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Sunshine Coast News Mar 19, 1990

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 (  Legislative Library  Parliament Buildings  Victoria, B.C. V8V 1X4  90.8  viears Gospel Rock concerns  by Dave Fraser  Ninety people crowded into  Gibsons Council chambers  Tuesday to defend a natural  monument they have grown to  love over the years.  Some considered the public  hearing into the rezoning of  Gospel Rock for a large housing  development a last ditch effort  to save a favourite place to  watch wildlife, picnic and otherwise enjoy the natural environment.  At stake is a 78 acre portion  of flat land above Gower Point  Road which will accommodate  150 or more houses. Fielding  questions from the large croud  was Hayden Killam, acting as  agent for the property owner,  Valentine Lands Corporation of  Richmond.  The hearing was adjourned  after almost two hours of questions and will be reconvened on  Monday, March 26 at the council chambers.  Several residents said existing  water supplies and sewage treatment facilities are insufficient to  accommodate such a large  development. Others said noise  and traffic would threaten a  nest of eagles at the site, while  two residents were worried  about their properties being affected by changed creek flows  upstream.  Jim Gurney, a regional  district director for Area E and  owner of two Gower Point  Road properties, said the  town's infrastructure was incapable of dealing with such a  large development.  "The town is not in a position to collect sufficient  development cost charges from  these subdivisions to offset their  costs to the town's service in-  frastruciure."  Development cost charges are  the mechanism by which new  developments buy into utilities  which are already in place in the  municipality.  "I resent the town offering  the spare capacity that I have  paid for to a new developer  without having to collect from  that developer a fair development cost charge."  He noted development cost  charges were reduced a few  years ago to encourage development in the area. Gurney said  these charges are grossly inadequate to serve the area.  "Past experience shows that  other much needed capital projects to serve the existing  population of Gibsons are  postponed to serve these new  developments."  Gurney said there is insufficient water capacity in town  supply lines to serve the  development, particularly for  fire fighting requirements. He  noted that during the past three  or four years, reservoirs have  had difficulty serving the area  during periods of peak demand.  "Expensive improvements to  the reservoir and pumps would  be required if the development  was to go in, at an additional  cost to the town," Gurney added.  He also pointed out that the  spare capacity of the present  sewer service area in the Gibsons Treatment Plant is already  overcommitted and road access  is inadequate for the Gospel  Rock development.  "There will have to be construction of new arterial roads  and upgrading of others to accommodate this development."  He said much more work is  needed to make development  cost charges fair and equitable,  backed up with technical information.  "Council is engaged in the  pursuit of additional tax base  without considering the costs of  additional responsibilities."  Gurney said the by-law  amendment is premature with  respect to the town's ability to  service the area. He urged the  town to concentrate on projects  which can be served by the existing infrastructure.  But Killam said Gurney was  premature in insisting that infrastructure concerns should be  addressed now.  "When it comes time for subdivision then every pipe has to  work, every fire hydrant has to  work, the water has to be there,  the sewage has to work and the  roads have to work. Otherwise  no subdivision."  Killam said the town's  engineering department has  provided all the technical  answers to the concerns raised  by Gurney, except for road access, "because they weren't involved in that."  Celia Fisher asked that  Gospel Rock be set aside as a  natural monument. Said another resident: "The town should  find out what the community  wants for a park and secure it  by dedication before rezoning."  Some residents expressed  worries that the developer may  designate as parkland an area  other than Gospel Rock or the  waterfront, as called for in the  town's Official Community  Plan (OCP).  Killam said the OCP clearly  states that the developer shall  designate parkland in a location  acceptable to the local government. "You just told the local  government where you want it,  so presumably at the subdivision stage, they will get it for  you."  Stan Carsky of Franklin  Road raised concerns about the  smell from the sewage outfall.  "Additional sewage would ruin  the best beaches," said Carsky.  "Bathers don't like the idea of  swimming in treated sewage."  Patricia Braithwaite said the  town's OCP calls for the highest  priority be given to designating  Gospel Rock as park. "It is the  only public lookout in  Gibsons."  Please (urn lo page 4  The Sunshine  25-per copy on news stands       March 19,1990      Volume 44      Issue 12  RCMP hearing  first in Canada  While he didn't win a prize for railing the most money for Cystic Fibrosis, there's little question that  Bud Kendall of Kendall Agencies sported the ugliest tie in Gibsons Chamber of Commerce's "Ugly  Tie Contest" held In Sunnycrest Mall Saturday afternoon. The chamber raised almost $500 for the  worthy cause. The complete list of winners Is on the front page of this week's "Shop Sunnycrest" supplement on Page 5. -Frill Bonulde photo  No barges on Mason Road  by Rose Nicholson  Sechelt Council has passed a  motion that 'Mason Road not  be used as an off-loading site  for barged in houses'. A further motion that the  Municipality apply for a  foreshore lease for recreational  purposes a. the foot of Mason  was passed unanimously.  The special Council meeting  on March 12 was attended by a  large crowd of West Sechelt  residents who continued to express their objections to the  house moving activities that  have been taking place in that  area.  Early in the meeting Mayor  Tom Meredith attempted to  propose a compromise solution  that would have permitted offloading of barges between 7 am  and 7 pm on Mondays,  Tuesdays and Wednesdays in  the months from October to  May, with the house being  moved immediately to the  parking lot at the Wakefield  Inn until the 2 am permit time  for moving along the highway.  "Most of the houses are going to Area B, but obviously  some will be coming to the  District of Sechelt," said  Meredith. "Should we deny the  ones going to Area B and accept the ones destined for  Sechelt? I don't think so."  A suggestion by Alderman  Doug Reid that alternate offloading sites at Field Road or  Porpoise Bay be considered  brought out a point by Alderman Mike Shanks that the increased distances, either  through the Skookumchuck by  barge, or the longer distance by  road along the highway from  Wilson Creek and through the  downtown core of Sechelt,  would add unreasonable costs  for the prospective homeowners.  Alderman Bob Graham  pointed out that existing bylaws are in place to take care of  the issue. "There is a strip of  land between the highwater  mark and the road that belongs  to the Municipality," he  pointed out, "and the road is  also under our jurisdiction. It's  just a matter of by-law enforcement."  Don Fraser of Meier Road  reminded Council that there is  a municipal policy that opposes  the issue of any new commercial and industrial foreshore  leases where the upland area is  designated for residential or  park and recreational use.  "The area is a Water 1 (W I)  zone," he said. "I'm sure your  town planner will tell you that  the permitted uses of W 1 zone  do not indicate anything in the  way of barging."  Please tum to page 8  by Caryl Worden  When Sechelt resident  Donald Robinson was arrested  by Gibsons RCMP, he was  drunk but uninjured. When he  was released from the detachment the next morning, Robinson checked himself into St.  Mary's Hospital. Doctors say  that if he hadn't gone for immediate medical attention, he  would have died within a matter  of hours.  'What happened to Robinson  during his nine-hour stay in the  Gibsons cell came under national scrutiny last week in the  first hearing by the RCMP  Public Complaints Commission  (PCQ.  The PCC is a federal review  panel that is independent of the  RCMP with the authority to  review public complaints  against members of the force.  The commission was set up on  September 30, 1988; ironically  the same date as Robinson's arrest.  Robinson, 30, was arrested at  Elphie's Cabaret for being intoxicated in a public place. In  his testimony, the logger admitted that he was in several altercations with other cell mates  during which his face was cut  and bruised. He also alleged  that after the first fight, Corporal Bruce Waite took him  from the cell into a nearby interview room, and "punched me  in the stomach and threw me to  the floor," Robinson testified.  "I grabbed his leg to try and  stop him from hitting me more,  but he kicked me with his other  leg two or three more times in  the stomach, then he picked me  up by the hair and slammed me  into the wall," Robinson continued, and attributed his life  threatening injuries to this  assault.  As well as the complaint of  assault brought against Waite  by Robinson, a complaint of  failure to protect a prisoner  while in custody and failure to  provide proper medical attention was brought against the  RCMP by Robinson's mother,  Bev Farewell.  An RCMP internal investigation which followed the complaints last year found that the  assault charges were unsubstantiated, but Waite received  disciplinary actions for failure  to follow proper procedure. Not  satisfied with the conclusions,  Robinson and Farewell brought  the matter to the BC Ombudsman who referred it to the  PCC.  Dr. Robin Evison, who attended Robinson at St. Mary's  Hospital, told the commission  panel that on admittance  Robinson was in a state of  severe shock, had massive cuts  and bruises on his face and was  bleeding internally. Robinson  was taken by helicopter to Lions  Gate Hospital for treatment of  internal abdominal injuries.  Both Waite and Corporal  Mark Sorokan, who was also  on duty that night, testified that  Robinson was taken to the interview room to "quiet him  down". They said Robinson  had already been warned in the  cell to stop being an aggressor  against another intoxicated  prisoner.  "I told Mr. Robinson that he  had to settle down and was  shaking my finger at him,"  Waite told the panel. "Robinson grabbed for my finger and I  immediately swept his feet out  from under him. He went to the  floor. He grabbed for my leg  and I felt that he was going to  bite me. I grabbed him by the  hair and pulled him up to his  feet."  When it seemed Robinson  was still going to fight him,  Waite said he again tripped him  to the floor and again pulled  him upright by his hair. He said  that at no time did he kick or  punch Robinson.  "Why didn't you just back  off? You're much larger than  Robinson, you should have had  no problem controlling him,"  Commission Council Don  Sorochan said, and asked why  Waite hadn't used other RCMP  restraint techniques such as an  armlock.  "That's what I decided to do  at the time," Waite replied. "If  I had to do it today, I wouldn't  even be in that room without  another officer present."  During earlier testimony, the  panel heard that Robinson had  been involved in several fights  with other prisoners in the cell.  But Robinson testified that  while he'd then been punched in  the face, he had not received  any blows to his abdomen.  However, Waite said that in  observing the cell activities he'd  witnessed Robinson lying on the  floor and being kicked by  another inmate at two different  times. "As 1 recall, he (Robinson) was in a fetal position on  the floor and they (the kicks)  were going to his midsection. In  my opinion it looked like he was  trying to kick Robinson under  the bunk," Waite said, an  observation which he had failed  to report during the previous internal investigation.  Please turn to page 21  On the inside  Lettera to the Editor Paget 3 St 17  View of changing Germany Page 7  Island Trust News Page 20  School Board row   Page 22  RCMP background  In September 1988, the federal government established Ihe  RCMP Public Complaints Commission (PCC) to provide a  way for an external and independenl review, investigation  and hearing of complaints against force members.  To dale six cases are scheduled, three in BC (including Ihe  Gibsons RCMP ��� Robinson case), and one each in Alberta,  Nova Scotia and the Capital Region of Ontario.  The PCC includes a full-time chairman and vice-chairman,  and part-time members from each of Ihe eight provinces and  two territories lhat have RCMP policing. (Except for in the  Ottawa Capital Region, Ontario and Quebec have their own  provincial forces).  When a public complaint b made, It may go through the  following process:  1) The RCMP makes an internal Investigation and decision  (informal or formal);  2) If the complainants are not satisfied with this process or  result, they can refer it to the PCC whose chairman reviews  Ihe case and: a) if satisfied with the RCMP findings, reports  that to all parties concerned; b) If nol satisfied can either: i)  issue a report of his findings to the Solicitor General of  Canada and RCMP Commissioner; ii) request ihe Commissioner to conduct a further investigation; or lii) insljtute a  public hearing Into the complaint.  The chairman can also Initiate an investigation or hearing  even if the RCMP has not already investigated it. All ihe  hearings are normally held in the community where the complaint arose. After the bearing, a report of the panel's findings and recommendations are sent to the Solicitor General,  the RCMP Commbrioner, and concerned parties. The head  of the RCMP the* most report what actions will be taken; if  there are none he most give reasons.  Serving the Sunshine Coast since 1945 Coast News, March 19.1990  Reflections  The Mounties may always get their man, but what happens to him once in custody is another matter.  The Sunshine Coast has once again taken national  precedence, this time as the site for the first RCMP Public  Complaints Commission (PCC) hearing, it took over 30  hours for hearing participants to sift through more than 75  written exhibits, (including one binder the size of a Vancouver Yellow Pages), and listen to testimony from 18  witnesses.  In a nutshell, the case involved a Sechelt man who was  arrested for being intoxicated in a public place and while in  the Gibsons RCMP lockup, received injuries that almost  killed him.  The complaint against the force included an alleged  assault by one of the officers on duty and neglect on the  part of the detachment in protecting or providing medical  attention to a prisoner while in their care.  Previous to the initiation of the PCC, complaints  against the RCMP were handled internally and the process  and resulting decision were not necessarily made available  to the public.  According to 1988 statistics, British Columbia has 25  per cent of the total RCMP members in Canada; but 45  per cent of all complaints lodged against the force come  from this province. Under the new hearing option provided by the PCC, three of the six cases currently scheduled  across Canada will be in this province. Add to these facts  that 85 per cent of all complaints against the RCMP occur  following SIPP (being in a State of Intoxication in a Public  Place) arrests.  Certainly people who are very drunk can also be very  aggressive and abusive. The RCMP provide techniques for  members to deal calmly with such hostility, and the force  even has specific procedures to follow in handling people  who are known alcohol and/or drug abusers.  But techniques and procedures are only as effective as  the members who follow them. If not enforced and proven  to be followed, then policy isn't even worth the value of  the paper it's written on.  An independent and public forum for investigation of  complaints against the RCMP was long overdue. The role  of the PCC is now to submit a report on findings and  recommendations following this hearing. The report will  go to Canada's Solicitor General and The Commissioner  of the RCMP who is expected to act upon the findings.  Let's hope that the value of that document is deemed to be  more than mere paper costs.  Caryl Worden  <      S YEARS AQO  Chalice Mining has high hopes for a gold mine it is  trying to develop in the Egmont area.  A memorial fund has been set up to commemorate  Jean Graham Milward, the Sunshine Coast's first  teacher of dance. Ms Milward died of a sudden illness  last month.  Father Angelo de Pompa of Sechelt celebrates his  25th year in the priesthood with a mass in Our Lady of  Lourdes Church.  In a report to Gibsons Council, Building Superintendent Ralph Jones reports that work on the seawalk from  Armour's Beach to Gibsons Marina is going well.  10 YEARS AQO  Parents from Roberts Creek to Halfmoon Bay crowded a meeting in Chatelech Secondary School, seeking  to have their children complete their Grades 11 and 12  at Chatelech instead of being bussed to Elphinstone  Secondary.  20 YEARS AGO  Doug Honeybunn reviews the first evening of one-act  plays produced by the new local drama club The Driftwood Players.  Gibsons Council presents retirement gifts to Fred  Holland, Bruce Campbell, and fire chief Bill Scott, all  retiring after more than 10 years of service on the Gibsons Volunteer Fire Department.  30 YEARS AGO  A meeting of 50 people heard a description of a gravel  project in Sechelt and the objections to it at a meeting  last week.  Contracts totalling $108,031 are awarded for school  construction including additions to Elphinstone Secondary School, Trail Bay Junior High, and Halfmoon Bay  Elementary.  40 YEARS AGO  Gambler Island and Keats Island residents are to be  denied electricity due to the high cost of power cable.  Popular Davis Bay man, Jack Whitaker, was saved  from drowning by the quick action of deckhand John  Tubbs of the Davidson Marina Freighter. Whitaker slipped while helping to unload the freighter.  The Sunshine  QOAlf IIWI  p.bti.h.<t by GLASSFORD PRESS LTD.  Office Man Anne Thomsen  Dee Grant  Editor: John Burnside  Caryl Worden  Kent Sheridan  Production Mar: Jane Stuart Advertising Mar: Fran Burnside  Sherrl Payne John Gilbert  Bev Cranston Jean Broccoli  Bonnie McHeffey  Brian McAndrew  Bill Rogers  Tht 8UN8HINE COAST NEWS Is a locally owned newspaper,  published on the Sunshine Coast, BC every Monday by Qlasslord  Prase Ltd., Box 460, Gibsons, BC VON 1V0. Gibsons Tel. 886-2622 or  886-7817; Sechelt Tel. 885-3930; Pender Harbour Tel. 8839099; Gibsons Fax Tel. 886-7725. Second Class Mall Registration No. 4702.  The Sunshine COAST NEWS is protected by copyright and reproduction of any part of it by any means Is prohibited unless permission in  writing is first secured from Qlasslord Press Ltd., holders of the  copyright. SUBSCRIPTION RATES  . Canada: 1 year US; 6 months 130; Foreign; i year 140  In a nutshell  On not learning Russian  by S. Nutter  Once, in that marvellous year  after the war when one felt that  almost anything might be possible, 1 applied to go to the  University of Moscow to take  film under the early Russian  master, Sergei Eisenstein.  I had taken a good look at  the DVA 'Bill of Rights' and  there, in the smallest print was a  paragraph saying that if a  veteran wanted a course in  something considered of value  to the country and not available  in Canada, he could be sent  wherever, pretty well, such a  course could be had.  Well, there was a course in  film at UCLA but it was for  technicians. There was the  beginning of a course in Paris  and the beginning of one in  Budapest. But Eisenstein!  Eisenstein in those years was 'it'  with those who thought that  film could be a new kind/; of  really accessible poetry - with  the peace, the truly international medium. We were all, of  course, very young, but then so,  as we saw it, was film.  My application was maybe  not at first treated altogether  seriously. I was set up with a  meeting in DVA, and found the  man to be the uncle of a Winnipeg friend, a doctor whom I  also knew to be DVA's head of  psychiatry.  But finally everyone involved  in Ottawa went along. An official letter went to the Russians, signed by a minister  (Brooke Claxton). 1 paid a call  at the Russian Embassy.  Everyone all wreathed in smiles.  No one was saying either non or  nyet. No one seemed to see any  difficulties in the way. I began  to think about learning Russian.  I had had the merest, very  merest brush with the language  during the war. 1 had been sent  with others as 'safety crew' for  a Russian group flying the  Atlantic in flying boats for the  first time. We had been given a  little book of English/Russian  phrases they thought might  come in handy. Not really successful. One of us spent a tense  few minutes trying to say to a  smiling pilot: 'carburetor icing'.  Finally the light seemed to  dawn, the pilot turned to his  panel and our friend sank back  at the navigation desk. Fortunately he glanced out of the  port, in time to see the wingtip  floats coming down...  This time, of course, I had to  make a proper approach, beginning with that strange made-up  Cyrillic alphabet. As it happened, there was a friend in production at the film board who was  said to have himself taught Russian at a school, but when I suggested that he might tutor me,  he dissolved, as they say, into  helpless laughter.  What had happened with  Stanley Jackson was that before  he was recruited into the new  film board he was teaching at a  boys' boarding school in Win-  nipag. There was a particularly  strange headmaster known as  'Poof, and he, distracted by  money problems, had put it out  in his brochure that he would  teach any boy any language he  wanted to learn.  Quite mad, of course, but  there were other evidences that  things were getting a bit strung  out with 'Poof. The inevitable  fat boy with glasses turned up  and opted for Russian. Jackson  was teaching English and Latin  and so 'Poof thought him just  the man for the job. Alt he  would have to do was stay one  lesson ahead in the book and  then, think of it, he would  himself have another language.  This was not good enough  for our Stan, a responsible  chap. He got in a chess playing  Russian once a week, from a  chess playing 'ethnic' pub that  he knew, for conversation.  This character, bearded and  all, looked very much like a  comic book Russian spy of the  time who went everywhere with  his pockets bulging with bombs.  The boys got suspicious, listened outside Jackson's door, told  their dads, and Stanley was hailed before the governors and  quizzed as a possible spy.  No help there, then I went  down to Toronto and plugged  into a course in Russian given  by a geographer at the'U of T.  It didn't last long. I had hardly  got to know that the 'M' with  the squiggle on the end is  somehow pronounced 'shch',  when Igor Gouzenco, the Russian cypher clerk, defected to us  in Ottawa and the whole spy  kefuffle blew up. In no time it  was plain that my hopes were to  be dashed.  A pity really. If I had had just  a year at good old Moscow U, I  might have been on all your TV  screens these weeks - another  'Russian expert' to tell you  whether Gorbachev is going to  make it.  Reveille  Wake: the silver dusk returning  Up the beach of darkness brims,  And the ship of sunrise burning  Strands upon the eastern rims.  Wake: the vaulted shadow shatters.  Trampled to the floor it spanned.  And the tent of night in tatters  Straws the sky-pavilioned land.  Up, lad, up, 'tis late for lying:  Hear the drums of morning play;  Hark, the empty highways crying  "Who'll beyond the hills away?"  Town and countries woo together,  Forelands beacon, belfries call;  Never lad that trod on leather  Lived to feast his heart with all.  Up, lad: thews that lie and cumber  Sunlit pallets never thrive;  Moms abed and daylight slumber  Were not meant for man alive.  Clay lies still, but blood's a rover;  Breath's a ware that will not keep.  Up, lad: when the journey's over  There'll be time enough to sleep.  A.E. Housman  Down from the mountain  An experience of a lifetime  by Sam Moses  The first time I laid eyes on  Chapman Lake it was like stepping into another world. A  world not unlike what one  would find in the north country  many miles away. Come to  think of it, the last time I saw  such beauty and felt such  solitude, was somewhere in a  meadow way up in northern BC  on the Alaskan border. Yet it  was here and it had only cost me  a tew miles by trail, and as for  the packsack...well it's an old  friend.  Funny thing about areas like  Chapman, it runs on God's  speed and I swear no time  passes there while I'm gone.  After breaking through the  brush down by the dam at the  southwest end, I always make  my way along the old trail that  heads east towards the  meadows.  There at the bottom of the  meadows on the shore of Chapman Lake I find my camp in  order, the only passage of time  noticeable is a little moss that  has grown over the ashes in the  fire-pit.  Here in this quaint little setting nature never failed to put  on a show for me, and 1 met  many children of the wild.  In that very spot I was introduced to a strange little bird  down by the stream as I was  drawing water. He would jump  from rock to rock on stilty legs,  and stand there for a few  seconds bobbing up and down.  Then lightning fast he would  jump into the water, coming out  with a small fish or an insect. I  started calling them the 'Chapman Dipper' because of the way  in which they moved, oddly  enough I later found 'Dipper' to  be their true name.  Out on the surface of the  lake, there always seems to be at  least one pair of small ducks  that will follow you out of  curiosity should you wander  along the lake shore.  There's one thing about  animals in the Alpines, they  don't seem to fear people as  much. The characters I try to  get a close look at are the Hoary  Marmots that live in colonies  near the south end of McNair  Lake. Just a leisurely walk up  the flower studded grasses of  the meadow above Chapman  and over the rise where the  cabin now stands, and you  might hear them whistle a  greeting to you.  The first time I heard a Marmot I thought it was a fellow  hiker trying to get my attention.  After whistling back a few  times, I realized it wasn't a  human. Upon investigating I  walked along the west shore of  McNair to the south end, at  which point I felt I was being  watched. All I could see were  some rock outcrops until  something moved...then it  became clear that on top of each  rock, propped up on their feet,  were creatures resembling fat  prairie dogs. They just stand  there like sentries guarding their  castle, until one gives a whistle  and they all go down off their  rocks to safety.  My evenings on the shore of  Chapman Lake were spent the  same as my mornings, coffee in  hand and my binoculars trained  on the north shore of the lake.  There by the mouth of the  stream that comes down from  Tetrahedron they gather to  quench their thirsts, bears,  deers, rabbits, and even the odd  goat.  t  Every time I go into that area  it always feels the same as when  I first journeyed there; nothing  changes, it remains untouched.  It's little wonder why it is so  easy for one to forget their  world of haste and change,  when they enter into another  where it has no meaning. When  times are trying and I forget  how to relax, I close my eyes  and picture Chapman Lake and  its surroundings. The true value  of such a place never leaves you  once you've been there, and  should the image grow dim.,.it  calls to you to return.  Should you ever get the opportunity to visit the Tetrahedron Wilderness area do  yourself a favour and go, it  could be your experience of a  lifetime.  Your community's  AWARD-WINNING  newspaper p  Coast News, March 19,1990  Letters to the Editor  Drug view causes strong response  Editor:  RE: Letter to the Editor  'Fight on Drugs' published  March 12, 1990.  The phrase 'I'm not going to  dignify that with an answer',  leaps to mind. But just in case  some naive souls, to whom it is  unbeknownst what X (I'll call  him X because 1 feel the term  'Mister' X implies respect and I  most assuredly don't want to do  that) and his comrades as he  puts it, stand for in our society,  read his letter. Perhaps we  should shed some light on X.  In the letter he mentions appearances and touches disdainfully on materialism, while  reminiscing (or is it a flashback)  about the sixties. Judging from  appearances (I realize we should  not do this too seriously, but  we'll get to those hidden truths  soon enough) one might hazard  a guess as to the first  materialistic object X discarded  during the sixties - was it  perhaps a mirror?  When I first read the letter 1  was appalled that the Coast  News printed his remarks.  Upon reflection, without any  'psychadelic mind-manifesting  drugs, or any other recreational  substances," 1 realized that to  the less naive readers the Coast  News allowed X to expose  himself (and as he reads this he  probably is again, hopefully,  only to himself for once).  His kind are akin to the  Robert Noyes of the world.  What with paying for casual (or  shall I say slave) labour with  controlled substances that he  and they cultivate. Fegan or  what!  What one does in his or her  own home is their business to a  point. How far can we let this  go? I'll give you an hypothetical  situation (besides the case in  point that is).  If a man took your child into  his home and brutally assaulted  the child, thus rendering the  child brain-damaged would you  not cry foul? There have been  many studies done on the permanent brain-damaging effects  of ingesting poisons for a  euphoric high and children have  enough pressures growing up  without their understood  authorities poisoning their  minds and at the same time their  bodies.  I certainly hope that the  chaperoning that X mentioned,  of a young peoples' dance in  Roberts Creek, was just one of  his hallucinations, otherwise the  world is literally going to pot  -RC homegrown.  Just like an addict X tries to  defend his lifestyle with the legal  drug caffeine. Give us a break,  X! No one has been convicted  of murder while under the influence of MJB.  Do you people who so fondly  remember the sixties in the same  instance forget that certain farm  in California where similar  teachings (I use the term loosely  here, please forgive me)  manifested into an uncontrollable rage under Charles  Manson - one bad apple?  1 hope the majority of people  on the Coast (for that matter  the world) would like to make a  safe community (that's not  commune, X) for our children  to develop into productive  ���legally - inhabitants of the  world.  If anyone, including X questions this information, all I can  say is I have reliable sources but  I will not reveal them here as  they are juveniles. Unfortunately for X, he is not, physically  anyway.  All I can say in closing is  people, let's try and nip this one  in his 'buds'.  K.L. Distance  Sechelt, BC  W KH)9ll Flower Arrangements  For any Occasion  .