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Sunshine Coast News Jan 4, 1988

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Array ���  Legislative Library  Parliament Buildings  Victoria, B.C. V8V 1X4  88.8  The tMtthine  I Published on the Sunshine Coast      26* par oopy on nowaatanda     January 4,1968      Volum��42      Issue 1  ��|gl Fourth Polar Bear Swim  50 hardy souls  take the plunge  With temperatures hovering  around freezing, 50 some odd  individuals showed up at Davis  Bay New Years morning to participate in the annual ritual of  defying hypothermia. An  estimated 500 warmly bundled  up spectators came out to  witness the 11 am event where  dozens of people clad only in  bathing suits and goosebumps  would throw themselves into the  icy waters of Georgia Strait.  It was once said by an  anonymous Scot that the power  of the great highland bagpipes is  unparalldled and this was more  or less substantiated when local  piper John Webb, in full  highland regalia, escorted the  swimmers to the water's edge.  Once there they exurberantly  threw themselves into the sea.  Many prizes were offered but  perhaps the most challenging  . was the one for the longest time  endured in the chilly waters. In  this category, four swimmers  actually stayed in the water  longer than the organizers could  stand it. When it finally appeared that the playful contestants would never come out a'  draw was called and they triumphantly emerged to a standing  ovation from the audience.  Final results were: 1st price  CoBn Dionne, 2nd prize Albert  Eger, 3rd prize Lorenze  Defresne, tied for the longest  time were Crystal Matties,  Kathleen Defour, Jonathon  Williams, and Mike Gibsons.  Oldest female participant was  Mrs. Sanders and youngest  female was Laura Weston.  Youngest male was Chris  Shoop. Best male costume was  John Harrigan, best female  costume was Darlene Humbird,  and best child's costume was  Jordan Guignard. Participant  from the furthest distance away  was Albert Eger from Montreal.  It looked as B they might stay ��� for a very longtime and people on  tat shore were getting downright caM, so the last four competitors  for IlKaaduraaee prise In last Friday's Scbetxwen Polar Bear Swim  ��� thai than were low prizes to be awarded. StB  ! of thm ww* wtNag to be the first to come la, to the four  naked hands and enlarged together. -���*������; Nkrr*��*  Islands Trust ssss  report positive  Local takes oass to Ottawa  Environment Bill ilsential  "If *�� doot start to think  globally in terms oT environmental degradation, well  lose it by the cod of the  century," Carole Rubin of the  B.C. Coalition for alternatives  to pesticides told a reporter last  week. It's been almost a month  since Rubin made her presentation to a Commons Committee  examining the new Canadian  Environmental Protection Act  (SPA), but she's still seething.  "We were promised in  December 1966 a bill that would  provide Canadians with the  most comprehensive piece of  environmental legislation in the  western hemisphere'. Where is  M", she asked the committee.  The environmental network  had great hopes for this legislation, she told the Coast New*.  She and many other environmentalists had been involved with workshops and  regional meetings held last  February to examine draft  Commons Committee that "the  those restrictions are minimal.  Out of 100,000 identified (ox-  ins, only nine substances are  currently regulated. The other  99,991 toxins, under this legislation, would have to go through  a screening procedure by the  government to determine what  level of restrictions they may  need.  CEPA seems to deal exclusively with toxins. It does  not, Rubin said, include  pesticides o> my food and drug  contaminants. It covers international air pollution, but not air  pollution that occurs within the  country.  In December, Rubin told the  objectives, guidelines and code*  of practice set out in CEPA are  honourable, but unenforceable." These show the scope  of the legislation to include,  'recycling, re-using, treating,  storing, disposing of or reducing the release of substances into the environments; or works,  undertaking, or activities that  affect or may affect environments."  "It should be called the Environmental Contaminant  Act," said Rubin "That's ail it  even attempts to deal with."  The act is a reactive document, which deals with protec-  lion of the environment on a  substance by substance basis  where the environmental groups  were looking for a document  that would ensure "conservation of natural resources and  regenerative economic development." A few changes in wording could provide that, Rubin  pointed out to the committee.  They were also hoping for  some kind of minimum federal  standards which would  "preclude the establishing of  pollution havens anywhere in  Canada," but no such section  has been included in the Act.  Please tan to page 4  Gibsons opts for  EDC participation   1iv~iis7c3B��i       changing its form to  VJ lawn \^Wn��lll HsnattVMantitaa) *t\ tta* imiimI  An emergency meeting of all  elected trustees of the Islands  Trust area has been called for  early January by Trust Chairman, Nick Gilbert. The purpose  of the meeting will be to discuss  and respond to a report on the  future of the Islands Trust  recently tabled with the Provincial Legislature by Mr. Dave  Merrier, Chairman of the Standing Committee assigned to  review the Trust.  The report resulted from a  series of community hearings on  the islands and written submissions from island residents.  Recommendations of the report  include retention of the Islands  Trust Act as the statutory vehicle for the "preserve and protect" mandate of the Trust,  assignment of. regional district  functions to the Islands Trust  on an incremental basis, and  maintaining the local trust committee system "for the time  being".  "We are responding to the  recommendations with cautious  optimism," Mr. Gilbert said.  "There are certain aspects of  the report which we are very  pleased to see, especially the  retention of the Islands Trust  Act, the mandate, the trust  committee system and the  Islands Trust Fund. However,.  we have many questions oa the  details of how the Trust would  take on the additional com-  nHinhy service functions, which  costly are likely unfounded. It is  anticipated that the transfer of  those monies already allocated,  to the seven regional districts in  the Trust area wffl be sufficient  to cover the costs of operation.  After many years of political  uncertainty and instability for  the Islands Trust and Its support  staff, the Chairman and the two  Vice-Chairmen of the1 Trust,  Stephen Wright and Carol Mar-  tin, commend the Honourable  Mrs. Rita M. Johnston,  Minister of Municipal AfleJri,  for having initiated the tiotdy  arid useful review.  In March 1987, a 'multi-  stakeholder conference' was  held in Ottawa, where representatives from industry, labour,  health agencies, enrivonmental  groups and the government all  met to bring forth recommendations that they could all agree  on.  From that came a number of  Strong recommendations, including one that would see an  environmental bill of rights entrenched in the act. This, Rubin  explained, would basically state  that "Canadians have a right to  a safe find healthy  environment". It would include  a prohibition clause which  would state, 'No one may  release, or cause to be released,  into the environment anything  that could be deleterious to the  environment.'  ��� j It would also give any citizen  the right to enter judicial pro-  '"'lif any government acts  f or falls to act to pro-  t environment,  of the recommenda-  I that came out of that con-    were included in the  final draft of the legislation.  : t Nor does the legislation cover  any crown agency, Rubin added. Private enterprise may be  restricted in what kind of toxic  sfbttances it can release, but  ���sJk a government agency. Even  Gibsons has decided to participate in the Economic  Development function of the  Sunshine Coast Regional  District. This 11th hour decision  was made at the last Gibsons  Council meeting of the year,  Tuesday, December 22. Previously, Gibsons had indicated  it intended not to participate  and should the Town decide to  follow Sechdt and opt out, had  only until December 31 of 1987  to do so.  Gibsons decision to stay with  the EDC followed a persuasive  presentation given by Commission Chairman Maurice Egan.  It was a similar presentation to  the one he gave to Sechdt  Council several weeks earlier  when they chose not to participate.  Contained within Egan's  presentation were the EDC's  response to the Stevenson,  Kellogg, Ernst and Whlnney  report indicating not only that  the EDC is responding to thir  recommendations but will be  ^^^^^^ be more  responsive to the municipalities.  For example, the EDC will be  partially comprised of one  member appointed by Gibsons  Council, one member appointed  by Sechdt Council (should they  wish), one member appointed  by the SCRP Board, one  representative from Area A,  and one member appointed by  each of the Sechdt and Gibsons  Chambers of Commerce for a  total of six.  Three non-elected members  at large are then to be selected  taking into consideration  representation Of industry,  labour, business, the arts, the  environment and the geographic  regions of the Sunshine Coast.  They are to be appointed jointly  by the Chairman of the  Regional District, the Mayor of  Sechdt (should he wish to participate), and the Mayor of Gibsons.  Those nine people will then  elect a Chairman who is not a  member of die Commission and  whose position will be reviewed  Maasasarataaap4  Sailing dropped  The 10:30 am ferry sailing from Isjtarfflr to 1  Bay and the return sailing at 11:30 am liave been dfacantimied  as of December 31, 1917, There has been no notification  from the B.C. Firry Corporation coacarnlngany possible  resumption of this saibng.  1  Serving the Sunshine Co^si since 19-  .'";���' Coaat News, January 4,1968  r  Wish list  The Roman God Janus gives his name to the month of  January. He is pictured as a two-headed god, looking both  backwards and forwards and the turn of the year is an appropriate time for both activities.  Elsewhere in these pages we have culled the pages of the  papers of the past year and it may be appropriate that here  m the editorial space which so often has been and must be  a centre of controversy if the newspaper is to fulfill its  community function we look ahead at the year to come  with a modest wish list for the Sunshine Coast in 1988.  Above all dse we must wish for improved harmony in  the conduct of our local government business. It is simply  a fact that we are something of a bad joke in Victoria  because of our interminable wrangling.  Often, too often, some local leader or another will pick  up the phone or a pen and fill the ears of some poor  government minion in Victoria with allegations and bitterness about some other local leader or body. It is done  usually because the perpetrator feds he or she has some  special influence that can be used against a local rival or  rival institution. It mvariably ends up making us look silly.  It canned be too often stressed that we must as often as  we can solve our differences locally and present a united  front to senior governments. Without it they will ignore us  and we will continue to be one of the most neglected  districts in the province regardless of whom we send to  represent us.  As a pre-requisite to harmony there must be good will  and the maturity to understand that it is possible to  disagree without anger and without malice. Where differences are too acute to be reconciled, leave them to the  attention of time and present to senior governments only  those issues on which we can find a common ground.  If the people of the Sunshine Coast can exert some  vigilance and remind any elected leader sharply that  boorish, childish, destructive behaviour is not acceptable  we will find a rapid improvement in our embattled state.  May the deliberations of all be blessed with insight and  maturity and may 1988 find us a slightly more civilized and  enlightened place when the two-headed god next looks  backwards and forward.  A Happy New Year to one and all.  Folly, folly  And so it has gone again, the 10:30 am sailing. Again we  have a three-hour gap in mid-morning when our highways  are closed.  Of all the follies perpetrated in the name of economy in  this strange province, surely there is no greater absurdity  than having a fully-crewed ship sit at dock with its motors  running for three hours every day to save the tip of the cost  iceberg which is the diesd costs of getting to Horseshoe  Bay.  S YEARS AGO  The Village of Gibsons aaaumes Ita naw status as a  Town by reaching a population ol over 2600, and will be  hosting an opan house to celebrate the fact.  An Arbitration award giving teachers In School  District 40 a three percent across the board salary Increase waa snnouncsd Isst wssk.  A 'resort concept' hotel, Gibsons Landing Marine  Hotel, will be discussed at a public hearing. It is to be  built on (tower Point Road by developers Jon McRae  and Art McQinnls. The 60 room, four-storey msrlne hotel  Is designed to operate aa a full facility hotel with rac-  quetball courts, sauna rooms, pool and retail shops.  10 YEARS AGO  The protracted B.C. Telephone Company strike  became more than just a male operator on the  telephone lines when a algn marked 'No Telephone Service Ship to Shore ��� B.C. Telephone Labour Dispute' was  posted on one of the ships on the Horssshos Bay  Un0,"torUn-      15 YEARS AQO  Furious rain starting before Chrletmas Day, covering  32 hours, amounted to 3.06 Inches which helped already  high stream flows to Increase Into torrents, creating  considerable damage.  20 YEARS AQO  Hartley Dent, NOP candidate for the new federal  riding of Coast-Chllcotin, was getting around the Sunshine Coaat laat week to meet people. Apart from attending several short meetings, Mr. Dent visited the Canadian Forest Products pulpmlll at Port Mellon.  26 YEARS AQO  School children of Roberts Creek area returned to  their school January 3, rebuilt following the fire which  destroyed the former 660,000 building and contents last  July 20.  90 YEARS AQO  Electronics la helping the Japanese fisheries Industry  enlarge the acope of Ita operations and increase Its  catch. Boats of only two or three tons are being modernized with electronic equipment. Electronic f lsh-f indera  are now carried on 20 percent or 7500 of all Japaness  fishing boats of five tone or more.  p.ti H GLASSFOUD PRESS LTD.  Aliiidilas,  \g^t  The lamhUs COAST NSWS Is a locally owned newspaper, publish-  eg on the Sunshine Coast, S.C. every Monday by Osseeterd Pises  1st, Box 460, Olbeena, B.C. VON ivo. oieeens Tel. ast-zezi or  10*7817; Sfohsil Tel. 66S49S0. Second Class Mall Registration No.  4706.  TaeauweWrw COAST Mlw�� Is prrtectsd by copyright srolreprcxl^  lkmrts^p��rto<Hbys^meas��ileprc^ttdunl��Mpermlssk>n)n  writing Is nret secured nasi esjeeessnf Press ue* holders of the  SUaWJRIPnON RATES  Some misgivings  on Free Trade  Our respective leaders have  signed the Canada/US trade  agreement. They assure us that  it is an historic moment. On his  weekly radio show President  Reagan describes it as a 'win-  win' agreement which will  greatly benefit both countries;  Prime Minister Mulroney rolls  out some ponderous and instantly 'forgettable rhetoric  designed to convey his  statesmanlike and far-seeing vision and the deed is'done.  ;  Perhaps not quite done, since  the Houses of Congress and the  Canadian Parliament have still  to ratify the agreement, but it  seems likely that" it will  ratification largely unchanged.  The average Canadian will  have heard the hothouse assertions for and against the accord;  it has been passionately praised  and damned with equal passion  as a disaster. Probably most  Canadians have accepted it as  inevitable and, having no ready  way to confirm the truth of any  assertions, are reduced to hoping that everything will turn out  for the best.  Among that number this  writer should be included but,  without any claim to economic  clairvoyance, there must remain  lingering misgivings.  Much has been made of the  fact that the European Common Market has been in existence for years without any  loss of national identity. But  there were six countries when  the common market started,  none of them big enough to  dominate the group. The  number has since grown and the  community works as a series of  shifting alliances with the Common Market which keeps the  power from being too concentrated.  Canada is a small country in  terms of its population and  economy joining into a free  trade agreement with one of the  world's giants. The possibility  of being totally dominated is  very real, especially given the  fact that a much greater percentage of Canada's industries and  resources is foreign-owned and  controlled than any other coun  try in the world going into the  agreement.  Then, too, some of the  misgivings must be attributed to  doubt about the leaders who  have promoted and signed the  agreement.  President Reagan's grasp oj  economic thought must be  '���*'''described'as: dismal at biat. His  '- refusal to raise taxes and in-  sistence on missive military  spending has turned what was  the wealthiest country in the  world into the world's leading  debtor nation during his  presidency.  The havoc wreaked by  Reaganomics is improperly  understood even in the wake of  the October stock market crash  and the alarming decline in  value of the American dollar as  the American failure to come to  grips with its budgetary deficits  has eroded the confidence of the  world in the once-invincible  American economy.  The Canadian Prime Minister  is not a man who instills great  trust or confidence. Four or five  years ago, as he sought the  leadership of his party, we are  told that he was denouncing  free trade with the Americans as  a threat to the sovereignty of the  nation. That was at least a position historically consistent from.  Canadian Conservatives all the ;  way back to John A. Mac-  donald.  Now, with exactly the same  reverberating pseudo-sincerity  the Prime Minister pours  ponderous scorn on those who  advance the same arguments he  espoused just a few years ago.  It is a conversion as dramatic  as that of Saul on the way to  Damascus. The mechanics of  the sudden conversion are not,  however, as clearly documented  as those in the case of Saul.of  Tarsus.  Then there is the fact that, In  a world of great population  growth and with famine becoming a consistent part of our consciousness; in a world which  spends $2 million a minute in  making 'armaments and in  which the worst famine areas  are those" in which military  machines,' for this reason or for  that, drive farmers from the  ��� J  land or make it too dangerous  to grow food; in such a workf  our Prime Minister's economic  grasp can perhaps be gauged by  the fact that he boosts the'  economy by building frigates'  and nuclear submarines.  That the free trade agreement'  signed on January 2 may have  enormous repercussions for  Canada is certain; it is not certain whether these repercussions1  will in the long term be positive  or negative.  That the architects of the  agreement are' leaders of such0  uncertain stamp and of such'  militaristic bent as Mulroney  and Reagan is cause for serious  and enduring misgivings.   ���   iv  a  Hope Is the thing with feathers  That perches In the soul,  And sings the tune without the words,  And never stops at all,  And sweetest In the gale Is heard;  And sore must be the storm  That could abash the little bird  That kept so many warm.  I've heard It In the chlllest land,  And on the strangest seat  Yet, never, In extremity,  It asked a crumb of me.  Emily Dickinson  Thoughts at the turn of the year  by Maryaane West  It's something like the return  of the swallows to Capistrano,  but in our family it's the lowly  skunk cabbage!  , I'm not sure how this happened because it began many  years ago, but one year we  discovered that already in the  depths of winter and despite  frosty temperatures, the skunk  cabbage which grows in the bog  at the bottom of the beach trail  was pushing its leaf spikes  through the litter of fallen alder  and maple leaves.  At a time of year when, al-  though the solstice is past and  the days are imperceptivety  lengthening, we still have to expect the coldest weather of the  season, outflows of arctic abend probably snow, it's reassur-  inf to find the skunk cabbage so  confident that spring is almost  ���hew.   .  It became a New Year's Day  ritual to look for the furled  spikes of fresh green among the  sodden browns of last year's  spent glory and I'm happy to  report that this year is no exception. The snow may be lingering  waiting for the next fall, the  varied thrushes have flocked to  the coastal areas and congregate  around the feeders, overnight  temperatures may be several  degrees bdow freezing, but the  skunk cabbage knows a new  reason lias begun and is ready to  celebrate, with pile gold  lanterns gleaming against the  black soil and leafless salmon-  berry, often the first spring  flowers ahead of garden heralds  of spring ��� snowdrops and  crocus.  Looking at my records I find  with interest that 30 years ago  the first flowers appeared at the  beginning of February and  sometimes later, but that in the  last six yean Unas been flowering already in January, in 1964  as early as January fifth.  It's a remarkable plant which  creates its own aura of heat,  which is undoubtedly why It's  an early bloomer, and the smell  which we find offensive attracts  the flies which it needs for fertilization and which emerge  from hibernation on sunny  winter days:  In early November, when it  seemed as though the fall rains  would never come, I wrote  about changing weather patterns. The rains came of course,  but considerably lets than usual,  both November and December  totals were bdow average.  I've just finished adding up  the year's precipitation and  1987 was the second driest year  in the last 26, with a total of 39  inches. 1983 holds the record  with almost 34 inches, I'm not  making any predictions, by the  law of averages 1988 should be  a wet one to even things up, but  the weather seems to conform  to no pattern these days, so who  knows. In toe western rain  forest it will add variety and in  terest to our lives.  A wonderful time is New  Year's with all the motivation  for starting over and making a  better job this time, of keeping  that journal more than two  weeks, for losing weight, for  getting in better physical shape,  for keeping in touch with family  and friends, for telling the  government what you really  think (con and pro) even though  you know from long experience  that nice as it would be, to be  wdl organized, you're too much  a creature of habit to ever mi'  ���hose sort of drastic changes  your lifestyle voluntarily! ��  It's nice to hang up all thf I  new calendars, but doss anyone Z  have any suggestions of what to I  do with the Old ones? Those 5  beautiful photographs which I  ���re works of art and. like Na- Z  nonal Geographies, far too I  good to just throw etit. Z  The New Year may wdl Jguf  wlwweinaJteit,k^mak��Jii�����  good one! More on Thatcher  Editor,  . This is a reply to Mr. R.E.  Miner's insulting accusation  mat in my letter opposing  privatization I was offensive, inaccurate and an outright liar.  Duds, in the past used to be  fought over such accusations.  f He states that Mrs. Thatcher  was re-elected by an "even bigger majority." That, if I  remember correctly, was not so;  it was less than previously, and  could have been less still had it  not been for the in-fighting and  disarray in the Liberal Social  Democratic Alliance.  I subscribe to the Msaehester  Gaanksa Weekly and the last  three issues are filled with  reports of Prime Minister Thatcher's intransigence, and the  hardships her attitudes have  brought upon working people  and the poor. Her treatment of  the National Health Service is  typical.  The National Health Service,  set In place by the Labour Party's Prime Minister Clement  Adee, was an example to the  western world and a modd for  our own in Canada. He also arranged free lunches for the  pupils of the dementary Council Schools. But Mrs. Thatcher  has changed all that. Today  people are dying because there  are not enough available beds  for urgent surgery. Under-  funding by the government is  the cause.  In the Guardian of December  6, is the photograph of infant  David Barber, a "blue baby"  who, like many others in his  plight, required heart surgery of  a routine sort to save his life.  ' His parents, after weeks of  fruitless requests for admission  to hospital, decided to bring  their case to court. They attracted so much publicity that  Mrs. Thatcher had to intervene  and little David's heart was  mended. But the long delay was  fatal and he died. Within two  months 34 children with serious  heart-conditions were turned  away from that hospital for lack  of beds and died. This is typical  for N.H.S. hospitals ail over  England.  < Mr*. John Moore, Social Services Secretary, was unavailable  for comment. He was himself in  a private hospital, where room  its are astronomical.  The shortage of money for  hospitals is so serious that  Royal College of Physicians  Surgeons has called on the  vernment to give immediate  icial aid to the National  lealth   Service.   200  million  pounds will be needed.  Mrs. Thatcher plans to in-  Ethe infamous poll tax  adults regardless of in-  lisastrous for poor people. Many former supporters including Michad Hesdtine and  former Prime Minister Edward  Heath oppose it, but none of  her cabinet ministers do for fear  of losing their jobs. This is different from our B.C. where one  of BUI Vender Zaim's cabinet  ministers opposed to privatization of highway maintenance,  said that our premier would be  remembered as "the One-term  Wonder."  As for Mrs. Thatcher's competence in the economics field,  let us look at the film industry.  England was one of the great  film producers of the world.  Splendid films were made. Even  Hollywood used to contract  films there. That industry was  among the biggest earners of  foreign currency. But Mrs.  Thatcher has changed all that  by cutting off the government  subsidy. My son and his wife,  who have worked in film for 20  years are now reduced to bidding on contracts for trashy  commercials. If they can get  them.  Mr. Milner cites the working  men crowding-the English pubs  as proof they are well paid and  satisfied with the present  government. Comment on that  is not necessary.  Shopping in Sechdt recently,  I found a cardboard whiskey  bottle stuck under my windshield wiper. It was put there by  a member of the B.C. Government Employees Union. It unfolded to reveal a thoroughly  documented argument against  Bill Vender Zaim's plan to  privatize our liquor stores. It is,  of course, because they are very  profitable and should fetch a  good price to help pay for the  colossal fiasco of the CrJ-  quihalla Pass Highway. The  pamphlet urges that we tdl our  MLA we don't want our liquor  stores privatized.  (Mrs.) Isabel Ralph  Thirst  no more  Editor,  He had his pipe, his  newspaper and Dorothy.  He came to us by way of the  Retina Leader Post where my  eldest brother delivered His  papers way back in the twenties,  He served his country and his  fellow man.  He was a Liberal.  On a hot summer day in the  original office of the Coast  News, Fred Cruice once made  this memorable quote: "What I  would like is a drink of good old  prairie water."  Thirst no more Fred! Heaven  can wait! ,  Dick Kenndt  More letters  on Page 20  ARE TOU DISAPPOINTED IN THE GROWTH  OF TOUR RETIREMENT SAVINGS?  Is your RRSP giving you strong growth, way ahead of inflation?  Olfes  DNo.  Does your RRSP offer you four attractive investment options-  all with proven long-term performance?  0  s  Olfes  DNo  Can you easily move your RRSP money from one form of  investment to another to take advantage of changing market  con*ion8? DVfes  DNo  9 Wis your latest RRSP purchase part of an overall investment  f��B* DVfes  DNo  SAre your RRSP assets being managed far you by some of the  most astute professionals in the country, with an outstanding  track record for making money grow? q^  qNo  Thousands of Canadians with RRSPs invested in BotonTremblay  ri��ualrurKlsc��nsry"YES''toalltlie��o^stiais.Canjw?Ifriot,  maUtJiecc^iwnorphoreustwIayfarmoredattontlieRRSP  investments that really perform.  GREAT PACIFIC  MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.  Financial Planners Sinca 1965  Box 127. OMoni, B.C.  VON 1V0     (6O4188S-M00  AUUUMW. IWM*  ^sw  YES: My pment RRSP investments don't pan the  ���     nutMt.Ruahme,with��itob��0tion.Bolk��  I "Some Good Advice for RRSftoeMors" and  '   (tote.   '.  I  Addles t  Oty/Piw.  Any after oidttolio-  eecMafe  We're PrOUCl     The Most Sophisticated and Detailed  Of OUr AUTOMOTIVE ANALYSIS  BEAR  available Anywhere  e The Bear's computer Is programmed for the fastest and'most  'sophisticated automotive analysis available anywhere. The Bear  actually talks to your vehicle's onboard computer.  SThe computer printout permits  a technician to fully diagnose  engine problems with readings,  specification comparisons, and  diagnostic messages.  CUSTOMER PRINTOUT  ��� You receive a printout listing  the repairs and service your car or  truck needs, and showing where  your vehicle's specifications are  in relation to the manufacturer's  original specs.  Our BEAR will handle almost  all makes and models  MAKEANAPTTMyENTMEET   a^g   ga^p  ONLY at SOUTH COAST FORD  $241  PRE OWNED CAR & TRUCK SPECIALS  Backed By Ford's 'VXD. ' WARRANTT Ask For Tiw Osta/fa   'wm,im,��m**m  1985 TEMPO 2-D00R  4 Cyl��� Auto, Very Clean,  Priced to Sill  1987 PONTIAC FIERO OT  V6, EFI, S Speed, Air Cond.,  Powsr Windows 4 Locks, Tin. Speed.  Cassette. Loaded! 14,000 KMS  Stk. #37-305-1  1985 TOPAZ 2-DQ0R  4 Cyl., 5 Speed,  1 Owner, Extras  1985 CHEV SUBURBAN  V8, Automatic, equipped to  Trailer Tow, 1 Owner  1978 CHEV CAMAR0  V8 Automatic, Mags.  Great Sound System!  Stk. #30-337-2  *************  1986 COUGAR  V6, Auto, Well Equipped, A/C,  Tilt/Speed. Very Clean  South Coast Ford Sales  USED VEHICLE SALES POLICY  All of our premium used vehicles receive a 4*  POINT IAFITY ami MICHANtCAi, CHICK  The tXTIWO*.. INTERIOR, UNDER THI HOOD  ���M MHMR THI CM are completely in.  specttd, A OQUPREUiON TUT is dons on  ihe *JH|lM and Ihe vehicle Is finally MAD  Once litis inspection la complete and our fully  IKINS8D TfCHNWIJW Is satisfied, a report  is IK.NEO and FILID with the mansaemsni of  our dealership. Ai 1Mb time it ii decided  whelhtr or not we should wholesale (he vehicle to ��� used car broker, or repair and retail the  vehicle locally  Potential customers for the vehicles we deckle  lo salt locaMy are encouraged |o ash a  sstesperton to see * copy of this inspection,  and may also speak directly to the technician  who performed the work We HAVE NOTHING  TO HIM PROM YOU.  All vehicles 1880 and newer come with AT NO  CHARGE, A FORD MOTOR COMPANY  VARIARLl TIME AND DISTANCE (VTD|  POWERTRAIN WARRANTY. This warranty so  piles to all makes and models but Is backed by  Ford Motor Company.  Depending on Ihe year, the warranty runs from  i months/9,000 km lo 12 months/20.000 km,  provided the vehicle has no mote than 160.000  km on the odometer  Further, for nominal charges, you can warranty  your used vrthlcle f�� up to 24 monthsMftOOO  km. One of our tales staff can give you lull  dalaiit.  ll a vehicle does not have a warranty with it,  our sales stall Is instructed lo fell you why It  does not and .he vehicle will be priced ap  proprietary.  Let Us Hero Take the Guesswork Out of Serins e Used Veefcfe  buy With confidence  ���REMEMBER'  YOU MAKE US NUMBER 1  * * * * VTeTSTTTTirS'sM?  1981 GRAND LEMANS  2 Door. V8 Automatic, Tilt  Wheel, Power Windows.  Stk. I07-05M  ������*�����*�����������#��  1983 LTD BROUGHAM  V8, Auto., P/Wlndows, P/LockS  Stk. #57-033-0  ******** * ��� ** **  1981 HONOA CIVIC  4 Cyl., 4 Speed. Sliver Paint  Stk. #306-272-3  **************  1986 FORD F250 4X4  302 EFI, 4 Speed, Two-Tone Paint  Stk. #TK-1127  A***************  19iBT-B.R0  !  VJ, EFI, Automatic, Overdrive,  Loaded wltti Options  Stk. #67-320-1  ���*������****���*****  1981DODGE AMES WW  4Cyl.Auto,.  'JStk. #16;349-1  ������*������������**���*���*���  1994 HORIZON 4 DOOR  4 C��t, Automatic, Warranty  Stk. #87-183-1  .*�����.��� **********  ���  1976 CHEV % TON  3M V8, Automatic  Stk. #37-317-1  S#rWc�� Loanevt tor Uf�� o utttl,  WE WILL NOT  BE UNDERSOLD  Sorvlco Quonnt��� ��� Ft��� Oil Ch��ng��� for Uto  WtuirfM.,  Scchelt  3  - Cosst News, January 4,1968  At 11 pm but Saturday night a fall moon, a low tide, aad Bdow freesles weather gave Glbsoas Marlaa  an extra touck of magic in Ike new year. See roaeaa >*���'*��  First six months  1987 in retrospect  In January 1987, the year  started off on an optimistic  note, with Gibsons, Sechelt and  the Sunshine Coast Regional  District (SCRD) holding a  tripartite meeting to iron out  misunderstandings and seek  new avenues of communication.  