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Creston Review Oct 16, 1914

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 .-"���������.  - i.-  .'���������- o-'  _. -*~ ..  ^*    .  W*'-/v���������'  ^REVIEW  No. 40  CRESTON, B. C, FRIDAY, OCTOBBER 16, 1914  6th Yeah  3 f-S  Local and Personal  ^r*  Patriotic concert. Friday, Nov. Q. Q  Additional Local and Persona! page 8  Lancaster & Co. advt. on Page 5 is  worthy of your .u������������*efi������l -_t.trenf.ion.  Orchestra dance at ��������� Mercantile Hall  t*>nigbt. Dancing atO o'clock prompt.  Friday, the 16th inst-, is the"dafce of  the regular monthly meeting' of the  (.reston Fawners' Institute.  Excavation has started on the new'  parish hall .in connection with Christ  '���������hureh. "Bees" are the order of the  dayin accomplishing the work.  The Creston-Erickson Rifle Association had the final shoot for the Dominion Plate on Thanksgiving Day. The  turn out was slim on account of wet  weather.       y---  The flrst offerfor the Red Cross fund  comes from the Creston Drug & Book  Co. They are selling a fine lot of real  photo reproductions of wpr scenes and  giving the entire receipts to the socie-  tys work.    Seo the window display.  - There should be no famine in grain  and mial feed in the vaiiey for a few  days. The Union unloaded two cars  of it this week and the Institute one.  The supply of oats and shorts was very-  low.  STALE READING���������Pages 2, 3, 6  and Tof tins week's issue, will be found'  stale reading. Our bundle of ready-  print had not arrived up to Thursday  morning and we are compelled to use  some "overs" from previous issues.  . E. Maiiendaine has started in tb  demonstrate that the Creston'Valley  . is well adapted for sheep-raising. He  received,a drove of half a dozen Shrop-  shires on Friday, and at least one  Other enthusiast intends followingTiis  lead.   . t -��������� "     ��������� .-  Y "J^iCfllsiNCh-On account of illiiess  Jta thefamdy of the Rev. J. P. West-  Vman he will not be able to be in Crest-  - on from Ogt/rah-to 22nd;5    The illustrated  lectttres 'are.cancelled.     Tlie  Pumpkin Pie Social which wasto have  been held fai Mercantile Hall on the  17th is withdrawn. ��������� :: "Y- -'���������' ' .V.\..'  tionaif  s^eat-A-i  should 'be thankful  National   Thanks  Crenton Presbyterian church thanksgiving service was- held on Sunday  night. The weather was decidedly  disagreeable and under the circum-  stances the atto_.ila.bce was aii that  could be expected though not at all  in proportion to the merits tif Rev. G.  TV. Blake's address.  C His text was from Psalm 100, 4-5:  "Enter into his gat-ee-With thanksgiving and into his courts ynth praise; be  thankful unto .him and bless his name,  for the Lord is good; his mercy is everlasting and his truith endureth to all  generations."  His remarks took the form of a na-  thanksgiving sermon, and in  g of the reasons why Canada  he iaid particular  stress on the pride we all should feel  in being citizens of an empire whose  promise to nations as well as individuals, no matter what the consequence,  was something more than a mere  "scrap of paper/' As Canadians we  should be thankfidfor the peace-loving  nation to the south of us; thankful  that although the big European nations were suffering from the awful  effects of the worst war the world has  ever seen here in Canada we nursue  the even tenor of our ways without  let or hindrance; thankful for the  bountiful harvest and stable business  conditions ' prevailing, and for the  magnificent development ahead of  Canada if her citizens but grasp the  commercial opportunities tbat are  bound to follow in the wake of the war  and specially emphasing thepoint that  thankfulness to be really acceptable  unto God must be deeper than the  mere outward expression of gratitude  for mercies shown. -  How Al>out\the Youths ������  W-r.  Dean Klinck  Visits Creston  Dr. J. Klinokf dean oi the faculty of ft-C. TT-nwersity, and Thos.  Cunningham, provincial fruit pests  inspector, were visitors to Creston  on Monday and' Tuesday.  Along with Dr. F- W.Wesbrook,  president .of jbhe university (who  was compelled to return home last  week) they are _ on a tour of the  province, looking . into the agricultural prospects, studying conditions  d making Investigations in order  aiXVJL  that they may foe able to formulate  The Best News  KITCHENER  v'tf  Editor Thb RByrEW:?  Sir,���������Your recent editorial though  admirable in its suggestion seems to  me to have neglected one that is really  moro important. What are we doing  to amuse ahd interest our youths, the  boys and girls ; from 10 to 17 years of  ago?? ?;;' ?.._...;���������,?.. ������.  v.; It Is deplorable to poo them at tho  present time with no rational healthy  form of employment for their leisure  hours. A large number aoem to find  their greatest joy in hanging; around  the dopot at train time and certain  others in shrieking and yolling in tlio  town. But of rational amusomont  there is not a sign.  I vontnro to nugges-i that the school  being token ns tlio centre of youthful  life a Games and Athletic Club should  bo formed Iii two hi .ipehoH������ ono for  tiiobdyo and another for jilio girls.    .  Tho boys branch should havo boxing  gloves, singlestick.-, nnd ns much gyni-  iios-k* appliances as possible, which  could bo addod to by degrees as funds  grow, and also at least throo teams for  either baseball, football, basketball or  evleket a penim-, middle and junior  team.  The glrlH conld share tbe gymnastic  nppiinituK, having definite days ami  hones Uu Um mi) and tMuld aiao have  b/iHlc.'fball, hockey or other tcama.  Ah to the (jueHtion  of expense tlie  hoys nml glrlN Hhould thomHolvcN mib-  Horibo a Hiimll fee per diem to belong I  to those clubs, and (heir |iiu*entii could '  doubUcaa be  provalli-d   upon   io help  (hem io nlai-1 them. j  1 cannot help thinking that hih-Ii i\ \  tliil. ...m.i.I *hi oi", i In? gri'iilesl, hoiio.it ;  Ut the town and the hcIuioI, provided I  tlmt it in kept iiliHolutely free from I  Mootai-inu iiilluence nnd as a IbiiiK per- I  lahiiug to the OicHon hcIioOI. !  - ' ..... ...H  jlili   \l i il   111 111    liplM'l'  lOI* (Jl IH !  Mi*. Stauvald, late of Bull River, left  for Cranbrook, after spending a week  in Kitchener.  W, Noble of Cranbrook spent Sunday in jS.tc_.ener.  S��������� A. Reid' is one of the lucky hunters in this neck of the woods. After a  three Week's hunt he Iaiided. ;his deer.  He is now looking for the'other two  that thelaw has alotted to hi nt.  ���������Olsen ?&?Miller madi-^a trip to the  head' of Ru-isel Creek in quest of deer  but returned emptyhanded. They put  the blame on the foggy weather. That  is alright, ��������� boys, but we will toice it  with a,grain of salt.  Little Ellen Andeen was .again put  in a plaster cast and will be confined  to her bed for several weeks.  E. Payne of Oreston was here this  week decorating H. RyihOlPs residence  with a brand new ohimney.  Messrs. Leodbeater and Sinclair of  Erickson are camped on Hrtr/ol Greek,  trying to got ihoir share, of big game  and birds.  DUCK CREEK  o'l.-l..  ������>..\. I  A  Carl Carlson met with a painful accident the latter part of last week. Ho  was busy snagging out stumps with a  toam and chain, when a small stump  lib was pulling got froo of the chain  and flow up and struck him on the fore*  howl? inflicting a nasty gash right  across fr-Om, tho right oyo up to hlB  hair. Ho was hastily driven into town  by Carl Wlfton and Dr, Henderson  noon lived him up with three sllk-lio*  and all kinds of bandage. Ho bus now  ndarly recovered,- his only anxiety being (Suit ho would 'not bo rocovored  Hiifllclontly to take in the* grand ball  on tin. 2Jlrd.! Choor up baby the worst  is yot to como.  Ono of the largest congregations on  record assembled for service on Sunday altoi-nooji, but owing to tho in-  < leniency of the weather pat-tor Blake  was not ablo to got out.  Mr. Pease and Walter Corbet' returned from thoir hunting trip up  Dnok Crook. Thoy wero fortunate  enough to capture a iloor apiece, also  a niimbei- of grouse and ono trout.  They are evidently better with the  rule than the fish pole.  Ml-H. W. A. Pease wm. a visitor to  Duck Crook on Tuesday.  Mrs. Thorpe and Minn Melh-eetb  were Dock Creek eallorH. TnoNilav.  jNoi-miiii t'raigie and Jack Penneii  \-.������-r������-. -.nr-.ii>n nilloi-H TtioHdav,  a progressive a^giacultura! faeulty  for the universifcybased on accurate  information concerning the province and its agricultural possibilities. _.''"  As far as the limited time at the  disposal of Prof. Kluck would permit, a thorrugh inspection of the  Creston valley, was Taaade, particular pains being taken in looking  over tlie flats in view of their re-  clamation at "a very early date.  When seen by The ' Review at  the Creston -House on Tuesday,  prior to their departure for Nelson,  the professor was not* shy in praising, the valley; tbe district, he said  being looked upon as one of the  most important fruit growing centers of the province. Discussing  the reclamation of the flats he had  no hesitation in saying the quality  and area of the land to be reclaimed justified any^.lfov^Mnment in undertaking the great work at the  earliest possible moment'..  Mr. Cunningham stated, visits  to Creston were always of particular interest to himself. Eighteen  years ago, when small ranches owned by F. Little and Mr. Arrow-  smith were the only, attempts at  fruit culture in the. whole valley,  lie was busy advising the then-settlers to get hold of ail tho land they  could and go in for fruit raising,  and in his trips through the country on Monday and Tuesday it. was  gratifying to see on every hand so  much evidence that his faith in the*  productivity of the valley was  more than justified.  0 Speaking ofthe flats Mr. Cunningham strongly urged that in  view of reclamation that these  lands should be utilized for the development of tho live stock industry in the valloy, thus ensuring an  all-year-round prosperity for Creston.  Regarding tho prevalence of fruit  pests in the valloy, Mr. Cunningham asanrod The Review that  this seotion had boen particularly  fortunate thiayear. fcJoab, of course,  had been somewhat prevalent* particularly on the Jonathan, and Mcintosh Rod varieties, bnt this troublo wonld continue its ravages so  long as Httlo or no attention was  paid to spraying. He ventured tho  opinion that thero was not a, power  sprayer in tho wholo valloy; in a  similar sized Htredoh of country iu  Wot-liing-on there would be at  least seven  of thom.  According to tho inspector ono of  tho oliiof noedH of thoCroston growers was a cool storago wnrohouno  hi?; o, ami tlie samo necessity obtains  at many othor points: No permanent prom.ori(.y oould <������mm out of  tho prosont Hystorn of disponing of  applon an hooii an packed, glutting  tho markot and forcing down prioos.  WxporimentH had shown that proporly handled our applos wore trood  IcuofMHu    Ho   know   of some   Mc-  Bonners Ferry, Idaho, Oct.  10���������Anungemenis are under  way to haVe engineers cf the  United States and Canadian  governments meet here to investigate the problem of  Kootenai Valley drainage.  If plans are earned out, 100,-  000 acres would be reclaimed.  Senator J. H. Brady, who  spoke here yesterday, received a wire from Washington  saying a United States government engineer will be  named to meet William  Young, representing the Canadian government, here soon.  The Review learns that Mr.  Young arrived in Creston the  early part of the week and left  almost immediately for Bonner's Ferry to get basy with  the American engineer on the  preliminary work to be done  jointly by both countries.  CRANBROOK  The city's Chinese citizens have contributed $54 to the Sunshine society  for the relief of distress in the city.  In'connection with the two companies o������,the East Kootenay regiment  ������ Volunteer ���������"CiU'b'^a; social -orgjtoiaa^  tion���������has been formed.  Five Cranbrook boys are showing 25  pounds of potatoes each at the Victoria  show this week.  The agricultural ���������* department has  offered to conduct a short course in  some branch of farming at Cranbrook  this fall, providing enough names'can  be secured.  The city has disposed of .$35,000  worth of the water works debentures  at 88. The funds derived will enable  the city to complete the whole of the  distributory system this fall. The 14-  inch supply main and the darn cannot  be touched until further sale of debentures are made. ...   '  The Cranbrook branch of tho St.  John's Ambulance Association have  now commenced their work on wrist-  ors, socks, etc., and by "November the  1st expect to. have-a number of articles  ready to Bend away.  A troup of vaudeville players under  tho Paiitages circuit are giving a two  nights' performance on Thursday and  Friday at tho auditorium. This is tho  first road show that has been in Oranbrook since tbo war started.  Miss Sutherland, the deaconess, loft  the first of tho week for Fernie, whoro  she will work in connection with the  Presbytoridn church in future.  Iniiosh Rods that had boon kopt in  storage until May that woro shipped oast and whon finally used almost in tho middle of Juno woro  still in frrih.Q condition. Better  prioos wero also obtainable Last  yoar apples sold in tho fall realized, in Vancouver $1.25 por box.  Tho samo grado of fruit marketed  in February and March fan. id ready  sale at $8.00 Cool storage waro-  housoH, ho pointed out aro not a  financial imposHibility in any locality, tho govornmont advancing 80  por cont, of thoir cost when built  by rosponsiblo companion.  Boforo   loaving tlio   dintriot Mr.  C'.'.MJ-iri^];-.".,!  will  iiir-i-Mx:'/ Mm, qiuir-  nntino stations of tho fruitt. inn|>oo-  tion branch at Foriiit*, KingHgate,  Cranbrook, and Waneta nnd will  mako i-iwiviuiAtin ft.*��������� *i.i ���������'.������������������������������������,{,'-,���������  worb tif b'-''���������>���������������.*:*.:::.::' :::  triot.  Busy on Concert  "Take hold of the wings of the morning  And flop 'round the earth till you're  dead,  And you can't get away from the turn-  that they play  To the bioomm' oid rag overhead."  Tlie truithfulness of the above���������  from some of Kipling's poetry-  promises to be amply proven in the  program, which is being arranged  for the patriotic concert on Friday,  Nov. 6.  Mesdarnes Carpenter, Crompton,  and Maiiendaine and Messrs Mac-  Donald, Bull, Moore, Crompton  and Blake, the committee in charge  of the program, have completed a  rough draft of the numbers to be  presented and the artists taking  part and The Review has no hesitation in saying the offerings compare more than favorably with  those submitted at similar concerts  at other pointa in B.C.  Those in charge of the sohocl  children commenced rehearsals on  Tuesday. The children will contribute at least one drill and one or  two choruses, and with the three  ladies aforementioned ably assisted  by the teachers drilling them something particularly meritorious can  be counted on. There will be solos,  quartettes, instrumentals, and orchestra, selections in the music line  with enough literary numbers to  piece out an extremely well-balanced program, every item on. which  will be good for at least a -double  ^3Es*H*_v     %~^~;>-*"~'     **"-"-"���������"������������������>- -  The committee on decorations,  with Mrs. Cherrington at it_j head,  is also active getting a line on the  available supply of materials for  the purpose and we are assured  a sight of the decorations alone will  be almost worth the price of admission, -ti   ^  Similar entertainments have been  and are being held all over the province���������as much as $190,; being netted in places not as large as Creston. Those who are behind the  concert, here, however, feel sure  Creston's financial showing on Nov.  6 will rOgistor a high wat%?mark  that will take some beating'in the  Kootenays at least. *r-  The admission is at ? popular  pricos, 50o and 25o, and.the date  FRIDAY, NOV. 8.  NELSON  Among recent donations to the Pa  triotlc Fund is two acres of land to be  disposed of as desired.  The only prevalent infectious disease  during September was chicken pox of  which thoro wort,. 20 cases.  Seven of the nine dairies of tho oity  at least are making improvements to  their buildings .and promi_*o_i iu order  to .meet tho requirements ofthe city  milk bylaw which will come into effect  in December.  A i-pcclal convention of tlio British  Columbia Sunday School Association  which will lie held in Nolson on Oct.  21, 22, 23.    Delogatpp from all  part of  of thc province: areYxpei-U.-d.  Tho demand for dressed turkeys at  tho public market on Saturday was  away beyond the supply. 510 eon ts per  pound was the ruling price,  It.iv. K. K. I/Ogie, for three yearn  pastor of the Presbyterian clmreli, has  resigned and will shortly move to Spokane.  A carload of plate gloss has ivn-ehed  tbo eit.y to be uhoiI tn replacing the  windows timaHhed during the reeoni  Hiilldiiiig rampago.  '    .ini -Tm-i Wi-T.ll_ll--_i.ilM-,-.  1*  ....  i im   "-tk'-.-na   InttiniiH any   that tlic  weather will be flue until  Clii-iatitUiH.  wj  *vJ!  - 'fi  '��������� j?'  W.J  ���������A  l  ,v...'-".. 4  ****>������*  mytrnti**  ftl  *^mmm***tSl  ���������������-ffei-a-fc-������*i '.use: '**>���������.'! ^'.,i\rf;]i,fm;  ���������titi^^^ammmm *..">    '  *\  *���������.*-.  THE REVIEW. CRESTON. B. C  ENGLAND'S FOOD SUPPLY  LARDER   WELL   FILLED   AND   NO  DANGt .. OF HUNGER  Mainly Luxuries That Will be Cut Off  On Account of the War���������Many  Staples Can Still be Imported as  Required.  England's food suppl. r.ppears to  be adequate tor some months to  come, and now that the first excitement over the war crisis has settled  down, the rumors of a danger of famine in the country are shown to be  unfounded. Prices began to go up  at once, esecially on wheat and  flour, which control the price of bread,  but    assurances    regarding    the    re-  of sews and ewes and cows.  Some cottage people, who have been  unable in the last day or two to get  dnlivery of food, have already begun  to sell their'sows, and it has become  very important that some official assurance as to the supply of fodder  should; be given, since the holding up  of stores may do almost as much damage in this direction as a general  shortage.  "There are," one importer said,  "tho-.sands and thousands of tons of  moat in the Smithfleld cold storage,  and  with, reasonable    economy    and  CHRISTIAN  ENDEAVOR  Outline of the Ideals and Methods of  the   Movements,  by  William  Shaw, LL.D.  The fundamental difference ' etween  the ideals and; methods of the Christian Endeavor.'-"movement and those of  the organizations  that had  preceded  it was in the emphasis placed Aipon  the  element ot religious    obligation,  and the definite character of its committee work. ? It made duty its Keynote, not feelliig or amusement.   The  sources of the United Kingdom have i Billingsgate   have    predicted    a  hsh.h.gioni   the   v  now begun io have a beneficial effect, | famine.     There    are    practically  uo ; had demount.*  The country as a whoU-  rational view of the sit.  in a few cases has   fear  the   point   of   &tten__.t.i.r.g   to   buy   up  unnecessary household supplies. Many ;  of the grocers, to their credit, have   A leading member of the Ooal Factors'  ge  01  exces-! Society stated that London was well  prayer-meeting' was its heart, with the  spiritual dynamic io inspire and energize all its individual and committee  activities.  before'the'fa ulcus aphorism ot the  psychologist, "No impression without  expression."  had  boon applied  to  re-  refused  to  take  advantage  sive demands,    and    by asking cash  and calming    their    customers    have  sought to lessen pr.nic and frustrate  selfish  buyers.  The press has been urging the fotly  care, the supply may last six months.'  "Owmg^to the depletion of fishing  crews by the calling out of the reservists aud the position in the North  Sea," says the Telegraph, "many vessels are reported to be on the point of  ceasing activity,   and  authorities    at  ,-oung people's movement  j .u-mut*.     mere     are     i-rucuutuiy   uu ��������� had demonstrated it.    The society he  ���������s  taking a J stocks of cured or salte-i fish in tin? j Caiue  the  manual  training  school of  . :.n.    Only j coun ry, as the popnlar taste for this i the church, where the young' disciples  H-evalled to |-dass of article has declined. (    ! learned how to speak by speaking, and  t!"^   how to work by  working.  It is safe to say jthat it. has "largely-  helped to transform the attitude of the  church toward the young disciples*..  The church now that is not. actively  iJui.en.aii.eCi   ou  ' Coal Exchange regarding the position.  supplied with coal, the" stocks in hand  being sufficient to moot demands for  a considerable time.  1   interested lu the'training of its' young  I people  is  a  curiosity.    It"    has  also  Kingdom against war risks, and  care for the distribution of food lauded, have done much to reassure people. They* are realizing that danger  lies not so much iu actual shortage as  iu a fear of shortage, which might  produce panic. A general setiment  against selfisfi buying is being fostered.  