*NWBf**V  SUNDAYS* HOLIDAYS 10-4  WEEKDAYSI-5:30  ^ GARDENS  Chamberlin Rd., Gibsons  Marijuana seen a serious health hazard  Editor:  Recent letters have called  marijuana a relatively benign  subtance. The following are  direct quotes from the University of California, Berkeley,  Wellness Letter, March 1990.  "Street pot today is generally  thought to be five to 10 times  stronger than it was in the 60's.  In 1988 researchers at the  UCLA School of Medicine  reported that marijuana cigarettes released five times as much  carbon monoxide into the  bloodstream and three times as  much tar into the lungs of  smokers as tobacco cigarettes.  Not only are these ingredients  more concentrated in marijuana  smoke, but users also puff  larger volumes, inhale more  deeply and hold the smoke  longer.  "A study by some of these  same researchers showed that  three or four joints a day could  do as much bronchial damage  , as 20 regular cigarettes."  At the University of Arizona  : College of Medicine in Tucson,  990 people were studied for  symptoms of chronic lung  disease. Researchers expected to  find symptoms in cigarette  smokers, but it soon became apparent that marijuana smoking  had strikingly adverse effects on  lung function.  "It's been long known the  tetrahydrocannabinol (THC),  the chief mood altering drug in  marijuana, decreases the  number of sperm and animal  studies suggest that it may impair fetal growth.  "The short term effects of  marijuana use are well known.  They include a reduction in at  tention span and short term  memory, an inability to concentrate, apathy, lethargy and  sometimes a feeling of anxiety  or panic instead of the expected  'high'.  "It's true that the scientific  case against alcohol, cocaine,  heroin, and tobacco is stronger,  but marijuana does have one  particularly insidious property  of its own. THC can linger in  the tissue for days or weeks.  causing intoxication even when  the person has not recently  smoked. And unlike alcohol or  nicotine, THC accumulates in  the body. Habitual users may  never be rid of it and the long  term health effects of this accumulation are unknown."  B. Cattanach  Roberts Creek, BC  The Medical Clinic  wishes to announce  that as of March 19, 1990  Dr. Wendy  Norman  will be practicing in the  Sechelt office only  885*2257  ���  Forestry urged to consider  Editor's Note: The following  was received for publication.  Barry Mountain  Sunshine Coast District  Forestry Manager  RE: Sechelt Marsh Protective  Society (SMPS) Resolution of  March 2, 1990.  In conjunction with our request for an industrial activity  moratorium on the Tetrahedron  Plateau, we wish to offer these  further considerations.  As( members of a forest  dependent society and as conservationists, we support sustainable development in the  provincial forest. It is the ability  to establish vigorous plantations  after timber extraction and the  control of the rate of cut, such  that it equals the rate of growth,  that distinguishes sustainable  activity from resource destruction.  The leading species of the  Mountain Hemlock Zone, of  which the Tetrahedron area is  part, are Mountain Hemlock,  Amabilis   Fir   and   Yellow  CHAMBERS PLANNING SERVICES  *************"������***-**-------------;  ���Retirement Planning *Llfe Insurance  ���Investment Planning ���Employee Benefit Plans  'Serving the Sunshine Coast for over 8 Years*  LAWRENCE K. CHAMBERS  LIFE UNDERWRITER  ��� Mutual runai licence *ilti Ascot Financial Snivicr. tret  telephone:        816-9111  fax 888-9121  TOLL FREE:    1 800-663.2051  BRITISH COLUMBIA  RENTAL SUPPLY PROGRAM  PHASE THREE  CALL FOR PROPOSALS  The British Columbia Housing Management Commission (BCHMC)  invites proposals for new rental housing projects in areas  throughout the Province with vacancy rates less than 2%.  The goal of the B.C. Rental Supply Program is to encourage  projects suitable for families and seniors, which will remain in the  rental market for a minimum of five years. Interest costs will be  reduced for selected projects which meet Provincial objectives.  Sealed proposals must be received by the British Columbia Housing  Management Commission no later than 4:30 p.m., Monday,  May 14,1990.  Information packages are available at the following BCHMC offices,  or by calling Mr. Jack Merkley or Ms. Marianne Wade at 433-1711.  ��� BCHMC - Lower Mainland  1701 -4330 Kingsway  Burnaby, B.C. VSH 4G7  ��� BCHMC-Victoria  201 - 3440 Douglas Street  Victoria, B.C. V8Z 3LS  ��� BCHMC - Interior  290 Nanaimo Avenue West  Penticton, B.C. VTA IN5  ��� BCHMC - Prince George  30S- 1488 4th Avenue  Prince George, B.C. V2L4Y2  BC��*  Cypress. These trees require 250  lo 300 years to reach maturity.  There are problems associated  with both artificial and natural  reforestation in this zone.  We challenge the Ministry of  Forests (MOF) to show evidence  that they recognize these problems and have the expertise  and budget necessary to overcome them. Furthermore,  would the MOF explain why  lands held in reserve with the  Timber Supply Area should not  be used to alleviate the concerns  of licence holders and solve this  land use conflict?  As naturalists we encourage  the public to appreciate the existence of old growth climax  forests which provide habitat  for a diversity of species and an  example of a natural and undisturbed environment.  White's  comment  Editor:  I didn't know whether to  laugh or cry recently when I  found Regional Director/Liberal Leader Gordon Wilson using  the front page of both local  papers to proclaim that all his  troubles in Pender Harbour are  part of a plot organized by me.  Not only would he have us  believe the entire three year long  Farrington Cove protest was  faked to promote my evil cause,  he sees the unrest over the new  zoning by-law as part of the plot  too.  Farrington Cove represents  the first incursion of high density cluster housing into a quiet  country neighbourhood that has  a record of fighting such things  in the past. Why should Gordon  find it so hard to admit there is  legitimate opposition?  As to the zoning debate, there  have been many attempts to introduce more restrictive zoninp  in Area A over the last 20 years  and every single one has  foundered in controversy. Why  should Gordon have so much  trouble accepting that there is  sincere, widespread concern this  time around as well?  Gordon is beginning to remind me of my sainted maternal grandmother, who saw  everything that annoyed her,  from property taxes to the bunion in her left toe, as the work  of the devil.  She at least had age and infirmity as an excuse; Gordon is  supposed to be presenting  himself as the leader of a major  political party and should be  above such silliness.  Howard White  The Tetrahedron area is such  a place. It is also the only accessible wilderness of any forest  zone left on the peninsula.  We urge the MOF to recognize the legitimate noncommercial values of naturalists, recreationists and water  users, and make the difficult  but wise choice of Tetrahedron  preservation.  Peggy Wagner, Secretary  The Sechelt March Protective  Society (SMPS)  More letters  on Page 17  __  Soviet Storting April 1,1990  Be Kind To The Environment,  YOUR BABY, AND YOURSELF  SUNSHINE  DIAPER SERVICE  Diapers   are   washed   in   "environmentally   friendly"  phosphate free detergent and rinsed thoroughly so there is  nothing to irritate baby's skin.  Less trouble and less expensive than disposable diapers and  will not add to your household garbage.  Everything necessary provided:  Diapers Waterproof Pants  Diaper Liners (if required)     Diaper Pails  Delivered right to your doorstep weekly and picked up twice  a week.  /is���-i.  V\ri  ���7    CALL NOW FOR SERVICE r/j  886-8329  Motorcraft  i mm nHynwmwiTi WaHwW Coast News, March 19,1990  ���> One of the many presentations  development in the Gospel Rock  Jr.  to Gibsons Council last week at the public hearing on the  ���Daw Frawr photo  School  bus  concern  by Rath Forrester  Recently a local school bus  driver resigned her job due to  the stress and the hazards of  driving our children to school.  With the tremendous increase in  traffic, the near misses involving children loading and  unloading became more than  her nerves could handle.  This particular reference was  to the Redrooffs area but it does  apply throughout the Coast  where drivers are completely ignoring the flashing lights of the  school bus. For some reason  they think it's OK to pass in one  direction when, in fact, their  vehicle should stop coming  from either direction.  Drivers musl take warning of  the dangers of such practices  and of the possible injury or  loss of life which could be inflicted by this stupid practice.  Caura Heni.en.on  March 23/1971-1988  It's your ninteentri birthday and on this day you'd be  Sharing this special rnoront with your family.  You'd be blowing out lite candles on a decorated cake.  Opening up your presents, smiling, laughing, being great.  Graduation's coming soon, new beginnings you would start.  We'd hold you dear and hug you and love you with all our hearts."  How I can visualize you dear doing all these things.  As I wipe away the tears that each morning brings.  I see the sunlight in your hair, I feel your tender touch.  I talk to you 'cause you're still there. I love you, oh so much!  Vou will never leave my thoughts.  I can so clearly see your smile, your face, all of you.  You're always close to me. Not time, nor lite, nor death, can ever, ever part.  The love that we have known and shared and hold within our hearts.  Loving You Always  Mom. Dad. Tammy, Tanya & John  Gospel Rock concerns  ��.*>  Continued from page I  John Hind-Smith and Catherine McManus appealed to  council to protect the last remaining eagle nest within Gibsons. They said the 1 SO-unit  development would place extreme pressure on eagles, which  have been featured in CBC and  National Geographic programs  aired throughout North  America.  They noted other jurisdictions impose buffer zones  around eagle trees to protect the  raptors from human encroachment. They range from a 75  metre radius in North Vancouver to 400 metres in New  Brunswick.  She said eagles can adapt lo  building one or two homes a  year, but the noise and pollution of a major development  could drive them away for  good. "Road widening could be  disastrous," she added.  McManus suggested a zone  of 100 metres around the eagle  tree "which would not affect or  .compromise the development"  as no building is slated directly  around the nest. She also said  traffic should be kept to a  minimum and new areas routed  through less sensitive areas.  Many concerned residents expressed concerns about clear-  cutting of trees at the Ocean-  mount and Bayview subdivision  and asked what would prevent  the same thing happening at the  Gospel Rock development.  Mayor Diane Strom noted that  a new tree cutting by-law has  been drawn up to protect environmentally sensitive areas.  But Town Planner Rob  Buchan said the by-law would  not have prevented the tree cutting at the above two subdivisions, as they are not considered  environmentally sensitive.  Responding to questions  from the audience about  penalties under the by-law,  Killam noted violators are liable  to a maximum fine of $2000  and would be required to  replace trees to their original  condition,   although   no  one  Student honours  A Gibsons resident was one of almost 300 Simon Fraser  faculty and students honored Ihis week during Ihe  University's annual awards ceremony.  Mark K. Nissen was recognized for winning a Natural  Science and Engineering Research Council postgraduate  scholarship valued al $15,000.  I  I  1  I  I  !  gj  :-  I  I  Health Unit  The Town of Gibsons has agreed to negotiate with the BC  Building Corporation to provide a site for the construction of  a proposed new health unit facility at Holland Park.  The offer was made at the Gibsons Council meeting March  6 as a way to seek a sensible solution to space problems al the  current facility. The proposed 10,000 square foot building  will include a second floor for other government and/or community services.  NOTICE OF  PUBLIC  HEARING  Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 555-28,1990  A second Public Hearing will be held at the Municipal Hall  at 474 South Fletcher Road at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, March  26th, 1990 to continue discussions on the proposed  Gospel Rock Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 555-28, 1990  which is proposed to amend the Town of Gibsons Zoning  Bylaw No. 555,1986.  The intent of the amending bylaw is as follows:  1. That that certain parcel or parcels ol land in the Town of  Gibsons more particularly known and legally described  as Blocks 6 and that part of Block 7, D.L. 842, Plan 6755,  as shown outlined on the map below, identified as Appendix "A" to Bylaw No. 555-28, 1990 be rezoned Irom  the existing Single-Family Residential Zone 4 (R-4) to  the proposed Single Family Residential Zone 1 (R-1).  A copy of the amending bylaw will be available for inspection at the Gibsons Municipal Oflice, 474 South Fletcher  Road, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday.  Rob Buchan  MUNICIPAL PLANNER t APPROVING OFFICER  r-:i a.b ro a.)  could say whether this meant  replacing immature trees or the  same sized trees as were cut  down.  Drop oil your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  ���t  THE COAST NEWS  Gibsons  until noon Saturday  f    FAMILY BULK FOODS &  DELICATESSEN  "FULL SERVICE DELI"  Featuring Frcybe's Award Winning Meats  __  Hearty Sandwiches  Piping Hot Soup  Tasty Muffins  Avalon Milk  Bunsmaster Products  Wed. & Thurs.  are SENIOR DAYS  10% OFF Regular Prices  Clult - Gtuup Discounts  UNDER  THE YELLOW AWNING  Cowrie Si. 88S-7767 II  COMMUNITY MEETINGS:  Right in your town!  PLACE:  For further information  Carol 8867454  KIN HUT  DOUGAL PARK  We're here! Now Weight Watchers brings Its New Fast & Flexible  Program closer to you, through a more convenient way to lose  weight: Community Meetings. With our new 1990 program you'll  lose weight last, while living your normal, everyday life���it's  easy! And talk about value: pre-paying lor a series ol meetings  saves you money.  JOIN NOW AND SAVE!  NEW FAST& FLEXIBLE PROGRAM  Wfoter.  Our most precious resource.  Last year, the Provincial Revenue  Sharing Program dedicated $35  million to help our communities  preserve the province's abundant  supply of pure, fresh water.  Even more funds will be added this  year. Watch for upcoming announcements concerning the Provincial  Revenue Sharing Program.  It puts tax dollars to work for all  British Columbians maintaining  and improving community sewer  and water systems.  Revenue Sharing is just one  of the ways in which the province  contributes to local efforts to  protect our most vital resource:  pure water.  $&  Ministry of Municipal Affairs,  Recreation and Culture,  Hon. Lyall Hanson, Minister  *ts  ms  tmmmt 4 u    A    .  Georcje    in    Gibsons  Coast News. March 19,1990  View of a changing Germany  by George Cooper, 886-8520  Ian and Stella Morrow have  just returned to Gibsons after a  year and some months in Hamburg, West Germany,  The Morrows came to the  Sunshine Coast after Ian retired  from the Royal Canadian Navy  following a lengthy career that  began with service at sea in  WWII and ended with Ian as  Chief of Staff of Operations,  Maritime Command with the  rank of Commodore, and latterly as Director General,  Maritime Operations.  Here on the Sunshine Coast,  Ian has his own marina consulting firm and has served on  the board of St. Mary's  Hospital and has also continued  his long standing association  with the Navy League of  Canada. Ian used his wide experience to facilitate the planning and construction of the  Gibsons Marina.  In Hamburg, Ian was a  member of the group preparing  designs for NATO's frigate  replacement program for the  90's. The program came to a  halt when nation after nation  withdrew, leaving only Canada  and the US still interested in  carrying on.  The Morrows were fascinated  by the turn of events seen  firsthand in Hamburg and by a  television coverage that ranged  far and wide, and yet gave  many a penetrating view.  "We saw throngs in Hamburg staring at shop windows  and buying foods not seen in  East Germany for decades. Not  unusual to see people with large  sacks of oranges, for instance."  The change came like the  spring breakup of river ice after  a long snow bound winter - sudden and irresistible.  "East German soldiers were  shown on TV beginning to clear  mine fields near the border in a  slow step-by step plan to ease  restrictions. At the same time  the people themselves opened  the borders and crossed into  West Germany."  West Germany grants automatic citizenship to East Germans, and so far this has meant  immediate grants to aid their  settling there, unemployment  payments and so on. Refugees,  adults and children, were given  an immediate payment of 100  deutschemarks as they entered  West Germany.  A story went about that  children who had already crossed were smuggled back to East  Germany to cross again and  again with other adults - for a  rental fee. The beginning of  private enterprise!  Ian said, "When the East  German government called  upon the USSR for troops lo  control the seething unrest, and  were refused, they could do  nothing but open the wall to  ease the pressure, or otherwise  face chaos.  "East Germany lost so many  hospital staffs that West Germany has had to send other  medical staff to man those same  Rob Ezart, Superintendent of Metropolitan Housing Corporation, is on site with an Hitachi Excavator preparing the ground for  the construction of a 51-unit, full facility Gibson Motor Inn  beside the curling rink in Gibsons. -Kent shcridin photo  V"r  SutuhJfM Coast  Credit Union  NOTICE OF  ANNUAL  GENERAL  MEETING  The 49th Annual General Meeting  of the Sunshine Coast  Credit Union  ��� GREENE COURT HALL  5811 Medusa St., Sechelt, B.C.  on  ��� WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28,1990  at 7:30 p.m.  Sechelt Branch  Box 375, Teredo Square  Secheii, B.C VON 3A0  Telephone 885-3255  Glbaorw Branch  Box 715, Kern's Pkva  Gibsons, BC. VON 1V0  Telephone 88&8121  East German hospitals. Medical  treatment in East Germany, by  the way, is years behind the  west's.  "it was estimated that 10,000  visited Hamburg on weekends  when the restrictions evaporated. Hamburg's outskirts are  only 33 kilometres from the  East German border. Many remained.  "The usually reserved and  grave folk of the northern part  of West Germany opened their  hearts and their purses, often to  buy clothes for the children of  the visiting families."  "But most of all, people  from East Germany wanted to  talk, talk about freedom to  talk," said Stella. "For most of  them expressing opinions had  always been verboten."  Stella said, "A lady from  Rostock whom I met on a train  in Hamburg was so overjoyed  to feel free to talk to strangers,  to tell how she felt, that she told  me all about herself. And soon  the whole railcar full of those  reserved people began to smile  encouragement.  "The lady said that for years  and years no one expressed opinions or thoughts in public - too  dangerous. And now, too, she  need no longer furtively attend  church service."  East Germany has lived in a  quiet rural-like atmosphere for  over a generation, their industry  based upon hand tools and out-  of-date machinery. Their  economy has been limited by  the need to barter among other  East bloc countries. The politics  of self-government are  unknown to them. Although  food has been inexpensive, it  has been limited in variety.  Housing - state owned.  They still use brown coal with  its consequent suffocating  pollution. The rivers and many  lakes are heavily polluted and  will take years to clear.  "Now," said Ian, "the people are anxious about the  future, fearful of the cataclysmic change they face to a  roaring, high-tech industrialized  society.  "An almost insignificant illustration of the bewildering  change: East German cars are  advised to use only the right-  hand lane on the autobahn. The  reason, their top speed is about  50 mph, whereas West German  cars are noted worldwide for  average speeds of more than 100  mph."  Jack ft Jill  Pre-school  Open  House  April 7 - 10am-lpm  For Information 886-3184  or 886-3418  For September  Registration  NOTICE  Please be advised that on March 20th,  1990 there will be a temporary water  interruption for all residences and  businesses fed from our Zone 3 water  supply (between Reed Road and Highway  101 and Henry Road to Crucil) from 9:00  A.M. to Noon.  Auxiliary elects  At the February 21 meeting of the Kiwanis Auxiliary, the  following officers were elected for the coming year: Mamie  Qually, President; Marg Berry, Secretary; Judy Holding,  Treasurer.  The March meeting will be held on Wednesday March 21,  in Ihe residents' lounge al 8 o'clock. New members are always  welcome.  CAD TRAINING  Learn Computer Aided Drafting using  Autocad release 10 3D software.  Instruction is on a one to one basis  at a level to suit the student.  Contact  Peter Chapman  885-7369  25% OFF PRINTS!  ��� Bateman ��� Parker  25% OFF FRAMING!  ��� Conservation Matting ��� Posters  ��� Needlework ��� Original Art Work  ��� Dry Mount ��� Prints  We Can Do It All!  Shadow BauK Galleries  885-7606  Family  Sports Store  Galian  Market  ���22.00 - Includes T-Shirt  * 8.00 -  No Shirt  ���26.00 - Late Registration (after Mar. 15 and on Race Day)  Refreshments & Prizes!  VIE FOR THE COAST NEWS CHALLENGE CUP  The Sunshine  GLASSFORD PRESS LTD.  Sunday, April 1st  9:30 am  RJ's Exercise  fttflficCnallsti  Botigriiuit ift>t)oppr   ENTRY FORMS - 12th Annual APRIL FOOLS' RUN, Sunday, April 1/90 -,  Make cheque* payable to: RJ's Exercise  Mail entry form before March 15th to: R.l.'s Exccrcise, Box 1448. t   lisons, B.C. VON IVO  or dro|) off at: Family Sttorts, Sunnycrest Mall. Gibsons  Name:.  Address..  Phone:   _MD   FD  Age:.  Individual Runner D  FEE ENCLOSED  �� 8.00 D No T-Shirt  Relay Team MemberD  Team Name:   No. in Team:   I  I ��22.00 D T-Shirt    Size: OS   DM   OL   DXL  I  I AlHlin S WAIVIl  I In conuctetanon of your accepting Itrii entry, t hereby for  mvvell. my heirs. e*ecult>n and adminrarretoe, waive and  release any and all right, lo claim, lor damage, I may have  againyt the orgamren of fhi, event, agent*, representative,  UKceivnrv and assigns, and the race sponsors, fur all and  any rn|rtries t may sustain during the court* of the event.  MMNI/HC��lStCNAtU��l  IMult be signed it athlete under It year, of agel I, the legal  parent/guardran o) the above competitor, hereby certify  that I have read and agree lo be hound by the term, of the  above waiver on behalf ot Ihe said tompelitor  * Gibsons Bus meets each ferry  PACKET PICK-UP  Family Sports,  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons  Fri., March 30 - 4-8pm  Sat., March 31 - 9-5pm  Sun., April 1 - 8:30-9:20am  Start:  9:30 am, Sunnycrest Mall  Finish:  Sechelt Indian Band Hall  .^mmmgmmmnmum  mmm. Coast News, March 19,1990  One of the many presentations made lo Gibsons Council lasl week at the  development In the Gospel Rock area.  hearing on the  -IhvtFrucr photo  School  bus  conoorn  by Rath Forrester  Recently a local school bus  driver resigned her job due lo  the stress and the hazards of  driving our children to school.  With the tremendous increase in  traffic, the near misses involving children loading and  unloading became more than  her nerves could handle.  This particular reference was  to the Redrooffs area but it does  apply throughout the Coast  where drivers are completely ignoring the flashing lights of the  school bus. For some reason  they think it's OK to pass in one  direction when, in fact, their  vehicle should stop coming  Irom either direction.  Drivers must take warning of  the dangers of such practices  and of the possible injury or  loss of life which could be inflicted by this stupid practice.  Caura Hmberaon  March 23/1971-1988  It's your ninteenth birthday and on this day you'd be  Sharing Ihis special moment with your family.  You'd be blowing out the candles on a decorated cake.  Opening up your presents, smiling, laughing, being great.  Graduation's coming soon, new beginnings you would start.  We'd hold you dear and hug you and love you with all our hearts^  How I can visualize you dear doing all these things.  As I wipe away the tears that each morning brings.  I see the sunlight in your hair, I leel your tender touch.  I tall; to you 'cause you're still there. I love you, oh so much!  Vou will never leave my thoughts.  I can so clearly see your smile, your face, all of you.  You're always close to me. Not time, nor life, nor death, can ever, ever part.  The love lhat we have known and shared and hold within our hearts.  Loving You Always  Mom. Dad. Tammy. Tanya & John  Gospel Rock concerns  p.  ��  �����*.���  ���-  1  K<  5:  Continued from page 1  John Hind-Smith and Catherine McManus appealed to  council to protect the last remaining eagle nest within Gibsons. They said the 150-unit  development would place extreme pressure on eagles, which  have been featured in CBC and  National Geographic programs  aired throughout North  America.  They noted other jurisdictions impose buffer zones  around eagle trees to protect the  raptors from human encroachment. They range from a 75  metre radius in North Vancouver to 400 metres in New  Brunswick.  She said eagles can adapt to  building one or two homes a  year, but the noise and pollution of a major development  could drive them away for  good. "Road widening could be  disastrous," she added.  McManus suggested a zone  of 100 metres around the eagle  tree "which would not affect or  compromise the development"  as no building is slated directly  around the nest. She also said  traffic should be kept to a  minimum and new areas routed  through less sensitive areas.  Many concerned residents expressed concerns about clear-  cutting of trees at the Ocean-  mount and Bayview subdivision  and asked what would prevent  the same thing happening at the  Gospel Rock development.  Mayor Diane Strom noted that  a new tree cutting by-law has  been drawn up to protect environmentally sensitive areas.  But Town Planner Rob  Buchan said the by-law would  not have prevented the tree cutting at the above two subdivisions, as they are not considered  environmentally sensitive.  Responding to questions  from the audience about  penalties under the by-law,  Killam noted violators are liable  to a maximum fine of $2000  and would be required to  replace trees to their original  condition,   although   no  one  *:  1  1  %  Student honours  A Gibsons resident was one of almost 300 Simon Fraser  faculty and students honored this week during the  University's annual awards ceremony.  Mark K. Nissen was recognized for winning a Natural  Science and Engineering Research Council postgraduate  scholarship valued at $15,000.  Health Unit  The Town of Gibsons has agreed to negotiate with the BC  Building Corporation to provide a site for the construction of  a proposed new health unit facility at Holland Park.  The offer was made at the Gibsons Council meeting March  6 as a way to seek a sensible solution to space problems at the  current facility. The proposed 10,000 square foot building  will include a second floor for other government and/or community services.  NOTICE OF  PUBLIC  HEARING  Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 555-28,1990  A second Public Hearing will be held at the Municipal Mall  at 474 South Fletcher Road at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, March  26th, 1990 to continue discussions on the proposed  Gospel Rock Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 555-28, 1990  which is proposed to amend the Town of Gibsons Zoning  Bylaw No. 555,1986.  The intent ol the amending bylaw is as follows:  1. That that certain parcel or parcels of land in the Town of  Gibsons more particularly known and legally described  as Blocks 6 and that part of Block 7, D.L. 842, Plan 6755,  as shown outlined on the map below, Identified as Appendix "A" to Bylaw No. 555-28, 1990 be rezoned from  the existing Single-Family Residential Zone 4 (R-4) to  the proposed Single Family Residential Zone 1 (R-1).  A copy of the amending bylaw will be available for inspection at the Gibsons Municipal Office, 474 South Fletcher  Road, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday.  Rob Buchan  MUNICIPAL PLANNER * APPROVING OFFICER  HCn H.S  TO HI  could say whether this meant  replacing immature trees or the  same sized trees as were cut  down.  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  at  THE COAST NEWS  Gibsons  until noon Saturday  "�� FrtaancNv Paxapaa maoa"  f    FAMILY BULK FOODS &  DEUCATESS  "FULL SERVICE DELI  Featuring Freybe'i Award Winning Meato  Hearty Sandwiches  Piping Hot Soup  Tasty Muffins  Avalon Milk  Bunsmaster Products  Wed. & Thurs.  are SENIOR DAYS  10% OFF Regular Prices  Club - Group Discounts  UNDER  THE YELLOW AWNING  Cowrie St. 885-7767 tl  COMMUNITY MEETINGS:  Right in your town!  PLACE:  For further information  Carol 886-7454  KIN HUT  DOUGAL PARK  We're here! Now Weight Watchers brings its New Fast & Flexible  Program closer to you, through a more convenient way to lose  weight: Community Meetings. With our new 1990 program you'll  lose weight fast, while living your normal, everyday life���It's  easy! And talk about value: pre-paying for a series of meetings  saves you money.  JOIN NOW AND SAVE!  NEW FASTtS? FLEXIBLE PROGRAM  ������  Wfoter.  Our most precious resource.  Last year, the Provincial Revenue  Sharing Program dedicated $35  million to help our communities  preserve the province's abundant  supply of pure, fresh water.  Even more funds will be added this  year. Watch for upcoming announcements concerning the Provincial  Revenue Sharing Program.  It puts tax dollars to work for all  British Columbians maintaining  and improving community sewer  and water systems.  Revenue Sharing is just one  of the ways in which the province  contributes to local efforts to  protect our most vital resource:  pure water.  8*  Ministry qf Municipal Affairs,  Recreation and Culture,  Hon. Lyall Hanson, Minister  -m& IV   /V  Georcje    in    Git)sons  Coast News, March 19,1990  View of a changing Germany  by George Cooper, WM8M  lui and Stella Morrow have  just returned to Gibsons after a  year and some months in Hamburg, West Germany.  The Morrows came to the  Sunshine Coast after Ian retired  from the Royal Canadian Navy  following a lengthy career that  began with service at sea in  WWII and ended with Ian as  Chief of Staff of Operations,  Maritime Command with the  rank of Commodore, and latterly as Director General,  Maritime Operations.  Here on the Sunshine Coast,  Ian has his own marina consulting firm and has served on  the board of St. Mary's  Hospital and has also continued  his long standing association  with the Navy League of  Canada. Ian used his wide experience to facilitate the planning and construction of the  Gibsons Marina.  In Hamburg, Ian was a  member of the group preparing  designs for NATO's frigate  replacement program for the  90's. The program came to a  halt when nation after nation  withdrew, leaving only Canada  and the US still interested in  carrying on.  The Morrows were fascinated  by the turn of events seen  firsthand in Hamburg and by a  television coverage that ranged  far and wide, and yet gave  many a penetrating view.  "We saw throngs in Hamburg staring at shop windows  and buying foods not seen in  East Germany for decades. Not  unusual to see people with large  sacks of oranges, for instance."  The change came like the  spring breakup of river ice after  a long snow bound winter - sudden and irresistible.  "East German soldiers were  shown on TV beginning to clear  mine fields near the border in a  slow step-by-step plan to ease  restrictions. At the same time  the people themselves opened  the borders and crossed into  West Germany."  West Germany grants automatic citizenship to East Germans, and so far this has meant  immediate grants to aid their  settling there, unemployment  payments and so on. Refugees,  adults and children, were given  an immediate payment of 100  deutschemarks as they entered  West Germany.  A story went about that  children who had already crossed were smuggled back to East  Germany to cross again and  again with other adults ��� for a  rental fee. The beginning of  private enterprise!  Ian said, "When the East  German government called  upon the USSR for troops to  control the seething unrest, and  were refused, they could do  nothing but open the wall to  ease the pressure, or otherwise  face chaos.  "East Germany lost so many  hospital staffs that West Germany has had to send other  medical staff to man those same  East German hospitals. Medical  treatment in East Germany, by  the way, is years behind the  west's.  "It was estimated that 10,000  visited Hamburg on weekends  when the restrictions evaporated. Hamburg's outskirts are  only 35 kilometres from the  East German border. Many remained.  "The usually reserved and  grave folk of the northern part  of West Germany opened their  hearts and their purses, often to  buy clothes for the children of  the visiting families."  "But most of all, people  from East Germany wanted to  talk, talk about freedom to  talk," said Stella. "For most of  them expressing opinions had  always been verboten."  Stella said, "A lady from  Rostock whom I met on a train  in Hamburg was so overjoyed  to feel free to talk to strangers,  to tell how she felt, that she told  me all about herself. And soon  the whole railcar full of those  reserved people began to smile  encouragement.  "The lady said that for years  and years no one expressed opinions or thoughts in public - too  dangerous. And now, too, she  Rob Ezart, Superintendent of Metropolitan Housing Corporation, is on site with an Hitachi Excavator preparing the ground for  the construction of a 51-unit, full facility Gibsons Motor Inn  beside the curling rink in Gibsons. -luniskciMui photo  S\  ���Sunshine Coast  Credit Union  NOTICE OF  ANNUAL  GENERAL  MEETING  m  The 49th Annual General Meeting  of the Sunshine Coast  Credit Union  ��� GREENE COURT HALL  5811 Medusa St., Sechelt, B.C.  on  t WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28,1990  at 7:30 p.m.  Sechelt Branch  Box 375, Teredo Square  Sechelt, HC. V0N3A0  Telephone 885-3255  Gibson* Branch  Box 715, Kern's Plata  Gibsons, BC. VON 1V0  Telephone 8864121  need no longer furtively attend  church service."  East Germany has lived in a  quiet rural-like atmosphere for  over a generation, their industry  based upon hand tools and out-  of-date machinery. Their  economy has been limited by  the need to barter among other  East bloc countries. The politics  of self-government are  unknown to them. Although  food has been inexpensive, it  has been limited in variety.  Housing - state owned.  They still use brown coal with  its consequent suffocating  pollution. The rivers and many  lakes are heavily polluted and  will take years to clear.  "Now," said Ian, "the people are anxious about the  future, fearful of the cataclysmic change they face to a  roaring, high-tech industrialized  society.  "An almost insignificant illustration of the bewildering  change: East German cars are  advised to use only the right-  hand lane on the autobahn. The  reason, their top speed is about  50 mph, whereas West German  cars are noted worldwide for  average speeds of more than 100  mph."  Jack ft Jill  Pre-school  Open  House  April 7 - lOam-lpm  For information 886-3164  or 886-3418  For September  Registration  NOTICE  Please be advised that on March 20th,  1990 there will be a temporary water  interruption for all residences and  businesses fed from our Zone 3 water  supply (between Reed Road and Highway  101 and Henry Road to Crucil) from 9:00  A.M. to Noon.  Auxiliary elects  At the February 21 meeting of Ihe Kiwanis Auxiliary, the  following officers were elected for the coming year: Mamie  Qually, President; Marg Berry, Secretary; Judy Holding,  Treasurer.  The March meeting will be held on Wednesday March 21,  in Ihe residents' lounge at 8 o'clock. New member, are always  welcome.  I  CAD TRAINING  Learn Computer Aided Drafting using  Autocad release 10 3D software.  Instruction is on a one to one basis  at a level to suit the student.   Contact  Peter Chapman  885-7369  Ufa  25% OFF PRINTS!  ��� Bateman ��� Parker  25% OFF FRAMING!  ��� Conservation Matting ��� Posters  ��� Needlework ��� Original Art Work  ��� Dry Mount ��� Prints  We Can Do k All!  Shadow Baux Galleries  885-7606  Family  Sports Store  Galiauf?  Market  The Sunshine  ENTRY FEE - before March 15th  ���22.00 - Includes T-Shirt  $ 8.00 -   No Shirt  *26.00 -  Late Registration (after Mar. 15 and on Race Day)  Refreshments & Prizes!  VIE FOR THE COAST NEWS CHALLENGE CUP  Sunday, April 1st  adidasw  �� SuKCftOftt  w Agenciw  GLASSFORD PRESS LTD.  RJ's Exercise  9:30 am  ��t cfMbcCnglisI)  Bougt)nut )&>tiopnr  I ENTRY FORMS - 12th Annual APRIL FOOLS' RUN, Sunday, April 1/90   j Make cheques p.iy.ihli' tt): R.l.'s E��ercise  | Mail entry ftirm before March 15th to: R.l.'s Excercise, Box 1448,.  hvons. B.C. VON 1V0  | of drop off ot: Family Sports, Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons  I  I Name:_ ���  j Iplease print)  Address:.  Phone:   _MO   FD  Age:.  individual Runner D  FEE ENCLOSED  �� 8.00 D No T-Shirt  ��22.00 D T-Shirt    Size: DS  Relay Team MemberD  Team Name:   No. in Team:   DM   DL   DXL  AlHirn s WAiyin  In consideration ol your accepting this entry I hereby for  myself, my heirs, evecorors and admrnlitratori waive and  release any and all rights to claims lor damages I may have  against the otganirers ot this event, agents, representatives,  successors and assigns, and the race sponsors, for all and  any injuries I may sustain duting the cosine of the event.  ���AMNlrllGAI. StCNATUM  Ifvttrst be signed if athlete under 19 years ol agel I, the legal  parefittguardian of the above competitor, hereby certify  that f have read and agree to lx> bound by Ihe tetms of the  above waiver on behalf ol Ihe said competitor.  * Gibsons Bus meets each terry  PACKET PICK-UP  Family Sports,  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons  Fri., March 30 - 4-8pm  Sat., March 31 - 9-5pm  Sun., April 1 - 8:30-9:20am  Start:  9:30 am, Sunnycrest Mall  Finish:  Sechelt Indian Band Hall Coast News, March 19,1990  AT CAP  ���     ELDERHOSTEL  IS COMING  AGAIN  The Sechelt Campus  is presenting  Elderhostel again  this June 10 to 23.  Students over 60  years of age from  all over the world  are coming to our  area to take courses  and join us for  community events.  This ever popular  program needs host  families to billet the  SO students'in each  week of the  program. Any  family can be  considered as a  "host" for one or  more students -and  gets to attend one  of the courses and  join us after school  for our events, as  well as receive a  small stipend to  help cover costs. If  you are interested in  hosting a student  this June, please  contact April  Siruthers at the  Sechelt Campus.  885-9310.  WOMEN REENTER THE  JOB MARKET  Students in the  Women's Job  Re-Entry Program  will be completing  their studies early in  April. Presently  they are at work  with local business  "hosts" doing on  the job training,  and will be  returning to the  classroom off and  on lo learn how to  hunt for jobs.  The 17 women in  the program have  learned office skills,  lifeskills, and to use  the computer in the  workplace. There  may be another  such program  offered later this  year. If you are  interested in  re-entering the job  force, please call  885-9310 for course  information.  ||s,    WHAT  COURSES DO  YOU WANT?  Staff at the Sechelt  Campus will soon  be doing planning  for the 1990-1991  academic year. If  you have requests  for courses, either  credit or non-credit;  or wish particular  services, please  contact the campus.  We welcome  community input,  and will consider all  suggestions.  CAPILANO  COLLEGE  Sechelt  Regional Centra  5127 Inlet Avenue  Sechelt  Bfltltti Columbia  To add ��� unique touch of Celtic flavour to St. Patrick's Day,  visitors to Sunnycrest Mall were serenaded with Irish tunes played  on Ihe hammer dulcimer by Tom Richardson.  -imnBurtukle photo  Diivis B.iy News ��t Viows  Successful recyc  No  barging  Continued from page 1  Peter Christianson of  Supreme House Movers, replying to charges that the house  moving is damaging the road,  said "We are well within the  allowed weight limits. Our  trucks do not subject any more  pounds per square inch  pressure to the road than a  dump iruck or a boat trailer.  And we do not know whether  we would be able to use the  Wakefield Inn parking lot. The  owners may not be willing."  Several aldermen made  reference to the numerous  phone calls they had received  recently from angry residents.  "I consider lhal I'm a  representative of the people  lhal elected me," added Alderman David Wells, "and I resent it when it is suggested that  I'm being influenced by big  business interests."  The eventual decision to prohibit the use of Mason Road  for the house moving was  greeted with applause by the  audience.  by Lauralee Solli, 885-3510  RECYCLING  Thanks to Neil Clayton who  came to tell us about Shop  Easy's successful recycling program which has been going on  for eight and one half months.  Since they started, 250 tons of  recyclables have been trucked  into Vancouver. This is only  five per cent of Sechelt's garbage, so 95 per cent is still going  to the dump. Did you know that  five acres of land a day is being  gobbled up for use as landfill  sites?  People need to learn the three  R's - Reduce, Re-use and Recycle. Request less packaging. Let  the stores and the manufacturers know you won't be buying their products if they don't.  Take your own bags to the  store; recycle material; make  your own.  Did you know even though  most garbage taken to the dump  is compostable and biodegradable, in a land siie, once  il's buried you can dig it up  years later intact? Air is needed  for it to decompose. All the  more reason to compost it at  home. Save the land used for a  dump for better things.  Shop Easy will be carrying on  the best they can. Their program is getting close to paying  lor itself. However, more bins  Chatelech  student  winner  by Rose Nicholson  Geraldine O'Keefe, Grade 12  student at Chatelech Secondary  School, is one of 19 graduating  students who have been awarded a $20,000 scholarship to continue education in a Pacific Rim  country. She will be spending  nine months in Japan where she  will live with a Japanese family,  study Japanese and travel  throughout the country.  GERALDINE O'KEEFE  "As my language gets better,  I hope to get a job teaching  English," she said. "Other than  that, 1 hope to learn as much as  I can about the country."  "Geraldine was one of 185  applicants from across BC," explained Assistant School  Superintendent Brian Butcher.  "It's a great thing that she's  done and we're proud that she's  going from the Sunshine  Coast."  Leanne Ross, Grade 12 student at Pender Harbour Secondary School, is number 20 on  the list, which means that she is  the first alternative if one of the  other students cannot attend.  "When you think that there  were 50 students short listed  among the hundreds that applied," said District Superintendent Clifford Smith, "it's a  great thing that two students  from our district ended up right  at the top."  arc going to be needed and help  with sorting is needed. Maybe it  would be a good community  project for Guiding, Scouting  and schools to get involved in.  If you are recycling, take the extra lime to put everything in the  proper bins. Lastly, let's get  government involved.  CHILDREN'S FAIR  Don't forget Rockwood Centre's Children's Fair on March  24. They are looking for things  lor the 'Imagination' corner. If  you have any hats, gloves,  shoes, beads, costume jewellery  or anything they could use, give  Joyce a call al 885-5682 to make  arrangements lo drop it off.  BRIDGE  Last bridge of this season at  Wilson Creek Hall will be Friday, March 23 at I pm. Il will  start up again in the fall.  SOFTBALL  The Sechelt Minor Softball  Association is holding registration in Trail Bay Mall on Satur-  ing  day, March 24 and on March 31  from 10 am to 2 pm. This is for  ages six to 14 years.  FLEA MARKET  Saturday, March 31 from 9  am to 12 noon will be a Flea  Market and all available tables  are now booked so there should  be a few good bargains!  BOUQUETS  Bouquets to the past executive, Bill L., Greta, Judy,  Joan, Bill M., Kay, Jim and  myself. Thank you for all the  hours spent - it was a good year.  Also thanks to all the guest  speakers who took the time to  come to our meetings to educate  and entertain us.  The new executive is as  follows: Bill Matheson, president; Bill LeNeve, vice-  president; Jean Robinson,  treasuer; Charlotte Copeland,  secretary; Jim Smith, Cliff Mc-  Connell, Eileen Nelson and  Joan Newsham, directors. It's  nice to see some new blood.  IJ/JIJU  The  SYLVIA  Hotel  Make the Sylvia part  of your Vancouver adventure...  Single from $42 Double from $50  Featuring "Sylvia's Restaurant & Bistro"  Y  Hriitu in this .ttl and receive si  FREE CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST  fluting vour st.ty wilh us!  ..Oirr/ooliing Vancouver's English Bay  Ontrte'Bcochot 1154 Ollford  681-9321  ��� ������������*^,,,��,-,,��������,��������������������������,,,,j  YOUR 1989 INCOME TAX RETURN  PEOPLE  WITH  QUESTIONS  WHERE CAN I GO FOR HELP  WITH MY TAX RETURN?  At tax time, many people have questions  about how to complete  their return and what information slips to include.  The first place to look for  answers is the General Tax  Guide that comes with your  return. It gives you step-by-  step instructions,  and helpful tax tips.  But if you still have  questions, Revenue  Canada offers a  variety of services to help you.  WHAT KIND OF SERVICES  ARE AVAILABLE?  Revenue Canada offers phone enquiry  services with extended hours during the  peak tax return weeks. Check the back  pages in your General Guide for numbers  and hours in your region. For people  who require special assistance, there's a  program in which volunteers, trained by  Revenue Canada personnel, help those  who can't leave their home. There's  a special toll-free number listed in the  General Guide for people with hearing  disabilities, using a Telephone Device for  the Deaf, and there are audio and large  print guides for those who require them.  WHAT GUIDES DO I NEED?  Revenue Canada produces a variety of  special guides for people with different  income situations. There's an employment  expenses guide, a guide for pensions  and one for new Canadians, to name a  few. Check the list in your General  Guide. If there's one you need, contact  your District Taxation  Office or call the special  "request for forms" number  listed there.  WHY SHOULD I FILL  OUT THE  GREEN FORM?  The proposed Goods  & Services Tax,  now before Parliament, has two main  objectives: to make Canada more competitive and to improve the fairness of  the tax system for all Canadians. The plan  includes a new credit to offset part or all  of the tax for lower or modest income  households. To find out if you qualify, fill  out the green form that comes with  your 1989 tax package. Even if you don't  have to pay income tax, it's important  that you send in the green form. If you  qualify for the Goods & Services Tax  Credit, you could receive credit cheques  every three months, starting this  December 1990.  WHAT IF I HAVE QUESTIONS?  Check your General Tax Guide. It has  most of the answers you'll need. If  you still have questions, contact your  local District Taxation Office by phone  or in person, and talk to the people  at Revenue Canada Taxation.  They're People with Answers.  PEOPLE WITH ANSWERS  ������I  Revenue Canada    Revenu Canada  Taxation Impfit 1  Coast News, March 19,1990  Sechelt Seniors  Special events  by Larry Graftoa  The bleating of this disgruntled goat from a parked truck was  briefly part of the Sechelt scene last week. -DivtFiw photo  Sechelt    Scenario  On our 'Special Events' sheet  we have a Spring Tea and Sale  scheduled for March 24 in our  hall which will start at 11 am.  As in past years there will be a  bake table as well as Easter  novelties for sale.  Members who will be delivering baked goods for the sale are  requested to have them at the  hall if at all possible by 10 am  on Saturday morning, March  24, in order that they may be  priced and set out prior to the  doors opening at 11 am.  CONCERT  Nikki Weber has organized  and will present her semi-annual  concert on March 24 and 25. It  will be a benefit for the Seniors'  Building Fund. For those of you  who have attended these performances in the past, you are very  much aware of their popularity.  For those of you who have  never attended, you do not  know what you have missed.  Nikki, in her inimitable fashion,  along with a variety of per-  Rockwood Centre show  by Margaret Watl   885-3364  The current show at  Rockwood Centre featuring the  work of fabric artist Susan Fletcher and the Sunshine Coast  Spinners and Weavers Guild,  will hold a closing reception on  March 28 from 2 to 4 pm.  Come and meet participating  artists and watch a spinning  demonstration.  CHILDREN'S FUN FAIR  Bring   the   kids   to   the  Rockwood Centre on Saturday,  March 24 for a full day of fun  and games for ages three to 12  years. Balloons, face-painting,  games. Just the thing to round  off the spring break. Admission  for kids is $1, adults free. That's  March 24, from 11 am to 3 pm.  MINOR SOFTBALL  Registration for Sechelt  Minor Softball is at Trail Bay  Mall March 24 and 31, from 10  am until 2 pm. Ages seven to  14.  LIBRARY NEWS  The annual meeting of the  /^DEPENDABLE ���  AUIO SERVICE  SID YOU KNOW...  We're known for successful  TROUBLE  SHOOTING  The South Coast's Only  BCAA UnOYtsD Shop  ���pmUI MuidtntlM lo WUU  ^WHifidWi  AUTOMOTIVE  Sunshine Coast  PEST CONTROL LTD   OrsavMRrt,    Panttar Harbour, BC   V0W2H0  LOCALLY OPERATED  GOVERNMENT LICENSED  UNMARKED VEHICLES  For control of carpenter ants, rodants & othar pasts  Our Perimeter Treatment  Cuts down on the Invasion  of crawling insects  For Confidential   .--   Advice & Estimates  883-2531  OUR SPECIALTY ��� Pmjwalmjnl Pi houses under construction!  SJIIIWI |fQ91S  uctlonl   N'      |  Sechelt Public Library Association was held in the SCRD offices on February 27. In presenting her report, Chairman  Frances Fleming thanked the  board, the staff and the  volunteers for the way they have  carried out their duties  In addition, the board has  been greatly appreciative of the  interest and support shown by  Mayor Meredith and the council. Without their help, the  library would be unable to provide the standard of service now  enjoyed by our borrowers.  During 1989 the board was  asked to provide input into the  development of plans for a new  library, which, when the new  Block 7 development goes  ahead, will be part of the new  complex. Many hours were  spent by the board and staff.on  this project and we hope thm  referendum will" soon beT  thcoming.  Our staff has grown, opening  hours have increased, 'book  numbers has increased but  available working space remains  the same. Most of all the library  needs space which can only  benefit everyone  Helen Cuylits will no longer  represent Wilson Creek Branch,  and her place will be taken by  Margaret Phillips. We will all  miss Helen and wish her well.  P.S. Parents, if you would  like pictures of your child with  the "California Raisins", feel  free to bring your own camera  i Rockwood Centre Fun Fair.  formers has always played to a  sell-out audience.  With that in mind it was  decided to hold the concert on  two nights in an effort to allow  more people to enjoy the performance which will start at 8  pm each night. The theme will  be 'Music of the 30's and 40's'.  There are still tickets  available for both performances  at Books and Stuff, Talewind  Books and from members John  Miller, Len Herder and Larry  Grafton. The cost per ticket is  $5.  RAFFLE  Tickets have been printed and  are now on sale for a raffle  which will be drawn at the  Seniors' Picnic in August. First  prize is a plasticized wooden  burl clock. Subsidiary prizes are  a teddy bear and a liquid leaded  glass picture.  FIRST V.P. ILL  Gerry Chailler, our first vice-  president is at present in room  127 at University Hospital for  surgery.  On behalf of our branch I extend our regrets to Betty and the  family with the hope that he will  be up and about again in due  course. Good luck, Gerry!  DOUBLE REMINDERS  As mentioned in an earlier  column, the dinner and entertainment scheduled for March  31 in the 'Special Events' portion of our activity sheet has  been cancelled in favour of  another activity in the hall that  specific night.  As of this date, the dinner  and entertainment scheduled  for April 28 will go as listed.  Tickets for this popular evening  will be printed and on sale soon.  Members planning on participating in our Tuesday afternoon activities are advised that  starting times for aggravation,  crib and whist have been moved  ahead a half hour and will now  start at 1 pm. The 69ers singing  practice will be from 3 to 4:30  pm. All time changes are until  further notice.  SHOP EASY DRAW  At our general meeting on  March 15, winners of the Shop  Easy Draw were Ethel Brown,  ^Barbara Hanke, Helen Hall and  .iilian Peterson.  Juh Crovvhurst  Th. MassageT^py ciinic Re9is,ered Massage Therapist M.F. Phys.  5565 Cowrie Street By Appointment Only  Sechelt. BC 885-4005  KIDS  Batman Colouring Contest  Come in and Pick Up your  Picture to Colour  Salman Arrives March 31  Trail Bay Centre Mall, Sechelt 885-5255  H"  ID  9  PAPER  FEEL the quality and softness of sanitary paper  made from 100% recycled unbleached materials.  Janitor's Warehouse offers a wide range of  sanitary products, without touching a single tree.  al extremely loin prices.  tl  RECYCLING  AND ECOLOGY  RECYCLING OF PAPER helps put the brakes on  deforestation  The production ol papet from recycled fibres  rsducal iht' need for virgin wood fibres The fabrication pro-  Ceil minimizes pollution .mil is energy efficient  Il is Ifss expensive than conventional methods of production  which are seriously depleting Canadian forests  Today 98 per cent of paper products provided to us from our  suppliers are made from 100 per cent recycled unbleached  fibre.  JVOIV is your chance to help save your environment, lei's  not just talk about it. let's get together  OPEN TO THE PUBLIC  for all your cleaning supplies  and paper products  MON.-FRI. 8:30-5       SAT. 8:30*12  Ottering a 10% Discount (luring the month ol March on Recycled Paper  Get together with a neighbour or friend  Buy your supplies in bulk  SHARE A CASE OF PAPER  I  WAREHOUSE  Member of the SAVOLITE Group  5538 Inlet Ave., Sechelt  "r * ~ l         ......   . 10.  Coast News, March 19,1990  Egmont  News  Egmont mourns Sarah Silvey  by Dixie Percy  Egmont mourns the passing  last week of one of its old time  residents, Sarah Paul Silvey,  Matriarch of the Egmont Silvey  family.  She was the last hereditary  chief of the Sechelt Indian Band  and ever since her abdication  the band has held elections for  its chief.  Sarah is survived by her seven  children: George Paul, Ella  Cummings, Barb Higgins, Gene  Silvey, Sally Rentmeister, Steve  Silvey and Wally Silvey. We're  sorry to see her go.  Bill Griffith Senior is in St.  Mary's Hospital. We hope he's  resting comfortably and feeling  Okay.  CLEAN-UP  Happy first week of spring.  The Egmont Community Club  would like to start off their  spring cleaning by getting rid of  some obviously unused cars in  the parking lot.  At present, there are three  junkers parked there and they  are more than eyesores. They  take up valuable parking spots  during the busy season, which is  not too far away. I'll take my  rap on the knuckles for owning  one of them but I promise to  either sell it or move it within  the month.  What about the owners of the  green Plymouth and the blue  Pontiac?  These cars, as well as the pile  up across from the tennis courts  are in need of direct action.  Maybe Doug Martin could dig a  big pit with his backhoe and  push them in!  DONATIONS  The Egmont School is in need  of donations in order to make it  more comfortable to use. Already some books have been  donated to the library as well as  some pieces of furniture. If you  have any items that could be put  to good use, by all means, drop  them off.  TIME FOR ACTION  I don't want to nag but  everyone seems to agree that we  need to put some energy into  making things happen in Egmont. Some good ideas have  been put forward, ie; weekly  coffee house, day care, library,  etc. Now we have to make them  happen. The facilities are sitting  there waiting for action.  The Pender Harbour Community Club would like  everyone to know about their  swap meet which is held the first  Saturday morning each month  at 10 am in Madeira Park. To  rent a table call Hans Schroeder  at 883-2753.  Happy gardening everyone!  See you in the fall.  BC's Lieutenant Governor  to visit Pender Harbour  It's official! The Lieutenant  Governor of British Columbia  will spend the best part of 24  hours in Pender Harbour. On  May 25 and 26 their Honours  Mr. and Mrs. David C. Lam  will drive from Victoria directly  to Pender Harbour and there  will be three opportunities for  the residents to see and meet the  Queen's representative for BC.  The Pender Harbour and Egmont Chamber of Commerce is  sponsoring and organizing the  CORRESPONDENCE  MANUSCRIPTS  RESUMES  BUSINESS PLANS  NEWSLETTERS  REPORTS  CONTRACTS  PAPERWORK  GOT YOU  DOWN?  ACCOUNTING  INVOICING  PAYROLL  ANSWERING  SERVICE  PHOTOCOPYING  FAX SERVICE  INCOME TAX  Personal &  Sell-Employed  Returns from  $20.00  <31ic tyaper HUll  883-9911  visit and preliminary arrangements are well underway.  Their Honours will go directly to the high school, arriving  after the lunch break. Mr. Lam  will speak to the students and  invite questions.  In the evening the Lieutenant  Governor's Dinner will take  place in the community hall  where 200 people will dine and  listen to an address by his  Honour. There will be ample  opportunity to ask him questions after his talk, a part of the  event he greatly enjoys.  On Saturday morning the  Lions Club will host a Pender  Harbour pancake breakfast  with all the trimmings at their  Morrison Hall in Lions Park.  The public will be invited to this  as well.  Their Honours will tour the  harbour and surroundings in  the course of the visit.  The office of Lieutenant  Governor is filled by one appointed by the federal government to be the formal head and  Queen's representative of the  provincial government. It is a  five-year term. Mr. Lam was  appointed in September 1988  and is breaking with tradition  somewhat, by going out and  meeting the people. Therefore,  he viewed most positively the invitation to come to Pender Harbour.  May Day, May Day  Pender Harbour May Day  1990 is almost here so let's  organize a parade to remember.  May Day is Saturday, May 19.  The parade starts at 11 am. All  entries must assemble at the  legion parking lot by 9:45 am  and judging will begin at 10 am.  Talk it over with your staff or  group and decide which of the  following awards you will win:  1. Best local float  2. Best decorated float  3. Best commercial float  4. Best group entry  5. Best comedy entry  6. Best decorated bicycle  7. Best entry by a walker  8. Best family entry  9. Best horse and rider entry  First,   second   and   third  awards will be for all categories.  Entries will be judged, ribbons  and trophies awarded on the  following:  Creativity, colour, originality, work involved, clarity of  identification and use of sound  or music. Let's go fo it, Pender  Harbour. Let's make May 19,  1990 the biggest and best May  Day ever. See you there!  Please call D. Gamble at  883-2286 for further information.  ��� REPAIRS  MOTORCYCLE   PART*  SERVICE  Distributors of Motorcycle and R.V. Batteries  M.T. - H.D.  MARK TAYLOR  885-7570  6181 Stockwell U.  Box 1375, Porpoise Bay  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  Deposit $1000 lor one year in a Pender Harbour  Credit Union Term Deposit to quality lor a...  2-WEEK HAWAIIAN HOLIDAY FOR 2'  > Soma Limitation May Apply  NO LIMIT ON NUMBER OF ENTRIES  PENDER HARBOUR CREDIT UNION  Serving Its members for 43 years  Madeira Park Centra  GEIdl  Business Hours  Mon. ��� Thurs., 10 ���  Friday 10 ��� 6  12.5% Declared  Call 863-9531  Pax 883-9475  Compare our Rates  Term Dep.  11%%  RRSP  11%%  AT THE PENDER HARBOUR HOTEL  Collee Shop Opens at 6 A.M.  Licenced Dining Room Opening Soon   Food Available In the Pub  J  ATTENTION MADEIRA PARK,  KLEINDALE, EGMONT, MIDDLE POINT,  HALFMOON BAY AND SECHELT  wm  PRODUCE  Granny Smith  Apples  79M74,  w^^yy yYt���  MEAT  dggggk  k  Sunkist  Oranges  I99  Box ol 54  Asparagus  .99* * 2"  kg.  Pender Harbour - Long English  Cucumbers  Each  1  29  IGA - Pure  Apple Juice  .78��  1 L.  Tide - Regular or Scented  Detergent  10 L.  8  99  FOODS  NOW OPEN SUNDAY  11-  ALL FLYER SPECIALS  EFFECT SUNDAY TO SATURDAY  PLUS MANY MORE  IN-ST0K SPECIALS  Whole Bone-In ��� Pork Shoulder  Butt Roasts  149     029  I      lb. O     kg.  Bone-In - Blade  Chuck Steaks  I 179     095  J I      lb. O     kg.  Boneless - From Pork Butt  Cube Pork  199     439  I      lb. **     kg.  Swanson - Chicken/Beef/Turkey  Meat Pies  GROCERIES  8oz.  .68*  Niagara ��� Frozen  Orange Juice  .98��  341 ml.  Scotties  Facial Tissue  200's  .78*  Coke/Sprite/Ginger Ale - Regular or Diet  Soft Drinks  188  2 L. Plus Deposit     1  IGA - 5 Flavours  Cat Food  170 gm.  2  /.78<  Kraft Parkay  Margarine  -196  3 lbs.  IGA - Sliced  Bread  567 gm.  .78* Coast News, March 19.1990
A 12-inch water lint is being installed along Highway 101 to improve the water supply to the
Redrooffs and Halfmoon Bay area. Here it is being hooked onto the present outlet just before the
junction of Highway 101 and Redrooffs Road. -Ruth Forroiw photo
School
Dance
The Pender Harbour Secondary grads of 1990 would like to
thank all the people who helped
make the Dance-a-thon on
Saturday, March 10 a success.
We would like to thank all
the parents who chaperoned
throughout the 12 hours; Darren Vickers for the music; the
many people who pledged the
dancers; and the dancers
themselves.
We would like to give a
special thanks to Wes Tietzen
and Sheila Munro who stayed
for the full 12 hours.
Following is a list of all the
people who participated by dancing in the Dance-a-thon for the
12 hours: Sandra Crosby, Ken
Ewen, Mona Gibson, Nicole
Gooldrup, Diane Lee, Sharon
Lee, Leanne Ross, Candi Whit-
taker, Rena Sheppard, Tina
Haddock, Nolan Percival, Julie
Craig, Krystal Craig, Jade
Christian, Robin Lenhart and
Rick Reed.
11.