Mayor Diane Strom and Bud  I Koch, and Chairman Jim  Gurney agreed on a united  economic strategy front for the  upcoming AVIM convention.  They also agreed to adopt a  joint approach for a special  conference the premier had called on decentralization.  The month also brought  $153,502 grant to the  Tetrahedron Ski Club to build a  trail and cabin system in the  high country above the Sunshine Coast, and this area  received Community Futures  designation qualifying the Sunshine Coast to receive millions  of federal dollars in loans and  grants with which to pursue intensive economic development  strategies.  Pender���. Harbour residents  were being plagued by the  stench of rotting fish from the  nearby dump, Sunshine Heights  residents were up in arms over  herring pens and unsightly  debris which littered their  foreshore, and residents were  < organizing to protect the Sechelt  Inlet.  Richard Tomkies resigned as  president of the Sunshine Coast  Tourist Association, the Sechelt  Seniors received their tax  number and the United  Fishermen and Allied Workers  Union was negotiating to take  over the Gibsons Government  Dock.  The School Board received  complaints of violence on the  school grounds at local elementary schools, which they promised to investigate, and told  concerned parents at Chatelech  Senior Secondary that they  would pursue the funding  necessary to build the promised  extension.  Sechelt council circulated a  questionnaire asking citizens  their ideas and opinions on  recreational facilities.  The economic atmosphere  continued to improve in  February. A new tourism promotion group organized, calling  itself Travel Sunshine Coast.  They received a $15,000 grant  from the Economic Development Commission, as did the  new Small Business Centre.  The Roberts Creek Library  received a $14,000 grant to  build an expansion. Building  started on the new Jack and Jill  Preschool, and the Sechelt  Downtown Revitaliza'.ion Committee received approval in  principle from Sechelt Council  for Phase One of their plan for  sprucing up the core of  downtown Sechelt.  Sechelt Council put a $5000  deposit on a 7.88 acre parcel in  downtown Sechelt where they  hoped to locate a recreation office complex, and the Sechelt  Seniors Association received the  first third of a $300,000 grant to  build a new hall.  Seven elk were let loose on  the Sunshine Coast in the hopes  that tik herds could be reestablished in this area, and the  provincial government��� after an  angry barrage of letters, reversed its decision to sell commuter ���  tickets in books of 20., ��� v  In the first election under its  own constitution, the Sechelt  Indian Band elected Tom Paul  as its new Chief.  Some tensions sprang up with  the flowers in March. The  school board announcement  that French immersion would  be located in Davis Bay Elementary School next term was met  with opposition from every  side. The final budget for the  Economic Development Commission caused friction with  both Sechelt and Gibsons, and  MP Ray Skelly expressed his  horror at the condition of the  Gibsons wharf during a visit  here, and promised to take the  matter up with the Minister of  Transport.  Area E finally got a Community Plan, residents at  Pender Harbour won a fight to  keep their dump open, and a  model of the proposed Gibsons  Landing Theatre Project was  unveiled for the public. Valdy  performed a very successful  fundraising concert for the  theatre project.  Ray Skelly called for an audit  of the Aqua West books to take  a look at what had happened to  a $60,000 federal grant that they  had received.  Jim Price, of the B.C. Ferry  Corporation, announced that  the 10:30 ferry sailing would be  reinstated on May 15 and would  not be automatically cancelled  in the fall.  Whales were spotted frolicking all along the coast in April,  in waters which were finally  zoned W-l that same month.  The W-l zoning covered  foreshore from Port Mellon to  Wood Bay Salmon Farm and  exluded aquaculture as a permitted use.  The Sechelt Indian District  Government Enabling Bill was  given second and third reading  in the provincial legislature,  completing another major stage  in the self-government struggle.  The area received $37,500  from the Partners in Enterprise  Funding for 1986, which was  applied for jointly by the two  municipalities and the Sunshine  Coast Regional, District  (SCRD).  The Gibsons Lifeboard Station Society raised .enough  money to lease a boat to cover  the waters around Howe Souri  ana Gibsons, and Travel Sun  shine Coast received provincial  approval for matched fundin  for everything they could raist  up to $91,000.  Please tarn to page 12  Audition  On Tuesday, January 5 at 7  pm in the Roberts Creek Community Use Room Driftwood  Players will be auditioning for  their next production, Agatha  Christie's The Mousetrap.  Driftwood Players are looking for men in their 50's, an  Italian accent would he an asset;  men and women 25 to 40; and a  wohian in her 50's. If there is  anyone out there interested in  directing this or any other production please come along and  discuss your ideas.  We have other productions in  progress for our fringe theatre  and welcome ideas and people  for further productions so if  there's some one-man-show for  instance, thai your dying to dot  come along and tell us all about  it.  Want to make further enquiries? Phone Nest at 886-7573  or Diane at 886-2469.  ^wwoty Qkimm  Winter Fashions up to  30%  off  Gibsons in  Coattaacel frees aeae 1  in December of 1988. An  Economic Development Officer  will be employed at the earliest  possible date and will report to  and be responsible to the EDC.  As well, the EDC Chairman  and/or the Economic Development Officer will report monthly, in writing and verbally, to  the two municipal councils and  the SCRD Board on budget  status, activities, results, successes, and planned projects.  Egan stated to the Coast  News that even though Sechelt  has decided to opt out of the  EDC for 1988 and will not be  contributing any monies to that  function, their participation is  still wanted and welcome.  Environment  Continued from page 1  "B.C. has one of the worst  " records in Canada for enforcement of provincial environmental legislation," Rubin told Ihe  reporter. "Bill Vender Zalm  won the Polluter Of The Year  award in 1987." That award is  made annually by the Canadian  ; Environmental Network at their  annual conference.  Rubin will continue to work  with other environmentalists  who are urging the government  to broaden the scope of the Act  before it is brought to the  House of Commons for  passage.  "The whole thrust of every  report, from the Brundland  Commission of the United Nations, to the report of the National Task Force of Environment and Economy, has been  that we have to deal with en-  ' vironmental protection on a  global basis. If we continue to  react on a country by country,  province by province, substance  by substance basis, then that  narrow vision will be our  demise," she warned.  IMDOLOGfST, HERBALIST & REREXOLOCIST  (Certified Graduate of Wld Rose College of Natural Healing)  Indotogy tea seie^lnvolvirii the study of the iris, which stows the con-  dition of all body, tissue. This Information Is charted and can be of  assistance in determining the root causes of many physiological and  psychological problems.  for More Inhumation Hwne 886-7626  RESOLUTIONS?  1)1 KT  X'KNTKR  offers  SOLUTIONS!  10 lbs. 2 wks.  17-25 lbs. 6 wks.  CALL TODAY FOR A FREE CONSULTATION  Phone  886-DIET  ~9m  you've been waiting for!  Our once a year  CLEARANCE of ALL INVENTORY  Closed Monday, Jan. 4th  We open our doors  Tuesday, Jan. 5th at 11am  aPlaPaPy'S  Sunnycrest Mall  886-3866  IT  Happy Kew (jean  to all our  Customers, Friends, Neighbours  from  Ken, Debbie, Gwen, Gloria, Ui, Karen, Cathy, Christine, Gall, Joan, Denlte, Jayna, Jamie  >   Goodbye to Gwen Nlmmo  flmiaiiimi'ef  0 sWes^eSJ^a^ajesii^BjfssB  Special Vlummm ?nim  o*i*  a****  Stationery  Office Supplies & Equipment  School Supplies  Com* in soon while selection Is best  IGHT JJV YOUR NE1GHBOURHOOL  Get it at the  PHARMASAVE  "Ml vest i'vtl - - 11 �� *���-*.-*%-���>-> "��� -i  ������  Coast News, January 4,1968  foe coaM only see It oa the West Coast. Wsefctag tltt rsta water off Mveways I* serious M  ���INtevNhreaea*  3ird Count '87  An excellent year  The 9th Sunshine Coast  3iristmas Bird Count wss held  >n Saturday, December 19. Slx-  een participants (and three  feeder watchers) were split into  ix parties covering our count  ircle (a circle seven and a half  Rules in diameter centred at the  ighway and Hall Road,  toberts Creek). Our circle thus  itretches from West Sechelt to  Port Mellon.  I The weather was good for  birding. There was light snow in  he morning and an overcast  ifternoon. The temperature re-  jmained dose to freezing all day  Send the wind was calm.  j Coverage was also good with  {sixteen observers in six parties  with each party led by a competent birder likely to know all the  species they met. With good  Average and co-operative  Weather we had an excellent  ���aunt this year with 89 species  recorded and 8858 individuals.  this was our second highest  species count (1983-92).  I Waterbirds, hawks, woodpeckers and passerines were all  abundant. We had particularly  high counts of Song, Fox and  Qolden-crowned Sparrow,  Towhees, and Ruby-crowned  Kinglets.  There are always exceptions  to the rule, and Pine Siskins  were lower than normal.  The big surprise both on  count day, and this winter as a  whole, is the complete absence  of Red-breasted Nuthatches.  Some years, particularly in mild  winters, these birds remain with  us right through the winter.  The only other regular species  we missed on the count was  Ruffed Grouse. As usual we  also missed three or four potential species in the higher, snowbound elevations of our count  circle, and missed on the nocturnal owls despite some efforts  to find them.  Two new species were added  to our all-time count day total,  bringing the total to 121. The  new species were Common  Snipe and Hutton's Vireo.  All in all it was a very good  day which seems to stabilize our  average count on favourable  weather days at around 90  species. This year we found  almost all the common winter  birds of our area, quite a few of  the uncommon ones, but did  not find any rarities or unexpected species.  Vancouver's Christmas Bird  Count   wss   on   Sundsy,  December 25 and wss plagued  for the second year in a row by  inclement weather, namely  heavy rain at lower elevations  and snow higher up. Final tally  was about 126 species, with the  best birds being two separate  Blue Jays.  Victoria's bird count was on  December 19 like ours and they  had perfect weather for a bird  count.  They took full advantage of  the weather and also the  presence of some real rarities in  the area to compile the all-time  high for a Canadian Christmas  Bird Count - 144 species,  wresting the title from Vancouver.  The really good birds on Vic,-  G^jS'-bS^Scto  and TMn Warbler.  We welcome all new  members to our Sechelt Marsh  Protective Society, Friday night  programmes, field trips and  other such events as the  Christmas Bird Count.  Members receive the monthly  Marsh Wrenderings and are  also registered as members of  the B.C. Federation of  Naturalists, receiving the  quarterly B.C. Naturalist.  Warming  savings  It's a welcome thought.  ;        The more you know  i about energy conservation,  the more money you'll save  on heating bills.  ,        That's why the  I Government of Canada has  [put together the ENERGY  * SAVINGS KIT. It has valuable  ^and up-to-date information  ^to help you build energy  efficiency into all your home  renovations/and increase  the resale value of your  home.  So if you're planning  to spend money on your  home this year, why not  plan on saving some? Get  the ENERGY SAVINGS KIT.  For your free copy, mail this  coupon to:  Energy Savings Kit. Home Energy Programs  580 Booth Street. Ottawa, Ontario KIA 0E4  Please send me your free copy of the Energy Savings Kit.  City:  I  PoitilCode; THtptwne: i  W    Energy, Mines and  Bstourow Canada  crtsnjts, Mines et  RteeourcM Canada  Hon. Marcel Masse,   Uton. Merest Masse,  CanadS  s.  Sunnycrtst Mall,  Gibsons  Prices eff active):  Mon., Jan. 4  to Sun., Jan. 10  100% Locally Owned * Operated  OPEN SUNDAYS  11 am-5 pm  Medium  GROUND 1   hQ  BEEFk03.29  /��. I at*M  Bulk  FRESH  SAUSAGE*,3.95 ��.  No Name  SLICED SIDE  BACON   *,5.g3 fc  Fresh  RAINBOW  TROUT    * 7.59 ��,  Florida Grown ��� Canada  #1 Grade ��� 28 oz Bskt.  FIELD  1.79  2.69  3.49  1.19  Canada #1 Grado - Medium  cooking no  ONIONS .��* -90  F.B.I. ��� Frozen Concentrated tRM JRk  341 ml Tin M U  ORANGE JUICE      -#9  Graves- Pure ��� 1 /. Ctn. D Q  APPLE JUICE -09  Delsey ��� 4 Roll  BATHROOM 1   CO  TISSUE 1-39  Miss Mew -170gm Tina O D  CAT FOOD -09  Unlco ��� Plum or Crushed 0Rk g/8h  796ml Tin Ull  TOMATOES -99  Liberty ��� 3 /. Jug  VEGETABLE O  QQ  OIL fca99  Campbell's - 284 ml Tina  TOMATO 0/  QQ  SOUP .W .09  Catelll ��� 4 Varieties eM       kfMeU  PiSTA 1.39  ���"' Coast News, January 4,1968.  Geor(ie  Gibsons  Vancouver's Police Museum  ay Gssus Csessr, sat-age  OLD VANCOUVER'S  SHADY SIDE  If you've reed our Betty  Keller's Oa Ike Seedy See,  Vaacosner lMkMMe, then you  ait well pruned for a visit to the  Vancouver Police Centennial  Museum, the city's newest,  opened not quite two years ago  in April, 1986.  '���We wished to (tesonethlni  special for Vancouver's centennial," said Joe Swan, the  museum's curator, "and what  better than this visual history of  'citizens in uniform,' 100 years  of Vancouver Police history."  Just retired from 22 years on  the Vancouver force, and latterly a columnist in two Vancouver  weekly newspapers, the West  Eerier/East Baser, Joe Swan is  a fitting choice for the cantor's  Roberts    Crook  Babysitter list  Parker, M5-2163  I've had a request for another  babysitter list. There are some  twelve and thirteen-year-olds  out there who are very eager to  give parents a night offend earn  some spending money.  So if you'd like work babysitting, please call me at 885-2163.  Don't be put off if you get the  recording on the answering  machine. Just give your name,  age, and general location you  live in: Marlene Road, the east  end of Lower Road, near "The  Pen" or whatever. Then people  can try to get a sitter dose by  for the drive home.  This is for sitters living in or  very near Roberts Creek only  please, unless you have your  own transportation. Older people who can fill in during the  daytime, especially on short  np,i"e, are very much in de  mand so I'd like to hear from  them as well.  When I get enough names 111  print a full list for parents to  dip out and save for future  reference.  1988 MEMBERSHIPS  Members wishing to retain  their voting rights in the Roberts  Creek Community Association  should purchase their 1968  memberships before the annus!  meeting in Msrch. New  members are also welcome.  Cards are available at the  Roberts Creek Community  Library or from Community  Assodation Treasurer Jacob  Chaban at 886-8541.  BROCHURE DEADLINE  Don't forget the deadline to  have your oganizatjon's summer activities listed in the tourist  brochure is January 15. Phone  Carole Rubin at 885-7935 to  make sure you get all the  publicity you can.  ���heete     8x10     9"  ttf*  LETS DO GREAT IN "88"  DONATIONS 81 HELP NEEDED  Proceeds aid Food Bank  THRIFTY'S  Tus��-8��t 1C-4  above Ken's Lucky Dollar  Besides the aerated history  of the Vancouver Cay force  that he compiled sad published  in hard cover, the stories in his  weekly columns of past criminal  escapades in Vancouver have  just appeared in paperback. TV  Peace Merests ��� Tree Stories  iV.��mmMesAr-  Joe Swan said of Betty  Keller's book. Oa The Shady  SMe, "I admire her  research and the  style of the book."  And he added, "Take a look  attheepilotueofherbook.'the  vices of Dupont Street only  flourished because of the  patronage of those who looked  for some excitement in their  respectable lives.'"  The museum displays are exceedingly well laid out for ease  of viewing: photos, large print  placards, mannequins, and  displays simply bring the place  alive.  The forming of the school  crosswalk patrols of pupus  trained by police took place in  1935 after there had been  several deaths at street crossings. There has not been an ac-  since. What happened in Gibsons, by the wsy, that led the  school board to dispense with  its pupil petrols which the  youngsters had conducted so  responsibly for years?  A poster concerning school  patrols used in those days had  this message: "Whenever you  see this sign, Mr. Motorist, approach the school the same wsy  you did as a child���slowly."  And from the pages of the  Point Grey police log, 1921:  Complaint of dog killing Mrs.  Scratchley's chickens; of  children molesting an adult  (throwing stones); of disorderly  children on a Sunday, "cautioned them".  And a lengthy entry by the  constable: "Looked in a window of the Point Grey hotd and  saw money and dice on a table  surrounded by men. Broke up  game. Proprietor said he didnt  know the game was in progress.  From the 1923 log of the  South Vancouver Police: an H.  Goddard, merchant ��>f Geufc  merdal Street, complained *i  mail on Monday that his store  window had been smaslfed on  the previous Saturday night.  And a Mrs. Litcombe complained of a child throwing  rocks at her. Turned out the  child was three years old. Constable McKay w:jned the  child's parents. And a note  from the mental hospital, "A  patient named Wheelwright has  left the hospital without permission. When you see him, send  him beck."  There was a bitter irony in the  life of P.C. Robert McBeath,  awarded a Victoria Cress for  single-handedly taking out  machine gun posts in s WW 1  attack, when be died by a shot  from an impaired driver.  A photo from 1933 shows the  mounted police squad clearing  . rioters from Hastings Street.  Above the melee a shop canopy  with the sign, "Dont Argue���  Tobacconist".  Assistant to the curator of the  museum is Larry Davis, (rest  nephew of Vancouver's first  woman constable who Joined  the force in 19J2 when she wss  almost 50 yean old, and by  1920, had risen to the rank of  inspector.  Displays tell the story of the  I  LADIES FASHIONS  7 Racks  50% off  Fashion  Yarns  25��y<  doff  SALE ENDS JAN. 17  Just for you$t��  OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK  Gibsons Landing  886-2470  police pipe band formed In 1914  under Duncan McTavish, and  of the mounted squad in 1910  and of the dog squad begun in  1958.  "Our museum is self-  supporting from donations and  1 rentals of uniforms of past  1 to movie and stage com-  "'said Joe Swan. "We  t no grants except the use of  1 heritage building from th��  a*ty. There is no call on the tax-  paver to operate or maimain the  facility."  "We are preparing an extension where some chilling  morgue scenes will be  displayed."  The museum is at IS) East  Cordova, adjacent to the police  station. Open afternoons in  winter with a souvenir shop that  has titles not often found  elsewhere. Telephone 665-3346.  TEEN CHOIR  Lyn Vernon's choir for ages  13 to 17 stm has places for more'  voices, and there are still a  number of bursaries available  for any deserving young person,  male or female. Phone  8864026.  BONNE ANNEE  New Year joy to the Santa  who turned over his honoriums  to local good-deed projects.  Embarrassed to find this known  he said, "Couldn't let income  tax have it."  How You Can  STOP SMOKING  Permanently  fey Erne* CaldmH  ��495  now at 277 Gower PI. Rd.  Inert to WebQK Wwto),    SSS7744  WEBBER PHOTO  TtJMUtt THE MOMENT  WEIL MOUNT TOUIIFAVOURITE  ���H0T0 ON A CHINA HATE  ��� eeneilee,eM.  e Heeeert rtwlo.  886-2947  27S Gower Pt. Rd.  Gibsons Landing  Happy New Year  SALE  458 Marine Dr. SM-U12  Gibsons Landing  MARY'S  VARIETY  open 7 dsvi s week  STUFFED TOYS  and  NOVjELTIES  GIFTS  Dry Cleaning Drop Oft  CUSTOM FRAMING  ��� Oval Matting  ��� Dry Mounting  ��� etc.  2S0 Cower ft. Rd.,  GawMuUndkig  BBS-MIS  Ken's  .f^W^^E'  We reeerse the right to limit quantities ���;������:  S4jW AjbBbsS a^uaaaeaaadeikJh ^taaua^eedhaaaa nan ���ufj       rm  fffj *tJWJ BBSjBjnBBssnfs, aeaaaersrsBssjasBj scant sssssj  Open 9 <im   til 6 pi  Yht Lormc*m  LOTTO GC  Viva  paper  towels  Vivid ��� Liquid  bleach  Dare ��� Chocolate Cream  Bonus Pack ^   _^  cookies     *5���2.00  Honeydew ��� Frozen  grape  drink       3��ml1.00  Kettogg's  Rice  2ro��1.00  .2.00  Crispies  .350 gm  2.00  MANY MOKE  $ IN-ST0RE SPECIALS  Diane's  vt fc.yy  taco chips 454 gm 2.59  Campbell's ��� Cream of Mushroom     ,_ _:  SOUP 284 ml. 59  Nabob ��� Deluxe ~    _ -,.  tee bags     ���g���2.49  Bee Cee ��� Creamed -   ss��em  honey      soo^l.79  Purex  bathroom  tissue j.  Carnation - Chunk Light  tuna        rw^l.09  Blck's - Bavarian _ _  sauerkraut *��*�� 1.29  Christie's Trlscuit  crackers    *<>��, 1.55  Scottowels  Plus r,1.99  Better Buy  lunch bags a, 2/.75  Sunlight  liquid  detergent     ,,1.97  D.iy by L) iy  t.   ���     ��� <T- ��-,-������-'.���-.       .'.-.-.-���,-,'     >.���,���.':.��������.���.-  Coast News, January 4,1968  Lucky Dollar Foods  WLH POINT ROAD, GIBSONS LANDING        886-2257  FREE DELIVERY TO THE WHARF  ..;,<;  ev��*v  Jokwhuj Food Spwnh  Prices effective:  Jan. 5 - Jan. 12  Luck1  dollar  FOODS  Fridays   til 7 pm Sundays & Holidays 10 ;im to 5 pm  Pacific  evaporated  mi IK 385 m/ ��� II  \Peek Frean's ��� Assorted j*   g%g\  cookies   ...m��� Z.Z8  Maxwell House  instant  coffee  Sunspun - Long Grain ��\��\  nCe 454am aO��J  227gm  ....454gm  5.59  Arctic Power  powdered  detergent  .1.51  1.49  Our Own Freshly Baked  Assorted Flavours  cookies 6,.99  Weston's Homemade Style  White or Brown  bread  1.09  No Name -600gm  Whole Unsweetened  strawberries     1.95  ���Pepperidge Farms ��� Layer .     _ -,.  cakes       ^a.1.49  Canada Grade 'A' Beef  prime rib  steaks A #����  3.89  Bum's - Bulk  Fresh ��� Bone In  garlic coil     ���.. 1.39 chicken  ' breasts  Medium  ib.  2.69  grOlind beef        Jb.     I .79     Bum's I Sliced Cooked  Freshly Sliced ��� Baby Beef  liver a .99  Fresh Beef  ham  175gmea.  1.89  Fletcher's  turkey  short ribs     ��, 1.99 franks    3753mea. 1.69  No Name  perogles  Minute Maid - Grape/Fruit  PUnCll 355 m/  1 leg 1.69  .79  bananas  j .29  Okanagan Fartcy  Macintosh  apples   b .39  Washington  bulk potatoes  U lbs,   iSw  Florida Large #%.��%  tomatoes ib .69  Better Buy - ^  margarine mm .48  Kra/t- 500gm ^   ,.||  cheese whiz     3.79  Armstrong  cream  cheese      250 ami. 65  President's Choice ��� Cheddar  cheese  slices  .500 gm  3.69  a=  I'M WELL AWARE  that It's the dawning of a new year and all that and I had mads sans  resolutions, one of which was culinary. (I was going to eat salad Iks  amadMarchhare!)Oiwoftlw(itherswMtosn)oygs1tlnguplntlie  morning. All that vanished when I glimpsed an that whits frost outside through my half-closed morning eyes. When I eventually rasa  from my cocoon I decided 'fuelling up' was the order of the day -to  heck with the hips!  GUARD'S PUDDING  in  3/4 cup snot  1/2 cup brown sugar  1 tssspoen baking soda  3 gontrous tablespoons raspberry ken  llarpssgg  orated rtad and lutes sf 1 taatsn  ���at si sum i sew ������*�� aewww ww   ���  .v.v.wv.  1. Butter a 2-2% pint pudding bowl  2. Mix dry Ingredients. Stir In |am, lemon rind and kites. Than beat  the egg and add it.  3. Spoon the mixture into the pudding bowl.  4. Butter some aluminum foil and cover the top of the bowl, i  ing some room for the pudding to expand. Tie the ton on ��  iy-  5. Steam the pu(k��ng for 2 Vj hours. Oonltorgrt to check the��  occasionally and sdd boding water when necessary.  6. Remove the foil and turn the pudding out on a wanh pate. Sent  with'a wine sauce, raspberry saves or plain old custard)  Am) then, go for a long walk!  HappyNewYaar  N���ST LEWIS  <P!  aoc  lu m Ivy Item, We do more for yon in providing Ou.ility ��t Friendly Service The Sunshine  w  I Published on the Sunshine Coast       25'per copy on news stands      January 4,1988       Volume 42       Issue 1  Fourth Polar Bear Swim  50 hardy souls  take the plunge  With temperatures hovering  around freezing, 50 some odd  individuals showed up at Davis  Bay New Years morning to participate in the annual ritual of  defying hypothermia. An  estimated 500 warmly bundled  up spectators came out to  witness the 11 am event where  dozens of people clad only in  bathing suits and goosebumps  would throw themselves into the  icy waters of Georgia Strait.  It was once said by an  anonymous Scot that the power  of the great highland bagpipes is  unparallelled and this was more  or less substantiated when local  piper John Webb, in full  highland regalia, escorted the  swimmers to the water's edge.  Once there they exurberantly  threw themselves into the sea.  Many prizes were offered but  perhaps the most challenging  was the one for the longest time  endured in the chilly waters. In  this category, four swimmers  actually stayed in the water  longer than the organizers could  stand it. When it finally appeared that the playful contestants would never come out a  draw was called and they triumphantly emerged to a standing  ovation from the audience.  Final results were: 1st prize  Colin Dionne, 2nd prize Albert  Eger, 3rd prize Lorenze  Defresne, tied for the longest  time were Crystal Mathes,  Kathleen Defour, Jonathon  Williams, and Mike Gibsons.  Oldest female participant was  Mrs. Sanders and youngest  female was Laura Weston.  Youngest male was Chris  Snoop. Best male costume was  John Harrigan, best female  costume was Darlene Humbird,  and best child's costume was  Jordan Guignard. Participant  from the furthest distance away  was Albert Eger from Montreal.  It looked as if they might stay In for a very long time and people on  the shore were getting downright cold, so the last four competitors  for the endurance prize in last Friday's ScheUwen Polar Bear Swim  received assurances that there were four prizes to be awarded. Still  none of them were willing to be the first to come in, so the four  linked hands and emerged together. -Peony Fuller photo  Islands Trust sees  report positive  Local takes case to Ottawa  Environment Bill essential  / . .��i .ja��*s  r.-^��"H,-V*fci1^  "If we don't start to think  globally in terms of environmental degradation, we'll  lose it by the end of the  century," Carole Rubin of the  B.C. Coalition for alternatives  to pesticides told a reporter last  week. It's been almost a month  since Rubin made her presentation lo a Commons Committee  examining the new Canadian  Environmental Protection Act  (EPA), but she's still seething.  "We were promised in  December 1986 a bill that would  provide Canadians with 'the  most comprehensive piece of  environmental legislation in the  western hemisphere'. Where is  it?", she asked the committee.  The environmental network  had great hopes for this legislation, she told the Coast News.  She and many other environmentalists had been involved with workshops and  regional meetings held last  February to examine draft  legislation.  In March 1987, a 'multi-  stakeholder conference' was  held in Ottawa, where representatives from industry, labour,  health agencies, enrivonmental  groups and the government all  met lo bring forth recommendations that they could all agree  on.  From that came a number of  strong recommendations, including one that would see an  environmental bill of rights entrenched in the act. This, Rubin  explained, would basically state  that "Canadians have a right to  a safe and healthy  environment". It would include  a prohibition clause which  would state, 'No one may  release, or cause to be released,  into the environment anything  that could be deleterious to the  environment.'  It would also give any citizen  the right to enter judicial proceedings if any government acts  improperly or fails to act to protect the environment.  None of the recommendations that came out of that conference were included in the  final draft of the legislation.  Nor does the legislation cover  any crown agency, Rubin added. Private enterprise may be  restricted in what kind of toxic  substances it can release, but  not a government agency. Even  those restrictions are minimal.  Out or 100,000 identified toxins, only nine substances are  currently regulated. The other  99,991 toxins, under this legislation, would have to go through  a screening procedure by the  government to determine what  level of restrictions they may  need.  CEPA seems to deal exclusively with toxins. It does  not, Rubin said, include  pesticides o, tny food and drug  contaminants. It covers international air pollution, but not air  pollution that occurs within the  country.  In December, Rubin told the  Commons Committee that "the  objectives, guidelines and codes  of practice set out in CEPA are  honourable, but unenforceable." These show the scope  of the legislation to include,  'recycling, re-using, treating,  storing, disposing of or reducing the release of substances into the environments; or works,  undertaking, or activities that  affect or may affect environments."  "It should be called the Environmental Contaminant  Act," said Rubin "That's all it  even attempts to deal with."  The act is a reactive document, which deals with protec  tion of the environment on a  substance by substance basis  where the environmental groups  were looking for a document  that would ensure "conservation of natural resources and  regenerative economic development." A few changes in wording could provide that, Rubin  pointed out to the committee.  They were also hoping for  some kind of minimum federal  standards which would  "preclude the establishing of  pollution havens anywhere in  Canada," but no such section  has been included in the Act.  Please turn to page 4  An emergency meeting of all  elected trustees of the Islands  Trust area has been called for  early January by Trust Chairman, Nick Gilbert. The purpose  of the meeting will be to discuss  and respond to a report on the  future of the Islands Trust  recently tabled with the Provincial Legislature by Mr. Dave  Mercier, Chairman of the Standing Committee assigned to  review the Trust.  The report resulted from a  series of community hearings on  the islands and written submissions from island residents.  Recommendations of the report  include retention of the Islands  Trust Act as the statutory vehicle for the "preserve and protect" mandate of the Trust,  assignment of regional district  functions to the Islands Trust  on an incremental basis, and  maintaining the local trust committee system "for the time  being".  "We are responding to the  recommendations with cautious  optimism," Mr. Gilbert said.  "There are certain aspects of  the report which we are very  pleased to see, especially the  retention of the Islands Trust  Act, the mandate, the trust  committee system and the  Islands Trust Fund. However,  we have many questions on the  details of how the Trust would  take on the additional community service functions, which  have been provided by seven  regional districts in the past."  Suggestions that the new  regional district will prove more  costly are likely unfounded. It is  anticipated that the transfer of  those monies already allocated  to the seven regional districts in  the Trust area will be sufficient  to cover the costs of operation.  After many years of political  uncertainty and instability for  the Islands Trust and its support  staff, the Chairman and the two  Vice-Chairmen of the Trust,  Stephen Wright and Carol Martin, commend the Honourable  Mrs. Rita M. Johnston,  Minister of Municipal Affairs,  for having initiated the timely  and useful review.  Gibsons opts for  EDC participation  by Ken Collins  Gibsons has decided to participate in the Economic  Development function of the  Sunshine Coast Regional  District. This 11th hour decision  was made at the last Gibsons  Council meeting of the year,  Tuesday, December 22. Previously, Gibsons had indicated  it intended not to participate  and should the Town decide to  follow Sechelt and opt out, had  only until December 31 of 1987  to do so.  Gibsons decision to stay with  the EDC followed a persuasive  presentation given by Commission Chairman Maurice Egan.  It was a similar presentation to  the one he gave to Sechelt  Council several weeks earlier  when they chose not to participate.  Contained within Egan's  presentation were the EDC's  response to the Stevenson,  Kellogg, Ernst and Whinney  report indicating not only that  the EDC is responding to their  recommendations but will be  changing its form to be more  responsive to the municipalities.  