Reg-ording the wheat resources, a  writer iu the Daily Telegraph says:  '���������\Vheat and flour are far aud away  Uii most iftiportant articles imported  into the country. Whereas the aver-  cousumption of wheat foodstuff per  head of the population is, roughly.  342 pounds, the average annual consumption of meat of all kin-��������� is only  about 120 pounds per capita".  "Happily,  as  the  following  figures  show. Great Britain    is relying    less  aud less upon    foreign    market  her supply of cereals, while more and  more  grain   is   being  imported   from  our overseas dominions.    Our   wheat  imports   now,  as  compared    with  14  years ago, are divided as follows:  Wheat Imports���������Grain,  from British Empire:  1S9S ���������  ���������    1,978,320  1912    '-    5_U23?905  From foreign countries.  1898   50,387,720  1912       50.448,6:54  Wheatmeai and Flour  From British Empire:  1893        1.879,820  1912.      4,710,727  From foreign countries:  1898 \    l9,0.-.8,789  1912      5,478,749  "India takes the lead with (in 1912)  an export to Great Britain of 25,370.-  000 cwt. of wheat, of -.he value of  ������ 10,945,999. Canada's consignmenr  .of 21,501,000 cwt. was valued at ������8,-  845,000. Australia's contribution of  wheat was valued at ������5,335,000; From  America cam'e 19,974,000 cwt. r_  whet valued at .������8,327,000 and from  Argentina, ������7,775,000 " worth of  wheat, ������8,435,000 worth of maize and  ������2,504,000 worth of oats. Last year  the total wheat and wheat-flour retained for home consumption was  149,641,000 cwt.  "Supplies may be said to come in  continuously throughout the year, as  follows:  January���������Wheat from Pacific coast  of America.  February uid Maroh���������Argentine  wheat.  April���������Australian whea..  July  and   August���������American   (winter) wheat, Canadian wheat.  i.eptember and  October���������American  (spring)   wheat,  Russian wheat.  November���������Canadian wheat.  Optimism about the wheat supply Is  further    reflected by a writer in the  Chronicle as follows:  ....  "The board of agriculture and fisheries stated officially that this year's  wheat crop of the United Kingdom is  crown on an averago 4 per cent, greater than last yoar, and that the yield  will bo above the average. It ia estimated that the crop will bo not Iobb  tlinn 7,000,000 quarters. After deductions for seed and taking stocks into  account on which an inquiry conduet-  O't hy the hoard has just boon completed���������there is now in this country  sufficient wheat to supply the wholo  population for about four months. This  ntyows for tho normal rnto of consumption, and it is irrespective of all  futuro   imports   from   abroad."  Tlie Mituntlnn wllh record lo m.,it  Is not loss satisfactory. Tho normal  killing), of home-grown stock supply  iii) per cent, of tho annual consumption, l.ii'.land is not necessarily dependent upon foreign imports for tho  bitiiiiice of HiippliuH, uh iu case ot emergency it could ho provided by  slaughtering a larger proportion of  home stock. This contingency cannot,  however, urino in present circum-  ���������it'-m:.*;,. 'Micro in ul tlii*. moment an  exceptionally large supply of forolgn  meat In cold i'toi*ugc. Heavy con*  HlpcnmonlH urn on the way. Thoro Is,'  therefore, no Jum Mention In tho present . osltlnn for any rlno In prlco in  meat.  A prominent ol'l'lolnl of the hoard of  agriculture nuld that if tho prlco of  meat or alurm at. the price of i'ooUln..  Htufft. ouunen farmers and brooders to  Mil f������.������������iMi������* 'm-Hiv-i:'!'' th*? lot'.? to the  country will bo fell for yearn. It In  liiipoHwIlilc to way how Ioiik K would  ttiko to uupply the loin-, If there In  nnythlnr. like n wholenule slaughtering  'Although the   prices of vegetabl.s j changtHl the attitude of the young peo-  howed   a     considerable     increase,   j llla tf)Wiml the curcli.   No longer do  loot and camp on the outer  are in the heart of things.  ,.���������   ... ... ���������,-. ......  ...widened their conception of  10 ' S-t^h*    *VpoU   ,   ?*    resources ,-ol i the religious life, and instead of plac  French soil as at other seasons. Our ���������*���������*--���������  The press has been urging the fotly I *"������������-eu   a     -eonsiueraote     increase,   ������������������   u. toward  of a food panic and thc government J sa-V3 the Standard, "there is no fear   [x      hoUl a  plans to insure shipping carrying food   ?/ a P**'������������e- m  that direction.    A* this      . J   .lho  and    raw    material    for    the United   Mme ot the yeur London is not so do- - u ha4 hr  ��������� ....   .^..ii - , .( ing    th    emphasis    upon being saved,  o*n vegetable crop is a good one. and j t,*ir molto\s< .-Sav^*  to serve."  t-.i       ..-I       -i JV������.     t ���������!     U  has  placed  the voung people  at  -.tuple  article���������the    potato���������has    tie' - * ���������-  best crop for years, and is generally   .  the front in all movements for temper  ance,   civic   righteousness   and  moral  S!f -P^i,di?faS*'    Th������re������orf-    wHl:e��������� reform  and  to   their  leadership  the  householder may   have  to  pay  a  higher   price   for   that  commodity in  the future, any idea of famine priees  haviug to he paid may at once be dismissed. Beans, peas, and caobages  may show heavier advances, but these  are not so indispensable as the potato  and the householder will be able to  economize supplies in that direction.  "The fruit market presents a different aspect. The London marker  ordinarily revives two-thirds of its  supply from France. With the almost abnormal home crop of the pre-  j-pj sent season, our neighbors' contribution was estimated at three-fifths.  Advices received are to the effect  that the last vessel of the line supply  ing the market from Cherbourg has.  left, while from Havre and Honfleur  there will be no steamers. No notification has "been received from St.  Malo, and it is hoped that that service may be maintained a few days  longer. Even if the trices of ^ren"'1  fruit become so exorbitant as to  prohibit them from the modest household, there will be little hardship."  "Only necessaries matter, and in  that category, must be included eggs,  sugar, butter, and bacon. At least  two-thirds of our egg supply will be  cut off by the closing of the markets  of South-Eastern Europe." . We are  used to obtaining immense supplies  of beet sugar from France, Germany  and Russia; these will very largely,  or perhaps, entirely, cease. Butter  and bacon come to us chiefly from  Denmark, though. Holland also-sends  ur. the former. 'The- Danish market  will remain open so long as we are  neutral; but we shall have to hid for  our supplies against insatiable buyers. The extent to which the Danish  market will remain open will depend  upon the degr_e of supremacy asserted and maintained by the British  fleet. If our supremacy at sea is  made absolute and indisputable, there  is no reason _yvhy supplier should not  come in as regularly as in peace tim-_,  or that prices should ever reach an  exaggerated figure.  "The character of the food supplies imported by Great Britain to  any appreciable extent from countries  involved in the war,, and therefore  liable to curtailment with a resultant  rise in price, may be seen from the  f-Ilowing details:  From Russia we import wheat, oats,  eggs, harley and butter.  From   Austria-Hungary���������Flour.  From   aormans���������Oats,     eggs    and  sugar.  From France���������Butter, vegetables,  sugar and chocolate.  '���������Russian supplies about ono-sovent*.  of our imported wh*.at, moro than half  tho barley, and four-fifths of the  oats, with one-sixth of our butter imports and one-third of eggs, normally furnishes* flvo-liftlis of our  Riigar supplies, and Franco ranks  next. Tho principal raw materials  of BritiHh Industries likely to he affected in prlco and quantity hy tho  outbroak of war throng lout l.uropo  ure:  Flax, tlio material of tho Ulster and  Scotch linen trade, importod from  Russia.  Hemp���������Russia and Italy contribute about one-fourth of Imported  supply.  Wood mid timber���������lttiRRia supplies  two-Hovonths of tho total imports.  Pc-iroleuiu���������About ono-third from  Rr.-tHlu.  "Tho only raw mntorlalb of industry, proporly no cullod, importod from  Germany, Italy and Franco aro dye-  ing i.nd tanning Htuffs, raw hides, und  various chalks."  was  largely due the nation-wide interest in  such campaigns as the "Go-toChurch-  Sunday." aud the "Saloonless Nation  by  1920."  It has given to the young people a  new vision of the churches' obligation  to obey the great commission, "Go  yo into all the world," and the ir.itial  plans for the great and successful educational campaign for missibns, carried on by the Young People's Interdenominational Missionary Movement,  now the Missionary Education Movement, were prepared by Amos R. Wells  and Earl Taylor, leaders in Christian  Endeavor; and the Epworth League;  and the young people's societies have  also?furnished the field and the force  to, carry out these plans.  The best available statistics would  indicate an enrollment of approximately 9,000 young people's societies and  .4,000,000 members in North America.  Tlie societies are organized upon the  broadest possible basis of service, and  engage in an infinite variety of ac-  tivies. These miglit be grouped as  follows:  The Prayer Meeting, with- its training in expression of religious truth  .and experience, and cultivation of the  devotional spirit.  The Quiet Hour an.i Morning  Watch, for the deepening of the personal religious life.  The Study Classes, for missions, the  Bible, civics, church doctrine, personal work, etc.  Heading Courses, Christian Culture  Courses, and literary evenings for the  broadening of the intellectual life.  The Social Work, for the promotion  of real recreation.  The Departments and  Committees,  .h their definite training.  It is difficult for ��������� an crgaaizatlon  whose mission it to train workers for  ofc'ier and more speciaii*_-.d forms oir-  work to import specific achievements,  and doubly difficult to do so without"  appearingto claim credit for results .*,  large part of. which belong, to other  organizations.; But, acting as. -a -re-*-  poi-ter simply, may ?! iiass?; oh?���������-.Ydiat.  has been reported to tne?  Mr. Fred B. Slmth, the Inspiring  leader of the Men and Religion Moyev  V'-mt, said at the great Congress in  Now York that; hi? first cxperiene in  personal -work, and his training for  such service, was received In a Clirist-  icn Endeavor Society In a home-mis--  slbn church in Dakota,  v The founder of the Baraca Bible  Class, Mr? M. A. Hudson, has said  that it was his Chritslan Endeavor  training that at last found expression  in  the organized Bible class.  The Presbyterian Brotherhood of.  Chicago, which was the pioneer of tha  men's brotherhoods in all our  churches,'-was organized by Andrew J.  Stevenson, ahd he said it was7tl\e result of bis training in? the Christian  Endeavor" Society. -; r   ������������������._���������. Y  . The Laymen-s Missionary Movement was th������ expression in. manhood  of the training John B.Sleman,had  received in the Society o������^^ Christian  ���������Endeavor in boyhood. '  '"'?-v- '?-",vYY?-7'Y  It was William T. Ellis, world-traveller and journalist, himself a pro-  duet of our young people'^ movement,  reeciving his rst training in; journalism as the editor of a little Christian  'l_ deavor local paper in York, Penn.,  vho said that of nearly three hundred  i issionaries whom he met 'on a? journey to mission lands, practically .all  who had gone out in this feneration  said they were there because of the  vision received in the missionary work  of their young.people's societies.  Thirty years ago tlie missionary in-  teres'r in the local -'churches was al  most exclusively-'among-the women.  Today it challenges the attention of  our strongest men. As nover before  men are going into partnersn.p with  God, and the Christian Endeavor  Tenth Legion alone has enrolled 32,-  000.  young    peopie    alone, accepting  CULTI VATlOr.    TO    KILL    WEEDS  Extra Work Pay-sT For Itaelf iii La.t.9-  ? er and Cleaner Crops ??  ���������'One- of the best methods of .-eradicating weeds���������a source of enormous loss  to farmers���������is as follows: Immediately after the hay or grain. harvest,  plough the land very shallo.wiy wlttt  a gang plough, turning a furrow two  or three inches deep. Then put on* a  heavy land roller-which willpack the  sod and thereby hasten its decay-  next use the disk and follow-:*s-?ith -the  smoothing harrows. . Should any weed  growth appear, keep the disk, and harrows going at short?intervals until  the soil is well decayed. A cultivator  with broad - poitt-3 may then, be -used.  The object Vis to destroy all?' rweed  growth?'until Vautumh; -wbien.?theVsoil  should* be- ploughed? thoroughly and  r$ell  Setup to  the winter's  frost.  On such land it is best, to.sow soois  kind of hoed crop,-such? as roots, corn  or potatoes, that requires-constant  hoeing aud cultivation during the.  growing season. If this method of cultivation is adhered-to closely/it-will  bo found to be one of the best meahe  i i* eradicating noxious weeds and ais������  of preparing the soil for future crops.  Actual experiments' have demonstrated that a much greater yield  may be expected from land cultivated,  in the foregoing manner as compare!  ���������v.Ith that secured from fields which,  have been, left in sod and ploughed in  late autumn. In one instance,; -two  four-acre plots were cropped with oata.  for purposes of comparison;- and the  plot which had been thoroughIyj������lti-  vated during the autumn yielded 60  bvishels   more than was secured from  . ...  .    --��������� .  .,       .   ......   _     \e land  not so cuitivc.ed.. The net  the principle of Christian stewardship, ��������� increase in revenvs, after making due  have   made" the   tenth   the  minimum ; allowance      for    cost   of. cultivation  gift for religious work.  Thirty years ago religion ..nd politics did not mix. Today religion is  the best asset a politician can-.-hay-n,  and the Sermon on the Mount ls being translated into our social and  labor legislation.  Thirty years ago  the  emphasis  in  religious work was upon.indiyidual salvation and heaven was tlie goal. Today the empsasis is upon the salvation'  i Of- the other' man   and service is the"  ���������.reward.  Thirty years ago the old sheep wero  in the fold, and the lambs were largely outside, waiting for an exfertence..  Today it is the little*chid that is in  the centre of the church's thought and  effort, "for of such is the kingdom of  heaven."  We -are endeavoring to getv religion  down out of the . louds of speculation,  intellectual hair-splitting, and sentimental emotionalism that exhausts itself in feeling, into real life, that it  may stand for a clear, and abiding  faith in God through Jesus Christ,  and a loving, brotherly1'ministry *and  fellowship with men.     -  amounted, to $14.00.  A similar experiment was.conducted  with, sugar beets  ou  two plots���������on9  cultivated   after  harvest,    the  other  spring-ploughed. In tbis case the di������*?  terence in r yield was even more not-*  iceable 't'h'ahVwith oats.   It was found  that the.* land cultivated occasionally'  during the-������,utumn producej. beets at  the.rate.of li-%" tons per acre,"while  the  yield. from  spring-ploughed  land .  was only s' i-t tons ..per acre. Stated  ii- dollars and cents,  this difference  is   very  co_.v_r.cing;   figured Vat  the  prevailing price for beets; it showed  a   greater   revenue   from     cultivated  land>of $16.03 per. acre.���������J.F., In Con*���������<  servatlon.-"   -���������/"���������'-'"ti--  ">'  **.   IM.   U.    IUX.O  Unions and Conventions, with their  practical training in co-operative ef  fort.  Christian Citizenship, with   its emphasis upon temperance,   civic   righteousness    and world-peace, giving to  our  ' future  citizens  a knowledge of  public  affairs  arid  training in  social  service,   enlisting  them  in   all legitimate    ways for the election of good  and efficient office holders, for tho observance     of  existing laws,  for  the  Scotland  adoption of improved laws, for thc im-  V'tles  provoment of the conditions of labor,   Ireland  and the rational use of the Lord's Day I Canada  for rest .arid worship; the opening of  rooms for reading and recreation, the  establishment of gyninasims und athletic fields, the promotion of clubs for  the special study of town and municipal conditloiji-, with addresses by tho  hoads of departments.  Boys' Clubs or groups under the lead*  ershlp of the virile young men to lead  the hoys in their i:.orts and athletics,  and by the contagion of character to  give them a vision of tho larger life of  Christian service.  High   School  Societies,  and  orgun-  ��������� ly.uliotia    in preparatory  schools and  colleges.  Prison Work,* by and for our "brothers in bonds," in jails, penitentiaries..  1 rlBono and prison camps.  Floating Soolotlos, for lito men on  iihlps and in somiion's missions on  shore.  Soldiers' Societies, in camps nnd  l.onts.  Evangelistic Work, In tho society.  cottage pruyor-moctlng, nnd In city  missions.  Fresh-Air Work, In seaside homos  and fresh air camps.  Immigrant Work, teaching those  l/vothors of mini from acroRK the ho:i  our language, und at the kiuuo lime  imparting to thorn tho spirit of Christ-  Ian brotherhood.  lloripltal  Work',  and   wovl.   hi   other  pilbllC   IllHtltlltlOllH.  Mi'-.slonH, at homo and abroad. The  vision received that calls for tho eon-  Boerontion of money and manhood.  In short, anything and everything  that tho church ought to da should ho  iu eluded iu tho plan .for tho young  rcoplo'H society that thoy "found thoiu  lcadora for tiro church of the future.  Tho result of thin iipoclile training  In noon In the t.oHlimonv of uinltltiidcK  of young mon, nilnii'loru, mlHuloiiarloH,  Chrlatlan Aanoclatlon Hocrotarleu, and  In -men who nay that, it wnn tu the <1<>-  1011a��������� Why did nho throw hoiHolf nt finite work nnd training or the young  hlm In that  way? people'.-, finoloty taht thoy "fond thorn-  llella���������HecatiHO    Bho know that, he I hoIvou" and wore faced toward a llfo  kl uu   ������l   Biriiri    ...l\..l.        i.l |f |H li t.kJLl II. |  (II    l .III'lHl.ltlll    UIIU I til U il i |������   tlllli    h>'l V ICM,  Forci-gn Born In the U.S.    .  A bulletin just issued by Uio censv...  authorities at Washington shows that  of the countries now warring ih tho  world, the British empire is represent  ed by very much the largest number  among the population of the  United  States.   There were in April, 1910, 13,-  515,000 persons of foreign birth in that  country, constituting 14.7 per cont. of  the   population.    The  numbers   \veri_  divided as follows:  Englr.nd  S76,45hi  261,034  82,479  .1,352,155  1,201,143  , 3,773,20*.  2,501,181  1,602,752  1,670,52*1  117,236  150,000  Total      Germany   Russia ..,..,  Austria   ...'.............  France      Japt.n (about)     Another aspect of tho question ls  the number ot foreign-born who have  become naturali/.od. Of the males of  whom a record la kept, Germany  shown tho largest proportion, as Indication, it scouts fair to conclude, that  tho German citl/.eu in moro nnxtoun to  cast off thc old ties of tho militaristic  .-Vthorlund In favor of the now-l'ouiiTl  homo of liberty.  To Preserve Eggs     ;...���������.������������������/-..  Preserve     only     absolutely    :freslt  eggs; stale eggs will* not keep in any :  preservative. ?.'    '  Have your preservative ready tb receive the.fresh eggs? as you get them.  IC yoii -hre in doubt as:to the freshness of-the eggs? candle them, or sea  whetheV they sinle^hejcfc placed in *  dish bf fresh w..ter. If7an egg sinks,'  it is reasonably fresh. ?  ��������� V)o rio^preeorve dirty egga.or egga  that rhave" been ^yashed. ??Washed  rsgs will not keep because .the shell  las. been moistened;' and dirty eggs  will become tainted in -flavor. .  "Do not. use. +he same liquid preservative mote than one year.  Infertile eggs are better than fertile eggs for pre.ervl^ist.   ��������� .  -tinse the eggis with' water t.fter removing them  from-the preservative.  Eggs that are in gocd'��������������������������� condition  when removed from water glass solution will' usually remain good for  tNyo weeks.  filter gluijs eggs are practically as  good im fresh, eggs tor .all cooking:  purposes. Jf it is desired to boll  them, prick a small hole throiigh tht������  la* go end of the shell before placing  them in the water. The pores of tho  shell liave been? sealed by tho wator  glass solution, nni without the pinhole  the expanding air within tho sholl  would burst it.  Under a Banyan Tree  Tho first parllnmont houso of the  Boors was undor a banyan tree, under  which tho rulorn of tho Trannvaal  gathered ln tho early days of tho republic to discuss nubutlonn affecting  the country, and tlio treo became  known iih the "Unit volltiiraad of tho  Transvaal." Tho Boom call tho npot  Wondcrhloom. It In a few mllon oul-  nldo of t'retorla, at the entrance, to a  cleft In tho mountain.  