CENTRE HARDWARE
,, i / //V\YOUR LOTTO STORE r/^A,JI
Sfc»8      ?
■^aa/s/vi'-J'
Madeira
Park
Shopping
Centre
883-9914
SERVING
PENDER
HARBOUR &
EGMONT
Pender Patter
PENDER HARBOUR CREDIT UNION
NOTICE
43rd Annual General Meeting
to be held on
April 20th, 1990
at the
Pender Harbour Community Hall
Dinner. 7pm
Meeting: 8pm
Tickets available at the Credit Union
Board ol Dlrectort
Bargain Barn broken into
by Myrtle Winchester, 883-9099
Wednesday night the Bargain
Barn was broken into by cutting
a large hole in the garage door.
An aluminum step ladder was
taken and a lock at the back
door of the Pender Harbour
Restaurant was tampered with.
The RCMP are investigating.
The thief was obviously a low
form of life, stealing from a
charity organization, but he/she
was a tidy sort. All of the wood
cut out of the door was cleaned
up and removed.
Of course the ladies of the
Bargain Barn would be happy
to see their step ladder returned.
ARTISTS WIN
Works by local artists Noreen
Marshall, Ada Priest and Chick
Page were selected from the 8th
Annual Images and Objects
competition at the Sechelt Arts
Centre.
The winning paintings by
Marshall and Priest and sculpture by Page will be shown at
the Arts Centre until April 1
and then will be entered in the
BC Arts Festival in Saanich
May 23 to 27.
POOL TOURNAMENT
The Pender Harbour Legion
invites members and guests to
Halfmoon
Bay
Happenings
Not
In my
backyard
by Ruth Forrester, 885-2418
The 'not in my backyard'
syndrome has raised its head in
our urea. Some will be pleased
to learn that there will be no
more barged houses allowed in
Halfmoon Bay, thanks to a
group who claimed to be
representative of the majority of
residents and who were extremely vocal in their protest.
As the Halfmoon Bay columnist I would like it known that
this group was by no means
speaking on behalf of myself or
of many who could see no fault
in these homes being recycled,
particularly when it is now nigh
impossible for young people to
find affordable housing on the
Sunshine Coast.
There arc presently some
beautiful homes in the Welcome
Woods area which were barged
in, and when completed, the recent ones will be equally pleasing.
It's a sad reflection on our
society that those who talk the
loudest will be catered to.
Maybe those of us who kept a
low key were too confident that
some reasonable compromise
would be the outcome.
Once again let me say that it
is high time the Area B
Ratepayers became active again
in order that the people can be
represented in such matters
MINOR SOFTBALL
Registration   for  Sechelt
Minor Softball will take place at
Trail Bay Mall on March 24 and
31 from 10 am to 2 pm.
SUPPORT THE CUBS
The Halfmoon Bay Cubs and
Beavers will be hard at work on
March 24 and 25 when they
have a mushroom manure sale
at 8033 Southwood in Welcome
Woods. Advance orders can be
taken by calling Don Kinneard
at 885-5208.
take part in a pool tournament
this Friday at 7 pm.
Registration for the round-
robin singles eight-ball competition is at the bar and organizers
say that it's meant to be a fun
contest and there will be prizes
and surprises.
RETIREMENT PARTY
Reservations are now being
taken for Al Lloyd's retirement
party to be held at PHSS on
April 18. For more information
call Cheryl Thompson at
883-9664 or Sue Elsdon at
883-2211.
VHF COURSE
The Pender Harbour Power
and Sail Squadron is offering a
one day preparatory course for
the VHF radio operators licencing examination.
The course will be on April I
from 1:30 to 4 pm. Call Jock
Hermon at 883-9525 or
883-2745 for more information.
ACTING COURSE
Jay Hamburger will teach a
course in Basic Acting and
Set lie Study that is appropriate
for teetis to seniors (regardless
of experience)
The three-hour classes will be
held Thursdays at MPES beginning April 12. Register through
Continuing Education or by
calling Jay at 883-2472 or Terry
Drumel at 883-9063. The cost of
the course is $68.
PRIME TIME
This   year's   Prime  Time
Family Fun Concert will feature
our local music students,
Capilano College choir and orchestra and a male barbershop
octette which may or may not
be called 'Harbour Harmony'.
The fifth annual PTFF Concert sponsored by the Pender
Harbour Music Society is coming up on April 6 at the Pender
Harbour Community Hall. Admission is by donation.
TICKET DEADLINE
This Thursday is the ticket
sales cutoff date for the Pender
Harbour Wildlife Society's 10th
anniversary dinner on March
24. Tickets are available at the
Paper Mill.
t «,. svho attended the S^rwa(jeira
pleasure dolng^   ^  yoU  tor   V
Wte fl^ 0rtl a tSs*:*S V°Ut
Building SupP^'s we're confident ^
Pindir Harbour Lions Club
ANNUAL AUCTION
April 28. 1990
Mjj YOU DONATE AUCTION ITEMS?
883-2392 or 883-9992
_$$$ SAVE $$$—
USED BUILDING SUPPUES
Quality, used lumber, bricks, windows, lights, plumbing, etc.
P A ■ USED BUILDINQ MATERIALS
11947 Tannery Rd., Surrey
MONDAY-SATURDAY BM-1311
We also buy used building materials
Tom Toolery Ltd.
Sales, Services & Rentals
883-9114
CENTRE HARDWARE
hardware
housewares
tackle
paint
883-9914x
^2>
FOODUNER
"Check our Flyer"
(Dr
9(enmar 'JJrapertes
t, NEEDLECRAFT SUPPLIES
883-2274
A MARINA
PHARMACY
883-2888
Oak Tree Market
Open 7 days a week
10 am • 8 pm
flokn rKenau It.
Marina *
lOIAl SHOPPING
7 Days • Wrwk
All Cttsvron Products
883-2253
IflUie'» RESORT
BOAT RENTALS
SI
AIR
883-2456
Like
YOUR NAME
Here!
Tajs traruhina
quit mm
in Pender Harbour Centre
Mon-Fri. 883-9049
PENDER HARBOUR
GOLF COURSE
Visitors Weliome
Vi M. North ol Garden Bay Rd.,
Hwy. 101 8H3-9541
f
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
sv ITIce
T>   YOUR NAME
^ Hew/
Ttas faaaniia
cut run
in Pender Harbour Centre
Mon.. Fri. 883-9099
aTYPINO
•WOOD PROCESSING
•ACCOUNTING
•FAX SERVICE
•PHOTOCOPYING
•ANSWERING SERVICI
ICBC
LIFE
MARINE
COMMERCIAL
HOMEOWNERS
HARBOUR INSURANCE
k.  AGENCIES LTD. I
883-2794
t»lo      PENDER
\"    HARBOUR
CREDIT
UNION
883-9531
tit
YOUR NAME
Here/
COAST fill
in Pendet H.irbour Centre
Mon. .Fri, 883-9099
HUGH W.JONES
Lawyer
883-9525
CONTRACTORS
883-9046
Seahorse
_ '(instruction
Indian Isle
Construction
Backhoe & Dumptruck
Service
883-2747 or 883-2730
Roofing
•83-9303
Mtinjajr
Tai ft Gmvel. Shohei. S-.l-.9lM.
metal Hoot*. To«h On, DwiQfch
Peninsula Power &
Cable Ltd.
Until •*• •<>» VoltJRv ftn*er Lint*
Duldonr Suli-Si.il it in*,
883-2218
Ray Hansen Trucking
& Contracting
Gravel, Hearing
Septic Systems
883-9222
MOBILE HOMES
Ne* and UiirJ - Initint Hauling
883-9338 or S80-4321 (call collect)
Miss Sunny's Hair Boutique
883-2715
Located at Headwater Marina
Madeira Marina
883-2266
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Professional Landlord
Services
Dm Howell 883-2969
Garden Bay
Hotel
Pub, Waterfront Restaurant, Moorage. Air
Char-tare Fishing Charter*. Bike Rentals
8M M74 Fub
SUNlt ■•lUurant
Sales * Service ltd. l
883-1119
at the Pendtr HtrDour Hotel
^SswEevm* F,°m 6 *m
wJaBEIrA     packed
i   -Hr»a LUNCHES
En* TAKE-OUT
-■*-»■ CHICKEN
tatawMt
Canadian » Chinese Cuisine
883-2413
I
HEADWATER MARINA ltd.
Ways, Hi-Pressure Washing,
rv Year-Round Moorage
883-2406
IHNJI^MJ*- "*li "f W i.WlffuWO-
i Coast News, March 19,1990  LEISURE  At The Arts Centre  Donne Belme, left, end Trudy Smell stend behind their works  selected to be among 20 local entries chosen for the Annual Images and Objects Exhibition to be held In Saanlch in May. All 20  of the winning entries, chosen from emong 150, ere on display at  the Arts Centre until April 1. -d��v�� tf rmr photo  On March 23 at 8 pm classical guitarist Clarke Steabner  will give a coffee house concert  at the Arts Centre. Clarke's  program will include Spanish  and South American musk  brought to South America in  the late 1890's and early 1900's.  Food and beverages will be  served during this concert.  Tickets are $6 and are available  at Coast Bookstore in Gibsons,  Seaview Market in Roberts  Creek, Books & Stuff and Talewind Books in Sechelt and at  the Arts Centre.  WEDDING  Michel Khleifi's fascinating  and sensuous Wedding in  Galilee may be the first narrative feature made in Israel  from an Arab point of view.  This film begins at 8 pm, admission is $4 at the door.  IMAGES & OBJECTS  Until April I, the 8th Annual  'Images and Objects' Exhibition will be shown at the Arts  Centre. Jurors Veronica Plew-  man and Karen Butchart chose  20 works by local artists to appear in this show.  These works of art, together  with 11 other regional shows  from throughout BC, will be  part of the Annual BC Arts  Festival in Saanich on Vancouver Island from May 24 to  27.  Congratulations to the  following artists who were successful in having their work accepted and will represent the  Sunshine Coast at this year's  festival: Jeffrey Birkin, Clint  Dtvy, Ene Falkenberg, Greta  Guzek, Katie Janyk, Noreen  Marshall, Fran Ovens, Lois  Kennedy Paine, Chic Page, Bill  Perry, Ole Pii, Ada Priest,  Diana Rae, Bill Rogers, Trudy  Small and Kathryn Warn.  The 'Model Craft' Exhibition  continues at the centre until  April 1.  Royal Canadian Legion Br. 109 Gibsons  UL FLEA MARKET  Tables ��� SS m.     *"-' *'  To Reserve Table Phone 8*8-2453  Free Admission  4:00 ��� 7:00 pm or leave meeeage.  King off the Safecrackers  The Dubious Fame  COMING IN  LOUD & CLEAR  by Peter Trower  Herb Wilson's presence on  the West Coast has not gone entirely unnoticed by the press.  One day Paul St. Pierre - then a  young reporter - arrives, eager  to do a story on him. Wilson  complies gladly, showing St.  Pierre around his small  kingdom, happy to have  something positive written  about him for a change.  When the article appears in  print however, Wilson has second thoughts. He realizes that  he has left himself wide open to  the possibility of less welcome  visitors. After 18 months on  Cortez, Wilson sells both the  mill and the property for a tidy  sum and moves to Vancouver.  Settling near English Bay,  Herb Wilson dabbles in real  estate again for the first time  since his Los Angeles days, buying and selling rooming houses  in the West End. The transactions are profitable. By the end  of 1945 Wilson finds he has  over $30,000 of completely  legitimate money in his account.  The war is over and travel is  possible again.  Herb  Wilson  decides to realize a dream he has  harboured for many years. He  buys a ticket on a cargo  passenger ship and sets out for  Sydney, Australia. It is the first  deep sea trip Wilson has undertaken since he sailed back from  South Africa, after his brief  stint in the Boer War, almost 45  years ago.  In Sydney, Wilson buys a  small motorhome, then known  as a 'caravan', and takes off to  explore the Australian countryside. He is fascinated by the  exotic flora and fauna and  makes copious notes with an eye  to writing a book about his experiences. It is a long time since  Wilson has been bitten by the  bug of authorship. The barren  years in Canadian prisons produced nothing.  After a month of leisurely  travel among the gum trees,  koalas and kangaroos, Herb  Wilson ends up in Brisbane.  Here, his thoughts turn once  more to the business of making  an income. He notices a small  millinery shop for sale in an attractive location and decides to  have a fling at running a store.  Wilson buys the establishment from the owner, stages a  On Channel 11  Tuesday, March 20  7:30 pm  Gibsons Council Meeting  Live   from   the   council  chambers in Gibsons, we present gavel to gavel coverage of  this   week's   meeting.  Thursday, March 22  7:00 pm  Coast Interfailh  James   McCullum   who  teaches at the Vancouver School  of Theology joins Maryanne  West in the studio to discuss the  Christian season of Lent.  7:30 pm  Trade Show  Gibsons is hosting a Trade  Show on  April  27 and 28.  Chamber of Commerce Vice-  President,   John   Clark   and  Director of Special Events, Art  Giesbrecht   join   Marlene  Lowden in the studio to discuss  their plans for the event.  7:45 pm  Home Show  Trail   Bay   Mall   recently  played host to a number of  distributors and manufacturers  working in the home industries.  8:00 pm  Driftwood Players Production  of 'Bus Stop'  In 1987 Coast Cable 10  videotaped the final performance of the Driftwood Players  'Bus Stop'. Directed by Jay  Pomfret.  This Community  Television Schedule  Courtesy ol ��� ��� ��� ���  SOUTH COAST FORD  885-3281   (kamma 0 $ub (fca^ette  March 20, 1990  'Rnfnmn^  PUB  EXTRA! EXTRA!  Bad Girl,  Gone Good,  More Than  a Nose Job.  Lori'in ipsum dolor sit ami  diam nonnumy elusmud 1<  magna aliquam erat volup  quis noslmd exercilalton i  dolore magna aliquam era  vcnlaml quit nostrud c   cum omn.ng null fly ci venumi guts noi  *** New Menu until 10:30 ���������  Local personalities rave!  Gramma's Pub  At The Head Of Ths Wharf   Marine Drive   Glbsonrj Landing  Wij SHOWERS ��� LAUNDRY ��� MOORAGE  IW     10a)m-12am Mon-Thura  ^qmrnp^  11am-lamFf)&Sa.  11-12am Sun  Q**l&���rt*^rlv��^r��Qrmn^tiJ^ don'i drlwl  mirns.  mass hat sale to dispose of the  old stock, purchases new merchandise  novelty shop - an Australian  version of a live-and-dime. The  concept, common enough in  North America, is new to the  land-down-under. The Aussies  take to it immediately and  Wilson is soon doing a  flourishing business.  Herb  Wilson  operates  the  novelty store successfully until  1947. Then he begins to feel  restless again. He has always  wanted to explore the South Sea  islands, and now he is well  within striking distance. Wilson  decides to sell the thriving store  and use some of the money to  realize his old ambition. He  manages to unload the business  lor considerably more than he  paid for it, settles up his affairs  and bids Australia goodbye.  To be continued...  Enjoy all the musk, drama and  comedy of CBC Stereo.  A world of news and entertainment  at your  CBC  Stereo  Any way you Slice it  the Classifieds bring results  ��     *     |_Jj_��  tNoePEN"''  a^��folo\hrougnout  ���Over  Idwtde  >mated  4,ooo won  travel  for att  aervic<  respo'  on the  , f������l  ,tp Travel AQ6^1..  *-��"      M6-M5S  rrtDf*"''" '  Sunnycr.��tMatt,GI-.������ r  Coast News, March 19,1990  13.  ^'^  Rhythms  of Life  n search of inner calm  by Penny Fuller  Put your head outside for  just a moment. Do you smell it?  No, not the pollution. Something else. A delicate scent inexorably threading its way into  your awareness.  That's spring! On March 20  at 1:19 pm it's official. The Sun  enters the sign of Aries - the  spring equinox is here.  It's a rare person who can  withstand the rising of hope and  optimism that accompanies this  season - the time of rebirth.  Somehow, the growing light  feeds and nourishes dormant  faith in every heart.  John Randolph Price says  "...Faith is the Power of the  master mind. It is the key to the  Kingdom." His book, The Su-  perbeings, is one of the most inspirational, beautiful pieces of  writing I've ever had the  privilege of reading, and this is  the perfect season for just such  a book.  In the dark days of winter  (either emotional or physical).  Faith takes on an aspect of 'last  resort mentality', a kind of inner chanting "Things will get  better, things will get better."  But as spring arrives, the element of desperation recedes and  Faith can become a deep knowing.  Now is the time to cultivate  and nurture the Faith inside  you. Like a tree it can be fragile,  easily destroyed if exposed to  the ruthless winter weather  before it develops deep roots.  But if started in the spring, and  cared for through the warm,  easy months, by the time a really fierce blizzard hits, it's strong  enough to survive.  How do you cultivate Faith?  Some of you already have some  kind of spiritual affiliation; ask  Gardening Notes  Getting a head  start on Spring  your rabbi, minister, priest or  guru. Many of these people  have committed a lifetime to  Faith, and have had it tested  and weakened and made strong  again many times. They may  have valuable insights to share  with you.  Or read a book by some inspirational writer. I would  highly recommend Superbeiags,  but masters such as Thoreau,  Emerson or Whitman have been  providing these kinds of insights  for a long time now. Have you  read any of their works lately?  Many of these sources will  suggest prayer. Some may even  mention meditation. As the  days grow longer and life on  this continent becomes green  and fresh again, there will be increasing opportunity for you to  do this kind of contemplative  activity outdoors, near water  and trees. Use this time. Make it  a personal priority.  If you plant a beautiful little  sapling, you don't just tend it  now and then when you think  of it. You make a commitment  to that plant and care for it on a  regular, consistent basis.  Can't you do the same for  yourself? Make a commitment,  a realistic commitment, to  spent! time alone praying or  meditating at certain specified  times. Make that time sacred. In  other words, whether or not it's  convenient, whether or not your  family goes into crisis at just  about that time, whether or not  your friends decide to drop in  right about then, you claim that  commitment to yourself.  Leave them to amuse themselves (or not as the case may  be). Remove yourself and enter  inlo a communion with the  higher powers.  If you have a hard time settling down, just walk. Hug a tree  or two. Listen to the sounds of  nature.  As with the sapling, you can't  'make' Faith grown. But you  can provide the necessary  elements which will allow it to  grow. Next time you feel buffeted by the upheavals of life, you  will discover a comfort, a calm  strength in the "inner knowing"  that all will be well.  GIBSONS  LEGION  Branch 109  Member;, and Guests Welcome  RON  HUGHES  IMPORTANT  GENERAL  MEETING  Tues., March 20  8:00 pm  by Marguerite  We can get a head start on  spring by growing flower and  vegetable seedlings indoors,  despite the fluctuating  temperatures. In about 10  weeks they should be ready to  harden off gradually in the cold  frame, in readiness to transplant  to the garden, thus avoiding  transplant shock.  Fill pots or trays with a sterile  potting mix of soil, with added  perlite to prevent fungus. Lightly press on surface very fine  seeds, cover with a quarter inch  of fine soil, mist spray, then  label contents, and place in a  warm place, keeping soil moist,  not wet, in a south exposure, as  seedlings heed as much light as  possible. You can cover with a  flourescent light tube a few inches above.  strength fish emulsion or liquid  seaweed mixture.  You might be well advised to  start right now the outdoor  gardening exercise of pruning,  to have it completed before  bud-busting occurs in early  spring.  Want to start a new  strawberry bed? Do consider  the plants named "Selva",  which produce huge berries and  are very prolific, bearing fruit  from March to November.  They are very suitable for this  whole area of the north west.  Remember it is time to spray  all your fruit trees and roses  with dormant oil spray now,  before the buds burst. Strip off  all old rose leaves of last year,  gather up from the ground and  dispose of them in the garbage.  This will prevent black spot  spore re-infecting plants before  you spray.  SAVE!  DOLLAR A BAG DAY  Tim. 20th  VUft THRIFTY'S  HELP THE  GIBSONS  U6-Z4U H Bn 598  Upstairs, ibovi Kin'i Lucky Dollar, Gibsons  Mir. 21  OPEN HOUSE  Saturday, March 24 11:00 - 2:00  1520 Johnson Road  '145,000  Ruth Moore 885-2432  1498 Port Mellon Highway *160,000  Barbara McFee  Century West Realty Ltd.  885-2235 or 689-5838  . Every two weeks give half  Driftwood Players  presenting a farce  play  The Driftwood Players' latest  play, 'Busybody', was chosen  by director Nest Lewis as a cure  to the end-of-winter blues.  The murder mystery farce,  featuring disappearing bodies,  bumbling cops and a colourful  host of suspects, will be running  March 29 to 31 and April 5 to 7  at the Roberts Creek Hall.  New to the Driftwood  Players stage are June Wilson, a  well-known Elphinstone  English teacher; Debra Allain, a  French Immersion teacher at  Sechelt Elementary; Reg Rowe,  a seasoned actor who is currently writing his own play; Tim  Anderson, secretary treasurer  for the local school district; and  Coast News reporter Dave  Fraser.  There are also familiar faces  to local theatre lovers: Karen  Bruce, a Sechelt Elementary  teacher who has been featured  in the local company's 'Mousetrap' and 'The Heroine'; Laura  Russell, a Grade 12 student at  Chatelech who acted in last  year's Driftwood production of  'Princess  Rainbow'  and  the  Qolden  Qloves  Local boxer Tony Duffy will  be boxing Alan Baine, BC  Champion from Prince George  at the upcoming 51st Annual  Golden Gloves Boxing Championships to be held at the PNE  Gardens on March 24 at 7:30  pm.  Also on the card will be such  well known names in BC boxing  as Manny Sobrel, Geronimo Bie  and boxers from Alaska,  Saskatchewan and California.  children's   play   'The  Tinder  Box'  tickets for 'Busybody' are $5  for opening night and thereafter  $7.50 advance and $8.50 at the  door. Advance tickets are  available at Coast Bookstore,  Linnadine's Shoes in Sunnycrest Mall, Seaview Market  and Talewind Books.  Your guide to  the finest in  area dining  A listing of  restaurants  and pubs  Tooot  the Ceatt  Our business discussion was not coming together as  smoothly or as quickly as we both had hoped. The afternoon had slipped by and hunger started to set in.  Finally, we agreed we should take a break, "grab a  bite", and come back to our task refreshed.  Pronto's was our choice. We knew there musl be a  reason for all those cars parked out front at lunch and dinner times.  We were pleasantly surprised that a restaurant with a  great reputation for pizza, pasta and steak would offer  such a wide variety of tempting choices. For appetizers we  chose escargot; and we were glad we didl  Included with the entree at Pronto's is a choice of soup  or salad. I, trying to be sensible, ordered the salad. It was a  generous portion of crisp greens. My companion ordered the  soup of the day - cream of corn - and we were both starting to  feel better already.  It wasn't long before we saw our friendly server, Gwen,  walking across the floor loaded down with what we  thought might be a tray of steaming dinner for a table of  hungry ironworkers. But nol she turned and headed  straight for us - and kept on coming! Well it looked good;  and tasted great ��� a generous platter of barbecued pork  spare ribs for my friend and a serving of Prbnto's  "famous" steak and lasagna for me. No more talking. We  ate, we enjoyed.  From the choices of dessert we took the apple crisp  cheese cake. Over a great dessert and coffee in these pleasant surroundings our business problems seemed to resolve  themselves.  Best investment we ever made! Thank you, Pronto's.  Andy's Restaurant. Every Wednesday nighl is Prime Rib Night. House  specialties include veal dishes, steaks,  seafood, pasla, pi/At, Thai food, and lots  of NEW dishes. Don't miss Andy's great  Brunch Buffet every Sunday from  llam-2:.V). liny 101. Gibsons, 886-3388.  Creek House ��� Intimate dining and  European cuisine in a sophisticated yet  casual atmosphere. Wc serve rack of  lamb, duck, crab, clams, scallops, steaks,  also daily specials. Reservations rccom.  mended. Roberts Creek Road and Beach  Avenue - 883*321. Open 6 pm. Closed  Mondays & Tuesdays. V. MC. 40 seats.  Mariners' Restaurant ��� on the  waterfront with one of the most spec-  lacular views in Gibsons, the Mariners'  specializes in fresh and live seafood, and  also offers a full range of lunch and dinner entrees. Both menus change daily,  with delicious daily specials. Marine  Drive, Gibsons Landing, 886-2334. Mon-  day to Saturday: Lunch 11-3, Monday to  Saturday: Dinner 3-10 and Sunday 3-9,  Sunday Brunch 11-3. 100 seals. V. M.C.  The Omega Pizza, Steak And  Lobster House - With a perfect view  of Gibsons marina, and a good time atmosphere, the Omega is a people-  watcher's paradise. Cast members of The  ! can usually be found din-  FAMILY DINING  ing here. Menu includes pizza, pasta,  steaks and seafood. Steaks and seafood  are their specialties. Banquet facilities  available. Very special children's menu.  Average dinner for two: $20. Reservations recommended. Located in Gibsons  landing at 1538 Gower Poinl Rd.  886-2268. Open Sun-Thurs. 11 .-Main ��� 10  pm, Fri and Sat 11:30 am ��� 10:30 pm.  Seals 145.  Pronto's Restaurants Two locations  to serve you. Both serve an extensive  variety of pizza, steak, pasta, lasagne,  ribs, souvlaki in a delightful family atmosphere. Children's menu available. All  dinner entrees include garlic bread and a  choice of soup or salad. Average family  meal for four about $15-$20. Located at  Wharf Rd., Sechell, 885-1919; and on  Highway 101, across from Gibsons  Medical Clinic, Gibsons, 886-8138.  The Parthenon Greek Taverna  Located on the esplanade in downtown  Sechelt. We specialize in Greek Cuisine,  fresh seafood, steaks, pasta, and pizza.  Open 6 days a week - Tues. through  Thurs., from II am - 10 pm and Fri. &  Sat., II am - II pm. Wc are open for  lunch - try our daily luncheon specials.  Lunch is served from II am - 3 pm.  