothers have reason to bless  Mother Graves' Worm Exterminator,  because it has relieved the little ones  of suffering and made them healthy.  The Indian Troops  A few mouths ago. General Sir Ian  Hamilton, Inspector-General of the  Overseas Forces, in his scrap hook ou  the first part of the. Russo-Japanese  war. recorded:  "Every thinking soldier who has  served on our recent Indian campaigns is aware that for the requirements of such operations, a good  Sikh, Pathan or Gurkha battalion is  more generally serviceable than a  British battalion."  He also wrote: "Why, there is material in the north of India, and in  Nepal sufficient and tit, under good  leadership, to shake the artificial society of Europe to its foundation."  It is computed that this material  f-ould furnish at least two million  soldiers to the "reserves" of which  Lord Kitchener made reference recently. *  Much Pain From  SCidnev Disease  Teacher���������Tell me what lesson can  be learned from the parable of the  prodigal son?  Small pupil (thinking of the husks)  ���������It teaches people to stay where they  are comfortable.  Grateful patient���������By the way, doctor, I should be glad if you would  send in your bill soon.  , Eminent Physician���������Never mind  about that, my dear madam; you must  get quite strong first.  A teacher received the following  note one-day:  "Dear Teacher���������Please give I_izzle  Home dinner. She has no father, and  I have uo way of getting her one, and  oblige. Yours truly."���������Punch.  Attendant���������Sir, Devil, this iii a registration clerk.  Devil���������Gocd! Have him wrlto out  the history of the world forward und  backward? and if he makes one mistake, to start all over again.- -Illinois  Siren.  A  REBELLION  Food   Demanded  Doctored   in  Vain  Until   Dr.  Chase's  Kidney-Liver  Pills Were  Used  Kidney derangements are often associated with disorders of the liver  and bowels, and under these conditions ordinary kidney medicines usually fail to effect cure. It is because  of their unique, combined action on  the liver, kidneys and bowels that Dr.  Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills are so generally successful, even in the most  complicated cases.  Mr. Emanuel Bernard, farmer, St.  Paul's, Kent County, N.B., writes*  "About eighteen years ago my wife  was bad with kidney disease, and suffered greatly from headaches, pains  in bowels and stomach, and her heart  was affected. For a year she was  treated hy her doctor, with no apparent benefit. She then used five boxes  of Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills with  most satisfactory results. This gave  us such a good opinion of Dr. Chase s  Kidney-Liver pills that we always  keep them in the house to be used for  all derangements of the kidneys, liver  and bowels." Dr. Chase's Kidney-  Liver Pills, 25c a box, 6 for $1.00, all  dealers, or Edmanson, Bates & Co.,  Limited, Toronto.  i*i.mmul.������  "!-_._._. -_���������__,_.*..-  ai__.   _���������������._._..-_*    *  *-*wt-f--*_\*.i���������a    i n__i    i i_r.li   _������.ns   K_.-ii*rJiic    j  The most famous despatch of modern times was the one from L. i*d  Roberts, announcing the relief of  Mafeklng, which sent a thrill throughout the whole empire.  It concludes: "The flying column  under the command of Colonel D.  Malum,"- which relieved Mafeking,  marched at the rate of fifteen miles a  day for fourteen .'consecutive days, and  successively accomplished its object,  despite the determined opposition of  the enemy." Simple aud direct, like  the man who wrote it.  Havelock's despatch concerning tho  relief of Lncknow is one of the nation's treasures. "The cheers of the  troops echoed through the courts of  tho palace/' he 'writes, "responsive. to  tho bugle sound, nnd on they rushed  to assured victory. The enemy could  nowhere with.laud them. In a few  minutes the whole of the buildings  were in our possession."  Of Wellington's despatches, the  moat interesting," and one of tho longest, being that which concerns the  Battle of Waterloo. * He flrst describes the action in some detail and  tho immensity of tho result, and concludes: "Such a desperate action  could uot be fought and such advantages gained without great loss,  aud I am sorry to add that ours have  been immense. Tho army has never  upou any occasion conducted itself  better. The Division of Guards; set  an example which was followed by  all, and there is no officer or description of. troops that did not:behave  well. I should not do justice to my  own feelings, or to Marshal Biucher  and the Prussian army if I did-not  attribute the successful result of this  arduous day to the arrival and timely  assistance I received from them."  The despatches of Wellington from  the Peninsula are classics of their  kind, so concentrated and masterly  are they, but possibly the most memorable despatch which eve.rr reached  England lies under a glass case in  the British Museum.  It is the despatch announcing the  Battle ot Trafalgar and the death of  Nelson.  It is one of the great thrilling messages of the world.  The despatch'is simple and unadorned. It was written by Nelson's  second in command, the noble Col-  lingwood.. "The ever-to-be-lamented  death," it runs, "of "Vice-Admiral Lord  Viscount Nelson, who, in the late  conflict with the enemy, fell in the  hour of victory."  Then follows an account of the  great fight, concluding with a generous note of praise for the gallant  fight put up by our foe, and finishing with the words, "It pleased the  Almighty Disposer of all events to  grant His Majesty's arms a complete  and glorious victory."  Field Marshal French has already  given us despatches that have touched the nation's soul, through their  strongly sympathetic tone.'  Vfaien he has decisive victory to announce, no doubt he will rise to the  occasion as nobly as any of the great  men who have had wonderful news to  impart.  SOLID CHOCOLATE  MAPtEBUDS  c For bites between meals  there is nothing equal/ to  Maple Buds���������all the goodness of the Indies seems  to be caught and prisoned  in these pure, velvet-  smooth bits of solid chocolate���������and they're so wholesome and nourishing too.  28S  What about your wife and children? Will they  dress well after you are gone? Will your children  be educated? ..Have a talk to-day with an agent of  THE EXCELSIOR LIFE INSURANCE  CO..  OFFICES:���������Winnipeg,  -Edmonton,   Saskatoon,  Vancouver.       Agents Wanted.  The Difference  It is simply a question of standards.  Defenceless misfortune arouses in  Germans the desire to trample and insult, an.d in Britons the desire to succor and befriend. It will take an aeon  at, least to educate them in such matters up to our level. Wo could never,  thank heaven, ha degraded to theirs.  ���������London Daily Mail.  F A R MESS  Slof'-_X?ys 2iai..e_s^re of Sotting the highest price* for WHEAT, OATS,  *SSU^JL_-.*Td PLAXt by shipping their    car    lots to  FORT WILLIAM  AND PORT ARTHUR and having them sold on commission by  THOMPSON   SONS   AND   COMPANY,  THE WELL-KNOWN   FARMERS' AGENTS-  ADDRESS   701-703   Y.,   GRAIN   EXCHANGE, WINNIPEG.  A druggist can obtain an imitation  of MINARD'S LINIMENT from a Toronto house at a very low price, and  have  it labelled his .own''-product.  This greasy imitation is the poorest one .we have yet seen of the  many that every Tom, Dick aud Harry has tried to introduce.  Ask for MINARD'S and you will  get it.  Thanks, Mr. Sobotka!  Przemysl, Przemysl, how often has  it proven.a stumbling-block to our untutored tongues! Fain would w.e have  rolled it musically, or mouthed it, or  hissed it, or twanged it. But we  couldn't get anywhere near what  seemed to he a correct pronounciation.  It constituted the despair of the wa>  fan! A doaen times a day it recurred  in conversation. It became Perae-  bizzle, Pereklmel, and even P-K-__ to  a certain nonindustrious few. Now  the secret Is out. The most mis-pronounced of all words will now liu future lose that reputation. Secretary  Sobotka of the Austrian embassy says  it should be pronounced "S-h-i-m-e-a-  s-e-1."  Tho human bod. will stand a lot of  fibuso hut somotl ��������� .s It will surely rebel and demand proper food in place  of the pastry, starchy, greasy stuffs  on which it has been mndo sick.  Then ls the tlmo tc try Crape-Nut.,  tho most sclentllio and perfect food h\  tho world.  A woman writes: "Throe yearn  ngo 1 was very ill with catarrh of the  atomach and was given up to die hy  ono doctor, 1 laid in hod four months  nnd my stomach was so weak that I  could not keep down medicine or  hardly any kind of food and wns so  weak and emaciated after four mon tha  of thle starvation that my daughter  could t-aully lift, mc from bod mid put  me In my chair.  '���������nut weak an my stomach wns, -t  accepted, relished and digested Grape-  NutR without any difficulty tho first  tlmo that wonderful food wns tried.  "I nm r.ow Htrong nnd in hotter  health than for a great many yearn  nnd am gradually growing still strong-  or. T rely on CJrnpo-Nuts for much  of .lie nniirlidimonl. that T not. Tlio  results huvo certainly been wonderful  in my cane au#*prnvo that no stomach  In ho weak it will not digest Grape-  NUtB,  "My buby got fat from feeding on  (.Hipc-Niil-i. 1 win. afraid I would have  to Htop giving the food to him, but. I  guess It io a heulthy fut for bin  health Ih Juiil, perfect." Name given by  Cuiiiidliui  Pontum Co.,  Windsor, Ont.  Look In |il<i?H. for lho famous 111 tlo  mm., l mi        III.ail 1.11 V* ItllV Jilt.,  "Thc-r*''H a Hormon."  Ever read the above letter? A new  one appear*, from time to time. They  ���������re genuine, true, and full of human  Interest.  The Rilla That Leads Them All.*���������  Pills aro the most portable and compact of all medicines, and when easy  to tako are the most acceptable of  preparations. But they must attos.t  their power to he popular. As Parma-  Ice's Vegetable Pills are the most pop-  ulav of all pills thoy must fully meet  all requirements. Accurately compounded and composed of ingredients  proven to bo efl'octivo in rogulntlng  tho dlj.osl.tvo organs, thoro is uo surer  medicine to bo had anywhere.  Tho great fault of American servants is familiarity. To be familiar  is to ho Inefficient. A familiar cook  ,1s at. inefficient as a pessimistic doctor.  7'he speaker, a prominent society  woman, is perhaps tho most brilliant  convcrsatli-iiallst in Now York, u, faot  which venders /more plognanl, this  anecdote.  "f. had a cook," she continued,  "whom T tried to bronlr of lier over  familiarity. What wan tho result'.''  This coolc, discussing mo in tlio boi*-  vants* hall, said:  "X don't sny she's a bad mistress,  bu). hIio'ei a womnn of only ono Idea.  Why, I can't never got hor to talk of  -i single thing but oatlng.'"  Restore Sunken Elevator  The Canndion Pacific Railway million bushel elevator at North Trans-  couu, which sank in tho soft earth last  autumn, and toppled partly over, is  now straight again.  In bringing the huge mass of twenty thousand tons to it vertical position,  thore wns not ns much ns a crack  mado ir* the structure. It uow rests  on seventy concroto piers, which go  down to bad rock, and it ls in better  shape than it was before. It will bo  at onco filled with grain.  A GOOD MEDICINE  FOR THE BABY  A Guaranteed Com Cure For 25 Cents  Putnam'f* Painless Corn Extractor Is  guaranteed to remove hard, soft or  bleeding Corns in twenty-four bourn  without pain. Tako only Putnam's, IL'g  the best.  An Example  "Evoryl.l.ing noomi* to bo going up  In price. Would you bollovo It, It coots  .almoin, an much nowndayj. to dvono a  child as it dooH a grown portion!"  "I don't doubt it at all. Only yostor-  day I hnd to buy a now dog collar for  Flfl, and tho prlco.. havo nlniOBt  doubled."���������Detroit Froo Prows.  Baby's Own Tablets are the very  best medicine a mother can givo her  little ones. They swoeten the stomach, regulate the howelp, break up  colds, promote healthful sloop���������In  fact they cure all the minor Ills of llttlo -Hies. The mother may feel absolutely fitifo in giving; them to hor children for they are guaranteed by a  government analyst to bo-strictly free  from all Injurious drugs. Tho Tablets  nre ftold by modlclno dealers or by  mnll ut 25 "cents a box from The Dr.  Williams' Medicine Co., Urockvlllo,  Out.  Positive Relief  from the suffering caused by disordered conditions of the organs  of digestion and elmrinatioji���������  from indigestion and biliousness���������  always secured by the safe,  certain    and    gentle    action    or  Beecham's  Pills  NC  Sold mwetyvrhtite.  Ia fame*. 2S cwrtfe  j-_.-i__.iaj!  Tenchor (after an impressive leeson  on hygiene)-���������Now, children, toll mo  wl;y you Hhould keep your houses  clean.  Inn tlon llvo pupil���������Because company  may arrlvo at any minute.  The Kaiser's Future  The Financial News says it may  he stated on undeniable authority  that attempts havo already beea  made to assassinate tho Kalsoj. ands  his son, tha Crown Prince. Them  can bo no doubt, says tho writer,  that the defeat of Gormany in th*  present war moans for the Kaiser  one of two thinae^-elther donth at  his cwn or somebody else's hands, or  else flight to a non-Toutonlc soil. Ever  since Germany began to mako preparation for an attack th* Kaiser had  boon Invostlng immense sums ot  monoy on this sldo of the Atlantic. He  is ono of tho largest landowners In  the Western. States���������not In his namo  of course. Ilo owns comildorublo sections of property in the wost of Canada,  1917���������Aro you Instrumental In col-  logo affairs?  IUI.4 Yos, Inddnd; I" play tho phm������  In tho band.���������Stanford Chaparral.  ��������������� >    I*.    XJ.     IV-U  Europe's Spoiled Child  Ono gravlous lady tlio Kaiser wiif* i  always terribly afraid of. This was  ItUi gran.Unol.lior, Queen Victoria, of  whom ho stood In groat awe, and who  had a way of treating hlm llko thn  M'-ollf child of Knropo lio Is. Ho liked  King Edward only In a very moderate  degree, and tho Peacemaker, who had  a very effectIvo w������y of show-lug what  ho thought of pooplo, nover refrain oil  from lotting tho Oorman Emperor  know    that IiIh altitude -jownrdf. this  v.uUi.li'^    H_..i   .....i'iiIi.     Tim   iv-i.'H.l    WUH  always very jealous of King Edward's  popularity and his enormous Influcnco  lu the council.! of Eu.N.po. The Haltering I'ooopllon that King EdwuriJ ro-  oolvod wliou ho went to Ischl to noo*  tllf.   <.(vf>d    A H.rl r|..M   Wirtnf.vr,.   ......1   .   Il'm  lam IT. nervous about  n  pofttjlhlc ile-  Mlllor'H Worm Powders nro complete ln tliomfsolvoB. Thoy not only  drive worms from tho system, hut repair tlio damage that worms causo  aiid ho iiivigoiii.1,0 Uio coiit.tUu(iun  thai: It speedily recovers from the dle-  orde.'t. of the digestion that, nro the ro-  suit of tho work of thoso parasitic  inlriidei'H, They do their work thor-  oughly and strength and soundness  follow tholv use.  "You usod to send mo candy boforo  wo were mariiod," sho said bitterly.  "Yes," lio repliod, Just nH bitterly,  ������.-.._      I. .-f������... (I      \\'\J       V.'l.i'o     il-.������i_ _-!<I     .MM-1  fathor would occasionally hand mo n  few good cigars." - -'Washington St.tr.  'lJl!:~Vou may depend upon It that  WHEN RHEUMATISM STRIKES THE HEART  IT KILLS-"NERVILINE" THE CURE  Effect    of     Nei'viline  Chronic Cases la Almost  Magic sti  x���������You ma  ��������� frleiidtt vii  nectloii or the Hymputii.c-*. of hin ally.' iuivo normwtut it irom loom.  your friends woh't forget you an long  o������������  .-ah   |r.r.if. ������ni-i������iftv *  1.1k��������� That's right: especially If you| finln that Is so essential to n rhnum-  Exposure to wot ov cold la upt to  bring on nn attack.  The muscles stiffen, tho joints H\vell,  and oxertlon brings ou cxcrutliitlng  twinges.  Ofton tho pain shifts from ono part  to unotli.-r, nud this ls dungcromi, as,  the heart Is apt to be attacked. Death  <i������i n  T'tlo I'oMow" " hen ft !������tin. cir.  Tho pain of rheumatism ls quickly  rubbed iiwny with  Nerviline.  Tlilu lu a swift, lasting, and safe  wny 16 cure i-houninllsivt. Y<m cijn depend on Ncrvlllno.   It hata tho power.  i\tf*   r_n**.r.* m*n H n r_>   tr\\*r*s\     it*r*   /*������*s*������>*l-������������-'v1   #������������������.���������*���������- #* ���������*������  ft������*     Lots of testimony to pvovo Norvl-  ', lino's certainty to cure.  The following letter Is from Mr. TO,  O. Sautter, Port of Spain, Tiinidnd:  "UiHt year I was severely troubled,  with rlioumatlnm. I had lt In my  arms, shoulders aud knees. Tho palu  was at times oxcrutlatlng, and laid m*  up co that I couldn't, work. I went  to Smith Brothers' Drug Stove and  was advised by tho manngor to us������  ���������Norvllfnc.' That wan oxccllcnt nfl-.  vlco. I used Nervlllni*. as directed nnA  was cured, completely nutod of ������very  trnco of my old enemy."  Ouch >oii hi.-* NmviUnt. youil i*t-u_-  l/.o It's different from all tho others-���������  that U contains something that get*  right "ul." the palu tho minute you  rub it on. Tho largo BO cont family  size In tho most economical���������get It  1  - , - .,    ,\. ,.    n,  ~l     ������ ..-, 1  | une remedy  I Bold   bv  dealers   evervwhere,  or  tlm  I (Jatnrrhozono  Co.,  Kingston,  ('finndlk  R r  _a  Y  1  I.  ?  l  t  ������������������'-.  .  XHJf- JUS-VIEW. CJtESTOX. B  STRATEGIC MOVE MADE BY  FRENCH COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF  GENERAL JOFFRE OUT-WITTED GEN. VON KLUCK  Joffre at my headquarters;������������������?���������*..- * .* I  strongly represented my position to  the French commander in chief.  '* ? *��������� .** I finally arranged with General Joff re to effect a further short  retirement towards the line between  Corjnpleghe and Soissons," the Post  says:- ������������������ .. ..??..?' ' .���������?;  "iuvidentiy it was ihe British cge_l-  mander's   belief  that  the  time  had  }iy Far-Sighted Plan ot Campaign the Germans were led anto the  Trap of the .Marne���������Allies'Retreat at a Critical  Juncture Turned  the Tables  Whether or not the war offices of i  YBritaln and France have definite  knowledge of the matter themselves,  the world as large, at any rh-te, has  never been supplied with a definite  reason for the sudedn swerving of the  German armies   southeastward   from  ������ the very gates, of Paris.   There "���������:��������� had  ;been no serious ..repulses experienced  by them prior to that sudden change  of plan, but just when the world"'was'  expecting the bombardment of the  French capital to begin,   they turned  > partly, around and marched righj7 past  ti their objective? .       *  The -latest?.'reports .of General Sir  ? John French, covering the latter end  ti- bf the retreat of the allies   to   the  ? Martiei and the fight'ng from then on,  do not state a reason for the enemy's  change Of pla,ns, being seemingly purposely vague oh the stage of the campaign. But thesis reports, however, do  provide some hints which are of assistance In. speculating as to the  cause of the   sudden   swerve   of the  Y:Gerhranj3.  In the first place, we heard much ih.  Value of Irrigation -  Partners of Southern Alberta Petition  Government to Undertake Irrigation Scheme  Farmers in districts in Southern Alberta who ore not served by any irrigation project Trill appeal to the Dominion government through the department ot the interior, to extend irrigation to their lands. The present  season has demonstrated lu a most  conclusive manner the advantages of  irrigation, as irrigated farms have  ane crops, whereas in districts where  Irrigation was hot available, the result  has been-disappointing. Farmers In  the district ranging from township  10, range 19 to range 26 in the south,  and township 13,?range 19 to 26 in the  north, west of the 4th meridian, are  not as yet served by any irrigation  project ,but they have had opportunity to see the success attained by irrigation farmers ih?the Canadian Pacific  Railway irrigation belts. These farmers are deeply in earnest in their ef-  HORRIBLE TALES OF CRUELTY  COMMITTED BY THE GERMANS  FEARFUL STORIES OF PILLAGE AND DESTRUCTION  Certified Evidence of the Work oi Fiendish German  Soldiers in  Murdering Innocents  and Wantonly, Destroying  Valuable Property  come to make a stand and that he i forts to secure irrigation for their dis  yielded only to strategical reasons trict, so much ..o that a petition is  propounded by General Joffre. Whaft j being circulated asking the Dominion  were Ytherre Teasons? Apparently  these; that while the Sixth French  Army on "the British left might be  sent forward" against the TJerman  -line, and, so possibly bring an end  to the retreat,_it was .more profitable to hold this army back until  the German advance had come.so  tar south that? this French army,  instead of being sent against the  German front, could be thrown  against the enemy's flank, General  Joffre's reasons must have been convincing because we find that not only  did General French consent to make  those ; discouraging   days   of   retreatia "short retirement toward the line  about the desperate attempt of the  er.omy to turt- the extreme left of the  allies, the British under General  French being on the defensive side of  this attempted turning movement.  Before we knew whether this movement was to be successful, word came  of the unexplained    swerve of Von  between Compiegne and Soissons,"  but that in the course of the following  week he Jail back fifty miles further  south to below the Marne.  "It  thus  follows  that Gen.  Joffre,  like   Gen.   French,   recognized    that  the German   advance   against   Paris  had failed    by   the    end of August,  Klnck. Statements by General French j but that Gen.  Joffre foresaw,  what  throw  some    light    here,    however, r Gen. French   did not, that von Kluck,  While the English were retiring before  Von Kluck they referred to by  the comamnder as forming "the extreme left cf the allied line, then,  without the change being explained,  we find General French saying in his  report that on August 20 "three or four  more German corps were opposing the  sixth French army on my left."  That is, prior to August 29 the  British were on the extreme left, but  on .that date the *sisth French army"  had taken the extreme northwest position. ? This would seem to clear up  the situation, with respect? to. the  turning movement attempted by? Von  Kluck, and at the same tlmei provide  a reason for the swerve to the southeast. Apparently General Joffre saved the left by sending up a new  French army, and when Yon Kluck  found- this new obstacle in his path  he had either to abf.adoh.Jiis turning  movement oi* ? continue it at greac  risk well to the northwest. Rather  than, do this, and also because the  German? armies advancing on Paris  farther south were meeting with difficulties, Von Kluck decided to* go to  . the ,jast t.nd try to effect a junction  with tlie Crown Prince.  With the German right chocked by  tho presence of this sixth army, the  allies'had to decide whether or not  it was time to rest their retreat and  institute a definite counter-offensive.  It was tho determination of General  Joffre, assented to by General French,  to fall back still - further which led  the Germans Into tre trap of the  Marne.  Studying the report of General  French on this stage, ot the opera-,  tions, the New York Evening Post  evolves a very logical speculation as  to the sautheas'erly move of the  enemy. Quoting the paragraph of the  report: "This was the situation whon  I  received  a    visit  from    General  government to proceed with the installation of such a system and the  farmers express, their willingness to  have bonds raised on their lands to  cover the cost Of the system, which  they-will undertake to repay with Interest in 40 years.  The petition which is being circulated among the farmers and meeting  with their hearty support recites in  part as follows:  To the Hon. W. J. Roche,  Minister of the Interior,  Ottawa, Ontario:  Sir,-���������We, the undersigned ratepay-*  ers and land owners in the electoral  districts in the province of Alberta,  ranging from towntehip 10, range 19,  to range 26 in the south, and township  13, r������.nge 19 to 26 in the north, west  of the 4th meridian, request that the  Dominion government proceed to con-  r .met and place in operation at the  earliest possible time, such an irriga-l fuge in a cellar.    At once the cellar  I have Just been furnished with  what Is undoubtedly one of the most  formidable indictments yet drawn up  against the conduct of the German  troops in the field, says the correspondent of the Glasgow Herald. It  has been provided by,John M. Chretien, an attorney at law of San Francisco, who a few days ago, in company  with a friend, Mr. Donald Ferguson,  made a trip into the heart of the  Vosges to see for themselves to what  extent the stories of German barbarities were true. I. must be stated at the  outset, and emphasized, that Mr.  Chretien has not accepted any second  Land evidence. Times, places and  names, it will be noted, aro given  with scrupulous care, and Mr. Chretien took the extra precaution of obtaining wherever possible the cards of  the peopie with whom he spoke.  The Germans entered St. Die by the  Rue de la Bolle, and though it tii an unfortified town they . destroyed every  factory, store, and residence in that  street for . alf a mile. They destroyed  them by pouring petroleum over the ,  floors and setting them on fire. Not a  single place was destroyed by artillery  fire but all determinedly, deliberately,  with no other reason than that of committing pillage and destruction. On  August 29, at 76 Rue -de la Bolle, two  old women and three small children  were seen by tlie Germans to take re-  shut off from Paris, would swerve to  the' east, and?.so expose his flank to  the new French army. Y It was a bold  move to anticipate on the part of the  enemy.   Why should von Kluck sheer  to the southeast,   and march with his  ri^kt flank across.the enemy's front?  Here  the  probable   answer    Is  that  von  Kluck knew,   what  Gen.   Joffre  knew,  that on the  left of the  German line things were not going well;  that   tlie  Crown  Prince    was   being  forced back,  or,   at  least,  held    in  check;  and that it was worth while  taking tlie risk of a flank attack from  the French on the chance of breaking  through the allied centre, or, at the  very least,  relieving    the    pressure  cgainst the German left.   Over-confidence may have induced von Kluck to  believe that a heavy rear guard would  he sufficient to keep the Sixth French  Army back from his flank until his  main   force,   joined with von Bulow's,  had broken through the French centre.  Von Kluck took the chance and  lost. Gen. Joffre took the chance and  won. It muct have required courage  of a very high kind on the part of the  French commander in chief to fall  back again dnd again, while keeping  unemployed an army which* might  have been brought in to check the  enemy. But what Gen. Joffre aimed at  was not the mere halting of the German advance, but the assumption of  a vigorous counter-offensive. To have  sent his new Sixth Army forward  to meet the enemy would have beea  only a continuation of the defensive. To keep it back north of Paris  ready to throw itself on a hostile  army ongaged in the perilous experiment- of changing front promised  greater results; and events justified  the French commander's courage and  foresight.���������Ottawa Free Press.  1  tion system r.s has been discovered  from the recert survey to be possible,  as we believe it is the - only salvation,  of the residents of our district, and is  of the most vitei interest in tlie pursuit of agriculture, fostering the mixed farming ide/is, and the future of  our country depends upon the. action  to he taken at once.  T. meet the cost of construction we  will bond our land, and we. are willing  to pap* the capital cost of installing  this sjvtem with interest at four per  cent., ,._xtending the time of repayment of the cost of construction over  a pei-iad of forty years, the first payment of such sum of indebtedness to  becevie due four years after the completion, of the canal, thus affordii-g  farasi -rs an opportunity to be in proper  coiiif-ition for irrigating growing crops  in o profitable manter.  We further signify our willingness  t<* accept the approximate figures of  ^.OO per acre .as the likely cost of  th������ construction of the canal and laterals, and we are prepared to pay this  i ni ." :r acre.  Indians Starving in North  Treachery of the Enemy  Germans    Violate    Sanctity    of  the  White Flag  A French office:* who is In hospital  'In Paris, gives a graphic account of  the fight ln which he fell.  "At nine o'clock In the evening," he  says, "I rocoivod the order to advance, to entrench myself as well as  I could, aiid resist to the end. My  company took up Its position in a  pouring rnln, and about half-past two  in tho morning three shots lived by  our sentries warned us of the approach of tho onemp.  "Tho Germans, who had beon taking covov ln a wood, crept to within  200 yards of us, whon they ofrmed up  and charged. I commenced volloy firing, and whole ranks of tho Germans  Toll, bnt thoy continued to advance,  our wuU-dliocU-il lire arroulod thoh*  advance when thoy wero thirty yardi.  from.ouv trenches.  ���������'During tho night a buglo nouuilod  ���������Cease firo!' but lt was a Gorman  bugle T wnn not deceived, and 1  slanted with all my power so as to bo  hoard by tho enemy, 'Firo ImlopomV  eutly.*   Tho Germans fled.  "A. few tnlnuto-** later a German of-  tlf-i-v a-p-pci rnd mri-yln**. u whlto fliitat.  I iiilvanoed from tho trench, uccouv  panled by four mon. 'Wo are sixty,'  mild the envoy, 'and wo wish to surrender.' I replied 'Advance ln order.'  "Four men wounded ln tho loga  staceorod forward, and my men, be-  Moving tho fight finlslind, showo.t  themselves above tho trenches. A  Maxim hidden In iho wood Immediately opened llvo on us with a hall of  bullets, while a fresh attack wns commenced.  "I gavo the oi'dar to rooommonun  volleying, und for tho tlmo thc Prussians decamped. Tlioy loft many dead  uml wounded, and tho following day  we found that   six mon, armed with  roni.M  of th*. enemy.  C'-of.s on'vhMr nrmi.."  Kilties Rouse 'Wonder of French  The Scotch have given a fearful  account of thomeolvos and havo suffered severely, several regim ",ts having been nearly wiped out. In one  engagement tho acotB Greys charged  with a man of tho celebrated Black  Watch clinging to each stirrup  leather. Reaching tho Gorman lines,  the horseman and footman almost annihilated the force of the enemy at  this point. The samo feat of putting  two men -.n each horso was performed by the Scots Greys and the Blac:  Watch at the battle of Waterloo.  Tlio   Scots    ate    a  never-ondliiK  source ot wonder to the Freuch peasants;   Thoy wear kilts ot khaki and  bare knees.    The    Fvonch    nt    first  Reports    From    James  and   Hudson  Bay Show Trappers Sorely Need  Help and Food  W. E. C. Tood f the Carnegie mus-  euin, Pittsburg, arrived iu Ottawa recently after spending over six months  on the western ..bores of James and  Hudson bays. He was conducting an  expedition for natural history specimens for the Carnegie museum.  Mr. Todd stated that the Indian  trappers in the region which he visited are suffering to a great extent  through the war. First news of the  fight reached him on Aug. 29, and at  that time the Hudson Bay Co. had  stepped the advances to the Indians. It  Is customary for the company to stake  the Indians in the fall lu tho form of  a "debt" of provisions, which is fixed  according to the hunting abilities of  the debtor. When the season opens  the following year the Indians and  Eskimos redeem tho. debt with furs.  As t'-eso advances havo beon cut off  the natives are in a serious predicament.  Mr. Todd said Mr. Wilson, the Hudson's Bay Company's manager for  James Bay showed hlm a store houso  of furs, which at ordinary times  would bo worth $100,000, but which at  curront market prices ave valued at  $17,000. At Whito River tho Indians  wero already In a distressing condition and when Mr. Todd arrived ln a  sailing boat tho natives camo out In  canoos .to moot him and by divers  n_ ans, mainly by poln,tlug to their  months,   mado  him  understand  that  door was saturated with oil and set on  fire by Otto SBaueni, of Company 5 of  the 120th Regiment of infantry, who  remained behind to carry out this particular piece of villainous work. Aftor  he had set fire to the house, and when  he was leavrfcg'by the front door, he  was killed, and L .companions returned and buried him in a plot of grouni  in front of the house. Isabel Dem-  houly, aged 65, and Marie v Bompard,  aged 59, together with three children,  escaped by forcing a grating in the  rear of tho cellar!,  Next da:, through the kinduess of  M.  Mare Francois, president of  the  Red Cross, and accompanied by Lieutenant    Georges Raton, ? M r. Chretien  and  Mr.  Ferguson    visited    Sauley?  There they inspected    the    Chateau  Sauley,  only completed four months  ago, and  converted iuto an .lospital  when war fcroke out.   Five Red Cross  banners  flew from the  Chateau  on  September 7, says Mr. Chretien, when  the Germans opened fire on it. One oti.  he bann.rs was shot away and the  other four are now to be seen hanging in shreds.   A shell bursting in th6  large dining room where 75 woundei  Fre__cli soldiers were lying Yilled them  all, besides the cure, whose bo*1 y was  completely severed in two. At the moment the cure (Jean Pierre) had been  ministering to the wounded men.    Of  the 300 wounded in, the chateau it was  only possible to remove 35 to safety.  The floors of the dining room and library were when I saw them black with  coagulated blood, and In the garden  were to be seen more than a hundred  mattresses saturated with blood. The  wohle interior is a mass of xu.ins, but  still the Rdd Crosj flags in shreds fly  from the roof. The village itself, which  was abandoned by its inhabitants, was  burned to the ground, not by bursting  shells, but by the buildings being wilfully set on fire after they had been  saturated with petroleum. The empty  petroleum caps -^ere visible all over  the place. The villagers had rot fired  one shot at the Germans. .  Mandray was the next village^ visit-  el.    Here the Abbe Rement toh. the  following story: Gn the night of Sep.  t6s_.be-" 8 the Germans appeared on tha  outskirts of the village, and considerable fighting took place in the main  street.    The French were compelled?  to retreat.   As   soon   as thj village  was free of the French the modern  Huns began   their   atrocities.   They  forced the Abbe to unlock the doors  of the parish church. They took his  vestments, the altar candlesticks ahd  other altar decorations, and the chal-   -  ices, and then deliberately-poured petroleum on the altar and on the surrounding carpet.   The match wai. applied, and in two hours an 800 years  old church was a mass of ruins, only  the   four   walls   remaining standing  Two days later the Germans burled  six of their dead in the chancel. While  one party was thus giving an example  of its "culture" others were not idle.  At nine o'clock a party broke Into tho  cottage of Madame Marguerite, a grey-  haired widow of 56 years of age. Four  held her down, and she was treated  in the most hideous way by the sergeant. She fled to the Abbe's house,  and told her story, which   he afterwards repeated to Mr. Chretien and  Mr. Ferguson in the Abbe's presence,  in the very room where the cowardly  act had been committed. About a hundred yards from the Abbe's house is  the cottage of Leonie Apy, aged 21,  and her mother, who had been bed-  2'''den for three years. The daughter,  who was reading to her mother, hearing the, firing, noticing the Germans  approach, and seeing as well the light  of    the burning church, put out the  lamp and barred the door. Almost immediately after th'e door was forced  and a party of   .ermahs    rushed in.  Tliey threw the young woman on the  floor and violated her in the presence  of Ler helpless mother.    When the  young woman recovered her senses  shY found her mother was dead.' **Oi-.  the morning of September the Abbe  Rement, while    ministering    to five  wounded -German soldiers whom he  carried from the village street to his  lawn, had his house pillaged ' ���������om top  to bottom by soldiers belonging to the  same company as the wounded he was  caring for. They took 400 bottles of  wine, the entire conents of his cellar,  all his bedding, his pictures, and personal belongings.   In the kitchen they  found a bottle of a colorless liquid ia  it.   The Abbe at onco warned them not  to touch it, which made two of them  a!l the more eager   to get it.   Both,  drank out of the bottle, and in an hour  were dead.   The bottle contained javal  water, or a mixture of chloride of llmo  for cleaning purpopes. When the Germans retreated they took with them  30 aged men,from 65 to 78 years ot  age.   They forced them to carry the  village spoils.   None of them has returned or been seen or heard ot since  then.  I  To Make Binder Twine  New Cordage Company at Calgary*  Iri Operation Soon  Of vital interest, not only to Calgary, but to the whole of Western  Canada, is the announcement that the  Canada Cor.r'.age Company, capitalized  at a.million dollars, with sufficient  capacity to supply western farmers  with 1,000,000 pounds oC binder twlno  per year will begin building operations at Calgary within tho month.  Arrangements for its, organisation,  proceeding Quietly in tho city for  somo months, are now completed  and the plant will bo ln operation tor  next year's trado. Tho west, it ir?  estimated, consumes 30,000,000 pouniU  of bindor twine yearly and has always  boon faced with a shortage.   In addl-  help then*.. Told thoso wero Scots  men, thoy remoAiborod -tho many  mon of this raco who had assisted the  French kings against tho l_ngllsh, centuries ago, when Scotland and .-.ng-  lttnd wove at swords' points.    -*  "Vlvont los lilcossais!" they crlod.  Many of tlu pcuuantt} tried to press  gifts of wine' upon the soldiers, and  woro disappointed whon tho Hlgli-  lirulern, mindful ot Earl Kitchoner's  udmonltlon, refused to drink.  tlon ' to  ensuring  a  steady  demand,  . . ���������   , _ ,   ,,        , L   ...~ -.             -        the establishment of tho Calgary plant  thought tholv government had brought \lhov woro bmiiy iu need of food. A will moan cheaper twine, as long  ovov a ioarsomo raco ot Amaxons to white whalo and some povpoisos woro freight haul from nearest conr__etitorB,  i.���������i..   -i...--,     ���������-���������....���������.   ���������*.���������,...  -.._.-._.  -__.._--.    CftUgl|t lfttor>   wll|tiU   tulod thom ovol.  Wt)Uftml( 0nt., aud Chicago, are ollm  t.ho two weeks until tho arrival of tho inntcd.  Hudson's Bay pnelcot. As _fc -vas Mr.  Tt-dd's Hour was confiscated and distributed among the trappers. ^ icro is  talk on Hudson Bay that, tho government will provldi for tho starving In-  dlttiiH. Thoy cannot bo left to their  own resources unless wholesale starvation takes place, as tho country  boars hut tho minimum of "moat animals."  worn the  Rod ��������� listen   to   you  ItllMMt.M .  Chances for Canada  Canadian trudo cominlssloi-ira in  Groat, Britain report a large Incroaso  ln the number of applications for British importers for Canadian commodl-  tl������_i to replace supplies formerly  drawn from tho continent and now  cut oft by tho war. Among tho com-  modltloM largely hi demand ure mentioned wheat, household and hardware  (.wi-il-Ii,-;, br.ishc.., Jlannclc, tools ri������rt  matchwood, otflco doslts.Hlssuo pnpor,  etc.  Bridegroom (to the brldo, who has  got an awful cold)���������Even >our cnui*h-  !,.,������ ������rt..-.(io lnf-lniHoiifj. hcl-tved *. 1 could  for hours.���������- .'ik-giMKle ���������  Kilometres and Miles  Fro'iuoiitly in the French war offlco  reports of fighting, distances aro  stated In kllomotroo. Tho simplest  way to convert kilometres into mllos  In to dlvli.o 1 y two, divide tho result  by four, and a.ld tho two results.  Thus, 500 kilometres divided by two  Udualu 62.5, and 62.G added to 250  glvos iWJi.lt; so that thero aro that  numb^T "f tv.!**-1" I������i Krto UU.inif>-lr������>H To  convert miles Into klloini.tr.-H, multiply by clKhl and divide the result '*\f  five.    Victoria Colonist.  "Why in a panic ln utockn like th������>  finding of Mosor?"  "Men  nml,  u  mil**   iiioui    in    mu  Penaltlos  An oi'dor-in-council Just Issued  shows tho penaltlos for violation of  tho ordor against trado with Britain s  oneiiiies. On Bummary conviction ot  any ono guilty ot trading with an  onemy Is liable to a term of Imprisonment not exceeding 12 months with or  without hard labor, or a flno of $2,000,  or ix/.... Oi. ...u---.S!..T- mi 'r.iV.rhr.rr.t  the penalty Is five years, or a line of  $5,000, or both and the confiscation af  goods or money In respect to tl.o ot-  ronuos optional with tho court. When  a company Is tho oftomlor, every director, manager, secretary or other.*  orflcor who Is a party to the contract  1 ��������� guilty ot tho olteiiBO.  Ten Men With Handa Cut Off  li* n l.'Or tn his hrotlier In Montreal,  from Franco,  Corporal  Stanley  Cooke, of tho Loyal North I-aucashlro  roRtment, snys:  "I have soon some bad nights In my  life, but noth!i.K to thin. Wo brought  ten  ot onr fellows over to England  German Food Supply  Authorities Take Measures to FTx  Prices and Arrange Distribution  The Bundesrath mot at Berlin te  discuss ways at' means of conserving the food supply for the people  during the coming yoar, and decided  that, with certain oxpedlents, the  grain supply would be ample vntll the  1915 crop :������ad boen harvested. The  mills will bo allowed to convert  larger percentages of grain Into flour,  10 por cont. of rye may bo added to  whoat flour, and 20 per cont. of potato flour added to rye.  It was also decided to prohibit the  feeding  ot  whoat  and  rye  to    live  stock, whereas heretofore one-fourth  of tho  ryo  yield  was  consumed  in  this manner.   It was further decided  to restrict tho   amount ot ryo   used  for distilling spirits to CO per cent, ot  the normal consumption. The hoard-  lug ot grain for speculative purposes  is prohibited, and compulsory selling  under expropriating proceedings provided for. A acalo of maximum priceo  for grain was adoptod. Tho maximum  prlco for yo   Is    220 marks ($55) *  ton   for   Berlin,   with a proportional  dlfforonco for othor cltlos.   Tho price  of wheat romaln.i 40   marks   higher ���������  than ryo.  Tho Gorman Rod Cross has re������  coved a contribution of 150,000  marks ($37,500) from tho Germau*  Austrian Relief Commlttoo ot ChW  i'.ugo. A contribution ot -iO0,oo(J maikA  had already boon rocolved from thlf  committee.  Willi  KUtu   _...liiir>  >���������>"���������  *���������>"���������   "i-  >-r  **  -.    ���������,'.,,������    ^,('1*     l.i.l    r,,il    rvfl" "  That tho admiralty la fully alive t-s*  tho nocoBslty of providing a moan*  for tho erowH of warships that strike  mines or aro torpedoed by submarln'os  to oscape drowning, slnco othor wan������  ships aro prohibited going to their ae������  filntaneo is shown by tho announce*.  incur, uuu, iat. i ...n.-n.-y it. ..--u..m_i_.|������  for a gonoral supply ot swimming col*  l.U(. to ho dls'.rlbuted lo thc officer*  und mon of the fleet. Tho nieii are  Instructed that tho collar shall bo carried on thoir person  when thoy are  -I .... .1      If,..,I      Ivi.t.x-. ...1       i.l-i.l      ,<���������������������  e.i.-'i  Individual  whon bo is nsleop.  k  ______ rjT?"*7l7.'.'.r .!r.'*:|;;,;������.tvra;..':iv.������'wr,>j.'i,,,'.  :Hrr^.^--?.",..5'.>'Ti^s''.'"^"'"t''s,  pr  *  ���������������  rrs~ft  i ������  fTHE REVIEW* CKESTOK, B. C  W������ iinaes-latlnsV  ffecommftad Magic taking  P*>w������3er at feeing the beat, purest  and josost healthful &&kin$ powder that it ts possible to produce*  .     CONTAINS NO ALUM  All istgredsesiita are plainly priated  on tho label.  POWD]  IW.GniITTCO.lT0L  TORONTO. ONT.!  WINNlPi-G'KONTHEAL  Gun Bases Found Near Pari*  Ac-ording to several wouuded British soldiers in the American Women's  Hospital at Paignton, the discovery  was made of concrete gun bases nearer Paris thau thj German army got  in General von Kluck's advance.  They explain this in the same way  as the finding ot concrete bases before Namur and Maubeuge and near  Soissons, saying .it is believed that  tlie Germans bought or rented certain stretches of laud years before  the war and then got exact measurements of the ranges, which is the  reason their artillery fire was so effective.  Minard's  Liniment Cures Garget  Cows.  in  Japan Wants Russian Alliance  "General Oba, the Japanese military  attache with the commander-in-chief."  says the Times' Petrograd correspondent, ���������"after an imperial audience at  Tsarkoe-Selo. gave a statement to the  Bourse Gazette frankly expressing his  _���������_-���������.    ���������_..������,    xn    ���������.,-.������..--_-..-       + *_._������    Cnaen.  c^iucet    *______-1    *.o    tuutvir,       ..__*-    ..-v--..-.- ���������  Japanese entente into a ofrmal alliance. Such an alliar-#������, General Oba  said, would be warmly welcomed by  the Japanese government and people.  "General Oba said he believed the  moment had arrived to conclude such  an alliance, and that M. Sanzonoff,  the Russian foreign minister; M. Is-  wolsky, the Russian ambassador to  France, and Baron Motono, Japanese  ambassador to Russia, were doing  their utmost to strengthen the bonds  of friendship between Japan and  Russia."  Many mothers have reason to bless  Mother Graves' Worm Exterminator,  because it lias relieved the little ones  of suffering and made them healthy.  Teacher���������Tell me what lesson can  be learned from the parable of the  prodigal son?  Small pupil (thinking of the husks)  ���������It teaches people to stay where they  are comfortable.  The Indian Troops  A few mouths ago, General Sir Ian  Hamilton, Inspector-General of the  Overseas Forces, in his scrap book ou  the first part of the Russo-Japanese  war, recorded:  "Every thinking soldier who has  served on our recent Indian campaigns is aware that for the requirements of such operations, a good  Sikh, Pathan or Gurkha battalion is  more generally serviceable than a  British battalion."  Ke also wrote: -Why, thore ia material in the north of India, and in  Nepal sufficient and at, under good  leadership, to shake the artificial society of Europe to its foundation."  It is computed that this material  *������**ould furnish at least two million  soldiers to the "reserves" of which  Lord Kitchener made reference recently. *  Much Pain From  truk  rw   Grateful patient���������By the way, doctor, I should be glad. if you would  send in your bill soon.  , Eminent Physician���������Never mind  about that, my dear madam; you must  get quite strong Urst.  A teacher received the following  note one-day:  "Dear Teacher���������Please give Lizzie  some dinner. She has no father, and  I have no way of getting her one, and  oblige. Yov.rs truly."���������Punch.  ���������   Attendant���������Sir, Devil, this i*_- a registration clerk.  Devil���������Good! Have him write out  the history of the world forward and  backward, and if he makes one mistake, to start all over again.- -Illinois  Siren.  A REBELLION  Food   Demanded  Doctored   in  Vain   Until   Dr.  Chase's  Kidney-Liver Pills Were  Used  Kidney derangements are often associated with disorders of the liver  and bowels, and under these conditions ordinary kidney medicines usually fail to effect cure. It is because  of their unique, combined action on  the liver, kidneys and bowels that Dr.  Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills are so generally successful, even in the most  complicated cases.  Mr. Emanuel Bernard, farmer, St.  Paul's, Kent County, N.B., writes*  "About eighteen years ago my wifo  was bad with kidney disease, and suffered greatly from headaches, pains  in bowels and stomach, and her heart  was affected. For a year she was  treated by her doctor, with no apparent benefit. She then used Ave boxes  of Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills with  most satisfactory results. This gave  us such a good opinion of Dr. Chase s  Kidney-Liver pills that we always  keep them in the house to be used for  all derangements of the kidneys, liver  and bowels." Dr. Chase's Kidney-  Liver Pills, 25c a box, 5 for $1.00, all  dealers, or Edmanson, Bates & Co.,  Limited, Toronto.  Despatches That Thrill the Empire   (  The most fa_n6iis despatch of ?nqj>d-  era times was the one from? L.._*d  Roberts, announcing the relief of  Mafeklng, which sent a thrill 'throughout the. whole'empire.-'.-.  It concludes: "The flying column  under the command of Colonel D.  Mahon, which relieved Mafeklng,  marched at the rate of fifteen miles a  day for fourteen consecutive days, and  successively accomplished its object,  despite the determined opposition of  the enemy." Simple aud direct, like  the man who wrote it.  Havelock's despatch concerning the  relief of Lucknow is one of the nation's treasures, "The cheers of the.  troops echoed through the courts of  tho palace," ho writes, "responsive to  tho bugle sound, and on they rushed  to assured victory. The enemy could  nowhere"withstand them. In a few  minutes the whole of the buildings  wero in our possession."  Of :Wellington's despatches, the  most interesting,- and one of the longest, being that which concerns the  Battle of Waterloo. " He first describes the action in some detail and  tho immensity of the result, and concludes: "Such a desperate action  could not be fought and such advantages gained without great loss,  and I am sorry to add that ours have  been immense. The army has never  upon any occasion conducted itself  better. The Division of Guards set  an example which was followed by  all, and there is no officer or description of troops that did not behave  well. I should not do justice to my  own feelincrs, or to Marshal Blucher  and the Prussian army if I did-not  attribute the successful result of this  arduous day to the arrival and timely  assistance I received from them."  The despatches of Wellington 'from  the Peninsula are classics of their  kind, so concentrated and masterly  are they, but possibly the most memorable despatch which evej* reached  England lies under a glass case in  the British Museum.  It is the despatch announcing the  Battle of Trafalgar and the death of  Nelson.  It is one of the great thrilling messages of the world.  The despatch^ is simple and unadorned? It was written by Nelsdn's  second in command, the noble Col-  lingwood.. "The ever-to-be-lamented  death," it runs, "of "Vice-Adniiral Lord  Viscount Nelson, who, in the late  conflict with the enemy, fell in the  Lour of victory."  Then follows an account of the  great fight, concluding with a generous note of praise for the gallant  fight put up by our foe, and finishing with the words, "It pleased the  Almighty Disposer of all events to  grant His Majesty's arms a complete  and glorious victory."  Field Marshal French has. already-  given us despatches that have touched the nation's soul, through their  strongly sympathetic tone.  When he has decisive victory to announce, no doubt he will rise to the  occasion as nobly as any "of the great  men who have had wonderful news to  impart.  /^Vm-A-jrA-xio  SOLID CHOCOLATE  MAFIEBUDS  -���������.-.���������>  * For bites between meals  there is nothing equal, to  Maple Buds���������all the goodness of the Indies seems  to be caught and prisoned  In these pure, velvet-  smooth bits of solid chocolate���������and they're so wholesome and nourishing too.  V/hai about your wife and children ? WiU they  dress weii after you are gone ? Will your children  be educated?   Have a talk to-day with an agent of  THE EXCELSIOR LIFE INSURANCE  CO.,  OFFICES:���������Winnipeg,   Edmonton,   Saskatoon,  Vancouver.      Agents Wanted.  The Difference  It is simply a question of standards.  Defenceless misfortune arouses in  Germans tho desire to trample and Insult, an4d in Britons the desire to succor and befriend. It will take an aeon  at least to educate them in such matters up to our level. Wo could nevor,  thank heaven, b3 degraded to theirs.  ���������London Dally Mail.  Tho human-body will stand a lot of  abuse but somotlmes It will surely rebel and demand proper food in placo  of the pastry, starchy, greasy stuffs  on which It has boen mado sick.  Thon li tho time to try f'rnpo-NuH,  the most scientific and perfect food In  the world.  A woman writes: "Threo years  ago I wns very ill with catarrh of the  stomach nnd was given up to dio by  one doctor. I laid in bod four mouths  and my stomach was so weak thnt I  could not keep down medicine or  hardly any khul of food und wns so  weak and omncloled after four months  of this starvation that my daughter  ������������������ould onsily lift mo from bed an������. put  mo in my chair.  "But weak ns my stomach was, -t  accepted, relished and dlgestod Grapo-  Nuts without any difficulty lho first  tlmo that wonderful food wns tried.  "I nm i.ow strong und in better  heulth than for a great, many yours  and am gradually growing still stronger. I rely on Grape-Nuts for much  of tho nourishment that 1 get. Tlio  n-i-uiu, ...-*%u c-uituii-.y ...luii woud-Tiul  in my enso nn^provo thnt no stomach  Js no weak lt will not digest Grape*  NuIr.  "My biiby go! Tui from foodlti.** on  drupe-Nuts. I was afraid I would have  to stop giving the food to liim, but 1  guess It. is ii healthy fat for hlo  Jieult.li Is Just perfect." Name given by  Cuiiudlun   I'oMi.iini  Co.,   Windsor,  Out?  Look in pligii. for tho famous little  t\n/,i' ��������� 'riir-i !������cr.d to \Vc*!!v!.U*."  "There's a Honson."  Ever read the above letter? A new  one appearc from time to time. They  ���������re genuine, true, and full of Human  Interest.  The Pills That Leads Them All.���������  Pills aro tho most portable and compact of all medicines, and when easy  to tako are tlio most acceptable of  preparations. But thoy must attes.t  their power to be popular. As Parma-  lee's Vegetable Pills are tho most popular of all pills they must fully meet  all requirements. Accurately compounded and composed of ingredients  proven to bo offectivo in regulating  tho digestive organs, thoro is no surer  modlclno to ho had anywhere.  A druggist can obtain an imitation  of MINARD'S LINIMENT from a Toronto house at a very low price, and  have  it labelled  his  own ^product.  This greasy imitation is the poorest one we have yet seen of the  many that every Tom, Dick and Harry has tried to introduce.  Ask for MINAItD'S and you will  get it.  FARMERS  ,��������������������������������������������� ..  .     ���������������������������-   ������������������������������������ ������������������������������������--.:  ������inf^ya 7a������.e^reu0f 98tt,������9 the highest prices for WHEAT. OAT8,  f������S ���������jf������_ind fLAX' by shipping their car lots to FORT WILLIAM  AND PORT ARTHUR and having them sold on commission by  THOMPSON   SONS   AND   COMPANY;  THE WELL-KNOWN   FARMERS' AGENTS.  ADDRESS   701-703  Y.,  GRAIN   EXCHANGE, WINNIPEG.  Tho great fault of American servants is familiarity. To bo familiar  Is to bo Inefficient. A familial* cook  ,1s as inefficient as a pessimistic doctor.  Tho spoakor, a prominent society  woman, is porhaps tho most brilliant  eoiivorsatli-iiallst in Now York, a fact  which renders /more plognant this  anecdote.  "I had a cook," sho continued,  "whom I tried to break of hor ovor  familiarity. What, was tho rosult?  Tills cook, discussing mo In tho Bor-  vants' hall, said:  "I don't say sho's a bad mistress,  but she's a woman of only ono idea.  Why, T can't, never got hor to talk of  u-a Hlnglo thing but eating.'"  Restore Sunken Elevator  The Canadian Pacific Railway million bushel elevator at North Trans-  cona, which sank in the soft earth last  autumn, and toppled partly over, is  now straight again.  In bringing the huge mass of twenty thousand tons to a vertical position,  thero was not as much as a crack  mado in the structure. It now i*ests  on seventy concrete piers, which go  down to bad rock, and it ls in better  shape than it wns' boforo. It will bo  at onco tilled with grain.  A Guaranteed Corn Cure For 25 Cents  Putnam's Painless Com Extractor Is  guaranteed to romovo hard, soft or  bleeding Corns lu twonty-four hours  without pain. Tako only Putnam's, It's  the best.  Thanks, Mr. Sobotka!  Przemysl, Przemysl, how often has  it proven, a stumbling-block to our untutored tongues! Fain would w.e have  rolled it musically, or mouthed it, or  hissed it, or twanged it. But we  couldn't get anywhere near what  seemed to be a correct pronounciation.  It constituted the despair of the wa.*-  fan! A dozen .times ~a day it recurred  in conversation. It became Perae-  blsszle, Perchimel. and even P-R-Z to  a certain nonlndustrious few. Now  the secret is out. The most mis-pronounced of all words will now Iu future loso that reputation. Secretary  Sobotka of the Austrian embassy says  it should bp pronounced "S-h-i-m-e-a-  s-e-1."  A GOOD MEDICINE  FOR THE BABY  Baby's Own Tablets are the very  best medicine a mother cun givo her  llttlo ones. They sweeten the stomach, regulate the boweh., break up  colds, promote healthful sleep���������In  fact they euro all tho minor ills of llttlo ones. Tho mother may feel abBo-  ltitoly Biifo in giving tbem to hor children for thoy are guaranteed by a  government analyst to bo-strictly free  from all injurious drugs. Tho Tablets  are sold by medlclno dealers or by  mall at 25 centn a box from The Dr.  Williams' Medlclno Co., Urockvlllo,  Ont.  Positive Relief  from the suffering caused by disordered conditions of the organs  of digestion and elimination���������  from indigestion and biliousness-  always secured by tho eofe,  certain    and    gentle    action    of  Beecham's  Pills  Sold ���������veryw-ter*.  Ia lioxea, 25 caatfe  .���������'       Ol       ll  Europe's Spoiled Child  Une gravlous lady tho Kaisor was  ui.vuy*. ...iT-i-ly uf'ruid of. 'i'lii.. was  his gratidmotlier, Queen Victoria, of  whom ho stood in groat awe, and who  had a way of treating him llko tho  MMoIlt child of l.uropo ho Is, Ho liked  King Edward only In a vory modorato  degree, and tlio Peacemaker, who had  a vory offectivo wav of showing what  ho thought, of pooplo, novor rofralnod  from lotting tho Gorman Emperor  know that his altitude towards this  country v.-an roe!!*'!-.. Thc Krilacr v.**..*;  always very Jealous of King Edward's  ni-l-iihii'lly nnd 11it. enormous Itilliiene"*  In tho roi.ncll i of Europe. Tho flattering rocoptlon that King Edwanj received whon ho went to Tschl to ne..  ��������� ho need Austrian Emperor mndo Will,  liim  II.  nervous uhoui. a  possible do-  ii,iiii|i.illlirn   ������m   'nm   uil.V.  An Example  "Everything dooms to bo going np  .In prlco. Would you bellevo It, It costs  aliiumi us much nowndnys to dress :i  child us lt does a grown person!"  "I don't doubt It at all. Only yesterday I had to buy a now dog collar for  Fll'l, and tho pricos havo almost  donblod."-���������Detroit Frco Press.  Teiicher (aftor an impressive lesson  on byglono)���������Now, children, tell mo  why you should lcoop your houses  clean.  Inatlontlvo pupil���������Bocauso company  may arrive at any minute.  1!H7���������Aro you Instrumental in col-  logo affairs V  .1014���������Yos, I ml (fed; T play tho plane  In the hand.���������Stanford Chaparral.  Miller's Worm Powders aro complete In themselves. Thoy not only  drlvo worms from tho system, but repair tho damage that worms cause  uud no _m-KO'.Uu lho c<-m..lt'i....n  that, it spondllv recovers from tho disorders of tho digestion that aro tho ro-  suit of the work of thoso parasitic  Intruders. They do thoir work thoroughly and strength and soundness  follow tholy use.  "Vou used to Bend mo candy boforo  wo wero married," she said bitterly.  "Yos," lie ropllod, just ns bitterly;  "nnd before -ve wore married your  fatlinr would occasionally hand mo a  few pood elfuirs."���������Waahlnglon Ntiir.  WHEN RHEUMATISM STRIKES THE HEART  IT KILLS-'NERVILINE" THE CURE  I 11 .... 4 -4 I M      ������ U       lit!  Blk���������Vou may donond upon It that  your fr.cii.i.. ui.h't forget you as long  iim vnu hove monov. ���������'  |     I)l>:-���������That's right: especially If you  i   ii.-v.:    uui imii-u    ii    i-i'm    ii-i-iii.  Effect    of     Nerviline    on  Chronic Cases Is Almost  Magical  Exposuro to wot or cold Is apt to  bring on an attack.  The mubcluM stiffen, lho Joints, s\vell,  and exertion brings on oxcmtldtlng  twinges.  Ofton tho pain shifts from ono part  to another, and this Is dangerous, us.  tlio heart Is apt to be uttackod. Doath  iih  ii   rule   follows  n   hour!   nHiu-1.  Tho pain of rhoMinullsm Is rfiilekly  rubbed away with Norvlllne.  Thlo lo a tnvlft, lautlug, and safe  way to enfe rhoun.riU.rm. Yotj can do-  pond on Nervlllrio. It has tuo povv-ur,  the nenotrntlnc fnrro. Iho eo-ntrel o-t*o������������  The Kaiser's Futuro  The Financial News says it may  bo stated on uridonlablo authority  that attempts have already been  mado to assassinate tho Kal80j_-������andv  his son, the Crown Prince. Ther*  can bo no doubt, says tho writer,  that the defeat of Germany in th������  present war moaiiH for tho Kaiser  one of two thlna*M-olthor death at  his own pr somebody else's hands, or  else flight to a non-Teutonic soil. Ever  since Germany began to mako preparation for an attack th* Kaiser had  boon investing Immonso sums of  monoy on this sldo of tho Atlantic. IX*  is ono of the largest landowners ln  tho Western states���������-not ln his uniuo  of course Ho owns coiuddorablo flections of property In lho west of Canada.  Lots of testimony to prove NorvJr  lino's cortalnty to cure.  Tho following lottor is from Mr. 10.  G. Sautter, Port ot Spain. Trinidad:  "Lartt year I wan aovoroiy tiouliloii  with rheumatism. I had lt In mjr  arms, shoulders and knees. Tho pain  was at times oxcrutlatlng, nnd laid mt  up so that I couldn't work. I wont  to Smith llrothon.' Drug Sloro an*  was advised by tho manager to ub������  ���������Nervlllrio.' That wan ovcollent nd-  vlco. I usod Norvlllno an directed an4  was curod, complotoly cu#od of ovory  trace of my old enemy."  CiiiCi., ju\i i-_... -CYi������'!������!_������-. j'..!. I, n.'iii-  l/.o lt'n difforont from all tho others���������  thnt H contains something that get1*!  ili_lit "al." tho palu tho minute you  rub lt on. Tho largo 50 cont family  size  Is  tho  most economical���������got it  ��������� rtrl..*!*     01*1   r.lat\   II,a    IP.    /.f.nt    4������.lnt    i.lnm  puln that Is so essential to it  rheum*| Hold   by  dealers  everywhere,  or  th*  uUi.  i_iii_ii. | UiiluiiMozoiie   in.,   i-.litKHT.on,   CUUUUO. PI  '     I ���������.  tt  iAJf v  i  -;7>  .,s  [,1  1  5:HE BEVI&W, CKESTQN. _5. a  ___���������_���������*___  .*_-*'������ *-*������������--.  Af *<_ S  DEBY  FRENCH COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF  GENERAL JOFFRE OUT-WITTED GEN. VON KLUCK  By Far-Sighted Man ot Campaign the Germans were led into the  \ Trap o������ the , Marne���������Allies' Retreat at a Critical  Juncture Turned the Tables  Whether or not the war officos of *��������� Joffre at my headquarters:   *    *    ���������   I  , Britain and    France    have    definite  strongly represented my position to  knowledge of the matter themselves, the     French     commander   in   chief.  *'���������:"* * I finally arranged with General Joffre to effect a further short  retirement towards the line between  Complegne and Soissons," the Post  says:  ���������' '?/  "Jiiviaeiitly it was the British com-  the world as large, at any rate, has  never been supplied   with a definite  .reason for the sudedn swerving of the  : German armies   southeastward   from  -the very gates, of Paris.   ThereY had  been no serious.repulses   experienced  by them prior to tbat sudden change  of plan, but just when tlie world was  expecting   the   bombardment   of 7the  French capital to begin,   they turned  partly around and marched right past  their objective.'?"'".  