Canada and the War  If war hna its horrors, ji.'ban also  its grout und ennobling componsa-  tlonn, and by uo nionnp tho least of  thom Ih Its virtu* at, a unifying nitont  In Groat, Britain, In HuhkIii, Iri Franco  ar.d In Belgium .the nlrlfo of parties,  tho joalovHion of class, tho untogau-  InniH ol! creed, Juivo all uliko*' bqen  hunhod. Tho wantonn:.BH of Gorman  Jiugoinm ban accompliHliQ'l In a month  a ,,orU of couuolldatloh that might  olkcrwli-u- have taken yeuvii. Iu onv  c-wii cane tho Impulno to got togothor  and to n'r.lc all minor Ihhuoh goon bo-  yonil (ho United Kingdom, and In iu>  whli ai*. thc empire Itr.oll. Wc hi.vc  ha I many proofs of It i;t tho ;w������t  fortnight, but. none more powerful and  Impronnlvo than that which has just  boon furnished by the Canadian parliament.���������London Dally Mail.  '���������WlHit'H tho multorwlti. Wllllo?"  "Ilii'n turned  anarchist."  "Anarchlt.t! Bear, doar! What a  turno.i hltn?"  "lie hiivh ho can't nuppoi-f anv kov>  or.;nient that wilfully acuiln nhlpn to  bring homo utrtiudod nchool toachcra."  ���������Cleveland Plain Dealer,  Thore In no IorIo llko that which  coinen from doing things worth white,  ���������OiiMtn   ..wiili.   .wuiurii.  FIRES AND  SOIL  FERTILITY  Destruction of the Timber Only Part  of thc lirimei.ee Damage Done  KxportH ntato that forest Bolls have  lost and nro losing much fertility ow  Ing' to forest flron which, doing anr  parontly Httlo Inimedlato daniage, rob  the soil of accumulalionB of liunniB.  in nnuiy Hectlons land Is bolng clolir-  nd I'or farm Ing, and, whoro nuch forest land has uot boon burned, there  Is a largo percontiigo of vogotablo mai>  tor which provldew conalderablo fortuity and a good texture. IMoroovor,  an this noil has a groato:' capacity lo  ubnorb uml retain niolnluro, It lu lout  llltoly to bo wiiBhod and gullied under hoavy rains.  He Could Not Underata.id  If tlioro Is any truth in tho report  from Borlln that tho Kaiser counted  on tlie .sympathy of tho American poo*  I������l'.- In the war Into which 1 c hns.  plunged l.uropo, II. goes to Hh.iv/ how  impossible lt Is fo.' a war lord to appreciate or understand nubile opinion.  A military despot and autocrat may  donplno p ibllc opinion, but there are  men when thu Inability to under-  Bland It in practically milcldo.���������New  York World.  itflb-  "Do you drive your own car?"  ed lho ovnort, nvotoilHl.  "No,"   roplied  Mr.    Chuggls-      "1  never drive it, I coax it."���������Wanhlnto*  filar.  "You hre Rolng to the doro."  "Hlr. that In a enr-sory romarfc.'^-"*!"  iil*llllitUI������)   .MIICIU. 111.  i In jliiMmmimii*mmmmimmmmm^  Mm*  jtfiaKHitlltil  iiiifll1i_iMI  i?iy^->l;iaMliil.wnmi-iriTri������niaaw  mmamW*  UN ,.,'.v3-'."���������'" ^'Y. "'"  ���������- -t'^sca  '   ���������'������������������"-toY"  \*  ITHE REVIEW* CBESTON, S. gA  /  'fBti\  TttE UNITY OF THE ESIPiRE  ASIATIC  ITVJMIGRATJON  KING.GEORGE    SENDS    MESSAGE  TO   FAft-FdLUNG. SUBJECTS  To the TBritlshOveraeas'lnie Expresses j  Hit Pride and Gratitude For Assist-,'  ance Being Given���������Object Lesson j  to the Whole World. '  London.���������The official information .  bin-can has given out a message from I  King Georgo to the overseas domin- i  ions and crown colonies. It is as foi-1  lows: |  pease differences with which my em- J  peoples of my whole empire at home ���������  and overseas have .moved with one!  inina and purpose to eonl'r>at and j  overthrow an unparalleled assault up-,  on the continuity of civilization and j  peace, of mankind. x  "The calamitous conllict is not of i  my seeking. My voice has beeu cast. ���������  throughout on the side of peace. My.  ministers earnestly strove to allay j  tho causes of the strife and to ap- ���������  pea3e dlffeernces with which my em-1  pire was not concerned. Had I stood I  aside when, in defiance of pledges to!  which my kingdom was a, party, the J  soil of Belgium.was violated* and her j  cities made desolate, when the verv i  life of jthe French nation was threat-,'  ened*" with extinction, I should Jiave i  sacrificed my honor and given to!  destruction the liberties of- my em- ���������  pire and mankind. 7 ? ������������������      .   .    }  "I������ rejoice that every part. of the I  empire is with me in this decision, ""j  "The    paramount    regard     for  *'a t  treaty of faith and the pledged wordj  of rulers and peoples is the commoni  heritage of Great Britain and of the?  empire.    My peoples in the self-gov!  erning dominions have; shown beyond |  all doubt that they    whole-heartedly j  endorse the grave decision it was necessary to  take.    My personal know-*  ledge of the loyalty and devotion of"  my overseas dominions had    led me 1  to expect that they would cheerfully \  mqjve the great efforts ahd bear ther  great sacrifices    which7  die*  present  conflict entails.    The full measure in  -vhieh they .have placed their services  and resources at my disposal? fills me  with gratitude and I am proud to be  . able to show- the world that my peoples  overseas; are - as  determined  as  the people of   the    United  Kingdom  to prosecute a. just ?cause to a successful end.'   - ,;  "The Dominion of Canada, the Com-  nionwealth of Australia and -the. Bmsv-  inion of New Zealand have pla.eedVat  my disposal their naval forces.'-which  have already rendered good service  for the empire: Strong expeditionary   w ������._^  uwu6  iuci'iucu iu  -utiuaua, j  Australia and Hew Zealand for ser-i  vice at the front, arid the Union of:  South Africa has released all British I  troops and undertaken the important!  military responsibilities, the discharge 1  of which will be of the utmost value I  to -they empire. Newfoundland has  doubled* its number of the branch of  the royalriayal reserve, and is sen..-  7-lrig a body of men to take part in tbs  operations  at  the"? front.    Fro_n  ihe  :': Dominion arid provincial, governments  - of Canada large and; wfelconie gifts of  supplies are bri theM" Svay rfor use by  rmy naval arid military torces arid for  relief in the United Kingdom, which  must inevitably follow in the wake  of war.- v-Y?    ?  "All parts of my overseas dominions have thus demonstrated, in the  most unmistakable manner, the fundamental unity of the eriipire amidst  V-hll.iti. diversity of situation and circumstance.":' ���������,-.'-'      : ''ti-  A message similar to the foregoing  has been addressed by King George  to the peoples of India.  PEACE CELEBRATIONS  Leaders of Public Opinion Favor Con-'  tlnuation of. P.ans ."'"���������'���������}���������:  Ottawa.���������Following the decision of  the executive committee of the Canadian Peace Centenary, a month ago  tb suspend operations, except. thoBe  of an educatlorial character, in view  of the European war, tho organizing  secretary, ID. H. Scammell, recently  sent out upwards of 150 letters to tha  leading men 'of affairs throughout thc  Dominion., The statements of Sir  Robert Borden and Sir Wilfrid Laurier  wore embodiod in the communication  In which the Premier and ex-Prom lor  hnd expressed tho opinion that thc  celpbration should be carrlod on despite the war and the recipients wor.-*  ���������tisked to express un, opinion on tho  situation. Mr. Scumiiioll has now rocelved nearly fifty replies. From east  and wont replios havo boon rocolved  and there Ib an overwhelming feeling  in favor of carrying out t]io arrange*  inoiitn, not only to more';|Cully roultoe  tho blosfilngs of ponoo, but as an example to othor groat nations of the  world.  Settlement of the Hindu Incident .Haj  Now Been Arranged  Ottawa.���������Thero is considerable satisfaction with the report that the Indian council has proposed .a plan for  the control of the Immigration of Hia  dus. The adoption of, the Japanese  arrangement wouid be, it is stated,>en-  tirely satisfactory to Canada and  probably to Australia and South  Africa, which have also had Hindu  incidents.  The arrangements between Canada and Japan is that Japanese who  reach Canada without passport-* may  be refused admission; that the Japanese authorities shall confine their Issue* of passports to merchants and  students and to laborers to the number of six hundred a year only. ���������  If it became known throughout  -ndia that Hindus could enter Canada,  Australia. New Zealand .and South Africa, only when they have passports,  in their possession there would be  no more Komagata Mfiru incidents.  With passports required the authorities in India would have in thoir own  hands the control of the volume of  emigration of Hindus to all Brltisn  overseas dominions, and" would limit  departures to the numbers a^nd' class  of Hindus which Canada, Australia*  South Africa and New Zealand would  be willing to receive each year and  able..to.assimiIate. ���������.,..-,.;-���������  At the time of the Komagata Maru  trouble, Canada urged the British  government to find a7 way of dealing  with the Asiatic immigration -movement,. ' arid the passport' proposal is  the   result. '���������'��������� -titi���������:���������.%������������������ ..ti-~- ti.;  WEEKLY MARKET REPORT  EARLY PREPARATIONS  German ,  War     Proclamations   Were  Printed Two Years Ago  London.���������Dr. Poutsma, one of the  South African labor leaders, who wa-i  among the British subjects to leave  Berlin; contributed an interesting article to the Daily Citnzen, on his impressions of the German capital ,in  ;war time.-������������������ ���������"?    '?'::-??    7r  "That the Germans were prepared  for all eventualities for7a considerable  time was shown," says ? Dr. Poutsma,  when the kaiser's proclamations were  posted up in Berlin, "and of course,  throughout' Germany, - ordering mobilization. These Vproclamations;'were  printed in' two colors* red' and black,  'and ?all??wereVdated 1912; The? figure  2? had iheeri^strieken out wiith a? blue.  pericil;?arid? the figure? ?.'4 added. Qn  every?'following day additional proclamations -were issued, and I rioticed  that? practically everyone had been  printed two years'ago.*   ;  "When, later on, the Lansturni Mit  Waffe was called out, again the procla.--  mations showed that\ they had been  printed two years ago. The Germans  have two kinds of lanstrums���������armed  arid unarmed. The last named hadn't  been called but then, and of the Lan-  struni Mit Waffe, only a small percentage were actually in the field."  LOCATION   OF  CANADA'S  TROOPS-  May     Mobilize     at   Knbwsley   Park,  f Near.*;��������� Liverpool,  With Army? Y.  Ottawa.���������There is a rumor that the  park of Lord D=rby, which has been  placed at. the. disposal of the war  -office, will* be used as the British mobilization quarters, for the Canadian  a'rmy. They will likely join one of  the new armies which Lord Kitchener is at* present training.  The final announcement of tlie infantry brigade and battalion officers  for the Canadian forces will bermade  by Col. Sam Hughes. There are many  more officers at Valcartier than are  required, and they aro undergoing examination by the examining board.  Three members of parliament are going with the troops���������Col. John Cur*  rie, M.P., Col. Harry McLeod and  .Major. Sam Shurpe.  Tho arrangements regarding the  transportation of the troops have been  completed. It-r/Ul take a fleet of ovar  twenty vesselB to accommodate the  troops. -.No vessel with a speed-of  los than fourteen, knots an hour i& hia-'  ing accepted, ns a trancpoi't. ,       .,'��������� ,  to "TeTpaIfTcable  British  Enthusiasm In  Recruiting  Washington.���������Tho British embassy  litis received from tho London foreign  olflco, tlio following dlnpnteh:  "Thoro In incroaslng onthusainni for  reornltluir In Groat Britain. Three  hundred thousand .mon havo Joined  the regular nrmy nlnee tho war began,  Thn cngnrnnHB to onllnt hnn prown  markedly since thoir troops havo  actually been on gaged with the  oaoniy."  Anothor moaHago rocolved at the  .onibnsfiy officially don led recent ro*  ports that lho British cvulsor Brltntol  had boon dlnahlod in a Ugh. with an  unnamed Gorman ship in southern  wntora.  Australian Ships Will Go to Fanning  Island With Cruisers  Ottawa.���������It is oxpcctc:l that It will  bo somo time boforo tho cablo lino lo  Australia which  wan cut noar Fanning  iBland,  prosumably   by  tho  Gorman cruiser Nuernberg,  is repaired.  Tho Canadian government has a cable  ship on the Pacific hut lc will not bo  sont to  mako  tho  repair boci-uso  a  ship cannot roach tho scone in tlmo  from our coasts.  An Australian  whip  \vM mako tho  I repairs  undor  the protection of the  j cvulucru of thc Common wen'th, which  woro eluded when tho Gorman cml������-  or got out. of tho harbor ut Honolulu.  So lav us known horo tho Gorman ship  has not yot boon captured,  Sifton Battery In Shape  Ottawa.���������Tho members or tho Sifton automobile battery now being organised at Ottawa for.nervleo Jn Europe Inehulon Hot-tor Olrounrd. a  brother of Sir t'ercy Glrouard, who  wan chief engineer of rallwayH in  Egypt undor Kitchonor. Tho battnrtei,  which are rapidly being rounded Into  shape, IncludoB ovor 100 men. It eon  Hints of toil?guns mounted on aut>  mobdri truclcB. Tho battory expects to  loavo for tho front In about ton dnyn.  Sent Me_6Hflo to Preeldent Wilson  London.���������Nows ban roachod horo  (hat tho North - Gorman Gazotto of  Berlin, tho official own of tho government, of Germany, pnbllshort a statement thnt l.mpnroi* Wllllnm hnn nont  an  important monflngo    to Presldonl  ll lurUUi  RuMlan ReoervlsU Not Called  London-���������The HiikhIhu nillllrtvv  iiuthoi-ltion have decided not to call to  tho colors tho roacrvlstB of that, country now abroad according to an announcement mado by the miiinlnn om-  bnoay, All the mnorvlntn will be per  niltteil, however, to onrbli In the ranks  Ot    tllU    UlllOU    UkUUUII.  Weekly Grain Lette.-. Supplied by  Thompson, Sons & Co., Grain Merchants, Winnipeg.  Winnipeg,    'September    8.���������During  the  past  week    the  grain    markets  everywhere have heen    very strong.  Prices advanced by leaps and bounds  for the first four days of the month  and  in  that time    wheat prices  advanced 7c to 12c per bushel.    Since  the 4th inst. there has been a sharp  .-.action, which' has brought prices in  the American spring wheat markets  and  in Winnipeg,  to  practically  the  same figures they rested at a week  ago,  but in  Chicago and New York  prices are sti .1 4c to 7c higher than a  week ago.    The  big  advance in  the  middle of the week under review was  caused   by     reports    that    England,  France, Greece and Scandinavia were  all heavily in the markets for wheat  and fiour.    Exporters, at the Atlantic  seaboard were eager buyers, and speculative "buying, combined with buyiag  for export, carried prices -up    easily.  Ocean Vessel space is in liberal supply, and' war risk insurance has been  reduced.     The  cost  of   exchange   on  drafts against grain shipments to Europe has. also been reduced, and generally the facilities for doing export  business have become improved. This  last  advance  however rwas  too  sudden and steep to be taken kindly by  cash buyers and exporters, and it gave  a sudden   check    to  such    business.  What has followed in the last three  cays has been a sudden heavy movement'of  new  wheat  to  the    spring  -wheat markets.    Owing to yesterday  being Labor Day and a holiday in.all  American and Canadian markets, the  weight of Saturday, Sunday and Monday's  receipts has  fallen on  today's  markets,   and  the  quantity being  so  large, and the buying for export and  cash trade having received a check as  metriioned above,- a great increase in  hedging sales has been inev'table, and  in the circumstances investment and  sreculative buyers naturally    baoked  away from the load offered to them.  No    doubt inariy traders foresaw on  Saturday what^Was coming, for thore  was a decline iri?prices on that day of  1 V������.c to Sic.    Today prices .lost" ,3c to  6c   per  bushel.    Declines    in   prices  such? as we have.Jhad in the last two  niarket days, though very large when  cdmrared with the moderate reactions  in? orainary market times, need riot at  -tlie  present time  disturb  those -who'1  iiwn actual wheat brlibld wheat speculatively. It is;? the nature of the grain  markets, ?;in times o| war of far less  moment arid Gravity?than iri?the present European "war, toimve quick and  wide advances and declines, until the  t|jrrie comes when conditions have mol-  eratted 'or become settled, to such an  extentj as~makes it clear- that the in  fluerices  of- war  onrtrhe market has  jiassed away.v In the present instance  "the chances are* that the influence of  the war to advance grain prices has  ���������Only begun.   The. War lias started at a  tiine when tlie new cropsi in the Northern  Hemisphere  were; for  the most  part just geicing ready to be harvested.   The; aggregate yield of the wheat  crops, except of the United* States, is  less than in the la'st twlO������years/ but  still the abundance? of trie' new crop  whatever it may be. is there to draw  upon::.:  The Unitea_YtCingdom, by  far  Jthe-. most dependarit' on .foreign  supplies, has been able to keep the ocean-  way to her storehouses open, and besides Ythe wheat and; flour that were  destined  to her ports,'" she has pre-  fcrce been the recipient of many shipments intended for continental ports,  but shut out by the war, and there ls  no   doubt  that  the  United  Kingdom  for the present is fully supplied, with,  breadstuffs for her own use. Later on,  however,  when  the  flrst marketings  cf the new crpps pass out ot'sight,  the growers will naturally hold on; to  a larger portion than usual of 'theti*-  grain in expectation of higher prices,  axul. the demand for-more will jjecome  moro  urgent and only: higher prices  will bring out tho supply. In the pres-  .ent,. sharp declines wllldje followed by  increased demand'botli for cash wheat  and  for  speculative  investment, and  sharp advances will again? take place;  In these times the usuiU grain statistics are liable not to be bo complete,  but last wook the world's shipments  wero  10,121,000 bushels  ot' which  ������,-  300,000 bushels were from the United  States aud Canada, the remainder being small lots' from India, Argentine,  Australhi,  North   Africa    and"   Chill.  Noarly 4,000,000 bushels of last week'*!  shiphients woro for rFrance, and only  about. 3,000,000 bushols to the Unitod  Kingdom.   Tho quantity on ocoan passage increased 770,000 bushels to 30,*  322,000    husholn     against     30,070.000  buahels tho samo week last year; The  United States visible supply decreased  last woek 1,515,000 bushels-and now  ut.widn at ''0,01a,00tl  bushel-.    t-Kuhibi  45,075,000  husjiohi  a  yoar ago.    The  movement of wlntor    wheat    In tho  l-.iltod   Statos   Is  largo,  but  tho  ox-  port, bolng largo and millers ������������������locking  up freely keeps the visible supply de-  .ronRlng. Tho movemont of tho sprliiK  whoat ban nuddenly tnerensed and the  earn   Inspected   at   Winnipeg' In   tho  laat three dnyn hnvo been 3,059 against  only  -1R;t  for  tlio  ''orri*fipondlnr;  three  days lust yoar.   At Mlnnoapolla tho re-  colplH   were   1,17!)   earn   agaliiHt.   481  cam hint yoar.  Our Winnipeg nmrkot has hud a  good demand for cash wheat of all  gradeh ut a moderate premium ovojc thc  Octobor future. From the Inspoctlouu  thin last wook il would noom that the  avirago grado rails (*nnsldcrahly undov  lant year's uvornge. About sixty por  cent, of the c.rn pann one and two  liorthorn, twenty por cont. threo  northern, ami tho balanco No. 1, n, 0,  food, rojocted and no grade. The  woathor in not. a 1 together favorablo  for harvesting and thro-dilng, local  nhoworn being common, but doluy ls  ������M.uit_i    iiiu   tuoutt.   umii   ������iaiiiu������,u.      to  day's cash prices are 1 Nor., 114c; 2 j  Nor., lll^c; 3 Nor., 109-&C; No. 4,  103%c; No. 5, 96V*c Rejected, on account of seeds and smutty wheat, sells  at 5c and 6c under the straight  grades. Futures closed October,  113}ic; December, _14%c; May,  121%c.  Oats  Prices for oats tcday are just about  the same as a wek ago, but in the interval Jthey touched 2c to 3c higher;  the easier feeling in other grains has  caused some reaction so that today's  prices are 2 C.W., 53������4c; 3 C.W.,  51%c; ex 1 fd., 51%c; 1 fd., 5l%c:  2 feed, 50%,c. Futures closed October  52%c; December, 51 %c.  Barley  The barley market is quiet���������-demand having slackened for the time  being. Prices are nominal, but we  quotes No. 3, 66c; No. 4, 64c; rejected,  62c; feed, 60c. The October delivery  closed at 66c.  '    Flax  Vhe flax market is very erratic.  Stimulated by the strength in grain  it advanced during the week 3c to  4%c over trie" iy*ices of a week ago,  but since then it has dropped 9c to  lie from the high point touched, and  today's prices are 1 N.W., 129c; 2 C.  W., 126c. Futures closed October,  131c; December, 135%c.  All prices quoted above are based  on delivery in store Fort William and  Port Arthur.  SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON  LESSON     XI..���������THIRD.    QUARTER,  FOR   SEPT.   20,   1914.  Germans in Danger of New Movement  London.