Reservations recommended. We also  have take-out - pizza, ribs, pasta, Greek  food and much more! 885-1995 or  M5-2833. Katherina ���  OS thi urns  Ruby lake Resort - Picturesque  lakeside setting. rwst-and-beam dining  room, children's play area and tame  swam are pan of Ruby Lake Resort's  charm. Sunday smorgasbord features  baron of beef and other hot meat dishes,  a beautiful salad bar and home-made  . Absolutely superb prime rib on  Friday. Breakfast from 6:30 am, lunch  from 11 am and dinner from 4:30 to 8  pm. Daily specials, licenced, reasonable  prices, menus have something for  everyone, on- and off-premises catering.  Hwy 101 just north of Pender Harbour,  good highway access and parking for  vehicles of all sizes. 883-2269.  The Wharf - Open for breakfast,  lunch and dinner seven days a week.  Breathtaking ocean view and sunsets  from even lable. Continental cuisine and  seaftXKl at its best. Sunday Brunch from  II am - 2 pm. Fully licensed and air-  conditioned. Dinner reservations rccom-  mended. Hwy. 101, Davis Bay. 885-7285.  Cedar's Inn - Appcti/ers all day till 11  pm. Darti every Tues. Everyone  welcome, Cedar Plaza, Gibsons 886-8171.  Open II am - midnight. Sun-Thurs; II  am ��� I am. Fri-Sat, llll scats. V��� MC.  Regular menu II tun to 8:.*0 pm.  MT IN -  IAKI (>(/  Chicken Shack - Deep fried chicken,  pizza, hamburgers, salads. All to go.  Cowrie St., Sechell -885-7414. Video Rentals. Open II am - 9 pm, Mon-Thur; II  am ��� 10 pm, Fri-Sat; noon - 9 pm, Sun.  Home delivery within 5 miles of store  after 4 p.m.  Ernie & Gwen's Drive In- Take  out, or delivery. Pizza, dinners, salads,  burgers, chicken, desserts, drinks, ice  cream. Free home delivery within 4 miles,  after 6 pm only, on $10 minimum orders.  Small charge for orders under $10. Open  late every nighl. Hwy. 101, Gibsons.  886-7813.  Average meal prices  do not include liquor  PAID ADVERTISEMENTS Coast News, March 19,1990  Cedars Third Annual  Volleyball Tourney  by Jay Pomfret  The March 10 and II  weekend marked the Cedars  Pub third annual Volleyball Invitational. The tournament  sponsorship has been vital and  greal appreciation has been fell  by members of the Sunshine  Coast Volleyball Association  (SCVA).  This year the SCVA invited  Parksville for the first time,  with Powell River and ihe  French Quarter from New  Westminster also returning.  Teams from home representing Gibsons Building Supplies,  Elphinstone Secondary School,  Cedars Pub and the new Orphanage met head to head with  the visitors early Saturday morning. Each squad played a total  of four matches, each including  three full games to 15.  By tourney end, the strength  appeared to favour ihe two  teams from Parksville, Powell  River and Ihe hometown Orphans.  By finals end Parksville 'A'  met Powell River in a real nail  biter. Parksville took the first  game 15 to 12, Powell River the  second 15 to 12 and finally in  the last game, Parksville won in  extra points 19 to 17.  Third place went to Parksville  H' team, while fourth was  taken by King Sims' and Silla  Webb's local pull-together  squad dubbed the Orphans.  It was not a great year for the  remaining SCVA teams, but  new blood and a little work will  hopefully build up a belter  future for next year.  Thanks to all who helped out  with all aspects of organizing  the tournament.  GARAGE DOORS  Cedar - Cladwood - Metal  Insulated Metal  Automatic Openers - Sold, Serviced, Installed  BUILT-IN VACUUMS  by Beam  Installed in New or Existing Homes  IN I t A 886-3730  Mobile Toll-Free 1-240-1044  Minor Hockey  A member of the Gibsons Orphans (right) gets set to blast a shot  back at the Parksville 'B' team during fast semi-final action at last  weekend's Cedars Pub Invitational Volleyball Tournament, held  in Elphinstone gym. Details of the eight-team, tourney are in accompanying article. -Fran Burnside photo  ��� Division  13  Sechelt Bantams entertained Seattle.  Final score: Winter Hawks 8, Seattle I.  Scoring for Winter Hawks by: Kirk  Savage, 3 goals, I assist: Dean  Stockwell, .' goals, I assist; Graham  Ruck, 1 goal, I assist; Kurtis Francis, I  goal, I assist; Troy Boyes, 2 assists; G.  Allen, I assist; Cody Munson, t assist.  March 10  Sechelt Winter Hawks entertained  Howe Sound. Final Score: Howe Sound  9, Winter Hawks, 2. Scoring for Winter  Hawks by: Kirk Savage, 2 goals; Chad  LaMarche, 2 assists; Dean Stockwell, 1  assist.  Atom Division - March 4  Interhouse Game between Doug's  Devils and Wings. Final Score: Wings 5,  Devils 3. Scoring for the Wings: Buddy  Peers, 3 goals; Curtis Munson, 2 goals;  Travis Cummings, 1 assist. Scoring for  the Devils: Ryan Dempster, 2 goals; Jim  Rickbeil, 1 goal.  March I  Interhouse Game between Wings and  Jets. Final Score: Jets 5, Wings 1. Scoring for Wings: Calvin Steels, 1 goal.  assisted by Tyler Wilson. Scoring For the  Jets: Jeremy Ruck, 3 goals, I assist; Ray  Blake, I goal; Brook Hamilton, I goal;  Jordy Radymski, I assist; Kris Nichols,  1 assist, Roland Nichols, I assist.  Marc* 3  Interhouse game between Devils and  Jets. Scoring for the Jets: Jeremy Ruck 2  goals, I assist; Richard Selby, 2 goals;  Dominic Rothlisberger, I goal, 3 assists;  Brad Wing, I goal, I assist; Louis  Nichols, I assist. Scoring for the Devils:  Ryan Dempster, 3 goals; Jim Rickbeil, I  goal: Roberts Trousdell, 2 assists.  March 7  Interhouse game between Jets and  Devils, Scoring for Devils: Jim Rickbeil,  2 goals, I assist; Ryan Dempster, I goal,  2 assists; Jesse Smith, I goal; Robert  Trousdell, 2 assists; Nathan Penonzek, 1  assist. Scoring for the Jets: Jeremy  Ruck, 4 goals, 4 assists; Terry Gray, 2  goals, 4 assists; Brook Hamilton, 2  goals, I assist; Roland Nichols, I goal, 1  assist; Louis Nichols, I goal, I assist;  Brad Wing, I assist; Dominic  Rothlisberger, I assist; Ray Blake, I  assist; Karl Nichols, 1 assist.  Reference: Point Atkinson Z\mm^m\TTKmT'"  Pacific Standard Time  tj 7 mm lot MCh II Ql jjjl  'oats In-Stock  TIDELINE  MARINE  5637 Wharf Rd  Sechelt  885-4141  ��5 r\rTr<7  Men's hockey playoffs start up  by Mark Benson  The playoffs in the Sunshine  Coast Men's Hockey League  got underway on Saturday night  with Wakefield and the Hawks  winning their respective games  in the first round best of three.  in the first game, league  champions Wakefield faced off  against the fourth place Gibsons  Kings, who are in the playoffs  for the first time. The game was  scoreless after one period of  play.  Wakefield methodically built  up a 3 to 0 lead by the end of the  second on goals by Mike Yarrow, Dave Crosby and Tom  Poulton. Mike Yarrow scored  his second goal midway through  the final period to give  Wakefield a comfortable 4 to 0  lead.  Strikes and Spares  CLASSIC:  SLOUGH-OFFS:  Sue Whiting  256-931  Lucille (tapper  245-671  UenHanchar  259-915  Megan Thomson  252-612  Freeman Reynolds  260-947  BALL ot CHAIN:  Waller Kohuch  273-1034  Pam Lumsden  276-687  TUES. COFFEE:  SueWhiling  205-703  Kathy Johnston  260642  John Hart  241434  Sue Whiting  247-659  Dean Martin  250-652  Kilty Mulligan  301-631  PHUNTASTIQUE:  GIBSONS 'A':  Donna Kbit  285679  Dariene Humbird  282-693  Jim Gilchrist  254494  Barb Christie  203-703  Rob Bolt  241-656  NIGHT OWLS:  Rick Nelson  301-707  Elinor PenfoM  241431  Freeman Reynolds  267-726  Elda Finlay  Bill Wilson  Ray Mahoney  277472  26*475  1  I  1  26I49S  A GIBSONS  SECHELT G.A.'S:  Joan Ross  252436  IJ   LANES  Lucille Clapper  Pal Gibson  264445  275440  AndyWeslie  246451  Don Webster  251451  hmm^)     886-2086  VBCJRS/SRS:  Tori Tucker  215-559  Debbie Davidson  SeUiGlullano  228-581  237-598  Dave Brackett finally got the  Kings on the board and the  comeback was underway. Next  Dan Rusnak scored and then  Tom Bailey brought the Kings  within a goal and all of a sudden  the lead was nol so comfortable  anymore.  The Kings pulled their goalie  for a sixth attacker in the last  minute bul the experience of  Wakefield showed and the  Kings did everything but score.  The final result was Wakefield  4, Kings 3. Wakefield leads best  of three.  In the second game of Ihe  double header, it was second  place Gilligans confronting the  third place Hawks.  Hawks jumped out to a 2 to 1  lead by the end of the first  period.  .  Gilligans roared back on  goals by Bill Trousdell, Gord  Clayton and Rob Stockwell to  take a slim 4 to 3 lead into the  room after two periods of play.  The Hawks broke the game  wide open with two quick short-  handed goals and the fans went  wild. Gilligans couldn't buy a  i. goal and the Hawks could do no  ���i :wrong.  Frankie Dixon led the Hawks  with four goals while Owen  Dixon chipped in a pair. Darren  Dixon and Adrian Dixon also  scored. Final score was Hawks  8, Gilligans 4.  Hawks lead best of three  semi-final I to 0.  Next Week's Games:  Tuesday, March 20, 8:30 pm,  Wakefield vs Kings; Wednesday  the 21st, 8:30 pm, Hawks vs  Gilligans; Thursday the 22nd,  8:30 pm, third game if necessary; Friday the 23rd, 8:30 pm  game one finals; Saturday the  24th, 8:30 pm, game two finals.  Gibsons  Swimming Pool  Call 886-9415 for luther Information  We are taking  Registrations  Now For  BRONZE  MEDALLION  Tuesdays & Thursdays'1  7:30 - 9:30 pm  April 3 - May 3  r**a����r��**a��*#**��ai  Publication of this schedule  sponsored by  Super Valu  Any way you Slice it  the Clossifieds bring results  ��    ��     ��     4    o    *  Notice Board  r ������������'���    ���  Adult Childnn ol Alcoholics meeting Monday nights, 7:30 pm at SI. Mary's Church  Hall, Gibsons. For inlo Anna 889-5281 or Linda 886-8165.  Gibsons Branch - Schlzoohrajnlci matting Mir. 19 It 7:30 pm at tha GiflbilrJI Hiiltb  Unit on S. Fletcher. DtaCUlllM WW follow, Intiristing vldto. Everyone welcome.  Sunihlne Corn Unit el Cinidlin Cancer Society regular monthly malting Mon.,  Mar. 19 at regional offices at I pm. All welcome.  The Sunshlni Coait Recycling ind Procmlng Society annual general meeting will  take place Mar. 28 at 7:30 pm In the Community Use Room at Roberts Creek Elementary. Everyone welcome to bring questions and Ideas about recycling.  Coast Aiioclitlon ti Protect tin EnvksMrmnt (CAPE) will meet Thurs., Mar. 22 at  7:30 pm at Community Services, Sechell. Now members welcome. For inlo  886-7502.  Sunshlni Co.it Ofl-Roid Bicycling Aiioclitlon (SCORBA) first annual general  meeting Sun., Mar. 18 at 11 am, S.C. Community Services, 5638 Inlet Ave.,  Sechell. For Info Guy Bullen 885-5341.  Emotions Anonymoui - a confidential support group for people wanting to Improve  their emotional health, Sun. 7pm St. Mary's Church, Gibsons. Contact Hope  886-2730.  Sunshine Cent Amitiur Radio Club monthly meeting at the home ol John Cllmo,  (3461 Samron Rd.. Sechelt at 8pm, Mar. 21. For Inlo 885-9491.  BC FrlMdi if Schizophrenics meeting Fri., Mar. 30 at 7:30pm at Garibaldi Health  Clinic, Sechelt. Newcomers welcome, for info 885-1927.  Annuity Intirnatlonal group no. 160 meeting Tues., Mar. 20 at 7:30 pm at the home  of Reg and Althea Rowe 5820 Marine Way, Sechelt. Everyone welcome. For Info  885-7693.  Cinidlin Fedifttion if Unhnrilty Wmm Sunshine Coast meeting Mon., Mar. 26 at  11:30am Kirkland Centre. Richard Curll will speak about 'The Sunshine Coast  Literacy Program'. On The Rocks  Coast News, March 19,1990  15.  Funspiel is open to all  by Harry Turner  March 31 is the Funspiel and  we already have a large number  of people signed up. If you want  to try curling, are new to the  community,   or   have  curled  before but want a little practice  before the next season begins,  now is the time to participate in  the fun. This end of season  event promises to be very entertaining. I am sure you will enjoy  ail of the events being planned.  Jr. Golf Program  by Celia Meda  The Sunshine Coast Golf and  Country Club is once again continuing its commitment to the  Junior Golf program, with  lessons beginning on Tuesday,  April 17 at 4 pm. Lessons will  run once a week, at the same  time, for a six week period.  The field will be limited to 30  juniors and 28 junior-juniors, at  a cost of $15. Convenors for the  juniors are Roy and Pat Scarr,  with Brian Leckie looking after  the junior-juniors. Players  should note that the First tee will  be closed from 3 to 5 pm on  lesson days.  The Tuesday Ladies shivered  and shook their way around the  course last week, knowing that  warmer days must surely be  ahead. I'm sorry that I don't  have the results from the 9-Hole  Gals, but the 18-Hole Ladies  counted putts, with the winners  as follows.  First Flight: Connie Grant, 31  putts (BB9); Mary Horn, 31  putts; Marion Reeves, 33 Putts  (BB9). Second Flight: Eleanor  Thompson, 31 putts; Louise  Varco, 34 putts; Marlis Knaus,  36 putts.  Many of our seniors are slowly returning home from  southern destinations, so here's  one more reminder for the  senior men. The regular Thursday Senior Men begin on March  22, with an 8 am registration  ($25 please) and a 9 am shotgun  start.  We encourage all those who  want to try the game for the  first time to get involved too. If  you are interested, phone John  at the club at 886-7512 or Joy  Hill at 886-3925. It is the last  time to enjoy the game this  season.  Beginners need not worry  about equipment since the club  rents brooms and sliders. The  only other equipment you need  is a clean pair of shoes (rubber  soled) and a warm sweater. This  is a community club and we  welcome all members of the  community from Port Mellon  to Pender Harbour to lake part.  Get a group together and join us  - have the time of your life.  The curling league play is  over for another year and  playoffs begin next week. Come  on out and cheer on your  favourites.  Presentation of awards to  league and playoff winners is to  lake place at the wind-up dinner  and dance which will be held at  the YMCA camp on April 7  starting at 6:30 pm.  A  ��� ���AAA  LOGS WANTED  All Species  TOP PRICES PAID  270-0693  8864377  A       A      A      A       A      at  [DELTA WEST FOREST SALES LTD  LIVING FAITH  LUTHERAN CHURCH  Whitlaker Road & Coast Highway  Davis Bay   885-2202  Rev. Frank W. Schmitt, Pallor  Sunday Church School     9:30 am  (in home at 4862 Coast Highway!  For information call 8B5-5792  Sunday Worship 11:00 am  Come Grow With Us  -��>*���*��-  THE UNITED CHURCH  OF CANADA  Sunday Worship Services  GIBSONS  Glassford Road 11:15 am  Sunday School 11:15 am  ST. lOHN'S  Davis Bay 9:30 am  Sunday School 9:30 am  Rev. Stan Sears  Church Telephone 886-2333  ���mmm-  GRACE REFORMED  PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  Morning Worship 11:30 am  St. Hilda's Anglican Church  Evening Worship    7 pm in homes  Wednesday  Bible Study 7:30 in homes  1. Cameron Fraser, Pastor  BB5-7488 Office 885-9707   mmm  ANCLICAN CATHOLIC  CHURCH OF CANADA  St. Columba of lona Parish  8835 Redrooffs Rd.. Halfmoon Bay  The Rev. E.S. Gale: 1-525-6760  Information: 8857088  "Pravt'r Hunk Anglican"   mmm  CALVARY  BAPTIST CHURCH  711 Park Road  Telephone: 886-261)  Sunday School 9:30 am  Worship Service 11:00 am  Hour of Inspiration 7:00 pm  Cai Mclver, Pastor  Arlys Peters, Music Minister  "The Bible as il is...  fur People as they are."  -W4I.W-  NtW LIFE FELLOWSHIP ~  New Testament Church  5531 Wharf Rd., Sechelt  Sun. Worship Service      10:30 am  Wed. Bible Study 7:30 pm  Morning Prayer 6:30-7:45 am  Tues.-Sat.  New Life Christian Academy  Enroling Kindergarten - Grade 12  Pastor Ivan Fox  Principal. David Cliff  Phone B85-4775 or 885-2672  _s��.ta.*a-  ANGLICAN  CHURCH OF CANADA  Sunday 10:30 am  Parish Family Eucharist  St. Bartholomew's, Gibsons  Wednesday 10:30 am  Worship and Bible Study  St. Aidan's, Roberts Creek  Rev. Esther North 886-7410  The Anglican Parish of  St. Aidan & St. Bartholomew   ������������>   PENDER HARBOUR  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  Lagoon Road, Madeira Park  Morning Worship 11:00 am  Sunday School - all ages    9:45 am  Prayer & Bible Sludy  Wednesday 7:30 pm  B83-2374& 883-9441  Pastor Mike Klassen  Affiliated wilh the Pentecostal  Assemblies of Canada  GIBSONS  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  School Rd, opptrsile RCMP  SundaySchool 9:45. im  Morning Wofship 11:00 am  Evening Fellowship 7:00 pm  Phone: Churth Office 886-7107  Pastor Dan Mac Aulay 886-7107  Youth Pasior |. Morris: 886-(499  Affiliated wilh Ihe  Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada  GIBSONS COMMUNITY  FELLOWSHIP  Welcomes you to join us  in Sunday Worship  Children's Progress 9:45 am  Prayer 10:00 am  Morning  Worship Service 10:45 am  Wednesday 7:00 pm  599 Gower Point Road  Pastor Monty McLean  886-7049   ���*���*���*   A THE  ANGLICAN CHURCH  OF CANADA  St. Hilda's - Sechelt  Sunday Services 8 & 9:30 am  Nursery & Sunday School 9:30 am  SI. Andrew's ��� Pender Harbour  Regular Sunday Worships 11:30 am  885-5019 Rev. lune Maffin  "We extend a Warm Welcome  to all"  ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH MASS SCHEDULE  Saturday  5.-00 pm, Si. Mary's, Gibsons  Sunday  9:00 am, Indian District  10:00 am, Holy Family, Sechelt  12:00 noon, St. Mary's, Gibsons  CONFESSIONS  1st & 3rd Sat. 4:00-4:30 pm Holy Family, Sechelt  2nd & 4th Sat. 4:30-5:00 pm St. Mary's, Gibsons  885-9526  If you are a league curler,  your tickets may be picked up  from John or Doreen. All  tickets must be picked up or  confirmed by March 30. If you  want to bring a guest, arrangements can be made and as  you know, they will be made to  feel most welcome.  I would like to remind you of  the annual general meeting  which takes place Wednesday,  April 4 at 8 pm. Everyone is encouraged to attend the meeting  to elect your new executive.  This is your club and it works  best when there is the largest  possible membership participation.  We are electing nine new officers this year and many people  have agreed to run. It promises  lo be a very good season next  year.  If you are interested in running for office and you have not  been asked, please feel free to  contact Terry Conner at  886-7040 or Harry Turner al  886-2184. We would be very  pleased to hear from you.  \  IN!  F  Priva  OP  rEHICLE  5PECTION  ACUITY  te and Commercial  lot*  EN 6 DAYS A WEEK  SUNCOAST  L  T  D  MOTORS  PfJ��*V  117 Sunshine Coast Hwy    ��aa nnan  Gibsons - near Pratt    OOO'OaC 1 w  Pender Golf  Pender golfers  swing into action  by Jerry Holmes  Notice that spring is definitely on its way was evidenced this  week by the joining of the  stalwart winter golfers wilh the  first flight of returning snow  birds, to officially kick off this  golfing season.  Speaking of winter, the fact  lhat we were able, for the most  of it, to play regular greens and  tees not only speaks well of the  condition of our course, but  just might provoke a little envy  on the part of Lower Mainland  golfers who were not so blessed.  The Senior Men's competition on Tuesday was won by  Bill Jack, showing mid-season  i form, with a net 33. Tied forjsecond at net 33.5 were George  Langham and Master Ball  Hawk, Jim Buntain. Third  place winners were Peter  Wilson, Neil Reeder, wielding a  red hot putter, and Bart  Dillabough, who also got the  KP on 3.  On Thursday, 21 ladies turn  ed out in still coolish weather  for coffee and doughnuts,  followed by a game of blind  partners.  The winning partners were  Marcia Keim and Joan  Willcock followed by Claudetle  Campbell and Jan Watson. The  third place winners were Shirley  Dumma and Cathy McQuitty  and the most honest pair was  declared to be Hazel Charbon-  neau and Lorna Elliot.  At the January 13 annual  general meeting, the following  executives were elected: George  Langham, president; Peter  Wilson, vice-president; Pat Mitchell, treasurer; Claudette  Campbell, secretary; Dutch  Haddon, immediate past president; Joyce Reid, Vera  McAllister, Bruce Hamilton,  Bart Dillabough, Dave Dakin  and Jerry Holmes, directors;  Jessie Rietze and Randy Legge  are Ladies and Mens captains,  respectively; Linda Reid continues as manager and Craig  Moore is greens superintendent.  THE TIME IS i  NOW  Prepare For Those  Special Occasions  In Your Life  Lose 10 lbs. - 2 weeks,*  sCONSULTATION=17-25 lbs. - 6 weeksr=  [Mm  Center  I'lie weight-loss pmfessimtols.  NOW  30% Off  Membership  886-DIET  634 Firnham Rd. Gibsons  hehind(i.hM.n^Wk.iinmk  mmm  I 16.  Coast News, March 19,1990  APPLIANCE SERVICES*  ��� CONCRETE SERVICES*  ���  EXCAVATING  ���  HEATING  ���  SERVICE * REPAIR  To All M��|or A,a>llanc��  Quality Reconditioned Major Appliances For Sale  GUARANTEED & DELIVERED  Will Buy Nice Non-Working Mator Appliancas  Norseman - Bjorn  888-7887  AUTOMOTIVE ���  Industrial      AUTOMOTIVE        Marine  PARTS & SUPPLIES  A101 SUPPLY ltd.  1061 Hwy. 101, Gibsons, B.C. 886-8101  VMotv-FrLb-4 Sat. 8-6. Sun. 10-3  "SECHELT RADIATORS"���  Complele Cooling System Service Centra  We Repair & Replace Rads. Heater Cores & Gas Tanks  AUTOS TRUCKS TRACTORS INDUSTRIAL MARINE  New, Used & Rebuilt  35(0 Wharf   Ask m��* Wc*-uP * **������*" Mon. ��� Set  (Old Foriitrv BuBdlnnil     HBM 885-7986^  YOUR "COMPLETE"  TRANSMISSION CENTRE  ���FRONT AND REAR WHEEL DRIVE  ���AUTOMOTIVE k MARINE "CLUTCHES  ]%    .AUTOMATIC t STANDARD  Come see the Specialists at  4  *��-~^��  y EAGLE TRANSMISSIONS  The Coast's first Transmission only shop.  Phone Kerry at 677  886-2111 Payne Rd.  TRANSMISSION SPECIALISTS FOR 18 YEARS  ��� BUILDING CONTRACTORS  Hallmark  Custom Homes  & Renovations  Enquiries 886-3344  886*3364 J  /**��ARi>AT2 Glass & Door Ltd.*x  Molds ��� Screens ��� Garage Doors  Prehung Doors ��� Aluminum Windows  8745 Young Street S., Chilliwack, B.C. V2P 4P3  Bill Allan Sales Bus. 792-0088  Res: 853-4101 Fax. 792-3475  "We service the entire Sunshine Coast"  ���CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT  SEA m HORSE  AL VANCE  883-9046  Jf    CONSTRUCTION  COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL QUALITY FINISHING  ' L-Q BUILDING "��  CONTRACTORS  Surveying, Foundations, Framing Siding, Patios, Stairs  "Custom Building"  COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL  "We BuiM '��rn From The Bollnm Up!"  >M.ir< Qttirion    sV FREE tSTIMATES * 885-9203^  ALPINE TRUSSES LTD.  886-8801  /V  88  Roof Trusses, Residential, Commercial^  ROOFING  Specializing In all types of  FREE     commercial & residential rooting  ESTIMATES 886-2087 eves.   GUARANTIED.  Need this space?  Call The COAST NEWS  .it 886 2622 or 881. 3930  D.R. CLAPP  &  ASSOCIATES  BUILDING & DESIGN  ^-Post & Beam New Homes- Renovations 886-3811,  Pegasas's  CorJstRuction  #20 Evans Road, R.R.#1  Halfmoon Bay, B.C. VON 1\���   , e     /v  . Marten Carmen    885-2052 VS,*1-'/-  CorsstRCictiorj   &' k^fflffit  #20 Evans Road, R.R.#1      f^^ffiM?  Halfmoon Bay, B.C. VON 1Y0   rip*'"���1-*-'  CLEANING SERVICES  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon lo Ole's Cove  Commercial Containers Available  886-2938  ��� CONCRETE SERVICES*  R Ready Mix Concrete  C Sand * Gravel  Njp    CONCRETE  fl  f-TD. jmvinc me sunshini coo, I  SECHELT PLANT GIBSONS PLANT "  ,     M5-71B0 saum  TOP L.INE UONCRETE  Curbs; Retaining Walls  'We build 'em, We pour 'em'  Free Estimates 885-9203  TURENNE  CONCRETE  ���PUMP TRUCKS ���lTONCRETEWORK  Placing & Finishing ol:  Basement Slabs. Patios. Driveways.  Sidewalks, Exposed Aggregate  .    FOR QUALITY WORK. CALL US! 886-7022  "(���OB TKE JEST Or SERVICE*!  Swanson's  -.   ��� sax     .     -s. - ���.   jReady-Mln Ltd.  ��� jtHOUBCINiaAl DISPATCH���.        a. ACCOUNTS |  [885*9666] 1885-53331  3 Batch Planti on th�� Sunihln* Coait  Gibtoni ��� S��ch��li ��� Pander Harbour  ELECTRICAL CONTR  Olson Electric  General Electrical Contractor  fit. Esttmalaa including 0.C. Hydro Er.crrrc Plus  Residential ��� Commercial 885-1939  DENNIS OLSON Box 2271, Sechelt  MIDWAY-POWER'UNE  SERVICES LTD;  Private & Industrial Electrical Contractor^  High & Low Voltage Power Lines      J  Reg No. 16135 flA3-94B3  EXCAVATING  Ernie Fallis  Contracting  'it Complete Backhoe Service  M  886-9192  COAST BOBCAT SERVICI  Small In Size ��� Big In Production  1'usi Holes ��� Trenching  Spreading/Levelling  Light Hauling .������������  885-7051   SECHELT <����������a  .   FUTURE    ,  Excavating & Developments  llesi*nlial Underground Installations  & Repairs  Roads & Driveways  Commercial  Industrial  Land Clearing  Satisfaction BuirintHd  CALL MIKE OR MIKE  886-2182  PAUL'S CHIMNEY CLEANING  886-7116  Competitive Rates  ICB LIQUID GAS  ��� Auto Propane  ��� Appliances  ��� Quality B.B. O'a  aas-2360  Hwy 101, across St.  Irom Big Mac's, Sechelt  ( Fastrac MCKHOE  SEBVICE   _  i^f^i^S,  ��� SDT1C FOLDS                            vfj  ��� DRAINAGE DITCHES                  ^*^  ��� EXCAVATIONS  ��� WATER UHES  Col 411 4X4  ^     ecilANM         Steve Jones  886-8269  MARINE SERVICES  ^ CAN-DO EXCAVATIN  Septic Fields, Landscaping,  Stump Removal.  Mauling of sand, gravel & topsoll  . George 885-7553 Emery  Q A D Contracting  ���Sand & Gravel Deliveries,  ���Stump Removal  Gary Davies 886-9585 po Box 1389  cDan Zuell    886-8070 Gibsons. Bcj  &  mccaneer  Marina iy Resort Ltd  Located In Secret Cove 885-7811  MARINE SPECIALISTS 21 years  PARTS - SALES - SERVICE.-REPAIRS  fi^K It C Thermojless .  