The latest reports .of General Sir  John French,- covering the latter end  of the retreat of the allies toi the  Marne, and the flghtmg from then on,  do not state a reason for the enemy's  change of plans, beln& seemingly purposely vague oh the stage of the campaign. But theso reports/ however, do  provide some hints   which are of as  mander's belief that the time had  come to make a stand and that he  yielded only to strategical reasons  propounded by General.Jbffre. What  were -i������he.".e Teasons? Apparently  these; Tftiat while the Sixth French  Army on "the British left might be  sent forward' against the German  line, and, so possibly bring;? an end  to the retreat^it was more profitable to hold this army back until  the German advance had come'_ so  far south that- this French army,  instead of being sent against the  German    front,    could    be    thrown  sistance In speculating    as    to    the! against   the'enemy's   flank,   General  cause of the ??sudden   swerve   of the  "Germans.     .  Ia the first place, we heard much ih;  those j discouraging days of retreat?  about the desperate attempt of the?  er.omy to turn the extreme left of the  allies, the BriMsk under General  French being on the defensive side of  this attempted turning movement.  Before we knew whether this movement was to be successful, word came  of the unexplained swerve of Von  Klnck. statements by General French  Joffre's reasons must have been con*  vincing because we find that not only  did General French consent to make  a "short retirement^ toward the line  between Compiegne and ? Soissons,"  but that In the course of the following  week he _3ll back fifty miles further  south to below the Marne.  "It thus follows  that Gen. Joffre,  like   Gen.   French,   recognized    that  the German   advance   against   Paris  had failed   by    the    end of August,  \ but that Gen. Joffre foresaw,  what  throw some    light    here,    however?*Gen. French   did not, that von Kluck,  \Vhile the Enslisli were retiring before  shut off from Paris, would swerve to  Kine.Tc    thfiv    rpferrer!   to   bv  the* east, and so expose his flank to  the comamnder as forming the extreme left of the allied line, then,  without the change being explalneJi  we find General French saying in his  report that on August 29 "three br four  more German corps were opposing the  sixth French aTmy on" my left."  That Is,  prior    to August 29  the  British were on the extreme left, but  oh?that date the 'sixth. French army"  had taken the. extreme northwest position.  /This would seem to clear up  the i.Ituation?  With   respect   to. the  turning movement attempted by Von  Kluck, and at the same time provide  a reason, for the swerve to the southeast.    Apparently General Joffre saved .the    left   by sending up a new  French army, and when Von Kluck  fouhd< this hew obstacle in his path  he had either .to abandon.his tiivning  movement? or   continue   it at greac  risk well   to   the northwest.   Rather  than do this,    aad also because the  German 7 armies  advancing  on  Paris  farther south were meeting with difficulties, Von Kluck decided to* go to  - the  *ast f.nd try to effect a junction  with the Crown Prince.  . With the German right checked by  tho presence of this sixth army, the  allies had to decide whether or not  it was time to rest their retreat and  institute a definite counter-offensive.  It was tho determination of General  Joffre, assented to by General French,  to fall back still ������ further which led  the  Germans  Into  tre trap?   of  the  Marne.  Studying the report of General  French on this stage, of the opera-,  tions, the New York Evening Post  evolves a very logical speculation as  to the soutlieas'erly move of the  enemy. Quoting the paragraph of the  report: "This was tho situation whon  I  received  a    visit  from    General  the new French army. 'It was a bold  move to anticipate on the part of the  enemy. Why should von Kluck sheer  to the southeast, and march with his  right flank across the enemy's front?  Here the probable answer is that  von Kluck knew, 'what Gen. "Joffre  knew, that on the left of the German line things were not going well;  that the Crown Prince was being  forced back,  or,  at  least,  held    in  Value of Irrigation  Farmers of Southern Alberta Petition  Government to Undertake Irrigation Schci.--".  Farmers in districts in Southern Alberta who are not served by any irrigation project will appeal to the Dominion government through the department of the interior, to extend irrigation to their lands.   The present  seasod has demonstrated in a most  conclusive manner the advantages of  irrigation,  as  irrigated  farms    have  line cro_is, whereas in districts where  irrigation was not available, the result  has been disappointing.    Farmers in  the  district  ranging  from township  10, range 19 to range 26 in the south,  and township 13,.range 19 to 26 in the  north, west of? the 4th meridian, are  not as yet served by any irrigation  project ,biit they have had opportunity to see the success attained by irrigation farmers in .the Canadian Pacific  Railway irrigation, belts. These farmers are deeply in earnest In their ef-  forts-to secure irrigation, for their district, so much  "O that a; petition is  being circulated asking the Dominion  government to proceed    with the-installation of such a system and the  farmers express their willingness to  have bonds raised oh their lands to  cover the co3t of the system, which  they rwill undertake to repay with In--  terest in 40 yearc.  The petition which is being circulated among the farmers and meeting  with their hearty support recites in  part as follows:  To the Hon. W. J. Roche,  Minister of the Interior,  Ottawa/Ontario: *  Sir,���������We, the ? undersigned ratepayers and land owners in the electoral  districts in the province of Alberta,  ranging from township 10, range 19,  to range 26 in the south/and township  13, range 19 to 26 in the north, west  of the 4th meridian, request that the  Dominionj government proceed to con-  rtruct and place in operation at the  earliest possible time, such an irrigation system r.s has been discovered  from the recer t survey to be possible,  as we believe it is the.only salvation  of the residents of our district, and is  of the most vital interest in the pursuit of agriculture, fostering the mixed farming idQjis, and the future of  our country depends upon the. action  to be taktn at once.  To meet the cost of construction we  will bond our land, and we. are willing  to pa*-- the capital cost of installing  this sV_tem with interest at four per  cent., ���������extending the time of repayment of the cost of construction over  HORRIBLE TALES OF CRUELTY  COMMOTED BY THE GERMANS  FEARFUL STORIES OF PILLAGE AND DESTRUCTION  *-ri***w_tTii_i_  Certified Evidence of the Work of Fiendish German  Soldiers in  Murdering Innocents  and Wantonly. Destroying  Valuable Property  I have just "been furnished with  what ls undoubtedly one of the most  formidable indictments yet drawn up  against the conduct of the German  troops In the field, says the correspondent of the Glasgow Herald. It  has been provided by John M. Chretien, an attorney at law of San Francisco, who & ie*������? days ago, in company  with, a friend, Mr. Donald Ferguson,  check; and that it-was-worth while;  taking the risk of a flank attack from  the French on the chance of breaking  through the. allied centre, or, at the  very least, relieving the pressure  against the German left. Over-confidence may have induced von Kluck to  believe that a heavy rear guard would  be sufficient to keep the Sixth French  Army .back from his flank until his  main force, joined with von Bulow's,  had broken through the French centre.  Von KJik-c took the chance and  lost. Gen. Joffre took the chance and  won. It must have required courage  of a very high kind on the part of the  French commander in chief to fall  back again and again, while keeping  unemployed an army which* might  have been brought in to check the  enemy. But what Gen. Joffre aimed at  was not the mere halting of the German advance? but the assumption of  a vigorous counter-offensive. To have  sent his new Sixth Army forward  to meet the enemy would have been  only a continuation of the defensive. To kesp it back north of Paris  ready to throw itself on a hostile  army engaged in the perilous experiment- of changing front promised  greater results; and events justified  tho French commander's courage and  foresight.���������Ottnwr\ Free Press.  a pei-M of forty years, the first payment of such sum of indebtedness to  bec<_v_e due four years after the completion, of the canal, thus affordii_g  farBi -rB an opportunity to be in proper  condition for irrigating growing crops  in a profitable manner.  We further signify bur willingness  ta* accept the approximate figures of  ���������"4.00 per acre .ajs the likely cost of  th������ construction of the canal and ��������� lateralis, and we are prepared to pay this  tr -m .r:r acre.  Indians Starving in North  Treachery of the Enemy  Germans    Violate    Sanctity    of  the  White Flag  A French office? who is in hospital  In Paris, gives a graphic account of  the fight ln which he fell.  "At nine o'clock in the evening," he  says, "I rocolved the order to advance, to entronch myself as woll as  I could, ar.d resist to the end. My  company took up Its position, iii a  pouring rain, and about halfrp'ast two  in tho morning throe shots flrod by  our sentries warned us of the approach of tho onemp.  "The Germans, who had been taking cover ln a wood, crept to within  _500 yards of us, whon they ofrmod up  and charged. I commenced volley Urine*, and wholo ranks of tho Germuns  foil, but thoy continued to advance.  Our woll-dlroctod ilro nrrcntod thoi.*  advance whon thoy were thirty yunh. I  from.our trenches.  "During tho night a bugle sounded  'Ceaso ilro!' bnt lt was a Gorman  bugle. I was not doeolvod, and l  slanted with all my power so as to bo  hoard by tho enemy, 'Firo Independently.'   Tho Gormans fled.  "A fow minuto*. later a Gorman of-  tloor imp*",* rod carrying u. white .lag.  I advanced from the trench, accompanied by four mon. 'Wo aro sixty,'  said tho envoy, 'and wo wish to surrender.' I roplied 'Advance ln order.*  "Four men wounded ln tho loirs  staggered forward, and my men, be-  Hovlng tho tight finished, showo.t  themselves abovo tho trenches. A  Maxim hidden In tho wood Immediately opened firo on us with a hall of  hulloln, while a fresh attack was commenced.  "I riivo tho ordar to rocommonco  volleying, and for tho tlmo the Prussians deuainped. They loft many dead  and wounded, and the following day  we found that   six mon, urmud with  -fi.-.        ...V. ���������        l.n A     fnll*,  ranlis of the enomy.    woro thn  fjTot.fi nnvhiMr arms."  Kilties Rouse *Wonder of French  The Scotch have given a fearful  account of thomeelvos and havo suffered severely, several reglm *.ts hav-  Ing been nearly wiped out. In one  engagement tho scotB Groys charged  ���������with a man of tho celebrated Black  Watch clinging to each stirrup  leather, Reaching tho Gorman lines,  the horseman and footman almost annihilated tho force of the onemy at  this point. The sadiio feat of putting  two men tn each horso was performed by tho Scots Greys and the Blae.:  Watch at tho battle of Waterloo.  Tho  Scots    are    a  nevcr-ondlue.  source of wonder to tho French peasants:   Thoy woar kilts of khaki and  Reports    From    James  and   Hudson  Bay Show Trappsrs Sorely Need  Help and Food  W. E. C. Tood f the Carnegie museum, Pittsburg, arrived in Ottawa recently after spending over six months  on the western .ihores of James and  Hudson bays. He was conducting an  expedition for natural history specimens for the Carnegie museum.  Mr. Todd stated that the Indian  trappers in the region which he visited are suffering to a great extent  through the Avar. First news of tho  fight reached him on Aug. 29, and at  that timo the Hudson Bay Co. had  stepped the advances to the Indians. It  is customary for the company to stake  the Indians in the fall in tho form of  a "debt" of provisions, which is fixed  according to tho hunting abilities of  tho debtor. When the season opens  the following year tho Indians and  Eskimos redeem tho. debt with furs.  As t' esc advances havo beeu cut off  the natives are iu a serious predicament.  Mr. Todd said Mr. Wilson, the Hudson's Bay Company's manager for  jamos Bay Bhowod hlm a store houso  of furs, which at ordinary timos  would bo worth $100,000, but which at  current market, prices are valued at  $17,000. At White Rlvor tho Indians  wero already In a distressing condition and whon Mr. Todd arrived in a  sailing boat tho natives camo out In  canoos to meet him and by divers  nr. ans, mainly by pohiitlug to thoir  mouths,   mado  him  understand  that  made a trip into the heart of the  Vosges to see for themselves to what  extent the stories of German barbarities were true. Ii must be stated at the  outset, and emphasized, that Mr.  Chretien has not accepted any second  hand evidence. Times, places and  names, it will be noted, are given,  with scrupulous care, and Mr. Chretien took the extra precaution of obtaining wherever possible the cards of  the people with whom he spoke.  The Germans entered St. Die by the  Rue de la Bolle, and though it:: an unfortified   town, they . destroyed  every  factory, store, and 7 residence In that  street for . alf a mile.   They destroyed  them by pouring petroleum over the  floors and Betting them on fire. Not a  single place was destroyed by artillery  fire but all determinedly, deliberately,  with no other reason than that of committing pillage and   destruction.   Oa  August 29, at 76 Rue-de la Bolle? two  old women and three small children  were seen, by the Germans to-take refuge in a cellar.    At once the cellar  door was saturated with oil and set on  fire by Otto-Bauem, of Company 5 of  the 120th Regiment of infantry, who  remained behind to carry out this particular piece of villainous work. After  he had set fire to the house, and when  he was leaving" by the front door, he  was killed, and L _ companions returned and buried him in a plot of grouni  in front of the house.    Isabel   Dem-  houly, aged 65, and Marie ?Bompard,  aged 59, together with three children,  escaped by forcing a grating in the  rear of thc cellar^        *  Next da;, through the kindness of  M.  Mare Francois, president  of  the  Red Cross, and accompanied by Lieutenant- Georges Raton, Mr. Chretien  and  Mr.  Ferguson    visited    Sauley.  There  they inspected    the    Chateau  Sauley, "only completed four months  ago, and converted iuto an hospital  when war broke out.   Five Red Cross  banners  flew  from  the   Chateau  on  September 7, saya Mr. Chretien, when  the Germans opened fire on it. One oJ  he banners was shot away and the  other four are now to be seen hanging in shreds.   A shell bursting in the  large dining room where 75 woundea  Freuch soldiers were lying .-illed them  all, besides the cure, whose bo#,y was  completely severed in two. At the moment the cure (Jean Pierre) had been  ministering to the wounded men.    Of  the 300 wounded in, the chateau It was  only possible to remove 35 to safety.  The floors of the dining room and library were when I saw them black with  coagulated blood, and in the garden  were to be seen more than a hundred  mattresses saturated with blocd. The  wohle interior is a mass of n.ins, but  still the Re*d Cros_i flags in shreds fly  from the roof. The village itself, whloh  was abandoned by its inhabitants, was  burned to the ground, not by bursting  shells, but by the buildings being wilfully set on fire after they had been  saturated with petroleum. The - empty  petroleum caps -^ere visible all over  the place. The villagers had rot fired  one shot at the Germans. -  Mandray was the next village, visit-  el. Here the Abbe Rement tok. tho  following story: On the night of Sep-  tamKan O   4*W*_������ flA-fmn-nn   ."_-_-"_-������----_*\������������������������>���������_.-J   j-n*-*   i>l-M  VWA*-".P_r*_/*. u -������-*-_.X/ . MVt IMtVIIO   f*}*}JK}OtAXs\M.   **-������--*   t,*---^  outskirts of the village, and considerable fighting took place in the main  street.    The; French were compelled  to retreat.   As   soon   as thj village  was free of the French the modern  Huns began   their   atrocities.   They  forced the Abbe to unlock the doors  of the parish church. They took his  vestments, the altar candlesticks and  other altar decorations, and the chalices, and then deliberately poured petroleum on the altar and on the surrounding carpet.   The match was applied, and in two hours an 800 years  old church was a mass of ruins, only  the   four   wails   remaining standing  .Two days later the Germans buried  six of their dead in the chancel. While  one party was thus giving an example  of its "culture" others were not idle.  At nine o'clock a party broke into the  cottage of Madame Marguerite, a grey-  haired widow of 56 years of age. Four  held her down, and she was tr.eated  in the most hideous way by the sergeant. She fled to the Abbe's house,  and told her story, which   he afterwards repeated to Mr. Chretien and  Mr. Ferguson in the Abbe's presence*  in the very room where the cowardly  act had been committed. About a hundred yards from the Abbe's house ls  the cottage of Leonie Apy, aged 21,  and her mother, who had been bed-  zy&en for three years. The daughter,  who was reading to her mother, hearing the, firing, noticing the Germans  approach, and seeing as well the light  of    the burning church, put out the  lamp-and barred the door. Almost immediately after tlfe door was forced  and a party of   . ermans   rushed in.  They threw the young woman on tha  floor and violated her in the presence  of ter helpless mother.    When the  young woman recovered her senses  sh"* found her mother was?dead. sOa  the morning of September the Abbe  Rement,  while    ministering    to five  wounded German  soldiers whom he  carried from the village street to his  lawn, had his house pillaged '���������om top  to bottom by soldiers belonging to the  same compf.ny as the wounded he was  caring for. They took 400 bottles of  wine, the entire conents of his cellar,  all his bedding, his pictures, and personal belongings.   In the kitchen they  found a bottle of a colorless liquid in.  it.   The Abbo at once warned them not  to touch it, which made two of them  a: I the more eager   to get it.   Both  drank out of the bottle, and ln an hour  were dead.   The bottle contained javal  water, or a mixture of chloride ot llmo  for cleaning purpo?es. When the Germans retreated tliey took with them  30 aged men,from 65 to 78 years ot  age.   They forced them to carry the  village spoils.   None of them has re������  turned or been seen or heard of since  then.  i  To Make Binder Twine  bare knoes.    Tho    Fronch    at    first  thought their government had brought  thoy* woro badly In noeii of food.    A  ovor a foarsomo raco ot Amazons to Whito whalo and somo porpoises woro  help thoiu. Told thoso woro Scots  men, thoy romoAiborod *tho many  mon oil this race who had assisted tlie  French kings against tho English, centuries ago, whon Scotland and England woro at swords* points.    ���������-  "Vlvent los .flcoHsalsl" they cried.  Many of th. peasants tried to press  gifts of wlno'upon tho soldiers, and  woro disappointed whon tho Hlgh-  lividers, mindful ot Marl Kltchonor's  admonition, vofuscd to drluk.  Chances for Canada  Canadian trado commlssloi-irs In  Great Britain report a large Increase  In the number of applications for British importers for Canadian commodities to roplaoo supplies formerly  drawn from tho continent and now  cut off by tho war. Among tho commodities largely lu demand aro mentioned wheat, houflehold and hardware  ^ui.drlcr,, brushc!*, .Innnoi.--*, tool" nn������l  matchwood, offlco doslcsYtlssuo paper,  etc.  caught lalov, which tided thom ovor  tho two woeks until tho arrival of tho  Hudson's Bay packet. As .t -vas Mr.  Todd's Hour was confiscated ond distributed among tho trappers, -"loro is  talk on Hudson Bay that the govorn-  mont will provldi for tho starving Indians. They cannot bo left to their  own resources "uiiIohs wholesale starvation takes placo, as the country  bears but tho minimum of ''moat'animals."  New  Cordage Company    at    Calgary'  Iri Operation Soon  Ot vital interest, not only to Calgary, but to    tho whole ot Western  Canada, Is the announcement that the  Canada Corv.age Company, capitalized  at a.million dollars, with    sufficient  capacity  to  supply  western  farmers  with 1,000,000 pounds of binder twine  per year will begin   building   operations  at Calgary  within  tho month.  Arrangements   for  Its    organisation,  proceeding  quietly    in  tho  city  for  some    months,    aro  now   completed  and the plant will be in operation for  noxt year's  trade.    Tho  west,  it is  estimated, consumes 30,000,000 pound.,  of hinder twine yearly and has always  been faced with a shortage.   In addition to  ensuring  a  steady  demand,  the establishment of tho Calgary plant  will moan   cheaper  twine,    as  long  freight haul from nearest competitors,  Wollantl, Ont., and Chicoco, are nlim-  Inated.  Bridegroom (to tho brldo, who has  ltot-an awful cold)-���������Even your cough-  -nll-.n    In    Hhn    frnnt I hi.* aoundf. lllolOillollR. bolOVOll:  f COUld  lted I listen   to   you   ior hours. h'liegeuue  MIIUMM1I.  Kilometres and Miles  Frequently ln the Fronch war offlco  reports of fighting, distances ara  stated ln kllomotroe. Tlio simplest  way to convert Itllomotroft into miles  Is to ilivloe ' y two, divide tho result  by four, and add tho two results.  