���������A Russian army, said to  number 250,000 men, is, according to  the Rome Tribuna, in France. The Tri-  buna is considered well informed regarding Russian movements. Official  confirmation of the report is refused  at the press bureau.  Experts here are of the opinion that  "the Germans; who heretofore have  been the outflankers, are in danger  of being outflanked and of being compelled to accept a frontal attack from  the allies, who now are on the. offe.--  sive. This ���������titanic struggle, in.wbich  the- combatants are totalled in millions, is likely to ebb and flow for a  week before a decisive result is  reached.  Great strategical importance is attached to the Russian capture of the  fortress jsf Nicholaieff, in Austrian Ga-  licia. It is situated at a junction of.  the railway* and has ctrong bow-  shaped fortifications |ind entrench  merits? bn?v both? banks of the River  Dnie/sterYY'tQ? -protect the railway:  brldgesiv The population of this placs  is'larrgely'r Pblistt.;:. It includes 4*000  vjeyre7'and a garrison of approximately  '..W,"0o6''m'en.-?'--:''-'..;-v. ������������������������������������;. ���������;.?';        ���������??���������'"-?  The news hasY* been received here  that tbe kingYpt theYTonga 'Islands,  in ther Southern? Pacific ocean, "has^ ^declared his. .Neutrality. The Toris^-  islands were "in danger-of starvation,,  as their food sup'ply from New Zealand was cut o_f until a ship was-sent  to. the relief of the natives. The ship  gave the king hisfirst ne.ws of the  war, and the moriarch promptly proclaimed his neutrality.? '       .  TO  KEEP OUT ALIEN   ENEMIES  American Consular Certificates Issued  or  Continent  Will   be   Refused   ' ,  After Sept.  14  London.���������The British government is  adopting stringent regulations' In order to keep out ofVE^ijl.tiain. alien enemies, who heretofore; %V3*Yb������eril. permitted, to land urider^ the? guise oS  Americans whose cltlzerishlp was at-.,  tested by consular certificates gnanted  on the-continent. "  After September 14 consular certificates will not .be accepted as proof ot*  lie American citizenship of those arriving from the continent. These per*  sons will not be permitted to land unless they are provided With passports.  , ..This measure lias been urged by tlm  American relief committee, which, has  been frequently victimized b,Y."fr&ii<lu-  lent ��������� claimants of American ' citizenship. The committee says, however,  that it is desirous both of protecting  its own funds from impostors and of  preventing suspicion that .theYOnitcit  States is iiBBlsting tlio enemies of  Greait Britain. * Y  ,  These consular ecrtlilcatcs,, It Is alleged, have been issued wholesale in  some of the continental cities without  anything approaching an adequate investigation to determine whether the  applicants i'or them really were Americans or entitled to American citizenship.  Arrest of an Alberta. German  - Montreal.���������Mystery surrounds tho  arrost hero of a Gorman capitalist  from Alborta, who.-was apprehended  by tho defective department, acting  with the military authorities, and  taken to the detention hospital, whoro  ,ho undor\vcnt a thorough Investigation. Tho stun of $75,000 in money  nnd a complete diagram of the Alborta coal mine, of which tho susnoct  tn said to have boon a director until  a fow wooka ago, woro found. The  muii'H name was not rovoalcd by tho  military authorltlca, hut It iti. understood ho ban Hold nut his Alberta In*  torcotn since tho declaration of wnv  and was roturnlng to. Germany. His  young nloeo, who accompanied him,  x;:\:: nh-.o Ijilccn tn charge. They .'ire  bolng hold ponding orders from Ottawa.  Tho military authorities nro rotlc*  out when npokon to concerning the  disposition of the two.  No  Matter Who Wine Austria Loseo  Bucharest.���������It In officially announced thut the effoi'tn of l-in;>cror Fraud-.  Joseph to iiociiro the support of Ko**.-  Hif .tIr*   Ihim   l'nlU'il(   und   lli������������   ������l1ulnnio*,y  of the UiiHHlann hnn won.-If Itounuinlii  onteru the war whe will ho with tin'  allien, it In considered eerti.ln that  Bulgaria will follow kouinnnlu, and  It la conceded (hat. denplte tho out-  conio of the war, A nutria will -lone  nincii iumu>rv.  Text of the Lesson, Matt.-xxv, 31-47.  Memory Verses, 34-36���������Golden Text*  Matt, xxv, 45���������Commentary Prepared by Rev. D. M. Stearns.  To understand this lesson as to the  Interpretation of it, the time when  and the parties concerned, we must  notice carefully the first verse and  the words, "When the Son of Man  shall come in Hi*, glory and all the  holy angels with Him, then shall He  sit upon the throne of His glory."  That defines clearly the time when,  and also that, the judgment referred  to, is not the judgment of the saints.  His redeemed ones, for when He shall  come in His glory they shall come  with Him, the Old Testament as well  as the New Testament saints, if we  may make that distinction. Let the  Holy Spirit tell you about this as you  read Zech. xiv, 5; Col. iii, 4; I Thess.  iii, 13; Rev. iii, 21.  Then, as to the people to be judged,  note the second verse of the lesson,  "Before Him shall be gathered all nations." Could anything be more clear  and plain in this connection than the  statements in Joel iii, l-2,lthat in coo:  nection with the restoration and deliverance of His people, Israel, He will  gather all nations in thcvailey of Jell osaphat and judge them because of  their treatment of Israel? In Zeph. iif,  8, He says that it is His" determination to gather the nations and pour  upon them His indignation, and in the  rest of that chapter He calls upon Israel to be glad and rejoice, for He will  be mighty in their inidst and get them  praise and. fame in every land where  they have been put to shame. '  In Zech. xiv, 2, He says that He will  ather all nations again-1 Jerusalem  to battle; in verse 4 that He will stand  again upon the Mount of Olives, and.  in verse 9 that after that He will .ie  king over all the earth. Let us then  be clear about this���������that in this judgment among those to be judged will  not be found His body, the church, for  she shall be with Him, nor Israel, for  she* is not reckoned among the nations  (Num. xxiii, 9). There is no mention  of any resurrection of the dead, just  or unjust, so it is not the judgment of  the' saints who shall never come into  judgment for sin (John y, 24^, because  that, -wasTsettled on-Cavalry, but shall  be -judged for their works''after the  i.rst resurrection at ttie judgment seat  Qf * Christ for believers only (L.Thess?  iv, 16-18; I Cor. xv, 51, 52; Rom. xiv,  10; II Cor. v, 10)v  ; rlt is riot ther great white throne judgment of Rev. xx, 11-15, where the unrighteous shall appear after their.resurrection a thousand years later than  the resurrection o������ tbe just (Rev. ii.:,  75-6)..-   ", ;,'.  It is simply, as the recqrd saya,  a judgment of nations, as such, by  their.respective armies, and the question is their good dr ill treatment of  His people. Israel. As all individual  salvation is through Jesus of Nazareth  of the tribe of Judah and king of the  Jews, so the salvation of nation's will  be through Him also, but in connection with a righteous Israel, who will  receive Him as their Messiah when  they shall see Him coming in His  glory to the Mount of Olives for their  deliverance. They shall then say, "Lo,  thi3 ds our God; we' have waited for  ,Him������ and He will sa,ve us; this is Je-  ijibvah. we have waited for Him; we~  will be glad and rejoice in His salvation."  ,-.fter that "Israel shall blossom  and bud and fill the face of the earth  with fruit" (Isa. xxv, 9; . xxvil, 6).  Then shall the saved nations who shall  hear Hlm say, "Come, ye blessed," In-  ���������herlt the kingdom when the kingdoms  under the whole heaven shall have become the kingdom of our Lord and of  His,Christ and shall walk in the light  o: the new Jerusalem and bring their  L'ory and honor Into it (Rev. xi, 15;  xxi, 24).  rhe others sliaill hear Him say, "Depart, ye cursed," and shall bo punished with everlasting destruction from  thc presence Of tho .Lord and from  thc glory of Ills power (II Thess. I,  7-9).  Any one who denies the truth ot  everlasting punishment, according to.  the last vorso of our lesson, must reject the plain words of the Lord Jesua  In this passage and elsewhere, :.s in  Mark lx, 43, 45, 47.  In this last verse 'of our* lesson the  same word Is applied to punishment  as to llfo (revised vorslon). I have  i rtloavorod to show the teaching of  fho Bible.concerning tho judgments in  a tract entitled' "Tho l^our" Judgments," .which riiay bo obtained from  Mr.vYcd Kolker, box 210, Harrlsburg,  Pa. If you send for it ask also for  "The Secret of Mlsnluiiaiy IntoienL"  nnd seo how God honors the simple exposition of His word.  IC tills lesson does not refer to the  church except as soon with tho Lord  on His throne, whom In tho heart lesson for tho believer? Ilore Is ono, at  least, tho great "Inafiiinich" principle,  which   always   holds good.   Whatever  nny  bollovor does in  llin    nnmo 'Ao  i conntB tin done to Himself and will ro-  J ward    it    accordingly.    Opportunitioo  I minned will bring up loan.  1  -���������  l'  NEWFOUNDLAND HELPS  Legislature   Provide*   for   Ora-wrd-tlng  of Volunteer Force  St. Johns, Ntld.���������Tho apodal nessioQ  of  tho  colonial  loithdnlurc,  called  to  iv-UBider measures uitido necessary by  tho  10iir.T-pen.i   wiir.   ���������������������������.  ',.r.lr���������*.|*���������������.���������.',   bv  Governor Davidson, with Itn program  fi'.inilod.   Tho opponitlou party Joined  the   govornment  tn   tho    support  of  I ovory ineuHuro and action was unanl-  I motifi.   Governor Davidoon, In bin clc#*  ; Ing speech, warmly praised tho bif>  i iiiony uinpiuyuu iu uiu icnitiuauit).  A   *_"j.  " ".vi  "T__-i  "*?  ��������� i  .1:  <  v  1  in-i_rtiH_ii������i  j^,IIM,J,M-W-.  srssasitm  \  **mtmwmmmii*imm*Hmw mm  ������wm*m  ffili-iiiiiiilMil  va . '        ���������  r'  ���������*T*Mf       -   ���������        .->���������   ��������� -i^j-   -j-r-������������������  THE CRESTON REVIEW  THE CRESTON REVIEW  Issued eveiyJTriday, at Oreston, B.C.  Subscription: $2 a year in advance;  $2,50 to United States points.  C. F. HL_o.E8,^t>wnereiid Editor.  CRESTON, B.C., F_|'__DAY, OCT. 16  Shoulder Arms!  is nevertheless our bounden dufcy .to.  forge in Cres-ton such a link in the  chain of the empire's defences ������8  wiii be worthy of the great nation  to which we belong.  The corps is being formed entirely for home service, and there is no  direct obligation placed on any man  joining.the, corps to yolunteer for  active service abroad, neither is  there anything in the regulations  governing the terms of service to  prevent any man resigning, except  iu case of danger from attack  locally by a foreign power.  There is nothing in the work in  connection with the training of the  psififery el|j|>,twhere members oan  meet for social purposes as well as  for dri$������ andvwill go a iohg way in  solving the problem of Wh-St are the  youiig Jhen" Agoing tb do these long  wmter evenssgs.  We believe it is the morfol duty of  every man ^lio can qualify to identify himse'if in some way with th^  work of propagation for the empire's  defence; not only by joining the  ranks hini^Olf, but by inducing his  friends to enroll.  JKIB  S^5i"  ���������wu���������ii ���������mWiiii ������������������.  <������LAih*\  =35  Given the  serious oonsideratioa  the question deserves there should  be no trouble in enrolling enough  men for two companies in Oreston,  oorpa that ia not distinctly benefici- for doeP down in .the heart o? every  man there is an innate respest for  fair play and a desire to see the  country's honor upheld even at  personal cost to the whole nation.  The cb-operatkm of every man in  the Creaton Valley will be earnestly,  welcomed   by   those who   are   in  al   mentally,  physically and  even  morally to all those taking part.  Uniforms and equipment, which  _.*������__    ������_������-M������-W*_     f ������W-_.    ������__    _>_*_*    tt_f_������������W      -.������_#������    4-1-v  wv xaaxxxfux ������ji,wo *q0 v*_o loua.  cm*v> ___T3,  will be rushed forward && soon a8  possible.  The regiment, it is understood, will be armed with the latest,  pattern mark  two, five star, KossI0^^05,4he com^tt^  (short) rifle.  Competent officers have been  placed in charge, at least one of  whom has soon actual war experience, and no time wiii be wasted  over useless ceremonial or parade  movements. .Every effort will be  made to make those joining competent with  the  rifle and   at   field  Financing Agriculture  Editor Tbus Bfvisw :  Sir: The evolution of the human  races may be, in short, confined into  two* classes���������the agricultural and the  industrial.' To the latter statistics say  belong 45 per cent of the population in  our Dominion,; -while the industrial  classes with their varied occupations  claim the other 55 per cent.  The dominating class of our nation  isti&xe industrial^which by its majority  and technical education has a superior  right to the final say in framing our  Tlie acid test' is very shortly to  be applied to the patriotism of the  Oreston Valley.  There are now two propositions  before the people of this section  which must be carried through  successfully if we ar������ desirous of  retaining our reputation of worthy  sons of ths Tft������������������f;*������*'i������ 3������n**'i_r*k  The t*vc eppcrtussitiss are: O,^  Our contribution, to the.Patriotic  Fund, and (2) tire, formation of the  Creston Company, ofthe 107 th  Regiment of Bast Kootenay Light  Infantry.  Competent committees are at  work oa the hustle for finances for  the firafnenumerated purpose, and  there Is Utile fear of the citizens  failing to do their duty in that particular matter.  Hie organisation of a volunteer  company, however, is a much harder task, and there are no committees of citizens working overtime  helping drum up recruits, hence the work. As near as possible the lat-  efforts of The Review to stir up ter operations will tie made idehti-  some enthusiasm in a cause of such  cal with those employed in actual  *��������� ������������������_k������m������jc_������*-k_t>i������^aiii    yifri^ST--r"' ... "y^.*������ J^^T^J*'*������v������*y������*s  While encoui3ging the formation      Correspondence is now going on  of a voluuteer company we have looking to the militia department  no fear of the outcome of the pros- opening and equipping a small ar-  ent struggle,  bnt now the fight is mory here, adequate to the need of  on we should all realize that though the company.    If possible part of  we may not be called upon to go to this will be fitted up with gymnas-_ lawsby which we all are governed. In  take our places in the battle line, it  tic equipmebfc and  made ; asort of oiir modern civilization finance has be-  ' ? - ..   . . '.'     ' ;'' _     1        ''    ������������������-������������������-''--���������- ���������������������������-'     V. - - ������������������.. **���������'. -vVY-r come  the   most    important    agency  whereby each unit of the human .race  can obtain comfort, conveniency and  food for existence, not only as it relates to_ our domestic affairs, but in our  relation also with other nations. To  this end the principal' nations' of the  world have adopted gold as a standard upon which to issue the currency  which finances &hem both for domestic and foreign proposes.  The utility of gold for this purpose  in normal times no one has seriously  questioned until our present crisis; but  What we do question is if our statesmen,- financiers and economists have  given the same sincere and impartial  study to the needs and economic requirements for financing adequately  the farming classes as that given to  iho industrial classes in their varied  occupations. ������������������'. The agricultural classes  are largely the source and foundation  upon which the industrial classes are  built and maintained. We know for  sure that it is the class which is the  closest to and forms the first link with  nature to bring forth from mother  earth what, is .needed, for human existence���������food���������thc first consideration,  in sufficient quantity for our domestic  needs and if possible a surplus to pass  on to other nations less favored.' A  currency, based on the standard of  gold id considered most reliable for all  concerned In our* bartering both at  home and abroad. The farmers have  loft this function of barter to the, Industrial class and this class in its varied declinations forms this second ^ink  in our sooial relations both at -homo  nnd abroad. To argue that the system  which is most convenient and secure  for financing this industrial class in  Its domestio os well an foreign affairs  in also tho most economical and reliable for financing tho agricultural  olitSs ln ' argument not founded upon  ' j scientific economy. ���������  '' ff our Htjitrenmen, flnnnolor-. nnd  economists would givo consideration  to tho following suggestions wa feel  confident thoy would mako tho productive tillable soil tho moanB of securing a moro staple and economical  standard for our domestic currency  than our present gold standard alone:  and there never wns, nor do wo trust  there ever will lie, a timo when this  mibjoct needs more consideration than  at tho prosont and that without delay.  Wo would ' suggest that our Dominion government {man an not; which  might bo known on tho Dominion Agricultural Mortgage Bond Act, to form  Hie b:rudi. for ast-mdard currency Ut bo  known ft* Dominion agricultural mortgage bond l-iotou, which notes by act  of parliament must lie unulu le^al te__  dor for ull debit and barter within our  Dominion. Suoh an act shall provide  that any community having 10 or  matt) oouve iiuniorH in nouu ol enrr-en-  cy ,l*������ ������im}J-*ovm   wio |������>-������*-Ui<.i'>v*u oi iim ���������������*  1  I  g. J*"'"*L j>  nataassaesau  ths Homm  OF  THB'  TKANSt&NT  fa  odMMohidus  SAMPLE  ROOMS  tTHS M.K3T ANC.   MOST  POPULAR H&rmZL IM  TUB KOOTENAYS  Jf  __*Lu  Run on strictly   up-to-date  lines.   Unexcelled service in  all    departments.      Kitchen  staff   (including    cook)   all  /white ladies.    Every comfort  and attention given to guests  The bar  is s upplied with  /��������� > *  only the best brand of goods.  Porters Me@t Tmin*  I    Wm A HERON.  MANAGER  AT  3 boxes Christies Sodas .... ������pl*UU  17 lbs. Beef Scrap���������makes the  hens lay  12 lbs. Granulated Sugar   14 lbs. Brown Sugar........  5-lb. pail Pure Lard.......  >lb. Tea \   2 can*. Corn '  2 cans Peas   2 cans Tomatoes   1 pkg. Wheat Flakes   1. pkg. Quaker Oats   2 pkg. Corn Flakes   1 can Fry's Coooa ���������..  1 can Magic Baking Powder  1 lai^p bottle VamlTa   J lb. Malkin's Beat Tea   1 pkg .Royal Crown Soap .  1 pkg. Gold Dust PoSyder  1 pkg* Laundry Starch    2 pkg. Bluing  ,., ,   1 box Toilet Soap  1'lb. "Coffee  .  2 lliK. Icing Sugar  1 pkg. Soda   2 pkgH. Cora Starch  $1.00  $100  $1.00  [$1.00  $1.00  $1.00  1    I  ��������� ��������� * *  $1.00  $1.00  These prices for Cash only  FRANK H. JACKSON  C^tw^lftN  Very Low Fares  IN CONNECTION WITH  1  TO THK  Limit, Five Months.  Stop-over and Exten-  - sion .privileges.  Full information re  Hail and Steamship Tickets from  j*  . .  *  R. M. REIDi Ticket  Agent, Creston, or  R. DAWSON, Dist.  Pass. Agt., Calgary  DailyiiOV. 7 to DIEG.31 inel.  nrurti ��������� t  UCNCttML  di uric  MNfiAVAM  uncdiiiN  in ���������"���������������������������  land should.-form themselves into.a  co-operative organization operating  under a constitution and bylaws drawn  up by the-Domininn government to  meet the situntibn. '. Individual members appl*ying for and obtaining a loan'  from the ' government under this act  should give a. mortgage in triplicate���������  the originoltnortgage which is endorsed and guarnateed by the respective  provinces in which the land to be  mortgaged is located and which is deposited with the Dominion government. in exchange for the mortgage  bond notes; the duplicate mortgage  which is endorsed and guaranteed by  the co-operative organization of which  the mortgagor is a member and which  is deposited with the respective provincial government;, and last the triplicate copy for the use of the localW  operative organization. Such loans  should, if necessary/be granted up to  the full value of the property mortgaged, as approved,by the local official valuator ofthe organization and  tho district officer acting on behalf of  the t-espeotivo governments concerriod.  By this' means the mortgage both as  to principal and Interest is guaranteed  by tho local organization and the Dominion and provincial governments.  