For example, the EDC will be  partially comprised of one  member appointed by Gibsons  Council, one member appointed  by Sechelt Council (should they  wish), one member appointed  by the SCRD Board, one  representative from Area A,  and one member appointed by  each of the Sechelt and Gibsons  Chambers of Commerce for a  total of six.  Three non-elected members  at large are then to be selected  taking into consideration  representation of industry,  labour, business, the arts, the  environment and the geographic  regions of the Sunshine Coast.  They are to be appointed jointly  by the Chairman of the  Regional District, the Mayor of  Sechelt (should he wish to participate), and the Mayor of Gibsons.  Those nine people will then  elect a Chairman who is not a  member of the Commission and  whose position will be reviewed  Please turn to page 4  Sailing dropped  The 10:30 am ferry sailing from Langdale to Horseshoe  Bay and the return sailing at 11:30 am have been discontinued  as of December 31, 1987. There has been no notification  from the B.C. Ferry Corporation concerning any possible  resumption of this sailing.  Another balmy day frolicking in the waters off Davis Bay.  ���Ken Collins photo  Serving the Sunshine Coast since 1945  euBjBjMafiwaa Coast News, January 4,1988  5 YEARS AQO  The Village of Gibsons assumes Its new status as a  Town by reaching a population of over 2600, and will be  hosting an open house to celebrate the fact.  An arbitration award giving teachers in School  District 46 a three percent across the board salary increase was announced last week.  A 'resort concept' hotel, Gibsons Landing Marine  Hotel, will be discussed at a public hearing. It is to be  built on Gower Point Road by developers Jon McRae  and Art McGlnnis. The 60 room, four-storey marine hotel  is designed to operate as a full facility hotel with rac-  quetball courts, sauna rooms, pool and retail shops.  10 YEARS AQO  The protracted B.C. Telephone Company strike  became more than just a male operator on the  telephone lines when a sign marked 'No Telephone Service Ship to Shore - B.C. Telephone Labour Dispute' was  posted on one of the ships on the Horseshoe Bay  ���Langdale run. ���_._. .������  16 YEARS AQO  Furious rain starting before Christmas Day, covering  32 hours, amounted to 3.95 Inches which helped already  high stream flows to increase Into torrents, creating  considerable damage.  20 YEARS AQO  Hartley Dent, NOP candidate for the new federal  riding of Coast-Chllcotln, was getting around the Sunshine Coast last week to meet people. Apart from attending several short meetings, Mr. Dent visited the Canadian Forest Products pulpmlll at Port Mellon.  25 YEARS AQO  School children of Roberts Creek area returned to  their school January 3, rebuilt following the fire which  destroyed the former $60,000 building and contents last  July 29.  30 YEARS AQO  Electronics Is helping the Japanese fisheries industry  enlarge the scope of its operations and Increase Its  catch. Boats of only two or three tons are being modernized with electronic equipment. Electronic fish-finders  are now carried on 20 percent or 7500 of all Japanese  fishing boats of five tons or more.  r*  The Sunshine  i in �� nwi  PublLhed by GLASSFORD PRESS LTD.  Editorial   Penny Fuller     Ken Collins  Advertiiini  Fran Bumside  John Gilbert  Production  JinScrudu  Bev Cranston  Bonnie McHeffty  Wish list  The Roman God Janus gives his name to the month of  January. He is pictured as a two-headed god, looking both  backwards and forwards and the turn of the year is an appropriate time for both activities.  Elsewhere in these pages we have culled the pages of the  papers of the past year and it may be appropriate that here  in the editorial space which so often has been and must be  a centre of controversy if the newspaper is to fulfill its  community function we look ahead at the year to come  with a modest wish list for the Sunshine Coast in 1988.  Above all else we must wish for improved harmony in  the conduct of our local government business. It is simply  a fact that we are something of a bad joke in Victoria  because of our interminable wrangling.  Often, too often, some local leader or another will pick  up the phone or a pen and fill the ears of some poor  government minion in Victoria with allegations and bitterness about some other local leader or body. It is done  usually because the perpetrator feels he or she has some  special influence that can be used against a local rival or  rival institution. It invariably ends up making us look silly.  It cannot be too often stressed that we must as often as  we can solve our differences locally and present a united  front to senior governments. Without it they will ignore us  and we will continue to be one of the most neglected  districts in the province regardless of whom we send to  represent us.  As a pre-requisite to harmony there must be good will  and the maturity to understand that it is possible to  disagree without anger and without malice. Where differences are too acute to be reconciled, leave them to the  attention of time and present to senior governments only  those issues on which we can find a common ground.  If the people of the Sunshine Coast can exert some  vigilance and remind any elected leader sharply that  boorish, childish, destructive behaviour is not acceptable  we will find a rapid improvement in our embattled state.  May the deliberations of all be blessed with insight and  maturity and may 1988 find us a slightly more civilized and  enlightened place when the two-headed god next looks  backwards and forward.  A Happy New Year to one and all.  Folly, folly  And so it has gone again, the 10:30 am sailing. Again we  have a three-hour gap in mid-morning when our highways  are closed.  Of all the follies perpetrated in the name of economy in  this strange province, surely there is no greater absurdity  than having a fully-crewed ship sit at dock with its motors  running for three hours every day to save the tip of the cost  iceberg which is the diesel costs of getting to Horseshoe  Bay.     The Sunshine COAST NEWS Is a locally owned newspaper, published on the Sunshine Coast, B.C. every Monday by Qlassford Press  Ltd., Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0. Gibsons Tel. 886-2622 or  866-7817; Sechelt Tel. 885-3930. Second Class Mall Registration No.  4702.  The Sunshine COAST NEWS Is protected by copyright and reproduction of any part of It by any means Is prohibited unless permission In  writing Is first secured from Qlasslord Press Ltd., holders of the  copyright. SUBSCRIPTION RATES  Canada: 1 /Mr SSS; j month. %��, Foreign; 1 year S40   Some misgivings  on Free Trade  Our respective leaders have  signed the Canada/US trade  agreement. They assure us that  it is an historic moment. On his  weekly radio show President  Reagan describes it as a 'win-  win' agreement which will  greatly benefit both countries;  Prime Minister Mulroney rolls  out some ponderous and instantly forgettable rhetoric  designed to convey his  statesmanlike and far-seeing vision and the deed is done.  Perhaps not quite done, since  the Houses of Congress and the  Canadian Parliament have still  to ratify the agreement, but it  seems likely that it will  ratification largely unchanged.  The average Canadian will  have heard the hothouse assertions for and against the accord;  it has been passionately praised  and damned with equal passion  as a disaster. Probably most  Canadians have accepted it as  inevitable and, having no ready  way to confirm the truth of any  assertions, are reduced to hoping that everything will turn out  for the best.  Among that number this  writer should be included but,  without any claim to economic  clairvoyance, there must remain  lingering misgivings.  Much has been made of the  fact that the European Common Market has been in existence for years without any  loss of national identity. But  there were six countries when  the common market started,  none of them big enough to  dominate the group. The  number has since grown and the  community works as a series of  shifting alliances with the Common Market which keeps the  power from being too concentrated.  Canada is a small country in  terms of its  population and  economy joining into a free  trade agreement with one of the  world's giants. The possibility  of being totally dominated is  very real, especially given the  fact that a much greater percentage of Canada's industries and  resources is foreign-owned and  controlled than any other coun  try in the world going into the  agreement.  Then, too, some of the  misgivings must be attributed to  doubt about the leaders who  have promoted and signed the  agreement.  President Reagan's grasp of  economic thought must be  described as dismal at best. His  refusal lo raise taxes and insistence on massive military  spending has turned what was  the wealthiest country in the  world into the world's leading  debtor nation during his  presidency.  The havoc wreaked by  Reaganomics is improperly  understood even in the wake of  the October slock market crash  and the alarming decline in  value of the American dollar as  the American failure to come to  grips with its budgetary deficits  has eroded the confidence of the  world in the once-invincible  American economy.  The Canadian Prime Minister  is not a man who instills greit  trust or confidence. Four or five  years ago, as he sought the  leadership of his party, we are  told that he was denouncing  free trade with the Americans as  a threat to the sovereignty of the  nation. That was at least a position historically consistent from  Canadian Conservatives all the  way back to John A. Mac-  donald.  Now, with exactly the same  reverberating pseudo-sincerity  the Prime Minister pours  ponderous scorn on those who  advance the same arguments he  espoused just a few years ago.  It is a conversion as dramatic  as that of Saul on the way to  Damascus. The mechanics of  the sudden conversion are not,  however, as clearly documented  as those in the case of Saul of  Tarsus.  Then there is the fact that, in  a world of great population  growth and with famine becoming a consistent part of our consciousness; in a world which  spends $2 million a minute in  making armaments and in  which the worst famine areas  are those in which military  machines, for this reason or for  that, drive farmers from the  land or make it too dangerous  to grow food; in such a world  our Prime Minister's economic  grasp can perhaps be gauged by  the fact that he boosts the  economy by building frigates  and nuclear submarines.  That the free trade agreement  signed on January 2 may have  enormous repercussions for  Canada is certain; it is not certain whether these repercussions  will in the long term be positive  or negative.  That the architects of the  agreement are leaders of such  uncertain stamp and of such  militaristic bent as Mulroney  and Reagan is cause for serious  and enduring misgivings.        i'  Maryanne's Viewpoint  Hope Is  the  Thing  with  Feathers  Hope is the thing with feathers  That perches in the soul,  And sings the tune without the words,  And never stops at all,  And sweetest in the gale is heard;  And sore must be the storm  Thai could abash the little bird  That kept so many warm.  I've heard it in the chillest land.  And on the strangest sea;  Yet, never, in extremity,  It asked a crumb of me.  Emily Dickinson  -S��  Thoughts at the turn of the year  by Maryanne West  It's something like the return  of the swallows to Capistrano,  but in our family it's the lowly  skunk cabbage!  I'm not sure how this happened because it began many  years ago, but one year we  discovered that already in the  depths of winter and despite  frosty temperatures, the skunk  cabbage which grows in the bog  at the bottom of the beach trail  was pushing its leaf spikes  through the litter of fallen alder  and maple leaves.  At a time of year when, although the solstice is past and  the days are imperceptively  lengthening, we still have to expect the coldest weather of the  season, outflows of arctic air  and probably snow, it's reassuring to find the skunk cabbage so  confident that spring is almost  here.  It became a New Year's Day  ritual to look for the furled  spikes of fresh green among the  sodden browns of last year's  spent glory and I'm happy to  report that this year is no exception. The snow may be lingering  waiting for the next fall, the  varied thrushes have flocked to  the coastal areas and congregate  around the feeders, overnight  temperatures may be several  degrees below freezing, but the  skunk cabbage knows a new  season has begun and is ready to  celebrate, with pale gold  lanterns gleaming against the  black soil and leafless salmon-  berry, often the first spring  flowers ahead of garden heralds  of spring - snowdrops and  crocus.  Looking at my records I find  with interest that 30 years ago  the first flowers appeared at the  beginning of February and  sometimes later, but that in the  last six years it has been flowering already in January, in 1984  as early as January fifth.  It's a remarkable plant which  creates its own aura of heat,  which is undoubtedly why it's  an early bloomer, and the smell  which we find offensive attracts  the flies which it needs for fertilization and which emerge  from hibernation on sunny  winter days.  In early November, when it  seemed as though the fall rains  would never come, I wrote  about changing weather patterns. The rains came of course,  but considerably less than usual,  both November and December  totals were below average.  I've just finished adding up  the year's precipitation and  1987 was the second driest year  in the last 26, with a total of 39  inches. 1983 holds the record  with almost 34 inches. I'm not  making any predictions, by the  law of averages 1988 should be  a wet one to even things up, but  the weather seems to conform  to no pattern these days, so who  knows. In the western rain  forest it will add variety and in  terest to our lives.  A wonderful time is New  Year's with all the motivation  for starting over and making a  better job this time, of keeping  that journal more than two  weeks, for losing weight, for  getting in better physical shape,  for keeping in touch with family  and friends, for telling the  government what you really  think (con and pro) even though  you know from long experience  that nice as it would be, to be  well organized, you're too much  a creature of habit to ever make  those sort of drastic changes in  your lifestyle voluntarily!  It's nice to hang up all the  new calendars, but does anyone  have any suggestions of what to  do with the old ones? Those  beautiful photographs which  are works of art and, like National Geographies, far too  good to just throw out.  The New Year may well be  what we make it, let's make it a  good one!  mmmaem  ���HIHaMaanal '  Coast News, January 4,1988  More on Thatcher  Editor,  This is a reply to Mr. R.E.  Milner's insulting accusation  that in my letter opposing  privatization I was offensive, inaccurate and an outright liar.  Duels, in the past used to be  fought over such accusations.  He states that Mrs. Thatcher  was re-elected by an "even bigger majority." That, if I  remember correctly, was not so;  it was less than previously, and  could have been less still had it  not been for the in-fighting and  disarray in the Liberal Social  Democratic Alliance.  I subscribe to the Manchester  Guardian Weekly and the last  three issues are filled with  reports of Prime Minister Thatcher's intransigence, and the  hardships her attitudes have  brought upon working people  and the poor. Her treatment of  the National Health Service is  typical.  The National Health Service,  set in place by the Labour Party's Prime Minister Clement  Atlee, was an example to the  western world and a model for  our own in Canada. He also arranged free lunches for the  pupils of the elementary Council Schools. But Mrs. Thatcher  has changed all that. Today  people are dying because there  are not enough available beds  for urgent surgery. Under-  funding by the government is  the cause.  In the Guardian of December  6, is the photograph of infant  David Barber, a "blue baby"  who, like many others in his  plight, required heart surgery of  a routine sort to save his life.  His parents, after weeks of  fruitless requests for admission  to hospital, decided to bring  their case to court. They attracted so much publicity that  Mrs. Thatcher had to intervene  and little David's heart was  mended. But the long delay was  fatal and he died. Within two  months 34 children with serious  heart conditions were turned  away from that hospital for lack  qf beds and died. This is typical  for N.H.S. hospitals all over  England.  Mr. John Moore, Social Services Secretary, was unavailable  for comment. He was himself in  a private hospital where room  costs are astronomical.  The shortage of money for  the hospitals is so serious that  the Royal College of Physicians  and Surgeons has called on the  government to give immediate  financial aid to the National  Health Service. 200 million  pounds will be needed.  Mrs. Thatcher plans to introduce the infamous poll tax  for all adults regardless of income: disastrous for poor people. Many former supporters including Michael Heseltine and  former Prime Minister Edward  Heath oppose it, but none of  her cabinet ministers do for fear  of losing their jobs. This is different from our B.C. where one  of BUT Vander Zaim's cabinet  ministers opposed to privatization of highway maintenance,  said that our premier would be  remembered as "the One-term  Wonder."  As for Mrs. Thatcher's competence in the economics field,  let us look at the film industry.  England was one of the great  film producers of the world.  Splendid films were made. Even  Hollywood used to contract  films there. That industry was  among the biggest earners of  foreign currency. But Mrs.  Thatcher has changed ail that  by cutting off the government  subsidy. My son and his wife,  who have worked in film for 20  years are now reduced lo bidding on contracts for trashy  commercials. If they can get  them.  Mr. Milner cites the working  men crowding the English pubs  as proof they are well paid and  satisfied with the present  government. Comment on that  is not necessary.  Shopping in Sechelt recently,  1 found a cardboard whiskey  bottle stuck under my windshield wiper. It was put there by  a member of the B.C. Government Employees Union. It unfolded to reveal a thoroughly  documented argument against  Bill Vander Zaim's plan to  privatize our liquor stores. It is,  of course, because they are very  profitable and should fetch a  good price to help pay for the  colossal fiasco of the Co-  quihalla Pass Highway. The  pamphlet urges that we tell our  MIA we don't want our liquor  stores privatized.  (Mrs.) Isabel Ralph  Thirst  no more  Editor,  He had his pipe, his  newspaper and Dorothy.  He came to us by way of the  Regina Leader Post where my  eldest brother delivered his  papers way back in the twenties.  He served his country and his  fellow man.  He was a Liberal.  On a hot summer day in the  original office of the Coast  News, Fred Cruice once made  this memorable quote: "What I  would like is a drink of good old  prairie water."  Thirst no more Fred! Heaven  can wait!  Dick Kennett  More letters  on Page 20  s        ARE YOU DISAPPOINTED IN THE GROWTH     ^  OF YOUR RETIREMENT SAVINGS?  ���w*tSS*  Is your RRSP giving you strong growth, way ahead of inflation?  I I Yes   LI No  Does your RRSP offer you (ourattractive investment options ���  all with proven long-term performance? IJ Vfes   HNo  Can you easily move your RRSP money from one form of  investment to another to take advantage of changing market  conditions?  ��� Yes   DNo  _    Was your latest RRSP purchase part of an overall investment  il-megy? DYes   GNo  /"| Are your RRSP assets being managed for you by some of the  |5l most astute professionals in the country, with an outstanding  ���   track record for making money grow? p, y     ,--,,.  Thousands of Canadians with RRSPs invested in Bolton Tlemblay  mutual funds can say "YES" to all these questions. Can you? If not,  mail the coupon or phone us today for more data on the RRSP  investments that really perform.  GREAT PACIFIC  MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.  Financial Planners Since 1965  Box 127. Gibsons, B.C.  VON 1V0  ALASDAIR W. IRVINE  YES: MypresertRRSPinvestmentsdon'tpassthi' ���  performance test. Rushme, without obligation. Bolton ���  Tremblay s "Some Good Advice for RRSP Investors" and 1  other informative data. ���  SK^etft ��w  Back!  "On Purchase or Lease of 1987,1988  mSCORT, TRACER, TAURUS, SABLE  F SERIES TRUCKS  with manual  tidnsmissions  teams'  *5��  \��*%  ��S'  So*1  V.e��s��,  \.e��s��  #/  KZM  e^ \ If*  m\ *��  pet"  ���0  A98S1  ��A0t^  ���-\��*  tfo>  ibo.*1  pet"1  ���0 oo*n  pe��*��<w'-  *00o*n  r-\8*  rT��*  leK   ��e.i  PVA>S  you  500  C����'  &**3lJ&p+  = B��!  ,sed  lAon*9  fW=  la*  ���sort^  00  WotV  t*W  pay"1'  ,eM-  SSoo**  We're Proud  of our  BEAR  The Most Sophisticated and Detailed  AUTOMOTIVE ANALYSIS  available Anywhere  ��� The Bear's computet is programmed for the fastest and most  sophisticated automotive analy  sis available anywhere The Beat  actually talks to yout vehicle's onboard computer.  ��� The computer printout permits  4he technician to fully diagnose  engine problems with readings,  specification comparisions, and  diagnostic messages.  CUSTOMER PRINTOUT  ��� You receive a printout listing  the repairs and service your car or  truck needs, and showing where  your vehicle's specifications are  in relation to the manufacturer's  original specs.  Our BEAR will handle almost  all makes and models  MAKE AN APPOINT  MEEJ   JJ^   B��AR  ONLY at SOUTH COAST FORD  $24 *  V  PRE OWNED CAR & TRUCK SPECIALS  Backed By Ford's 'V.T.D. 'WARRANTY'   Ask For The Details     ��� v.,mi. rim. t ��u����  1985 TEMPO 2-DOOR  4 Cyl.. Auto, Very Clean.  Priced lo Sell  *************  1987 PONTIAC FIERO GT  V6, EFI. 5 Speed. Air ContJ ,  Power Windows 4 Locks, lilt. Speed.  Casselte. Loaded1 14,000 KMS  Stk #37 3051  *************  1985 TOPAZ 2-DOOR  4 Cyl., 5 Speed,  1 Owner, Extras  1985 CHEV SUBURBAN  V8. Automalic, equipped to  frailer Tow. 1 Owner  *************  1978 CHEV CAMARO  V8 Automatic, Mays,  Great Sound System1  Stk #30 337 2  *************  1986 COUGAR  V6. Auto. Well Equipped, A/C.  Till/Speed, Very Clean  South Coast Ford Sales  USED VEHICLE SALES POLICY  All ol out premium ubed vehicles receive a 44  POINT SAFETY ana MECHANICAL CHECK.  Thi EXTERIOR. INTERIOR. UNDER THE HOOD  anrj UNDER THE CAR are completely in  specled A COMPRESSION TEST ,;. done on  Ihe engine and lite vehicle Is linallv ROAD  TESTED.  Once this inspection <t> complete and oui lull.  LICENSED TECHNICIAN is satisfied .. raporl  is SIGNED and FILED with the management of  our dealership Al Irtis time it is decided  whether or not we should wholesale the vein  cle to a used cat broker, or repair and retail Ihe  vehn.il> locally  Potential customers lor the vehicles We decide  to sell locally are encouraged to ash a  salesperson to see a copy ol this inspection,  and may also speak directly tc the technician  who performed Ihe work WE HAVE NOTHING  TO HIDE FROM VOU.  All vehicles t9HU and newer com* wUh AT NO  CHARGE. A FORD MOTOH COMPANY  VARIABLE TIME AND DISTANCE |VTD)  POWERTRAIN WARRANTY This warranty an  plies to all makes and model! hut is backed by  Ford Motor Company  Depending on !h" year Ihe warranty runs from  3 monlhs/S.OOO km lo M monihs'20,000 km.  provided Ihe vehicle has no more than 160 000  km on Ihe odometer  Further, for nominal charges, you can warranty  your used vehicle for up to 2* monlhs'40,000  km One of our sales sla't can oive you full  details  if a vehicle does riot have a warranty with >l  our sales staff is instructed to ten you *<���< II  does not and the vehicle will be priced ap  Let Us Help Tall* the Guesswork Out of Buying a Used Vehicle  BUY WITH CONFIDENCE  'REMEMBER-  YOU MAKE US NUMBER 1  M i';..-:.m  'sJ-F*  ****************  1981 GRAND LEMANS  2 Door. V8 Automatic. Tilt  Wheel. Power Windows  51k #07-057-1  1983 LTD BROUGHAM  V8, Auto , P/Windows. 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Sechelt  885*3281  FORD ��� IINCOIN ��� MFHCURY  mwi  ���Hi  a��  amm  emMtk <*���  Coast News, January 4,1988  At II pm last Saturday night a full moon, a low tide, and below freezing weather give Gibsons Marina  an extra touch of magic in the new year. ���Ken Collins photo  First six months  1987 in retrospect  In January 1987, the year  started off on an optimistic  note, with Gibsons, Sechelt and  the Sunshine C'oasl Regional  District (SCRD) holding a  tripartite meeting to iron out  misunderstandings and seek  new avenues of communication.  Mayor Diane Strom and Bud  Koch, and Chairman Jim  Ourney agreed on a united  economic strategy front for the  upcoming AVIM convention.  They also agreed to adopt a  joinl approach lor a special  conference the premier had called on decentralization.  The month also brought  $153,502 grant to the  Tetrahedron Ski Club to build a  trail and cabin system in the  high country above the Sunshine Coast, and this area  received Community Futures  designation qualifying ihe Sunshine Coast lo receive millions  of federal dollars in loans and  grains with which to pursue intensive economic development  strategies.  fender Harbour residents  were being plagued by the  stench of rotting fish from the  nearby dump, Sunshine Heights  residents were up in arms over  herring pens and unsightly  debris which littered their  foreshore, and residents were  organizing to protect the Sechelt  Inlet.  Richard Tomkics resigned as  president of ihe Sunshine Coast  Tourist Association, the Sechelt  Seniors received their tax  number and the United  Fishermen and Allied Workers  Union was negotiating to take  over the Gibsons Government  Dock.  The School Board received  complaints of violence on the  school grounds at local elementary schools, which they promised lo investigate, and told  concerned parents at Chatelech  Senior Secondary that they  would pursue ihe funding  necessary to build the promised  extension,  Sechelt council circulated a  questionnaire asking citizens  their ideas and opinions on  recreational facilities.  The economic atmosphere  continued to improve in  February. A new tourism promotion group organized, calling  itself Travel  Sunshine  Coast.  They received a $15,000 grant  from ihe Economic Development Commission, as did the  new Small Business Centre.  The Roberts Creek Library  received a $14,000 grant to  build an expansion. Building  started on the new Jack and Jill  Preschool, and the Sechelt  Downtown Revitalizalion Committee received approval in  principle from Sechelt Council  for Phase One of their plan for  sprucing up the core of  downtown Sechelt.  Sechelt Council put a $5000  deposit on a 7.88 acre parcel in  downtown Sechelt where they  hoped to locate a recreation office complex, and the Sechelt  Seniors Association received the  first third of a $300,000 grant to  build a new hall.  Seven elk were let loose on  the Sunshine Coast in the hopes  that elk herds could be reestablished in this area, and the  provincial government,,after an  angry barrage of letters, reversed its decision to sell commuter  tickets in books of 20.  In the first election under its  own constitution, the Sechelt  Indian Band elected Tom Paul  as its new Chief.  Some tensions sprang up with  the flowers in March. The  school board announcement  that French immersion would  be located in Davis Bay Elementary School next term was met  with opposition from every  side. The final budget for the  Economic Development Commission caused friction with  both Sechelt and Gibsons, and  MP Ray Skelly expressed his  horror at the condition of the  Gibsons wharf during a visit  here, and promised to take the  matter up with the Minister of  Transport.  Area E finally got a Community Plan, residents at  Pender Harbour won a fight to  keep their dump open, and a  model of the proposed Gibsons  landing Theatre Project was  unveiled for the public. Valdy  performed a very successful  lundraising concert for the  theatre project.  Ray Skelly called for an audit  of the Aqua West books to take  a look at what had happened to  a $60,000 federal grant that they  had received.  Jim Price, of the B.C. Ferry  Corporation, announced that  the 10:30 ferry sailing would be  reinstated on May 15 and would  not be automatically cancelled  in the fall.  Whales were spotted frolicking all along the coast in April,  in waters which were finally  zoned W-l that same month.  The W-l zoning covered  foreshore from Port Mellon to  Wood Bay Salmon Farm and  exluded aquaculture as a permitted use.  The Sechelt Indian District  Government Enabling Bill was  given second and third reading  in the provincial legislature,  completing another major stage  in the self-government struggle.  The area received $37,500  from the Partners in Enterprise  Funding for 1986, which was  applied lor jointly by the two  municipalities and the Sunshine  Coast Regional District  (SCRD).  The Gibsons Lifeboard Station Society raised enough  money to lease a boat to cover  the waters around Howe Sound  and Gibsons, and Travel Sun?  shine Coast received provincial  approval lor matched funding  for everything they could raise  up to $91,000.  Please turn to page 12  Audition  On Tuesday, January 5 at 7  pm in the Roberts Creek Community Use Room Driftwood  Players will be auditioning for  their nexl production, Agatha  Christie's The Mousetrap.  Driftwood Players are looking for men in their 50's, an  Italian accent would bean asset;  men and women 25 to 40; and a  wonjan in her 5()'s. If there is  anyone out there interested in  directing this or any other production please come along and  discuss your ideas.  We have oilier productions in  progress for our fringe theatre  and welcome ideas and people  for further productions so if  there's some one-man-show for  instance, that your dying lo do  come along and tell us all about  it.  Wanl to make lurlher enquiries? Phone Nest al 886-7573  or Diane al 886-2469.  ^owuwj Cleotfljcce  Winter Fashions up to  30%  Ooff  Gibsons in  Continued from page 1  in December of 1988. An  Economic Development Officer  will be employed at the earliest  possible date and will report to  and be responsible to the EDC.  As well, the EDC Chairman  and/or the Economic Development Officer will report monthly, in writing and verbally, to  the two municipal councils and  the SCRD Board on budget  status, activities, results, successes, and planned projects.  i-'gan stated to the Coast  News that even though Sechelt  has decided to opt out of the  EDC for 1988 and will not be  contributing any monies to that  function, their participation is  still wanted and welcome.  Environment  Continued from page 1  "B.C. has one of the worst  records in Canada for enforcement of provincial environmental legislation," Rubin told the  reporter. "Bill Vander Zalm  won ihe Polluter Of The Year  award in 1987." That award is  made annually by the Canadian  Environmental Network al their  annual conference.  Rubin will continue to work  with other environmentalists  who are urging the government  to broaden the scope of the Act  before it is brought to the  House of Commons for  passage.  "The whole thrust of every  report, from the Brundland  Commission of the United Nations, to the report of the National Task Force of Environment and Economy, has been  that we have to deal with environmental protection on a  global basis. If we continue to  react on a country by country,  province by province, substance  by substance basis, then that  narrow vision will be our  demise," she warned.  IRIDOLOCIST, HERBALIST & REFLEXOLOGIST  (Certified Graduate of Wild Rose College of Natural Healing!  Indology is a science involving Ihe studv of the iris, which shows Ihe condition of all body tissue. This information is charted and can be of  assistance in determining Ihe root causes of many physiological and  psychological problems.  For More Information Phone 886-7626  RESOLUTIONS?  DIET  CENTER  offers  SOLUTIONS!  10 lbs. 2 wks.  17-25 lbs. 6 wks.  CALL TODAY FOR A FREE CONSULTATION  Phone  886-DIET  The  you've been waiting for!  