Thus, 500 kilomotroo divided hy two  oquuli. G-..5, and 62.5 added to 250  gives 5112.5; ao that thoro aro that  number of mllon in noo Uilomolros. To  convert miles Into kilometres, multiply by olKbt and divide the reuult -ry*  five.���������Victoria Colonial.  Penaltlos  An ordor-in-councll just Issued  shows tho penalties for violation of  tho order against trado with Britain s  enemies. On summary conviction of  any ono guilty oC trading with an  enemy Is liable to a term of imprisonment not exceeding 12 months with or  without hard lubor, or a fiiio of $2,000,  ov both. On conviction on lni..ct.m*.nt  tlio penalty Ib five years, or a lino of  $5,000, or both and tho con 11 scut Ion nf  goods or monoy In rospoct to the offenses optional with tho court. When  a company Is tho offondoi*, every ill-  rector, manager, secretary or other  officer who ts a party to tho contract  1 ��������� guilty o������ the of-eimo.  German Food Supply  Authorities Take Measures to Fix  Prices and Arrange Distribution  The Bundesrath met at Berlin to  discuss ways ar ** means of conserving the food supply for the people  during tho coming yoar, and decided  that, with certain expedients, the  grain supply would bo ample vntll tho  1915 crop :_ad boen harvested. The  mills will bo allowed to convert  larger percentages of grain Into Hour,  10 por cont. of rye may bo added to  whoat flour, and 20 per cont. of potato flour added to ryo.  It was also decided to prohibit the  feeding  ot  wheat  and  ryo  to    live  stock, whereas heretofore one-fourth  of tho  ryo ylold was consumed in  this manner.   It was further decided  to restrict tho   amount of ryo   usod  for distilling spirits to 60 por cont. ot  tho normal consumption. The hoarding of grain for speculative purposed  ls prohibited, and compulsory soiling  undor expropriating proceedings provided fox*. A ocalo of maximum prlcoo  for grain wub adopted. Tho maximum  prlco for yo   -is    220 marks ($55) *  ton   for   Berlin,   with a proportional  dlfforonco for othor cities.   Tho price  of whoat remain.. -10   marks   higher*  than ryo.  Tho German Rod Cross has re������  coved a contribution of 150,009  markr. (137,500> from tho German-  Austrian Relief Commlttoo ot Cht������  -*ui_o, A contribution o. _lU0,uui. muika  had alroady been rocolved from .hlf  committee.  "Why Is a panic in utoolc-. l'.u*. tho  flndliiK of Moses?"  "Men  una  u.  hum*   proiii     in     uiu  That tho admiralty l������ fully allvo U_  lho nocosslty of providing a moan*  for tho crows of warships that strike  mines or aro torpedoed by submarines  lo oscapo drowning, slnco othor war.  shlpfl aro prohibited going to thoir at*  nlntanco is shown by tho announce*.  lUOIlt   llllll   i.llH  i -l.i-Uiiliy   tu ���������������_-U.-ttiiiH  for a gonoral supply ot swimming col*  Iui*. to bo dls'.rlbutcd to the officer������  and mon of tho fleet.    Tho men ure  Ten Men With Hands Cut Off  in n lottor lo his brother hi Montreal, from Franco, Corporal Stanley  CooUc. of tho Loyal North Lancashire  regiment, sayH:  "1 havo soon some bad slght������ In my. ��������� . .       , .       ....  life, but. nolli.nK to this. We brought  instructed that tho collar shall bo car-  ton of onr fellows over to Kngland | rled on thoir pm-Hon w\wn thoy are  ,sT  una  U.    UUH-J    ill -Ull  Willi   llUlll    -lu llUr*.   r.n-   Uix   ���������*.   l.-k-  v... -.*���������,.>-  .-.re   imi ������>nl off "  . ���������> il        |. /.,,!        I������\ (1 ���������**������-' ll  ni A   *i mt  o*ii-.i   Individual whon  ho Is asleep.  I., '  .,_,. ... ,J���������.,_,..ai,,j,���������.m,,������l-, *M.fem������x/*^imMHi*fimm0mam<mim������i  ssaaa  __������_*___5_S_________!_K_______I___!  rn**,*****  ***m*m  ******wtm*mmmtmmm*timl������mmmA THE CRESTOft REVIEW  THE CRESTON REVIEW  Issued every Friday at Oreston, B.C.  Subscription : $2 a year in advance;  $2.50 to United States points.    '  C. F. Hayes, Owner and Editor.  CRESTON, B.C., FRIDAY, DEC. 11  Awakening  In at least one locality the glorious gospel of buy-at-home, as  preached by the daily and weekly  papers of the province, has borne  fruit; the Nelson and District  Women's Institute are arranging  for speakers at their Saturday  meeting who will set forth some of  the reasons why thei public shonld  buy at home.  The awakening of tlie ladies of  Nelson and distriot is decidedly encouraging as the women folk are  undoubtedly the worst transgress-  gressors of the law of shop in your  home town, never* stopping to consider that money spent at home  brings greater returns to any given  citizen than money sent away���������that  what helps your neighbor helps you  .and your town.  Every resident.���������citizen, businessman or rancher���������owes it as a duty  to himself to buy at home, the  whole fabric of community prosperity depends on assisting those who  assist you.  Tbe Herald has always been and  is today one ** of Cranbrobk's -most  valuable assets, and it is of the  most vital public importance that  the paper be kept going. No centre occupying the piace Cranbrook  does in Kootenay in particular and  British Columbia in general can  afford to be without a live weekly  newspaper.  Here's hoping that every subscriber will come through with his  two-spot in real money, or an approved joint lien note that Banker  Supples will accept in lieu of cash  on balance days���������and that -sthe  Herald coal bin will be overflowing  till summer's balmy breezes blow.  Overlooked  Give Them a Lift  On Saturday evening, December  19th, in Mercantile Hall, the Creston brass band is giving a venison  dinner, to be followed by a 12-o'clock  dance.  The dinner will cost you 50 cents  and the band boys insist on you  bringing -along your best appetite,  as they have a large and fresh supply of venison which will be served  any way you want it, and the  supply of other good things to eat  will be the best the Valley produces.  Our readers may not be aware  of the fact, but fact it is, that Creston has about the only band in the  whole Kootenay country west of  Fernie at the present time. The  music it dispenses will compare  favorably with the product of any  other band of the same strength,  and given reasonable support and  encouragement it is here to stay, as  outside one member every man in  it is a permanent resident in the  Valley.  The band is a credit to Creston,  and outside one - collection, which  netted some $7, this is about the  first call the boys have made for  support, in any shape, manner or  form.  They need the money to pay for  new music and incidental expenses  and they ask all to take in the dinner, and dance if possible, in order  first to have a good time, and  second to help a worthy institution.  In a nicely-bordered paragraph  prominently placed on the front  page of Saturday's Nelson News  was conveyed the tidings that Hon.  W. J. Bowser and Hon. W. R. Ross  "will leave in a few days for a brief  trip to Kootenay to inform themselves of the needs of the district,  and also to visit the Doukhobor  settlements."  In Monday's News appears tlie  itinerary of these gentlemen, whioh  includes stops at Grand Forks,  Trail, Rossiand, Brilliant, Nelson,  Fernie and Oanbrqok; the return  journey being made by Spokane.  To say that Creston is disappointed in not having a visit from the  ministers while they are down this  way "to inform themselves of the  needs of the district," is stating the  case mildly.  This particular district has several little matters that should be  brought, to the attention of both  ministers; matters that Mr. Ross  and Mr. Bowser cannot very well  be correctly informed of at Nelson  or Cranbrook, or any other point.  Just why the ministers should  find it necessary to stop at both  Rossiand and Trail, which are less  than twenty miles apart, and not  feel it incumbent upon them to  make a visit between Nelson and  Cranbrook, a spread of over 120  miles of country (in which Creston  is centrally and in other respects  advantageously situated) is a trifling mysterious, to say the least.  Conservatives, Liberals and Socialists alike have not forgotten the  pass-up Creston got when the Redistribution Commission appointed  by the provincial government was  holding sessions in Kootenay, and  so soon afterward to be again overlooked doesn't���������well it doesn't tend  to strengthen the Conservative  cause in those parts.  Granbrook's Newspapers  The newspaper situation in Cranbrook insofar, at least, as the Hor-  ald is concerned seems to have at  last got down to a permanent foundation.  For some time past residents iu  tho divisional city woro not quite  mire whether the place boasted of  one newspaper or two, or two in  one���������as was tho caso fpr ono wook  ���������though to tho credit of tho Herald  be. it aaid it. never mmsud an isauo  in all the times of stress.  Now comes the announcement  that Mckhi'h. Thompson and Sullivan Imvo 1-oas.vrl the plant. Mr.  Thompson was formerly in charge  of tho btiHiiu'HH oru\ of tho Herald  and will continue  in that, capacity,  ..i ,;i,,    M..   <-i,,n;....,. ���������.,;n    ir,.i.  ���������������<������,,,.  tlu- iicwH and editorial part of thc  workfi. Ah*. Thompson Imn tho  1'iiniin-nH iibily nud if he ol' iho Irish  i ''ift-oini-H nm di'liver llie .������.vi/l<-  ��������� i, ...... I', > 1! i* .tli.,    lit.,   ('uiiu-..   ���������������!' fl...  IbniM ik n-iiMJinil-Jy hhI'i-.  WE   HAVE   JAP   ORANGES  Xmas. Menu  No "if's"  or strings to  thing you buy here.  any-  Just one price on each and  every article, and that the  lowest���������quality considered.  For Christmas wo offer:  Seeded Raisins  Re-cleaned Currants  Sultana Raisins  Shelled Almonds  Shelled Walnuts  Oranges, Lemons  Nuts, Candies  Almond Paste  Icing Sugar  Fancy Biscuits  Pickles, Ketchup  Jachaon's Teas���������the hest  in Crtstsioit.avc., 40c. ib.  C U    Ififil/ftfin  i i iiiummiMir  -8I-N1-RA1.HTOT.F   CHIKH  if  I  :; Apple Grading  i  As related in our news columns  last week, Creston had an official  visit from Dominion Fruit Inspector Clark of Vancouver on "Wednesday last and outside of some legal  expense imposed on The Fruit  Growers' Union his stay here should  prove beneficial. .  In a brief interview after the  magistrate's court, Mr. Clark told  The Review that up to the present a certain amount of leniency  has been shown by his department  in order that the ranchers might  learn and become more acquainted  with the law as regards packing - -  and grading, but that time is-past, j I  and in the future every step that  will emphasise upon the fruitgrowers the necessity of care will be,  taken. "The time has arrived for  fruit men to see that the standard  is raised so that nothing will come  back on them," he said.  Ranchers will have to learn to  take pride in their districts and in  the products of their districts, he  explains. They should take no  chances in packing and not come  too close to the line set down by the  government as a standard.  In the prosecution here Mr. Clark  held it was purely a matter of carelessness on the part of packers not  on the part of growers and in this  connection pointed out that the  packer was liable to a penalty of  not less than f>5, nor more than $50  and costs for packing any fruit for  sale contrary to the provisions of  the Act���������this proviso beinga special  protection for the apple operator  against carelessness or fraudulent  work upon the part of the packers.  Unlike some.other statutes made  and provided the Inspection and  Sale? Act is unmistakably clear in  defining the different grades.  Fancy quality shall consist of  well-grown specimens of one variety:  sound, of uniform and of at least  normal size and of good color for  the variety, of normal shape, free  from worm holes, bruises, scab and  other defects.  No. 1 quality shall include no  culls and consist of well-grown specimens of one variety, sound, of not  less than medium size and of good  color for the variety of normal  shape and 90 per cent free from  scab, eta  No. 2 quality shall include no  culls and consist of specimens of not  less than nearly medium size for the  variety, 80 per cent, free from worm  holes and such other defects as  cause material waste.  Although in Grades 1 and 2 a  margin of 10 and 20 per cent, respectively is allowed for inferior  specimens the paoker should not  take advantage of this allowance  for seconds. The margin is permitted to make the work of grading easier and more raj-id than if  absolute perfection was exaoted.  10 per cent, is presumed to bo the  margin within which an honest  packer can do rapid work using  every endeavor to make each specimen conform to tho general standard for the grade.  During tho past soason thero has  boon a considerable amount of scab  in this distriot but this is no excuse  for lowering tho standard ofthe  various grades of apples; thoro is  only ono standard and whon soabis  prevalent it only means that thero  will bo so many loss apples of  Grade No. 1.  A note explanation in tho . Act  statoa: "It will bo noted that tho  definition of Fancy, No. 1 and No.  2 do not vary from yoar to year nor  do they vary in various provinooa  of the Dominion.    If tho quality of  amem  corac  THE   HOME  OF   THE  TRANSIENT  COMMODIOUS  SAMPLE  ROOMS  \THE BEST AND MOST,  POPULAR HOr_:L /AT  rw_- ���������������0Ot*tnay&  Run on strictly up-to-date  lines. Unexcelled service in  all departments* Kitchen  staff (including cook) all  white ladies. Every comfort  and attention given to guests  The bar is s upplied with  - only the best brand of goods.  ���������  Porters Meet Trains  *9e Hm BOWLS  mB-HSI  of some sort was absolutely necessary in the best interests of tne  Valley.  Too much care ca,Undt be taken  in the grading, packing and marking of fruit going out from Creston.  Such cax*e is absolutely necessary in  order that a reputation may be  built up for theJ-Creston fruit that  consumers at distant points will  learn of it through xis reputation  for a high standard of quality and  the uniformity only obtained  by careful packing and grading.  .Sternal vigilance is the price of  a good fruit market and growers  and packers for their own profit as  well as for the good name of the  Valley, should excercise every care  to see that every -box.- or orate of  fruit they market grades just a little  better than the Act requires.?-  deavored to outline my.ideas.? -Doubtless there are? featiir^ ?1 have bvei^  looked that can be added to the club's  programme, which should be broad  enough for the most liberal-minded  right-thinking citizen, and yet not too  extreme to' give offence:to those of a  puritanical cast who are willing to  meet the world half way in such an  institution. With many .thanks, for  space in your paper, I am, Tours very  respectfully, ~ Layman  CRESTON and SKYURK MINERAL GUMS  _GXi+.*_���������_ a+-_* -Swii -_Kfi-__> *Mo|af������v������  N/4VUVW   .**->    mt**.*r .*m-m\**m*m*'sx*  ^_f%vfc������mm> T*fci-WT*5__*{_-������-*-_**fc  Wanted: AOub  . of West Kootenay. ? Where located,  near WyrihdeJ, on the -Crow's Nest  Pass Railways  TAKE NOTICE that I, Guy Lowenburg, acting as the duly authorized  agent of G. A. Becker, Free Miner's  Certificate No, 85711B, and the Estate  of Mary Walsh (deceased), Free Miners  Certificate No.85703B,intend sixty days  after the 7 datie hereof fe "apply to - tne  Mining Recorder for a Certificate? of  improvements, for'the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above  claims.-"'.,.'"'.:. vv-;v  And further take- notice' that action  under Section 85 must be commenced  before the issuance of such Certificate  of Improvements. ���������-  ,   Dated this lstday of November, 1914.  i/iio uiiiii Moiieniijy jm   jtuor _Iio only  result is that a smaller proportion  of tho fruit in of the higher grado."  10 While the legal proceeding.- wero  4 ..   .,f\-,0\l\      ,,..li.,,t       . ... Vr.%.t .... *> 4 f.      ,,%/,,-.  '���������-'-' ' *        '' * *      I   m   ' ' '*._  .. .,-...,.  ..4 1,  -,  .  .1   ..  V . ...       V..I       _..V,  drastic action  ... \...  4l  ,,. . v.  i:,4  I inspector'h blacklist,  Editor Review :  Sir,���������In your last issue I noticed a  local paragraph to the effect that the  club ih connection with the Methodist  church had re-opened for the winter  season,-but for the present would be  open but one night each week.  Excellent as is, no doubt, the Methodist club for the young people, it  hardly fills the bill for a town like  Creston in that it is not open often  enough. Nor, if my information is  correct, is its equipment sufficiently  extensive to attract the all sorts and  conditions of young fellows who are  making their homes here. Por these  reasons, and not overlooking the denominational feature of the affair, I  cannot help thinking tho Mothodlst  club will hardly be -the success and do  the amount of good work its officers  would wish���������though it is a wholo lot  better than no club at all.  Tho club Creston needs, arid one it  would support if good men will only  undertake its organization and conduct, should have its headquarters in  ono of tho somowhat-centrally located  vacant stores in town. It shonld have  u reading room* Btockod with a reasonable supply of litoraturo to Interest  tho younger mombors as woll as tho  more mature There should bo a  smoking room; a gymnasium as well  equipped as finances would permit, including ono or two boxing outfits, and  the room sufficiently largo, If possible,  to permit of bankotball, for Instance,  and other indoor games of the like,  boing playod.  Thoro should bo anothor room for  tho less strenuous forms of amusement  suoh as cbcHH, cliockei-n, oriblwige,  whist, eto. , This department, o.  courso, must be supervised, and rigidly  so, so that nothing boi-ilei-ing ou gambling would be tolerated, aud tho general conduct of thoso fraternizing horo  so shaped that the youth of tendor  yoara could froquont tho room with no  moro evil after-offeotH than would attend his participating in the samo  games in the home.  An institution some what of tho sort  I havo outlined would servo tho dual  purpose oi Keeping Uio younger generation off thc stroot at night, and  bring together tho older citizens, thuo  helping strengthen a community  friendship that will mean much In tho  luiuiti. Uuveiu|-iue������i-  ol   cue   (own *_uu  Iii a very general way I have en-  BOAR FOR SERVICE  LargeEnglish BerkshireBoar Creston  Boy (31161) for service at Mountain  View Ranch. Fee $3.������������������Stocks &  Jackson, Creston, B.O.  RANCH WANTED  Wanted, a Fruit and Cattle Ranch  at or near Creston. Describe what  you have. Address L. G. MAYHEW,  Kblowbna, B.O,  Purebred Poultry for Sale  -High d_Asa_  White Wyandotte <&  Barred Rock. Hens  Cocks, Cockerels  t&  Pallets  Bred from Prlze-WInners and a  grand laying strain. $1.60 to $5.00  each, according to quality. Fancy  Pigeons $1.60 per pair.  A. HAYES, G-nnlngton, Ont.  ���������,7.wrra;rammrT-mi-n_-iiiriii"_wi-1  A. Mirabelli  Dl.A-.-__l IN  High classBoots and Shoes  Saddle and Harness  Repairing aSpeeiatly  GET YOUR  Plumbing, Tinning and  Conoral  UtH-tHUI  Runalr  MM MUM  WrtrV  HUl'*  Done  by  W/      I-?     -U-tnmVk **e% ������_  VV      ���������        JL-J������������    .JLm*m*m\M.K/k\*'+*  Too Hunurno-ion oi work   wen none  ingots long after tho price la forcottcn 1AJL_      *0 *-*.!_,������_������ A-V-**!"*!.     l\EVli-VV  I  [\  t  I  XSf  The Leading  Hotel of the  Frnit    Belt  Out   Guests  Call   c/lgain  YOU will make no* mistake  when you get off the train  if you sign the register at  the Creston Hotel. Travelling  men will substantiate this. We  study the comfort of pur guests.  The rooms are well furnished in  a manner up-to-date.  Headquarters .or Mining Men,  Lumbermen, Ranchers, Tourists  and Commercials.  /. B. Moran  Prop.  \ ������,  .t  THE CANADIAN BANK  OF COMMERCE  SIR EDMUND WALKER, CV.O*I.l-.D���������D.CX^ President  ��������� AWEXAKDER LAIRD, General Manager JOHN AIRD. Ass't General Ttlanager  CAPITAL, $15,000,000     RESERVE FUND, $13,500,000  BANKING  BY  MAIL  Accounts may be opened at every branch of The Canadian Bank  ? Of Commerce to be operated by mail, and will receive the same  careful attention as is given to ?'? other departments of the Bank's  business.. Money may be depo, ted or withdrawn in this way as  satisfactorily as by a personal \-sit to the Bank. S24  -   C. G. BENNETT Manager Creston Branch  'i**.'' *   i vLtT-.av.--l ;*ff.v -,-. --.-r "ri. t t~t i.   *-  :������l*e| Xqur Fruit Trees, Bushes, and  ��������� ' JOri^m^ of Every Des-  ::-ti^' criptibn from the  Largest and Best Nursery in the West  ��������� 1000 Acres Under Cultivation  Buy ?From        - THE  BRITISH OOLUMBIA NURSERIES GO.  Limited  Our Specialty:  "One year trees on 3-year whole roots"  Grown and Packed by Men of Lifelong Experience  NO JRBIGATIOH .'.: NO WMTEB INJURY  Write fn??&-pagO Illustrated Catalogue to  David B. Horne,  Nakusp,  P.  O.,  or A.  MILLER,  Arrow Lakes ORESTON, B. C.  *m  Venision has been plentiful in Fernie  during the past week,  **" j.  '    - -    ---'-  oo A night School"of three classes is being conducted at Frank.  An amateur dramatic society is being .organized at Kaslo.  Tlie Vipond shingle mill at Nakusp  lias sold the entire 191_r-output.  The Sunday night benefit concerts  at Fernie are poorly attended.  Golden has. forwarded $200 to Victoria for Patriotic Fund work.  At Rossiand the Josiemine has added 25 men to its Working force.  