The Dominion mortgage bond notes  Issued on the security of such mortgages must only be expended undor  tho supervision of tlio local organization and for tho purpose only ns specified ln the application, as each organization must bo responsible for each of  ita member* and the respective province responsible for oaoh of its organizations. Tho mortgago loan ahould bo  for a term of years with tho privilege  to redeem before maturity. AU payments of principal on such mortgagoH  must bo made in mortgage bond noton  whioh must then bo withdrawn from  circulation as thoir function has been  accomplished and their place taken by  the gold standard circulation gravitating book to tho farmers through the  increased productiveness on their fond  by sciontiflo methods of tlllaW* obn-  vorgonco of porlahabln proiliic^ Into  raarkotfiblci ^piuioditicH and a nation  al organization for, distribution, Add  to thin tho moral' Impetus with a spirit  or progr-woiv^neiw ^tpiiwui oo o-^om-  pUflod by this loaocra In each community having audi an oi*g_--i}7-atlon.m������fl  thon draw your own ebnemfltond nfii to  whether our Dominion goverhmont  can u-uel. lliu cu*culutioti ul *tucn uui>  t\sm;y    uii..t:  ..iiu   ������_^rtbuiirutw4    .iiuMtiit  have produced suiBcient stdrpluSvto replace it with foreign gold. If we doubt  this then we must admitthat thfiearn-  ing power of our Dominion agricultural class?has'.���������beentisi? better standard  under crippled financial conditions and  disorganization^ than with sufficient  accommodation iand perfected organization, ? The iriterestYpn these:mortgages should not exceed 4 percent,  and this should include the cost of administration.    .      \ , ?     Y  We will leave it to those better qualified to picture the blessing and progress ������four agricultural development  in its many and varied lines by being  able to finance it unhampered, as required, along the lines of scientific  modern advancement. ; You all know  that the cow which has to exist on  half rations and scanty attention can  only. produce half or less of the nutritious fluid and that at a greater cost to  its owner than the cow with full rations and-propertettontlon. ?   "���������  And so with the agricultural class.  If tho politicians,' statesmen and financiers claim* interest in the agricultural  class from whom they -take most of  thoir nourishment, they should see,  too, that they get full value by giving  full financial ration and propor attention. Do not, overlook the value of  effeotive co-operation by the fanners  as a result from organization under  government coptrol an4 be not nits-  guided by a amnll povvontogo of better  to-do faimers units In its class who,  like similar units In the industrial  cloas, havo selfish interests at stake  Iif thw gi-rDut tiiul of civlll_^l natlous  it boehoves us all to throw aside all  to throw aside aU petty, differences  and selfish Interests and meet on common ground with common Intereetn  for the elbyatlon to a. nobler and mow  perfect adjustment of our social and  national relations. O. ,T. WIGEN  On  behalf of the flo-nperatlvi* Fw.lt  Orowers of Wynndel, 11,0,  RANCH FOR SALE  For sale, my Fruit Ranch at a bar-  Siin,   containing 8 luwicai     3  aereu  cared. lflO fruit trees, many tiearing  Btrawberriot.** Block Ourrantn and  CJooHeVuMvii-iH, also AS trees in nwrHorj'  row,; rough framo houso, stable, cow  houses, plgstlos, poultry houaoti and  root house. Noarly all lias been  talruih-vl mit t wire tnnroA t Wloek Iftt l������  iiOtv U064,  alongside. Kootonay tlat������.  mm\>sti*0*itX m*ji������*v/������.������������.*, u.MibuUf Wil>.  li;,-.g-__a������.a. .'i..1   !:.;.,-.������...t. ,_:_j  -..  ..I... ..,Ul-������������������,r|������ ,������__���������������-���������__-������ rt.iftii..i,���������   .^-.Mt  nifiKiii'iiiiiiifiiini  ijmimm)m^imm Bp-__Bmr_5r_S9B--"W  "_   v  THE  CRESTON  REVIEW  ti^timmm  Qur'I&C* Budget  0  AA  7%e Lending  Hotel of the  Fruit    Belt  ��������� ���������%*s*f  OU  will  make   no   mistake  when you get off the train,  if you sign the register at  the  Creston  Hotel..     Travelling -  men   will  substantiate  this,    w-e  study' the -comfort' of our guests...  The rooms are well furnished in  a manner up-to-cjate.    ,  Silverton's first, contribution to the  patriotic Fund is over $6Q0.  . The3- p... Telephone Co. is expending $2,000 upon new lines in Phoenix.  A Trail, fisherman last week landed  a 10-pound Ling, which measured 31  feet, \   "***  ' Entries at Kelowena fall fair this  year were" 25 jler cent larger than in  18J3.  Penticton has'raised the pay of the  medical he_.lt_������ttr_Hcer-to-$125per annum. ,    'r~ ti .  Cigars made 'from Okanagan valley  leaf tobacco have-a large 'sale-in England. . ������.  .-F-^.-��������� am. -*k-*C _-_      ���������.  tjr__������c-A������������t  Call   cAgain  Headquarters tor Mining Men,  'Lumbermen,. Rancherd,' Tourists  and Commercials. ;       -, .'  /. B. Moran  Prop.  THE CANADIAN BANK  OF COMMERCE  CAPITAL, $15,000,000  REST, $13,500,000  t  I  XYl.KJ>Ly*2J 3.     V^JLA-JUrjtl/JLVftJ  Issued by The Canadian Bank of Commerce, are a safe, convenient  ,an& inexpensive method of remitting small sums of money. These  Orders, payable without' charge at any bank in Canada (except in  the Ytjkon Territory) and in the principal cities of the United States,  are issued at the following rates : ��������� *-  $5 and under . .    * .N 3 cents.  Over 5 and not exceeding $10 . <t  ������    40       ������ *��������� 39 1.0*  *���������    30       ** *' 50 . 15  REMITTANCES ABROAD  shonld be made by means of onr SPECIAL FOREIGN DRAFTS and MONBV  ORDBRS.   Issued withont delay at reasonable rates. " S28  C. G. BENNETT  i*  ������<  Vernon hunters *  en plentiful but *u  season.  sport prairie chick-  i-isurally*-wild this  Manager Creston Branch  Larg(  Get Your Fruit Trees, Bushes, and  Ornamentals of Every Des-  cription rrom the  ,    r,,   .-       ,      1 .   ., 1   1     <0 " '        -    _|        ,. I        ' . "     -������ _��������� *  ' . "* "  [est and Best Nurs-ery in the West  1000 Acres "Under Cultivation .:  Buy From ' TW^  BRITISH C0LuMB!A NLiRSERiESCO.  r%*-- /^  Oiir Specialty:  "Qne year trees on 3-year whole roots"  Growu and Packed by Men of Lifelong Experience'  NO IR^i&ATION NO %INTEB INJUE.Y  -."'������������������ mmtmmm��������� ��������� .:,,,,���������..-.,.���������'  Write fnrSO-page. Illustrated Catalogue vtO':-''' ���������   : r:  David B. Horne,  ; Nakusp,  P.  p., or A.  MILLEK,  The new Oddfellows Jlodge at Belle-  vue starts with a membership (of seventy-two. '",*' "*       ���������  "f-**r_    - i    "*j\../ -r  Slocan JLake.fruit fair lost,week had  more entrieV'flSan at any previous' exhibition^ -_--_ ___ -_-  New Denver raised $100 for the Pa-  triotic Fund  at a concert  one night,  last week.' -j  jt'."   ".       *~       >'  -      #������������������ - ���������  '  Grand Forks fruitfair last week had  increased entries,in, nearly-every jde-���������  partment. "*~ ������V -''-���������"���������-  The B. C. Telephone Company is put:  ting its Rosslaitd -main street wires  underground.*-'  The smelter at Trail has just declared its customary quarterly dividend  of 2 per cent.  ��������� Salmo has a Red Cross Society which  is making sox and shirts for the soldiers at the front.  The bars of two Revelstoke hotels  were robbed of' some $60 each one  morning last week."  Penticton veports an abundance of  vagrants soliciting almoin the residential part of the town.  Grand Forks high school girls are  receiving military drill and are to be  formedrinto a girls scout squad.  Grand .Forks brass band has gone  out of busitiess. The leader and seven  players left the (town last month.  W. E. Smith/ a  Revelstoke grower,  if, _.-_..----_'���������"������.    ������������f_._-_.������~?v������4.������...*   %~e   ������������j.4".ru^~������ ..rl-  la SuOWlug   -ac* rwicuco   ui   jiuuoiruca ai  the Irrigation Congress at Calgary.  NOTICE!  #.  SATURDAY,  opens our Cash Emergency Sale���������  the biggest and hest sale ever pulled  off in Creston.  V m   X   ���������  .   Did you get one of our large circulars fit. explains the idea that after-  that date its Cash or Trade���������and no  book-keeping.  new v^-ttLorx  .Be sure ana get our  -   PBIGE   GROCERY   LIST,   ready  Saturday morning.  \ Yours for Low  Prices and Quick Returns. ' 5  LANCASTER   &  GO.  'IV,"  Arrow Lakes  CRESTON, B.C.  ssBasaBsssBsssaasatt  r  :Ut*  and Feed Stables  Shipment of McLaugHd Sieighs find Cutters oij Haii^j  \?v':":^. '������������������:���������.', ������������������ -,-tbam r-SEEiQ-HS': -��������� ���������������������������������������������*'���������;:: ��������� ������������������'������������������':^ '  .'.,,-'..      .     '���������' : ���������.������������������������������������ ..'   ''.'���������.'       ...';.. 1   v.' . ,,���������#������������������... . ������������������", ,.-...-v:;  Havriess| Sjng-le and Double ond ''.Supplies on Hand :..���������������������������  Several Sets of Second-Hand Harness   ;���������  Sleighs and Ctiiters *��������� ���������   ;; t,;". ���������'.   " ^ipA^^jjR,- ;S'AW^l  T.:.:-'7l'  Ai'������*M7"i  tij   Phono 56  Sirdar Avonuo  Box 14  ii.ii.-jv-jf-.t '":���������'.  0% MONEY,  3tfONlEX;"0%"  l?oaiiw niay bo ol)taiii(.d for any piirpoHO on"nooeptriihh.'"'  ���������'���������'��������� ". Iltvtl EhUius Heourity ;  lioorai priviiogcH  CorreHpondtMicc 'Kolicited  im0mlm*mmmm**m*m*mm������mmm**mmmmsmm j  AC.  AGENCY   COMPANY  H)H liaw I*.Uh-Uh5 hhlg.  l������KNVKIi. Colo.  ' Rossiand raised $646 for the Patrio  tic Fund. $345 will beheld at Ross  land to relieve the needy in the city.  A 25-pound cabbage was among the  'vegetables displayed at the Rossiand  Methodist Rally Day services on Sunday. . *  V This year potato prices at Vernon  range from $20 per ton and shipments  are going out steadily both east and  west.  Rossiand has organized a Red Cross  and patriotic society, the purpose of  which, is to make clothing for those at  the front.  The coyotes have killed about 100  chicken forW: T: Ross of Grand Forks  this fall, who has got particularly Oven  by killing six coyotes. ������������������"���������",  Complaints ,qf garden and. orchard  raiding at Kaslo arc again* beinj-" made.  Thero appears to, bo a sort of organized gang doing the work.  ���������Knitting articles; for the Rod Cross  Society hasv been.' -Interfered with at  Revelstoke, the supply of knitting  needles in town boingf exhausted. Y  The amount collected at Vernon  eustomB*oflice diirjIng'Scptember ipame  to $3,648.00, as compared to $8,512.23  6\urlng the same month lost year.  ,' .   '���������'*,-.''' -i ' ���������'���������-   '������������������'������������������ ���������''     '���������'���������*������  ...;i^a.HjD^tonai^i! is ivrglng Kaslo ran-  : cli'ors to -; opon ar,public , market.,, and  thus control the local vogotablo,,, and  fruit trad^ at prosont done byChineso.  '" 'I^Co j-uriil mall'dyllverythrough ^ho  yiUloy arbund Grand Forks is held, up  through the delay of Uomo ot tho s'ub-  scribora In sending in their application  'forms;' '������������������'���������!-���������',*.-1,v-'i-   "���������'?v  ,; :-;-  ! There iai-o jl8 pountlosip Ij^alio <flolln-  qiiont In ^ito^t^xow to tbifl,grand to-  tai amount of ^120,10^, and a number  of tlio 18 have boen delinquent for hov-  ������r.a?yoam* .,,,,*. :V,..r',.....vr.;. ,>--��������� >������������������ "  'ikiIVo imwroolui-'-aroLbclng addod to  dibHuliuid'irBclioolaccomodation to tako  Oiti^ of uomo siicty bogiimors who woro  denied ndmittancoi ? when ��������� denied admittance when nchool 'ro-opontid in  August.'' !���������'������������������������������������������������������' ":"'  ���������'���������OVw B;600,0jk> foiit1 of logs more wore  scaieU last montti tnun in the corres-  pobdlng uionth of last year, according  to the report of Tlnibcr Inspector Geo.  D, McKay. Tin) total logt. scaled in  Hoptombor, Iflli, amounted to 00,500,-  11*00 i������.._i-; i(iu- touii Hiuiifi ior r.opu.'iul>ui',  1   ������������>������i������,   Walr. III.UxXl.ll til.  The Dominion Government is putting black bassfrom Ontario into B. C.  waters.  Arrow Lakes Produce Association  are opening a co-operative store at  Nakusp.  A sacred concert at Trail on Sunday  last netted $45 for tbe Red Cross Society fund.  Mra: S. T. Gilmour of Kelowena was  offering strawberries for sale early  last week.  The night shift ofthe saw mill at  Bonner's Ferry was taken off "Wednesday night.  H.?L. Battch, a Rossiand hunter,  brought in a 225 pound buck deer one  day last week.  The new concrete stack at the Trail  smelter is 250 feet high, and 18 feet  inside diameter.  240 gallons of black spotted   trout  heve  heen,   placed in    the  streams  aroundNo������_.__porfc.--*������   -.     .      .    ,    ���������*  p** .  Wall Soo, one of Kaslo's Chinese  citizens was last week fined $100 for  trafficking in opium.  ���������Vernon's potato crop is not a heavy  one���������nine tons to the acre being considered a good average.  1.' ''       - *��������� *  , Kaslo council has voted $25 to' the  Patriotic Fund and will give r$I0 each  month till the war ends. !  There were 1300 entries at the last  Grand Fork's fair, being 30 per cent,  better than the previous record.  When present additions are completed the government will give 1200 miles  of telephone service in the province.  New Denver Methodists are donating the whole of tlio financial receipts  of Sunday;; Oct. 18,  to tho   Patriotic  Fund.  Y !���������-������������������'��������� - .  .  Kaslo housekeepers are now allowed  free "juice" for one poroh light, provided their electric light bill runs $2 a  month. :  Potato shipments will be extra heavy  this week from the Vernon station,  and will probably, beat all previous  records. ,  !Nover in tho history of the Rossiand  camp had the shipment of ore to the  smelter boon carried on to the extent  that it is today.  Dr. G. C. Read oi Kaslo will attend  to tho medical roimi i'ements of all  municipal indigents durlngtho coming  winter, frob of charge.'; ,ri;,    ,  Tiedge: The postofflco ntRrOyolHtokoi  is now housed in tho old Baptist church.   Whon tho clerks "vvieh to damp a  Btamp thoy rub it 011 the wall.   .<i: ������������������'��������������������������� v.  -.   <���������.', , 1,7' -  Now Denver riflo club defeated the  Slocan City   rlflotnon in a ilvo-wuwi-  team, shoot'by������������������4 points.*  The Hhoot-  ingwosnt-JOO, GOO nnd'000 yards. '  Tho number of alien x-esorvists with  thc.Polioo in Trail to date is 120 A'us-  triatiH and 1 Gorman. Thin* lis the result of tho recently. passed ordor-in-  councll.       . ?���������'.,. ,,'r        ??���������?  On nnd aftor tho first Tuesday In  April, 1015, tho village of Bonnow Ferry will bo no moro, for upon that date  t-liri    ..ittiirmi.     ...Ill V,rt������������%������in     o' l.ttm,   /-.#*l...  second class.  Tlio Kaslo Kootoiianiaii says that  Charley Hanson of Poplar Creek haw  has salted down 400pounds of red flsh.  Ah u hurley I nut punay 01 uimu-h Ki-oaHe  lit) wiii IM) nil i^iit.  (.llin wmi^-i.  Renewal of License  *> Section 41  , Notice is hereby given that on th^  first day of December next application  will be made to'the Superintendent of  Provincial Police for renewal ofthe  hotel license to sell liquor by retail in  the hotel known as Kitchener Hotel,  situated at Kitchrner in the Provini*<*  of British Columbia.  Dated this I3th day of Odtober, 1014.  LENA ANDEENsVOwner and  Administrator.  Renewal of License  Section 41  Notice is hereby given that on th.*.  first day of December next application  will qe made to the Superintendent of  of Provincial Police for renewal of the  hotel license to sell liquor by retail in  the hotel known as Erickson Hotel,  sitnated at Erickson, in the Proviac<-  of British Columbia.  Dated this 13th day of October, 1914.  ,    W. W. HAT J*. Proprietor.  Renewal of License  ~t       r Section 41 -^  Notice is hereby given that, on the  first day of December next, application  will be made to the Superintendent of  Provincial Police for renewal of th*'  hotel license to sell liquor by retail in  the hotel known as tha Creston Hotel,.'  situate at Creston in' tbe Province of  British Columbia.  Dated this 13th day of October, 1914.  0. B. MORAN, J?Top.  Renewal of License  Section 41  i  Notice is hereby given that on' th������i  first day of December next, application  .will be made, to the Superintendent of  Provincial   Police for  renewal of tht'  hotel license to sell liquor by retail in  tho hotel known as the King Georg������-  Hotel   situate at Creston,   in the Province of British Columbia.  Dated this 13th day of October, 1914.  ���������.'������������������     Wm. A. HERON,  For the Orfeston Trading Co.  Renewal of License  Section 41  Notico is hereby given that on th^  first day of December noxt, application  will be made io the Superintendent of  Provincial Police for renewal of the  hotol license to. sell liquor by retail in  tho hotel known as the Sirdar Hotel,  situate at Sirdar, in the Province of  British Columbia.  ���������1)n.ted this 18th day of October, 1014.  WM. MORRIS, Prop.  GET YOUJR  iPlpmliin^       and  General Repair Work  Done by  W. B. Embree  '.���������;?���������''    1:  : '  The fliHi_.fiio.ioii - of work   well  tlont>  Kiu.ciu l(*n*.' altci tbo prion it* fomi>**.������,  GOy'.LO WEN BERG  OoNHUI.'iriNO    I.NOINKKiK  RESTON  B.C.  JAS. H. SCHOFIELD,  Fire, Life nnd Accident lusurniuit*  UYtAT? RAT'ATV!   Wt/v  **���������(���������.  1  I  5-*!  *���������%;  ���������:���������;.-  ���������'���������"���������':-'--^a  titim  ���������:-.'-..V>J  mm  W  ���������������������������'���������&$  V.-v  m  titiw  ��������� *v* *���������  '-%  ��������� m*?A  Mm  ,X������-1  . .. > \  ti*i  *>        *���������  f   T������   A TT  -J.N. ������  _J^r_i  |ij^,i.i.ll,^i|.,^i|,.Hft-i*H"^i������ii .|ii.l|,,'_^y.i,:tn,,i  mmmmm  Sj*mflffltij|jmH||H  HMrfl THE REVIEW. CBESTON, B. G>  ENGLAND'S FOOD SUPPLY  LARDER    WELL   FILLED   AND   NO  DANGL   . OF HUNGER  Mainly Luxuries That Will be Cut Off  On     Account     of   the   War-���������Many  Staples   Can   Stili   be   Imported   a?  Required.  England's food suppl. i.ppears to  be adequate for some months to  come, and now tbat the iirst excite:  ment over the war crisis has settled  down, the rumors of a danger of famine in tbe country are shown to be  unfounded. Prices bagan to go up  at once, esecially on wheat and  Hour, which control the price of bread,  but assurances regarding the resources of the United Kingdom bave  now begun to have a beneficial effect.  Tbe country as a whole is taking a  i vtional view- of the situation. Only  in a few cases has i'ear prevailed to  the point pf attempting to buy up  unnecessary household supplies. Many  of the grocers, to their credit, have  refused to take advantage ot excessive demands, and by asking cash  and calming their customers have  sought to lessen ps-.nie and frustrate  selfish  buyers.  The press has boen urging the Colly  of a food panic and the government  pl-ans to insure shipping carrying food  and raw material for the United  Kingdom against war risks, and to  care for the distribution of food landed, have done much to reassure people. They are realizing that danger  lies not so much iu actual shortage as  in a fear of shortage. whu-.h might  produce panic. A general setiment  against seitis-i buying is beiug fostered.  Regr.rdiug the wheat i-esources. a  writer in   tlie  Daily Telegraph  says:  "���������Wheat aud flour are far and away  th * most important articles imported  into the country. Whereas the aver*  cousumpiion of wheat foodstuff per  bead of the population is, roughly,  342  pounds*,  tlie  average  annual con-1  of sews and ewes and cows.  Some cottage people, who have b ^n  unable in the last day or two to v/.t  d silvery of food, have already begun  to sell "their sows, and it has become  very important that some official assurance as to the supply of fodder  should be given, since the holding up  of stores may do almost, as much damage in this direction as a general  shortage.  "There are,"    one    importer    said  CHRISTIAN  ENDEAVOR  Outline of the'Ideals and Methods of  the  Movements;  by  William  Shaw, LL.D.  The fundamental difference I ctween  the ideals and methods of the. Christian Endeavor movement iind those of  the  organizations   that had  preceded  it was in the emphasis placed upon  obligation,  the element of religious  "tho- sands and thousand's, of tons of I and the definite character of its com*  meat hi  the  Smithfleld cold storage,! mittee work.    It -made duty its key*  and with reasonable economy and  care, the supply may last six months."  ������������������Owing to the depletion of fishing  crews by the calling out of the reservists aud the position in the North  Sea," says the Telegraph, "many vessels are reported to be on the. point of  ceasing activity, and authorities at  Billingsgate have predicted a fish  famine. There are practically no  stocks of cured or salte-i flsh in the  coun vy, as the popular taste for this  class of article has declined.  "No fears are entertained on the  Coal Exchange regarding the position.  A leading member of the Coal Factors'  "Although the   prices of vegetables  allowed   a     considerable  note, not feeling or amusement. The  prayer-meeting was its heart, with the  spiritual dynamic to inspire and energize all Its. individual and committee  activities. ���������"''.'  3efore thc famous "hphorlsm of the  psychologist, "No impression without  expression," had boi-n applied to religion, the young people's movement  had demonstrated it. The society became tho manual training school of  th*. church, when* tlie young disciples  learned how to speak by speaking, and  how  to work by working.  It is safe to say that it has largely  ] helped to transform the attitude of the  ard  the  young    disciples.  