Cobra Bom now  la-Stock  lOUTBOARDS" '"  ��� GEM. CONTRACTORS*  lor the Professional  and the Homeowner.  RENT-IT!  Marina Dlaaal Rapalr  DAVE COLES  Mobil* Sanrica ��� Papain ��� Ovarttaula  Injector Service Special Month  886-2875  Need this space?  C.rll   lh,.   COASI   Nl WS  CANADA INC.  Ul     TOOLS & EQUIPMENT     &fr  .,5540 Inlet Ave., Sechelt       885-2646^  BONNIEBROOK  INDUSTRIES  886-7064  pile Tank Puroplittj*  nereis Septic Tank Salaao  ��� CRANE SERVICE*  *10tWTANDEM#  ��� 88* REACH*  Portable Toilet Rentals*  112 Yard Dump Truck *  ^m*i.    Cottrell's Marine Service1  V   lEja. SERVICE TO Al I  MAKES  H     KsCS      Specializing in Marc Outboard  rT^l^^s^^fc'     * stern drive rebuilding  DIVER MT Located at  BOAT *W        Smitty's Marina, Gibsons  HAULING SHOPUS-7711     RES. 885-5*40  -Residential*  -Commercial.  PAINTING  30 Years Experience     Fully Equipped  Free Estimates  M.B. Painting  Marcel Beaunoyer 886 9626   888-3381        "  MISC SERVICES  CENTURY ROCK  885-5910  <5>J  A.D. LANDSCAPE GROUP  OVER 20 YEARS ^^  "^"       DESIGN  STONEWORK  I & GARDENING  Mackenzie Excavating Ltd.  Land Clearing & Development  Cam Mackenzie .,..  885-2447  886-3558  W dig Urn Munehlnm Cornell  m.        h ,     RENOVATIONS WITH >  U/liVUli * T0UCH 0F OSS  0(1*" ***��   COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL  IMPROVER M5-^  tm HALFMOON BAY.  'COMPLETE LANDSCAPE SERVICE        6' 7' & 8' 00LDENA  "Kir        mmmmmt  BARK MULCH MTn 3  '"���  t5vtU.rJellnrMlnSKh.lt WO eMiri 14AOM7 NIIMM"  MURRAY'S NURSERY "Tt7  Located 1 mile norlh ot Hwy 101 on Mason Ha     S8S-2974  p bc f���rrigs Schedule  Land Clearing  Excavations  Septic Tanks  885-3924  885-7487  VANCOUVER   SECHELT PfNINSU LA  HORSESHOE BAY-1  LANGO^  EARLS COVE   SALTERY BAY  Lv. Langdale  6:20 am      2:30 pm  8:30 M'       4:30  10:30 6:30  12:25 pm M 8:20 M  ��� ��mi�� Manntt In  Lv. Horseshoe Bay  7:30 am      3:30 pm M  9:30 M        5:30  11:30 7:25 M  1:15 pm      9:15  Lv. Earls Cove  6:40 am      4:30 pm  8:20 6:30  10:30 8:30  12:25 pmM 10:20 M  Lv. Saltery Bay  b:45 M      3:30 pm  7:35 5:30 M  9:25 M     7:30  11:30       9:30  DAL ENTERPRISES  1989 416 4WD Caterpillar  Backhoe Loader  Septic Systems, Ditching Etc.  Call Nick  for all your Backhoe Needs     666-7148  Will Buy Timber  or will do Excavating  For Timber  Big or Small Amount  or will Rent 518 Cat Skidder  by the hour with operator  Will Go Anywhere  Louis & 0. LePage Logging       886-3821  'Notf Were will be no  "First Ferry" run on  Saluidays. Sundays A Holidays  {vii Park 1 R��d North Rd A Siicc-I. Gower Pt t franklin. Lower But Slop)  Gibsons Bus Schedule  Depart  Arrive  Mall       5:45  1:45  Langdale 6:10  2:10  7:45  3:45  Ferry Ter. 8:10  4:10  9:45  5:45  10:10  6:10  11:45  7:45  12:10  5:10  Ellective March I, 1989  I via Wanna rranklln. Finfiill. Para a Itiad to |  Arrive  Mell       6:30  8:30  Depart  Lower     6:15  BueStop 8:15  10:15  12:15  10:30  12:30  Saa Bus Driver lor Lanodala mishit lonnnbroah Itaigtlll.  Wrradciaah Para Schsdulai  FARES Adults Seniors Children (6-12) Comm. Tickets  Oul ot Town   $1.50    SI.00 .75       S1.25/tMe|  In Town .75       .75 .75  These transportation schedules sponsored hy  Swctwl Agewtet  INSURANCE        citaonsTRAVEL    886-2000 886-9255  Red Carpet Service From Friendly Professionals In Sunnycrest Mall, Ofteom.  Insurance  Notary  A Member ITDl  Independent  Travel  Professionalsi duradek  Vinyl  SundKks  Aluminum a Gloss Railing  886-3730  Mobile ToD-Froo 1-240-1044  PPPPPS  Coast News, March 19,1990  17  WaaBnaaaararaai  to the Edit  s  Sechelt waterfront concern  ~���   ,_  TOWN OF GIBSONS  Motor Vehicle Branch  718 Winn Rd., Gibsons  DID YOU KNOW?  Your Autoplan coverage is related to the  use of your vehicle? If you generally use  your vehicle for purposes other than  those specified on your insurance  papers you may not be covered in case  of an accident. Check with us to be sure  your vehicle is rated correctly.  886-3379  For your complele ICBC  S Licencing Service  Monday-Thursday  8:30 to 4:45  Friday  9:00 to 4:30  Saturday  9:00 to 12:30  ���  Qutopkin  Editor's Note: The following  was received for publication.  Mayor and Council  District of Sechelt  Subject: Boulevard and Windward Lane.  I would be remiss if I did not  express my views on the abortion which has been created on  the waterfront in Sechelt.  In past correspondence I have  set out my thoughts on the 'One  Way' situation on the Boulevard.  My question is this: Why on  earth should the residents of the  Boulevard be subjected to the  hazards to life and limb of trying to dodge ten thousand puddles and potholes on Windward  Lane?'  In view of the taxes imposed  on the residents of that particular area it would have seemed proper to have provided  hardtop for the entire route  prior to the time the signs for  'One Way' were imposed, not  only on the residents, but on the  tourist trade which is so essential to the area.  The light sand cover that was  sprinkled on the lane is long  gone and if a person had a  nickle for every pothole on the  lane, one would be a multimillionaire. As the lane stands  the only beneficiaries are the  garage and car wash people.  May I suggest the 'One Way'  signs be removed until such time  as the lane is in a state where it  is useable on a reasonable basis.  Larry Grafton  Sechelt, BC  Trustees  assure  Editor:  The Board of Trustees of toe j  Pender Harbour and District  Health Centre Society would  like to assure the community  lhat we have their best interests  at heart.  We would like to have a full  time dental practice operating  out of the clinic in the near  future and would ask you to  bear with us during the transition period.  The Board of Trustees  Community upset  Editor:  We feel upset! Our community is divided. Growth and intolerance are the causes. There's  something to talk about: 'The  barged-in houses', 'The slum',  and 'Stucco versus siding'. Was  that cedar or vinyl? This  negative PR is apt to bring land  values down.  The individuality and character of the area is evident. Small  homes, trailers, cottages and  double-wide mobile homes  predominate. In the last five  years new housing starts have  risen and there is a more visible  selection of modern homes.  Standards have risen. The  barged-in homes are also updated to current standards, and  upon completion, fit in well  with existing architecture and  physical terrain.  People are equal but wages  are not. We feel proud to live in  an area that can provide affordable housing and some friendly neighbours.  Leigh E. Thorn  G. Taylor  12 Year Residents  Teachers support  home workers  i (imff ***" '"lo* A"�� c��"h��'^ ^Aa  RENT-IT!     ^  CANADA INC /  885o2848  TOOLS & EQUIPMENT  OPEN SUNDAYS  EFFECTIVE APRIL 1ST, 1990110-5 PM  Serving YOUR Community Better   CONVENIENT HOURS:   Monday-Friday  Saturday  Sunday  7:30am-5pm  8:30am-5pm  10am-5pm  Editor:  I am writing on behalf of the  Sunshine   Coast   Teachers'  Drop oft your  COAST NEWS  Sunshine Coast  Services  Directory  IP  n  MISC SERVICES  886-7359  Conversion   IVindours,   Glass,  MISC SERVICES  Aulo  &  Marine Glass, Aluminum Windours|  Screens    .,     .���. ��� ���      _'.    Mirrors  Hwy 101 & Pratt Rd.  ]  GIBSONS TAX SERVICE  Avt. tries Sia.00  Association to express our support for the striking Home Support Workers, Local 72 of the  BCGEU.  This group, which provides  valuable services to homebound  people and those requiring  assistance, has been without a  contract for 14 months. Starting  wages are $4.91 an hour for  respite care and $5.91 an hour  for homemakers.  They are seeking fair wage increases and reinstatement of  their benefit package. They are  fighting to resist contract stripping, a two-tiered wage structure,  and rigid time limits for services  such as bathing invalid clients.  We hope for an early and  equitable settlement, which  recognizes the value of the work  done by these people.  M. Joan Robb  President SCTA  Office Technology Program  Train for Success  ��� Secretarial - 8 months  ��� Financial - 10 months  ��� Word Processing - 10 months  To ensure career advancement, acquire  microcomputer and word processing skills.  Our graduates are in demand!  The Office Technology Program offers you:  ��� Professional instructors  s College Certificate  s Well-equipped computer labs  ��� Work Practicums  . ��� Job placement assistance  Wc have a place for you, but hurry!  Telephone 984-4959 for information and to  arrange for a personal interview.  CAPILANO  COLLEGE  20SS Purcell Way ��� North Vancouver ��� B.C.  Income Tax Preparation  I business strictly confidential  635 Martin Rd., Gibsons  A. Jack  886-7272,  MINI  STORAGE  885-2081  For successful  BUSINESS MEETINGS  large or Small  CEDARS INN  895 Hwy. 101, Gibsons  Fax 886-3046    886-3008  PENINSULA INDUSTRIAL  & LOGGING SUPPLIES  PORT  MELLON  & GIBSONS  ��� Wire Rope & Rigging  ��� Welding Supplies  ��� Hydraulic Hose & Fittings  ��� Misc. Industrial Products  Van. Direct 889-7387  Gibsons 886-2480  Port Mellon 884-5303       ,^__^_  1042 Hwy. 101, Gibsons (across from Kenmac)  Need this space?  Call The COAST NEWS  ��� it 886 ?6?? or 88b 3930  JACOBSEN FEEDS        *  64513 Norwest Bay Road  888-9389        YourAuthorized Dealer  We carry a complete line of  ^ Animal Feeds & Supplies  (JB i Bucket-field's I  the growing people.  ��� Commercial & Residential*  ��� Carpet & Resilient Flooring*  ��****���*������   Phane   �������������**.  .��"��.�� 886-8888  |s��opp."g   SHOWROOM at  5601 Hwy. 101, Sechelt  TuM.-Frl., 12:30-5 Ml day Sit.  TMI FlOOn STORE At VOU" DOOR ��_^_,  CHAINS A WS  SALES & SERVICE  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER &  CHAIN8AW LTD  731 NORTH ROAD   886-2912*3  JON JAR EM A ^  DESIGN CONSULTANT  PREI.IMINAH.V DEI El.OPMF.NT CONCEPTS  CUSTOM HOME DESIGN  RENOVATIONS OR ADDITIONS ��� REVISION OF EXISTING PLANS  DRAWINGS AND RENDERINGS  CAM. (86-6930 TO discuss vour home environment a  '.tnn tttslta STREET  Vancouver, a.t.  JIM'S      FUEL INJECTION SERV'CE  25 Vf.tr, (ii f.xf)t'rn'rtrt' At Vtiur St'rvru'  The fuel injection system is the heart of the diesel  engine, have your fuel injection equipment serviced  for maximum engine performance   By |IM BANKS  OtyenilMe Scrvite At A Ke,i���,ti,ilirV frig.  324-1715  There is a variety of federal  Krograms for seniors in Canada,  fould you like to know  what they are?  GIBSONS MOBILE SAW SERVICE  Custom Cutting ��� Planing  Bevel Siding ��� Posts & Beams  Chris Nipper 866-3466  . R.R.K4, S6, C76,  VOIbaone. B.C. VON 1V0  /     Complete. Confidential, & Professional     \  BUSINESS * PERSONAL OFFICE SERVICES  (gilt frtner fltll 883-9911 J  FREDERICK G0ERTZ LTD:  Complete Binocular Repairs  Repair Facilities  From Experienced Technicians  For any inquiries tor old t new blnKulars   PIMM 684-5377 (Vm) j  8UN8HINE KITCHEN  ��� CABINET*  886-9411  ?   Mrroom Kern's Plaza.Hwy 101  Ofmn rueaday to Saturday 10-4 pm)  The "Seniors' Guide  To Federal Programs  And Services," provides basic information about federal  benefits and services  available to Seniors.  This guide is available  in English and French.  It is now being produced  in nine other languages for  distribution this summer.  The guide will also be available in a talking book form  in both English and French  this spring. If you would like  to obtain your copy of the  guide and/or talking book in  the language of your choice,  check the appropriate box below.  Please fill in the attached coupon  and mail it to:  Seniors  P.O. Box8176, Ottawa, Ontario KIG 3H7  Name-  Street-  City_  I PltMSf fulfill  Province-  _ Postal Code.  Book  ��� English  ��� German  D Ukrainian  D Italian  D Polish  D Chinese  ��� French  D Hungarian  ��� Portuguese  ��� Russian  D Greek  Talking Book  O English       ��� French  W    Government     Gouvernement  ol Canada  Seniors  du Canada  Les alne(e)s  CanadS 18.  Coast News, March 19,1990  rl  CCOAST NEWS CLASSIFIEDS^  Homes  8. Property  ANDERSON REALTY  a Recreation  ��� Retirement  ��� Relocation  FREE CATALOGUE  5686 Cowrie St . Box 1219  Sechelt. B.C. VON 3A0  685-3211 FAX 865-2699  Van. Toll Free 684-8016  Pender Harbour, 2 bdrm mobile  on private lot, $40,000  276-2338. #17sr  Lot,  60x120'  #50 Creekside.  V $28,000, 483-4833. #14sr  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  Classifieds  at any of our convenient  Friendly People  Places  ���IN PENDER HARBOUR���  The Coast News  {Madeira Park Shopping Centre) 883-9099  Marina Pharmacy 883-2888  AC Building Supplies 883-9551  ���IN HALFMOON BAY���  B&J Store 8859435   IN SECHELT   The Coast News  (Cowrie Street) 885-3930   IN DAVIS BAY   Peninsula Market 885-9721  -IN WILSON CREEK-  Wilson Creek Campground 885-5937  ���IN ROBERTS CREEK���  Seaview Market 885-3400  ��� IN GIBSONS���|���  The Coast News  (behind Dockside Pharmacy) 886-2622  DEADLINE IS NOON SATURDAY  FOR MONDAV PUBLICATION  3 PM AT COAST NEWS OFFICES  ECHELT & GIBSONS  New owner David Orr will be hippy to help you  place your classifieds at AC Building Supply, one  ol our Friendly People Places in Pender Harbour.  Sechelt. 5 yr. old 3 bedroom  borne. 1886 sq. ft., 2 balhs.  basemenl with cold room,  greenhouse, garage, level lot.  landscaped, wood and electric  heat. 5 appliances, many extras,  close lo all amenilies. $169,000.  885-5128. #15sr  Cleared lot on cul-de-sac, Field  Rd. area, potential view, services  available, $26,900. 885-5861  #14sr  View lol above hwy. opposite  hotel  overlooking Pender  Harbour, $28,000 OBO, 885-9778  #15s  For sale by owner, ft acre lol on  Gibsons Blult, fantastic view! Fully serviced, lop access, lo view  call 886-8757. #l2ss  PANABODE  Rorberts Creek, 1700 sq. II.  panabode rancher, oceanview  Central Gibsons 1600 sq. ft.  townhouse. harbour view. Keats  Island 54' waterlronl (lease)  complele details 886-2694. #12  Three bdrm, home. Sargent Rd..  fantastic 180�� view. exc. retirement home with on grade enlrance, carport & drive, 1'/.'  balhs, 2500 sq. It. up & down  No agents please 886-9370. #13  Double wide 24x32". 2 bdrm.. 1  balh. 886-7141. #14  5 bdrm. home wilh up & down  fireplace Downstairs could be  used as suile. plus 2 bdrm second home on this view property.  $179,000. 886-8327. No agents  please. #14  By Owner: Gibsons, view of  mountains & water, older home,  2 bdrm.! fireplace, workshop,  garage. Sunny landscaped yard.  886-9202. #14  1981 14x72' deluxe moduline  mobile home on private lot on  Creekside, Wesl Sechell 2  bdrms.. 2 balhs.. 5 appls.,  heatilalor fireplace. $67,900  885-4421. #14  Commercial Lot  50'x120' North Rd. in Gibsons  886-8866 01886-9111 #14  GIBSONS  DELUXE  TOWNHOMES  Central location across Irom  SC. Credit Union, spacious  2 bdrm,, 2 lull bathrooms on  level entrance. Upper units  have 2 bdrms. plus den.  Fabulous view - Open Daily I  to 5 pm. Des Caldwell  886-2497 Argosy 922-2211.  COSTVK ��� The Coslyk Production  Company ol Sechelt, BC, proudly  announces the new 1990 model,  "Kathryn Olivia", wheel base  19H'. gross weight 7 lbs., prototype No 2 designer and chiel  engineer. Russell, production  engineer. Laurel. Model released  March 7. 1990 at 4:13 am at  Sechelt. BC. Free squealing,  economical teed, aerodynamic  body, water-cooled exhaust &  changeable seal covers.  Founders of the company Hazel  Fraser or Marysville. BC and  Mary Odegard ol Parksville. BC  are proud ol Ihe new model.  Special lhanks lo technical director. Dr. Westlake & production  supervisor Anna Marie St. Leger.  The management guarantees  there will be no other models  released this year. This model is  a sequence to the 1986 model.  "Dustin Allan". #12  Obituaries  BERWICK: Marguerite Aleen  (Rela) passed away on March 13,  1990 in St. Mary's Hospital. Survived by her loving husband A.  Edward ol Garden Bay; son Albert  E.. San Jose. Calil.: 1 sister Myrtle and husband Bruce Collinson  ol Garden Bay. She will be missed by many friends. No service  by request. Private cremation.  Arrangements through Devlin  Funeral Home Directors       #12  ATKINSON: Passed away March  14. 1990. Grace Olive Atkinson  late ol Sechelt in her 70lh year.  Survived by her loving husband  Robert; 2 sons Robert & Patrick;  1 daughter Sharon; 7 grandchildren; 1 brother James Burton. Memorial service Wednesday. March 21 al 2 pm in the  Kingdon of Jehovah Witness,  Sechell Cremation arrangements  through Devlin Funeral Home  Dircclors. #12  SILVEY: Passed away March 14.  1990, Sarah Ellen Silvey. late of  Sechell, formerly ol Egmonl, age  80 years. Survived by four sons,  George, Gene. Steve and Wally:  three daughters, Ella, Barb and  Sally; grandchildren and groat-  grandchildren. Funeral ities  Wonday. March 19 at 9:30 am'  Our Lady of Lordes. Sechelt.  Reverend A.. DePompa.  Celebrant imermenl Sechell Indian Cemelary. Devlin Funeral  Home. Directors.  #12  Are you in an unhappy relationship? Call the Transilion House  lor Iree confidential counselling.  815-2944. TFN  Do you need some information to  deal with your legal problem? Call  Ihe Legal Information Service  885-5881; Mondays and  Wednesdays 9-4. TFN  Announcements  r  1  Come & See our Selection ol  Memorabilia. Chairs. Books,  Linens & Tools. Also a Wood  Cook Stove and much more  For OlcUTimm,.  Sake  iit  0^L  nlouHDi      The LOWEST  Classified Ad Rates  $400  ttVM-^ tb^LUU  (minimum) for 10 words  it ed 0��**' 25   ,or each addi,ional word  C\��SS��"W girths, (nil 4 f���und FREE!  Pay for 2 weeks, Get the 3rd week FREE  When paid by CASH, CHEQUE  or MONEY O'DEk  \\  SWlC SedTcLASSIFIEPS  They run until your item is sold!  I 3      (or up to 10 words    I       per ,iililitioii,il word  Your ad, featuring one Hem only, will run for four consecutive  weeks and will then be cancelled unless you instruct us to renew it  for another four, by Saturday, 3 pm.  NO CHARGE FOR RENEWAL fur .is Itirtu as you want!  iNin available in < ommeriual advertiwr��l  ALL CLASSIFIED ADS musl be PRE-PAID before Insertion,  For your convenience, use your MASTERCARD or VISA!  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE  At "Friendly People Places"  and at COAST NEWS Office  Pender Harbour   FRIDAY 4:30 PM  At COAST NEWS Offices,  Sechell & Gibsons      Saturday, 3 PM  COAST NEWS Classifieds  The LOWEST Price!  The HIGHEST Circulation! FAX: 886-7725  The FIRST on the street!  Cowrie St.. Sechelt 885*3930 Crulce Lane. Gibsons 886-2622  Madeira Park Shopping Center, Pender Harbour 883*9099  In Memoriam  In loving memory ol my beloved  husband Dick Oliver who went  wilh God lo eternal rest March  19. 1989. You left us wilh saddened hearts, bul beautifl  memories we shall treasure  forever.  Ever loving wife Eva & Family.  in  Thank You  Special lhanks to Ihe Iwo young  staff members al Ihe Sechell  Shell slation for their kind  assistance and courtesy on Monday evening when my car decided  lo "Pack it in". Theii helpfulness  was greatly appreciated.  From a Coast News Staff member  #12  Special lhanks to everyone who  helped me make Art and Helen's  reliremenl parly such a success  Judy Barnes #12  INDIVIDUAL THERAPY  COUPLES COUNSELLING  Call Eleanor Mae 885-9018  #15  Reliable Canadian and Oriental  ladies, all ages, desire  housekeeping arrangement, exchange for accommodation.  1-547-2020 anytime. #15  Cameo Club - single?  Come and join us for dinners,  dances, hikes and other social  events. For Inlo call 885-7524 or  885-2942. #12  Attractive educated widow, late  50's, recent to peninsula seeks  companionship - Interests,  classical music, ballet, opera,  dancing, photography, open air,  experimental cooking 8, wine,  N/S. Reply to: c/o Box 334,  Coasl News, Box 460, Gibsons,  B.C. VON 1V0. #13  Lonely, 67, with minor handicap,  good pension, would like lo meet  lady companion. Please call  885-4064. #13  Working single Mom whose  priorities include laughter, kids,  personal growth and the great  outdoors seeks companionship of  male wilh similar Interests. Box  412. c/o Coast News, Box 68,  Sechelt. BC, VON 3A0.        #12  1095 Hwy. 101 at Pratt Rd.  Gibsons 886-8261  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS  885-2896. 886-7272, 886-2954.  TFN  Does someone in your family have  a drinking problem? Call Al-Anon  886-9903. 885-7484. Al-Ateen  886-2565. TFN  Income Tax Service, Douglas  Baird. 886-3955. 1255 Carmen  Road. Complele lax relurn $15.  Seniors $10. #16  Phone us today aboul our selection  ol  beautilul  personalized  wedding   invitations,   napkins,  matches, stationery and more.  Jeannies Gills & Gems  886-2023  TFN  Shiatsu Massage  Relief ol muscular tension, full  body relaxation. Peggi Francis  886-4545. #12  Adult children ol Alcoholics or  disfunctional families please call  885-5281 or 886-8165 for help.  TFN  Spiritual Raltaat  at Ruby lake Resort Fri.. March 3A to  Hon. April!  t'ftarrr' name' Wrrrjnate' CelflDrale'  Vou in tune with Ihe Earth and Ihe  Universe Facilitator Mikhaita Alorrah  S9Q/3 Nlohli: Ratet Mill drop, tlta  more ratio carnal Into Janine  MS-32Ba Between 9 30am-2 30pm  Psychic healer and counsellor  Gloria Yates is again olfering  psychic development classes.  Level 1 learn how lo meditate, increase and clear your energy,  create your reality, understand  auras, chakras, elc. Many uselul  tools for quality of life. Phone lor  more information 886-4929. #13  Lyco Designs 'Coming & Going'  Sales, temporarily, please contact  886-3808. Thanks lor your support. Jocelyn Diether.        #13  Industrial First Aid Course  2 - week day class  Begins April 23  Call Continuing Education  Dana Lamb 885-2991  #12  Tax Clinic for Seniors. Mar. 30 &  Apr. 6, 12 to 4pm at Com. Serv.  For info call Volunteer Action  Centre 885-5881. #13  To all those concerned aboul Ihe  disappearing trees in our area,  please attend a coffee letter  writing gathering, Mar. 29 at  7:30. Call 886-7955 to confirm.  #13  The Awakening Muter  a Workshop al Rockwood Centre Ian.,  March 29. loam-Spat Learn to  recognne and release Ihe lears that  hlock material and spiritual abundance, using Intuitive techniques &  incusing exercises Facllllator:  Uikhaila Alorrah ot Oklahoma former-  i/ ot Gibsons IZO.N/aay.tnlo A Pre-  registration: 111-3214 Between  1 30am-2 30pm Bring a lunch &  Writing Papal-  8-       Weddings  8. [ngagements  Larry and Judy Barnes of Garden  Bay wish to announce the  engagement ol their daughter.  Sandy, to allan Brommeland, son  of Don and Mavis Brommeland ol  North Vancouver. Wedding date  to follow. #12  Silver charm bracelet at Indian  Band Hall night ol Rugby dance.  Owner must identify. 885-3217.   #12  A sweater Mar. 11 in Dougal  Park, Call Coast News in Gibsons 886-2622.  Pets  o\ Livestock  Httslr & Acflianred  DrirJ Training  ��� Bright clean dog  & cat boarding  ��� Dog grooming  "SCIENCE DIET  NUTRITION CKNTRE  Open 8 am - 6:30 pm  every day,    M<->5H  PET FOOD  SCIENCE DIET, IAMS.  TECHNI-CAL, NUTRO-MAX.  PURINA. WAYNE.  Also full line of bird seed  And much more.  Quality Farm t, Garden  Supply Lid.  Prall Rd. 886-7527  TFN  SPCA SPAVINQ PROGRAM  Contact Christine's Gifts, Sunnycrest Mall or Marlee Fashions.  TFN  Kerry blue Terrier, male pup.  $550, health, temperment  guaranteed. 886-2505.     #12ss  Free to good home, 2 goats  (does). Call 886-9290 eves.  ir<   CASTLEROCK  ���if RENN��ls  \Ji!;!,"' Hi|lhW0y 101,  jMk  885-9840  Boarding & Oroominj  Mir animal* will in- ar t r-pted without  Akila puppies alter 6pm or leave  mess. 886-3134. #12  Teenager must sell gray Arab  15,3h W.T. good wilh children,  $550 firm. Ronda 886-2553. #12  15 h.h. 5 yr. old reg. Ap. '/<  gelding exc, temperament,  $1500; 10 mon. dk. bay Ihoro.  colt, $800. 886-2001. #12  Adorable spayed fern, white Persian cat. needs a loving home.  886-8070. #13  Free lo good home, spayed fern.  Springer Spaniel, great with kids.  Phone 885-2650. #13  Used Western saddle. $250.  886-7038. #14  Reg. American quarter horse. 11  yr. old, Bay Gelding, exc. beginners horse, road safe and very  gentle. $1500 Chris 886-3093.  #15ss  PIANO TUNING  Repairs & Rebuilding. Technician  D. Clunies-Ross. 885-3168 eves.  #14  9-piece set maple Gretsch studio  recording drums, sacrifice at  $2500.886-4599. #14ss  Violin or Fiddle Instruction  Michelle Bruce  885-9224 #13  Leslie rotating speaker sound  small package, Roland Revo 30.  $250.885-7232. #14  Willard upright piano lor sale.  Phone 886-2855 any time.    #14  Fuzzy black wool gloves, lost  "somewhere" on my rounds.  Please call Fran at the Coast  News, 883-9099, 885-3930,  886-2622. #11  One screw - on sterling silver ear  ring. 886-7031 mornings.  Reward. #12  Black Persian fern, cat, lost between Creekside & Abbs Rd  886-8691. #12  Garage Sales  Moving sale, Sat., Mar. 24  Marine View Way. Sechelt.  Follow signs Irom Trail & Anchor  alt. 10am. ��\i  Barter & Trade  14 tt. alum. boat. 20 HP eng., 2  gas tanks, 2 oars, on taller -value  M00-$1000. Trade lor short box  Iruck canopy or small 4-cyl. car  or W.H.Y. 886-2728 days.   #14  77 Impala SW, cruise control,  P/S, P/B, P/rear window, 2-way  rear door. 350 V8, $1400 or offers. 