Kelowena" council pays 15 cents per  hour to those on civic relief work.  A patriotic concert at Moyie last  week produced $34.50 for Belgian relief.  The town snow plough made its first  appearance at Kaslo on Wednesday  last.  Windermere ha6 given $181 to Red  Cross Society work and $60 for Belgian relief.  The Nakusp Telephone Co. has declared a 6 per eent dividend for 1914  operations. -..-    .   y  Hunter Bros, of Rossiand have donated 300 pairs of spxr' to the local Red  Cross Society. ..?     '    ;-'  Edward Began, : a Kaslo interdict  has been fined $20 for partaking, of the  cup that cheers.  The C. P. R. 7 will in future pay  Greenwood council $20 a month for its  water supply.-..'-  Rossiand kids have a nasty habit of  stuffing the mail hoxes of the Golden  City with snow.  Greenwood citizens plan to have a  public Christmas tree for all the children in the town.7.7 . ��������� ,,.,.  Fort Steele raised $90 for the Pat-^  riotic Fund and 'Relgian relief at a  dance on Noy. 30. 7?      v -  W. E. Stevenson ; has a7 traction engine at work on-the S. S. ranch at  Lardo pulling stumps.  Kelowena. has added an auto truck  to-its fire fighting,,, equipment.? It has  a speed of 30 milps an hour.  Blairmore ratepayers are to vote on  a.by Jaw to,box-row $4,500 to complete  the present waterworks system.  P. C* McRae took six children from  Natal, and two,from Fernie, to the  Children's Home atNew Westminster.  A number of children from Fernie  district were taken to the children's  Aid home at New Westminister last  week. ."   "'''���������'.���������������������������  The teachers in the Nelson schools,  have started a small fund with which  to provide some work for the unemployed.  Rossiand citizens presented Chief of  Police Long with ia silver tea sorvico  and a suit case oh his departure for  Nelson last week.  Ledgo:���������Buttercups were gathered  In Grand Forks bmt week. If a fow  moro meal tickots can be found that  city will soon bo a hummer.  Saturday, DecJ2th  i)ia-*'*������*e-������**feftw&^s&&&c>e*5;e������������  Transfer, Livery and Feed Stabies  Shipment of McLiiugl.u Sleighs and Cutters ou Hand   $  TEAM   SLEIGHS  Harness, Single and Double and Supplies on Haud  $ Several Sets of Second-Hand Haruess  I Sleighs and Cutters COAL FOR SALE  iH.S.McGreath, Prop.  %   Phone 56 Slrdnr Avenue Box 14  W.-'v.-.^-*'*'*^^  WE START OUR  During this sale we are going to sell  everything at such a big discount���������to  enable you to buy many extra presents  for your wife, children and sweethearts.  Our entire stock of General Merchandise  (except -Sugar and Flour) will be included in this Gigantic Holiday Sale.  Times are hard and we are going to  sacrifice a share of our profits to help  tide over the hard times confronting us  one and all this winter,  Watch for our large posters.  I  LANCASTER   &   GO.  THE QUALITY  STOKE  Canadian Pacific Railway  EXOTRSIONS TO  Easiern Canada & Unsted States  On Sale Dec. 1st to Dec. 31st, 1914  Three Months5 Limit  i  VERY LOW FARES to Toronto, Hamilton, Sarnia,  Windsor, Montreal, Ottawa, Belleville, Kingston  St. John,  Halifax,  and all other   points in' ."  '������������������:���������    ?.   Ontario. Quebec and Maritirne Provinces  REDUCED RATES to points in Central States, including  Minneapolis,    St.. Paul,    Duluth,    Chicago,  Kansas City, and other points  Cheap Rail Fares in connection with Trans- Atlantic  Passages.   Return Limit 5 Months  I  All further information from any Ticket Agent,  or  R. M. Dawson, Dist. Pass. Agent, Calgary, Alta.  MONEY TO tOAN  .0%-.MONEY  MONEY ��������� <>%  Loans may bo obtained tor any purpose on ucccputhh*  ImJiI Instate security ;  liberal privilogot.  Corrc^pondonee solicited  ��������� r������-������  *0~m m  v  smi m  r  A.t>.    AUClM-wl  ,fcr)8('Say'Kh'*ir:tri(!'Bld������.'  r*r\ mm c*-. a ivf* r  DENVER, Colo.  Last Sunday Natal Methodist church  dispenced with its regular evening service and Instead gavo?a sacred concert  ���������the collections going for local relief.  Thoro wore 200 .pupils in actual attendance in tho Natal, schools for tho  pust month, the avo*. ago dally attendance wub 220 and tho perfect record  attendance 70.  Tho Great Northern has discontinued running regular passenger trains  into Fornio. Passengers will havo to  lido in futuro upon passpngor equipment attached to freight trains.  Fornio Toadies T_enevolont Society  has received .from tho provincial trea-  Hnry a cheek for J-^SfiO in recognition of  tho work they'arip doing in relieving  distress outHdio of thin municipality.  Six eases of urticIcH I'or tlie hoUUci-h  at the front and Nevoral for Un. Belgian  Hiilforers havo been prepareil for shlp-  ment by tho Row-land Hod Cross and  and Patriotic Rncloty, count It uting the  Hccond Hbipuicnt Hince thc war began.  Three Turku were recently arreHted  In Coleman as prlHoners of war. Thoy  wei ������i .iiH.i^i..l ... '���������...Iclt.lr,;; r.icncy for  an orphanage for IbeTiuklub cbiliiren.  Tbe editor of the Hulletin i-tny-. tliat  the only graft that Ih older tlinn thin  Tnrkii-.il orphanage   l������Uf>iiitnn  iu  that  nn <!���������.....,,  right.  .���������)!...,..,.,I ������������f Ihm blrlli-  Greenwood proposes to reduce retail  liquor licenses from $300 to $200.  Oordwood thieves have commenced  operations outside Revelstoke city  limits.  Oamo Warden Lewis states deer  and sheep aro plentiful in tho South  Fork country.  The attendance atBollvue Methodist  Sunday school has reached high water  mark���������120 pupils.  J, A. Mann, G. N, agent at Fernie  has resigned, and his place has been  takon by.J. E. Cole.  Fornio Frco Pross:���������Tho boy scouts  j aro too rambunctious to ocoupy tho  | basement of Christ church.  Tho C. P. It. has decided to transfer  without charge persons who havo lived at Hoonior to new plnees of i-chi-  donco.  Tho Railway OommlHsion has ordered that tho Hubway under Cox street  Fernio, bo completed beforo thc first of  tho year.  Fernie chief of police bus been In  ntruetod to -firoHoeutc*. all who bave not  paid thoir traders license for the curront half year.  Tho Granby mine*, nl, Phoenix are to  rcmimo operations on a limited Hcalo  with wagon cut 25 per edit until the  price of copper Hhoh.  Fornio Rod Crow, worker** bave made  another niii|Miiiiii, ������������������ r.iMilii,...' r.r,;.-.fc:'t.:.  Ill the last lot. were 2.12 bandagei., 28-5  pairs of sox, HlH handkerchief--, etc,  , Vernon council bun juh(i pin-wed a l������y-  \������\i. \.>1iU>1i m-ovldeMthat, owner*- of one  I enw who ������ell their mirpbiH milk iiuih<,  | lake out a HeeiiHeat a i*oh(, J(?_i per year.  SYNOPSIS OF OOAL MINIG  REGULATIONS  Ooal mining right.*' of the Dominion,  in Manitoba, SaBkatobewiiu and Ali.ortn  the Yukon Territory, die Northwest  Territories and in a portion of tbo Province of BritiHh Columbia, may bo leased  for a term of twenty-one years at  an animal rental of $1 nu oore. Not  moro than 3,5(50 aores will be leased to  one applioant.  Application for a lease toast bo made  by tbo applicant iu poreou to tho Agont  or Sub-Agent of the distriot in whloh  .he rights applied for are -situated.  In Bnrveyed t������rrltory tho land must  lie described by Bcotlous, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in nusurveyed  territory the tract api.lied for sboll be  tanked out by the iippliuaul hluibulf.  Bach api.linatiou mnRt bo aooompnnled  by a foo of |5 which will bo rofnudod It  the ri������ht,n applied for aro not available  but not othorwi-,0. A royalty shall be  paid ou tbo merchantable output of the  mino at the rato of five oeuts por ton.  Tho perfion operating the niino nball  fnrniflh tho Agent with sioin roturnu  accounting for the full quantity of mor-  chanttiMe ooul mined and pav tbo royalty thoro in. If tho ooal mining righto  are not being operated, huoIi retnniH  nhould bo fnrniHhed at lenfit, once a -year  The loimo will Include tho coal miu-  lug rishtd only, but the Iuhhuu may Um  permitted to purcluiHo whatever available Burfiu-e xiKhtB may be considered  necoB.ary for the working of the mine  nt tho rate of $10 an acre.  For foil luforniatioij npplioatlon nhould  lie made to the Secretary of tho Department nf tho Interior, Ottawa, or to an*7  A.R0nt or Sub-Aeont of Dominion Lanrin  W. W. OOllY,  Deputy MtnlHter of tho Interior.  MiiH advertisement will not be paid for.  ,l���������llh_������lll,������,���������lim. |, j,., T, ff^j . ������...^-yj-  ttmmm  **m*****sh*m ^^ISSSiW-  THE REVIEW* GRE STOKB.C*  5USiiNliR  tititi:.riti;iNO:N:0^:O'-tiJE^5^Y-:ti'--'  f  Her  Vengeance  %  %  By Basil Tozer  Ward,   Lock  &   Co.,   Limited  London, Melbourne and Toronto ���������  (Continued)  He began to run towards tbe bouse,  and Hugh, pausing for a moment,  looked again at the iiower girl and  saw that this time she was smiling to  herself? He turned und ran at full  speed after Lord Ambrose, who when  Hugh overtook him had reached the  gravel circular drive in front oi the  house.  "The front door is open," he said as  Hugh joined him. '"Come along. They  are still inside. I think, anil no one  can get out now I have locked the  postern gate."  The front door indeed hung open,  but no light issued fro.m the hall, ami  while without tbe day still lingered,  withhi all was dark and gloomy, with  heavy shadows lying in every corner.  Side by side Hugh aad Lord Ambrose ran up the two or three steps  leading to the wide porch before the  door. Lord Ambrose was just ou tlie  j oint of pushing the door back and  entering when Hugh called hiin.  "I say," he said quickly, "there is  a man lying here!"  In fact, pulled aside into the shadows of the skie of the porch lay the  inanimate figure of a man, and Hugh,  stooping and feeling; found his haud  suddenly wet with blood.  "*He is dead," "he said; "'this is murder!"  Lord Ambrose struck a match and  s-howed the form of a small man,  dressed iu sober black, with a cleanshaven, insignificant face, <^nd with,  in his head, an open wound which was  bleeding freely.  "'Why, it's Hannah!" said Lord Ambrose, recognizing his valet. "He must  have been attacked as he opened the  door; but T don'-, think he is dead."  "No," said Hugh, looking more  closely, "but he is pretty hadly stunned.*' He took off his own coal and  arranged it undar the injured man's  head, and put him in a more comfortable position. "No, I don't think the  wound is a very had one," he said,  again standing *jp.  Lord Ambrose, turning  pal<*;   for  in-f  deed it had a weird and unexpected!  effect, this bell ringing, as it seemed, {  in midair just by the bedroom window, j  "It is a signal," said Hugh, jumping  to the window. "It is a bell to a  branch of that tree."  He ran to the door, and Lord Ambrose followed him.  "I wish' I wat on the telephone," he  said. "AVhere can the beggars be?  We ought to have sent someone for  the police at once."  \ "Be* careful," said Hugh as tbey  I came out on the landing. "I think  there is a man standing on the stairs  up there."  * And as he spoke a man, standing  just behind him in the shadow of a  dark corner, aimed at him a blow he  only just avoided.  At once Hugh grappled with his assailant, and Lord. Aiubreoc--_pr!*ng to  help him.  "We hav-e him now, by .love!" crieo  Lord Ambrose; "hold tight," and at  the same moment the man Hugh had  glimpsed upon the stairs leaped down  upon Lord Ambrose's back, and burglar and niarquis's sou went rolling,  kicking, lighting, scratching, swearing,  over and over on the floor ot the  landing.  Hugh had seized his assailant round  the waist, but the other returned him  a grip every whit as strong and fierce;  and if Hugh astonished his man by  the force of the grip he laid upon  aim, Hugh himself was no less astonished to feel the power of the arms  twined round his own body. Silently  in the gloom of the evening twilight  on the dark landing the two great  men strove breast to breast, each trying to pluck the other up, each using  such a force as not one mau in ten  thousand could have withstood, yet  each failing utterly in his endeavor.  Silently they strove, with muscles  swollen and big every nerve knit,  and neither could win the least advantage. Then Hugh shifted his  hands in an attempt to secure a better hold, but the other was too quick  for him, and when they gripped again  with the same fierce, unswering, tight  embrace, Hugh was hardly so well off  as he had been before. So he put  forth all his force into one great effort, and summoning all his powers  strove to bear his enemy backwards  and backwards till he should break,  using a strength that might have  seemed enough to break a pillar of  iron, but that his enemy endured without failing. Unable to hold to such a  pitch of effort, Hugh at last relaxed;  then in turn the burglar put forth all  his strength and put upon Hugh such  a grip to pluck him up as might have  torn up a young^ oak tree by the  roots. But Hugh Knew that if his feet  once left the ground he would be lost,  and he in his turn resisted, and in  his turn baffled all the other's powers.  Outside the window, just beyond  the landing where tbey fought thc little bell still swung to and fro with its  noisy clamour; and next Lord Ambrose and the second burglar struggling on the floor came liard against  the legs of Hugh and his enemy. In  a moment all four were down in  a  Giti^r u vim  Wml^l^'VM of  25 and 60c. at alt Druggists  and stores.   Take.Abbsy Vita Tablets  for Sick Nerves.  that showed her face, still lovely, but  many times more pale and strange,  than before. Hugh tried the gate but  it was fast; he shook it with all his  force as if he would have torii it  down; but it resisted all his efforts,  and then Lord Ambrose came panting up.  "We are done," said Hugh; ''they  have got through the gate and locked  it on us."  "Locked? Nonsense! I locked it,"  cried Lord Ambrose shaking it in his  turn, and then drawing out his key.  "By Jove!    How did they do it?"  "They must have provided themselves with a duplicate key," said  "it would be easy enough to take an  impression of the lock any time the  street was clear.*' After a pause he  added, "They must, have had an accomplice to open the gate and to shut  it behind them.".-  "That flower-girl, I'll be bound,"  said Lord Ambrose with an oath.  "They were a brace of niggers; I'll  have every nigger in town searched  tomorrow."  "Are you sure both were niggers?"  asked Hugh. "I saw the face of only  one of them, and then only i'or the  moment as I fell on top of him,"  "Oh, they were both niggers," answered Lord Ambrose; "both had faces  as black and shiny as night. One good  thing, we interrupted them so that  they got nothing for  their pains."  "How do you know that?" said  Hugh.  "Why the silver has not been taken,  and there is nothing else of any  value."  "They do not seem to have looked  at the silver," said Hugh, "and yet,  unless they were after something or  another, why did they stop so long  after the first alarm? Let us go back  to the house and make sure nothing  is missine."  He   was   breathing   rather  heavily,,   ���������.������,���������- ,.���������������������������   ���������������,.** ������������������ , _���������   .  his   eyes  flashed.    The  sight of  the  %^<**������* *&*** j* ���������S*^?  wounded man, the touch and smell of  blood on his hands, had awakened in  his heart primeval passions that the  calm man of business had never  known he possessed. He was stirred,  too, by the sight of this unoffending  citizen stricken down on the threshold  of his master's house.  ���������'I say," he said, turning to Lord  Ambrose, "we must find our friends  who did this."  "Tlie silver is in the dining room;  that is what they will be after," said  Lord Ambrose.  Hugh knew the way, and crossing  tho hall opened tho door of a room  opposite. It was lighted, the table  was spread for dinner, on the table  aud on the sideboard was a collection  of silver���������the Marquis Castleham's  property, old heirlooms chiefly, and  lent by him to his son���������calculated to  make to water thc mouth ol! any  burglar. **���������  "They have not been here," said  Lord Ambrose.  "Come along, then," Hugh said;  "they must be somewhere about."  Tho two young men went into ihe  hall again and listened, but heard nothing. They went out of the hall Into  the passage beyond, to the head of the  kitchen stairs, and heard nud saw ln  ilie kitchen below tho two women servants busy with thc preparations for  dinner, evidently quite undisturbed  and unconscious of anything having  happened out of tho usual.  'Our burglars have not passed this  -vay," said Hugh; "let us go Lack."  They returned to the hull and wont  <*iulckly into the two or threo rooms  :imt    Lord Ambrose used,  the other  ���������'.pnrtmonts  of tho  house boing shut  up  and  mostly  niifnrnl.etl.  But none  (.if the rooms Into which they looked  . !:owed an.*, i-lgn of any iiiLru-slou.  "Your bedroom?" said Hugh.  ������������������But thero in nothing thero,"  said  ���������-.ori]  Ambrose;      ''thoro    ls  nothing  "ririh stealing in the wholo place, ox-  l������t dad's silver."  "Let us look." said Hugh, who had a  vague ide.. half hidden In his mind  . nt It wns not silver or liny ordinary  ' n.iiy Hint thin burglnry had for an  ���������iiU-f-t.  They ran quickly up the great stair.  v.:y   and   entered     Lord     Ambrose'ii  ��������� -Jrooiii.    Here again ovcry thing was  uiiillhtiirhed;  there wai'  not, the least  Yu.oi' any intrusion.  ������������������.veil,  theno  are  the  most, illusive  '��������� .rglani I ever hoard  of," mild  Lord  ..i11.j <���������.-.(-, Ic-oltljig about, hlni iii iihtoii-  -innent.  'We     muut  have  disturbed   thom;  '.-.���������:,- unii't lie hiding somewhere," mild  i nu'ii, am) nn lie t'polie n hell hegau to  l     in,/,   .'f.   li   ir.-i'iiiml,   Jutir   out.lido   tlie  ... iir...,in  window,  "���������'.ood   Lord;    what,   im   that?"   mild  fusion and fury. Hugh got a kick under the chin that for the moment  made him think his jaw was broken,  anl then his hand came across a  throat which he at once set to work  to squeeze with all the ardour he had  left him, only to find immediately that  it was Lord Ambrose he was thus endeavoring to throttle.  "Quick! scoot, Caesar!" said a gasping voice, and a man who had been  punching Hugh between the shoulders, as the only available portion of  his anatomy, sprang suddenly to his  feet, having unexpectedly found himself quite free.  "Let's clear!" gasped another voice.  "Hi! stop thief!" cried Hugh, trying  in his turn to get to his feet.  "Two cursed niggers!" gurgled Lord  Ambrose on the floor. "Oh, my  throat!"  Now tho two burglars had freed  themselves; one was already running  down the salrs, and his companion  just paused to aim a final blow at  Hugh, who retaliated by dashing his  fist into the man's face. Tho follow  sworo and sprang back,  "Scoot, Dodd!" cried tlio man running down the stain-;. "She'll bo mad  with us for this."  "Now, who is 'she'?" thought Hugh  as he rushed to follow tho fugitives.  "Stop 'om!   stop 'cm!"  cbled J.ord  Ambrose. "Stop ihlof! I'll get my pistol."  He ran into hip room and out again.  By that tlmo tho two burglars woro  down t.ho stairs, and his companion  hall with Hugh in swift pursuit. Lord  Ambrose wished to fire but, was afraid  of hitting Hugh, so he discharged his  pistol into the air Instead, by way of  showing what, he could do, .and then  followed.  "We'll have 'om now!" lie culled to  Hugh; "tho postern ls locked."  At the (op of their speed tho four  men rushed out of tlu house nnd down  tho drlvo to^tho oiitranco-gatos; tbo  two burglars ^flrst, Hugh ne\t, close at  their heolfl, and behind Lord Ambrose  with his pistol in his bund.   '  Bqt tho light of a lamp In tho  street, showed the postern gate not  locked   but   wide   open,   end   without.  CHAPTER IX.  A Row of Figures  Lord Ambrose had opened the postern gate again and was now standing in the street, looking eagerly to  see if any trace of the fugitives were  visible. But. there was no one in  sight; and plainly the start the two  burglars had obtained was enough to  make pursuit useless, since by now  they might have .turned a dozen corners and be a dozen streets away in  any direction.  "There never is a policeman wbeu  you want one," grumbled Lord Ambrose. "Hi, you, boy," he called as a  lad suddenly appeared around a. corner near, "here is a shilling. Run and  find a policeman and tell him he is  wanted at Tewxton House and you  shall have another."  The lad took the money and went  off at a run, evidently much excited,  and Hugh said  hundreds of years in their struggjo tor  freedom, the race t_.at helped to win  the battle of Crecy, the race that  fought for a generation under (lien-  dower against the greatest captain in  E'-rope���������I should like to see ihat race  give a good taste of its quality in ttnl&  struggle in Europe, and they are going to do it.  "I envy you ycung people yo_r**  youth. They hav������ put up tha age limit for the army but I march, l am sorry to say, a good many years oven, ce-  yond that. But still our turn will  coine. It is a great opportunity. It  only comes once In many centuries to  the, children of men. Por most genera  tions, sacrifice comes in drab, weariness of spirit to men. It has .como today to you: i. has come today to us  all, in the form of the glow and tKri.i  of a great movement for liberty, that  impels millions throughout Europe to  the same end.  "It is a great war for the emancipation of Europo from the thraldom of ������.  