ch uow that is not actively  iu the training of its young  I j.eoplo   is   a   curiosity,     lt    has  also  changed the attitude of the youi\g peo-  increase,   -> ple toWur(j tue church.    No longer do  1 ! thev hold aloof and camp on the outer  <__  a  i...uiv:   ui  uuu uu-fuuii.     i\i.  uu. I      ,  *    -tliov  nro  in   tho hoart of I bines  !.^������i.theJlar ^^iL^L80 d������;'?t hki'bSadSiS thei!  conceptions  pendent upon the resources of  French soil as at other seasons. Our  ovvn vegetable crop is a good one, and  it v.-ill last for months. The  .taple article���������tho potato���������has tie  best crop for years, and is generally  free from disease. Therefore, while  the householder may bave to pay a  higher price for that commodity in  the future, any idea of famine prices  haviug to be paid may at once be dismissed. Beans, peas, and caabages  may show heavier advances, but these  are not so indispensable as the pota.o  and the householder will be able to  economize supplies in that direction.  "The fruit market    presents a dif-  sumption of meat of all l.inu- is only | fei?e.ut aspect.    The    London market  about 120 pounds per capita. } ordinarily receives two-thirds of    its  "Happily,  as   the  following   figure*- j suPP������y  from    France.    With the al-  show. Great Britain  and less upoa  her supply of cereal  more   grain   is "bem  our overseas dominions.    Our    wheat  imports  now,  as  compared    with  14  years ago, are divided as follows:  Wheat Imports���������Grain  l-rom British Empire:  139S     1,978,320  1912      5t.,123,905  From foreign countries.  1898 50,3S7,720  1012      50,448,634  W_ieatmea! and Flour  From British Empire:  18.������8        1,879,320  1912       4,710.727  From foreign countries:  1808     19,038,789  1!)12     5,478,740  "India takes the lead with (in 1912)  an export to Great Britain of 25,379,-  000 cwt. of wheat, of the. value of  .������10,945,1)09. Canada's consignment  of 21,501,000 cwt. was valued at ������8,-  845,000. Australia's' contribution of  wheat was valued at ������5,335,000. From  America* came 19,974,000 crtl. <.  whet valued at ii8.327,000 and from  Argentina, ������7,775,000 worth of  wheat, ������8,435,000 worth of maize and  .C2,504,000 worth of oats. Last year  the total wheat and wheat-flour retained for home consumption was  1-19,641,000 cwt.  "Supplies may be said to come in  continuously throughout the year, as  follows:  January���������Wheat from Pacific coa*?*.  of America.  February    and     March���������Argentine  '-..heat.*     ���������  April���������Australian wher...  July   and   August���������American   (winter) wheat, Canadian wheat.  ueptember and  October���������American  (spring)  wheat, Russian wheat.  November���������Canadian wheat.  Optimism about the wheat supply is  further   reflected by a writer in the  Chronicle as follows:  "The board of agriculture and fisheries stated officially that this year's  wheat crop of tho United Kingdcm is  prown on an average 4 per cent, greater than last year, and that the yield  will be above the average. It ls estimated that thc crop will be not less  than 7.0(1(1,000 quarters. After deductions for seed and taking stocks into  most abnormal home crop of the pre-  the religioiis-dlfe, and instead of placing th emphasis upon being saved,  their motto is, "Saved to serve."  It has placed tbe young people at  the front in all movements for temperance, civic righteousness and moral  reform and to their leadership was  largely clue the nation-wide interest in  such campaigns as the "Go-to-Churcli-  Sunday," and tlie "Saloonless Nation  by  1920."  lt has given to the young people a  new vision of tlie churches' obligation  to obey the great commission, "Go  yo into all the world," and the initial  plans for the great and successful educational campaign for missions, carried on by the Young People's Interdenominational Missionary Movement,  now the Missionary Education Movement, were prepared by Amos R. Wells  It is difficult for an orgarnizution-  whose mission it .to train workers for  ot'ier and more specialised forms of  work to .report specific achievements,  and doubly difficult to do so without  appearing to claim credit for results ;���������.  large part of which belong, to oilier  organizations. But, acting as a ro-,  porter simply, may I passYOn what*  has been reported to me?  Mr. Fred B. Siuith, the inspiring  leader of the Men and Religion VMbve-  i*mt, said at the great Congress in  New York that his first experiene in  personal work, and his trainiug for  auch service, was received in a 'Christ-,  ir.n icndeavor society in a home-mission church in Dakota.  The founder of the Baraca Bible  Class, Mr. M. A. Hudson, has said  that it was his Chritsian Endeavor  training that at last found expression  in  the organized Bible class.  The Presbyterian Brotherhood of  Chicago, which-was the pioneer of tha  men's brotherhoods In all" our  churches, was organized by Andrew J.  Stevenson, and he said it was the result of his training in? the Christian  Endeavor Society.. -  The Laymen's Missionary; ���������'������������������ Movement was the expression in manhood  of -the training John B: Sleman had  received in the Society of Christian  l.ndeavor-in boyhood.  It was William T. Ellis, world-traveller and journalist, himseif a product of our young peoplw'4 movement,  receiving his rst training in- journalism as the editor of a lit-Me Christian  1_ deavo'r local paper in* York, Peun?,  ..-ho said that of nearly three hundred  i issibnaries whom he met on a journey to mission lands, practically alL  who had gone out in this' generation  said they were there because of the  vision received in the-missionary work  oi' their young--people's societies.  Thirty years ago the missionary in-  teres. in the local chinches was al  most exclusively among tlie women.  Today it challenges the attention of  our strongest men. As never before  men are going into partnersn.p with  God,      and     the   Christian  Endeavor  ^i  '^%ti������;^Q^ti������5^ti)������  CULTIVATION    TO    KILL    WEED*  Extra Work  Pays For Itself in Larger and Cleaner Crops  One 'of the best methods of eradicating weeds���������a source of enormous loss  to farmers���������is as follows: Immediately after the hay or, grain harvest,  plough the land very shallowly wita  a gang plough, turning a furrow twa  or three inches deep. Then, put on a  heavy land roller which will pack the  sod and thereby hasten its decay:  next use the disk and follow "With the  smoothing harrows. Should.any Wood  growth appear, keep the disk and harrows going at.?sbort intervals until  the soil is well decayed.? Acieultivator  with broad ?point3 may theiiVbe used.  The objectr is to destroy? all ��������� weed  growth untilvautnmn.vwlien. the' soil  should be ploughed tlioroughly and  well set up to the VwinttirV frost.  On such land it-is jbOst! to sow som*  kind, of hoed crop.?sucb.as?3.oots, corn  or potatoes,v that requires ..constant  hoeing and cultivation during the  growing season. Ifthis mejthod of cultivation is adhered to closely, it will  bo found to be one of the best means  ���������i������������������* eradicating noxious weeds and also  of preparing the soil for future crop's.  Actual experiments have demon's trated that a much greater yield  may be expected from land cultivated  in the foregoing manner as compare 1  v Ith that secured ftfom fields which  have been left in sod and ploughed la  late autumn. In one instance,, two  four-acre plots were cropped with oats,  for purposes of comparison, Tand the  plot which had been thoroughly culti  vated during the autumn yielded 60  Tenth Legion, alone has enrolled 32,-j bushels more than was.secured from  000 young people alone,��������� .accepting 1 rie land- not so cu_tiv*/;ed. The net  the principle, of Christian stewardship. ' increase"* in revenv 3, after making due  that the last vessel of the line supply  ing the market from Cherbourg has  left, while from Havre and Honfleur  there will be no steamers. No notification has been received from St.  Malo, and it is hoped that that service may be maintained a few days  longer. Even if tlie prices of French  fruit become so exorbitant as to  prohibit them from the modest household, there will be little hardship."  "Only necessaries    matter,    and in  that category,   must be included eggs,  sugar, butter,    and bacon.    At    least       _. ��������� ��������� -,      ,_���������    _-���������       _ .,  two-thirds  of our egg supply wW *be ��������� Td experience  and cultivation ot the  cut off by the closin! of the markets I devotional spirit,  and the young people's societies have,  also furnished the field and the force  to carry out these plans.  The best available statistics would  indicate an enrollment of approximately 9,000 young people's societies and  4,000,000 members in North-.America.  The societies are organized upon tlie  broadest possible basis of service, and  engage in- an infinite variety of ac-  tivies.- These might be grouped as  follows: ���������,'-���������������������������'���������  The Prayer Meeting,'with its training   in  expression  of  religious truth  of South-Eiastern Europe. We are  used to obtaining immense supplies  of beet sugar from France, Germany  and Russia; these will-, very largely,  or perhaps, entirely, cease. Butter  and bacon come to us chiefly from  Denmark, though Holland also sends  u-^ the former. The Danish market  will remain open so long as we are  neutral; But we shall have to bid for  our supplies against insatiable buyers. The extent to which the Danish  market will remain open will depend  upon the degr.e of supremacy asserted and maintained by the British  fleet. If our supremacy at sea Is  made absolute and indisputable, there  is no reason why suppliers should not  come in as regularly as in peace timo,  or that prices should ever reach an  exaggerated figure.  "The character of the food supplies imported by Great Britain to  any appreciable extent from countries  Involved in the war, and therefore  liable to curtailment with a resultant  rise in price, may be seen from the  f-Ilowing details:  From Russia we import wheat, eats,  eggs, barley and butter.  From   Austria-Hungary���������Flour.  From  Germans���������Oats,    eggs    and  sugar.  From France���������Butter, yegotables,  sugar and chocolate.  "Russian supplies about one-soventh  of our imported wheat, moro than half  tho barley, and four-flfClis of the  oats, with one-sixth of our butter imports and one-third of eggs. Germany furnishes live-fifths of our  sugar supplies, and Franco ranks  noxt.    Tho    principal  raw  materials  account on which an inquiry conduct- of IJrltteh lndustrlos likely o bo af  ei by the board has just been com- foelod lu prlt50 t ���������Uantity by the  Plotei -there ia now in this country   outbreak  of  war  throne .out     l  sufficient wheat to supply tho wholo  population for about four months. This  allows Cor the normal rato of consumption, and it Is irrespective of all  future   imports   from   abroad."  Tin. ."situation with regard Lo meat  is nol k'f_i. satisfactory, Thc normal  killing!) of home-grown stock supply  (in per cont. of tlio annual consumption. England Is not*-necessarily dependent -upon foreign Imports for tho  baiimco of supplier, as In caBo of om-  orgeney it could ho provided by  slaughtering a largor proportion ot  home Hloolc. This contingency cannot,  however, nrlfio- in proHont. cli'.'.um-  Htunci.-H. Th-.i-u ia ut thin inomuiit tin  exceptionally largo unpply of foreign  incut lu cold storage. Heavy con-  Hlgninciitu nro on tho way. Thoro ls,  therefore, no Justification ln tho pros-  ������>nt oHltion for any tIho In price In  niont.  A pr6nilnont official of Hie hoard of  iiRrlr.iill.ure said that. If the price of  moat or ulurni at lho price of feeding  Muff's ������'-ninfiM farmers und breeders to  kill .'-U...1'* '.iii inn Ih iit������< Johh mi ihti  country will bo felt for yearn. II, Is  ImpoHidblc to nay how long It would  tnlie to im pply ilm low., If there In  anything like u wholesale nhuiKhtcrlnft  outbreak of war throng iout Europo  aro:  Flax, tho material of tho Ulstor and  Scotch Hnon trade, Imported from  Russia.  Hemp���������-Ilussln. and Italy contribute about ono-fourth . of imported  supply.  Wood ami timber������������������Itm.-.ia supplies  two-Hi.vnnt.ha of tho total Imports.  Poiroloum���������About ono-thlrd ** from  Ili'.ssia.  "Tho only raw materials of Industry, properly ho oallod, imported from  (Jormany, Italy and Fruneo aro dye  lag and tanning stuffs, raw hides, mid  varloun  chaU.-..."  W. N. U. 1020  The Quiet Hour an.1 Morning  Watch, for the deepening of the personal religious life.  The Study Classes, for missions, the  Bible, civics, church doctrine, personal workr_.tc.  Reading Courses, Christian Culture  Courses, ahd literary evenings for the  broadening of the intellectual  life.  Thc Social Work, for the promotion  of real recreation.  The Departments and Committees,  v'-.h. their definite training.  Unions and Conventions, with their  practical training iu co-operative effort.  Christian Citizenship, with its emphasis upon temperance, civic righteousness and world-peace, giving to  our future citirrens a knowledge of  public affairs and training in social  service, enlisting them in all legitimate' ways for the election of good  and efficient office holders, for tho observance of existing laws, for the  adoption of Improved laws, for tho improvement of the conditions of labor,  and the rational use of the Lord's Day  for rest arid worship; the opening of  rooms for reading and recreation, the  establishment of gymnaslms and athletic fields, tho promotion of clubs for  tho special study of town and municipal conditions, with addresses by the  heads of departments.'  Boys' Clubs or groups under the leadership of tho virile young men to lead  the boys in their ii.orts and athletics,  and *by tho contagion of character to  givo tliom a vision of tho larger life of  Christian sorvlco.  High School Soclotlcs, and organizations in preparatory sohools mid  colleges.  Prison Work, hy and for our "brothers In bonds," in jails, ponitentlarU.-s,  iriHons and prison camps.  Floating Soclotios, for the men on  ships and in seamen's jiiIhhIouh on  shore.  Soldiers' Societies, in canips and  lost. I.  Evangelistic Work, In tho society,  cottago pniyor-mcetjiig, and lu cltv  missions.  FroHh-AIr Work, In seaside homes  and fresh air eanipR.  Immigrant Work, Lunching those  brothers of ours from across tlio sea  our buiguuiro, and at tho sumo tlmo  Imparting to thorn tho spirit of Christian brotherhood.  lioiipiuil W'oi'K, .uul work iu uUiur  publlo institution-..  MIijhIoiib, at homo mid abroad. The  vision received that cnlls for tho con*  Hocroatlon of money and manhood.  In short, anything and everything  that thc church ought to do should he  included in tho pluii for the young  rcoplo's society that thoy "found thorn-  loud ors for tho church of the future.  Tho result of this upeclilc training  I", r,-?^n hi 1h������������ ("Mlti-tnny of i������i������.!MI-ti*jd������y������  of young men. nihilHtm-H, mliiHbnniirloH,  ("hrUitlaii AuHOchitlon HoeroUirhi-.. and  . hi -nun who i<ay thnt It wan hi the do-  Ella���������Why did she throw horsclf at   finite work and training of the young  him In that way? people's society tuht thoy "fond th.;;u-  lliillii���������l.ccnuuo    Hhe  l<iu.w tlmt. he I hoIvoh" and were faced toward a life  wan a kooiI catcii.���������l.tppuicott's.  have   made- the  tenth' the  minimum  gift foi* religious', work.  Thirty years ago religion ; nd politics did not mix. Today religion is  tlie best asset a politician can have,  and the Sermon on the Mount is being translated into pur social and  labor legislation. .-  Thirty years ago the emphasis in  religious work was upon individual salvation and heaven?was^-.the goal. Today the empsasis is upon the salvation  of the other man; and service is the  reward.   '.' ' ��������� :-ti '���������_ :  -.:  -Thirty years ago the old sheep wero  in the lold, and the lambs were largely outside, waiting for aa experience.  Today it is the little chid that is in  the centre of the church's thought and  effort, "for of such is th'e'kingdom-of  heaven."  We are endeavoring to get religion  down out of the louds of speculation,  intellectual hair-spllt.ting; and sentimental emotionalism that exhaustss itself in feeling", Into real life, that it  may stand for a. clear .and^ abiding  faith-in God through Jesus" Christ,  and a loving, brotherly ministry" and  fellowship with men.. 7'Y  '      titi  allowance     for    cost  of  cultivation  amounted to $14;00. -���������������������������'���������?  A similar, experiment was conducted  with sugar beets.; on two plots���������one  cultivated after harvest, the other  spring-ploughed. In this case the difference in yield was even more noticeable than with oats. It was found  .that the land cultivated occasionally  during the autumn, produce! beets at  the rate of ii?%; tons per acre, white  the .yield from spring-ploughed land  was only 8 4-5 tons per acre.. Stated  ii dollars and cents, this difference  is very co.ivi^cing;'?.figured? at tha  prevailing price for beets,Vit showed  a greater revenue from cultivated  land of $16.03 per acre.���������J.P., in Conservation.  Foreign Born .in the U.S. .'  A'bulletin just issued by tlie cens".-.^  authorities at Washington shows-that  of the countries now warring in tho  world, the British-empire is represent,  ed by very much the largest number  among tlio population of the United  States.   There were in April, 1910, 13,-  _ To Preserve JEggs  Preserve only absolutely fresll  eggs; stale eggs will not keep In any  preservative:  Have your preservative ready to receive the fresh eggs as you. get them.  If. you are in doubt as to the fresb.-  uess of the eggsr candle tbem, or sect  .wltether they sink when placed in a  dish of fresh w: ter. If an egg sinks,  it is reasonably fresh.  V)p* not preserve dirty eggs or eggs,.  that    have    been  wjaslied.    Washed  rsrgs will not keep because tlie shell  l.as "been, moistened; and   dirty eggs  "will become tainted in flavor.  Do not use the same liquid preservative mote than ono year.  nfcrtilo eggs are better than  fcr-  515,000 persons of foreign birtii in that- -jie eggs- for pre ervinc  f,??ni,!.!!._;??.8_tJtut1S?-:,4.'.7. J)?r-..cent.'-0f      -dlnso the eggs" with water ; ftcr ro-  the   population.     The  divided as follows:  England      Scotland      Vales     Ireland      numbers   woro  876.15.".  261,03.  82,479  1,352,155  Canada     1,201,14s'  Total    ,      n,773,2(b>  Germany        2,501,181  Russia          1,602,7*5*1.  Austria  ?...    71,670,52-1  Franco        117,236  .Tapi .11  (about)         . 150,000  Another aspect*of the question is  tho number of forelgii-born who have  become naturalized. Of the males of  whom a record Is kept, (jormany  show.-, tho largest proportion, ns Indication, It HooniH fair to conclude, that,  tho Gorman citl/.oii is more anxious to  cast off the old tlos of tho militaristic  FtUhorlnnd in favor of the now-found  home of liberty?  moving them from the preservatlvo-  Eggs that are in good condition  when removed from water glass solution will usually remain good fer  two weeks.  Wator glass eggs aro practically as  good as fresh eggs for all cooking  purposes. Jl it is desired to boil  them, prick? a small holo through the  largo end of the shell bet ore placing  them in tho water. The pores of the  shell haver������been sealed by the water  glass solution, mil without the pinhole  tho expanding air within the shell  would burst "it.  FIRES AND  SOIL  FERTILITY  Under a Banyan Tree  The first parliament house of tlie  Boors wan undor a banyan tree, undor  which the rulers of tho Transvaal  gathered lu tho oarly days of the republic Lo dlscuHH (iiiostloiiH affecting  tho country, nnd the troo bocamo  known at; tlio "fiiut volluiraad of tho  Transvaal."   The lloors call tho spot  Womb'rblonin ft (h ji Cow nit Ion (o*t-  sldo of Protorla, at. the ontranco to a  cleft In thu mountain.  . Canada and the War  If war has Its. horrors, li. has also  its groajt. and ennobling compensations, and hy no means Iho least ot  thom is Its virtue an a unifying agont  In Oro-it Britain, In ItiiHHln, 1*i Frnnro  a:;d In Belgium tlio strife of parties,  tlio JoaloiiKlcH of claHH, tho antogai.-  Ihius of creed, huvo all aliKe boen  hushed. Tho wnntonffdHH of Gorman  Jingoism hns accomplished iu a month  a vork of consolidation that, might  otherwise havo taken yearn. In onr  own cuiin thc Impiiluo to got togothui*  and to Hli.lt all minor issues goes bo-  yand the Unitjd Kingdom, nnd Ih iu*  wide iu. tht) i.i-ij>i_c it.-M-lf. Wo '.a.'tj  hiMi many proofH of It, I., the :iah.  fortnight, but none moro poworlV. and  ImproHHlvo than that which has Just  boon furnished by tho Canadian parliament.���������Loudon Dally Mall.  "What's tho mutter wltr. Wllllo."  "Ho't- turned anarchist."  "Anarchist!     Dear,   dear!     What*,  turno I hlm?"  ���������'Uo finyri bo on n't mipport any rov-  o.r.-.mont that wilfully solids ships to  bring homo atranded school touchers."'  ���������Cleveland Plain Donlor.  