Our once a year  CLEARANCE of ALL INVENTORY  Closed Monday, Inn. 4th  We open our doors  Tuesday, |an, 5th at I lam  PUPPY'S  Sunnycresl Mall  886-3866  Happy Urn 1��m  to all our  Customers, Friends, Neighbours  from  Ken. Debbie, Gwen, Gloria. LIE. Karen. Cathy. Christine, Gail. Joan. Denise, Jayna. Jamie  Goodbye to Gwen Nimmo  AwttUKCifl)  Special! VVmmm Vtim  otfpv  tfv*  Stationery  Office Supplies & Equipment  School Supplies  no*  Come In soon while selection is best  miGHT IN YOUR NEIGHBOURHOODS  Get it at the  PHARMASAVE  PRICE  POST OFFICE  UTILITY BILLS  Gibsons Ph.irmasave  Sunnycrost Midi  886 7213   "-��� ' u ���  ������MMM  aMMMiMlM  i ��� ��� i ii >��� t You could only see II on Ihe West Coast. Washing the rain water off driveways Is serious business here.  h ���Penny Fuller photo  .Bird Count '87  An excellent year  j: The 9th Sunshine Coast  ���,'Christmas Bird Count was held  ;^on Saturday, December 19. Six-  jteen participants (and three  jfeeder watchers) were split into  Jsix parties covering our count  'circle (a circle seven and a half  miles in diameter centred at the  ^highway and Hall Road,  I-Roberts Creek). Our circle thus  {stretches from West Sechelt to  JJPort Mellon.  ;- The weather was good for  Jbirding. There was light snow in  ���the morning and an overcast  ;afternoon. The temperature regained close to freezing all day  and the wind was calm.  I Coverage was also good with  ���sixteen observers in six parties  with each party led by a competent birder likely to know all the  species they met. With good  coverage and co-operative  weather we had an excellent  count this year with 89 species  recorded and 88S8 individuals.  This was our second highest  species count (1983-92).  Waterbirds, hawks, woodpeckers and passerines were all  abundant. We had particularly  high counts of Song, Fox and  Golden-crowned Sparrow,  Towhees, and Ruby-crowned  Kinglets.  There are always exceptions  to the rule, and Pine Siskins  were lower than normal.  The big surprise both on  count day, and this winter as a  whole, is the complete absence  of Red-breasted Nuthatches.  Some years, particularly in mild  winters, these birds remain with  us right through the winter.  The only other regular species  we missed on the count was  Ruffed Grouse. As usual we  also missed three or four potential species in the higher, snowbound elevations of our count  circle, and missed on the nocturnal owls despite some efforts  to find them.  Two new species were added  to our all-time count day total,  bringing the total to 121. The  new species were Common  Snipe and Hutton's Vireo.  All in all it was a very good  day which seems to stabilize our  average count on favourable  weather days at around 90  species. This year we found  almost all the common winter  birds of our area, quite a few of  the uncommon ones, but did  not find any rarities or unexpected species.  Vancouver's Christmas Bird  Count   was   on   Sunday,  December 25 and was plagued  for the second year in a row by  inclement weather, namely  heavy rain at lower elevations  and snow higher up. Final tally  was about 126 species, with the  best birds being two separate  Blue Jays.  Victoria's bird count was on  December 19 like ours and they  had perfect weather for a bird  count.  They took full advantage of  the weather and also the  presence of some real rarities in  the area to compile the all-time  high for a Canadian Christmas  Bird Count - 144 species,  wresting the title from Vancouver.  The really good birds on Victoria's count were Emperor  Goose, .yellow-bellied Sapsucker  and Palm Warbler.  We welcome all new  members to our Sechelt Marsh  Protective Society, Friday night  programmes, field trips and  other such events as the  Christmas Bird Count.  Members receive the monthly  Marsh Wrenderings and are  also registered as members of  the B.C. Federation of  Naturalists, receiving the  quarterly B.C. Naturalist.  Ik If , ���  Warming  yp to home comfort  savings  It's a welcome thought.  The more you know  ��� about energy conservation,  : the more money you'll save  ; on heating bills.  That's why the  I Government of Canada has  ' put together the ENERGY  : SAVINGS KIT. It has valuable  ! and up-to-date information  to help you build energy  efficiency into all your home  renovations, and increase  the resale value of your  home.  So if you're planning  to spend money on your  home this year, why not  plan on saving some? Get  the ENERGY SAVINGS KIT,  For your free copy, mail this  coupon to:  Energy Savings Kit, Home Energy Programs  580 Booth Street. Ottawa, Ontario KIA0E4  Please send me your free copy of the Energy Savings Kit.  I  .-J  ��� ���I  Energy, Mines and  Resources Canada  Hon. Marcel Masse,  Minister  Energie, Mines et  Ressources Canada  L'Hon. Marcel Masse,  Ministre  Canada  Coast News, January 4,1988  100% Locally Owned & Operated  Sunnycrest Mall  Gibsons  Prices effective:  Mon., Jan. 4  to Sun., Jan. 10  OPEN SUNDAYS  5 pm  9   ��,   I i15l  11 am  Medium  GROUND  BEEF  Bulk  FRESH 1  SAUSAGE k��� 3.95 , I  No Name  SLICED SIDE  BACON  g 5.93     lb.  kg  Fresh  RAINBOW  TROUTM  Florida Grown ��� Canada  #1 Grade ��� 28 oz Bskt.  FIELD  TOMATOES  Canada #1 Grade ��� Medium  COOKING  ONIONS  F.B.I. - Frozen Concentrated  341 ml Tin  ORANGE JUICE  Graves ��� Pure ��� 11. Ctn.  APPLE JUICE  Delsey - 4 Roll  BATHROOM  TISSUE  Miss Mew ��� 170 gm Tins  CAT FOOD  Unico ��� Plum or Crushed  796 ml Tin  TOMATOES  Liberty ��� 31. Jug  VEGETABLE  OIL  Campbell's ��� 284 ml Tins  TOMATO  SOUP  Catelli ��� 4 Varieties  1 kg Bag  PASTA  -������**  79  2.69  3.49  1.19  bag    ��� w W  .79  .89  1.59  .39  .99  2.99  2/. 89  1.39  "^ ��� ���" mm  WaWkwmm  Coast News, January 4,1988  George    in    Gibsons  Vancouver's Police Museum  by George Cooper, M6jg0  OLD VANCOUVER'S  SHADY SIDE  If you've read our Betty  Keller's On The Shady Side,  Vancouver 1886-1914, then you  are well primed for a visit to the  Vancouver Police Centennial  Museum, the city's newest,  opened not quite two years ago  in April, 1986.  "We wished to do something  special for Vancouver's centennial," said Joe Swan, the  museum's curator, "and what  better than this visual history of  'citizens in uniform,' 100 years  of Vancouver Police history."  Just retired from 22 years on  the Vancouver force, and latterly a columnist in two Vancouver  weekly newspapers, the West  Ender/Esst Ender, Joe Swan is  Roberts    Creek  Babysitter list  by Jeanle Parker, 885-2163  I've had a request for another  babysitter list. There are some  twelve and thirteen-year-olds  out there who are very eager to  give parents a night off and earn  some spending money.  So if you'd like work babysitting, please call me at 885-2163.  Don't be put off if you get the  recording on the answering  machine. Just give your name,  age, and general location you  live in: Marlene Road, the east  end of Lower Road, near "The  Pen" or whatever. Then people  can try to get a sitter close by  for the drive home.  This is for sitters living in or  very near Roberts Creek only  please, unless you have your  own transportation. Older people who can fill in during the  daytime, especially on short  nr,,,ve, are very much in de  mand so I'd like to hear from  them as well.  When I get enough names I'll  print a full list for parents to  clip out and save for future  reference.  1988 MEMBERSHIPS  Members wishing to retain  their voting rights in the Roberts  Creek Community Association  should purchase their 1988  memberships before the annual  meeting in March. New  members are also welcome.  Cards are available at the  Roberts Creek Community  Library or from Community  Association Treasurer Jacob  Chaban at 886-8541.  BROCHURE DEADLINE  Don't forget the deadline to  have your oganization's summer activities listed in the tourist  brochure is January 15. Phone  Carole Rubin at 885-7935 to  make sure you get all the  publicity you can.  a fitting choice for the curator's  position.  Besides the illustrated history  of the Vancouver City force  that h; compiled and published  in haift cover, the stories in his  weekly columns of past criminal  escapades in Vancouver have  just appeared in paperback, The  Police Murders ��� True Stories  from the Vancouver Police Archives.  Joe Swan said of Betty  Keller's book, On The Shady  Side, "I admire h> careful  research and the humourous  style of the book."  And he added, "Take a look  at the epilogue of her book, 'the  vices of Dupont Street only  flourished because of the  patronage of those who looked  for some excitement in their  respectable lives.'"  The museum displays are exceedingly well laid out for ease  of viewing: photos, large print  placards, mannequins, and  displays simply bring the place  alive.  The forming of the school  crosswalk patrols of pupils  trained by police took place in  1935 after there had been  several deaths at street crossings. There has not been an ac-  since. What happened in Gibsons, by the way, that led the  school board to dispense with  its pupil patrols which the  youngsters had conducted so  responsibly for years?  A poster concerning school  patrols used in those days had  this message: "Whenever you  see this sign, Mr. Motorist, approach the school the same way  you did as a child���slowly."  And from the pages of the  Point Grey police log, 1921:  Complaint of dog killing Mrs.  Scratchley's chickens; of  children molesting an adult  (throwing stones); of disorderly  children on a Sunday, "cautioned them".  And a lengthy entry by the  constable: "Looked in a window of the Point Grey hotel and  saw money and dice on a table  surrounded by men. Broke up  game. Proprietor said he didn't  know the game was in progress.  From the 1923 log of the  South Vancouver Police: an H.  Goddard, merchant of Commercial Street, complained by  mail on Monday that his store,  window had been smashed on  the previous Saturday night.  And a Mrs. Litcombe complained of a child throwing  rocks at her. Turned out the  child was three years old. Constable McKay warned the  child's parents. And a note  from the mental hospital, "A  patient named Wheelwright has  left the hospital without permission. When you see him, send  him back."  There was a bitter irony in the  life of P.C. Robert McBeath,  awarded a Victoria Cross for  single-handedly taking out  machine gun posts in a WW 1  attack, when he died by a shot  from an impaired driver.  A photo from 1935 shows the  mounted police squad clearing  rioters from Hastings Street.  Above the melee a shop canopy  with the sign, "Don't Argue���  Tobacconist".  Assistant to the curator of the  museum is Larry Davis, great  nephew of Vancouver's first  woman constable who joined  the force in 1912 when she was  almost 50 years old, and by  1920, had risen to the rank of  inspector.  Displays tell the story of the  s  LADIES FASHIONS  7 Racks  50% off  Fashion  Yarns  25 7<  Ooff  SALE ENDS JAN. 17  Just for you^  "\  OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK  Gibsons Landing  886-2470  police pipe band formed in 1914  under Duncan McTavish, and  of the mounted squad in 1910  and of the dog squad begun in  1958.  "Our museum is self-  supporting from donations and  from rentals of uniforms of past  years to movie and stage companies," said Joe Swan. "We  get no grants except the use of  this heritage building from the  city. There is no call on the taxpayer to operate or maintain the  facility."  "We are preparing an extension where some chilling  morgue scenes will be  displayed."  The museum is at 240 East  Cordova, adjacent to the police  station. Open afternoons in  winter with a souvenir shop that  has titles not often found  elsewhere. Telephone 665-3346.  TEEN CHOIR  Lyn Vernon's choir for ages  13 to 17 still has places for more  voices, and there are still a  number of bursaries available  for any deserving young person,  male or female. Phone  886-8026.  BONNE ANNEE  New Year joy to the Santa  who turned over his honoriums  to local good-deed projects.  Embarrassed to find this known  he said, "Couldn't let income  tax have it."  How You Can  STOP SMOKING  Permanently  by Ernest Caldwell  &o44<ifote$)  now at 277 Gower Pt. Rd.  Inent lo W��bb��r Photo)     888-7744  WEBBER PHOTO  TREASURE THE MOMENT  IN CHIN*  WE'LL MOUNT YOUR FAVOURITE  PHOTO ON A CHINA PLATE  ��� prtotollnlthlnfl ��� heya cut  ��� photocopying   ��� Konlca camera!  ��� films, flaahta A Iramia  ��� batlarlaa. ate.   ��� Paaaport Photoi  886-2947  275 Gower Pt. Rd.  Gibsons Landing  Happy New Year  SALE  455 Marine Or. 888-3812  Gibsons Landing.  Natural  Vitamins  &  Health  Variety ESS FOODS  Clblonilindlin. 886-2936  MARY'S  VARIETY  open 7 days a week  STUFFED TOYS  and  NOVELTIES  GIFTS  Dry Cleaning Drop Off  886-8077  Next to Shell Station  Cower Ft. Rd.  'Show Piece'  Gallery  ntxt ro  tht Qlbtont  Flirt Marital  CUSTOM FRAMING  ��� Oval Matting  ��� Dry Mounting  ��� etc.  280 Cower Pt. Rd.,  Gibsons Landing  886-9213  We reserve the right to limit quantities -)  We fully guarantee everything we tell  to be aatlafaetory or money cheerfully refunded...  Open 9 am 'til 6 pi  Your lOflBW hntn  jjfBBi  Viva  paper  towels       2O/1.00  Vivid ��� Liquid A   ,���*.����  bleach        ,2.00  Dare - Chocolate Cream  Bonus Pack  cookies    5<��9m2.00  Honeydew ��� Frozen  grape  drink       3��m,1.00  Kellogg's  Rice  Crispies   350 3m 2.00  MANY MORE  $ IN-STORE SPECIALS  GROCERY  Diane's -,.    ��^  taco chips  m 9m Z.59  Campbell's - Cream of Mushroom ^  SOUP 2S4m,.59  Nabob - Deluxe _     _ _  tea bags    2oosm2.49  Bee Cee - Creamed _        _  honey       ax, sm 1.79  Purex  bathroom  tissue Ss2.99  Carnation - Chunk Light  tuna        lS43m1.09  Bick's - Bavarian  sauerkraut SOD**, 1.29  Christie's Triscuit  crackers    25o9m1.55  Scottowels  Plus ft 1.99  Better Buy  lunch bags 25,2/.75  Sunlight  liquid  detergent      ,,1.97  Day by Day, Coast News, January 4,1988  Lucky Dollar Foods M  ���wer point road, gibsons landing     886-2257 FREE DELIVERY TO THE WHARF I   ���-/%,  FREE DELIVERY TO THE WHARF  CKY  LLAR  %ojmum Fowl Special  Prices effective:  Jan. 5-Jan. 12  Fridays  til 7 pm Sundays ��t Holidays 10 aim to 5 pm  Pacific  evaporated  mllK 385 ml ��� ���  ���  Peek Frean's - Assorted -*   A A  cookies      mamZ. Z9  Maxwell House  instant  coffee  .227 gm  ...454 gm  5.59  Sunspun - Long Grain _ _  HCe 454gm . OSJ  Arctic Power  powdered  detergent     15,1.49  t  BAKERY  Our Otun Freshly Baked  Assorted Flavours  cookies 6s.99  Weston's Homemade Style  White or Brown  bread  1.09  Burn's ��� Bulk  garlic coil  ib  Medium  ground beef   ��  Freshly Sliced - Baby Beef  liver  Fresh Bee/  short ribs  ./i.  No Name - 600 gm  Whole Unsweetened  i  FROZEN  T  No Name  strawberries     1.95    perogies  .lkg  Pepperidge Farms - Layer .     _ -^ Minute Maid - Grape/Fruit  cakes       3699m 1.49    punch 355  bananas  1.39  1.79  Jb.  .99  Fresh - Bone /n  chicken  breasts       -.��,, 2,69  Burn's - Sliced Cooked  hart! 175gmea.    1.89  1.99  Fletcher's  turkey  franks  .375 gm ea.  1.69  <  DAIRY  1.69  ml  .79   /b.     ���  Okanagan Fancy  Macintosh  apples  lb.  29  .39  Washington  bulk potatoes   0 ��w  .99  Florida Large ^ ^  tomatoes it .69  Better Buy . **  margarine 454 gm. 49  Kraft-500gm O   ft%  cheese whiz     3.79  Armstrong  cream  cheese      250 ami. 65  President's Choice - Cheddar  cheese  SliCeS 500 gm  3.69  I'M WELL AWARE  that It's the dawning of a new year and all that and I had made some  resolutions, one of which was culinary. (I was going to eat salad like  a mad March hare!) One ol the others was to enjoy getting up In the  morning. All that vanished when I glimpsed all that white trost outside through my half-closed morning eyes. When I eventually rose  from my cocoon I decided 'fuelling up' was the order of the day - to  heck with the hips!  GUARD'S PUDDING  1 cup brown breadcrumbs  3/4 cup suet  1/2 cup brown sugar  1 teaspoon baking soda  3 generous tablespoons raspberry |am  1 large egg  grated rind and juice of 1 lemon  1. Butter a 2-2% pint pudding bowl  2. Mix dry Ingredients. Stir In jam, lemon rind and juice. Then beat  the egg and add It.  3. Spoon the mixture Into the pudding bowl.  4. Butter some aluminum foil and cover the top of the bowl, allowing some room for the pudding to expand. Tie the foil on securely.  5. Steam the pudding for 2% hours. Don't forget to check the water  occasionally and add boiling water when necessary.  6. Remove the foil and turn the pudding out on a warm plate. Serve  with'a wine sauce, raspberry sauce or plain old custardl  And then, go for a long walk!  Happy New Year  NEST LEWIS  iv   at  ���*�����    ax     "     t1  Item by Stem, We do more for you in providing Quality ��r Friendly Service  MttAAAMkmi  ��� -  " - * ���  ���-���' '  ���   BAalMatt.^ <b Coast News, January 4,1988  Hnih waterfowl and local residents enjoyed Ihe fresh and frosty atmosphere of Sechelt Marsh over the  weekend.  ���Km Collins photo  Sechelt Seniors  Square dancers delight  by Larry' Grafton  COUNTRY STARS  In early December our  "Country Stars Square  Dancers" visited the Powell  River Starclusters for a  delightful pot-iuck supper.  Following the repast the two  clubs danced the night away  witli Larry Olscn of the Star-  dusters calling.  On the following morning,  the Country Stars were invited  lo the residence of Betty and  Larry Olsen for coffee where  they were treated to a home  video show of the previous  night's performance.  On December 18th the Country Stars held their annual  Christmas Party. Included in  the festivities were the student  dancers who are being taught  the intricacies of square dancing  by Harry Robertson and Cliff  Salahub. The evening was  rounded out with Christmas  carols   after   'Santa   Merrill  GIBSONS  LANES  Bowes' presented gifts.  The Country Stars Executive  for 1988 will be as follows:  President, Marvin Volen (partner Peggy); 1st Vice-President,  Ken Abram (partner Gwen);  2nd Vice-President, Vic Southin  (partner Gwen); Secretary-  Treasurer, Gwen Southin.  This   fine   Executive   have  plans for an excellent year of  dancing.    Their    motto:  "Everything great for '88."  THE ISLE OF MAN  Do we have any Manx men in  our organization, or on the Sunshine Coast for that matter?  One of our members sailed the  Irish Sea as a boy, with his  father, and has fond memories  of the Isle of Man. If you are  familiar with the Island and  would care to talk over past experiences, Bill Drummond is the  man to call, 885-2554.  MEMBERSHIP  We welcome Kay MacKenzie  home from Vancouver where  she underwent surgery in early  December. During convalescence, membership cards  will be available from Rita  Stansfield at 885-9534 or Flora  Gardiner at 885-5338.  The New Year is upon us and  membership in Branch 69 is due  and payable ($5) as of January  I, 1988. And you potential new  members, you'll receive a hearty  welcome if you join, along with  plenty of good fellowship when  you enter into the regular activities of the branch.  For you "50's and up", bear  in mind that support as a  member now, will stand you in  good stead when the magic  "65" rolls around. The combined Seniors organizations in B.C.  are in the process of fighting  now for conditions that will  govern your retirement conditions at that time. Your moral  support with a yearly membership will help.  LIFE MEMBERSHIPS  Over the years, certain people  in our branch have exerted effort over and above the call of  duty to the benefit of Branch  69.   The   following   list   of  members have been honoured  with life memberships: Emory  Scott, Grade Scott, Jim Derby,  Elizabeth    Derby,    Jean  Sherlock, Bert Sherlock, Iris  Corbett,   Ivan   Corbett,   Eva  Hayward, Dave Hay ward, Bob  Foxall, Elsie Elcheson, Connie  Wilson, Nikki Weber.  BRIDGE  Plans are underway for a  grand bridge competition at our  hall. I have been told that sixteen couples will be necessary  before the competition can be  arranged. If you enjoy the game  and wish to participate call Len  Herder at 885-2878 for further  details.  Sechelt  Scenario  Health unit  by Peggy Connor, 8*5-9347  Dr. Peter Reynolds who has  been holding the post of  Medical health Officer (MHO)  for the Coast-Garibaldi Health  Unit since Dr. Jim Lugsdin left  has chosen to take early retirement, he announced at the  December 10 annual meeting of  the Coast Garibaldi Union  Board of Health.  His replacement Dr. John  Hartley Smith also present will  be filling in until a permanent  MHO is picked for this area. I  Mayor Shirley Hen/y  represents Pemberton and the  Squamish-Lillooet Regional  District; Alderman Corrine  Longsdale the District of  Squamish; Alderman Lilian  Kunstler, the Town of Gibsons;  Alderman Joyce Kolibas, the  District of Sechelt; Alderman  Gary Rose, Powell River; Director Stan Gisborne, Powell River  Regional District, and Director  Peggy Connor, the Sunshine-  Coast Regional District.  School Districts are  represented by Shawn Cardinal  for #46; Margaret Cousins for  #47; and Celia dimming for  #48.  Election of officers saw  Director Peggy Connor reelected as chairman; Alderman  Corrine Longsdale elected Vice  Chairman; and Alderman  Lilian Kunstler Member at  Large. Accounting Director for  the Health Unit Diane Read  conducted the election.  Air quality in classrooms will  still continue to be addressed as  it is of great concern to the  Board of Health.  Department heads of staff  were present and answered  questions from board members  for a very informative meeting.  LEGION BINGO  Sechelt Legion Branch 140  starts up its Bingo again this  Wednesday. Everyone  welcome. And Happy New  Year to all.  Spinners  workshop  The Sunshine Coast Spinners  and Weavers Guild is sponsoring a Spinning Workshop,  January 15-17 by Judith  MacKenzie.  Judith is a fibre artist from  Victoria. At her 'Rumpelstilt-  skin Studio' she is developing  apprenticeship programs for  spinners, dyers and weavers.  She has given the spinning  courses at Malaspina College  for the past several years, and  twice a year holds a week long  retreat of spinning and weaving  at Fairburn Farms in Duncan.  The class will be limited to 15,  and the only requirement is that  you can spin a continuous  thread.  For more information call  Louise Hume 886-3752 after 6  pm or Guli Willeumier  886-8519.  Our   END OF YEAR SALE   We have a number of furniture oddments for sale at very reasonable  prices, IF YOU DO YOUR OWN PICKUP!  ANTIQUE OAK HUTCH *45000  3 Steel Desks    ea *150����  Dressing  Chest & Mirror     *145����  Minolta  Paper Copier        *375����  2 Keyboard  Hammond Organ *750����  Room Dividers   ea. *45����  Coffee Tables    ea. *20����  Chesterfield Suite *495����  Numerous  Office Chairs   from$20����  Super Single  Waterbed *275����  Complete with heater  'SECHELT CARPETS'  HWY 101, 885-5315  ^j>*u .^  anuary ^^  Clearance  50%  SAVINGS!  ��� Outer wear ��� Skirts  ��� Cord Pants ��� Sleepers  ��� Sweaters      ��� Tops  ...and much MORE!  Trail Bay Centre,   885-  Sechelt  Semi-Annual  SALE  Has begun!  Wonderful Savings  throughout the store  ^ia  a^aM^aM  IMMMMH Coast News, January 4,1988  Egmont News  Just in time for Christmas, John Armstrong of Egmont Fish Processing delivered 200 pounds of fresh farm raised sea trout to Petra  Detwiller of ihe Sechelt Food Bank. The donation was courtesy of  Ihe Angus family from Totem Oyster Sea Farms.   ���Km Collins photo  Davis Bay News ��t Views  Welcome, 1988  hy Jean Robinson, 885-2954  HAPPY NKW YKAR  Welcome to 1988! May it tea  healthy and happy one lor all.  Sue and Dill LeNeve were certainly the hosts with the most.  They put on a fantastic New  Years party at the Hall. Evelyn  Uushcll played the piano while  husband Jack was M.C. and  upwards of, 40 people danced  the night away.  BRIDGE  For all you fanatics who can't  wail another day, bridge is at  the Wilson Creek Hall on Friday, January 8, 1 pm.  Our good friend and  neighbour, Helen Heath who  has organized the bridge for a  number of years has suffered a  stroke. So far she is coming  along nicely. Get well soon,  Helen, we miss vou.  POT LUCk DINNKR  On Sunday, January 10,  1988, the annual Pot Luck Dinner and Tree Burning takes  place in the Wilson Creek Hall,  6 pm. Bring your old Christinas  tree, your family, a casserole,  plus cutlery and plates for a first  class friendly family feast.  QENERAL MEETING  The Ciencral Meeting of the  Davis Hay/Wilson Creek Community Association takes place  January II, 7:.W pm, at the  Wilson Creek Hall. Guest  speaker will be a Management  representative from Chevron to  explain about the Tank Farm  and safety measures.  THANKS  The Davis Bay Carollers were  out the rainy evening of  December 20. Their spirit did  not sound dampened as approximately 30 adults and children  serenaded the lucky residents.  Thank you all.  Also thanks to the Davis Bay  Parent Advisory Group for the  delicious lunch on December  17. This was expressly for  Seniors and many Grandparents  and Great Grandparents attended. Thanks to Tracy Francis, 1  was able to be there representing her absent Grandparents.  What a kind thing to do for our  Seniors.  TODAY'S HINT  If you are a cheque writer,  why not write 88 on a few of  them, just for practice and to  save some embarrassment later.  Drop oil you'  COAST NEWS  CLASSimiDS  al  Panlnaula MarKat  Davis Bay  "A Friendly Paopla Plao��"  ADULT UPGRADING  CLASSES  Study in the evenings at Capilano College.  Courses are tailored to fit your needs and  paced to match your speed.  Mondays  WRITING  Tuesdays  MATH ���  Express yourself with con*  f idence. Build your skills or  polish your style with John  Pass, a published writer and  experienced teacher of English to adults.  Muddled by metric? Franl-  ed by fractions? Whatever  your Math anxiety, let Julie  Southerst help you through  in her stress free math sessions.  Thursdays  BIOLOGY    What makes your body tick?  CHEMISTRY What are those atoms up  PHYSICS     to? Unravel some mysteries  of the natural world with  Elaine Futtermsn.  Glasses can  be taken  for general interest;  upgrading; or College credit towards Adult Saslc  Education Certificates.  For Information and registration, |  Capilano College, 6627 Inlet Avenue, I  Year's resolutions  by Ann Cook, 883-9253  LEAP YEAR 1988  New Year's resolutions, Leap  year, full moon and five extra  pounds to think about for this  first day of 1988. Such a  beautiful full moon this freezing  cold night. I find myself wrapped in a shawl and going outside  to moon gaze, star watch and  listen if the water is still running  so the pipes don't freeze.  Three times a day I have to  check a calendar to make sure  what day it is. I seem to confuse  very easily these years. I'll  blame the holidays for falling  on Fridays instead of Mondays.  BORN DECEMBER 19  Christmas week baby is  Jeremy Jacob Silvey, a brother  for Tyler and second son for  Rob and May. Grandmother  Dorothy now has seven grandsons and Lisa.  AROUND TOWN  The Thrift Store will be open  every Wednesday if you need  books to read or sweaters to  wear or just want to meet and  catch up on what's new. Goods  are always needed and appreciated if you are spring  cleaning early.  The Egmont Fish Plant has  been working and keeping quite  a few locals employed.  The Backeddy and Bathgates  are back on regular open hours.  The Fearn family are home  from a Honolulu holiday, all  sporting tans, though it rained  for several days while they were  there, (hmmmmmn tanning  clinics)  During December the Egmont Lions were good Elves.  Thanks to the folks that are  sending me postage stamps.  Happy January birthdays to  Rob Eutenier, Kenny Sharp 14,  Lisa D. O'Neil, David and Colleen Jensen, Sherrie Higgins,  Bob Rivard, Fred Larson, Kristi  and Stewart Hately, Sheelagh  Vaughan, Gunnar Jardine, and  the only three in Egmont Ron  K., Kelly K. and Rob K.  Selected Fashions At  tlariJjels  ^ FINE FASHIONS  Visa Teredo Square. Under Ihe Yellow Canopy  MasterCard Ncxl lo Pac,(ica ptl=���acy Mon. ��� Sat.  American Express 885-2029 10am - 5pm  a*a�� I   I  mimmm  MMa��*aliMa��aMaaW  ~ ' -���"'���   -   ������ -'  -   -   -   - ���e-Rflspapaj  ���^^s^asniBiea^aneiyaiBses^  ���^Mawn^aiavapBpB^ByepaaVB^a^a^  10.  Coast News, January 4,1988  Sunshine Coast  Services Directory  ��� APPLIANCE SERVICES*  ��� CONCRETE SERVICES ���  EXCAVATING  ��� GEN. CONTRACTORS*  m  SERVICE ft REPAIR  To All Major Appllancax   "Quality ReconditioneO Map Appliances For Sale  GOARANlEtD & DILIVERED  Will Buy Nice, Nun Wo'Mng Maiur Appliances  BJORN 885-7807 "  9ofa Hawibm  Ifir  Refrigeration &       IsSg  Appliance Service  BACK AT PRATT RU. 886-9959  AQUACULTURE SERVICES  ffla/ter^arine  (Conodo) Ltd.  MANUFACTURERS AND SUPPLIERS      I  of fish farms and equipment or supplies.  E Porpoise Bay Rd ��� Sechelt J  WSS "'' ~674|8BM10T7a.T65.4103>/  ��� AUTO SERVICES  flUTOPRO  ROWLAND BRAKE  & MUFFLER  LIFETIME GUARANTEE==  on Mulflers ��� Brakes ��� Shocks   Springs imobt vehicles)  FREE INSPECTIONS      ,M Wh���, S��  RENDER HARBOUR COLLISION      *  Complete Autobody Repairs & Painting  ^S    Auto Glass ��� ICBC Claims, etc.  you beho f/vr ��� we MtND 'CM  Mile Dow  j.iijtiii Bav Road  ���^8832606;  ��� BUILDING CONTRACTORS*  SEAWIND SPECIALTIES^  ��� Cupboards ��� Closets* Panelling  ��� Feature Walls*Built-in Furniture  ��� Basement & Attic Finishing  V SKILLED, CAREFUL WORK 885-9285,  ROOFING  bpeciali?ing In all types of  FREE       commercial & residential rooling  EST! MATES 886-2087 eyes.   JmSSL  POMFRET  CONSTRUCTION  for all aspects of  residential & commercial construction  885-9692   PO Box 623, Gibsons. B C  GIBSONS  ROOFING  > Repairs large or smoll of any type  Chris Robertson 886-9443 FREE ESTIfAATESj  cm: Swanson's  For: Ready Mix Concrete Sand ft Gravel  Dump Truck Rental  Formed Concrete Products  I Phone 885-9666 ��� 886-5333  Turenne  Concrete Pumping Ltd  ��� Pumping  ���loundatluns ���paIi05  ���Placing    ���Sidewalks    ���nool  ��� finishing   ���Driveways  ^  "������'^"on. 886-7022  n Ready Mix Concrete        ^. j j- ���    \  IXC Sand* Gravel   .   JWd  N r*    CONCRETE  *~i~\  LTD  Ml Mil TPIANI                                   GIBSONS PLANT   I  V      8B5-71BI) 866-6174        J  ELECTRICAL CONTR.  SEAVIEW ELECTRIC  a.        ^ ^ Plumbing 1 Heating Ltd.  Residential ��� Commercial ��� Industrial  Hmmtmtm    * Ma'"tenance & Design  tlBBIrin   ��� Ene'8�� Management  *'"" *���*   ��� Fire Alarm Systems  ��� B.C. Hydro Authorized  "Electric Plus" Contractoi ���  r��� FREE ESTIMATES���I  j    885-7142     T  Need this space?  Cilll  tin:  COAST   NEWS  ,it 88B ?62? <ii 88!, 39.10  Electric Plus  Authorized  B.C. Hydro  Contractor  ^eailde Ote  leaiide Clectric JiJ  Residential - Commercial - Industrial  Box 467, Gibsons, B.C.  VON 1V0  886-3308  EXCAVATING  Garry's Crane & Excavating  ��� Wheel & Track Backhoes ,t  ��� Excavating & Drain Fields     f,StVtS  ��� Clearing & Stump Disposal l$  9 Screened Topsoil - Fill  ��� Sand & Gravel  Deliveries  886-7028  BACKHOE and OPERATOR  Qualified In Septic Fields  Forming Driveways,  Landscaping  886-3445  Am  i/l       tup  RENOVATIONS WITH  A I0UCH OP CLASS  COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL  1 IMPROVER  urn  BOX7  HALFMOON BAV  885-50*9,  P&M EXCAVATING  Backhoe Service  ki*0Case NO JOB  TOO SMALL  ��886-2182 886-8363 J  HEATING  COAST BOBCAT SERVICE  Small In Size - Big In Production R&,  Yard ITwn Up      - Posl Holes %B  ��� Topsuil Cirdiel, Mulrli Spreading ^^^  Light Trenching ������������3  .  18857051   SECHELT .��<..<,,���,&;  "^  GR&H  ICG LIQUID GAS  ��� Auto Propane  ��� Appliances  ��� duality B.B O's  885-2360  Hwy tot, across St  from Big Mac s. Sechell  ��� MARINE SERVICES  iuv-*-  Need this space?  C.ill  the COAST  NEWS  .���1  886 K/7 or 88b 3930  ��� GEN. CONTRACTORS*  Contour Desigm  HOME PRODUCTS  Awnings ��� Railings ��� Vinyl Decks ��� Blinds ��� Hooring  ' 3Pa>���nbd    SHOWROOM BY APPOINTMENT 886-3191,  '55   Sutherland marine  V-jtdt ^^   Motile Marine ServlcB & Repair  MRRIHR       **��*����m rtCfPjnivrr  OUTBOARDS   Fact���J|y *uii>on*����d Sal���� * b��rvici*   "rX'^ZJ^'  ��� I'd'ls A Service lot all  snu.ai��iai  l      COHO MARWA. Mjuena Pa<k  julhort'fls ft slem n,,\  VHF7CB9  883 1119  J  0>'c  \5a&5��      ��bi  &uujb        * El��c  '    i ��\ ������       Contr  t    ����.    ' 886-3344  J CONSTABLE >*  CONTRACTING  Builder ��� Plumbing ���  Electrical ���  Hydio Electric Plus*  Contractor  TOM CONS1 ABLE   886-3364,/  Fine Tree Works  Pruning . Topping     (,ull>'lnsurect)  Danger Tree Removal  Landscaping &, Maintenance  ll.��'. .UviMlnk llennri,! Ikiliveiy.  NNti-4H!i4 Hi.liirKlrul.llllia (H'lli  ROLANDS  HOME IMPROVEMENTS LTD  ��� 5" Conlmuous aluminum gullets  ��� Aluminum soffits & lascias  ��� Built-in vacuum systems  ��� Vmyl siding  885-3562  Serving The Entire Sunshine Coast  Gibsons Call 886 3002 Paul Franske  Cornell's Marine Service  SERVICE TO All MAKES  Specializing In Merc Outboard  1 stern drire rebuilding  Located at  Smitty's Marina. Gibsons  ESTIMATES        SHOP886-7711     RES. 885-5840 .  ������**      Cott  Diur-h W1  FREE ^  Otvtl '" * Salt Walei Licences  JfcJL.i;  * Motel & Campsites  * Watei Taxi ���"*'  # Marine Repairs       * Ice and Tackle      883-2266  MISC SERVICES  6 7 &8 QOLDEnA  HEDGING EVERGREENS  '3��,lt  BLACK RICHMOND PEAT SOIL  8yds ileliverod inSuchell    CIRH  BARK MULCH  15 yds delivered In Sucheil   $270  COAST'S LARGEST NURSERt  30 ACRES OF PLANTS  MURRAY'S NURSERY        261-2151  Localed 1 mile- north of Hwy 101 on Mason Rd.    flflS-2974 ^  SECHELT IRONCRAFT  & FIX-IT SHOP  rCHAINSAWS^  SALES & SERVICE  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER &  CHAINSAW LTD.  