886-2728 days. #14  Huge ravine lot In Creekside on  Mtn. View Drive, fully serviced,  $30,000, 886-8698 or 583-3234,  #125  Finders    ��=i  Keepers .  r Collectibles  Behind tin Chevron  at Hie Sunnycrest Mil  TI S SOIL  Mushroom Manure-Bark Mulch  Topsoil mixed-Hog Fuel  By the yard or truck lull. Top  quality products at reasonable  prices. You pickup or we deliver.  Phone anytime 885-5669.    TFN  Inglis auto, washer, exc. cond.,  guaranteed & delivered, $325.  883-2648. TFN  Older Iridge in gd. work, order,  $150,886-3841. #13s  IBM compatable computer w/30  meg hard drive, keyboard and  amber monitor, brand new. just  $1199. 886-8356 days or eves.  #15s  Men's med. large Warden dry  suit. gd. cond. 885-9030.    #12  Elec. lawnmower. exc. cond..  $125: Tandy Coco 3 computer, 4  games. $125. 885-2998.     #12  Tidy lank. 70 gal. diesel, $50:1  Warn winch, 8000 Ib./cable &  controls, $600 OBO. 885-3600  aft. 6pm.       #12  Rhododendrons and Azaleas,  $3.25-$18. large selection.  Roberts Creek Nursery, 2569  Lower Rd. Opening Mar. 9.  886-2062. #12  '78 Camperette; '76 Terajet 4X4;  complete water pump' harvest  gold elec. range. 886-4517.  #13  Renovating kilchen, 17 cu. ft.  fridge: dishwasher; stove  lop7wall ovett1;' microwave/1  convec, combo: teak cabinets &  counters. 886-9992 aft. 5pm.#13  6 YOS. DELIVERED  $40.00  LYLE FORBES  883-9907  Full cords ol split & delivered  firewood, $90 Gibsons. $100  Sechell. 886-3360. #13  New min. bike, SIS, 18 sp���  value $430. sell $380: dance  shoes, size 8V;M; mini speaker  boxes for Walkman; headphones;  copper pendant lamp. 886-3983  aft. 6pm. #13  Apco-XT (IBM comp) computer  system, 640K in ram. twin floppies, 20 meg. fixed amdeck  V232A, amber monitor,  Panasonic 10801 (9 pin) printer  (no cable) price. $850. Ph.  885-3125. #12  Smoked glass bathtub doors,  54"x58" 3 panel, $100; oval  arb. kilchen table w/leaf & 4  swivel chairs, $100. 886-2491  eves. #14  "CUSTOM DISPLAY CASES "  Custom built, near new glass  display cases.  HALF PRICE  1 at 3"A'wx 4'A't - $750; 2 at  10'w x4'l- $300 ea. Cedars Inn  office. 886-3008. #12  1000 gal. clean water tank,  $300: Karcher power washer,  850 PSI. $350; Shindaiwa weed  eater (blade or wire) used once,  $350; I HP Sears above ground  water pump, $150. Ph.  886-9470. #14  Insulated 'It ton short box Iruck  canopy, $75; 11' Dlepper row  boat w/hand trailer, $450;  weight bench & weights. $75;  photo copier, stand never used,  $185.886-4535. #12  HOME MANURE  Nature's Fertilizer  $20 per pickup  885-9969  TFN  Carseal, crib ��� mattress, toys,  clothes - newborn to age 4, double bed. 886-7908. #14  Kenmore washer, Westinghouse  dryer, both in gd. working order.  886-9202. #14  Hide-abed couch in exc. cond..  needs mattress. $250 OBO.  886-7355.679-0987. #14  Quantity of steel'/<" plate, 10" C  Channel, steal links, 26' dla.  suitable for swimming pool, lish  farming, etc. 886-7064.      #14  24" GE elec. stove, gd. cond.,  $35.886-9998. #12  30 gal. hot water tank, gd.  cond.. 885-1939 aft. 6pm.  #14  Two 15-spd. Norco bush pilot  mountain bikes, 20" Mystl, 19"  men's, $200 ea. Mint.  885-9232. #14  New chesterfield & swivel chair.  886-7031 eves. #14  Boy's 10 sp. bike, $50 OBO.  865-4704. #14  Misc. furniture: side table,  chairs, beds, dressers, chesterfields, etc. 883-9110. #14  7 ft. burl coffee table, beautilul  883-9110. #15ss  12 sq. 18" tapersawn. $83 per  sq.; 12 sq. 18" barns. $67 per  sq. Evenings 883-2250.      #14  Slate pool tables, sold, serviced &  installed. 886-3730 or mobile toll  Iree 1-240-1044. #14  Moffat heavy duty original 500,3  eye. 2 sp. washer, $359 OBO;  Kenmore 5 prog, portable  dishwasher, copperfone, new  motor & pump, $259 OBO; Inglis  Normandie 5 eye. 2 spd. washer,  white, new bearings S seals,  $357 OBO; Roy 30" white nice  stove. $339 OBO: McClary bullet  200, 30" h. gold. $367 OBO;  Kenmore washer & dryer, white,  $616 pair; Speed Oueen h.d.  dryer, almond, $269 OBO; 30"  h. gold slove. aulo., $349 OBO.  and more. All recond. appliances.  Corner Cupboard 885-4434 or  Bjorn 885-7897, Will buy nice  non-working or used appliances.  #14  New, Used & Rebuilt  AUIO PARIS  8" Bench Grinder  M49M  A101 SUPPLY LID.  886-8101  Wedding and engagement rings  for 'ii appraised value  886-7819. #12s  Dazy turbo Jet whirlpool bath with  automatic timer for 5 lo 60  minutes. Double insulated Model  No. 611. Like brand new, $400.  value lor $200.686-2685.    #12  Collector's camera, Leica C.L.  wilh 40mm Summicron lens.  $800.885-9232. #13  Old and antique radios restored  and repaired. Gordon Oliver,  885-9800. #13  Complele kitchen cabinets & appliances (apt. size). 866-2924  aft. 6 pm. #t4ss  3 year old cedar and lit trees,  suitable lor hedges, 45' ea.  Orders taken 886-2198.       #13  All steel bush box for S.W.B.  truck, $700.886-2198.      #13  Temporary power pole, $150.  Wanted - used kitchen cabinets.  886-3457. #13  Won pickup load,  split & delivered, stock up lor  next winter. 885-5032.       #13  Apple 2E enhanced 2 disc drive,  monitor, printer, lots ol programs  and manuals, 1V, yrs. dd.  886-2408. #12  '80 GMC 8' truck box, no rust,  minor dents, $500 OBO.  885-2251. #12  Renovattotilng?  Plan to include 2 beautilul cedar  double entrance doors. Pre-hung  with frame and all hardware,  $595 OBO. 886-3845. #13  Rhododendrons t Azaleas  $3.25-518.   large  selection.  Roberts Creek Nursery, 2569  Lower Rd.. opening Mar. 9.  886-2062. #12  Box springs & mattresses. $20  ea. 883-9110. #13  Giant screen TV. RCA, replacement $5000; $850 883-9110.  #13  Fischer baby bear wood stove,  $150,683-9110. #14ss  5 any day Blackcomb ski tickets.  $30 ea. 886-8008. #13  Moving: Maple bdrm. suite,  sideboard, bed settee & chair,  patio furniture, 10 It. alum boat,  nearly new 6 HP Johnson, garden  equip., sewing machine, recliner,  easy chair, 10 - 5 pm dally. 6908  Hwy. 101.885-9792. #12  IBM clone 640K, 40 mgb, fid,  built-in monitor, MS-DOS asst'd  software, $1500 OBO. 883-2284.  #14  MAGNACHARGE BATTERIES  Auto, Industrial Ir marine, 90 In  stock  at A101  Supply  Ltd.  886-8101. #12  GM TH 350 auto, trans., short  extension, $245; GM TH 350  auto, trans., long extension,  $275; Olds TH 350 auto., trans.,  Short extenslo, $245. Phone  866-8101. #12  Roadrunner trailer; duru piston  pump with 30 gal. tank assembly  4 1/6 HP motor control; 15 cu.  It. freezer. 866-7833. #12  _  . .-...���-.��� Coast News, March 19,1990  19.  Wedding dress new style size 10.  complete, $250 firm. 886-7004  #12  Older exec, style oak desk 34x66  - stubby legs - pre WW2, $500  685-3335. #14  Commercial washer, dryer and  Ireezer. AH reconditioned, $800  or sell separate. 886-9408.   #14  Older white 30" stove, Brown  dryer, 1-spd., both work fine.  $l25/ea.: pedal loot fliptop garbage can. $5; kitchen tap &  faucet set, $15; double steel sink  (later) $25; pendant almond  metal lamp. 25' cord. $20. New  double sink, $75; new moen  faucet with spray, $75.886-3983  aft. 6 pm. #14  SATELLITE SALES  Green Onion Earth Station  885-5644  TFN  Husky chainsaw, 40" bar/28"  bar, new chain, great firewood or  shake block saw, $395  885-7t77 days 885-7874. #15sr  Dry firewood. $85 U ton pickup  load, unseasoned, $70. slock up.  885-5032. #12  Antique dining table with 4 carved chairs. $650 OBO.  886-9596. #12  Enterprise cook stove, heater,  exc. cond., $500 lirm.  886-8128. #12  Waterbed, super single, c/w  headboard, $200.886-4698. #12  30" GE elec. range, avocado, immaculate cond., $200; GE frost-  free refrigerator, white, $200.  683-2368. #12  Braun yogurt maker, Donvier ice  cream maker. Brother sewing  machine, size 2'k tap shoes.  885-3764. #12  2200 watt Honda generator.  $400; 4' redwood hot tub, $350;  fireplace $50.885-2543.     #12  Queen size waterbed. wood,  stove, washing machine, tools,  lamp. 885-9772. #12  110 volt portable generator, 1700  watts, $400 OBO, canopy for  short narrow box, $200 OBO.  885-9000. #12  Harvest gold manual defrost  fridge In perfect working order,  $150; auto, propane conversion  kit complete with tank, $600.  885-5466 alt. 5pm. #12  Sterling silver flatwear, full sets  of five, family heirloom,, must,  sacrifice, appraised value $2800.  885-5725. #12  Cozy comfort wood heater, 3.1  cu. tl. firebox. $400: console  stereo, dictaphone, office desk.  885-9906. #12  TIRES  14'x, 15's&16's  Mosl on rims Irom $10 to $25 ea.  886-7370 #12  IMJJ MJJ-I l.��l 1 ,986   SP���1-   slaoda'1.   H"*1   '76   Montecarlo,   $500   OBO      ^**-**m^-*^*��*^��r mt^^m^    ^''���������������������������^  EpKUaliSUUSUIllXliW slereo. good cond. $5000 080    886-2375 ,n 0UT1OAROS FOt* SALE "���"���* a*** Gibsons Har-  ���>->���>-�����������-___  -USED CARS-  1989 TOPAZ 4 cylinder automatic  11999 COUGAR LS V6. automatic  1989 ESCORT 2 door, 4 cylinder, 5 speed  1989 ESCORT LX 2 door, 4 cylinder, 5 speed  1989 MUSTANG LX 2 door, 4 cylinder, automatic  1989 THUNDERBIRDV6, automatic  1989 LTD CROWN VICTORIA vs. automatic  1989 MUSTANG LX 2 door. 4 cylinder, automatic  1989 PROBE GT 4 cylinder. 5 speed  1989 ELDORADO V8, automatic  !   1988 MUSTANG 6TV8, 5 speed  1=11987 FIER0GTV6,5 speed  1987 BONNEVILLE 6 cyllner, automatic  1987 CAVALIER SW 4 cylinder, automatic  1986 ESCORT L 4 door, 4 cylinder, automatic  1986 CAMARO Z28 V8, automatic  1986 CELEBRITY 4 door, 4 cylinder, automatic  1984 ESCORT 4 door, diesel. 5 speed  1984 CHARGER 2 door, 4 cylinder, automatic  1982 FORD EXP 2 door, 4 cylinder, automatic  1981 ACADIAN 4 door, 4 cylinder, 4 speed  11981 MAZDA GLC 2 door, 4 cylinder, 4 speed  1981 DATSUN 310 2 door. 4 cylinder, 4 speed  1980 COUGAR XR7V8, automatic  [1980 MUSTANG 2 door, 4 cylinder, automatic  1980 GRANADA 2 door, 6 cylinder, automatic  1980 GRANADA 2 door, 6 cylinder, automatic  1980 CHEVETTE 4 door. 4 cylinder, automatic  1979 ZEPHYR 2 door, 6 cylinder, automatic  1979 COUGAR 4 door, V8, automatic  1979 THUNDERBIRD VS. automatic  1978 BOBCAT SW 4 cylinder, automatic  1978 LTD II4 door, V8. automatic  1978 DATSUN 510 4 cylinder, 4 speed  1977 PARISIENNE 2 door, V8, automatic  1976 SEDAN DEVILLEV8, automatic  1975 VENTURA 2 door. V8, automatic  1975 TORNADO 12 door, V8, automatic  1975 MONTEGOvs, automatic  1975 BMW 5301V6, automatic  1969 FAIRLANE 2 door, V8. automatic  1 USED TRUCKS   1989 F-150 PICKUP V8,5 speed  1989 F-150 PICKUP V8,5 speed  i 1989 F-150 4X4 ve. 5 speed  1988 RANGER V6. automatic  1988 RANGER S 4 cylinder, automatic  1988 AEROSTAR V6, automatic  1988 F-150 PICKUP V8. 4 speed  1988 RANGER 4 cylinder, 5 speed  1986 RANGER PICKUP V6. automatic  1986 FORD 1 TON VAN V8.4 speed  I 1985 F-250 4X4 V8. automatic  i 1985 FORD F-250 4X4 diesel  ; 1984 BRONCO II 4X4 V6,4 speed  I 1982 NIVA 4X4 4 cylinder, 4 speed  I 1982 GMC CARGO VAN 8 cylinder, automatic  ! 1981 RAMCHARGER PICKUP ve. 4 speed  ��� 1978 WAG0NEERSWV6. automatic  j 1977 FORD ECONO-CAMPER V8, automatic  7. 1974 DODGE Vi TON V8, automatic  ��� 1974 DODGE % TON V8, automatic  I 1973 VW VAN 4 cylinder, standard  m 885-3281 M0L5936  SOUTH COAST FORD  FORD ��� LINCOLN ��� MERCURY  ' SOUTH COAST FORD SOUTH COAST 2  EXPECTING A  TAX REFUND?  Lease to own - 12 monthly  payments and the car is  yours. '81 Chrysler K car  $550 down $182 mo. '80  Ford Fairmont $600 down  $199 mo. '84 Pontiac Pari-  sienne $1000 down $324  mo. 12 mo/20,000 km  power train warranty OAC.  Jamteson Auto 886-7919  DL5848.  '68 GMC 18' llatdck, open side  racks, 350, V8. 2-spd. $1600.  886-9422,886-6370. #12  79 Thunderblrd, low mil.,  sunrool, air, exc. cond., $2800  OBO. 885-1912. #12ss  '80 GMC short Vandura 305,  P/S, P/B, $3500 OBO.  886-2169. #12ss  '81 VW pop-lop camper, sleeps  4, 62.000 ml. clean, straight  body,   no  rust,   new  tires,  economical, $8900. 885-5505.  #12  1987 Toyota Tercel DX. 4 dr., 5  spd., 40,000 kms, $8900.  886-2933 eves #12  1975 Ford PU, gd. work truck,  $750.883-9110. #13  1979 Chev Monza, V6. P/S,  P/B, exc. shape. 883-9110. #13  '80 Mustang tastback. 4-cyl.,  4-spd., low mil., economical,  $2350. Trades OK. 885-2079.   (713  77 Comet, lamlly 4-dr., runs  exc., |ust moved hare must sell,  $1450 OBO. 885-2079.        #13  75 Dodge �� ton Super Cab,  77,500 mil, power train gd.,  some rust, $850.8857331. #13  79 Monarc, mid-size, 4-dr., gd.  family car, 51,300 ml.. $2200.  665-7167. #13  1976 GMC Sprint, (car-truck),  swivel buckets, mag wheals,  cass   tape deck,  $1500.  #1418  CASH PAID  For Some Cars and Trucks  Dead Car Removal  Abex Used Auto Parts  and Towing  666-2020  TFN  1982 Volvo SW, AM/FM Cass..  5-spd 0/D., snows, etc. Great  shape. 686-3030. #15sr  76 Pontiac LeMans, rel. trans..  $500,885-7113. #12ss  1976 GMC 1 ton, gd. for parts,  $500.686-4599. #14ss  1974 LTD Squire Wagon, new  tires, ban., gd. cond.. best offer.  886-3567. #13  '85 Ford club van XLT F150, fully  loaded, tinted windows, gd.  cond. 866-2723. #13  74 LTD S.W.. new brakes, tires,  bat., body in gd. shape, runs  gd.. must sell. $680. 686-9749.  #14  '81 Honda Civic 2 dr., hatchback, exc. run. cond., $2000  OBO. 886-8407. #14  1988 Blazer St. tilt steer., air  cond.. 4 whel. dr., telephone.  Call Bernie 885-2772. #12  1980 Ford Supervan. 6 stand..  PS/PB, large 3-way Iridge, porta  potty, sink, plus extras, $4500.  885-9771. #14  77 Volkswagan Van for parts.  886-3331. #15SS  '65 F150 Ford Supercab, 4X4,  lariat pkg, 300 C.I. 6 cyl, 4 sp.,  lots ol extras, $14,500 exc.  shape. 886-7163. #14  '66 Dodge Ram, 350, max!  custom, V8. auto., factory propane. P/S, P/B, P/W, AM/FM  cass., now radials, battery.  paint, $13,500. 883-9526 days.  #14  1980 Ford 250 4x4. 6 cyl. standard, steel construction box,  $5000.886-3921 eves.    #12ss  '87 Jetta. 2'ri yr. warr. remaining, 55,000 km., std. 5-spd.,  snows, $9995.885-4794. #14sr  1965 Olds Calais, multi-port fuel  ln|��� air. cond., AM/FM Cass.. 2  dr. HT, 2 tone gold, call Mark  683-9531 (OH.) or 863-2725  (home). #12  1978 Olds Delta 68. 2 dr.. loaded. 100.000 plus kms.. gd.  shape. 886-2442 or 886-8075  ask tor Larry. #13  79 Toyota Corolla wagon, auto.,  low mileage, nice clean car,  $3995.886-7819. #12  '87 Dodge Aries, like new, 2.2 II.  4 cyl.. auto.. $6800 OBO.  886-9979. #12  '89 Jeep Sahara, mint, 14000  kms., loaded, $18,200.  886-2234. #12  78 Fairmont on propane, new  engine and tranny, $1500.  886-3439 alter 6 pm. #12  EXCELLENT  LEAVING  PROVINCE  '86 Pontiac, 6000  PS/PB, air. cond.,  AM/FM, exc. cond.,  one owner. $5500.  886-4752  76 302 motor, $200.886-2826.  #13ss  '69   Plymouth   Valiant,   $500.  686-2826. #13ss  1975 Ford * ton, new rotors,  muffler, some rust, $2000.  883-9483. #13ss  1981 H> ton Chev, auto, 360,  55,000 miles, $4500 OBO.  683-9211. #13ss  71 240Z Datsun, $3000 or trade  for small trailer; 1965 Mercury *  tonpickup.$200.865-2543.#12  79 Monte Carlo, V6, 2 dr., AC,  PS, PB, good condition.  885-3383. #13ss  1979 15 passenger Ford van,  rusty but mechanically sound,  $500.885-5466 after 5 pm. #12  76 Dodge Colt needs some work,  $500080.885-5992. #12  1966 Caravan, ps/pb, ak. 5  passenger, 146,000 km, one  owner, wc. cond., $9450.  666-9856 weekends. 966-6686  Van. #t2  1966 Sprint, standard, good  stereo, good cond., $5000 OBO  886-9643. #13  '81 Honda Civic HB. exc. cond.,  69.000 kms.. AM/FM cass..  auto. $2500.666-2367      #12  1960 GM Rally, 12 sealer van.  V8. 94.000 kms.. $5500 060  885-1960. #12  '87 Honda Accord LX. Exc.  cond.. 1 owner. P/S, P/B.  stereo, 5-spd.. sunroof, 58,000  kms.. warranty, $12,000.  886-9095. #14  '60 Chev PU. very gd. running  cond., asking $2000- 886-4627.  #12  1976 Volvo, $1000. 886-2911.  686-2106. #14  77 Mercury Monarch, gd. body,  running well. 685-4504.      #12  I960 VW PU. collector's Item.  Mechanic's special, best offer.  685-3692. #14  1970 Chevy Nova. 250 6-cyl.  $300 OBO; 1977 Mercury Bobcat. 4-cyl. gd. cond, $750 OBO.  885-4704. #14  77 Ford 1 ton, 390, new rubber,  runs great. $1600.685-3897 Ive.  msg. #12  1966 Pontiac SW, 266, 3-spd..  runs, $200.885-3288.        #12  1981 GMC PU, $1750 OBO. Call  886-8771. #12  1965 Pontiac Custom Sport, V8,  P/S, P/B, $400 OBO. Ph.  886-8025. #12  79 Ford van. raised roof, part,  camperlzed. $3500. 886-4804.  #14  Idle Brock 4 BBL alum, intake for  351m ��� 400 engine. $100.  685-5840. #14  New, Used & Rebuilt  AUTO PARIS  OPFN EVERY DAY  A101 SUPPLY lid.  886-8101  76 VW window van. good condition. $1600.886-2924        #12  76 Ford Granada lor parts. $1  and up. 886-2826. #12  78   Datsun  886-2826.  510.  $1100.  #13ss  C .tmpers  Motorhomes  LET'S TALK  MONEY  Let's get together and sell  your RVunil.lt we can't sell  if we'll buy it. Free Appraisal  and pickup anywhere.  LANTZVILLE RECREATION  COMPANY LTD.  ran r,�� 1-880-663-4234  D7363  OUTIOAROS FOR SALE  9 9-20-30-40-50-70 HP  1988-1989 Evinrudes Excellent  condition. Lowes Resorl.  883-2456. TFN  Cal25. fully equipped, moorage  included. $11,500. 886-8706.  #13sr  Vesl There Is a reliable local pro-  pellor repair service. 885-5278.   TFN  16' K&C Thermalglass boat. 85  HP Evm, new canvas, new leg,  trailer, $3,000 OBO. 885-5858 or  686-9078. TFN  22' Sangster 186 HP. 868 leg.  sleeps tour, head, stove, ice box,  extras. 886-8443. #14sr  EVINRUDE OUTBOARDS  Special savings on all models in  stock. Full marine services. Hyak  Marine Services 866-2246.   #12  21' Kuslom Koach trailer, tub &  shower. Gd. cond., $5600.  885-2777eves. #12ss  28' Prowler 5th wheel, excellent  shape, air conditioning, TV aerial,  $11,500 OBO. 885-5861.    #15s  1981 Maxivan by Getaway,  sleeps 4, exc. cond., 17 MPG.  $11,900,886-8487. #12  1978 Chev. motor home, low  mileage, new radials, lots ol extras, $15.000.886-2526.     #12  1967 deluxe motor home, 24',  perfectly clean and A1 condition.  886-6481. #13ss  73 Econoline motorhome. good  shape, $3900 OBO. 886-2924  alt. 6 pm. #t4ss  1977 Ford camper, no rust, new  tires, lurnace, flush toilet, stove,  2-way Iridge. exc. cond.. $7850.  886-2062. #13  1959 Mercury 17' travel trailer,  $1200 OBO. 885-4704.        #14  8'/!' camper, older model, clean  & well kepi, $1750. 886-3845.  #14  RV excellent condition, Vanguard  20' travel trailer, sleeps 6.  885-7626,885-7855. #14  22 ft. Reinell I/O new paint on  hull, no power, heavy duty trailer.  $3500.883-9463. #14sr  SECHELT MARINE  SURVEYS LTD.  Captain Bill Murray  M.C.M.M.C.   M.N A M.S.|  M.A.B.Y.C.   ��� Marine   ,  Surveyors and Consultants  885-3643  K&C thermoglas 16V. 70 HP  Johnson, depth sounder, anchor,  Hie jackets, tanks, EZ-load  trailer, low hours, exc. cond.,  $3500.885-9906. #12  2 Mustang survival suits, new,  $300 ea. 883-9133. #13  MVTrina Marie-34'gillnetter, A  licence, wood, Ford diesel,  $95,000.883-9133. #13  28' Silverton Sportslisher.  350's, too much to  886-8315.  Homemade single fibreglass  Kayak with rudder & spray skirt,  very stable. $800. 866-9760.  #13  Totally rebuilt 318 cu. in. left &  right wilh gears. 883-9110.  #14ss  24' Blue Water Sloop, fully rigged, sitka mast, a must seel  $15,000.886-4535. #12  Gibsons Harbour, power It required. Phone  866-9011. TFN  45'  work.   Gd.  885-5448.  schooner,   needs  value.   $7500.  #15s  23' FG hull, no motor, dual controls, $1200; 23' FG over wood  with 108 HP Volvo. $2600.  885-3127. #12  25 HP Johnson OB. longshaft  with new lank, just serviced.  $775; 20 HP elect, start Merc.  08 with near new battery, $1050.  885-7736. #12  19 fl. F/G cabin, 60 HP 0/B. 4  HP 0/B. sounder, tanks, trailer,  extras. 883-9080. 12ss  270 Volvo leg. 3.51 WakeshaFW  C. $1000080.883-1119.    #15  7000 lb. Easyload boat trailer,  tandem axle, surge brakes, up to  30' boat, $4500.886-3589. #14  22'// boat, gd. shape. Volvo leg,  no motor. 883-9278.        #14sr  17' fibreglass boat. 50 HP  Johnson, trailer, ski bar, anchor.  886-7064. #14  1214' Hourston F/G, 9.5 HP  Johnson. Best oiler. 885-3692.   #14  Reinell boat & little DV trailer.  $750; 25 HP Evinrude. $450.  885-7196. #12  BARGAIN  Glen L 21' CB sailboat, sails,  most fittings, needs linishing, HD  Galkins trailer, $5000 Firm, view  886-9382. #14  Pacillca 20 1986 20' centre consol boat, complete w/power,  $8500.883-9110. #15ss  BROOKS & MILLER  FLOOR COVERINGS ltd.  Benjamin Moore & International  Paints  Marine  Flnlthm  Commercial  Pricing   ;'  Bill Wood  SECHELT  [A  Bus 885-2923  Res. 885-5058  CUSTOM  BUILD  YOUR OWN  MANUFACTURED  HOME  Up to 1848 sq. tt. Pick one  ol our plans & modify to suit  Pricing starting at approx.  $44 per sq. tt.  580-4321  1982 14x70. fully lenced. landscaped lot. upper Gibsons.  $75,000.886-2809.        #I3SS  1976 12x46. 4 appl.. $10,000.  883-9133. #13  Mobile homes for sale.  886-9581. /������,   #12  Motort v< les  1960 Stunk! OS ION a, 12,61  kms., gd. cond., $1560.  666-7029. #|2s  1984 Harley Davidson wide glide.  60 cu. in., exc. cond., $9000  Call Dan 885-3252 aft. 5pm.  #12  1982 Yamaha 650 w/two  helmets, good cond.. $800  865-2206. #13  1982 VZ490J Yamaha, only 30  hrs. since new. Mint cond..  $1500.886-4599. #14SS  Pender Harbour Motorcycle Club  X-country enduro races. Apr. 22.  Classes: Enduro, motocross,  school boys, Jr. school boys. Information Andy 883-9971.    #16  1969 Honda 250; 1975 Kawasaki  350.685-1939 alt. 6 pm.     #14  1200 Yamaha touring bike. 1  owner, mint. 883-9110.    #15ss  Honda blue 200cc Twinstar.  perfect cond.. w/helmet. asking  $725. 885-7626,885-7855. #14  BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  These Ads appear in Ihe more than 90 Newspapers ol Ihe B.C. and Yukon Community  Newspapers Association and reach more than 1.400.000 homes and a potential two million readers  S165Jor 25 words $3.15 per additional word        Call the Coast News at 885*3930  AUTOMOTIVE  FULL CIRCLE LEASING. CARS,  TRUCKSANDVANS. New1990  Ford, OMC, Chrysler Imports.  Early teas, retumi Wholesale  leasing and purchese, cash for  trades. $0 Down, Iree delivery.  Ask about our 24 Mo. option  lease. Call coted: (604)273-  7778.  SELLING YOUR CAR? Free  photo ads H you send photo and  description (Regular value  $10.95). Must Include phone  number. Published In the "Buy  andSeT. Attention: F.P.A.,5791  No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC. V6X  2C9.  IBBBFrelghllinerConv. 220 W/B  444 cummins, 3 + 5 year valid  warranty, 46,000. Eelone rear-  end, air delledorkl, with or without job. Call: (604)888-5350.  BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES  Inventors, you can pram Irom  your Ideas. For FREE inlormalion  cat: Pacific Inventions Inc.,  (604)684-6030 or write, #700-555  West Hastings, Vancouver, V6B  4N6.  Well established appliance bust  ness lor sale on Sunshine Coast  Well stocked shop has parts display area. Include* 3 bedroom  house. All on 1.6 acres.  (604)8864859.  GARDENING  THE ULTIMATE GARDENER'S  STORE, 1,000's of products,  greenhouses, hydroponics, huge  book selection. $4 lor catalogue  fuH ol money saving coupons.  Western Water Farms, #103,  20120-6411) Ave., Langley, B.C.,  V3A4P7.  BUSINESS PERSONALS  BUSINESS OPPORTUMTES  $DOLLARS$ - Tops 'N Trends  home party sales. Consultants  needed. Casual sportswear, col-  our catalogue available. Fantastic hostess gifts. Call Lynn, 1  800-268-6670.  Weatherdek Is Canada's leading  supplier ol sheet vinyls used In  waterprootlng eundecks,  roofdecks, balocnlee, pod surrounds, etc. We now have a  dealership available In your area.  In return tor a 612,000 Investment, we supply Inventory, tools  wdal training If you went to start  your first business or adds product to an existing one, give us a  collect cat at (604)860-1200.  A����itlon:Mr.O.Chai��son.  8TART YOUR OWN IMPORT/  EXPORT business, even spare  lime. No money or experlenoe.  Sine* 1S46. Free brochure:  Wide World Trade, c/o Cdn.  Smal Business Inst., Dept. Wt,  1140 Bellamy RoadN.it, Scar-  borough, Ontario, M1HIH4.  THIS B YOUR OPPORTUNITY  to be your own boss In a $60  bNon market wlh unimted earnings. Right now you are only 18  months away Irom Independent  wealth. Telephone: (506)375-  6861 orwmo: Box478,Hartland,  N.B.E0J1N0.  EARN EXTRA MONEYI Learn  Inoorne Ttu Preparation or Basic  ~ " Pino by correepon-  or Ire* brochures, no  , contact: U6R Tax  Services, 206-1348 Pembina  Highway, Winnipeg, MB, R3T  2B6, 1-800-665-5144. Enquire  a*toutexdua^|t*noWe*lerrtto-  rtesavalabre across Canada.  DICKIE DEE, 1h* lo* cream bicycle people*, wH have exciting  cpena-igs avalabt* during the  1090 season lor dMnTNton in  ���elected sreasotBC Weoflera  naoonaly recognized product  an*, aj ahe txtfrnant needed end  * owiuawe sunput pmorsm. Be  pari ofDIckaiD*** 31 yeers ol  qdred. Contact:  DICKIE DEE  ICE CREAM LTD., #116, 1401  m- -���. /mm i ��� it i ��� 11  Waini  fVVH VTaMMVy, �������  1H6. (604)734-3370.  VENDING ROUTES. Eamhugt  In your  MM. MMWOUMrtMd  hmm  ftatarl riwiiMi a  letVVHa     **nnlt MHti*rr*r*r*#1 P**  pop and  hem 62,800.   Cai tor details:  Eagb Venting, (604)587-3532.  DIVORCE? No court appearand or consent ol accuse neces-  aaryl Just 6-15 weeks, 666.96  plus costs. You or we type.  Lawyer endorsed. Sand for copy  of Canada's new Divorce act and  literature. Same system since  1B70. Olvorcervlcs, 201-1262  Burrard, Vancouver, (604)687-  2900. Franchises available.  EDUCATION  HOW TO PUY POPULAR PIANO. New home study course.  Fast, sasy method. Guaranteed!  