Destruction of the Timber Only Part  of tho Immense Damage Done  Exports at ato that forest soils havo  lost and are IohIhb much fertility oiy-  ing to forest tiros which, doing 'apparently little Immediate damage, rob  the soil of uccHtinillations of humuo.  In muny sections land Is being cleared for farming, and, where such forest laud lum not boon burned, ther*  Is a large poroontago of vegetable mai-  tor which provides considerable fertility and a good t.oxturo. Moroovor,  uh thlH noil has a grou.to;.* cupucily !���������������  absorb and rutuin moisture. II is lo������������  likely to ho washed nud gullied under heavy rains.  He Could Not Umleratand  If there Is any truth In lho report  from Berlin that tho Kaiser counted!  on the sympathy of tho American poo-  ���������>]v lu tiu; ,vu.' into uMi-i 1 U liiiA  plunged Europe, It' goes to sh.iv/ bovr  impossible It Is fo. n warlord to appreciate or understand public opinion.  A military despot and autocrat may  dosplHO pihllc opinion, but there ur*  inert when tho inability to undeP-  Htniid it Is practically HUiclde.-���������Ne������  York World.  There l������ no logic lllco that which  comoH from doing thlngH worth while.  | of chrlHltan loaderuhlp uml ������������������������������������rvlco.     |���������ontutii H-vcti.  Mardoii.  "Do you drlvo your own car?" iibHk  od Uio iwport mtf-.nr.Ht,  "No,"   roplied   Mr.    Cliuggl.S.      "I  never drive It, I coax it,"���������WuHhlntott  fltnr.  "You are going to the dogs."  "Sir. that Ih a cur-nory remark.1^***  \ l.aillinoio Aniciiu-iii.  -a_t___i_  -,i^7iWm^ij^^^M^itr*i^,p-i^w.i*iiiiii.,.w.������wuHliiiiiiii_'i������ Im .VtnUiJiwi.  mmxmmixmimmemuxxmmmmmmmmmmmxummm0^^mmux.^mim^^mi.  ���������y.l^fa4t^<ll'jAMfci**W^4^ -".itj  ift.it]  THE BEVIEW& CBJBSTON, B, G.V  M UNITY OFTHE EMPIRE  i  KING   GEORGE   SENDS    MESSAGE  TO   FAR-FLUNG  SUBJECTS  ASIATIC  IMMIGRATION  Settlement of ihe HSr.di: incident rfaa  Now Been Arranged -  Ottawa;���������Thero is considerable satisfaction with the report that the In-  f   *���������     _.--*->u _-..-..-:_.-,_, ___. e .*__..__,<-_._,   dian council has proposed a plan for  To the Bntish Overseas He Expresses   the control Qf the immigration of Hia  Hi& Pride and Gratitude For Assi3t-, dus- The adoption 0f the Japanese  ance Being Given���������Object Lesson arrangement would be, it is stated, en-  to the Whole World. ' t>rely   satisfactory  to    Canada    and  i ...,,.,_.. -in,-- r_.Fir.i_i inrwin-unn probably to Australia and South  London.���������lhe    official   mlormation , \tr.       W-__ch   have  also  had  Hindu  bureau has given out a. message from I ^."AVr:.^ ��������� mnuu  King George to the overseas dbmin  ions and. crown colonies.    It is as foi  lows:  WEEEY MARKET REPORT  pease differences with which my em-  peoples of my wlio'le empire at home  and overseas havo ..moved."-with one  mind and purpose to confr>at and  overthrow an unparalleled assault upon the continuityVof civilization and  peace of mankind.  .   "The calamitous conflict    is not of  incidents  The arrangements between. Gan-  i ada and Japan isr-'that Japanese who  j reach Canada 7 without passports may  be refused admission; that the Japanese authorities shall* confine ?"their. issue of passports to merchants and  students and to laborers to the number of six hundred a year only.     -  If it became "known, throughout  7_ndia that Hindus couid eater Canada,  Australia, New Zealand and South At-..  ^C?^!^o.-^^ when they have passports  throughout on  the side of peace. My , ...   A   ,    nn-.c-.pt.Rinn     thero  wnn Id   h-?  .ministers  earnestly   strove   to   allay | inft-������2������ KSSSSS? ttSST 1������������������22i.'  '  the  Causes  of  the   -.trite ' and- to an- i no mpre Komagata Maru incidents,  w-f $*!_-_i������-._������_..,f.i. ,1*1 om        With passports required the author-  pease diifeernces with which my ;em-ities m indla would have in their own  pire was not concerned.   Had I stood.Ita���������V the ������ontrol  aside when, iu .defiance of pledges to   nan^*3 **?������ contioi  which, my kingdom was a. party, the  soil of Belgium was violated and her  cities made desolate* when ���������the very  life of the French nation was threatened wiili extinction, I should have  sacrificed my honor and given to  destruction the liberties of my empire and mankind.  "I  rejoice   that  every  part  of   the  empire is with me in this decision.  of the volume of  emigration "of Hindus'���������'������������������' to all British  overseas dominions, and Ywould limit  departures to the,numbers and class  of Hindus which Canada, Australia,  South Africa and New Zealand would  be willing to receive each year and  able to assimilate.  At the time of the Komagata Marii  trouble, Canada urged the British  government to find a way of dealing  ..-m^     ���������������������������������,v.������.,v..     ..f.~f.~A     .-_...        ' with-the Asiatic immigration    move-  of rulers and peoples is the common "- .    -  heritage of Great Britain and of the  empire. My peoples in the. self-gov  ernirig "dominions have shown beyond  all doubt that they, whole-heartedly  endorse the grave decision it was nee  essary to  take.   - My personal know  EARLY PREPARATIONS  German War Y Proclamations Were  Printed Two.Years Ago  London.���������Dr. Poutsma, one of the  ledge of the loyalty and devotion of; south African labor leaders, who was  my overseas dominions had led me j among the British subjects to leave  to expec������ that they would cheerfully Berlin, contributed an interesting art-  make the great efforts and bear the; jcie to the Daily Citiizen, on his im-  _rront   daorlfiooi.      -wrh-oTn      tI-io!      nrosonf- *'___.._������������������.:'������������������������������������ ^-������ * .1.n    _-<-������^v-.ot,     r.onit-1     .n  great sacrifices ?which ihe ? presen  conflict, entails. Tho full measure.ic  which they have placed their services  and resources at my disposal fills me  with gratitude and I am proud to be  able to show the world that my ajpeo-;  pies overseas are as determined. as.  the people  of" the?  United Kingdom  pressibns   of? the  German   capital   in  warvtime.  "That the Germans were prepared  for all eventualities for a considerable  time, was shown." says ..Dr. Poutsma,  when the kaiser's proclamations were  posted 7 up in Berlin,. and of course,  throughout Germany, ordering mobili-  to prosecute a just cau������e to a sue-i zation.    These    proclamations    were  cessful end.;  '"The Domlhioji?of Canada, the COni-"  nionv/ealth vof Australia and. the Dominion of ?New- JZealand have placed Vat  my disposal- their naval forces, \vhicn  have already rendered good service  for the empire; Strong expeditionary  forces are being prepared iii Canada,  Australia? and  New  Zealand  fOr  ser-  printed in two colors, red and. black,  and aii were dated 1912?? The figure  '2? had been stricken ?put r with a;; blue,  pencil and the figure' 4 added. Oh  every following day additional proclamations were issued, and I noticed  that practically everyone    had  been  printed two years 7 ago,  "When, later on, the Lansturm Mit  vice at the front, and the* Union of   Waffe was called out, again theprocla-  SputhYAfrica has released all British I mations  showed that they had been! erated or become settled to such an  troops and undertaken the ^important ;* printed two years ago.   The Germans ] extent, as makes it clear that the iu  Weekly Grain Letter. Supplied by  Thompson, Sons & Co., Grain Merchants, Winnipeg.  Winnipeg, September 8.���������During  the past week the grain markets  everywhere have been very strong.  Prices advanced by leaps and bounds  for the first four days of the month  and in that time wheat prices advanced 7c to 12c per bushel. Since  the 4th inst.? there has been a sharp  r action, which has brought prices in  the American spring wheat markets  and in Winnipeg, to practically the  same figures they rested at fa week  ago, but in Chicago and New York  prices are still 4c to 7c higher than a  week ago. The big advance in the  middle of the week under review was  caused  by    reports    that    England,  m..*...',,.      fl~^f.f,f.    r.m.A    (_/ii)nr1inri.irj    T_r-������y������  r xau.c,   vr_\5������3\.������. _-/__t*   kjv_v������_\������___**< * .*.   ,.v**.  all heavily in the markets for wheat  and flour.    Exporters at the Atlantic  seaboard were eager buyers, and speculative buying, combined with buyiiig  for export, carried price's up    easily.  Ocean vessel space is in liberal supply, and war risk insurance has been  reduced.    The  cost of  exchange  on  drafts against grain shipments to Europe has also been reduced, and generally the facilities for doing export  business'have become improved. This  last  advance  however  was   too  sudden and steep to be taken kindly by  cash* buyers and exporters, and it gave  a  sudden  check    to  such    business.  What has followed in the last three  trays has been a sudden heavy movement  of  new   wheat  tc  the    spring  wheat markets.    Owing to yesterday  being Labor Day and a holiday in all  American and Canadian markets, the  weight of Saturday, Sunday and Monday's  receipts has fallen  on today's  markets, and   the  quantity being  so  large, andjrhe buying for export and  cash trade having received a check as  metnioned above, a great increase in  hedging sales has been inev'table.and  in the circumstances investment and  speculative buyers ,naturally    backed  away from; the. load offered to them.  No    doubt many traders foresaw on  Saturday what was coming, for there  was a decline in prices on that day of  lV������c to'3C.    Today prices lost 3c to  6c   per  bushel.    Declines    in  prices  such as we have had in the last two  market days, though very large when  compared with the moderate reactions  in orainary market times, need not at  the present .time ���������.���������disturb."^those who!  own actual' wheat or hold wheat speculatively. .It is tno nature? 6f the grain  markets, in times of war of far less  moment and Gravity than in. the present European war, to have quick and  wide advances aud declines until the  time comes when conditions have mo:l  f day's cash prices are l Nor., 114c; 2  Nor., lll%c; 3 Nor., 109.4c; No. 4,  103-5_*c; No. 5, &6-V4C Rejected, on account of seeds and smutty wheat, sells  at 5c and 6c under . the straight  grades. Futures closed October,  113%c; December, 114%c; Mays  121M-C.  Oats  Prices for oats tcday are just about  the same as a wek ago, but in the interval they touched 2c to 3c higher;  the easier feeling in otlier grains has  caused some reaction so that today's  prices are 2 C.W., 53.4c; 3 C.W.,  51%c; ex 1 fd., 51%c; 1 fd., 51%c:  2 feed, 50% c. Futures closed October  52%c; December, 51% c.  Barley  The barley mar.-et is quiet���������-demand having slackened for the time  being. Prices are nominal, but we  quote No? 3, 66c; No. 4, ff4c; rejected,  62c; feed, 60c. The October delivery  closed at 66c  Plax  Vlie flax market is very erratic  Stimulated by .the strength in grain  it advanced during the week 3c to  4%c over the prices of a week ag$>,  but since then it'has dropped 9c to  lie from the high point touched, and  today's prices are 1 N.W., 129c; 2 C.  W., 126c. Futures closed October,  131c; December, 135% c.  All prices quoted above are based  on delivery in store Fort William and  Port Arthur.  military responsibilities, the' discharge  v of which'.will be of the utmost value  7? to   the   empire.     Newfoundland   has  "doubled its number of the branch of  the royal naval reserve, and is sending a body of nieh to take part in the  operations   at  the-front?    Prom  tlia  Dominion and provincial governments  of Canada large and welcome gifts of  supplies are on their way for iise by  my naval and military lorces and for  relief in the United Kingdom, which  must inevitably follow    in the wake  of war."* ?*���������      ?  "All parts of my overseas domin'-'  ions have thus demonstrated', * in the  most unmistakable manner, thefun*-  damental unity of the empire amidst  all its diversity of situation and 'cir-  cumstance." ���������;'?-"���������-?     ���������  A message similar to the foregoing  has Ibeen addressed- by King George  to" the peoples of India.  two- kinds of lanstrums���������armed   fluences  of warden  the market has  narmed.   The. last named hadn't   passed away.   In the present instance  the chances are that theVinfluence of  have  and unarmed  been called out. then,, and of the Lan-  strura    Mit Waffe; only a small per  centa'ge were actually in the.field."  PEACE CELEBRATIONS  Leaders of Public Opinion Favor Continuation of Plans  .Ottawa.���������-Following the decision of  the executive committee of the Can-  uulan I?eace Centenary, a month ago  to suspend  operations, except thoso  ? .of'an educational character, in view  of the European war, the brgani'/dng  socretary, M. H. Scammell, recently  sent "Out upwards of 150 letters to the  leading men of affairs throughout the  Dominion. The statements of Sit  Robert Borden and Sir Wilfrid Laurier  wero embodied in the communication  iu which, tho Premier and ox-Promior  had expressed, tho opinion that the  celebration should be carried on despite the war and tho recipients weiv.  askod to oxprosH an opinion on tlie  situation. MivScammoll has now rocolved nearly fifty ropllos.   From cant  ���������- and woBfc replies havo boon received  and thoro is an ovorwholmlng fooling  In favor of carrying out tho arrangements, not only to moro fully realize  tlio hlOHHlngs of peace, but. as an ex-  ninplo to other great, initloim of tlio  world.  IJpitlol. Enthusiasm In Recruiting  , Wiishi.iglon.���������Tho British embassy  bus rocolvod from the Loudon foreign  office, the following dispatch:  "Thoro Ih increasing enthusalHin for  recruiting in Great Britain. Threo  iiuiidit'd Llioiii-iuui until huvo joined  tho regular army since Iho wnr bognn.  The oagernoHH to on list him grown  markedly Hlnco thoir troops havo  actually* boon engaged with tho  onomy." *  Another iiiohwiko rocolved at the  run bri Hay officially denied recent reports that the British cruiser Bristol  had boon disabled in a Ugh? with an  iiunnmod Gorman    ship    In uoiithorn  LOCATION   OF  CANADA'S  TROOPS  May     Mobilize     at   Knowsley   Park,  Near Liverpool, With  Army  Ottawa.���������There i3 a rumor that the  park of Lord ,D=rby,' which has'���������' been  placed at the disposal of the war  office, will be used as the British mobilization quarters for the ?,Ca*nadian  army? They will likely join one of  the new armies which "Lord Kitchener is at present training.  The final announcement of the infantry brigade and battalion officers  for the Canadian forces will be .made  by Col. Sam Hughes. There are many  more officers at Valcartier than are  required, and they are Undergoing examination by the examining board.  Three members of parliament are going with the troops���������-Col. John Cur  rte, M.P., Col. Harry McLeod and  Mf .Ior Sam" Sharpo.      *. "'"  The arrangements regarding the  transportation of the troops have been  completed. It will take a fleet of oyer  twenty vessels to accommodate : tho  troops. No vessel with a ��������� speed of  les than fourteen knots an hour is being accepted as a tranoport.  TO "^eFa7r   CABLE  Australian ShipB Will Go to Fanning  Island With Cruisers  Ottawa.���������It is oxpoctod that it will  bo some time boforo the cable line to  Australia which was cut. near Fanning Island, presumably by tho Gorman cruiser Nuornborg, is repaired,  Tho Canadian government Iiuh a cablo  ship oil tho Pacific but k will not bo  sont to mako tho repair because a  ship cannot roach the scone in time  from onr coiiHtM.  An Australian ship will make tho  ropalrB undor the protection of tha,  cruisers of tho Commonwoa'.th, which  woro eluded when tho Gorman cruiser got out of tho harbor at Honolulu.  So far us known horo the Gorman nliip  haa not yot boon captured.  Germans in Danger of New Movement  London.���������A Russian army, said to  number 250,000 men, is, according to  the Rome Tribuna, in France. The Tri-  buna is considered well informed regarding Russian movements. Official  confirmation of the report is ref uses  at the press bureau.  Experts here are of the opinion that  the Germans, who heretofore have  been the outflankers, are in danger  of being outflanked and of being compelled to accept a frontal attack from  the allies, who now are oh the offer .-  sive. This titanic struggle, in which  the combatants are totalled in millions, is likely to ebb and flow for a  week   before   a   decisive     result - is  Great strategical importance is attached to the Russian capture of the  fortress of Nicholaieff, in Austrian Ga-  licia. It is situated at a junction of  the railway, and has strong bow-  shaped fortifications and entrench  i__ents on both banks of the River  Dniester to protect the railway  bridges. The-population of this place  is largelv Polish, It includes 4,000  Jews and' a garrison of approximately  10,000 men. *r .  The "news has    been received here  that the king of the  Tonga Islands?  in the Southern Pacific ocean, has declared    his    neutrality.    The  Tonga  islands were in danger of starvation,  as their food  supply from New Zealand was cut off until a ship wa"s sent  to the relief of the natives.   The ship  :ygave   the   king his first news of the  the wkr .to advance grainYpricesrhasV war, andYthe monarch;-promptly pro-  only begun.   The war has started at a^ claimed his neutrality;'  time; when the new crops in the Nojrth-  erhr Hemisphere  were  for the most  part just getting ready to be harvested.   The aggregate yield, of the wheat  crops, except of the United States, is  less than,in the last two years, but  still the abundance of the new crop  whatever It may be is there to drajy  upon.    The United Kingdom, by far  the most .dependant on foreign supplies, has been able to keep the ocean-  way to her storehouses" open, and besides the wheat and flour that were  destined to her ports,    she.has pre-  fcrce been the recipient of many shipments intended for continental ports,  but shut out hy the war, and thti*e is  no  doubt  that  the- United   Kingdom  for the present is fully supplied with  hreadstuffs for her own use. Later on,  however,  -when  the,.rfirst  marketings  of the new crops pass out of sight,  the growers will naturally hold on to  a. larger portion than usual of their  grain in expectation of higher prices,  ard the demand for more" will become,  moro urgent and only higher i*rtees  will bring out the supply, ln the present, sharp declinos will bo followed by  increased demand both for cash whoat  and  for speculative investment, and  sharp advances will again tako place.  In thoso times the usual grain statistics aro liable not to be so complete,  but last woek tho world's shipment!?  woro  10,121,000 bushels  of  which  !),-  aOO.000 bushels were from the United  States and Canada, the remainder being small lots from India, Argentine,  Australia,  North  Africa    and    Chili.  Nearly 4,000,000 bushels of last woek'y  shipments wero for France, and only  about 3,000,000 bushels to the United  TO  KEEP OUT ALIEN   ENEMIES  American Consular Certificates Issued  on  Continent Will  be  Refused  After Sept. 14  London.���������The British government i3  adopting stringent regulations in order to keeP out oi Britain alien enemies, who heretofore have been permitted to land under tho guise of  Americans whose citizenship was attested by consular certificates granted  on the continent.  ��������� After September 14 consular certificates will not be accepted as proof of  he American citizenship of those arriving from the continent. These persons will not be permitted to land unless they are provided with passports.  This measure has beeiv.urged by tho  American relief committee, which has  been frequently victimized by fraudulent claimants of American citizenship. The committee says, however,  that it is desirous both of protecting  Its own funds from impostot-S and of  preventing suspicion that-the-United  States is assisting tho enemies of  Groat Britain.  Theso consular certificates, It Is alleged, have been issued wholesale in  some of thc continental cities without  anything approaching nn adequate Investigation to dotormlno whether tho  applicants for them really woro Americans or entitled to American citizenship.  Arrest of an Alberta German  Montreal.���������Mystery   Btirrounds   the  arrest   here of a German    capitalist  Kingdom.   The quantity on oceati pas-Jg^om Alborta,  who was apprehended  Sifton Battery In Shape  Ottnwa.���������Tho members of the Sifton uufoinohilo battery now being organ Izotl at Ottawa for iiorvlco In Europo includes '.lector Glrouard, a  brother of Sir Percy Glrouard, who  was chief onglnoor of railways in  Egypt undor Kitchener. Tho hntterh.i,  which avo rapidly bolng rounded into  shape, includes over 100 mon. It con  hIhIh of ton guns mountod on automobile trucks. Tho battery expects to  leave for the front, in about ten dnys.  dent N/lesftage to Pre������ldcnt Wilson  London.��������� Nown hat* reached horo  11 mt the North Gorman Gazotto of  l.orlln, the official or^an of the gov-  mont tlmt l.nipornr William has sont | iniHHV. All the rnBcrv'.'t... will b������ nor  nn ii ii por Mint moHoiige to Protitdonl i mlttcd, however, to enroll In tbo riiiil.