military cas.o, which has cast its'  shadow upon two generations of men,  and which has now plunged tl^s. wor_d  into a swelter of bloodshed. Some  have already given their lives. There  are some who havo given more than  their own lives. They have given the  lives of those who are dear to them?  I honor their courage, and may God  be their comfort ahd their strength.  "But their reward is at hand. Those  who have fallen have consecrated-  death. They have taken their part in  the making of .-*, new Europe, a new-  world. I can ..ea siens of it coming in  the glare of the. battlefield. Tbe people whl. gain more by this struggle  in all lands thau they comprehend at  the present moment. It Is true they  will be rid ofthe menace to their freedom.   But that is not all.  "Thero is some.hing infinitely greater and more enduring which is emerging already out of, this great conflict  ���������a new patriotism, richer, nobler,  more exalted th ������������������-the old.   .  "I see a ne* * recognition amongst  .-.11 classes, high and low, shedding  themselves of selfishness, a new recognition that the J.onor of a country  does not depend merely on the maintenance of its glory in the stricken  field, bui: in protecting its homes from  distress as well, it ls a new patriotism, it is bringing a new; outlook for  all classes. A great flood of luxury  _.nd of sloth which had-submerged the  land is recedin~, and a new Britain is  appearing. We can see fo.* the first  time the fundamental things that matter in life, and that have been obscured from onr visio:_ by the tropical  growth of prosperity."  "May I tell you, in a simple parabls,  what I think this war is doing for us?'  Mr. Lioyd George concluded. "I knor7  a valley in North Wales, between the  mountains and the sea, a. beautiful  vaiiey, snug, comfortable, sheltered by  the mountains from all bitter blasts, -t  was very enervatn..,", and I remember  how tbe boys were in the habit of  climbing the hills above the village to  have a glimpse oi the great mountains  in tlie distance and to be stimulated  ar.d freshened by the breezes whicb  came froir the hilltops and by- the  great spectacle of that great valley.  "We have been living in a sheltered  valley for jenerations. Wo have been  too comfortable, too indulgent, many  perhaps too selfish. And the stern  hand of fate has scourged us to au  elevation where wc can see the great  everlasting things that matter for a  DOCTORS DID  f.0T HELP HER  But Lydia E. Pinkham's Veg������  ������table Compound Restored  Mrs. Bradley's Health���������  Her Own Statement.  Winnipeg, Canada. *���������������������������' Eleven year* ���������  ego I went to the Victoria Hospital,  Montreal, suffering with a'growth. Th������  doctors said it was a tumor and could  not be removed asit would cause instant  death. They found that my organs wer������  affected, and said I could not live mora  than sixmonths in the condition! was in.  "After I came home I saw your advertisement in the paper, and commenced  taking Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable  Compound? I took it constantly for two?  years, and still take it at times, and  both my husband and myself claim thaifc  it \vas the means of saving my life. I  highly recommend it to suffering  women."���������Mrs.tiOniLLA Bbxdley* 284  Johnson Ave. .Winnipeg, Manitoba, Can.  Why will women-take charicesf or drag  out a siekly,balf-heartedexistence,miss*- ^  ing three-fourths of tlie joy of living,  when they can find health in Lydia EL   -  Pinkham's Vegetable Compound ?  For thirty years it  has been the,standard remedy for female ills, and has *_*e-  stored the health of  thousands of women  who have been troubled with such ailments as displacements, inflammation,  ulceration, tumors, irregularities, etc  If you want special advice  writ������ to -Lydia JE. Pinkham Med-  idine Oo. (confidenti i\l) J,ym_*  Mass. x our letter will be opened*  read and answered by a woman,  and beid in strict eonfidence.  Tie Land Does It  Once again Western Canada takes  all the. big prizes in connection with  the International Soil Products exposition, Saskatchewan and Alberta  dividing the honors. This is ho new  story, but it is pleasant enough, to bear  repearting.  In connection with the repeated successes of Canadian grain growers at  these international shows, it is worth,  while noting that their victories are  won in cor_apeti_ion frequently with  men who are using Canadian seed  grain. The fact that, the honors continue to come to Canada under such  conditions prove i as surely as can be  that the so;i of Western Canada grows  tetter crops than can be produced in  any other part of the continent.  This evidence should make the best  possible sor������ of advetrising, as it no  doubt will.  American farmers who  nationT "the great" peaks "ofTioiior Ve i follow the best farming methods will  had forgotten, duty and    patriotism, j ������������t be slow to realize how materially  clad in glittering white, the great pin-  uacle of sacrifice pointing line a rug  ged finger to Heaven. We shall descend into the valleys again, but as  long as the men aud wqpieii of this  generation last they wilKearry in their  hearts the image of these great nioim-  tain peaks whos*. fingers ara unshaken though Europe rock and sway in  tbe couvulsions of a great war."  *'he chancellor resumed his seat  amidst loud and continued cheering,  There  was  a  grea*  rush  of      crult*.  Let us get back to tho Iiouk".. and   to the recruiting room after the meet-  they can better themselves* by, getting  over the border to the best land on  earth, and they will be welcome; there  is plenty of room yet.���������Calgary Herald. \  Mrs. B. .says she never cries over  spilt milk.  Being a "cat" she naturally would  not.  see how that man of yours is getting  on���������he may be more badly hurt than  we thought.  Lord Ambrose nodded aud turned  back quickly with Hugh, both feeling  just, *a trifle uneasy at the way in  which they had neglected the injured  valet In their eagerness for tho more  exciting occupation o. burglar-hunt-.  Ing.  (To bo Continued I  ROAD HOGS OF EUROPE  Ing.  Widow (to her little boy)���������Jbbnny,  I am going to marry Dr. Brown.  Johnny���������Bully for you, ma! Does Dr.  Brown know it?  THE LITTLE NATIONS  DEFENDED  Stirring    Speech    Delivered    by    Mr.  Lloyd Georce  in Queen'r,  Htdl  (Continued From Last   w'ook)  Thoy think we cannot bent them II  will not bo oiuiy. It will bu a long job.  It will bo a torrlblo war. But In tlu  ond wo Hlmll march throng.* terror to  triumph. Wo shall need all our quad-  tlos; ovory quality that Britain and .is  pooplo poaHust;���������jji'iiduut-t- lu coiuiuol,  daring In action, tenacity In purpose,  courngo in defeat, modornt* ,n in victory; In all Uiiiips, fulth; r.nd we  shall win.  "It lias pleased thom to bcllcv*" nnd  to preach th. belief thnt wo aro a decadent, degonorato nation. They proclaim It to tho "vorld, throuzh thoir  rrofcf-SorH���������that *"o nro an rn heroic  nation,   skulking  behind   our  mahng- \  pear, and stoop, und turn Homething In  the lock, and then glide silently away,  giving him just ono backward glance  *,������/   ������i   ���������>  aro beginning to find out their nilstako  alroady. And thoro nro h.\lt a million  of young men of Britain who have already registered their vow to thoir  king that they will crosn tho unas and  hurl that Insult against British cour-  fiirn nrr-*,t..f**  !��������������� p'-rpctl'iltO-T, 0!. 11*10 hflt  ' tlalleids  of Franco nnd  of Goi'iuauy.  Cfc__rfc������-i_f_-_ 9r*nula.ed Eyelids,  IkU^jM   %j* Eves inflamed by ex-.o-  E_urefo 3*uu, lluafnml Wla4 --[wiieiUH   or  .thiico   auu   01   uunuiiuy.  %/_������-*_____ yu"<'J*,Krc,ie������"ll*yMurInB j And we want, lmlf a milllou mere. And  W dr*S������ M������Remedy. NoSniartirip,   we shall got thom.  ���������,     *f.       .  .   ,p������t Kye Comfort.    At But Wales must contlnuo doing hor  Y0������������".lJni|rgi������'������ 50c per ftottlr. Murine fy������   duty.    I nliuuld llko to noo a  Wol.'ih  S������lv������inTiibei2_c.ForB������0-i������lflMEy������rn������nifc  llrnr.rv.rl ,   f. m SSt..9m. W,.  .   9* .     ...      -������   ������������������-- -*- *���������������������������'������*������J *.m,t\,mn.m������*  1 should like to fee  , army In tho field.  ' iuc  .uco  WiO iH'-eci  mu  Nurumuu lor  The   House  Without  A Gold Spot  THE house that  has a Perfection  Smokeless Oil Heater  needn't have a cold  Bpot anywhere.  A Perfection is light  and can be carried  easily from room to  room--anywhere  that extra heat is needed.  For the "between seasons" of. Fall and Spring-  the Perfection Smokeless Oil Heater gives just  the heat you want.  TION  HEATERS  SMOKE1E  Perfection heaters are solid, h.uul-  somely designed and sinokelesH and  odorless. Look for the Ti'iungle trademark,  M-ttl������ In Cuiiittk  ROYALITE OIL i. l.n.i r������r -.11 ...-.  THE IMPERIAL OIL COMPANY; Limited  Y-'inuipei C-lf-r-* Rri'n_ Montrr-I QiK-t-ri* lUliUx  Cdnt-Ui        S-ikaUen        Vsacmmtr       T������r������_t������       Ottawa  ltl  1  ?1  V  - fl  ���������i  a=  B-l  KjjjjjjiiijJB^^^^^^  mm  ���������^im*mJmMmi*/m-i~ :   :j*t?*������S3v'5i  mmmmmmmm  u&m  .  i 5  1  ft?  f  4  I  il  il  4  tTKE review* creston, b. c  TTItA     i___. ��������������������������������������������� '_���������%.���������������'  a -___������;   jr*-*-* *������*jr    vt  Constipation  - *e Growing Smalle? Eves? Day.  GARTER'S UTTLE  &1VER PILLS ate  "respO-mble-^tl-By not ^  only give ieli-i������������������  they permanently  eiiteConstiptt.  4ton.   Mil*  lions use  them for,  mess, Indigestion, Sick Headache, Smttou Skits*  Small Pill, Small Do������e, Small Price,  Genuine cwatbeu Signature  STOP  PRO-GERMAN   PROPAGANDA  Stricter Censorship Will be Established Over Papers Entering and  in Canada  Tho government is taking steps to  stop. so far as possible a persistent  pro-Germand and pro-Austrian agitation ln some of tho foreign settlements, particularly in Western ' Canada; whlcb might later on lead to  dangerous outbreaks. A pro-German  propaganda is being carried on wherever possible in Canada by German  agents and sympathizers in the  United States. German pamphlets  printed la tbe English, German, Austrian and Hungarian laugugesrare being jbailed into Canada surreptitiously, and some articles of a decidedly  pro-German and pro-Austrian agita-  pearing in a few of the German papers in the west, particularly in Alberta.  The government intends to establish- a considerably stricter censors-hip over the entry and publication oi  tbis sort of literature in Canada, and  if? warnings sent out to German editors in Canada are not observed,  more drastic action will be promptly  taken. As one step towards counteracting this pro-German propaganda  all German papers in Canada? will  probably be required to publis.'. in full  the British white paper, setting forth  the British side of the case arid ,the  causes of tbe war.  P^H_uflii  Tlie prostrating  cough tears down  your strength.  Tht clogged air-tubes directly affect your tangs aad speedily lead to  pleurisy, pneumonia, consompiioa.  SCOTT'S EMULSION overcomes  bronchitis in an easy, natural way.  Its curative. OIL-FOOD soothes the  inflamed membranes, relieves the  cold that causes .tho trouble,  and every drop helps to  Strengthen yoar lungs.  All Druggist* Hae* tt  REFUSE SUBSTITUTES  SEVERE PAINS  AROUND THE HEART  Though we have somewhat advanced prices  because ot the increased cost andscarcity of  raw material, the usual  high standard of our  quality will be mpin-  tained.  Children Teething  BABY 18 VERY COMFORTABLE AND  LAUGHS DURING THC TEETHING  PERIOD.   THANKS TO  Mrs. Winsl.qw's  Soothing Syrup  PURELY VEGETABLE���������NOT NARCOTIC  Are Nearly Always Caused  by Stomach Trouble  Don't let a pain in the region of the  heart frighten you into thinking you  have heart disease. Just as a pain in  the back seldom indicates? kidney  trouble/ so... pain near .the hearty is.  sra'rcely eyei";. present in organic? heart;  disease. The pain is nearly always  caused by stomach trouble for the  stomach and heart are connected hy  many, nerves, and gas on the stomach  causes pressure on the heart.  The alarming pains will disappear  If you tone up' the stomach, eat the  right things and don't worry. Dr. *,Wil-  liams*. Pink Pills for Pale People are  the best stomach tonic.   One or two  Pills after each meal soon produces a  healthy appetite, the food does not  distress? you, you are no longer troubled   with   gas,   sour risings in the  throat,   aad those misleading   pains  around the heart.    Strength and en--  ergy return, and the rich, red blood,  carries ren.wed vitality to every part  of the body.    Mrs. Henry Connolly,  Brookvale, P.E.I., says: "For a number of years I was a great sufferer  from indigestion which,.despite all the  treatment I took, was gradually growing worse.   I would sometimes feel as  though I was smothering, and when  the trouble came   on t would suffer  from violent palpitation   and -pains  around the heart which greatly alarm-  ed me.    I was    under doctor's treatment ofr a long time,   but   with' no  benefit,   A friend suggested Dr. Williams' Pink Pills and I decided to try  them.   In about a month I felt much  better and by the time I had' taken  another four boxes I was in the best  of health and able to eat all kinds of  nourishing food.   It   is   now several  years since I was cured and I have  never felt a symptom of indigestion  since.   I take every opportunity of recommending Dr. Williams' Pink Pills  to friends .who are ailing."  If your dealer does not keep these  Pills you can get them by mail at 50  cents a boxor six boxes tor $2.50 from  The Dr. Williams' Medicine Co.,  Brockvllle, Ont.  Wood Used in Maritime Provinces  Two hundred million feet, board  measure,, of wood per year are required by the various industries of the  Maritime Provinces that use wood as  their raw material-���������not to speak of  the many millions of feet of timber  used in rough building, construction  for poles and railway cross-piles, fuel  and the many other uses of timber.  Such is the conclusion of an investigation recently made by- the Forestry  Branch of the JDominion Department  of the Interior rnto the wood-using  industries of tho Maritime Provinces,  and published aa their Bulletin No. 44,  "Woodusing Industries of the Maritime Provinces.'-' The value of the  wood used is nearly $3,700,000; of this  entire amount only 12.3 per cent.���������  about 25,000,000 feet���������was imported.  Twenty-eight kinds of wood are  used in the industries, spruce occupying first,,place. A list of the uses.of  each particular wood in the industries  is a feature of the bulletin.  The report is compiled from reports  sent in by over six hundred manufacturers of the province, a classified list  Automobiles for Life Saving  -So* serious _is tlie^dearth of transport facilities ���������~ r, the front thr.t the  British Red Cross Society are making  a most earnest ippcal to the British  public to provide a remedy.  The war office has paid a high tribute' to the British .society, and its  appeal for motor-ambulances is receiving hearty support.  Already an immense number of  automobiles have been placed at? their  disposal. In a-* few hours they are ,  stripped of their bodies and fitted up  as two or four stretcher ambulances,  and sent on to the front.  Where people have been unable to  send cars they Rave forwarded cbecks-  for $2,000, the .price at which a suitable car can be purchased.  One generous donor lias provided  the wherewithal to buy ten such cars,  another sent a check to cover the  cost of three, whilst still others, as  soon as they were made aware of the  great need, came forward "with their  cars and their offer of service as  drivers, '^he society,. however, will  provide chauffeurs and all necessaries  if only the vehicles are forthcoming.  The cars for which there is the  greatest need are those where thera  is a distance of at least 6 feet 4  inches from the back of the steering  wheel to a vertical line drawn from  the centre of the back wheel. Such  cars are best suited for four-strr tcher  ambulances, for the over-lapping  would not entail any severe jolting of  the wounded across difficult roads.  It would be impossible to overrate  the value of these gifts. Each car  thus lent will be directly the mean;  of saving very many valuable lives.  OE... WilOru,  .f.f\^m.f.r.f.f\r.  given in the- work.  Copies, may be obtained on application to the. Director of Forestry, Department of the Interior, Ottawa. ,  No Rest With Asthma.���������Asthma usually attacks at night, the one tube  when rest is needed most. Hence the  loss of strength, the nervous debility,  the loss of flesh and otlier evils which  must be expected unless relief is secured. Fortunately relief is possible.  Dr. J. D, Kellogg's. Asthma. Remedy  has proved its i-ierits through years tiot  service. A trial will surely convince  you.  FREE TO ALL SUFFERERS  ItTOU !������������������!-OUT Ol SORTS''RUN DOW.N" MOT tlio B[,U*--i'  ������-trM Iron- KIDNKV. _I.4DD_.I-., MtRVOUS DISEASES,  CHROMIC WBAKNEIS.ULCKRO.fllUH !!R(H-T[ON_,PIt.tti,  wrlta far. PRKE ci.oth um;un MEuinM. book on  Minard's Liniment Cures Distemper.  - Strange Story of a Sharpshooter  Exploits of a Sengalese sharpshooter are attracting much attention, his  single handed encounter with a German patrol standing .out prominently  in-the news from the front.  It appears that the Sengalese, a  black giant who had learned to operate a motor car in Africa, was detailed to drive the machine of a French  general. In the course of .operations  he was ordered to be at a certain  point at a specified hour to meet his  commander. The order was impressed  ,on hlm with military precision.  The Sengalese started in good time  but on the way thither encountered a  German patrol. He seized his rifle  and completely exterminated the detachment.  Promptly on the hour he arrived at  the rendezvous, the car filled with  lances, saddles, swords and helmets.  Milner Says Attack is on Empire  c*--_...i..������~.~   -.*'   ���������Aff.^ni.fif.Xf.^-'r *._...   *4..:t-  ������?_J-3_iii-__-g   ������&_   i-_Le_-_C-_ooi.t7*   uum   _-xx_.u.-  er said the British, empire    was the  gr^at object at present attacked, not  France, not Russia, not even the British Isles, but the position of hegemony  which Britain held and the ideals for  which Britons  stood  throughout the  world.  "We  have  been  considerably  successful in dealing with the French  in Canada? but nobody could say we  had absorbed them," he said. "Though  two  civilizations  remained    side  by  side, affecting one another extraordinarily slightly, but on doubt both are  satisfied with the political system, under which they live.   It is a tremendous  success  and  an  immense credit  to our imperial system and its marvellous tolerance that we should    have  French-Canadians now to fight for the  maintenance of British integrity."  ZAM-BUK CURES PILES  Bead These Strong Proofs  Mr. Henry Fougere, of Poulamonlj,  NjS��������� writes: "I suffered terribly wita  Piles, and could not find anything te  give me relief until I tried Zam-Buk.  After using this balm I am completely  cured. I consider Zam-Buk the finest  salve on the market."  Mr. W. J. Donovan, of New Edinburgh, Ont., says: ".For two years I  suffered from bleeding piles; the pais  was very intense. I tried numerous*  so-called cures, tout, without effect. At  last I tried Zam-Buk, and am glad tm  say that'perseverance with this ointment has resulted in absolute cure."  Mr. SI. E? Hill, Shevlln, Man.,  ���������writes: "I had suffered a great deal  with Piles and had tried many  remedies, but without effect. Having  tried a sample of Zam-Buk, and being  encouraged by ths results, I persevered; it worked like magic, effecting a complete cure."  These are but a few of the many letters received from people who hav������  ended their suffering by Zam-Buk.  Hundreds have proved that nothing  will end the dull gnawing pain lik*_  Zam-Buk. Its rich herbal essences  quickly end the inflammation of the  hemorrhoid veins and restores them  to their normal condition.  Zam-Buk is best for piles, eczema,  cuts, burns, bruises, ulcers, chapped  hands, cold sores, rheumatism, sciatica,  and all injuries and skin diseases.  Every home needs Zani-Buk; it ?_���������  purely herbal, and can be used for baby  or grandparent with the same gratifying results.  Refuse all substitutes; insist on hav--  Ing Zam-Buk; there is nothing "just as  good." At all druggists and stores, or  postpaid from Zam-Buk Co., Toronto,  on receipt of price, 50c. box, 3 boxes  $ 1.25. For free trial box send your  namo and address, this advertisement,  namie of .paper, ahd lc. stamp. ������������������������������������'-  - To Co-operate With Canada  A government memorandum directs "  public attention to the fact that ths  Canadian war contingent associatiou  in London has completed its organization and is ready to co-operate with  Canadian committees intending aid to  tbe Canadian forces, medical or otherwise, or by acting as representatives  of the Red Cross Societies, Daughters of the empire or other patriotic  bodies. These are urged to correspond with the association as to the  assistance they wish to render in the  emergency.  old  You should  take a. vacation,  chap. ...���������������������������������  I suppose all things benefit by a  rest.  Sure.   