I   HWY. 101 & PRATT RD.  888-2912 J  a^ft:  SCHNYDER WELD & FAB.  Welding & Repairs  8867303    885-4116  Sheehan Construction Ltd.  renovations and  general contracting  B Ldg  BC  VDN 1X0  8867830  ^-Skylights-  Brighten up those dark rooms  Increase the value of your home  \2 years experience  COASTAL CONSTRUCTION  886-2762  ��� CLEANING SERVICES ���  CHIMNEY CLEANING  -^  Top Hat Cleaning Systems  ' The Reliable Ptolesslonals''  886-8554  24 HOUR  ( SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon lo Ole s Cove  Commercial Containers Available  885-9973 886-2938J  ��� CONCRETE SERVICES*  Coast Concrete Pumping  l FOUNDATIONS  FREE ESTIMATES  John Parton    885-5537  ^j BC FERRIES  ^ Schedule  VANCOUVER  SECHELT PtNINSUl A  J181  RSESHOE BAY-LANOI  ni.  WINTER    SPRING '88  Effective Fri., Jan. 1 to  Thurs., June 23,1988  JERVIS INLET  EARLS COVE - SALTERY BAY  Lv. Horseshoe Bay Lv. Langdale  7 30 am       3:30 pm M      6 20 am     2:30 pm  9:30 M         5:30 8:30 M'     4:30  1:11 pm        7:25 M 12:25 pm M 6:30  9:15 8:20 M  M denotes Maverick Bus  M* denotes no Maverick Bus on Sundays -    -    ' ���   ���EXTRA SAILINGS- EASTER I EARLY SUMMER:  Lv. Horseshoe Bay ,, 30 Lv. Earls Cove  Lv. Langdale 10:30       Lv saltery Bay  Lv. Earls Cove  6 40 am       6:30  10:30 8:30  12:25 pm M   10:20 M  4:30 pm  Lv. Saltery Bay  5:45 am 5:30 M  9:25 M 7:30  11.30 9:30  3:30 pm  Etlective Thurs., Mar. 31 thru Mon., April 4 and Irom  8:20   2:30  7:35   1:30pm  Fri, May 20 thru Thurs., June 23  139  OMEGA  Tarminal  'Note theie will be no  "First Fairy'" run on Saturdays A Holidays  No Bus Service Sundays  '6:02  7:45  MS  11:45  1:40  3:45  5:45  Gibsons  Marina  �����:O0  7:47  ���:47  11:47  1:42  3:47  5:47  Sunnycreel  ���5:65  1:00  10:00  Lower  Bue  Shatter  IMINI BUS SCHEDULE!  Leaves Sechell  lor Gibsons  Trie Dock. Cowrie Street  Monday  8 40 a m  ���10 00 a m  1 00 p m  ��� 3 15 p m  Tuesday  8 40 a m  ���10 00 am  1 00 p.m  2 30 P m  Wednesday  8:40 a m  ���fOOOa.m  1 00 pm  ��� 3 15 pm  ���6:01  1:03  10:03  12:03  1:33  4:03  6:03  Thursday  8 40 a.m  ��� 10 00 d m  1 00 pm  2 30 p m.  Feiiy  Tannine!  ���6:10  6:10  10:10  12:10  2:05  4:10  6:10  Friday  8 40 a m  10 00 a in  3 |5 p m  Leaves Gibsons  loi Sechell  Lower Gibsons  Municipal Parking Lot.  Gower Pt. Rd.  9 15 am  '10 45 a in  ��� 1.35 p m  4 00 p hi  9 15am  1145 a m  1 50 p m.  ��� 4 00 p m  9 15 a m  ���10 45 a m  ��� 1 35 p m  4 00 p rn  9 15 a in  11 45 a m  ��� 1 35 p m  ��� 4:00 pm  9 15 a rn  10 45 a m  4 00 p m  LOWER ROAD" roule   via Flume Road, Beach Avenue & Lower Road  Suncoast Transportation Schedules Courtesy of  The New Owners ol  Gikoiu)  Ttwiefc  Travel Experts With Years Of Experience In Cruising, Airfares, Packages, Via Rail/Amtrak, &  Medical Insurance.       Call Us 1st  Sunnycrest Mall  886-8222, 886-9255, Res 865 5984  TIEKNEY & WHITE  CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS  BRYAN E. TIERNEY, C.A.  683-2167 (Residence 298-7713)  t^ ?Ut]l WATER S1REE1   VANCOUVER. BC V0B <M3  GREAT  PACIFIC   MANAGEMENT  ,   , CO. LTD. (EST. I%5)  ��� Financial Planning Service  ��� Investment Fund Aiieetalr W, Irvine  ��� RRSP's k "  ��� Retirement Int ome I unils      (<>"���*) 886-6600  ��� lax Shelters ������,,,. ,  .���. K���  ni!i  886-7359  Conversion   Windows,   Glass,  Auto  &  Marine   Glass, Aluminum Windows  & Screens, ,,      .     ��� _      _,      Mirrors  ,    Hwy 101 & Pratt Rd. ..  SUNSHINE KITCHENS  ��� CABINETS ���  886-9411  Showroom Kern's Plaza, Hwy 101  pen Tuesday to Saturday 10-4 pm  Centrally  Located  Close to: * Stores * Pubs * Nightclub *  Banks * Restaurants * Post Office  * Clean and Comfortable Rooms and Cottages  * Full Kitchen Units * Colour Cable TV  Ask about our weekly and monthly rates  Reservations Advised 886-2401  ^M  ��� -���-���--'���������--     ��� - :   ���  Coast News, January 4,1988  11.  Halfmoon Bay Happenings  New auxiliary officers  Regional District Chairman Peggy Connor, rolled up her sleeves and pitched In last week, running the big  machinery clearing the site for the new Halfmoon Bay Elementary School. The equipment operator  doesn't appear to be too worried about being replaced.  Pender Patter  Slow start to year  by Myrtle Winchester, 883-9302  A rather short Pender patter,  this first one of the new year. It  seems that this is the week that  everyone sits back, recovering  from the holiday, and gears up  for the year ahead. If you or  your organization are planning  new projects or activities for  1988, be sure to call and let me  know about them.  LIBRARY NEWS  The library (Pender Harbour  Reading Centre) re-opens from  its holiday closure on Tuesday,  January 5 at I pm.  January is the month to  renew library memberships;  the? are issued on a January-  December basis.  If you resolved to spend some  time in 1988 helping a community organization, call Blanche   Perreca   (883-9656)   and  volunteer at our new library.  AQUATIC CENTRE  For those of you who resolved to improve their physical  condition in 1988, the Pender  Harbour Aquatic and Fitness  Centre begins its new year on  January 9 with a public swim.  Next Monday a variety of swimming, lifesaving and fitness programs begin.  BOTTLE DRIVE  The Scouts, Cubs and  Beavers will hold their annual  Pender Harbour bottle drive on  January 9 and 10 from 9 am to  I pm.  This is the only fund-raising  event that the organization has,  and proceeds ensure that all  members can attend summer  camp and the annual skating  party.  Although the Scouts will collect door-to-door, they would  CHRISTIAN SCIENCE  SOCIETY P.O. Box 1514  Sechelt  Sunday Service &  Sunday School 11:45 am  Wednesday B pm  United Church Bldg., Davis Bay  8B6-790b 885-2506   .��.*.*   NEW LIFE FELLOWSHIP  NEW TESTAMENT  CHURCH  Services Times       Sun.. 10:}0am  MidWeek Wed.. 7:30pm  Youth Croup Fri. 7:30 pm  Women's Prayer       Thurs., 10 am  Pastor Ivan fox  885-4775 ol 885-2h72  Jft.�� A  THE UNITED CHURCH  OF CANADA  Sunday Woiship Seivices  GIBSONS  Classtord Road 11:15 am  SundaySchool it):(X)am  ST. JOHN'S  Davis Bay Mil) am  SundaySchool 9:30am  Rev. Alex C. Reid  Chun h Telephone 886-2333   *.��������>���.   GRACE REFORMED  PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  Morning Worship 11:1? dm.  St. Hilda's Anglican Church  Evening Worship    7 pm in homes  Wednesday Bible  Study 7:30 pm in homes  |. Cameron Fiaser, Pastor  885-7488  ALL WELCOME   at * * .   ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S  & ST. AIDAN'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  Parish Family Eucharist  Church School 10 am  Rev. I.E. Robinson, 886-8436  _jes��s US-  CALVARY  BAPTIST CHURCH  711 Park Road, Gibsons  SundaySchool 9:30 AM  Morning Worship Service 11 AM  Interim Pastor  Arthur Willis  Arlys Peters, Minister of Music  Church Office: 886-2611   .��.tl.��   GIBSONS COMMUNITY  FELLOWSHIP  Welcomes you to join us  in Worship  Prayer Sun.  9:30 AM  Morning Worship Sun.  10:00 AM  Wednesday 7:00 PM  599 Gower Point Road  Pastor Monty McLean  886-7049  THE SECHELT PARISH  of the ANGLICAN CHURCH  ��     ST. HILDA'S (Sechelt)  ^*%     8 am      Holy Communion  ^e*^     9:30 am      Family Service  ST. ANDREW'S (Madeira Parkl  11:30am BB5-50I9  Rev. lune Maffin  .��.��.,��  ANGLICAN CATHOLIC  CHURCH OF CANADA  ST. < OLUMBA OF IONA PARISH  8835 Redrooffs Ko.nl  2ml Sunday 10:00 Morning Prayer  11 :U0 Communion  ���llh Sunday   11:0() Morning Player  5th Sunday    1:30 Communion  the Reverend E.S, Gale  BB5-748I or 1.525-6760  Prayer Book Anglican  .��.��.��..  PENDER HARBOUR  PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  lagoon Road, Madeira Park  Sunday School 9:45 am  Morning Worship 11:00 am  Prayer t. Bible Study  Wednesday, 7 U) pm  883-2374 & 883-9441  Pastor Mike Klassen  Affiliated With The Pentecostal  Assemblies ol Canada  GIBSONS  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  New Church building on  School Road ��� opp. RCMP  Pastor Ted Boodle  SundaySchool 9:45 am  Morning Worship 11:00 am  Evening Fellowship 7:00 pm  Bible Sludy  Weds, at 7:30 pm  Phone  B86-9482 or B86-7107  Affiliated with the  Pentecostal Assemblies  of Canada   ���* ���* *   THE SALVATION ARMY  Next to Langdale Ferry  Sunday School  Morning Worship  9:45 am  11:00 am  free Pickup For Sunday School  In Gibsons Area  Phone 886-7232 or 886-9759  John & Bev Sludiman  We Extend A  Warm Welcome lo All  appreciate a phone call if you  have a large amount of bottles  or cans. Contact Linda Curtis  (883-2819) or Dennis Cotter  (883-9050).  GOLF CLUB AGM  The Pender Harbour Golf  Club will hold its annual general  meeting at Ihe club house on  January 9 al 2 pm. All members  should attend.  MUSIC NOTES  Pender Harbour's second  Capilano College credit course  begins on Monday, January 11  at the Music School at the Old  Ranger Station Cultural Centre.  In the 1,5 credit course, Commercial Harmony II (Music  104), Al Hawirko will continue  exploration of material introduced in last semester's  Commercial Harmony I.  For more information call  Capilano College Sechelt  (885-9310).  NEW DOCTOR AT CLINIC?  Some of you have wondered  about a new shingle hanging at  the Clinic.  Dr. Van Loon is still with us,  but as Dr. Ariel Boilen since her  marriage lo Ken Boilen on  December 13.  Congratulations to them  both.  by Rulh Forrester, 885-2418  The Halfmoon Bay branch of  the St. Mary's Hospital Auxiliary recently held their installation of new officers for the 1988  years. Installation took place at  the Christmas luncheon with installing ceremony by Joan  McLeod, retiring Hospital  Board Representative.  Jean Mercer is President with  Marjorie Ross, Vice-President;  Evelyn Harrison is Secretary;  Margaret Engstrom, Treasurer;  while Thrift and Gift Shop  representative is Gladys White.  Extended Care Unii representative is Dianne Flynu and Olive  Coniyn is Social Convenor.  The raffle was also drawn at  the lunch and the lucky winners  were: Gladys White, who won  the grandfather clock which was  donated by Bill Dolmage; and  the second prize which was a  beautiful hand crafted ceramic-  canister set made and donated  by Joan Clarkson, was won by  W.K. Keddy of West Vancouver.  CELEBRATIONS  The New Year was celebrated  in style at the Welcome Beach  Hall when almost 50 friends and  neighbours gathered for a really  great evening of good food and  fun. Everyone enjoyed dancing  to the music provided by Bill  Vorley.  Yours truly and family were  not able to join the group for  this occasion as tradition has it  that New Year must be brought  in at home with family and  friends. Sure saves having to  drive home. But our New Year  was a night of music and singing  surrounded by special people,  all of whom helped make it a  memorable occasion.  The highlight of the evening  is when piper Ken Collins marches in at midnight to greet the  new year and when we all join  hands for the singing of Auld  Lang Syne.  Despite the fact that we have  now lived in Canada for some  36 years there's still a wee yearning for our ain folks at the  midnight hour on Hogmanay.  But it is thankfully a brief moment of nostalgia which is soon  remedied by the good friends  jwho join with us and who help  make it a happy occasion.  Part of the holiday break was  spent at Whistler, therefore  your correspondent has kind of  lost touch with what has been  happening at Halfmoon Bay.  So if you have anything for this  column   I   would   appreciate  hearing from you.  In the meantime - a guid new  year tae yin and all, and mony  may ye see. Those are the first  lines of a song which mean - a  good new year to one and all,  and many may you see.  LONDON  on  MANCHESTER  iWardair  CANADA  Buy a ticket to any Wtrdilr  destination In Canada and GET  YOUR 2ND TICKET FOR  $5Qfi00 $19.88  " " "   " Book by Jan. 11 tor travel trom  Jan. 12 to Apr. 30186.  Call your travel experts. Bill or Joan, at   Gikm Imd  RES: 8855984  886-8222  Sunnycrest Mall     886-9255  Light follows darkness and grief-grown clouds do  vanish .      but in a storm ot sorrow who remembers?  We do, your Inends ..   let us lead you through this darkness.  You can depend on us for support and consolation  ... we understand your needs.  You know us . . . our assistance is jusl a phone call away.  \ 1665 Seavie*  \ Gibsons  *. ���' DA. DEVLIN  886-0551  Halfmoon Bay students  get new soccer field  Students attending Halfmoon  Bay School will be playing soccer next season on a new, improved field which will eventually be surrounded by a six  lane, all weather track. The  School Board has agreed to a  proposal put fortlt by the Halfmoon Bay Recreation Commission to angle the field in such a  way that it lies on a small portion of Connor Park.  This adjustment would provide the space necessary to accommodate the track, which the  Regional District will be responsible for developing.  The existing field will be  enlarged to accommodate face  to face ball fields 210 feet by  750 feel in size, and a map  showing future plans for  development indicates that  eventually there will be tennis  courts and a picnic area nearby.  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  at  B & J STORE  in Halfmoon Bay  until noon Saturday  "A Friendly Paopla Placa"  Notice Board  Gibsons Business 4 Professional Women's Club next dinner meeting January 11,  1988 al 6 30 pm al Omega Restaurant Guest speaker Alison Leduc.  Sunshine Coast Peace Committee meeting will be held on Monday. January 11 at  7:30 pm at Roberts Creek School library Everyone welcome.  Tetrahgdon Ski Club General Meeting January 7.7 to 9:30 pm. Roberts Creek Community Use Room New members welcome  Gibsons Public Library Assoc. Annual General Meeting January 18 at 7:30 pm in the  library  Sunshine Coast Equestrian Club (loimerly Timber Trail Riding Club) will hold its lirst  Open General Meeting January 7, 1988 at 7:30 pm in Roberts Creek School. All  members please atlend. non-members ate welcome. Memberships are due. Call  885-7243 tor further info.  Sschelt Marsh Society guest speaker Kevin Bell from Lynn Canyon Park Ecology Centre. 7:30 pm Eriday. January 8. at Ihe Arts Centre.  Volunteer Drivers urgently needed lor all areas to lake seniors and the physically  disabled lo medical appoinlments boin locally and in Vancouver. Expenses reimbursed. Other volunteer |0bs also available. For more information call VAC 885-5881.  I  TOURIST AND RECREATION GUIDE  IfaHQ* % O*  COZY UP WITH A BOOK!  ��� Craft Books ��� Woodworking ��� Cookbooks  ��� '88 Calendars ��� Cards ��� Gilt Wrap  =TALEWIND BOOKS*  5693 Cowrie Sired   Srilit-li  Come  Down eh*  &  Browse  280 Gowai Point Kd . Gibsons Landing  Fine Art - Art Supplies - Gifts  Walortront, Gibsons  . SMALL BOAT RENTALS  . SCUBA AIR  . TACKLE, MARINE, GIFTS  . CHARTS & BOOKS  GIBSONS marina  A  CANOE RENTALS  ��� Row Boat Rentals  fLlk' rsgO't 883-2269  BOAT RENTALS  ��� Fishing Gear Rentals  ��� Air Tanks  FISHING & DIVING CHARTERS  FISHING GUIDE  cLowes flesort^Motel  Camping & R.V. Sites Pender Harbour   883-2456  Le\suref^e???  Come - meet the artists of  Shadow Baux  - paintings - wearable art - pottery  - fine art prints  Cowrie St., Sechelt  BBS-7606 Coast News, January 4,1988  Clearing has now begun on the site of the future Senior Citizen's Activity Centre located behind the Arts  Centre in Sechelt. -to CoUhu photo  1987 in retrospect  Continued from page 4  Parents' protests at the  relocation of the French Immersion program brought results,  and the school board reversed  their decision.  The Chairman of the Sechelt  Celebration Days Committee,  Joe Benner, resigned when  Sechelt Council refused the  committee a special licence for a  beer garden during the  festivities, in spite of a petition  signed by local businesses, overwhelmingly in favour of it.  The Gibsons Economic  Strategy was unveiled. Seen as  crucial to the development of  Gibsons, was the development  of a first-class waterfront hotel.  Also seen as important were the  proposed theatre development  in lower Gibsons and Joe  Belanger's proposal for the  reconstruction of Captain Vancouver's vessel, HMS  Discovery.  As days grew longer and  warmer in May, Gibsons council began to get complaints  about rowdy youths on public  beaches, and Sechelt Council  debated whether or not porta-  potties would relieve visitors'  problems in Tuwanek.  Larry Reardon was appointed wharfinger at Gibsons  wharf, Sechelt bought  Rockwood Lodge, and Egmont  got a Lions Club.  Between the two  municipalities, over $20,000 was  raised toward Rick Hansen's  Man In Motion fund.  But the Sechelt Downtown  Revitalization Committee ran  into conflict with Mayor Bud  Koch, and the month ended  with the committee threatening  to disband. Some of the problems were resolved early in  May, with some meetings that  resulted in Mayor Koch agreeing to have the required by-law  drafted.  June also saw the hiring of  Corby Coffin as executive director of the Gibsons Landing  Theatre project.  Sechelt received proposals  from various groups who  wanted to use Rockwood  Lodge, and passed a by-law  allowing them to purchase the  land parcel designated for use as  a recreation/office complex for  $550,000.  Meanwhile a foul atmosphere  surrounded Gibsons as the  sewage treatment plant  malfunctioned   sending   an  MORTGAGE UPDATE  Jan. 1  6 mo.  1yt.  2yr.  3 yr.  4��r.  5yr.  lit  9.75  10.25  10.75  11.25  11.50  11.75  2nd  11.25  11.75  12.25  13.25  V.R.M.  9.75  Professional Real Estate Service  Stan and Diane Anderson  (Off.) (85-3211 (Rn.) 885-2385 Vancouver Toll Free: 684-8016  Anderson Realty Ltd., Sechelt  7I^EWST0C,(  =VIP and GE APPLIANCE SALE on now!=  Furniture And Appliances  5651 Cowrie Next To Sechelt Supermarket. 885-5756'  odoriferous  cloud   over  the  neighbouring residents.  Taxpayers expressed their  displeasure loudly, at the increase in school taxes. Gibsons  received a grant to study the  feasibility of expanding the  town's boundaries, and the  Regional District was told that  there would be no second Minibus this year.  Buddy Knox played for a  fundraising dance for Sechelt's  new leisure centre, and while  everyone enjoyed themselves,  the endeavour lost money.  Owners of Casa Martinez  were told that the first step to  receiving a zoning change that  would enable them to open a  neighbourhood pub, was to  hold a public hearing.  Mayor Bud Koch, in addressing the crowd at a gala opening  of the Gray Creek Hatchery, of'1'  Aquarius Seafarms, described  Sechelt as "The town that dared  to say fishfarming is the way to  go."  Some disagreement arose,  this month, between the SCRD  and Sechelt Council, both of  whom claimed jurisdiction over  the foreshore in David Bay.  Meanwhile residents opposing  commercial development zoning proposed in Davis Bay and  Tuwanek, delayed passage of  the Sechelt Community Plan.  We'll take a look at the last  six months of 1987 next week.  Shaske upset  by ferry loss  by Ken Collins  The 10:30 ferry sailing from  Langdale to Horseshoe Bay was  discontinued December 31 with  no more notice than the fine  print on last year's schedule and  SCRD Director John Shaske is  angered.  As well as believing the  residents of the Sunshine Coast  have been misled into thinking  the 10:30 sailing was to be reinstated for the entire year, he  believes the Ferry Corporation  is losing revenue by not making  the run.  "It was well utilized," said  Shaske. "It only costs $600 to  make that run," he continued,  pointing out that the staff are'  already there so the only additional costs are that of fuel and  approximately 30 vehicles  should pay for it.  Shaske also believes that the  people who utilized the 10:30  sailing Would not necessarily  take another sailing.  "I personally have taken the  10:30 sailing eight times since it  was re-instated," he said and  added, "but only two of those  times were essential." He said  he took the other six trips only  because the 10:30 sailing time  was handy. Otherwise he would  have stayed home.  As far as can be determined,  new schedules without the 10:30  sailing on them were not issued  until January 1.  Save on beautiful  Richmond Carpets that will  stay beautiful for years with a  minimum of care. Using the  most advanced technology  available like DuPont STAIN-  MASTER Carpet fibre, these  Richmond "Carefree" Carpets  have been designed and manufactured to present the look of  luxury you want, while resisting soiling and staining.  Hurry! Our special pricing for Richmond "Carefree" Carpets is for a  limited time only! .�����__��  CARPET  ARGUS  Level Loop      Reg. ��9�� sq. yd.  This Weak:  $595 8. $6  95  sq. yd.  DIANNA  Great Rec Room Carpet  ��� Reg. ���9" sq. yd.  $795  This Weak-     '  eg. yd.  CHAPPARAL  Kitchen Print Waterproof Backing  means easy clean up of spills.  Reg. '14" sq. yd.  This Week  $11  95  sq.yd.  BALLERINA  Level Loop Print  With Action Back  Reg. ��14M sq. yd.  This Week - In Stock -  $6  95  sq. yd.  RICHMOND  Roll Ends  Reg. up to ��29��  This Waak - In Stock -  $9  95  K).y0.  STARSCOPE  Beautiful Cut & Loop  Reg. ��25"  $1695  This Waak ��� In Stock -      IWn yd.  SOLUTIONS'  Stainmaster Saxony  ���OTHER INSTORE SPECIALS1  TUES.-SAT.,  9 am - 5 pm  Layaway The Sunshine  Coast News, January 4,1988 13.  Second Section  4987 - A RETROSPECTIVE*-  ������ -   ���T������*�������������������- 14.  Coast News, January 4,1988  Pntjes From A Life Locj  Argentinian guitarist Guillcrmo Fierens, will be performing this  week at the Twilight Theatre in Gibsons. See story below.  Countryside Concerts  Fierens plays  The ley idary Spanish  maestro Am res Sei ia, who  died last ye; , left a ir pupil  and protege . You can hear this  Argentinian guitarist, (miller-  mo Fierens, at 2 pm in the  Twilight Theatre, January 10.  A few seats are expected to be  available al the door from 1:30  on performance day. Limited  seating is also on sale lor the  three subsequent Countryside  Concerts: George Zukerman  (bassoon) with Leslie Janos,  piano, February 7; Rivka  Golani (viola) and Kum-Sing  Lee, piano, March 13; and the  Tafeli nslk I. roque Orchestra,  March 20.  For ticket information, call  886-251.1. Mo if not all of  these concerts    ?i be sol   out  ahead of lime, i  main for '.he I  cerl, so del.i\ li  I 25 seal i re-  lt rusik con-  ladvisable.  Guillermo I lerens is fast  establishing himself as a legend  in his own right. Now living in  Italy, Fieren ' musical activities  concentrated in  and the rest of  Latin America.  . his llrsl major  in tour.  i said 'his of his  lanci ai the  Edinburgh in  1983: Aspiring musicians,  whatever their instrument,  would do well 10 study the quiet  poise an authority of his per-  and the sensitivity  h hi subordinates his  . Ii rique lo the in-  ie music.  I be difficult to imagine a more lining tribute to  the late Andres Segovia than  this recital by his pupil Guiller-  are   mainl  Great Brita  Europe  This ye  North  The  debut  Queen,   II  formani  with wh  prodigic  terpretf  "It w.  mo Fierens," said the Sutton  t'oldfield Observer of his performance last year during the  Lichfield Festival.  Fierens' program will include  five Renaissance pieces, a Bach  Chaconne, Sor's Theme and  Variations, Opus 9 and music  by the Brazilian composer Villa  Lobos. It is an event not lo be  missed by anyone interested in  music.  Cultural  calendar  This weekend, and early ne.u  week, look for the Winter/  Spring '88 Calendar of Cultural  Events, highlighting concerts,  plays, art exhibits, films, studio  visits, children's programs and  special events etc. that will be  taking place on The Sunshine  Coast between January I and  May 30, 1988.  The Calendar includes information on times, places, admission, contact persons, and a  brief description of the events,  It is available, free of charge, it  your local bookstore . art  galleries, info-centres am. om-  munity markets.  Be sure to pick up yo  early, to have the late- information on Coast Cultural  Events at your fingertips. Hist  up in the New Year is the Countryside Concert presentation of  classical guitarist Guillcrmo  Fierens, January 10,2 pm at the  Twilight Theatre. For ticket  information, please call  886-2513. Happy New Year  from your Arts Community  Coordinator!  Road to Renata  by Peter Trower  For my money, the fall is the  best season of the year and  undeniably, the only sensible  time to travel. It is early  September and appropriately  autumnal when Yvonne and I  set out again for the BC  hinterlands. It is our second  odyssey in six months and it will  prove even more fascinating  and rewarding than our first excursion. The trees are a fantasy  of green and gold and winter  hides in the hills.  We make our first stop in  Princeton for an excellent  brunch of sausages and mash at  a place called the Mini-Chef.  The cafe has been the subject of  considerable recent news  coverage, due to its policy of  employing the mentally handicapped. Princeton itself seems  lo have undergone a major attack of civic pride since our last  visit. There are signs of renovation everywhere and formerly  drab buildings gleam with fresh  coats of paint. The old town  looks infinitely better for the  facelift.  Originally, we had not intended to spend much time  around the Princeton area but,  on checking with the Information Bureau, we learn there is a  derelict town named Coalmont  and an authentic ghost town  named Granite City, up a valley  several miles to the northwest.  We had no idea there were any  ghost towns in the immediate  region and feel compelled to investigate.  The route to Coalmont, as  might be expected, is not exactly  the best piece of highway we  have ever travelled. It winds  along the side of the valley like  the Burma Road, dwindling to a  single lane in a couple of places.  The roadbed is shaley and  unstable, shored up with cribbing at various points. Awesome  gulfs yawn frequently to our  left. It is a road to negotiate  with caution.  Coalmont, when we finally  arrive there, proves lo be a sort  of living relic, a burned-out  mining town whose days of  grimy glory are very much in the  distant past. A sign at the  town's outskirts announces that  the place is inhabited mainly by  bachelors who keep odd hours  and don't appreciate travelling  salesmen. Since we are not peddling any particular merchandise, we feel safe in entering this  strange community.  Coalmont reminds me of  Cumberland on Vancouver  Island, Vananda on Texada,  and other enclaves of yesteryear  that have fallen upon threadbare times. II is a mixture of  new buildings and old boarded-  up stores and defunct meat  markets. The original Coalmont  Hotel is still in operation  however, as is the town's one  general store called the Coalmont Emporium. This facility  (which incorporates a liquor  store) is one of the ost off-the-  wall operations I have ever encountered. Tl shelves are half-  bare of cor libles and the  freezers arc empty, A third of  the building s occupied by a  cafe with no customers. There is  a pool tabic at one end. The  Emporium appears to be an all  gathering place that ex-  heer nerve and little  he laid-back operator  that Granite City is  nit half a mile behind  purr  ists on  moi i.  infoi i  locale1  ihe town  We to  off up a back road  Let's Start the Year Bight |  THIS WEEK'S   IJECIAL  PRIME  RIE  $Q95  with all the trimmings  Cedar Plaza  Gibsons 886-3138  ��� 2 locations to serve you  Dolphin Mini Mall  Sechell 885-1919  PRONTO'S  and strike the ghost town, or  what's left of it. Vandals have  had their way with legendary  Granite City. A few sagging log  buildings slouch in a lonesome  meadow beside the once lucrative river. Even the cairn,  erected by the provincial  government, has been savaged  and the plaque is gone. Nonetheless, there is a definite aura  to this bleak place that once, for  a brief time in the 1890's was  the third largest city in BC.  Phantom miners haunt this field  and you can almost hear the  roar of celebration from long  demolished saloons. History  sings here.  There are myths aplenty  about this place. The stream  was unique in that its gravel carried platinum along with the  gold. At the time of the strike,  platinum was not recognized as  a precious metal and most of  the miners discarded it. One  canny old Norwegian, however,  collected a bucketful of the  mineral and buried it somewhere in the meadow. That  bucket is now worth many  thousands of dollars. Hopeful  treasure hunters have been searching for it ever since and the  field is dotted with fruitless pits.  Granite City is a convergence  point of old memories. Part of  the old Fur-Brigade Trail snakes  through the woods above it and  close to it lies the town's old  graveyard. This final resting  place is still used by the inhabitants of Coalmont and new  graves mingle with ancient ones  among the whispering trees.  Granite City has yielded up  what is left of its magic to us.  We zigzag back along the cliff-  hanging road to rejuvenated  Princeton and continue our  sidetracked journey through the  autumn boondocks.  To be continued...  Gibsons Legion ��4r  Branch 109  Back by Popular Demand  PETER  LONDON  Jan. 8th & 9th  Members & Guests Welcome  $��% fop* 1nii  r~We will be CLOSED until -/�����.    \v  Wednesday, January 20th \-i  ^ Hwy 101, Secret Cove 885-7184 (?  From London. Ontario  to London.  ALLIED  The Careful Movers  In a day when personal service seems like a chapter from history,  you'll be pleased with Allled's genuine concern. Call us. We'll  make a helpful house call...right away.  LEI WMY'S TRANSFER LTD.  Cuitom picking, storage, local * long distinct moving.  HWY 101, GIBSONS       ^finKR" 886-2664  H0YERE OPP OC LENGERE FREM  FLY.*.in style!  Please make your travel arrangements with the friendly professionals at  Sunnycrest Mall       Res: 885-5984 886-8222    886-9255  That great FITNESS feeling  has never been so INEXPENSIVE  Use of WEIGHTS. BIKES. SAUNA  1 MONTH FREE  when you buy 3  (Thit'i right: 4 monlha for the price of 3)  Sign up before January 18  Existing memberships may be  extended at this special price.  OPEN WEIGHTS:  Mon. - Fri. 4 - 9 pm  Saturday 1 - 4 pm  Sunday 7-9pm  ��� Weights  ��� Showers  ��� Lounge  ��� Sprung Aerobic Floor  ��� Sauna * Massage  ��� Juice Bar      ��� Tan Machines  This year make your New Year's resolution COUNT  4  5T  THE WEIGHT ROOM  & FITNESS CENTRE  North Rd.,  Gibsons  886-7675 Coast News, January 4,1986  15.  Highland piper John Webb escorts the Davis Bay New Year's Day  swim participants to the water's edge. ���Km Collins photo  On the Arts Beat  Ensemble performs  The Sunshine Coast Arts  Centre's season opener for 1988  has beguiled audiences wherever  they have performed. The  Robert Minden Ensemble will  present their "Musical Saw and  Other Crazy Instruments  Show", a combination of music  and storytelling, at the Arts  Centre on January 16 at 8 pm.  In this unique evening,  Minden creates a kind of  magical state as he joins personal narrative, ancient tales,  and dreams with the healing  power of sound performed on  instruments as varied and  unusual as the musical saw,  conch shell, vacuum cleaner  hose and water phone.  Robert Minden created the  Ensemble in 1982, beginning a  professional collaboration with  his two daughters, Andrea,  flutist and extraordinary left-  handed spoon player, and  Dewi, trumpeter and musical  arranger. They are joined by  Carla Hallett, a french horn  player who has combined horn  playing techniques and im-  provisory skills to develop one  of the most elemental sounds of  the Ensemble: the conch shell.  They delighted audiences at  Expo and have collaborated  with Freddie Stone on a recent  jazz album Minden, Canada's  foremost musical saw player,  has composed and performed  with several dance companies,  the Berkeley Symphony Orchestra and Green Thumb  Theatre.  The members of the Ensemble are excited about sharing  their music with the Sunshine  Coast in a setting with the  acoustic and visual qualities of  the Arts Centre. Tickets for this  musical experience are $7 at  Talewind Books, Seaview  Market (Roberts Creek), the  Arts Centre, and the Hunter  Gallery  Channel Eleven  Tuesday, January S  7.00 p.m.  Gibsons Council 'Live'  Gavel to gavel coverage of  the Gibsons Council meeting  'live' from Gibsons Council  Chambers.  Wednesday, January 6  7:00 p.m.  'Live' Phone-In  The broadcasting students  from Elphinstone Secondary  School (ESP TV) bring you a  new series of programmes to be  aired on Wednesdays. The first  show in the series deals with the  proposed peace curriculum. The  Peace 2000 Club at Elphinstone  holds a discussion on the Global  Studies proposed curriculum  with host Amanda Stubley and  guest teachers Jack Pope and  Fran Jovick.  Thursday, January 7  7:00 p.m.  