*.  Wilson. ! of tho allied armies.  Russian   Reservists  Not Called  Loudon.���������-Tho       UiU-Man     military  luithoiltlos havo decided not to call to  tho colors tho reservists of that conn-  try now abroad according to an an-  Bttgo Increased 770,000 bushols to 80,*  .���������.22,000 bushols against '10,070,000  bushels the name wook lnnt year. Tho  -United Stales vIhIIiIo supply decreased  last wook 1,515.000 bushels and now  st.viids at 30,0111,000 bushols against  45,075,000 bushels a yoar ago. The  movement, of wlntor whoat In the  V.iitod States is largo, but tho ox-  port, boing largo and millers stocking  up frooly koops tho visible supply decreasing. Tho movement of lho spring  wheat lias middonly lncroased and tho  oaru in ft pouted ut .Viuuipoi. iu tlio  last, throe dnyn havo boon :i,058 against  only 48.1 for tlio corresponding throo  dnys last yoar. At Minneapolis tho receipts woro 1,47!) cars against 481  cars lost yoar.  Our Winnipeg markot lias had a  good demand for cash wheat of all  grade h at; a moderate premium over tho  October futuro. From tho inspoctlonu  this last, wook It would Room that tho  HVoriiKO Hi mi" iltitht ������:uiih!u_ii,.ii)l,y illliiin  hint, year's avorago. About sixty por  cent? of tho -.'*. rn pans ono and twe  northern, twenty per cont. Ihroo  northern, and tho balance No. 4, 5, fl,  reed,  rejected  and    no    nrudo.     Tlio  %*</.���������,. \* a-������������������     Im      <-./���������.-      Ml.f.r������^llHh      f������������ v''������"i 1.1 -f*-  for  harvoHtlng  and   threshing,    local  ijlioworii being common,  but delay ih | como  of the   vv  rather the roBult than duimtso.    To-  much territory.  by the detective department, acting  with tho military authorities, and  taken to the .dctontlou hospital, where  ho undor wont a thorough investigation. Tho sum of $75,000 in monoy  and a coniploto diagram of tho Alborta coal mino, of which Uio suspect  In said to havo boon a director until  a fow wooks ago, woro found. Tho  man's namo was not revealod by tho  military authorities, but it is understood ho hns Hold out his Alborta Interests hIiico thn declaration of wnr  and was rouirning to Germany. Bin  young niece, who accompanied him,  waB also taken In churgo. Tlioy aro  bolng hold ponding orders from Ottawa.  Tlio military authorities nro reticent, whon npolton to concerning tbo  disposition of tho two.  -SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON  LESSON     XII.���������THIRD     QUARTER.  FOR   SEPT.   20,   1914.  Text of the Lesson, Matt, xxv, 31-47.  Memory Verses, 34-36���������Golden Text*  Matt, xxv, 45���������Commentary Prepared by Rev. D. M. Stearns.  To understand this lesson as to the  Interpretation of it, the time when  and the parties concerned, we must  notice carefully the first verse" and  the words, "When the Son of Man  shall come in His glory and all the  holy angels with Him, then shall He  sit upon the throne of His glory."  That defines clearly the time when,  and also that the judgment referred  to is not the judgment of the saints,  His redeemed ones, Ior when He shall,  come in His glory they shall come  with Him, the Old Testament as well  as the New Testament saints, if we  may make that distinction. Let the  Holy Spirit tell you about this as you  read Zech. xiv, 5; Col. Hi, 4; I Thess.  iii, 13;  Rev. iii, 21.  Then, as to the people to be judged,  note the second verse of ,the lesson,  "Before Him shall be-gathered ail nations." Could anything be more clear  and.plain in this connection than the  statements in Joel iii, 1-2, that in con  nection with the restoration and deliverance of His people, Israel, He will  gather all nations in the valley of Je-  hosaphat and judge them because of  their treatment of Israel? In Zeph. iii,  8, He says that it is His determination to gather the nations and* pour  upon them Kss indignation, and in the  rest of that chapter He calls upon Israel to be glad and rejoice, for He will  be mighty in their midst and get them  praise and fame in every land where  they have been put to shame.  in Zech. xiv, 2, He says that He will  ather  all  nations   against  Jerusalem  to battle; in verse 4 that He will stand  again upon the Mount of Olives, ahd.  in verse 9 that after that He will be  king over all the earth.   Let us then  be clear about this���������that in this judgment among those to be judged will,  not be found His body, the church, for  she shall be with Him, nor Israel, for  she is not reckoned among the nations  (Num. xxiii, 9).    There is no mention  of any resurrection of the dead, just  or unjust, so it is not the judgment ot  the saints who shall never come into  judgment for sin (John v, 24), because    .  that was settled on Cavalry, but shall ?.  be judged for their works after the.??  i.rst resurrection at the judgment seat r?  of Christ for believers only (I Thess.  iv, 16-18; I Cor. xv, 51, 52; Rom. xiv,  10; II Cor.-v,. 10).  It is not the great white throne judgment of Rev. xx, 11-15, where the unrighteous shall appear after their rc._-  nrreetion a thousand years later than  the resurrection of the just (Rev. xx,  5-6). .- .  It is simply, as the record says,  a .judgment of nations, as such, by  their respective armies, and the question is their good or ill treatment of  His people, Israel. As all individual  salvation is through Jesus of Nazareth  of the tribe of Judah and king of the  Jews; so the salvation of nations will  be through Him also, but in connection with a righteous Israel, who will  receive Him as their Messiah, when  they shall see Him coming in His  glory to the Mount of Olives for their  deliverance. They shall tlien say, "Lo,  this is our God; we have waited for  Him, and He will save us; this is Jehovah, we have waited for Him; we  will be glad and rejoice In His salvation."  ..fter that "Israel shall blossom  and bud and fill the face of the earth  with fruit" (Isa. xxv, 9; xxvii, 6).  Then shall the saved nations who shall  hear Him say, "Come, ye blessed," inherit the kingdom when the kingdoms  under the whole heaven shall have become the kingdom of our Lord and of  His Christ and shall walk in the light  o7 tho new Jerusalem and bring their  L'ory and honor into it (Rev. xi, 15;  xxl, 24).  Vhe others sha\l hoar Hlm say, "Depart, yo cursed," and shall bo punished with ovoiiasting destruction from  the presence of tho Lord and from  tho glory of His power (II Thess. 1,  7-9).*  Any ono who denies tho truth of  overrating puniahmont, according to  the last verso of our losson, must reject the plain words of the Lord Jeaus  in this passage and elsewhere, as in  Mark ix, 43, 45, 47.  In this last verso of our lesson tha  same word is applied to punishment  as to life (rovlsod vornlon). I'have  i -ileavored to bIiow Uio teaching of  tho Biblo concerning tho judgments In  a tract entitled "The i.*'our Judg-  m;������ntf*," which mny bo obtained from  Mr. Vrod Kolkor, box 2U1, ilarrisburg,  Pa. Tf you send for It ask also for  "The Secret of MlSBlonary Interest"  and soo how God honors the Blmtdo exposition  of His word.  If this hiHHim does not rotor to the  church except ub soon with the Lord  on I-Hs throno, whoro Ib tho heart lesson for tho bollovor? Horo Is ono, at  least, tho great "Inasmuch" principle,  which .tl'v.iyi-j hoIdH good. Whatever  any bollovor dons Iri Ills namo Me  (���������.mints as dono to TUmnolf and will reward It accordingly. Opportunities  missed will bring ub Iosb.  No Matter Who Wine Auutrln Loses  Bucharest.���������It lo officially announced jlml tho oiiortH oi i.om:>t*i*oi* KritnciH  Joticph to Hocuro lh.> support, of Ro'i*  in nia has failed, and the diplomacy  of lho RiiBBliuiH has won. li* itoumunia  ontora tho war nbo will bo with tho  allies,    lt Ib  considered  corli-ln  that  .   NEWFOUNDLAND HELPS  Legislature Provides for Organljclnfl  of Volunteer Faroe  St- Johns, Ndd.���������Tho special seaulon  ol die colonial KigisiuluiH, .-itih'it io  .-.insider mouHiirot. mado nocoMRiiry hy  tho r.uiopcan war, was. prorogued by  Uovornor Uavldt-on, with Its program  fi lllllod. Tho opposition party Joined  tho  govoriimont  In   tho    support  ot  *- r������S,if  -il  V-TM  r, - ���������r  t-  ,       *rvS  " s ������������������  m  :tititi������ti\  ��������� -���������it'-sgZ  ���������M  m  ?#  " .Jv:j>3  ��������� _>  ' ;��������� *'>���������  '-:- 'fti-l  ��������� '���������?.''  .���������-.y#'.  ���������?^3fi  - --iti*  m  i:'t&  Hi  ���������iti  W  :m  I  I  It   hi  coiicodcd   thnt   doiit.Hr-   tbo  out-1 moiw.   Governor ilavldsAft. In his clo������*  ar, Auutrln will    lowo, ing iipoocb, warmly praised tho har- /  I mony displayed In the loftlHlnturo, /  /  W^)^WJffl^|l^l������IIWW^gi-������lii;  rsu p.'  r  %  TffE il^TON REVIEW  Belotv is given a list of  sonete of the Toilet Preparations received thisweek  Rexall Florida Water  Crown Perfumery Soaps  Nyal's Toilet Waters  Palm  Olive Soap   and  Cream  Woodbury Facial Cream  Saety's Parisian Balm  itt&W   /vat*   ana    i ooin  Brashes,     &c,    &c.  .������"'?;?; ?  .LaOC?*!  ana  jre-fsoirai  Creston   Drug  &  Ikmk Company  P. BURNS & Go.  Limited  CRESTON  Kead   Offices  B.C.  CALGARY;  V \NCOU-  VER: EDMONTQ^.  Dealers iu  MEAT  Wholesale and Retail  Fish  . Game,   Poultry,  and Oysters  in Season  We have tht goods, and  our prices are reasonable  There will be no phiiipkin Pie Social  Saturday night.  Lancaster's store goes on the. cash  system starting to-mdr_x������\v.  The Literary and Debating Society  are having another debate on Oct. 27.  W. A.Wilmot of Creston was among  the arrivals at the Strathcona, Nelson,  on Friday last.  Rev. G. W. Blake was at Nelson  yesterday attending a pro renata meeting of the Kootenay Presbytery the  evening previous.  There is great i*ejoicing at the Bevan  home these days���������a son and hcirarriv-  on Friday last, and both mother and  boy are doing nicely.  Thos, Cunningham   of   Vancouver,  fruit pests inspector, and Prof.Klinck,  dean of the faculty of tlie B.C. University, were in Creston the early part of  * the week.  Local Conservatives sire looking forward to a visit from Attorney General  Bowser and Minister 'of.. Lands Ross  sometime this month, when a big rally  will be held at Creston.  A. Lindley is a business visitor at  Macleod, Alberta, this week, where he  has gone to dispose of a car of fruit  and vegetables which vvas shipped  fmm Creston last Thursday.  Creston people who may have rea  ; son to visit Seattle are warned that  I the bauks there are taking a discount  I of one per cent, ou all Canadian money  i though no such move has yet been  i made at Spokane.  ! The Creston Orchestra will be "at  I home" to-night at a dance in the Mer-  *��������� cantile Hall, starting prompt at 9 o'-  j clock. A particularly attractive pro-  i gram has been arranged. Gentlemen  | pro rata.    Ladies bring refreshments.  | Fernie Ledger:���������E. Mallandaine, of  Creston, and H. G. Parsons, of Golden  came in on Thursday evening and took  up the question of organization of  companies to be attached to tbe 107th  Regiment with Lt. Col. Mackay. Satisfactory arrangements were concluded. ''..''���������'  Sister Vincent of St. Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook, writes The Review:  "The -sisters of the hospital extend  their most cordial thanks to the people  of Creston v"alley for kind offerings of  fruit, which was received with much  thanks and highly appreciated."      ���������?  SYNOPSIS OP OOAL MINIG  KEG I  LATIONS  Ooal mining rights of the Dominion,  in Manitoba, Saskatchewnunnd Al .ertn  the Ynkon Territory, the North west  Territories and iu a portion of the Province of BritiHh Colnmbia, may bo leased  for a term of twenty-one years at  an aniiunl rental of $ 1 ni> acre. Not  more than 2,560 aores will be leased to  one applicant.  Application for n lense must be made  by the applioant in person to the Agent  or Sub-Agent of the district in which  the rights applied for are .situated.  In surveyed territory tho land must  lie described by sections, cr legnl suh-  divisions of sections, nnd in uusurvoyed  territory tho tract applied for .hull he  h talced out by tbe applicant hiiiiBfdf.  Each application must ho nocoinpiiuicd  by a fee of $5 whioh will ho refunded if  the rights applied for nre not available  but not otberwiso. A royalty idiall he  paid on the merchantable) output of tho  mino oc tho rate of flvo cent, per ton.  Tho person operating tho mine shall  furnish tho Agout with s vom returns  accounting for tho full ijuaiitity of merchantable coal mined nnd pav the roy-  iiiiy tiimouu      If ihe uo.u ulillilJg rights  aro not being operated, oaoh roturnn  should bo fnrnlflbod nt leant, onco a year  Tho lonso will include tho coal mining rights only, but thu Iohboo may he  permitted to purchano- whatever avnil-  ab'c Hiirfaco rights may l._ aoui-iidt-rod  neoofsary for tho working of tbo mine  at tho rato of J10 an acre.  Fur foil information application Ahould  Ik- m .wl a to the Sr-crf.nry cf tht*. Ti: p;.rt-  im-ril of the Interior, O.tnwa, or fo any  An������nit ������������r Sub* A^em ������������f Dominion Lnndfl  WW, OORY,  Deputy MiniNfcr of tlio lutorlor.  N. li.���������-IJiiauthoriwd publlonlion of  this ndviirM .nirioiit will not bo paid fur.  ',.,.,.,. ... t'j.ioiri iirnln n good mi Ml 111 -  I'll |M'lif-l illllll ii|| Uu- I'eM'I'W jl|s| |||4  noilll   IIS   |MlMHilllc.  TllC   l<  liicrv  cinic  ��������� 'X|M-  it III llll l'l IM-I  ii-... ni* *iii.;,(i ,m-i  Jas. Cook's collection of Creston  Wealthysj Kin^s and Spitehbergs���������  some twenty.iive boxes all told���������helped a whole lot in winning for B.C. the  first prize for the best fruit exhibit at  the Irrigation Congress at Calgary  last week. The prize of $500 was given  to the Patriotic Fund.  Creston Masonic Lodge is to-night  receiving an official visit from Jas.  Stark, New Westminister, Grand  Master for British Columbia, and also  I from J. C. Pitts of Windermere, the  district deputy. An emergent meeting of the lodge is being held to entertain the distinguished visitors.  Creston's 1014 mushroom crop, now  being harvested, is reported a bumper  one. One agricultural authority statoa  that to tell the difference between a  mushroom and toadstool all you have  to do is boil an onion with them; if  the onion turns black they are good or  bad. but ho has forgotten which.  Although the financial returns were  not quite up to tho standard of some  provious years tho Presbyterian ladies  Aid fifth nimual Thanksgiving dinner  on Thursday night last was woll up to  the expectations for 101-1. Tlio menu  included all tho hoohoh'h good things  which were provided in good measure,  pressed down, shaken together and  running over,  The new residence which tho Catholic congregation in Creston has erected opposite the church w.iu opened on  Wednesday evening of last week with  Homewhat of nn old-fashioned house  warming. Father John oxcollinp himself na a host. A whlstdrlvo at which  ten tables of players participated waa  tho feature ofthe evening���������along with  refreshments provided by tho ladles���������  and a royal time was spent by all.  Friends of Mr. and Mi*.. I.. Barra-  cloiigh, former owners of the City  Bakery, will hear with regret of n  painful accident to Mrs. Uai-racloiigh  al their ranch at Kaniloops oue day  I last week. l.Hurning from a hunting  i t rip and while entering the limine, pre-  coded by IiIh wife, his rille uiicxpocted-  IV    diNcblinr-Wl.    till*    bllll*-!    iMffrt'ln'*'     l.j  Mrs.   Hari-acloiigh'H   nnii.    IJuforfun-  .itcly (he   Indict WiiiS  a  .sotl-nunc  otic,  rendering ihe injury much more pain-  h nn.-.' run at   lnl.    She w-iim rushed lo  I Ik*   hospital,  I l'i|>. nn<l i--: riwii .'<r-rliii>-nlri'lv fit  li" ���������  ..,...,...i  C. O, Rcdg������_--i was a visitor at Nei-  ���������son- on Friday las.t  B. W. Payne was a .Kitchener visitor the early pJtrt of. tlie week.  Some nice, bags of duck's are being  secured at Kootenay Lantling.  Frank H. Jackson's "Dollar Day"  announcement should appeal to the  thrifty housewife.   Look it up.  P. B, Fowler, a former manager of  the bank here, but now at Fernie, was  renewing acquaintances In towu for a  few days this week.  According to reports from Bonner's  Ferry the -������������������Continental mine at Port  Hill,, which bus been shut down for  some time, resumed operations last  week.  Spokane this week claimed another  of the valley families in tho persons of  Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Ely of Canyon  City, who removed to the Washington  metropolis.  From present appearances Creston  will be as well represented on the second contingent as it was on the flrst  Canadian corps. There are at least  four candidates already in sight.  C. G. Bennett, manager of the Bank  of Commei'ce, who with Mrs. Bennett  and Miss Erickson, have spent the  past three weeks at Windermere and  Cranbrook. returned to town on Saturday.  C. S. Durkee, cashier in the C. P. R.  offices at Greenwood, is spending a  few days this week witb Capt. and  Mrs. Forrester, en route to the smelter  town after a. three months trip to the  maritime provinces.  Christ church harvest'thanksgiving  service will be held on Sunday evening at 7:30. The church is being decorated for the occasion, and with appropriate music the service should be well  attended.   All are welcome.  Tbe farmers' Institute of B.C. contemplate asking all members to contribute two bits each to an Institute  donation to the Pairiotic Fund, thus  raising at least $2,000. Creston Institute proportion of this would be $60.  '    7vY '���������:-:. ... - 0-  Jas. Adalard, a Cresten rancher, has  been showing his friends samples of  "ever-producing' varieties of both  strawberries and raspberries���������the second crop for 1914. Thejf were on display at the Methodist harvest home  services a. couple of weeks ago.  Creston's baseball fraternity was  kept posted on the game's .in the  ; world's, series between Philadelphia  Americans and Boston Nationals, which  the latter won iu four straight games.  The score each day was posted "at the  depot and Hatfield's barber shop.  Creston astronomers report that pe-  levans Comet is, now visible to the naked eye and will remain visible  througout October. It may be seen  about 10 o'clock on clear nights at a  point almost directly below the pole-  star. At that time the comet is low  iu the sky.  At the meeting Tuesday night the  board of trade discussed informally  quite a variety of subjects. Tlie pound  district questiob was laid over for the  November meeting. The campaign  being waged urging people to use  madc-in-Canada goods exclusively wos  W-trmly approved by all present.  I        _���������    -   ,        .   -  ,s     . . .��������� , . .     . I ...  The Following DISCOUNTS Will be  gsven on _.-V_.iv;.������__  25 per cent on Apple Trees  10 per cent on All Other Nursery  Stock, Except  !Eose Bushes  Do not place your order before getting our quotations j  , i  The &Bw@m?*&8d[@ MUmPS@p������@&  .   ��������� r  Comprising 125 Acres GRAND FORKS, B. C.  Frank V. Staples, Agent, Erickson, B. C.  In view of tho [persistent .rumors of  a Federal election next month or in  December and a provincial contest in  in 1015, Crestonites are 'reminded that  this is the month? to have your name  placed on tho voters list. Any of tho  leaders of the political parties in town  will accommodate you in tho matter.  All the features of an old-time hal-  lowo'on will bo * In evidence at tho  social which Christ Church Ladies'  Guild is giving on Saturday, Oct. 81st,  .in Mercantile Hall. There will bo  games, music, dancing and refresh-*  ments, while tlu; decorations alone  will bo worth almost tbo admission  fee-���������adults 25c, children 10c.  Tho Oreston O.ay Products Co. is  making its first delivery of bricks this  wook, having completed tho burning  of a kiln of Home 110,000 of thom. TIioho  who havo examined the brick pro-  noun'co thom high class, particularly  for hand-molded product,. The plant  is located on thn'flats and work In;** at  top Hpcud can turn out 2,000 a day. T.  Toboau is in charge at the works.  By a popular v������,lo of almost two to  ono Dr. Henderson nnd A. B. Stanley,  who supported tl)ie negative on the  topic, Resolved,"That the defeat of lho  Gorman army woifld ho in the best in-  toroHts'nf nnivernal imhico," were i-o-  l.urr.c:! vici, ii.; Js. "JW.--.V n',Hlii^ .]������.-  bate in the Presbyterian chiu-cli. Their  opponents wen* l.apt, Malleiidaincanil  Lieut. Oi-ompton. Thero will he another debate on Oct. 27, subject and  ., ,.���������i.:,..*..*     ... * *  i  TT*  LIMITED  ������     Watch for our Announcement'  ! in next week's Review  I  '""j '    . .    i   ,  Ba_BE_S__!  WSTti,  Ford Touring Gar  $590.00  Runabout  Town Car  $540  840  Uuy your car to-day under tho now buyeix  profit-sharing plan. For fiill information seo  Creston Auto & Supply Co.  CRESTON  B* C.  __!__  1  ������  ______  y^^u^mmaiimamaaaiimM  u______i_  ______  ���������HH**Vmrm**T  SBE  ^mlMSI  m"lw'*i   ���������'-"--��������� * "'tmvmxt tv  " "*^> *'.hihmfiti*tssm  ' im'tu."***** HMt#*miSW*������**l*lil*i������

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