Even tl*. > calendar is freshened up by taking a month off.  the*, disease, and woNDURfur. cuKl.il tttaclrd br  TMHieWrWNOM WBMBPV. W.I f   THERAPION-  dec idolm*  Ik* rtmedr ror YOUR OWN-lltn-iit.  AbioUitelr PRB****  No/follow up circular.. No oblltfKtlomi. Dr. LicCLK^c  MED.C0.IlAV.KR__O_KRU,HAUrRTKAn LONDON.KNO  WK rtXHX TO rKOVK TIIKRAriON *rVH.U CVBK V������������.  PA TENT8  Featliorstonhaugh & Co., head office,  King stroot ea.it, Toronto, Canada.  Naturally  "Can you toll mo which class of  peoplo Hvoh tho/longoul?"  "Why, contonarlaiiH, I bollovo."-���������  DallaB Nows.  "Yos, I ofton think tbat womon aro  ���������8 woll auallllod for war as mon. My.  busbuud Is oppobed to il.   But I o.l-un  fool as If I'd llko to loavo homo and  get Into tho thick of tho light."  "But why loavo homo?"~.~Clovoland  Plain Doalor.  DODDS   y  iirwirrf  y >;,  7/7,  PI LLS ^"a  \NN'  The senator and the mayor were  walking up the -avenue. The senator  was more than middle-aged and considerably more than fat, and, dearly  as the major loved him, ho also loved  his joke.  ��������� The senator turned with a pleased  expression on his benign countenance  and said, "Major, did you seo that  pretty girl smile at mo?"  "Oh, that's nothing," roplied hla  frlond: "The flrst timo I saw you I  Jaughed out loud!"  *mmmm Jim    .I'n-ii      i ���������   -*������������������ ._-���������.IM.  Whether tho corn bo of old or now  growth, It must yield to Holloway's  Corn Cure, tho simplest and beBt  euro offorcd to tho public.  *mmms^mtt**mm^mssmm*mm*m* ���������i^mmi  Tho SmlthB woro having somo  troublo with tuo plumbing In tho houso  and upon investigation found that a  doad frog bad by somo moans got  caught ln ono of tho pipes.  Mr. Smith afterwards recounted tho  lncldont to Ms old Scotch neighbor,  and concluded bis fdory by remark-  tng: "And what do you think tho  trouble wual A frog bad got caught  ln ono of tbo rlpos."  "Oh!"  walled    tho    tondor-hoarlod  Scot. " "Tho pulr frogglo."  _,���������-,.,       ,   -i.  Minard's Liniment Cures Colds, etc.  He���������Will you marry mo?  She���������Do yo uthink you could keep  me in clothes?  He���������That's the first thing I'd try to  do.���������California Pelican.,  ���������IOO REWAftD, dn <  The readers of this paper will b*  pleased to learn that there la at least  one dreaded disease that science has  been able to cure In all Its stages and  that Is Catarrh. Hall's Catarrh Curela  the only* positive cure now known to  the medical fraternity. Catarrh being a  constitutional disease, requires a constitutional treatment. Hall's Catarrh Cure  Ll tal-?n .internally, acting directly upon  the blood ar-d mucous surfaces of the  K2!05_; *ufr?fry destroying the foundation of tho dlseaso and giving the pat-  lent strength by building up the constitution and assisting nature in doing Its  wofj. The proprietors have so much  faith in Its curative powers that they  ??2I .?ne Hundred Dollars for any oaie  that it falls to cure. Send for list of testimonials.  k!?,?'  ^5r i.?ol(L b3_. alt   ���������Druggists,'  vs������.  Take  Hall's  Family. Pills  for  cohsupa.  A Remedy for Earache.*-^-To -i.av������  the earache is to endure torture, T__s  ear is a delicate organ and fev- cara  to deal with it, considering it work  for a doctor. Tti. Thomas' Eclectrio  Oil offers a simple remedy. A few  drops upon* a piece of lint or medicated cotton and placed in the ear will  work wonders in relieving pain:  A groat improsBlon has, boon mado  on British opinion by tho Czar's attempt to mako RiihhIii a lomperanco  nnd almost teetotal empire at ono  stroke.  For a Kovernmont to doprlvo ltaolf  voluntarily of $������05,000,000 of rovonuo  In poaco tlmo would bo unnrocodont-  ���������Qdj-to do so in war tlmo, when sovoral  million men aro la the field is almost  Inor.fdiblo.  Loudon writer-, acclaim tho Czar'o  act na a Hplondld Illustration of the  now ItuSBla, created by war.  w. w. u. iu_ro  Sho���������on, no oo itoortuit you trou  .right on me -aornsl  He���������Sorry. Why do you grow fiudi  things?  Sho���������T grows 'om for a 'obby, llko  ������h  Borne grown .'orchids and suoli.���������  -. i        (     -*i  PIMPLE. ON FACE   ���������'���������'��������� > ��������� '��������� ������������������-���������-'     N  rtching and Burning, Scratching  Irritated. Disfigured for a Time.  Used Cuticura Soap and Ointment.   Pimples Disappeared,.  ,-.... , ������-.���������__,,  17B0 Wlnnlpog St., Kcglna, Saslc���������"I  was troubled with itclilnp plmploa on my  faco for ov������y throo yoar������. Thoy -wore rod  aud unsightly. Thoy caurchI ItclUnu antl  burning and I usod to scratch and Irritate  thom. Tlio breaking out dlaOgurod mo for  a time:  "1 trlod many woU-advorttsod treatments'  such as I'rcacrlptloa, ��������� ���������,  elri.., bub wl'iliouh fliiccom.. A short, tlmo n������o  I batt tho advertisement* of Outlcura Soap  and OliUmmib iu a local pnpor-and aftor  I had tt-lod a froo uampla l oould soo a ro-  murlrablo Improvement. X washed my faco  -with tho Soap anil tlion applied tho Ointment two or Lhroo tbnoa u. day. After using  moro Outlcura Hoap and two boxcu of Outlcura OJntuient all the plmplos complotoly  rilHappoarod." (Signed) Nloliolaa Koch,  Juno 13,1014,,  Samples Frco by Moll  A generation of mothers has round no soap  no woll suited for curving and purifying tlio  tiiln and hair of Infanta and children m  Outlcura Hoap. Its ah-olu ta purity and ro-  freNhlng frn_rr*������nco alone nro enough io rec-  cramond It abovo ordinary sklni noapn, bub  thero aro added to these qualities delicate  yet efroctlvo emollient) properties, tlorlvod  from Oiitloura Ointment, which render It  Uiraii VMiUMtilo 111 utuiuriniiiit 4* louiilul.y  ������AJ  dtatre-Mlng eruptions an������| promoting a nor-  is.al oondlUoa of tldn ocfd hair health. Cuticura Bo������p and Ohilmont tuAd throughouti  tlio world. Cor liberal freo sample or each,  Willi U_i-p. book, send post-card to '..'OuU-  mm, mm    Tl0.r.l     f*    %ln������4nn    TT    a     ���������  ���������������  Both  Disappeared  . An old farmor in England was  anxious to marry, but could not make  .up his mind between the charms of  a certain comely widow in the neighborhood and her equally charrain..  daughter.  At last ho determined to let chance  .solve tho problem.  "I'll ax ono I fust sees a*goln' in,"  Jig muttered, and off ho started on his  amatory errand. But when ho arrived, both mother and daughter woro  .sitting in the doorway.  "Dang It!" ho cried. "Hore was I  .cojnln' to ax one o' 'eo to marry me,  an* I sworo tho fust 'ua should ha'  the chance, nut thero yo .oth bo together. I'll shot my eyes now, au'  .the ono as doan't want mo must go Indoors. Th' ouo v. i stays Is my wlfo to  bo."  Shutting his -"yes, the old farmor  mounted ten solemnly; thoro was a  pubdued chuckle, but whon ho opono.t  them both womou had gono.  A very systematic business man  tried to educate his young wife to keep  correct household accounts. ^JBrttl.  this end in view he'gave her an account book, and instructing her to eater on one side all her expenses in detail, and on the other side money received. At tho end of the -first month  the fair young wife carried her account book to her husband In triumph.  "See," said. she, "I have done what  you asked," But a groan of despair  escaped from the husband's lips when.  he read on one page: "Received from  Dick, $100," and on the other, "Spout  it;"  Minard's Liniment Cures Diphtheria.  An old Scotch ,'omnn -wiif* endeavoring to soil a hon to a neighbor.  Ai^d are you suro, said the neighbor, that tho bird has not ono dc-  fo.it?  Wool, said Ha owner, Ah'll no say  it luisnu' one defect. It will lay u  bit egg on tho lord's Day.  Jinks���������Hoarding    in    tho   country,  now, oh? What do you do with your-|  golf ovuuiiigsv ,  Winks���������Somo nights I sit outdoor-. I  to keep cool, and othor nlghle I go t >  bod to keep warm.  Mcthor���������What do you think, you  will mako out of my daughter's tul-  i-nt?  Professor (absont mlnodly)���������Abont  two dollars u Iohhou, if the piano  holds out.  Mra. llakor-��������� Is tho tablo at your  boarding bouiui of unvm-yhiK cvi-cl-  leiice?  Mrs. Ilarkor���������No; there aro dayti  when we don't hoar a word of goimlp.  ��������� T������idt_-f>.  SUPERIOR-  "Surpassing others in greatness, goodness, extent or  value of any quality."���������  Century 'Dictionary.  That's the definition, and  that's why Post Toasties are  called the  Superior Corn Flakes  ���������the surpassing, delicate  Indian Corn flavour being  scaled in by skilled toasting  with sugar and salt.  Post  Toasties  arc made in clean, airy, modern  factories -- cooked, seasoned,  rolled  and   toasted   to   crisp  golde a flukes  Heady to serve direct from  the package.  To secure thc Superior  Corn Flakes, ask for  POST TOASTIES  ���������sold by Grocers  Canadian l'onlum Cereal fo., l(td,  Wlndr-or, Out.  1  ���������1  ���������1!  $  3  <  ._  A.  4  ,.'C  *_v,  \k$'  IM  i Hi: CRESTON  REVIEW  Our stock of Toys, Books  and Fancy Goods will be as  complete this year as usual  and we solicit your trade.  Do not send your money  to the Catalogue Houses,  but patronize your home  store. You will find our  prices reasonable.  Help build up YOUR  OWN town.  Greston Drug &Book Go.  Urn it������Cl  CRESTON  Head   Offices  B.C.  CALGARY;  V \NCOU-  \/t?D.  t*r.*.,f/*^\T-ry-v  ui/ivivi>i ������ \J  Denlnrx iu  EAT  Wholesale and Retail  Fish. Game,   Poultry,  and Oysters  in Season  We have the goods, and  our prces are reasonable  P. BURNS & Go.  Local and Personal  Oreston Cemetery Co. annual meeting to-night.  R. J. Ix>ng paid Cranbrook a business visit last week.  Frank Jackson's Xmas. menu on  Page 4 is worth while.  Fred Hurry was the winner of tho  mounted deer head raffled on Saturday night.  Fob Sale���������Household furniture, including new range, chairs, mattresses,  etc., to be seen at Rev. Healey's ranch,  Erickson.  Notwithstanding the stringency  Postmaster Gibbs informs us that the  ^--,___ _!.___      _"*������1_ "������j -   -      .1      0 _.- it^i m  Country was   almost   as   heavy this  year as in 1913.  Keep your eye on the five spots yon  accept these days. Mexican money  has been found in circulation in the  Kootenay. It is in $5 bills iand bears a  strong resemblance to Dominion notes.  H. F. Mnerling, of the government  staff at Nelson spent Sunday with Guy  Lowenburg. He was en route for  England to enlist for service against  Germany. Mr. Muerling was favorably known here, having been one of  the engineers on the reclamation sur-.  vet* of the flats a few years ago.  Creston's half dozen representatives  ) along with all the other men from the  j First Canadian Contingentwill receive  | a Christmas box. containing 50 cigar-  | ettes, 4 ounces of smoking mixture  ; and a box of matches. The Nelson  Veterans' Association are doing the  Santa Clause Act in tbis instance.  Geo? Bonar o' Vah'- was in town  Friday endeavoring *������������������ ''-Mtc ���������*- -'ome  i foi- three of his girls whom he wants  to attend Creston school after the  Christmas holidays. **r. Bonar is  running a cordwood camp about five  miles east of "Yahk, having contracted  with a Lethbridge firm to ship 80 carloads of wood.  Good Morning  We are Introducing  American Silk  American Cashmere  American Cotton Lis  HOSIERY  Thoy have stood the test. Givo  real footwear comfort. No seama  to rip. Never become loose or  haggy. Tho shape is knit in���������  not pressed in.  GUARANTEED for fineness,  stylo, superiority of material and  workmanship. Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months with,  out holes, or now ones free.  OUR SPECIAL OFFER  to every one sanding us $1.00 In  currency or postal notes, to cover  advertising andahipping charged  wo will send postpaid, with written guarantee, backed liyailve-  milllon dollar company, either  J Pair* of our 75c. aalue  American Silk Hosiery,  or   4 Pair* of oar SOc. value  American Canhmcrellonicry  or   4 Pair* of our SOc. oalum  American Cotton-Lii-ilo Hosiery  or   S Pair* of Childrmn'* Ho*i*ry  Give the color, Bizo, apd  whether Ladies' or Gents' hosiery Is desired.  DON'T DELAY -Offer ox nl res  whim a dealer in your locality is  (.IlK'tCil.  THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CO.  P.O. Box SMI  DAYTON,       OHIO,        U.B.A.  JAS. H. SCUOnEU)  ������*\t*\, Lift** Mfi.1  Aeeid������**lil   I������������iurti������������*v-  ICKAI* KHTATIC,  Ktc  KAII. B.C.  <;nv   lowknkkrc;  tUmxiu.ytisn   Kt-iiMWMH  'JKHSTON  The PresbyterianTJadies' Aid bazaar  is fixed for Dec. 15. There w:'i be on  sale a fine assortment of usefid articles  as well as those suitable for Christm'is  gifts. Afternoon tea w'll also be  served. In the evening there Wi*T be  a short programme of musical and instrumental selections, grab bags, etc.,  for which the admission is 10 cents  Christ Church Ladies Guild bazaar  on Thursday last was almost a bigger  success, than the ladies had counted on  owing to the prevailing stringency.  Outside of the dolls practically all the  articles on sale were disposed of, and  the money from this source together  with the proceeds of the social in the  evening will net the society a little  better than $100.  The annual convention of the Farmers* Institute which was fixed for  January at Victoria has been cancelled. Institute headquarters, though,  is anxious to secure all resolutions  branch institutes intended submitting  to the convention. Tho resolutions  from Creston will be adopted at next  Friday nights meeting. Members with  resolutions to oifor kindly remember  this.  Comparing the number of dead deer  being brought into town with the  battalions of hunters who are abroad  iu tho woods theso days, the nntlored  monarchs of the forest must bo traveling in airship? or thoy would havo  been nil annihilated boforo now. S. E.  Bradley ventured forth yesterday with  a carefully-selected squad of of woodsmen, and notwithstanding a few previous false starts on his part wo still  have hopes of a nice venison roast.  Tuesday night's debate at the Pres  byterian Church wis the boat of tho  sonsan both in point of attendance as  woll as in learned argument ably pre-  Hcnted. Tlm subject was Resolved,  "That tho high price of land rotards  tho development of Creston Valloy."  The decision was In favor of tho ufilr-  matlvo, which was by MesnrH. Enibrco  and R. B, Staples; Joe. Compton and  Jas. Cherrington opposing for tho  negative. Refreshments woro served  ai the clone.  Tho Oreston Band Venison Dinner on  Saturday, Doe, 10, is an event that  none should miss. Venison -will bo  served hot, cold, fried, boiled, or any  other way yonr palnto inclines, from  fi.'M) to 7..10 p.m. at HO cents for adult*,  and 25 cents for child ion undor 14  years of ago. TIiohw who wish to dance  will bo --i-ir������-i .ruined at a "hop" ti-om 8  Ui IU o'clock for which an extra charge  of IM) cents for the gentlemen only will  be made and the band will supply  good  music.   This is practically the  .,..,',.....   !...>    ,..,,,i,  i,������t.tt  iniuie lot* Hiip-  .,,,..<      hi,.,,.       . f.   if       -i���������     i  is proud of.    Be sure and show your  B.C. I appreciation by being at tho dinner.  Christmas la but two weeks off.  Lancaster's advt. on Page 5 interesting as usual.  Creston brass band Veiiison dinner  and dance on the 10th.  <*  Tom Bundy was at Cranbrook on  Saturday for a meeting of railroad  telegraphers.  Sugar climbed down another 20  cents a hundred on Tuesday���������a net reduction of an even cent a pound in the  past threo weeks.  Rev. J, E, Healey will conduct the  services morning and evening in the  Presbyterian church on Sunday, and  at Canyon City in tho afternoon.  Miss Waddy, teacher in the primary  room of the Creston school, was on  the sick list the foro port of the week  her room being taken by Miss Vera  Palmer.  The hunting was rather crowded at  Arrow ������������������Creek, the early part of the  week. Tuesday night no less than  seven were quartered in one of the  sleeping apartments in the Arrow-  smith lodge at that point.  Mayor Little respectfully submits  that provided the war continues  throughout 1915, a tangible expression  of the Creston Valley "ranchers' loyalty  could be given by each and every one  of tbem donating the product of one  of their apple trees to the Patriotic  Fund.  Dean Doull of Victoria, who, on  Nov. 25 was elected Bishop of Koote-  nav, on Sundav announced his acceptance of tbe high office and will take  o*.-er the duties in February. One of  his first official acts after, consecration  will h- to hold a confirmation  service  Eight mipils for pruning and twelve  for packing ar** required in order to  have these schools conoueted at Creston this season. For the convenience  of all those ieterested enrollment  lists have been put up in the postoflBce  or you can enlist at the office of Secretary Lidgate of the Farmers' Institute.  JThe Following DISCOUNTS Wiii  given on IMMEDIATE ORDERS  25 per cent on Apple Trees  10 per cent on All Other Nursery Stock Except  [Rose Bushes  Do not place your order before getting our quotations  The RSwersitBe Nurseries  Comprising t25 Acres GRAND FORKS, B. C.  Frank V. Staples, Agent, Erickson, B. C.  A successful meeting of the ?Red  Cross Aiixiliarv was held at the home  of Mrs. McMurtrie on Tuesday afternoon, nineteen ladies being present.  The total amount collected in the Red  Cross boxes in town to date is $8.20.  The hexfc genera.' meeting of the Auxiliary wil1 be at, the home of Mrs. Bennett on Tuesday, Dec. 22, at ?* /o'clock.  Fresh eggs are-retailing at 55 cents  per doxen. Tlie high price was responsible for at least one resident killing off one able-bodied on-strike hen  as a sort of notice to the other egg-  producers of the flock to get busy or  share the same fate, and sure enough  next day the output of egge increased  from one to half a dozen per diem.  The reorganized Creston orchestra  is practising regularly and is now open  for* engagment. The organization is  under the leadership of Mrs. Crompton, with Mrs. Fowler, pianist; Messrs.  Winters and Blinco, clarionets. Considerable new music has been purchased which along with all the old favorites will enable them to present an  attractive musical menu for dances etc.  Following thp putting of the Creston  depot on to a one-man footing tho C.P.  R. last week closed the stations at  Kitchener and Rampart, and dispensed  with tho services of Jan operator at  Oranbrook. Tho agent at Kitchener  has been thoro since 1808, and will  likely bo given a* station on tho Kcoto-  nay Central lino between Golden and  OalvattI, which will bo operated commencing noxt week.  Cranbrook Herald: Mrs. J. H.  Doyle returned-from Oroston Monday,  whoro she spent a wook visiting with  Mr. Doyle, manager of the King  Goorgo hotol. About the middle of  the month Mrs.' Doyle and lier daughter, Miss Bernadotto, will move to  Creston to reside. Miss Augusta, tho  eldest daughter, who holds a responsible position with tho Kootonay Telephone company, will remain in tho  oity.  Frank Jackson captured a small owl  Tuonday afternoon on the road in front  of his store. Intentionally or otherwise Frank took a mean advantage of  this wise guy of ihe bird family as  when nabbed the owl was just starting  In to mako his evening meal off a nice  plump English * spin row that he had  caught browning around Bob Hold's  poultry-feuding ground. When interviewed the owl stated it was from tbo  Arrow Creek counti-y but so numerous  were the Ureijton him torn In those  parte it had conclud-nd Itu llfo Wt.uld l*e  alwiolutely iiafo In town. Beside**, Jt  bad hoard '.Tim Cherrington was taking a hand In a debate on the land  ijui-hmoii ana it hml come m a bit early  li, Im nun*, ui tx goou mull, i'oi* i?he event.  Finding tilings too stirring hero the  owl puller] out for Moylo yo.itoi-.liiy.  The Creston Mercantile Co. are  showing a very nice line of  which we have marked at very  low prices, including Fancy  Guns and Saucers, Fancy B &  B Plates, Tea Sets, &c, Bon  Bon Dishes, Mustard Pots,  Salt and   Pepper   Shakers, &c.  Also a table of F^cy C^  which we will sell at a Discount  of 20 per cent*  ������ ' *���������'-'' " :���������**���������- 1 ������������������     .  Pudding Bowls for Xmas. Puddings  Ttie Cresion Mercantile Co.  LIMITED  WE SELL A  Drag Saw Outfit at a Snap  will cut 30 Cords of Wood per day  Second-hand Sewing Machines from $10 up  SPRAY OUTFITS, both hand and  power, fully  equipped, ready to spray.  Stickney, Maesey-Harris and Olds Gas Engine....  150 feot lj-inch Fire Hosje at a snap. ?     ���������  Farm Implements of every rloRoription.      /   , ' ,  ���������   ' ������������������ .��������� i       ." ''V^,;*;;',:.'���������./'*..'��������� til:'/:'..  High grade Kerosene, Gasolene OUb ������j,nd GreasQH  )       .���������'"..'*. A'''.'*',!  .,'-;'   tititi'-ti,ti-\:  "a  -ii-., ���������   I .imi HI n���������1���������mmmmm .  ������������������   *     ������������������<���������"  .?..; ���������:".->.;' .���������?���������������������������.:,������������������������������������  ., . , .������������������*,������������������. i . ���������������������������-.<   . .     .'...-  z    .',-.���������. ,. i . ,  Creston Auto & Supply Co.  tr,������V^Tsf%JKI        ... *������ c.  it. ������. JiliiV AIM, Manager  i  ���������  ii  wm*Smm  ******  ��������� .,'.,i'<i.',������*i������rfU,4l',W4H,_rw������kitt,!,i,>'������1_l\MUU  ,'������?;^^l

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