'Live' Phone-In  Talk to your Local Government  The first in a monthly programme  that   will  allow  the  viewers to talk to members of  their local government. Al Price  hosts the first show with invited  guests Gibsons Mayor Diane  Strom,   Sechelt   Mayor   Bud  Koch and new Regional Board  Chairman   Peggy   Connor.  Topics of local concern will be  discussed and viewers are invited to phone in with their  views and questions.  7:50 p.m.  Kinsmen Mothers March  The first of two short programmes  dealing   with  this  year's Mothers March.  8:00 p.m.  New Year's Resolutions  'Live' Phone-In  Eleanor   Mae   and   Muriel  Haynes join Dianne Evans to  talk about New Year's resolu  tions.  Viewers are invited to  phone in during the programme  to talk about their resolutions.  8:30 p.m.  Continuing Education  Continuing   Education  Coordinator Mary Pinnager brings  us some of the highlights of the  spring session.  9:00 p.m.  Kinsmen Mothers March  Amanda   Stubley   talks   to  Kinsmen President Barry Stein  about   their  efforts   for  this  year's Mothers March.  Looking In  Australian Saga  Montague Royal  Since the puzzling but  hauntingly-beautiful Picnic At  Hanging Rock was released in  the early I970's, the Australian  film industry has become an increasingly important force on-  the world scene. Such pictures  as GalUpoli, The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith and Breaker  Morant, have enjoyed both  box-office success and critical  acclaim. The reason for this,  apart from high-quality work in  all departments, has often been  attributed to Australia's extreme isolation. This remoteness  has caused them to develop in  different directions from other  countries and gives their films a  unique quality.  The Australian television industry has been no less innovative. They have produced  several mini-series that rank  with the best British efforts in  this area. One of their most-  impressive accomplishments is a  13-part epic called Against The  Wind, shown briefly in this  area, a couple of years back and  soon to be available on VCR.  Against The Wind was the  brainchild of screenwriter Bron-  wyn Binns. As a girl, growing  up in the Castle Hill area of  New South Wales, she heard  many tales of the convict days  in the early 1800's. Years later,  she returned to Castle Hill and  did extensive research. Gradually, she conceived the story of an  Irish girl transports and her  English convict husband who  managed to weather those  brutal and turbulent times.  With the help of a fellow writer,  Ian Jones, Binns fleshed out the  concept into 13 one hour  segments and sold it to  Australia's Seven Network.  They hired an expert cast,  spared no expense on the production and eventually turned  out something of a minor  masterpiece.  The basic plot of Against The  Wind is too sprawling to more  than briefly reprise. The pivotal  character is a strong-minded  young Irish girl named Mary  Mulvane. The story begins in  Ireland in 1796. English oppression is in full force. Mary is convicted of stealing a cow and  sentenced to transportation for  seven years. On the convict  ship, she meets a Dublin woman  named Polly MacNamara and  they become friends in misery.  After a hellish journey, the ship  arrives in New South Wales.  When the girls recover from  their ordeal, Polly elects to  marry a free settler named Will  Price who owns a small tavern  in the bush. Mary is assigned as  an indentured servant to a Captain Wiltshire and his family.  Here she meets an English convict named Jonathan Garrett  whom she eventually teaches to  read and write. She is also  befriended by an older convict,  Dinny O'Brynne, a staunch  Irish nationalist.  Years pass. Mary and  Jonathan complete their  sentences, are married and start  homesteading a tract of land  near Will and Polly's tavern.  Dissension grows among the  convicts over their harsh treatment. Eventually there is a  violent armed uprising at Castle  Hill. Dinny O'Brynne is one of  the ringleaders. The rebellion is  crushed by the redcoats and  many convicts are killed, including O'Brynne. Mary and  Jonathan name their newly-  born son after him.  More time goes by. The officers of the New South Wales  Corps have become totally corrupt, oppressing the free settlers  and cheating them out of their  crops. When the new civilian  Governor, William Bligh, attempts to curb this illegal activity, he is deposed by the redcoats  and martial law is declared.  (This is the same Captain Bligh  who figured in the Bounty  mutiny. Recent historical  research has shown him to be  much less a monster than  novelists have painted him. In  this latter phase of his career, he  appears to have been  remarkably fair-minded and  humane.)  In any event, Mary, Jonathan  and their friends survive all  those upheavals. Order is  restored, a new Governor is instated and Jonathan is made a  Justice of the Peace. As the  series ends, Mary and Jonathan  have left their convict pasts  behind them and attained  respectability.  I have made no attempt to  touch on the many sub-plots  and the dozens of other  characters who enliven this  remarkable series. Suffice to say  that the pace seldom lags and  the acting (much as in the best  British films) is of uniformly  high calibre down to the briefest  roles. Against The Wind is a  painstaking recreation of a very  difficult period in Australia's  brief colonial history. While it  does not flinch from the grim  realities of the era, neither does  it wallow in them as certain  lesser films on the same subject  have done. Against The Wind,  ultimately, is about the triumph  of the human spirit.  Christmas  Cards &  Decorations  1988 Calendars  Mfe1 TALEWIND  BOOKS  I     ^v*y Cowrie St.. Sechell 885-2527  aiiiiiiimiiiiiiii  FINANCIAL  ADVICE FOR  WOMEN  Many women come lo Investors  for confidential advice about  how to achieve security and  growth for their money  II you want to take charge ut  your future, we can help.  Call us today  Your resident Investors Planning Team  J N W (Jim) BUDD Sr.  Investors  Group  PROFIT FROM OUR EXPERIENCE  885-3397  DEBORAH MEALIA  886-8771  JH.(Jim) BUDD Jr.  886-8771  * EXERCISE  Rieta, Ruth & John 686-8305  ntiitnminiiiwiiiiir  !Open: Wed - Sat  8:00 ��� 2:00 AM  :  unit1  WED. NITE  Pool Tourney  Drink Specials  UflKS  tilT��  Ian. 7th  LOTS OF PRIZES  Trivia Prizes  FREE Shirt Draw  eiitieeii  Your guide to  the finest in  area dining  DINING GUIDE  A listing of  restaurants  and pubs  TomM  tfoCoMt  The scenic view in Lower Gibsons at night is always magnificent, but I've never seen it more beautiful than over the festive  seasons.  My friend and 1 were seated by a window when we arrived at  the Omega Slcak and Lobster House, and it took us more than a  tew minutes to drag our gazes away from the Christmas lights  reflected in the still ocean, and the gently rocking silent boats. But  when we did, we found the menus fully absorbing. So many  things to choose from! As well as a wide selection of appetizers,  there were a variety of salads to choose from.  The steak and seafood section drew my eyes and we finally settled on steak for me, steak and lasagna for my friend. We didn't  even make it to the wide choice of pizzas which take up the back  page. All the prices were so reasonable that we weren't even  restricted by budget restraints.  The escargot arrived along with my choice of tzanziki and pita  bread. The escargot, piping hot and covered with melted cheese,  the tzanziki, chill and spicy, to be scooped up with crusty pita  bread. The steaks were fabulous. I was born and raised in Alberta, and have a snobbery typical to people from that region, I've  always believed no one outside of Alberta knows how to choose,  prepare or cook beef properly. But I have to admit that I've never  tasted better steak. It was broiled to a perfect pink, tender and full  of flavour - no chemical after taste as you so often get.  Also worth mentioning was the Omega potato, which accompanied the steak, a whole potato, deep fried and covered with a  delicious cheese sauce. It was different from anything I've ever  tasted and very good.  The Omega is going to be seeing a lot of us this year, there are  still a wide variety of menu items that I want to sample.  Average meal prices quoted do not include liquor.  Creek House - Intimate dining and  European cuisine in a sophisticated yet  casual atmosphere. We serve rack of  lamb, duck, crab, clams, scallops, steaks,  also daily specials. Reservations rccotn-  mended. Roberts Creek Road and Beach  Avenue - 883.9321. Open 6 pm. Closed  Mondays & Tuesdays. V. MC. 40seats.  Jolly Roger Inn- Overlooking  beautiful Secret Cove, the Jolly Roger offers fabulous views from its dining room,  lounge and terrace. Lunch and dinner  menus are full and varied, and feature  fresh seafoods at very reasonable prices.  All new snack menu in the lounge. Fri.  NIGHT ON THE TOWN  evening ��� Seafood Special, S9.9S* including Caesar Salad, dessert, coffee or  tea. Sat evening - Prime Rib, $13.50, including soup or dinner salad, hot apple  slrudel, tea or coffee. Sunday, 12 noon til  2 pm - Chef's Surprise! Average dinner  for two: $25. Reservations requested. 80  seats. All major cards accepted. Hwy,  101, Secret Cove, 885-7184, Open Wed.  thru Suit, from II .tin  The Omega Ptz/a, Steak And  Lobster House - With a perfect view  of Gibsons marina, and a good time atmosphere, the Omega is a people-  watcher's paradise. Cast members of The  Beachcombers can usually be found din-  FAMILY DINING  ing here. Menu includes pizza, pasta,  steaks and seafood. Steaks and seafood  are their specialties. Banquet facilities  available. Very special children's menu.  Average dinner for two: $20. Reservations recommended. Located in Gibsons  Landing at 1338 Gower Point Rd.  8S6-UM. Open Sun-Thurs, 4-10 pm, Fri  and Sat 4-11 pm. Scats I4S.  Pronto \ Restaurants i wo locations  to serve you. Both serve an extensive  variety of pizza, steak, pasta, lasagne,  ribs, souvlaki in a delightful family atmosphere. Children's menu available. All  dinner entrees include garlic bread and a  choice of soup or salad. Average family  meal for four about S15-S20. Located at  Wharf Rd.. Sechdt. 885 1919; and in  Cedar Plaza, Hwy. 101, Gibsons.  886-8138  The Raven Cafe  FOR SALE  by Owner  The Homestead - Daily lunch and  dinner specials as well as regular entrees.  Lunches include sandwiches, hamburgers, pyrogies and salads. Dinner  ���ejections include steaks, chicken and  seafood. Prime Rib and IS item salad  bar are the house specialty on Friday,  Saturday and Sunday nights. Average  family meal for four $13430. Hwy 101,  WUiOn Creek, 885-2933. Open 8 am - 9  pm daily. 40 seats inside, 30 seal patio.  Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner,  Ruby Lake Resort - Lovely view of  lake from Ruby Lake's post and beam'  dining room and good highway access for  vehicles of ail sizes. Breakfast served all  day. Lunch prices begin at $2.50, dinners  from $5.50 including salad bar. Smorgasbord Sunday nights includes 12 salads,  three hot meat dishes and two desserts,  $10.95 for adults. $5.50 for children  under 12. Tiny tots free. A great family  outing destination. Absolutely superb  prime rib every Friday night. Average  family dinner for four $20-25. Sunshine  Coast Hwy, Pender Harbour 483-2269.  Open 7 days a week, 7 am - 9 pm. 54  seats. V., MC. Breakfast, lunch and dinner.  Cedar's Inn - Appetizers all day till 11  pm. Darts every Sun. Everyone,welcome.  Cedar Plaza, Gibsons -��868l7r: Open 11  am - midnight, Sun-Thurs; 11 am -1 am,  Fri-Sat. 100 seats. V., MC. Regular menu  11 am to 8:30 pm.  ���~~   '     "  ���  -^: 16.  Coast News, January 4,1988  Alternative health  eare explored  by Hajo Hadder  The Elphinstone Wrestling team grappled with style at the Simon  Fraser Invitational in December. -George Rlchey photo  Elphinstone team  makes their mark  The Elphinstone Wrestling  team went to the Simon Fraser  Invitational on December 17  and 18. Competition was fierce  with a total of 706 wrestlers taking part in the Junior Division.  Nevertheless, Elphinstone  Wresllers did quite well with  Danny Tetzlaff coming third;  Ian Bruce and Scott Lincez  fourth; Jason Alcock and Jason  Peers were sixth.  On December 18 all Elphinstone Wrestlers took part in the  Elite Division and although  there were no wrestlers in the  'medals' Elphinstone definitely  established their presence.  The most notable match was  Scott Lincez's loss In Ihe final  30 seconds to the Port Co-  quitlam leant captain, a Grade  12 student and last year's B.C.  High School Bronze medalist.  It is a matter of record that  today more people are ill than  ever before. This at a time when  incredible amounts of money  are being spent on medical  research, when conventional  scientific medicine has given us  masterpieces in surgical procedure, outstanding technology,  the most radical methods of  treatment. Baby Paul from Surrey is a case in point: he just had  a new heart implanted - the size  of a walnut. And yet, the  average life expectancy is now  regressive. People do not live  longer. They are not healthier  and the effective yield of the  gigantic cost explosion  -reflected in rising Medicare  premiums, drug costs, doctor  bills - has not led to a perceptible improvement in the overall  health of the population.  It is also a matter of record  that of all the treatments and  cures available today, modern  scientific medicine uses perhaps  one-tenth. This is not the place  to explore why this is so, interesting as that may be.  Rather, we shall have a look at  the neglected methods of healing, the other nine-tenths.  Coast health clinics  Child Health Clinics will be held  in Gibsons on January 5, 12, 19  & 26. In Sechelt they will be  held on January 6, 13, 20 & 27.  Pender Harbour Clinics will be  on January 7 & 21. The present  location of the Sechelt Clinic is  Bethel Baptist Church, comer  of Trail and Mermaid Street,  across from the fireball.  Tuberculin Skin Testing &  Travellers' Clinic will be held  from 34:30 pin on January 4,  11, 18 & 25 in the Gibsons  Health Unit. In Sechell, Skin  Testing only on January 27. The  Pender Harbour Tuberculin  and Travellers Clinic is on  January 7 & 21.  Please make appointments  for all clinics for Gibsons and  Sechelt by phoning 886-8131.  For   Pender   Harbour,   phone  883-2764.  S.I.I). (Sexually Transmitted  Disease) Clinics arc held every  Wednesday at the Coast-  Garibaldi Health Unit, 494  South Fletcher Rd., Gibsons  from 44:30 pm. Information,  counselling and testing (including AIDS) will be given. No  appointment necessary.  Prenatal Classes: Early Class is  on January 5 from 7 to 9 pm.  The Late Classes will be on  January 19, 26 & February 2  from 7-9 pm. Pender Harbour  Prenatal Classes can be arranged upon request (883-2764).  Single and Pregnant? Phone the  Health Unit 886-8131.  The next Hospital Tour will  be on January 27. Please phone  St. Mary's Hospital Switchboard to arrange for tour  885-2224.  Drop-In gives parents an opportunity to meet other parents and  discuss common concerns. The  group gathers every Tuesday  from 1:15 to 3:30 pm in the  Gibsons Health Unit, 494 South  Fletcher and at 1:15 to 3:15 pm  at Bethel Baptist Church in  Sechelt on Wednesdays (corner  of Mermaid & Trail).  There will not be a Breast-  Self Kxam Class in January.  Usual class is from 7:30 - 9 pm  in the Coast-Garibaldi Health  Unit, 494 South Fletcher Rd.,  Gibsons. (Learn to do Breast  Self  Exam).  There is no fee for any of  these services.  The Pups and Peanuts put on a fine demonstration of stick handling during a practice session Saturday  a,,ernoon' -K��CoH�� photo  ".TTacktop DRIVEWAYS  Residential & Commercial  Guaranteed Quality Work at Competitive Prices  S��  B.A. BLACKTOP  SERVING THE  LOWER MAINLAND  FOR 30 YEARS  a LOCATED  IN SECHEL T  PHONE  885-5151  FOR FREE ESTIMATE  *(.ACKTOPl  Box 1550  Sechelt, B.C.  We are responsible for our  own health. If we become patients, then it is up to us to be  well informed, so that our own  measures to restore our health  complement those of our family  physician. We must contribute  in equal measure in order to effect a cure. It is not a situation  of conflict and competition but  rather one of intelligent cooperation. If the method cures  the patient, then the method is  correct. There is no longer any  room for dogma, dictum or  theory: too many people are  suffering.  The neglected nine-tenth  comprise a vast arsenal of healing therapies, methods and  treatments. Acupuncture leads  the alphabetical order, yoghurt  and yoga are somewhere near  the end. In between we have  Polynesian kahuna services and  homeopathy, chiropractic,  water therapy and the ancient  art of bloodletting. We have  Doctor Bach's flower remedies  and healing herbs, magic  minerals called cell salts, healing  with clay packs and soma-  therapy as well as Shiatsu. We  have ancient biorhythms and  modern biofeedback, music  therapy, Rolfing and a host of  others.  And just like in days gone by  we have quacks and charlatans  and purveyors of magic potions  as well as a whole flock of self-  styled healing facilitators.  That's life.  Acupuncture and Shiatsu are  like brother and sister.  Acupuncture works with  needles of gold, silver or  stainless steel that are stuck into  certain points on the skin.  Shiatsu achieves the same effect  with finger pressure only: the  Japanese word shi means finger  and atsu means pressure. Both  methods use the same specific  points on the body for treatment. These points are called  tsubo, or pressure points.  The method was brought  from China to Japan in the  sixth century AD with the  spread of Buddhism, which  originated in India - where I was  first introduced to Shiatsu  almost 20 years ago.  Oriental medicine looks at  health as a matter of balance  between yin and yang, the two  components that make up ki  (chi), the universal energy of  life. This energy is said to flow  through 14 channels in the  human body. Twelve of these  channels are connected to vital  organs. The channels are called  meridians, and most of the  tsubos can be found along these  meridians.  Discounting for the moment  individual   tsubos,   there   are  Please turn to page 17  7�� *U ft** pUuuU  In lieu of Christmas cards, the following have donated to the  Sechelt Branch of St. Mary's   Hospital Auxiliary Memorial Fund:  Dave & Doris Ashton  Cliff & Peggy Connor  Hazel & Graham Craig  Garry, Roberta. Jeff &  Denise Foxall  Edith Hopper  Maurice & Margaret Hemstreet  Heather & Brian Myhlll-Jones  & Family  Faye & Hugh McCourt  Dorothy Parsons  Alan & Rosa Swan  Dick & Eleanor Thompson  The Sherlocks  Gladys Warner & Rob  Catherine & Harold Nelson  Len & Bepa Swanson  Beginners  arates  Shito-fiyu Itoiuhai  Jan. 7 THURSDAYS 5:30-6:30  Wilson Creek Community Hall  Jan. 12 TUESDAYS 5-6  Gibsons Elementary Gym  BLACKBELT INSTRUCTOR DARYL HENN=  $10.00 per month    886-3911  Winter-Spring  1988 Schedule  Effective Friday, January 1 to Thursday, June 23,1988.  SUNSHINE COAST - VANCOUVER  Lv. Langdale  6:20 am     4:30 pm  8:30 6:30  12:25 pm    8:20  2:30  Lv. Horseshoe Bay  7:30 am       5:30 pm  9:30 7:25  1:15 pm      9:15  3:30  EXTRA SAILINGS - EASTER/EARLY SUMMER  Effective Thursday, March 31 through Monday, April 4 and  from Friday, May 20 through Thursday, June 23, 1988 an  extra sailing is scheduled in each direction as follows:  Lv. Langdale 10:30 am Lv. Horseshoe Bay 11:30 am  From all of us at BC FERRIES, a very happy New Year.  a BCFGRRKES  Your Friendship Fleet  b484 (Schedule subject to change without notice.)  WINTER FITNESS '88  January 4 ��� March 28 (12 weeks)  ^^ 5 Dm  w*  Mon.  Tuts.  Wed.  Thurs.  Fri.  5 pm  Claaalcally  Fit  No  Bounca  Claaalcally  Fit  No  Bounca  7 pm  Workout  Workout  Workout  Workout  Workout  WORKOUT  A class emphasizing cardiovascular conditioning with a  strength and stretch component.  CLASSICALLY FIT  Winter sports conditioning, flexibility. Tone and strengthen  muscles for control and injury prevention. A must for skiers;  downhill & cross country, hockey and curling.  NO BOUNCE AEROBICS  A moderate to challenging no jump aerobic workout minimizing leg, foot, and joint stress. The use of light, handheld  weights is recommended for those who want more of a  challenge.  qfrtM  MonFrl  Saturdays  Sundays  4-9 pm  1-4 pm  7-9 pm  Dropln  3 Mo  6 Mo  1 Yr  Aerobics  $3.50  65.00  110.00  180.00  $4.00  80.00  135.00  225.00  Combo  $6.50  115.00  195.00  320.00  Spec/a/ Students A Family Rates  DARE TO COMPARE  YOU GET MORE FOR YOUR MONEY HERE  North Road, Gibsons  886-7675  SaSaBM Coast News, January 4,1988  17.  Lewellen Jenkins was the lucky winner of Rudolph the Red Nosed  Giraffe In Wishful Thinking's raffle last week.  Rhythms of Life  Moody month  by Penny Fuller  Here it is, ready or not, 1988.  Have you noticed that 88 is just  like two eternity symbols side by  side? That's worth meditating  on for a good two minutes.  Last night, the moon was full  in Cancer. Some astrologers  would tell you that the let-down  feeling you are now experiencing is somehow connected to  that. Personally, 1 think we  have a chicken and egg scenario  here.  Astrological interpretations  are based on observing repeated  phenomena which correspond  to the relative positions of  planets. Ever since anyone can  remember, every culture has  had some sort of mid-winter  festival, whether it was called  Yule, the feast of Saturnalia, or  Christmas, which was followed  by a time of low energy and  melancholia.  Everytime the Sun is in  Capricorn (right around midwinter) you get a full moon in  Cancer. Inevitably, wisemen  and shamans could predict that  when the full moon is in  Cancer, people suffer from inertia and depression. I call it  post-Christmas blues.  Enough of the festivities and  back to the grind of reality. It's  still a long haul till summer and  it may seem that all you have  ahead of you is paying Christmas bills.  Whether or not the full moon  last night has anything to do  with the feeling, you could  waste the next three months  (that's one quarter of the year)  feeling lousy if you don't take  active steps to prevent it.  January is a great time to  force yourself onto a vitamin  supplement and exercise program. If that appeals to you  about as much as joining the army, then just take the vitamins.  The important thing is to take  care of your body because you  don't need to be fighting biochemically induced depression  right now.  Contact with other people is  also important. It's easy to  become a couch potato, specializing in re-runs, until the  weather warms up, but you  need the energizing effect that  other human beings will give  you. Volunteer, take a course or  join a club, but get out and be  with other people once in a  while.  Last, but not least, pamper  yourself. Do one nice thing for  yourself every day, and every  payday for the next couple of  months. Buy one thing just for  you. It doesn't have to cost a  lot, a hand-dipped chocolate, a  bubble bath sample, a second  hand book, just a small present  to yourself.  If you need a little added inspiration to help you along, go  out and look at the sky tonight.  If it's clear, you should see quite  a meteor shower, offering plenty of opportunities to make  your wishes for the new year.  Health  Care  Continued from page 16  about 363 tsubos on the human  body. If for some reason an imbalance has occurred, ki energy  tends to stagnate in the tsubos  and they become sensitive to  pressure. Shiatsu alleviates the  stagnation and restores flow  and balance before the condition becomes chronic. Regular  Shiatsu tends to catch imbalances before they turn into  diseases and is thus one of the  most effective therapies in.  preventive medicine.  Shiatsu is not a miracle cure.  It will not heal neuroses and can  at best only alleviate some of  the symptoms caused by congenital diseases, infections and  injuries. It is no substitute for a  balanced diet, regular sleep and  regular exercise, nor will it give  you the vitamins and minerals  you may lack. But it will show  you the way of pressure-  sensitive tsubos where imbalances exist and help you correct them.  rml     Gibsons  kgr Swimming Pool  Sept. 21 ���  Dec. 7,1987  MONDAY  Early Bird  Aqua Fit  Ease Me In  Lesson  Noon  Lessons  Swim Fit  6:30 a.m.- 8:30 a.m.  9:00a.m. -10:00a. m.  10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.  11:00a.m.-t 1:30 a.m.  11:30 a.m.- 1:00 p.m.  3:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.  7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.  TUESDAY  FII&50+ 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m.  SeniorSwIm 10:30a.m.-l1:30a.m.  Adapted Aquatics 2:30p.m.- 3:30p.m.  Lessons 3:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.  Public 6:00 p.m.- 7:30 p.m.  Co-ed Fltniii      7:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m.  DIANE SOLES Is now teaching  Co-Ed Fitness on Tuesday and  Thursday evenings.  THURSDAY  Parent 4 Tot 1:00 p.m. -2:00 p.m.  Adapted Aquatics 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.  Lessons 3:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.  Public 6:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.  Co-ed Fttnin     7:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m.  FRIDAY  Early Bird  Aqua Fit  Fit & 50 +  Senior Swim  Noon Swim  Pubic Swim  Co-ed Fltniii  Teen Swim  6:30a.m.-   8:30a.m.  9:00a.m-10:00a.m.  10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.  10:30a m.-11:30a.m.  11:30 am- 1:00 pm  5:00 p.m.- 6:30 p.m.  6:30 p.m.- 7:30 p.m.  7:30 p.m.- 9:00 p.m.  SATURDAY  Public  Public  SUNDAY  1:30 p.m.- 4:00p.m.  7:00p.m.- 8:30p.m.  Family  Public  1:00p.m.- 3:30p.m.  3:30 p.m.- 5:00 p.m.  REGISTER NOW  Gibsons Swimming Pool 886-9415  Publication ol this schedule  sponsored by  Super Valu  Santa Sack draw  Winners announced  The fourth annual Santa  Sack draw was held over the 12  days preceding Christmas  amidst singing and laughter.  Roberts Creek and Cedar Grove  Elementary Schools provided  carol singing, and Arline Collins  and friends sang street carols.  Fireworks were donated by  Fong's Market on Marine Drive  and Christmas tree lights by  Webber Photo, making for a  delightful event.  The winners were:  Denise Rudolph, a $20 gift  certificate from Show Piece  Gallery; C. Hachett and Ron  Girard, gifts from Mary's  Variety; Ken Krintila, a Gibsons  flag and a Beachcombers book  from Gibsons Chamber of  Commerce; Megan Moren, a  gift certificate from Just For  You; Lorene Stanley, a gift certificate from Wishful Thinking;  Piper Deggan and Jeanette  Mah, treasures from the Landing General Store; Norma  Duthie, a gift certificate from  Richard's; Moira Clement, a  chocolate Santa from Truffles;  Nancy Randall, a gift certificate  from Webber Photo; Bob  Carpenter and Rosemary  Coates won books from Coast  Bookstore; Michael Fawkes,  herbal gift health bath from  Variety Foods; John Tansley,  100 photocopies from Pebbles  Realty; Brock, a toy from Nifty  Thrifty's; and Ruth Hogberg, a  gift certificate from the Harbour Cafe.  Thanks to all and a Happy  New Year from the Gibsons  Landing Merchants Association.  Reference: Point Atkinson f<" sk��*umchuk Narrowsaaa i nr ��mm  _ .       . T. plus 5 mm lor aach It or rise.  Pacific Standard lime        anarmm rorucnn at<���>���  Time To  WINTERIZE Your Boat & R.V. rl  ett^t^Lt^m  a*J*\m mamntn.    on fenced premises  ���Rill   WWrUgW   pow��, & water on  HARBOUR VIEW MARINE  Hwy 101. Gibsons Cull QQG    O O Q Q  '     (across Irom DeVries Floors) Dorlm .11  OOD" fc t��JO      A  Nominate now  The B.C. Council for the  Family is proud to announce its  second annual Distinguished  Service to Families Awards.  The B.C. Council for the  Family is a registered non-profit  society with a commitment to  families and a belief that  families are the source of our  society's strength.  Sponsorship of these awards  reflects this commitment and  belief by recognizing exceptional volunteer and professional efforts and outstanding  leadership in the cause of better  family living in British Colum  bia. Executive Director, Dr.  Carol Matusicky, stresses "the  Council hopes to highlight the  work of both individuals and  groups from every corner of the  province.  The deadline for nomination  is March, 1988. Forms are  available from The Awards  Committee, B.C. Council for  the Family, 200 - 1687 West  Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.  V6J 1X2 or B.C. Council for  Ihe Family, Parliament  Buildings, Victoria, B.C. V8V  1X4  Poetry contest  Margaret Atwood, Al Purdy  and George Woodcock will be  the final judges in Poetry Contest, open to all poets, established and new. Deadline for submission is April 15, 1988.  The first prize will be $1000,  with five additional prizes of  $100 each. All winning poems  will be published.  Poets may submit any number of previously unpublished  works. All poems, with an entry  fee of $5 each, should be addressed to:  Canadian Poetry Contest,  6429 McCleery Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6N  1G5.  Proceeds from this contest  will go to CIVA (Canada India  Village Aid), a non-profit  organization that provides  health services in the poorest  areas of India.  Something to keep in mind:  300 poems digs a clean water  well, 1000 poems builds an irrigation dam, 4000 poems  builds a dispensary.  TRAIL BAY SPORTS  Trail Ave   * Cowrie   SECHELT   885-2512  I  TheFMC  4 Wheel Alignment System  iTHE MOST ACCURATE WHEEL ALIGNMENT POSSIBLE;  The latest Computer Technology from FMC  and OK TIRE can now provide the Sunshine  Coast with the most accurate 2 or 4 wheel  alignment available.  Computer-accurate alignment on all foreign  and domestic vehicles.  Call 885-3155 for an appointment.  ALIGNMENT  from  $9095  29  =# Don't forget to call tor our FREE BRAKE INSPECTION (most vehicles) #=  OICCSERVICE CENTRE  8640 Dolphin St., i  Acton from RCMP station.;  jRCMPi  : Please phone lor an  : appointment  wtma*  ^tgtaawattamaam  eammmem    ^  i* 18.  Coast News, January 4,1988  **"  January is DECORA  Computerized  COLOUR SELECTION Cntre  GIBSONS I  It's a new and unique concept in colour  selection...and it's here, now, at CBS in  Gibsons.  Now you can create professionally  coordinated colour schemes with just the  touch of a button. Come in soon.  See for yourself!  A complete coordinated colour scheme  for you...in just seconds.  - Complimentary colours  ��� Contrasting colours  - Designer colours...  for dramatic colour effects  JANUARY DECOBATOB  SPECIALS  aii Wallpaper  Up to 24 books to choose from  30% off  All in-stock  Ceramic Tile  (Gibsons only)  15% off  Ceramic wall tile  adhesive **s.w  $1C29  Sale     I U  Ceramic floor & wall tile adhesive  (water base) Reg. '24"  Sale  $20  99  S66 Until Sand  -"���ill rvtUOIFlEO WAUGRaiii  CO'JUS POIja MUR MOQIFIE Ml tSJBK  Flextile Polymer  wall grout  2 kg Reg. '7"  ���  GIBSONS  BUILDING SUPPLIES Coast News, January 4,1988  19.  [TING MONTH  at  BUILDING SUPPLIES  With a roll of wallpaper & a can of paint  YOU CAN CHANGE A ROOM IN A DAY!  Come in and talk to one of our decorating professionals soon.  Greet January  PAINT VALUES  Available both:  ��� GBS locations  Interior  \Matt  Interior  Flat Latex  Great for walls & ceilings in  bedrooms, living rooms & dining rooms.  Reg. *24"  Sale  $19  99  jjjsunwti"  ITRES  Interior Flat  Latex Sealer  for sealing  new drywall.  4 I. Reg. '16"  esaur  Quick-Dry"^  Sale  $13  99  White  4 LITRES  Interior Lo Lustre  il Enamel  Hard wearing coating for kitchens, bathrooms, & trim.  Reg. '30"  Sale  $24  79  '"tenor  Paint Thinner  4 I. Reg. *5"        �� 4 OQ  Sale  $4  TWO LOCATIONS  SUNSHINE COAST HIGHWAY   GIBSONS  WHARF AND DOLPHIN SECHELT  888-8141  Semi Gloss  Latex Enamel  Excellent for Kitchens, trim,  high traffic areas.  4 I. Reg. ��30" ('//�����  Sale  $2479   *��^*Sb2;  Interior Eggshell  Latex Enamel  A washable, high hide coating  for most walls.  Reg. '24"  Sale  $19  95  White  Blue Plastic  9" Tray Kit  Reg. ��3'8  Sale  $099  OPEN Mon-Sat B am - S pm  Sunday (Gibsons only) 10 am - 4 pm  885-7121        Vancouver (Toll Free) 688-6814  IMH  msmssm  iii 20.  Coast News, January 4,1988  n ii   i i  ������ i ��� i _i|  .'    "."��'  rs to the Editor  Some facts on Sunshine Coast Queen  Editor,  I would like to correct some  minor inaccuracies whidl appeared in a recent article regarding the former B.C. Ferries  vessel Sunshine Coast Queen.  She was built at River Rouge,  Michigan, a superb of Detroit  for the Michigan State  Highways Department to provide year round service across  Mackinac Strait. This narrow  strait between Lake Michigan  and Lake Huron is blocked with  ice in the winter and the ship  was   heavily   constructed   to  operate in these conditions.  The well known Mackinac  Bridge (over five miles long)  was under construction at the  time, but this was expected to  take five years. She was named  Vacationtand as the northern  part of Michigan is a hunting,  fishing and summer home area.  She operated very successfully for eight years when the  bridge was completed and she  was then put up for sale. Unfortunately, because of her extreme  weight (almost twice as heavy as  the present Jumbo ferries) and  Music said intrusive  Editor:  I would like to know why,  when taking my children to the  local swimming pools and to the  skating arena, we must continually be subject to the pounding cadence of rock music. At  ihe arena in particular the selection of music is usually tasteless  and, most assuredly, not conducive to a family outing.  Why, when the information  readily available to discerning  adults clearly indicates that this  type of music is not only annoying but, in reality, destructive in  nature, should we be so tolerant  of our young children being exposed to this violent noise in  these public places?  1 suggest that the directors of  the arena might use some adult  discretion in allowing the young  people to program the music being played during open skating  hours.  expected high maintenance  costs, she was difficult to sell  and lay idle for many years.  Eventually a trucking firm attempted to operate her hauling  trucks between Great Lakes  ports, but this only lasted one  unsuccessful season. Later she  was sold to the North South  company in Quebec who  operated her between Rimouski  and Baie Comeau, but again,  her operating and maintenance  costs were too high for the  revenue produced.  Whatever happened to the  beautiful waltzes and joyful  music which we enjoyed at such  places in our younger years?  These types of music made for  relaxing and social times  whereas this relentless pounding  and screaming only serve to annoy, confuse and frustrate  many of us trying to enjoy our  recreation on the ice.  Stephen Hubert  In 1967 she was purchased by  B.C. Ferries and operated successfully on the Langdale run  for nine years. She was again  put up for sale and after several  years she was bought by a company which expected to use her  in the Arctic, but this plan was  abandoned.  She sank on December 3 off  the Oregon Coast while under  tow to China to be broken up.  Apparently one of the end  doors was damaged in a storm  and water entered the vehicle  deck.  David Fyles  wayne ross  Excavating  Septic Fields  Water Lines  Landscaping  Ditching  Wells  22 Years Of Experience Working For You  10% Discount FREE  to SENIORS ESTIMATES  885-5617  "FOR ALL YOUR BACKHOE NEEDS"  A memorable Christmas  Editor:  Those of us who listened to  CBC radio two days before  Christmas must have been  touched by the stories of callers'  "most memorable Christmas".  I know I was. My "most  memorable Christmas" will,  most likely, be the Christmas of  1987 when, on Christmas Eve,  J.W. Smallwood brought into  Gibsons Food Bank $38 in rolled pennies gathered by his two  grandchildren, Jennifer and  Amanda Ginn.  The very thought of these little girls gathering and painstakingly wrapping 76 rolls of coins  in order to give them to the  Food Bank to aid those less fortunate than themselves, is the  very essence of what Christmas  is all about. Amanda and Jennifer, you made our day.  Alia, Gwen, Eileen, Kathy,  Joyce, Carmen and the Gang  at Gibsons Food Bank  (Nifty Thrifty's)  P.S. At our First Birthday  Party on Saturday, December  12 at Nifty Thriftys, the winners  of our lottery were D. Stiles -the  School  reunion  Editor:  Lord Tweedsmuir Elementary School is 50 years old and  we want to celebrate (from 1937  until 1940 we were called  Westside School). We are having our reunion on February 26,  1988 at the school, from 6 until 10 pm. Tickets can be purchased by sending $5 and a self-  addressed, stamped envelope to  the Lord Tweedsmuir Reunion  Committee, 1714 8th Avenue,  New Westminster, B.C. V3M  2S7.  Moira Mickey  Co-Chairperson  BE  ^g-   ane  31  PART 7oFM  To the Peoples  of the World  A   BAH*  :   STATEMENT   ON  Peace  THE RbSL'RGENCEorfanHlical religious fcr  mtir (Kxiimng in many lands cannot he regarded as more than a dying convulsion. The very  nature of the violent and disruptive phenomena  aswciated with it terries to the spiritual  bankruptcy it represents. Indeed, one of the  strangest and saddest features of the current outbreak of religious fanaticism is the emem lo  which, in each case, it is undermining not only the spiritual values which are conducive to  ihe unity of mankind but also those unique  mora! victories won by the particular religion  it purports to serve  However vita] a force religion has been in  the history of mankind, and however dramatic  the current resurgence of milium religious  fanaticism, religion and religious institutions  have, for many decades, been viewed by increasing numbers of people as irrelevant to the  major concerns of the modem world. In its  place they have turned either to the hedonistic  pursuit of material satisfactions or to the following of man-made ideologies designed to rescue  society from ihe evident evils under which it  groans. All too many of these ideologies, alas,  instead of embracing the concept of the oneness  of mankind and promoting the increase of concord among different peoples, have tended to  deify the stale, to subordinate the rest of  mankind to one nation, race or class, to attempt  in suppress all discussion and interchange of  ideas, or to callously abandon starving millions  to the operations of a market system thai all too  clearly is aggravating (he plight of the majority  nt mankind, while enabling small sections to  live in a condition of affluence scarcely dreamed of by our forebears.  For a free copy of ihe cMnplete MUcmcnt  -TO THE PEOPLES OF THE WOEXD" or  information about the Bahai Faith and local  ���ctlvitiri, pica* write or ealli Itt 404, Gib-  mm, M6-207S.  wxz  as  ac  ad  adult-sized rocking horse  donated by Geoff Clement; the  beautiful water colour painting  by Joan Warn was won by J.  Curwen and the $20 Gift Cer  tificate was won by Tasha Hyde  of Victoria, B.C.  It was good to see so many of  our old friends who made the  whole thing happen.  1+  Canadian Radio-television and  Telecommunications Commission  Conseil de la radioditfusion et des  telecommunications canadiennes  em  DECISION  Decision 87-923. Mountain FM Radio Ltd. Egmont, B.C. APPROVED - Increase in the effective radiated  power for CIEG-FM Egmont from 1 watt to SO watts. Decision 87-925. Mountain FM Radio Ltd. Pendar  Harbour, B.C. APPROVED ��� Increase In the effective radiated power for CIPN-FM Pender Harbour from  3.3 watts to 350 watts.  When may I read CRTC documents? CRTC documents may be read In the "Canada Gazette", Part 1; at  CRTC offices; and at reference libraries. CRTC decisions concerning a licensee may be read at the  licensee's offices during normal business hours. You also may obtain copies of CRTC public  documents by contacting the CRTC at: Ottawa/Hull (819) 9974313; Halifax (902) 426-7997; Montreal (514)  2834607; Winnipeg (204) 949-6306; Vancouver (604) 666-2111.  Canada  Province of British Columbia  ROYAL COMMISSION ON  ELECTORAL BOUNDARIES  Public Hearings  The Commission, pursuant to the Inquiry Act and Order in Council No. 690  as amended, appointing the Honourable Judge Thomas K. Fisher as Commissioner to enquire into and recommend the appropriate number of electoral  districts, each returning one member for the Legislative Assembly and the  boundaries for all electoral districts, will hold public hearings commencing in  January, 1988.  In making his recommendations in regard to the appropriate number of electoral districts and boundaries for those electoral districts, the Commissioner  is required to have regard to the following:  (a) the principle of the electoral quota, that is to say, the quotient  obtained by dividing the population of the Province, as ascertained  by the most recent population figures published by Statistics  Canada, pursuant to the Statistics Act (Canada), by the total number of electoral districts recommended by the commissioner;  (b) historical and regional claims for representation;  (c) special geographic considerations including the sparsity or density  of population of various regions, the accessibility to such regions  or the size or shape thereof;  (d) special community interests of the inhabitants of particular regions;  and  (e) the need for a balance of community interests.  Public hearings will be held at the following locations on the dates and times  specified:  CHILI IWACK  SURREY  BURNABY  COQUITLAM  WEST VANCOUVER  CAMPBELL RIVER  PORTALBERNI  PARKSVILLE  MERRITT  January 18, Monday, 11:00 a.m.  Conference Room #1, Chilliwack Cottonwood Inn  January 20, Wednesday, 10:00 a.m.  Room 109, Newton Inn  January 25, Monday, 10:00 a.m.  Burnaby Room, Sheraton Villa Inn  January 26, Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.  Boundary Room, Best Western Coquitlam  Motor Inn  January 28, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.  River Room, Park Royal Hotel  February 2-, Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.  Anchor Room, Anchor Inn  February 3, Wednesday, 10:00 a.m.  Timberline Room, Timber Lodge Motor Inn  February 4, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.  Court Room, Bayside Inn  February 8, Monday, 10:00 a.m.  Banquet Room, Valnicola Motor Hotel  SALMON ARM February 9, Tuesday, 12:00 Noon  Board Room, Best Western Villager West Motor Inn  REVELSTOKE February 10, Wednesday, 12:00 Noon  Banquet Room, Best Western Wayside Inn  FORT NELSON February 15, Monday, 10:00 a.m.  Lower Liaird Room, Coachhouse Inn  DAWSON CREEK      February 16, Tuesday, 12:00 Noon  Room 201, North Country Inn  PRINCE GEORGE     February 18, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.  Cranbrook South Room, Holiday Inn  PRINCE RUPERT      February 22, Monday, 10:00 a.m.  Banquet Room, Crest Motor Hotel  STEWART February 23, Tuesday, 11:00 a.m.  Prospector Room, King Edward Hotel  TERRACE February 24, Wednesday, 10:00 a.m.  Banquet Room, Desiderata Inn  SMITHERS February 26, Friday, 10:00 a.m  Banquet Room, Hudson's Bay Lodge  NELSON February 29, Monday, 10:00 a.m.  Conference Room #1, North Shore Inn  KIMBERLEY March 2, Wednesday, 10:00 a.m.  Gerry Sorenson Room, Rhinekastle Inn  FERNIE March 3, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.  Meeting Room #1, Cedar Lodge  POWELL RIVER        March 7, Monday, 11:00 a.m.  Haida Room, Beach Gardens Resort Hotel  VICTORIA April 12 & 13, Tuesday, Wednesday, 10:00 a.m.  Parrot Room, Chateau Victoria  VANCOUVER April 14 & 15, Thursday, Friday, 10:00 a.m.  York Room, Georgia Hotel  Submissions both oral and written are Invited on all aspects of the mandate.  In regard to the principle of the electoral quota (see "a" above), it is a suggestion only, that persons making submissions use a population of 38423 for each  electoral district as a guide.  Forward written submissions to the Honourable Judge Thomas K.  Fisher, 580-625 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C., V6C 2T6.  Persons wishing to mate an oral submission at a hairing or general  enquiries are asked to contact Mr. Terry Julian, Chief Administrative Officer, at 580-625 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C., V6C 2T6. Teleph6ne:  660-4169. Coast News, January 4,1988 21.  "V,  'CP  COAST NEWS CLASSIFIEDS  Homes  & Property  GIBSONS DUPLEX  View lot. $74,900 lull price.  S700/month rent Irom 1-2 bdrm  and 1-1 bdrm. suite. New  carpeting & new siding. Beautiful  ocean view. Also 1 bdrm. house  with ocean view. $45,900 lull  price. Phone 403-432-0979 coll.  or 886-2249. #1  Working family wants 2 lo 3  bdrm. house on 5 + acres, owner  finance or rent to own. have down  payment, rels. avail. 886-3408  alter 6 pm. #1  Wanted to buy, waterfront property Hopkins Ldg./Soames PI.  522-2505 colled. ft  Tyler Silvey is thrilled to announce the sale arrival ol his  brother Jeremy Jacob, born on  December 19, 1987 al 12:42 am  at St, Mary's Hospital, weighing  7 lbs.. 8 ozs. Proud parents are  Robert and May; pro'ud grammas  are Dorothy Silvey and Edna  Howrii Many lhanks lo Dr.  Rogers and Ihe slafl al St. Mary's  Hospital. #|  Obituaries  MORRIS: Passed away December  20. 1987. Eleanor Norah Con-  ingsby Morris, late ol Gibsons in  her 101st year. Survived by a  brother and several nieces and  nephews in the east, and by  many friends in this area. No service by request. Private cremation  arrangement through Devlin  Funeral Home. #1  In Memoriam  SUNSHINE COAST  HOME SUPPORT SOCIETY  Bo. MiO. SscWI. B 0 VOWAO H5-SIU  "In memory" donations  gratefully received. Card will  be senl lo the bereaved: lax  receipt to donor upon request.  Thank You  Thanks to my wonderful family &  Irionds lor the great surprise parly as I reached maturity - my best  birthday ever! God bless you all.  MomQ. #1  I.  HommI Property  2.  4. kaManaoriua  ��. TkMkVtM  6. PamoMl  1. Announcements  I. Weodhtfil  Eng Atj cmc ntt  9. Lou  10. round  11. Ptrto I LivMtock  II. Mink     ;-----  13. Travel"'  14. Wanted  15. Free  ^16, CaranSilM  17. UrttflTr.de  II. lor Sale  19. Auto.  10. r unfit  11. Marine  12. MoMKHcMMi  It. Motorcycles  14. Wanted to lent  25. led 1 keaklast  2*. lot lent  17. He* Wanted  II. Work Wanted  19. CMMCwe  30.  31. legal  31. IX. I Yukon  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  Classifieds  at any of our convenient  Friendly People  Places  IN PENDER HARBOUR   Marina Pharmacy     8832688  AC Building Supplies 8839551  IN HALFMOON BAY  B & J Store 8859435  IN SECHELT   Books & Stuff  (Trail Bay Centre) 885-2625  The Coast News  (Cowrie Street) 685-3930  IN DAVIS BAY-  Peninsula Market 8859721  IN WILSON CREEK-  Wilson Creek  Campground 8855937  IN ROBERTS CREEK-  Seaview Market 8853400  IN GIBSONS  B & D Sports  (Sunnycrest Mall) 886-4635  The Coast News  (behind Dockside Pharmacy) 886-2622  DEADLINE IS NOON SATURDAY  FOR MONDAY PUBLICATION  &  Judy or Helen will glva you courteous service end  friendly eislstence when you piece your distilled ed et AC Building Supplies - one el our  L Friendly People Pieces In Pender Harbour.  Thank You  Thank you - lirsl ol all lo my family for their loving support; to all  our friends for their caids and expressions of sympathy; lo Dr.  Burlin and Dr. Lehman; Shirley  and Ihe nurses on the second  floor, lor their care ol Fred, To  Reverend Alex Reid; Ihe choir:  and the United Church women for  their support. Dan Devlin for his  helpfulness and the Coast News  lor a beautilul tribule. A special  lhanks lo Nora Neilson and my little Iriend Dory. Many thanks  Dorothy Cruice. #1  INDIVIDUAL THERAPY  COUPLES COUNSELLING  Call Eleanor Mae 885-9018.  #4  Single? Join Cameo Singles Club  lor dancing, politick dinners,  other events. 885-2058,  886-2550 or 886-3364. #3  Sunshine Coast Transition  House: a sale place lor women  who are emotionally or physically  abused. Counselling and legal into., 24 hr. crisis line. 885-2944.  TFN  Announcements  WWC #54 rallle Dec. 12, 1987.  Pat Cassidy-food hamper; Jim  Monroe-cenlre piece; Arlene Harrison; Xmas table set #1  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS  885-2896. 886 7272. 886-2954,  TFN  II someone in your family has a  drinking problem you can see  what it's doing to them Can you  see whal it's doing lo you? Al-  Anon can help. Phone 886-9903  or 886-9826.  Attention Teens ���  Al-Ateen   Can   Help.   Phone  886-7103. TFN  VOLUNTEERS NEEDED  Can you help?  Gibsons Landing Theatre Project  886-8778  TFN  Brand new black leather boots  worth $100, in Lower Gibsons,  Dec. 21. Christmas present, not  even out ol box. Reward. Phone  886-3133. #1  Older aluminum rowboal in good  shape near breakwater (off  Headlands Rd), may have drifted  off al high tide. Call Keith  886-8427. #2  Please return boy's yellow 12 sp.  Norco Jammer bike lo bus shelter  al Silver Sands. No questions  asked. Anyone with information,  please call 883-9259, #1  While cal. calico lace & lail. Park  Ave,, Rots. Ck. 885 7046.     #1  Set ol 10 keys on plastic FOB.  Onl. identilication. Were left at  Pharmasave postal counter Call  CoaslNews #i  Pets  8. Livestock  MAGUS KENNELS  e Bright clean dog  & cat boarding  e Dog grooming  K9 Maintenance  OPEN 8 am - 6:30 pm  everyday. 886-8568  SKA  885-4771  TFN  SCIENCE DIET �� IAMS  Pel Food  Quality Farm & Garden  Supply Ltd.  Pratl Rd. 886-7527  TFN  Custom made leashes & collars.  Call Castlerock Kennels evenings  885-9840. #2  B  PIANO  TUNING  repairs ft. appraisals  Ken Dalgleish  886-2843  LOG BUYING STATION  Cedar, Fir. Hemlock  886-7033  Terminal Forest Products.   itTFN  Desperately seeking seasoned  firewood, large quantify delivered  to North Van. Top dollar paid  cash. 926-4571. #1  Used woodstove, gd. cond.  886-8557. I\  Private semi-treed lot, min. 90',  view would be nice, Gibsons.  Gower Pt. aiea or Roberts Cieek.  886-3041. #1  Clean garden fill. Gibsons area.  886-7156. #3  Barter 8. Trade  Swap/lrade for good campervan  or sell immaculate Chev S10 4WD  Iruck, 24,000 km, canopy etc.  886-2429. #1  T i S TOPSOIL  Mushroom Manure $25/yd., $24  lor seniors. Baik Mulch $27/yd.  Steer Manure. Screened Topsoil  mixed. All prices negotiable. Call  alt, 6 pm or anytime weekends or  holidays, 885-5669. TFN  Multicycle Inglis auto washer.  $295. Guaranteed & delivered.  883-2648. TFN  Green Onion  Earth Station  SATELLITE  Sales & Service  885-5644  McClary Royal Charm wood  slove. $300 OBO; Honda Accord  86/87/88 ski rack, $150 OBO  (New $200 + ) 886-3994.  #3  Willis piano, $1200; chest  Ireezer, $195; slereo luner  receiver c/w 5 band equalizer,  needs work, $95; chrome table.  $25.886-7534or886-2511.  #3  SEASONED NORSE MANURE  U-Load $20/per PU or 2/$35  Lockyer Rd.. Rbls. Ck.  885-9969. TFN  GUILLERMO  FIERENS  Sun., Jan. 10  2 pm  Twilight Theatre  A few seats left, Ai the  door frnm 1:30 pm or  phone 886-2513 (after  noon) lo reserve,  igga  2 sieel rad, snowlires (tuneless).  PI75/80R13M/S. rims incl,  $80,885-3483 #?  HYDROPONIC NUTRIENTS  and Halide Lights, etc.  Quality Farm & Garden Supply  886-7527, TFN  Firewood, bucked & split. $25  load, you pick up 886-3540 all  5:30 pm. TFN  W.W. UPHOLSTERY  & BOAT TOPS LTD.  FOAM  SALE  All foam  mattresses,  pillows, etc.  20%  OOFF  886-7310  637 WyngaarlRd.. Gibsons  Cedar siding, 1x6. 23' It; 1x8.  28' If ; 10" bevel 40' It,. Gibsons Mobile Saw Seivice.  886-3468 #1  Save $50. new 7 2/3 sq. 210 Ib.  mid brown duroid sq. butt  shingles 885-2198. #1  Ladies' lamb coal, 14-16. $250  all 7 pm 886-9014 #2  Stainless sleel sink with taps,  good condition, will install.  883-9278 #2  HAY FOR SALE  NewHay$3.50    Old Hay $2.50  885-9357  IFN  Color VCR camera with portable  VCR. $825 OBO, Tarry 886-3595.  886-2268. TFN  4x8 Italian slate pool table with all  aces. $925 OBO. Tarry 886-2268  01886-3595. TFN  I Claholm Furniture  And Interiors  Attention Prawn Fishermen  UFO approved wire tunnels. $1  ea 885-3805, #1  Heavy duly boat trailer, capable  ol carrying 31' boat, hyd.  brakes, mostly galvanized, 2/3  complete. $1500 firm. 886-3730  #1  TTIMETO  WINTERIZE  Your <jO  Boat & R.V.  storage  on fenced premises  power & water on site  HARBOUR VIEW  MARINE ltd.  Mobile Homes  Second hand 26" Admiral colour  TV, best oilers. 886-3362.     #1  1 year old mountain bike, excelled cond.. must sell. $175.  Phone 885-9840 eves. #1  21" RCA colour TV, remote control. $275.885-3875. #1  Firewood - In $80/cord. maple  $80/cord: hemlock & pine  $65/coid. Full cord guaranteed.  886-3779. #1  10" Dewall 770 deluxe radial  armsaw comp. with sland. $325:  convert, oven, as new, $75.  '885 1912 alter 5 pm #1  Chesterfield & chaii, good condition. $300 OBO 886-2282 or  886-8413. #1  24" colour console TV. $95, 20"  colour portable TV, $150; 8"  B/W, $35 886-3318, 886-2422  eves. #1  '62 T-Bird, no rusl. '69 Pinto, no  rust. 4 sp.; '80 Faiimonl, no  rusl. 886-8287 K  75 Ponliac Venlura. 6 cyl  PS/PB, $550: 77 4X4 Dodge,  winch. $1200 886 3313        #3  79 Diesel Peugeot wagon, gd  run. cond.. $1500 OBO  885-9774 #1  Musi sell, '81 Ford Granada, 6  cyl. auto, P/S, P/B. cruise. Only  44000 km. $3750 OBO.  886-3575 #3  Coast  Auto  Rental  Sales t  Rentals  885-2030  DI7M1  CASH PAID  For Some Cats and Trucks  Dead Car Removal  886-2020  IFN  72 Ford V< Ion XLT. good box,  exc moloi/trans, whole or lo'  parts B86 8271 oi 886-7934  #1  Campers  Motorhomes  1973 31' Airstream, 1980  Cherokee 4X4. $21,000 or sell  separate. Husky 2100 & Alaskan  mill, $400. 686-8961, Bon-  niebrook. #1  CAPTAIN BILL MURRAY  Master Mariner  In Sail and Steam  Formally ol HlQga Marine  Marine Surveyors  and Consultants  M5-3643  Call Dorhn at 886-2233,  Hwy 101. Gibsons      t-  .. (Across Irom UeVpies Floors)/  Deep V Thermoglass hull, 19V;'  slandup hardlop, new sloped  laips, 300' rope, 60' chain, anchor, winch, depth snd., compass, live bail tank, near new  2-12 HD batteries, no motor,  needs paint, little maintenance,  lirm $2500. 886-2802 all. 5pm  #2  17' Glasscratt, 85 HP Merc.  $2100; 18' Reinell, 120 I/O,  $2500, trailers 886-3313.  #3  OUTBOARDS FOR SALE  9.9-25-70 HP 1982-1986. exc.  cond.. exc. price. Lowes Resort,  883-2456 TFN  80' dock w/40' iron stairs,  comes Willi 3 yr water lease in  Gibsons Harbour. $19,500 OBO  Tarry 886-3595 or 886-2268.  TFN  14' Cobra 40 HP elec. start hydr.  steering trailer, $2150 OBO,  "Tarry 886-3595 or 886-2268.  TFN  (F  \\\\^   VT~VrTT  on  all in-stock  EVINRUOE  OUTBOARDS  and  MARINE  ACCESSORIES  Authorized Dealer lor  VOLVO PENTA, OMC  COBRA, EVINRUDE  CHRYSLER,  CRUSADER,  MITSUBISHI,  ISUZU & VETUS  DIESELS  HARBOUR VIEW  MARINE ltd  Call Dorhn at 886-2233  Hwy 101. Gibsons  n  (across from DeVnes Flootstij  10x50, 2 bdrm , $8,000 OBO  New root, new WW carpet, new  light fixtures, new panelling  throughout 4" T&G custom ceiling & cabinets, and more  886 3041 #1  Mobile home space available.  Sunshine Coast Mobile Home  Park 886-9826 TFN  1.01*12, 14x60', 2 bdrm., bay  window. 4 appl, front & back  porches, fully skirted, this home  is like new. $25,500  Sunshine Coast Mobile Home  Park 886-9826 TFN  ESTATE SALE  Lot #12 - 14 x 60. 2 bdrm  Ige. din area, fully carpeted  F/S, WD. bay window. Ironl  & back poich, skirted  WIS HOME IS LIKE HEW  Asking $25,500  Sunshine Coast Mobile Home  Park -1 mile west of Gibsons  886-9826  Sm cottage, furn . linen, dishes,  elec. heat.  1 person only, no  pels, $350 inc ulil. 886-9336.  #2  Avail. Jan 1 Lower Gibsons,  quiet, clean sell-cont bsml..  W/W. 4 appl . heat & cable incl.,  pref. active single retired  homemaker. N/S, no pets. $290  neg 886-2694. #2  3 bdrm. house, gorgeous view.  Gramhams. all appl, large yard,  new W/W. central vac��� $500  8864562. #2  2 bdrm apt  Lower Gibsons no  pels, no children 886-8223.  #1  2 bdrm waterfront cabin, Gibsons Wood 8, oil heal, avail to  June 30. $375 886-2627 or  438-3843 tl  3 bdrm home, Rbts. Ck., wood  & elec. heal, 4 appls, S400/mo.  8868725 weekends or Van  439-1652. #3  Selma Park. 4 bdrm. 2'A  balds, solar home, lovely view,  long term, avail Feb. 1.  885 7902 #3  Avail Feb. 1.4 bdrm. rancher on  : FirciestRd . $475/mo,, rel. req,  fail 886 2895 lor more inlo.  IFN  Wanted to Rent  Immed, 3 bdrm, family home  near schools 8, shopping  421-8221. #1  Clean lady with 2 quiel children  seeking decent living quarters in  Gibsons, prefer 3 bdrms., refs.  available Please phone  886-9743. #2  2 or 3 bdim. house, F/S, lease.  Sechell area 885-1990 #3  Newly transferred RCMP member  looking for long-term accommodations in Gibsons. Prefer 2  bdrm. house w/appiiances  Leave message 886-9244.     #1  View home upper Gianlhams, 2  bdrm. main floor, finished bdrm.  and bath in ground level basement. 5 appls., rels. req.. long  lerm rental pref. $400/mo,,  Feb 1 886-2546 #2  Help Wanted  COMMISSION SALES  The leading contractor Eieiinc  Plus Syslems requires Ihe services ol commissioned sales ijl-u-  pie Duties include direct sale^ ol  an innovative B C Hydro em-rgy  program Must be sell stan-.-r.  elec. or mech. background  helpful. Qualified leads provioed  Please submit work history lo  BEG. Electric, 110-4331  Vanguard Rd.. Richmond V6X  2P6. Alten: Marketing Manager  ��1  Roberts Creek Hall avail .  dances, parties, weddings  equipment rental Jacob,  886-8541, 6-8 pm IFN  2 bdrm apart. clean, view 4  appl,, S. Fletcher, mature adults  $450., Jan 1 886-7175       #1  Part-time self-motivated e*  perienced maintenance person  required lor intermediate care  home. Please apply in writing.  Administrator. Kiwams Village  Care Home, RRl Sle. 7, Gibsons.  B.C. VON 1V0 #3  Lady to work full-time front office  in local motel. Will be required  also to d.- occasional overnight  part-lime relief Resume with  references required. Phone  886-3321 aft. 3pm. ��1  Apis, for rem. I & 3 bdrm heal  & cablevision included  886-9050. IFN  Hairdresser/hairstylist warned  lull or part-time. Top commission  rates, exc location in Gibsons  shopping centre. Apply Box 115  Gibsons, or 886-7616 ar  886-9804 t\  1  bdrm   Ig   ground level SC  suite, S Fletcher, Gibsons, lesp  adults, rels pi $295 886 9121  *2  Bids lor janitorial contract al Gin-  sons legion will be accepted up  lo Jan 11, 1988 Job descriptions available al legion.        #1  CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  Copyright and  Advertising  Regulations  The Sunshine Coast  News reserves the right to  classify advertisements  under appropriate headings  and determine page loca  tion. The Sunshine Coast  News also reserves the right  to revise or reject any advertising which in the opinion  of the Publisher is in questionable taste In the event  that any advertisement is rejected the sum paid lor the  advertisement will be  refunded.  For PHONE-IN Classifieds 885-3930  Minimum '5" per 3 line insertion  LilIi additional line MM   Use our economical las)  week tree rate l ������ , ,, * ui art tor 7 Yveeks \ get Ihe  tmid week FREE  IHE FOLIOWINO CLASSIFICATIONS ARE FREE  Bi'lh Announcements lost and Fnu-ifi  payment " ust berecBivi I  by NOON SATURDAY  for Monri.iv publication    mJsv  Iv.ASILHCARD.iiin- VISA ACCEPTED ���"�����  CLA!  NOON SATURDAY  ALL FEES PAYABLE  PRIOR TO INSERTION  rr  Please mail to:  COAST NEWS Classified. Box 460. Gibsons. BC VON 1VO  or bring in person to one of our  Friendly People Places  I       Minimum '5 p��r 3 line Insertion  I  I  I  V  I  I  I  ��� 'B  rczxixrrm  i  i  L  NO. OF ISSUES  'M   M    I    I   1    I    I   1    1   I    I   1    I    1    I    1   1    1   1    1    1    1   I  CLASSIFICATION: e.g. For Sale, For Rent, etc  c  I  I  I  I  J 22.  Coast News, January 4,1988  Help Wanted  Needed for part time work,  doormen for Elphre's Cabaret.  Call Scot at 886-3336        ��  Sell-motivated bookkeeper experienced in One-Write System  and counter sales. F/T position,  Tldeline Logging & Marine.  Phone Rose for interview appt.  885-4141. TFN  Help yourself Update youri  resume, call Arbutus Office Services, 885-5212 TFN  FIRST AID/SECURITY  PART TIME EMPLOYMENT  Canadian Forest Products,  Howe Sound Pulp Division,  is seeking a Part Time First  Aid/Security person lor its  bleacb kraft pulpmill operation at Port Mellon, B.C.  The position supplies relief  to Ihe four person department for reasons ot vacation  and other leaves ol absence  Applicants must hold a valid  Industrial First Aid certificate and have qualified  experience in the lirsl aid  Held.  Interested  persons should  forward a resume outlining  their qualifications and ex  perience,  to Ihe address  shown below.  Industrial Relations  Supervisor  Canadian Forest  Products Ltd.  Howe Sound Pulp Division  Port Mellon, B.C.  VON 2S0  o  en  ���  in  oo  00  u  (A  Peace notes  INF Agreement cosmetic  by Alan Wilson  Seventeen year old Aussies Robert (left) and Mark Graham were all  smiles on their high school Graduation Day in November in Perth,  Australia. Former students at Elphinstone, where their dad, Bob,  was Counsellor, both came home with awards. Robert, who plans  to study for a B.Ed, in Music, won In History and Ancient History;  Mark received certificates of excellence In English and Economics,  and will study Occupational Therapy.  COAST NEWS Photo   Reprint*  Any published photo or your  choice from the contact sheets  5x7  8x10  $6��'  QOI  iu-      Business  Opportunities  Work Wanted  Carpenter for home renovations,  siding, etc. Brad Benson  886-2558 #3  Painting, Interior/exterior, reas.  rates. For estimate call Brian.  886-4557. #3  PEERLESS TREE  SERVICE LTD.  Topping ��� Limbing - Danger Tree  Removal,  Insured,  Guaranteed  Work. Free estimates. 885-2109.  TFN  Cleaning, gardening, janitorial,  res/comm .   grass,   windows,  gutters, split wood. 886-3580.  TFN  Handyman - gardening, painting,  fences, clean up, odd jobs,  reliable. 885-9840 Jan. #1  Experienced handyman will do  your work, reasonable. Jack.  883-9278. #1  Large dump truck avail, for hauling firewood, sand, gravel,  manure, etc., reasonable. Liz  886-9033 eves. #1  Looking for a good handyman?  Paint, wallpaper, vinyl, carpet,  ceramic, small jobs ol any kind.  886-7235 eves. #2  Prof, drywall application, filling,  no job too small, free est. Phone  885-4198 or 885-4663. #1  Busy Sunshine Coast  8AKEBY/C0FFEE SHOP  For Sale  In Major Shopping Centre  Ideal Only For Capable Baker  Phone Afternoons Only  886-3978  New & used store for sale, good  location Phone 986-8333.      #1  Keats Island Baptist Camp. The  access road through DL696 will  be closed on Dec. 30 and on  Jan. 5 lor a period ol 24 hours  each day B Johnson, Keats  Camp. #1  Application has been made for  a wafer lot lease in the Vancouver Recording District by  Laura McLeod, businesswoman, commencing at a post  placed 27.4 M.N 52'30'Wot  the southwest corner ot D.L.  5850. Group 1, N.W.D.  Thence 39.6 M. S 37' 30' W,  thence 18.3 M N 52' 30' W,  thence 39.6 M. N 37' 30' E,  thence along shoreline lo point  ol commencement The purpose tor which Ihe disposition  is required is a private mooring  facility. File #2403672.  1  Comments concerning this application may be made to Ihe  office of Ihe Senior Land Officer. 210-4240 Manor St..  Burnaby, B.C. V5G 1B2.  Town 01 Qlbiom  Contract No. 9.101.1  Construction Ot  200,000 Gallon  School RoirJ Reservoir  CALL FOR TENDERS  Sealed tenders clearly marked "Contract No. 9.101.1,  Tender for Construction of  200.000 Gallon School Road  Reservoir, will be received by  the undersigned up to 2:00 pm  local time of January 20,1988  and will be opened in public at  that time and date.  The work comprises the  construction of a reinforced  concrete 200,000 gallon reservoir and related appurtenances.  Contract documents and  drawings may be obtained  alter 2:00 pm. January 4.  1988 at the offices of Dayton &  Knight Ltd., Consulting  Engineers, 626 Clyde Avenue,  West Vancouver, B.C. V7V  3N9, upon payment of twenty-  five dollars ($25.00) which  sum will be refunded on return  of the documents In good condition within thirty (30) days ol  receipt of tenders.  The lowest or any tender will  not necessarily be accepted,  and Ihe award of contract will  be subject to funds being  legally available.  Mrs. R.L. Goddard  Clerk-Treasurer  Town of Gibsons  P.O. Box 340  1490 South Fletcher Road  Gibsons, B.C.  VON 1V0  V  GET  RIGHT  TO THE  POINT!  with  Coast News  Classifieds  885-3930  We can all breathe a little  more easily now that a deal has  been reached to pull back from  the brink of WW III with the  elimination of Intermediate  Nuclear Forces (INF) from  Europe. This is an especially important agreement because it  reduces the risk of accidental  nuclear war. The short flight  times of these INF missiles has  had us hanging by a hair for  several years, subject to computer or human error.  The importance of the agreement must be emphasized to ensure its speedy ratification and  implementation. We can't afford to settle for a protracted  debate or a slow phase-out.  Let's praise both superpowers  for having come to such a sane  decision, but while we applaud  the agreement, let's be realistic.  As some commentators have  pointed out, the INF agreement  covers at most only six percent  of the world's nuclear arsenals.  This is about one percent of the  total nuclear megatonnage!  We must also recognize that  such 'arms control' agreements  have in the past been used to  legitimize the development of  other weapons systems. Salt II,  for example, while never  ratified by the US, actually  allowed a two thirds increase in  nuclear forces. The tendency is  for arms agreements to mask  ongoing technological shifts or  build-ups in other areas.  That point was made by Professor Fred Knelman at the BC  Peace Conference this past  weekend. He argued that the  INF agreement is cosmetic in-  so-far as it fails to solve the problem of nuclear weapons in  Europe. The US for example,-  has for several years been moving to short range battlefield or  'tactical' nuclear weapons, supplying its field forces with  weapons small enough to be  transported by individual  soldiers.  Knelman also pointed out the  nuclear weapons of Britain and  France aren't covered by the  agreement. Furthermore, the  US has a plan called Flexops, to  use sea launched Cruise missile*  from ships based in European  waters. The call for a speed-up  in the development of Star  Wars, which came on the heels  of the INF announcement, certainly falls into the historic pattern.  While all this is discouraging,  it could work to our advantage  if we were to use the opportunity to turn public attention away  from Europe. Independent analysts have long said war is  unlikely to start there (except  accidentally). We need to focus  on the parts of the world where  the chances of nuclear war are  much higher, such as the Middle  East   and,   increasingly,   the  BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  These Ads appear in the mora than 70 Newsp*|  iwspapers Aiiociation and reach mora than 900,00  $129. for 25 words ($3. per each additional word)  Thau Ads appear in the mora than 70 Newspapere ol the B.C. and Yukon Community  Newspapers Aiiociation and reach more than 900,000 homoe and a potential two million readeri.  Call the COAST NEWS at 885-3930 to place one.  AUTOMOTIVE  $1 Down leases a new car or  truck. Seven Year warranty.  Payments starting at $967  mo. O.A.C. Call lease manager at   (604)465-8931.   DL  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES  FOR SALE MISC.  HELP WANTED  PERSONAL  Buy/Lease any gas, dlesel  car or truck, new or used.  Direct Irom volume factory  dealer. Call for pre-approved  credit. Call collect 464-0271.  08231.   Leaaing Expert offers any  Car/Truck lease with immediate delivery OAC. Specializing Ford Trucks Mercury Lincoln Cars. Call Doug  327-0431  Perry   personally  collect.   Want a Vehicle? Credit a  problem? For fast approval  call 1-800-863-6933.F.A.N.T  All makes and models.  D8196.   Purchase/Lease/Rent -  Volkswagen, Audi, Campers, Buses. Our Commitment is the lowest prices In  B.C. lor Volkswagen-Audi.  Call 1-800-663-9349, Capilano Volkswagen, 1151 Marin* Drive, North Vancouver,  DL6066.  1973 Freight Liner c/o tractor. Racon 350 Cummins  with one year trans, warranty. Tractor In excellent condition. Comes with Job at  large rep. company. Owner  to sell quickly. Al (604)  852-1777.   Freedom! Independence!  Make Money! Reduced  Taxes! Your Own Hours!  Capital Gains! Interested In  any of the above? Make your  life Interesting, challenging,  fun! Call Wilda (604)684-  9892. Learn about a great  opportunity.  Specialized trucking company for sale. Boat moving  & large tanks. Profitable  History. Owner Retiring.  Contact D. Clarke 461-0560  Ste #326-720 Sixth St. New  Westminster V3L 3C5.  EDUCATIONAL   Victoria Halrdressing School  738 Fort Street, Victoria,  B.C. V8W 1H2. Now accepting applications for January  classes. Also offering refresher courses in halrdress-  Ing. Phone 388-6222.  Diploma correspondence.  Free calendar. High School  upgrading, accounting, management, administration,  secretarial, computers. Established 1964. National College, 444 Robson, Vancouver, 688-4913 toll tree 1-800-  367-1281, 24 houra.   EQUIPMENT AND  MACHINERY  Lighting Fixtures.  Canada s   largest  fid  B.C. V5C 2K5. Phone  Western  display.  Wholesale and retail. Free  Catalogues available. Nor-  burn Lighting Centre, 4600  East Hastings Street, Burnaby, B.C. V5C  Woodstove Liquidation. New  Mountain Glow Woodstoves.  $525 & $565. 1-574-3982.  Please leave message.  GARDENING   Greenhouse & Hydroponlc  equipment, supplies. Everything you need. Best quality,  super low prices. Greenhouse $175., Halldes $115.  Over 3,000 products In  stock! Send $2 lor Info pack  & Free magazine to Western  Water Farms, 1244 Seymour  St., Vancouver. B.C. V6B  3N9. 1-604-682-6636.  Curved glass patio extensions starting at $1,095.  Hobby greenhouses starting  at $599. Full line of greenhouse accessories. Call B.C.  Greenhouse Builders toll-  free 1-800-242-0673 or writ*  7425 Hedley Avenue, Bur-  naby, B.C. V5E2R1.  HELP WANTED  Logging Trucks. New and  used. Complete financing  available. Fully rigged  Jeeps, Tri-axles, highway  and off-highway. Phone  Steve or Grant art 1-800-  663-6205.   Portable Morbark Post Peeler - Power unit re-built  $12,000. 75-AG Michigan  Loader with log grapple and  bucket - $9,000. Phone 347-  9565.    FOR SALE MISC.   Wonderful World of Sheepskin. Largest Selection of  sheepskin products and New  Zealand Wool and sheepskin  mattress pads In Canada.  Coats, Seatcovers, Slippers -  much, much more. Kelowna  - Phone 765-2300. Toll Free,  1-600-663-4333 B.C.. Alta.  Senior Sales Person Required - Immediate vacancy, the  Peace Arch requires an experienced sales person to  handle an established sales  territory plus a real estate  product. Applicants should  forward resumes by courier  or fax to 531-7977 to Barry  Banlulls, Advertising Manager, Peace Arch News,  1335 Johnston Road, White  Rock B.C.   Ibec Aquaculture Is accepting applications lor experienced Seafarm manager.  Send resume to Box 769,  Port McNeill, B.C. VON 2R0.  No phone calls please.  Work in Japan. Individuals  with a degree or experience  in electronics and electrical  engineering, TESOL, linguistics, pharmacy, securities/finance or business  management interested in  teaching English for one  year In Japan to employees  of me|or corporations/government ministries should  write to: International Education Services, Shin Taiso  Building, 10-7, Dogenzaka  2-chome, Shlbuya-ku, Tokyo  150, Japan. Information on  the position will be sent  after receiving a detailed  resume and photograph.  The Skeena Innovation Project Is taking applications for  a Managing Coordinator.  Location: Terrace. Salary:  $35,000 - $40,000. Responsibilities: Manage staff of 6,  Proper delivery of S.i.P.s,  employment Initiative services, Knowledge/experience of social cultural Issues  related to contemporary native concerns. Contact Clar-  ency Nyle 639-9361,   The Skeena Innovation Pilot  Project Is taking applications  for three program officers.  (Location Terrace). Salary  $34,000 - $38,000. Duties -  Development planning strategies that will Improve labour market conditions In  Native Communities. Closing Date Jan.22/87. Information Contact Clarence  Nyle 639-9361.   Certified Mechanic required  In the beautiful and warm  Fraser Valley. Dealership  services all makes. Prefer  tune-up and/or automatic  experience. Send resume to  Box 841, c/o The Chllllwack  Progress, 45860 Spadlna  Ave., Chllllwack, B.C. V2P  3H9.  world's oceans. It is the naval  arms race which should concern  us most now.  The superpowers' navies constitute one of the three legs of  the nuclear triad, complementing the other two legs, the  bomber forces and land-based  missiles. Originally the missile  submarines of both sides were  invulnerable and thus provided  a reliable retaliatory deterrent,  something like the bomber  forces.  Nowadays, however, while  the Soviet submarine force retains the traditional defensive  posture, the US navy has  adopted an aggressive policy of  forward-basing close to Soviet  territory for the launching of a  possible pre-emptive first strike  at Soviet land-based missiles  (where the Soviets have 74 per  cent of their missiles). The US  navy also has a policy of  'escalation dominance', the preemptive destruction of Soviet  ballistic missile subs prior to the  outbreak of war.  These interlocking policies,  known as the Maritime Strategy, are designed to handle two  of the three legs of the Soviet  nuclear triad. The Maritime  Strategy involved antisubmarine warfare to take out  the sea-leg of the triad (that's  where the Nanoose test range,  comes in). In turn, the land-leg  is vulnerable to the new US submarine ballistic missiles (Trident  C4 and D5) which are so accurate they can take out Soviet  missiles still in their silos.  Professor Knelman pointed  out that these developments are  particularly ominous if seen in  conjunction with Star Wars.  While many scientists have said  it is impossible to create a  perfect space defence, Star  Wars might be able to meet US  requirements if it has . fewer  Soviet missiles to cope with.  Singles Today. The magazine and introduction servTce  for single people Is pleased  to announce the opening of  Its Vancouver office. Telephone 433-9450. Canada's  Largest Introduction Service.  Calf for a free magazine.  Don't be alone. Join Slnglea  Today. Canada's Largest  Introduction Service. For details call 433-9490. Also receive a free copy of our  latest magazine listing  10OP's ol single people.  PET8 AND LIVESTOCK  Dachshund S.S. C.K.C.  8/wks. Shots, wormed, tattooed, ready. Guaranteed.  From champion mother. B &  T start $275. Red $350.  Chocolate $400. Dapple  $500.  Phone 7-9pm   1-462-  9702.   REAL ESTATE   Okanagan lakeview properly  ��� three adjoining parcels  totalling 1.95 acres. 1- Older  four Bedroom, 1- 3 bedroom  and Vt acre building lot.  $15,000 plus assume small  mortgage. Box 402, Sum-  merland, B.C. VOH 1Z0.  8ERVICE8  IC8C owe you money for  personal injury? Vancouver  lawyer Carey Linda (slnoe  1972) has Free Information.  Phone 1-684-7798. Second  Opinions Gladly Given.  ICBC Injury Claims? Call  Dale Carr-Harrls - 20 yeara ���  trial lawyer with five years  medical school before law. 0-  669-4922 (Vancouver). Experienced In head Injury and  other major claims. Percent-  age lees available.   TRAVEL   Book CUBA Holidays with  Kaegl Travel. Over 70,000  Canadians visited CUBA In  1986 alonel Golden Ag* Die-  counts (50 Plus)! Kaegl Travel, 421 W. Broadway, van-  - - ��������� 1R4. r  With most Soviet ICBM's  destroyed in their silos by a preemptive strike, SDI could provide effective defence against  the remainder.  Retaliation by Soviet bombers and their much less  sophisticated Cruise missiles  (the third leg of the triad) could  be dealt with by Strategic Air  Defence forces located in northern Canada. Knelman stated  that our government is quietly  going along with US plans to  deploy kinetic and laser  weapons in our north. Not only  does this make Canada a target  but by diverting sop,c of the  Soviet missile forces it further  undermines their deterrence  capability (the ability to credibly  threaten widespread destruction  in the US).  This in turn reduces the  security of the west by causing  |the Soviets to move to hair trigger launch policies, by forcing  them to build up their land based forces, and by making  agreements on long range  missile forces much less likely.  While some in the west might  feel more secure with these US  defence plans, in reality we all  will be much less secure. Undoubtedly the Soviets see these  moves as provocative, as a  possible first strike, whether  they are or not. And the fundamental truth of the nuclear  'age is that if one side is insecure,  both are insecure. The only true  security is common security.  That is why we must redouble  .our efforts and not rest easy  with this as yet very partial success. We in Canada must  recognize our unique ability to  halt these developments by denying the use of our territory  for anti-submarine warfare  testing, for Cruise missile  testing, and for SDI testing and  deployment. The first step is to  withdraw from NORAD.  Body needs  right fuel  by Dennis Labbe  It is truly a sad fact that most  people know more about their  automobile than they know  about their own body. An  automobile requires continued  maintenance. You must change  the oil, the coolant and the  grease. Periodically you replace  filters, electrical parts, tires,  belts, lights etc. You must also  use the proper fuel and if a car  is kept clean, it always looks  good.  The human body is not unlike the automobile, it requires  chemical changes. It has its  own unique inate ability to  repair and replace some parts,  (some unfortunately cannot be  replaced), and it requires the  proper fuel and must be kept  clean.  The automobile is made up  of various integral parts to  allow it to function. The body  is made up of millions upon  millions of cells. The cells make  up the tissues and the tissues  make up the organs, bones,  nerves etc., which must work  with integrated cooperation.  Certain types of cells require  specific fuels or they will not  function.  One does not put used oil or  unclean fuel into their  automobile without some bad  side effects. To keep the  human body working at its optimum, one must be aware of  the best fuels and how to use  them. The human body requires specific amounts of  minerals, vitamins, proteins,  carbohydrates and fats. When  Fundraising  drive on  one or more of these are not  provided we cannot expect the  body to function properly.  The human body is not just  physical as is the automobile.  The human is also mental and  spiritual and these require a  special fuel. Along with nutritional needs, we also must have  clean air, pure water, good  nerve energy, clean and  wholesome blood, meaningful  interpersonal relationships,  emotional poise, personal  growth and the proper exercise  and rest.  With the automobile, bad  fuel will cause poor performance. When fuel does not  enter the combustion chamber  properly it runs roughly. When  fuel is ignited and there is a  malfunction, such as tuning, it  performs poorly. When carbon  builds up within the motor, problems are sure to arise.  Good health is not simply  good nutrition. The old cliche  'You are what you eat', is not  complete. It should read, 'You  are what you eat, you are what  you assimilate, you are what  you metabolize, and you are  what you do not eliminate.'  As you learn more about  how to maintain your automobile, you know for a fact  that it will perform without  serious problems for a long  period of time. That exact attitude should be applied when  considering the human body.  Prevention is the magic  bullet. If you do something  good for your body today, it  will benefit you tomorrow.  couver, B.C. V5Y '  879-  More than five million Canadians suffer from some form of  lung disease - the number one  cause of absenteeism from work  and school.  The B.C. Lung Association's  annual Christmas Seal Campaign to fight lung disease is  now under way, says Sunshine  Coast-area Christmas Seal  chairperson Patricia Murphy.  The purpose of the campaign is  to raise public awareness about  lung disease and to raise funds  for lung disease research and  health education.  This year's goal for the Sunshine Coast area is $8,230.  "When the Uing Association  was founded 80 years ago, its  sole concern was tuberculosis.  With tuberculosis now under  control, the Association is ag  gressively challenging lung  I cancer, emphysema, asthma,  land occupational lung diseases.  jSome of the diseases' related  'causes - cigarette smoking, air  ipollution and environmental  hazards in the workplace ��� are  also.of great concern to the  [Association," says Maurice  Cownden, president of the  Association.  He adds that lung disease in  children, especially asthma, is a  serious problem affecting the  quality of life and life itself. Of  all the causes of illness among  children, most disabilities and  deaths are the result of  respiratory disease.  The B.C. Lung Association  hopes the 1987 Campaign will  generate at least one million  dollars. Coast News, January 4,1988  23.  Tragedy of polio  haunts victims  Still no winner for this Guess Where so the prize of $15 will be  awarded to the first correct entry drawn which locates the above.  Send your entries to reach the Coast News, Box 4(0, Gibsons by  Saturday of this week.  Police news  On December 28 at 4 am  there was a fire at the Jade  Palace restaurant. The fire,  which occurred at the plastic  'bubble' window, was quickly  controlled by the Fire Department. There was an appearance  of arson and subsequent investigation led to the arrest of  three youths against whom  charges of attempted break-in  are anticipated.  Charges against the same  three youths are also anticipated  in the break-in and theft about  two weeks ago in the Oriental  Gardens restaurant and the  Village Store.  On December 27 there was a  break-in and theft in a Gibsons  residence in which $831 was  stolen from a wallet. Reminder:  Lock your doors when you are  going out.  On December 30 an investigation coordinated by the  Gibsons and Sechelt  detachments led to a quantity of  marihuana being found in a  Gibsons residence. Charges are  pending.  During the past two months  information given to police  through 886-TIPS has been very  helpful.  Polio, the most devastating  epidemic to hit a generation of  North Americans, is a ghost  returning to haunt its victims.  Hundreds of British Columbians between the ages of 30  and 70, all with histories of  polio, have come forward with  symptoms which appear to be a  progression of the disability  which had incapacitated them  years ago.  The disability is called post  polio syndrome. The symptoms  are: muscle weakness, fatigue,  muscle and joint pain,  respiratory difficulty and  susceptibility to cold.  Faculty from the School of  Rehabilitation Medicine at UBC  and the G.F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre are working to give  people with post polio syndrome a chance to get their lives  back on track. They are looking  for people who have been  diagnosed with the syndrome to  sign up for a clinical trial, which  will get underway in January.  "You have people who as  children, had severe polio,"  said Dr. Cecil Hershler, a  specialist in physical medicine.  "They're in bed for two years  or so. They get out of it, they go  back to school, they cope  through their youth and get involved in tremendously active  occupations. It's devastating for  them when they come in tell us  they can't do what they were  doing sue months ago."  The people who have come  forward with the symptoms  have experienced everything  from leg cramps to severe  respiratory complications, some  came down with simple bouts of  the flu and ended up on  respirators.  The most popular theory  about the syndrome is the first  bout of polio resulted in the  death of nerve cells. It meant  the nerve cells that were left  over had to go to work double-  time, resulting in more stress on  ligaments and joints because  muscles were working beyond  their capacity.  Dr. Elizabeth Dean heads the  Rehabilitation Medicine team.  She is hoping to find out  whether a general conditioning  program will improve the  strength people need to perform  the activities of daily living.  "I don't know whether this is  a question of curing polio or  whether it's a question of  managing it," said Dean. "We  have done some preliminary  work already, looking at the effect of a modified aerobic training program, and we've found  some dramatic improvement in  the small number of patients  we've examined so far."  The clinical trial will take that  work further. It will include an  aerobics program, a muscle  training program, and a combination of those programs. As  well, a control group will be  established, whose members  will eventually move into the  training programs. The UBC  team wants to recruit 80 people  who have post polio syndrome.  "There are several studies  which only have analyzed the  effects of post polio syndrome  on muscles because patients  complain of muscle fatigue and  muscle pain," said Dean. "In  this study, we're looking at cardiorespiratory function of the  patient as well, so we'll come up  with the whole picture."  Opportunity  tohave a voice in the  economic and social  development of  your community  Hon. Elwood Veitch Minister of State for Mainland/Southwest Region and  Parliamentary Secretaries John Jansen and Norman Jacobsen, will hold a public  meeting February 4,1988 in the Sechelt/Gibsons area:  ��� to hear your ideas and opinions;  ��� to find ways to cut red tape, boost small business and  support individual initiative;  ��� to help develop the potential of this region.  LOCATION: Greene Court Hall,  5810 Medusa Street,  Sechelt, B.C.  TIME: 9:00 A.M.  As part of its decentralization plan, your Provincial Government wants to  improve the way major decisions are made, by more directly involving the  people affected.  Your views are wanted  If you wish to take advantage of the opportunity to present the views of your  business or service group, association, or group of concerned citizens, on the  economic and social development of this region, please send a written  submission to: The Hon. Elwood Veitch  Minister of State, Mainland/Southwest Region  Care of:  Gary Swift, Government Agent  102 Teredo Square  Box 950  Sechelt, B.C.  VON 3A0  Phone: 885-5187  BUILDING BRITISH COLUMBIA FROM THE COMMUNITY LEVEL.  BC^  MAINLAND/SOUTHWEST REGION  Hon. Elwood Veitch, Minister  SPRING TERM COURSES  IN SECHELT  Unless otherwise stated, all courses listed will be  held at the NEW Sechelt Campus, 5627 Inlet  Avenue.  ACADEMIC/CAREER/  VOCATIONAL COURSES (Credit)  Classes commence the week of January 11, Fees  are $23.50 per credit hour, plus $25.00 non/  refundable registration fee.  ENGLISH 29071 CREATIVE WRITING  3 Credits  Prerequisite: English 190 or 191 or Creative Writing 291.  Instructor: Robert Sherrin  14 Tuesdays - 6:30 to 10:30 PM  ART 154-71 ORAWING 1  3 Credits  Prerequisite: None  Instructor: Paul Deggan  14 Tuesdays ��� 6:45 to 9:45 PM  MUSIC 180-71  1.5 Credits  Prerequisite: None  A course to teach the basics of improvision on chord changes.  Location: Pender Harbour  Instructor: Fred Ardiel  14 Mondays - 7:00 to 10:00 PM  TOURISM MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE PROGRAM  The Tourism Management Certificate continues at Capilano  College Sechelt with three weekend courses. The course gives  students access to the most current concepts and applications  in the field of tourism management.  Detailed brochure available by phoning Capilano College  Sechelt, 885-9310.  TOURISM 113 HUMAN RESOURCE  DEVELOPMENT IN TOURISM  Fridays/Saturdays/Sundays, January 22-24 & 29-31  TOURISM 116 SPECIAL EVENTS AS TOURISM GENERATORS  Fridays/Saturdays/Sundays, February 12-14 & 19-21  TOURISM 118 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT  IN THE TOURISM INDUSTRY  Fridays/Saturdays/Sundays, March 4-6 & 11-13  ADULT BASIC EDUCATION/ FOUNDATION PROGRAM  Prerequisite: Minimum age 17 and out of school for one year;  maturity.  This full or part-time program provides students with the opportunity to upgrade their skills and knowledge of English,  Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences. Completion of the program will either increase your employment opportunities, provide the qualifications for entry into vocational  training programs, or prepare you for studies at a higher  academic level.  Instructors: Elaine Futterman, John Pass, Julie Southerst  16 weeks starting January 11  You are requested to phone the College Receptionist for  timetable details.  EXTENSION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES  (Non-Credit)  10% discount on Extension Programs up to January 9.  WORD PROCESSING ON A MICROCOMPUTER  7:00 to 9:00 PM. Monday & Wednesday, February 1  or  7:00 to 9:00 PM Tuesday & Thursday, February 2 ��� $115,  DO'S FOR THE IBM-PC/PC COMPATIBLE  9:00 to 4:00 PM Saturdays, January 9 or 16 or 23 ��� $65.  BASICS OF MICROCOMPUTERS  7:00 to 10:00 PM Monday/Wednesday January 4  or  7:00 to 10:00 PM Tuesday/Thursday January 5 ��� $130.  LOTUS LOOK-ALIKES  9:00 to 4:00 PM Saturday March 5 ��� $65.  MARKETING SKILLS FOR CRAFTSPERSONS  9:00 to 5:00 PM Friday February 5 ��� $45.  GETTING YOUR PRODUCT TO MARKET  6:00 to 9:00 PM (dinner meeting) Wednesday. February 3. - $20  (includes dinner).  FOODSAFE  LEVEL 1 (kitchen and dining room staff) 9:00 to 1:30, 2 Fridays  January 8 & 22 - $45.  LEVEL 2 (managers, chefs) 9:00 to 1:30 PM, 2 Fridays, February  12 & 26 -$45.  Training for employers and employees in preventing foodborne  diseases. Causes of disease, how to run a sanitary operation  and food purchase and storage is covered.  FLAGPERSON TRAINING  9:00 to 4:00 PM Saturday. February 13 - $45.  UNDERSTANDING CHILDREN'S BEHAVIOUR  9:00 to 3:30 PM Saturday, February 20 ��� $40 (or $35 if taken with  next course).  PLANNING A PROGRAM FOR YOUNG CHILDREN  9:00 to 3:30 PM Saturday March 19- $40 (or $35 if taken with  above course).  COURSES & OTHER SERVICES  ACHIEVEMENT RESOURCE CENTRE  Free Workshops  Instructor: Bev Hill  RESUME WRITING  5 Sessions, Tuesdays 9:00 to 10:01 AM starting March 1.  ORGANIZING YOUR WARDROBE  5 Sessions, Tuesdays 11:00 AM to 12 noon starting March 1.  LIBRARY SERVICES  Access to books and media collection at the North Vancouver  campus is provided by microfiche catalogue, and a small collection in Sechelt is available to the public and students.  COUNSELLING SERVICE  A counsellor is available on a part-time basis. Call for an appointment.  AOUACULTURE COURSES  A number of courses are being planned for this Spring through  the Aquaculture Resource Centre at the Sechelt Campus.  Please call the campus to have your name put on our mailing  list if you wish more information on these courses. (885-9310).  The Centre also has information on topics related to the industry. Call or drop In 12:30 -7:00 PM Monday to Friday.  SMALL BUSINESS CENTRE  A business counsellor is available to discuss planning, financing or operating a small business. Please call 885-9310 for an  appointment.  CAPILANO COLLEGE ���  SECHELT CAMPUS,  5627 Inlet Avenue, Sechelt, B.C.  Telephone 885-9310. 24.  Coast News, January 4,1988  Now, where was il I left my kitty litter...?  -Myrtle Winchester photo  Massage therapists say  cutbacks will cost  Health Minister Peter  Dueck has plans for a cutback  in health care services that  could be disastrous for B.C.  says the Massage Therapists'  Association (MTA) of B.C.  MTA President Peter Behr  says he has been reliably informed that massage therapy,  chiropractic, naturopathy and  other services could be de-  insured by the end of the year.  The MTA believes the cuts  will be made at the same time  that a government committee  is named to look for other  cost-cutting measures in the  B.C. health care system.  "Nothing should be cut until that committee has filed its  report," Behr said. "To make  - this kind of purge in the name  ! of saving money is cutting off  your nose to spite your face.  "It's deptive-atization.  They want to keep the car but  ; save money by not putting oil  in it.  "Over 60,000 patients a  year are referred to us by  medical doctors," Behr said,  "all for valid medical reasons  ranging from arthritis to  multiple sclerosis to whiplash.  "If we are taken off the  Medical Services Plan a good  percentage of those people are  going to be deprived of treatment for financial reasons.  They are going to Hood public  facilities that are already overcrowded, and they won't be  getting the treatment that their  physician felt was best for  them."  Behr says that public care of  those patients will be much  more expensive than it is now.  He says the typical course of  four to live massage therapy  treatments costs the health  care system $35 to $75 in total.  MTA figures show almost  every other comparable treatment would cost more, so  Behr predicts that removing  massage therapy from Medical  Services and Workers' Compensation coverage will increase health care costs, not  save money.  "We have made every effort  to demonstrate our cost-  effectiveness, to show how all  those 60,000 patients come  with medical referrals and how  we can successfully treat 87  percent of them," Behr said.  "But the Minister has not  responded."  He said his association has  been calling for a public forum  Proctor-Silex recalls  Drip coffeemakers  Proctor-Silex Canada Inc.  has announced it is voluntarily  recalling certain drip coffeemakers made prior to April,  1986, because they represent a  potential fire or shock hazard.  The coffeemakers involved  are Model A566W Series  G3758 and Model A567W  Series 4258 and Series D1068.  The model and series numbers  are stamped on the bottom of  the appliance.  The potential hazard was  discovered by Proctor-Silex. It  results from a defect in a component part of the cof-  feemaker, supplied by another  company. These units were  manufactured during three  one week production runs in  the months of September and  October of 1985 and March  1986.  The coffeemakers subject to  the voluntary recall  are no  longer being manufactured,  nor are they available in retail  stores.  In the interest of safety, the  manufacturer requests that  owners of Proctor-Silex coffeemakers carrying the above  model and series numbers  discontinue their use and  return them by mail, as soon  as possible. The unit should be  packed carefully. Include a  label with your name and  mailing address in block print.  Send to:  Proctor-Silex Canada Inc.,  Department 514, P.O. Box  1630, Picton, Ontario K0K  2T0. (613)476-2191.  The coffeemaker will be  reworked and returned at no  charge. Reworked units can be  identified by the addition of  the letter 'R' and three additional characters adjacent to  the 'Series' code.  The pride in our  VERTICAL &  HORIZONTAL BLINDS  is equalled only by our  100% LIFETIME GUARANTEE  ��� Choose from over 1000 choices of  colour, fabric and patterns  ��� Our 100% Lifetime Guarantee ��� it's  outstanding in our industry  ��� Vertical and Horizontal Blinds,  Woven Woods and Pleated Shades  ���we stand at the leading edge of window covering technology  ��� Every order is custom made  ��� FREE: Ask for this 'must read' full colour booklet detailing in five steps  how to achieve function and enhanced design with your window  treatments.  Always  Insist on  Louver  Drape  on health care policy since  April.  Patients, practitioners and  everyone involved in health  care should have a chance to  contribute their opinion. But a  political solution could be imposed on us," Behr said.  "Massage therapy costs $1 a  year for everyone in B.C." he  said, "It costs less than the administration of the Health  Ministry. It doesn't make  sense to change it."  Behr points out that of the  total $962.9 million spent on  medical services last year, 93  percent went to medical doctors and the remaining 7 percent was split mainly by  physical medicine practitioners: massage therapy,  chiropractic, and physiotherapy.  Bud Koch  predicts  by Ken Collins  1988 will be a year of  economic growth for the Sunshine Coast, Sechelt Mayor Bud  Koch said in a New Year's interview with the Coast News. His  analysis is based on the spinoffs  that could come from Pacific  Rim development.  "I see Canada pushing Japan  for second place in the world  and Vancouver taking its  rightful place in the Pacific  Rim," he said.  Koch also sees the formation  of the new economic development zones and the Sunshine  Coast being aligned with the  Lower Mainland as a positive  step. "We are in that zone and  we see some really great  benefits. Port Mellon, for example," he said, "is going to  give us a real shot in the arm."  A newsprint plant will be added  to the pulp mill.  Local improvements will be  going full steam ahead in 1988.  Koch said, "We are carrying a  very healthy surplus," referring  lo municipal finances. He anticipates eight of nine local road  improvement projects in the  coming year. In both Davis Bay  and Trail Bay, Mayor Koch said  the waterfront would be  upgraded.  The larger projects on the  drawing board include the 18  hole executive golf course, complete with pitch and putt and  facilities for growing turf. The  present arena will evolve into  the 19th hole, and the recently  purchased Block 7 will house  both an ice and roller rink as  part of a community recreational centre and Kinnikinnik  Park will have a ball field.  And the mayor wishes Sechelt  a "Happy New Year!"  For MORE  COMFORT  at LESS  COST  Consider  Energy Saving Double Glazed Windows  New Extended Warranty  Call  INVEST SELECTIVELY  FOR YOUR OBJECTIVES  for ideas and advice:  GORDON ROSS  661-2332 Collect  P.O. Box 1068.  Vancouver. B.C.  V6C 3E8  ' A Winning Attitude  Announcing the formation ot a new company!  COMPLETE FOREST MANAGEMENT SERVICES  LOGGING T    V��,  ENGINEERING '^r^VM  JBL FORESTRY SERVICES  Division ol Jackson BrolMu Logging Co Ltd.  R.R. #1 SECHELT, BRITISH COLUMBIA VON 3A0  TELEPHONE (604) 885-3287  ONEIDA  5-Pc. Place  k   Setting Sale!  COMMUNITY"  SILVERPLATE  Sale  $4999  Reg. $70.00  SAVES20.01  Enchantment'  SAVE UP TO  ISSIH ROGERS*"  SILVERPLATE  Sale  ��29."  Reg. $39.95  SAVES9.S6  King Jamas'  . , ......     J'��iii��f&it!  Dinner Fork, Dinner Knife, Dessert  Spoon, Teaspoon.  Matching 2-Pc. Gift Sets at substantial savings!  An inexpensive way to complete a fine service  of silverplate or 18/8 stainless flatware.  SHOP NOW! SALE ENDS JANUARY 30, 1988  All Oneida Stainless patterns  are made trom highest quality  18/8 stainless.  <KITCHEN  CARNIVAL  DELUXE STAINLESS by ONEIDA '"  Sale$15"    Refl $260�� savesu>01  LTD'"  STAINLESS  Sale  Reg. $94.00  SAVE $27.01  99  Easton'  HEIRLOOM-  STAINLESS  Sale  *���-     Colonial'  Up tO    tZOQ/      OFF    Every Item in the Shop   (except Murchie's products)  qCITCHEN  CRRNIVflL  No Visa or Mastercard on 50% OFF items  885-3611  Cowrie St., Sechelt

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