Also organ and electronic keyboard course*. For FREE Information, write: Popular Music  Systems, audio 52,3284 Bouch-  erte Road, Kelowna, B.C., VtZ  2H2.  FREE: 1990 guide to study-at-  home correspondence Diploma  courses lor prestigious careers:  Accounting, Airconditfonlng,  BooWatapaig, Business, Cosmetology. Electronics, Legal/Medical Secretary, Psychology,  Travel. Granted. (6A) 263 Adelaide West, Toronto, 1-800-950-  1972.  EOUPMENT * MACHINERY  GOOSENECK Stock Trailer Sale  - Keller 16x6x6614,10.000 LB.,  axle*, 2 way rear door, centre  one, escape door, 4 wheal  brakes, 66,486. Tratenand Sales  �� Service (403)291-3767.  FOR SALE IMC  Lighting fixtures. Western Canada's largest display. Wholesale  and retail. Free catalogue available. Norburn Lighting Centre,  4800 East Hastings St., Burnaby,  B.C., V8C 2K5. Phone:  (604)299-0666.  Suntan beds, deluxe commercial  type, 26 lamps, face tanner, electric HI. 18,000 new, asking  16,486 O.B.O. WW consider vehicle orboalaetrade. (604)653-  4020,(604)537-4727.  MATERNITY CATALOGUE.  Fr*e 32 page fashion catalogue.  Great fence MMemiy, 7148  Fleher Street S.E., Calgary. AB,  T2H0W3.  Phone:  (403)253-  QUN BARQAM8 - Save IB to  4C*by��ub*trt>lnglo"TheGun-  nmnef, the Canadian monthly  newspaper Noting hundreds of  najw.ueed, modern and antique  ���raanm lor sale or trade. Sub-  ���onptlon 620/yr. to: Gunrunner,  Boa S66T, Letrfcrioge, Absrts,  TU3Z4 aampleoopy61.78.  00 YOU LOVE TO SEW? For  Ira* catalogue ot qutfly emtio  rwrionsstand rongSJtr.S.E.to: A  Great Notion, 13647-7A Annuo,  tarty, B.C..V4A7H4.  HEALTH  VITAMIN DISCOUNTS. Sine*  1973, offering high quality-lowest  prices on Vitamins, Minerals,  Herbs, Body Building and Weight  Loss, Supplements, Hair Treatment, Skin Care and More. FREE  CATALOGUE. Write: VITAMIN  DISCOUNTS, Dept.BCI5, 260  S.W. Marine Drive, Vancouver,  B.C..V5X2R5.1-800-663-0747.  In Vancouver, 321-7000.  HELP WANTED  HELP WANTED  Singles/Couples. Complele government-approved Building Manager* Correspondence Certificate course for apts/condos/  rhees/mini-storage. Guaranteed  Placement Assistance. RMTI,  1I20-78SW. Pender. Vancouver,  B.C., V6C1H2. (604)661-5456  SELL 6500 DAILY...EASY  Earhuggers(TM). Hot New Fash-  Ion Jewellery opportunity lor you  NOW. Proven results. Demonstrate malls, lairs, stores, etc.  Samples and inlormalion call  FREE: 1-800-663-7575.  EXPERIENCED EDITOR  WANTED for weekly, Inuvik,  N.W.T. One year contract. Salary negotiable. Northern News  Services, Anneltes Pool, Managing Editor, Box 2820. YeKowknile,  NiW.T., X1A 2R1. (403)873-  4031.  Service advisor. MSA. FORD  SALES In Abtbotslord, B.C., requires a Service Advisor. Suc-  cessM candidale should be laml-  lar with warranty and customer  service. Send resume to: Al  Derksen, MSA FORD, 33033  South Fraser Way, Abbotstord,  B.CV2S2A7.  Established weekly newspaper  seeks Advertising Manager, Associate Publisher. Reply lo:  (604)886-3577 after six. Purchase Option.  General Manager Canada  Games 1993 ��� Jeux du Canada  1983. The Kamloops 1993 Canada Games Society ha* an ending; position available tor * General Manager. As General Manager, you will plan, direct and  mart* the 1993 Canada Summer  Game* within guidelnee rastab-  Hehed by the Board ol Directors  and Management Committee.  You have diverse management  experience, a University Degree  In a related drsciplin* and a  proven track record as a dynamic  project leeder. Yourbeclroraund  includes experience as a Senior  Manager responsible lor marketing, administration and financial  management. An equivalent  oombinallon ol education and  experience wll be considered.  Plea** submit your resume tor  this term posit ion (June 1,1990-  Decembof 30, 1993), Including  salary expectations and business  references, before March 30,  1980 to: President Kamloops  1969 Canada Games Society,  P.O. Bote 1993, Ksmtoops, British  Columbia, V2C6M9. Unstraduo-  tion entrance* do cede innonoe  MdaBonrrfete. Vevieezappeler:  (604)372-1993.  East end FOOD COOP In Vancouver, P.C. requires a Retail  Manager. The successful eppti-  carttrWatarBaponsrbtelorar-intjal  sales o($1-2M consisting of food  and household hardware. Applicant should have strong retail  background In grocery and natural food management. Excelent  interpersonal/communication  skills required. A competitive salary, comprehensive benelle  package and co-operative work  environment are ottered. All ap-  picallons acknowledged and held  in confidence. Apply In writing  giving detals ol quaMcationa and  salary requirements by March 30  to: PaulC.NewmanfPresident),  1034 Commercial Drive, V5L  3W9.  Forklifl Mechanic required immediately. 620/hr. Company truck  and benefit*. Electric lortditt experience prelerred. Send resumes to: 110,13478-78*1 Avenue,  Surrey, V3W8J6.  Qualified diesel and gasoline  Marine Mechanic required lull  time on the Sunshine Coast.  Good salary and bandits package. Send resume to: Box 2540,  Sechelt, B.C., VON 3A0.  SPRING IS HEREII Ski Iree to  May 21. Sunshine Village require* Iriendly cashiers, cooks,  dishwasher*, daycare, housekeeping, gondola Apply: Coordinator, Box 1510, Band, AB, TOL  0CO.  Legal secretary required lor conveyance end corporate position.  Experience preferred. Please  apply to Daniel Nowosad at  Nowosad Klaver, 8700 Market  Street, P.O. Box 1289, Port  Hardy. B.C.. VON 2P0, Or call:  (6o4)04����031.  ATTENTION! Make $300* per  irtanmahome. TumTRASHInto  CASH. Become a Relunder.  Send sen-addressed stamped  envelope: Retold Spodaiel. Box  108.Horselly,B.C.,V0L1L0.  Earn up to 6300 per day commis-  etonlromhome. Take orders lor  publisher. People contact you.  Stamped sett-addressed envelope to: 1306, 543 RowcMfe  Annus, Kelowna, B.C., V1Y  5Y8.  Harvest Log Homes of Morritt,  B.C. hat Immediate openings lor  experiencedlogbulldora. Aflrac-  tln pay scale and steady work tor  buMers able to accept responsl-  bteaes. Contact Brad Hagen  (604)376-9840.  PETS 6 LIVESTOCK  Chesapeake Bay Relrienrs,  good lamlly pets, excelent hunting dogs, champion blood line*.  Pups ready tor a new home March  22nd, 6400. (604)4788656.  RENTALS  Dlsccver Ills the way I's meant to  be, at BEECHWOOD VliAQE In  sunny Sldney-by-lhe-See. NOW  renting Irom 61,375. month, Including meals. Call toll Iree: 1-  800663-3406.  WHITE ROCK-lndependent re-  sort living lor active seniors. Deluxe 1 bedroom and den suites,  gas F/P, 2 baths, 5 appliances.  Leaaes tram 81.660/mo. Include*  dawer/UgN housekeeping, hydro  and morel Penthouse also available. Pacilic Cartlon (604)531-  1160.  Prime onToo or ratal apace. 7,610  square leet. Downtown Houston,  B.C.. comer 10th Street Poulon  Annua. Available April 1,1990.  Lease term* negotiable. Cat:  (604)845-2617 (Houston).  SERVICES  Mater ICBC and Injury claims.  Joel A. Wener, trial lawyer lor 21  year*. Cai cosed, (604)736-  5500, Vancouver. Ilnorecrwery,  note*. No Yukon enquiries.  ICBC INJURY CLAIMS? Cai  DsleCarr-Harris-20 years a trial  lawyer wlh fin year* medical  school before law. 669-4922  (Vancouver). Experienced In  head in|ury and other major  claims. Percentage lees avail-  ���ICBC ottered me 63.500. Cany  Llnd* got me 6190,000.' G.N.,  Abbotstord. LawotticesolCarey  Llnd*, Vancouver 664-7796.  Serving dent* throughout B.C.  lor 18 years  TRAVEL  VICTORIA B.C. THE ADMIRAL MOTEL" Firwavjcommo-  dallon onrtooUng the beautiful  harbour. Housekeeping una*,  raasonaU* rat**ftn*nay, personal adrmtlon (rx>m larr* owners. CAA Recommended. 257  Belevile Street, Victoria, B.C.,  V8V1X1. (604)3686267.  G'DAY FROM New Zeeknd and  Australial Interested In dairy  larmlng oversees? Experience  milking 120-450 cow* In 2 hours,  Kreons sged 19-28 oontact the  ernallonal Agriculurat Exchange Association, 1208,1501-  17lhAn. S.W., Calgary, AB.T2T  OE2.  PERSONALS  WOULD YOU LIKE to corre-  ���pond with unattached Christian  people, agss 16-60, the object  being corrv*ntonahfp or mar-  rtag*. Write: ASHGROVE, P.O.  Box2W,Ch*e*,B.C..V0E1M0.  Genealogy Service DM your  ancestors com* tram Inland? Lai  uahasf your tamly Ire*and learn  aboul your IWriugo. Emerald  Agencies, 120-12620 Clark*  ~     " B.CV8V2H1.  Pltce your ad herel  Regiment Tour/Esoorted Third  Annual. Retrace footsteps 1944-  45. Southern England, Franc*,  Belgium, Hotand, Germany.  Depart May 9/3 wke. Veteran,  couple*, al welcome. Bob,  Cheam Travel, ChlHwack,  (604)7924)207 rjtys/svenlngs.  AFRICAN PHOTO SAFARVEe-  oorted. Kenya, Tanzania. Depart  Vancouver June 2/3 wk*. Game  parks, sightseeing naghNgMa.  CU Bob, Crteam TmveLCr*  IwacK (804)792-9207 days/eve-  SKIERS: Lake Loube, auntan-  mng espial ol the Canadian  Rockies has ski and stay packages from only 629/day (quad  orxupancy, minimum 3 day*).  Cai 1-60O-363-O003.  CRUISE HOLIDAYS.  Program, cai today, onJa* tomor-  row on the world's finest orris*  ships at urtefatvabt* savings  Reglal��rnow: (604)361-1444,  Victoria. 29-  11  Coast News, March 19,1990  Wanted to Rent  Married couple with children,  clean resp.. financially secure,  require 3-4 bdrm. home for rent  or lease. 1 yr. to 18 mos. commencing July 1. 886-3376.   #14  Family of 4 needs 3-4 bdrm.  house, long term. 886-8914.  #12  Local housing contiactor wanting  to move family up looking for 3  bdrm house to rent for long term  starting on or before June.  NS/NO. storage or workshop.  885-7111. #12  Clean resp. N/S prof, couple  seeking 1-3 bdrm. home or cottage. Sechelt area, ocean view,  pret. for approx. 1 yr exc. ret.  886-4573. #t2  Senior widow, N/S. N/D. 1  bdrm.. $450 util. incl.. June.  Collect 681-4846. #12  Couple with inlant, 2-3 bdrm..  Langdale to Egmont. needed by  April 1.886-9140. #13  Jusi arrived Irom Sweden, clean,  professional N/S couple wilh  small dog seek short term rental,  nol lussy. can pay in advance.  885-7513. #13  Sell employed N/S human with  impeccable rets., will caretake.  pet sit, rent or lease self contained living space 886-4432    #13  2 or 3 bdrm. house, 1 or 2 yrs.,  prefer turn., leave mess, at  Bayside Lumber, attn. Al.  884-5355. #14  Local dance teacher seeks home,  lor sell and cat. Apr. 1. Hope  886-2730, #12  Room & board needed immed. lor  quiel NS/ND man, will pay up lo  $600/mo. Please call collecl or  Iv. mess. 583-2962. #13  Responsible man looking for 1  bdrm. apart., contacl Joe al Promos Rest. Gibsons. 886-8138.  #14  Wanled 2-3 bdrm. apartment or  house by quiet resp. family ol 4.  Central location prel. Sharon  885-7919. #14  Wanted lo rent or buy. home or  cottage in Roberts Creek area. No  recent renovations or indoor use  ol peslicides. 885-3295,  885-3790 (Sheila). #13  Bed 8, Breakfast  Gibsons area, close lo Ihe terry  886-3134 alter 6 pm or leave  message #12  Help Wanted  Experienced Pizza cook. Andy's  Restaurant. 866-3388 apply to  Kham. TFN  Secret Cove Marina requires student summer stall. Please call  Cash Whelan or Hayden at  885-3533 or leave mess.     TFN  Carpenter Finisher - must be experienced in layout and all  aspects ol linishing. Please send  resume to B.B. Construction,  R.R. 1, Bay Rd. Site, Sechelt.  B.C V0N3A0. #14  Beaver Island Grocery is looking  for part-time help, kitchen experience required. 883-2108.  #12  "immediately required  Exp. Iramer 6 helper, good  wages, permanent position possible. J.R. Redwood Const..  298-5215 or 886-8859 alter 6  pm. #12  OVERSEAS JORS  High Demand in Australia, U.K..  France plus 18 different ratin-  ttles. Need persons willing to  work overseas on contracts. All  trades. Supervisory positions  also available. Call Smart International Incorporated.   1-7IB-H7-MI4  Roberts Creek Hall avail.,  dances, parties, weddings,  equipment rental. Yvonne  885-4610. TFN  Davis Bay/Wilson Creek Hall  available. Wheelchair facilities.  885-2752 0(885-9486.       #13  Main floor 1 bdrm. suile, avail.  Apr. 1 central Gibsons wilh view  & fireplace. $500/month incl.  utils & cable 886-4856      #12  One bdrm. apartment lower Gibsons, new building, S560/mo.  12 mo. lease, quiel secure easy  walking distance lo shops, etc.  886-3420. #12  3 bdrm. upper duplex, 1470 sq,  ft., new carpels & painl  throughout. 5 app��� fantastic  view, Sechell, no pels, rels.,  $800 plus half utilities. Call  434-5347 ask for Chris.       #12  Egmont house on Vi acre waterfront, main floor ��� 3 bdrm. un-  furn. (with appls.) - $525; basement - 1 bdrm.. furn.. - $375:  utils. incl. for both, avail. Apr. 1,  mature resp. people only, refs.  req., call 522-8460. #14  1 bdrm. in house. $400 with  hydro incl.. w/d. central Gibsons, must like dogs. 886-8254.  #12  Heated mini storage. 886-8101  TFN  2 bdrm. home wilh view, avail.  Apr. I. $750. 886-8327 all  6pm. #12  Roommate needed, environmentally concious, non-sexisl only  need apply. 885-3692.        #14  3 bdrm. waterfront home in Gibsons. Avail. April 5. 685-2500  aft. 5 pm. #12  West Sechelt, avail. May 1. 3  bdrm. house upper half. 5 appls.  Refs req. $750 plus util. Call  885-7622 wkdys 6-9 pm.    #12  Comfortable accom. avail. In  private lodge. Weekly rates. Call  883-9579. #14  600 sq.ft. boat shop. 883-1122,  #14  Help Wanted  Receptionist with secretarial  training or experience. This Is an  entry level position for someone  interested in a career as a legal  secretary. Resumes to Welsh &  Gray, Box 130, Sechelt.      #12  All resumes are NOT equal. Call  Arbutus Offices. 885-5212.  #12  Flagging personnel needed. Send  full resume to R.R. Traffic Control. Box 17, Silver Sands. Halfmoon Bay. B.C. VON 1V0.  Deadline March 27,1990.    #13  Middle age lady currently working as nurses aide requires a live-  in homemaker position, references. 940-0032. #13  Medical Laboratory  Technologist  We're looking for a self-motivated  laboratory technologist to provide  vacation and sick relief for our  Sechelt and Gibsons labs. You  must be CSLT registered and  have recent haematology experience. You will be performing  routine haematology. coagulation,  blood glucose testing, urinalysis,  slide tests. ECG's and venipuncture. If interested, you should  phone: Metropolitan Clinical  Laboratory, Sechelt Branch,  Phone: 885-2257. #12  Driftwood Inn and Pebbles  Restaurant require clerk/receptionist hostess and trained kitchen stall, cook, prep cook.  Phone for interview 885-5811.   #12  VOLUNTEERS  NEEDED  Public  Relations:  and  Marketing Skills are needed  to help advertise and promote events lor the Boy  Scout Association on the  Coast.  Pioneer Museum is looking  for people interested In helping with various events and  demonstrations.  Companion Needed to Read -  and converse with aphasic  stroke victim in Gibsons. 1  -2 hours per week.  Emergency Program needs  volunteers. A one day  workshop and availability in  the event ol an emergency is  the only commitment.  For these and more opportunities please call Volunteer-  Action Center 885-5861  The Ministry of Social Services  and Housing requires foster  homes for children 12 to 16  years. Please contact Judy Walls  or the intake social worker  weekdays at 885-7101.       #14  The Halfmoon Bay Child Care  Centre is accepting applications  for the following positions:  Licensed Daycare Supervisor  ���requires strong people skills and  previous supervisory experience.  Daycare Assistants for both day  and out ol school care. Require  high energy people with child  care training and or experience.  Substitute Child Care Workers for  on-call basis. Deadline Mar. 23.  apply lo H.B.C.C.C, 57  Wlldwood, RR1, Haltmoon Bay,  B.C. VON IVO. 885-3739, or  drop off at 8086 Northwood.   #12  Waitresses  Bartenders  & Cooks  Full or Part-Time  Peninsula Motor Inn  886-2804  Hair Stylist/Hairdresser  Apply J's Unisex, Sunnycrest  Mall, Gibsons. 886-7616.  TFN  Co-ordinator required lor Project  Parent, a Family Support and  Counselling Program. Education  and experience In counselling  and supervisory skill required.  M.S.W. preferred. 14 hrs. per  week. Submit resume by March  23 to Administrator, Sunshine  Coast Community Services Society, Box 1069, Sechelt, BC, VON  3A0. For Info, phone 885-5861.  #12  Help Wanted  We are in need ot a N/S sell-  motivated person for inside sales,  deliveries, (Egmont to Port  Mellon) receiving freight, errands, store maintenance, and  more. Entails lifting. Drop off  resume and for interview appt.  Janitor's Warehouse. 5536 Inlet  Ave.. Sechelt. #12  LICENSED  AUTOMOTIVE  MECHANIC  Apply in Person  SUNCOAST MOTORS  Hwy 101 near Pratt. Gibsons  866-8213  Medical Dicta Typist lor casual  relief work. Applicants with  medical terminology and typing  skills 60 w.p.m. are invited to apply. Benefits and wages as per  Hospital Employees' Union contract. Please apply to Mrs. L.  Buchhorn, Personnel Officer. St.  Mary's Hospital, Box 7777.  Sechelt, BC. VON 3A0. Phone  885-2224 Local 21, #12  Wanted part-time, full-time hair-  dresers. Call Wayne 886-2121 or  886-8510 eves. #12  Part time retail sales clerk, apply  In person with resume and refs.  Landing Home Hardware. Sunnycrest Mall.  'GARDEN  BAY  HOTEL  is now hiring for summer  -Chef-Cooks. Bartenders,  Waiters-Waitresses. Bus  People, Dishwashers, Cleaning Stall, and Marina and  Grounds Staff. Please apply  in person. 663-2674  29.  Business 8.  Home Services  PEERLESS TREE  SERVICE LTD.  Topping - Limbing - Danger Tree  Removal,   Insured,  Guaranteed  Work. Free estimates. 885-2109.  TFN  Coast Construction 665-4190  Roollrtfl���Repairs���Remodelling  Quality custom homes. Materials  and workmanship guaranteed.  Free estimates. 885-4190.    #14  SrU TREE SERVICE  Topping, trimming, pruning,  danger tree removal, bonded and  Insured, 20 years experience.  885-3897. #15  Arbutus Office Services  in downtown Sechelt - to serve  you better ��� rm. 217, Teredo  Square (West Wing). 885-5212  Hrs. 9-4. Alter hour appointments by arrangement.       #12  Have it Ion pickup, will haul.  $75,885-3127.                 #12  McBrlde's Plumbing 6 Htg  3rd generation plumbing  pany.   specializing   in  Homes. 1-525-4466.  Ltd.  corn-  New  #13  Why pay more tor  Tree Services  Call the  Undsrcutterslor free estimates &  consultation.   Dangerous  tree  removal our specialty.  Fully Insured, guaranteed work.  885-5096 or 883-9587 alt. 6.  #14  Work Wanted  ,��� u0me PROFESSIONAL  >n STEAM CLEANING  Carpets  Upholstery  POWERFUL TRUCK-MOUNTED  EQUIPMENT  BEST POSSIBLE RESULTS  CHERISHED  CARPET CARE "  886-3823  y  Exp. framing forming carpenler  available. Air equipped, please  call 886-9027. Free estimates.  #12  Construction company available  lor work from Iraming to  finishing, air equipped, local  references available. Call  866-3538 evenings. #12  TREE TOPPING  Danger tree removal, limbing and  falling, fully Insured, free  estimates. Jell Collins.  686-8225. #13  Carpenters available lor decks,  additions,   finishing  work.  Estimates, references. 886-2556.  #13  Handyman carpentry, electrical,  drywall, painting, eavestrough  cleaning. No job too small. Alan  886-8741. #13  Mobile licensed HD mechanic,  welder, air, arc 4 wire feed.  885-7336. #13  MT PLACE OR yrjuiji  Professional auto body mechanic  will contract your work. Autos,  trucks, Industrial, marine hulls.  Fibreglass, plastic & exotic  finishes, welding. For appointment 885-7659 aft. 6 pm.    #13  W ork W anted  Renovations, vinyl siding, windows, painting, cement, rooting,  fences, etc. Quality workman-  #13  ship 886-3078.  Bondable couple will care take  and maintain apartment or trailer  park in return tor free accommodation and small salary (terms  negotiable). Collect Prince George  562-3687 ask lor Bob or Mim.       #12  Hard working motel managers  (couple) ol 42-unlt motel and pool  in Okanagan seek managing position ol motel (any size) or campground on Sunshine Coast  Please call John or Linda  885-2534 #14  Framing crew  equipped. Ph.  886-7830.  available,  air  alt.   6  pm.  TFN  00 YOU NEED  ���rush cutting, rototilling. rubbish  removal, carpet/upholstsry  cleaning, window cleaning,  mobile home washing,  housecleaning. Skip's  Maintenance Service. 885-2373.  #14  Will do yard work, shoveling, digging, raking lawns, etc.  886-8370. #14  Reliable/responsible man/men  available for day jobs. Painling,  yard maintenance, etc. Robert  886-3822. #12  Carpenter builder - new & old.  Christopher James Klymson  885-2043. #12  Child Care  5fr4*-.  m  Molly Mouse has spaces available  for 18 months to school age. Call  886-3913. #19  Needed a reliable sitter for 2 small  boys, weekdays & some Sals,  Roberts Creek area, prefer In my  home, mornings 7:30-12:30, Call  Kelly 886-8842. #12  Middle age lady requires live-in  nanny posilion (experience)  references. 940-0032.        #13  Reliable babysitter wanted  weekdays. Pendei Hatbour.  883-2544. #13  12 yr. old has babysitting certificate. Will babysit nights and  weekends. Gibsons area.  886-8691 ask for Jennifer.   #12  Reliable babysitter for 16 mos.  old, weekdays, lower Gibsons.  N/S, Rels., my home. 886-8649.  #14  '*'       Business  Opportunities  Repo carpet cleaning van, diesel  cleaning machine, all equipment  necessary to start business.  Jusi  rebuilt,   bids,  financing  available. 883-9110.  #13  Notice to Creditors  and Others  NOTICE is given that creditors  and others having claims against  the Estate of Kenneth Webster  Eldt who died Nov. 17/89 are  hereby required to send them to  the undersigned before Ihe 27th  day ol March 1990 after which  date the Executor will distribute  the said Estate to the persons entitled thereto, having regard only  to the claims of which it has  Notice.  by K.A. Crosby, Executor. Box  282. Gibsons, B.C. VON IVO.  #12  Gambler Island public hearing  Islands Trust news  On January 27, 1990, a  public hearing was held at the  Gambier Island General Store  in New Brighton. Despite the  bleak, wintry weather there  were 55 people in attendance,  most of whom are permanent  residents on Gambier Island.  The purpose of the public  hearing was to consider an  amendment to the Community  Plan for the purpose of a Community Centre on part of Helen  Negroponte's property in New  Brighton. Following overwhelming support, the hearing  received third reading and is  presently with the Minister of  Municipal Affairs for signature.  A tenure for the temporary  dumping and storage of bundled logs at Douglas Bay was  issued by the Ministry of Crown  Lands to Douglas Bay Development Corporation on March 13,  1989 for a term of eight months.  This tenure authorized the siting  and construction of a log dump  facility which, according to the  terms of the tenure, was to be  removed as part of a required  site cleanup and restoration.  Despite repeated requests  from Crown Lands, the Federal  Department of Fisheries and the  Islands Trust, nothing has been  done. To date, the Ministry of  Crown Lands is offering the  $10,000 bond to the Department of Fisheries in order that  they can restore the stream and  beach. It is not known at this  time if Department of Fisheries  will want to take on this responsibility.  There has been a lot of concern together with frustration  on the part of the public and the  local trustees with regard to  what has taken place at Douglas  Bay and a determination to see  that it is cleaned up.  The quarterly Islands Trust  council meeting was held  February 23 and 24 in Victoria.  The transition process from old  to new legislation dominated  the two day meeting. At the inaugural meeting to be held in  Victoria on April 1 and 2, the  new Islands Trust legislation  will be in effect.  The Islands Trust offers its  constituents a unique opportunity to translate their environmental concerns and  values into their community  plans, regulations and Trust  policy, with an end result being  good, sensitive land use planning. This belief can only be  realized if the population shares  a real concern for the long term  health of the environment.  There is no longer any doubt  that we need to be very concerned about the deteriorating state  of our local Howe Sound  waters. The problem now is that  an impoverished Islands Trust,  once a leader in environmental  concerns, has not been able to  respond adequately to a proliferation of critical environmental issues, with the  result that grass roots groups  are jumping in.  We welcome their initiatives.  A high level of community  energy focussed on individual  issues can be far more effective  than any local government.  The Trust is limited by our  legislation. We are only allowed  to do those things that the province has itemized, ie.:  ��� Trust powers and policy  will  be generated  within its  o  <0  0)  O  LAND DISPOSITION  In Ihe New Westminster land recording district and  situated in Blind Bay adjacent to Nelson Island.  Take notice that Neil McAskill of 6288 Burnlake Drive ol  Burnaby. B.C. an engineering technologist and Ian  McAskill of 949 Jarvls Slreel, CoquiUam, B.C. intends to  apply for a Foreshore Lease of the following described  lands.  Unsurveyed Foreshore Fronting Lot E of D.L. 5377 on  Nelson Island commencing at the Iron pin (IP) marking  the South West corner ol Lot D proceeding on a true  heading of North 53' West a distance of 90m, thence  South 10' West a distance of 60m to Join the Iron pin  marking South West corner of Lot E and containing an  area ol 2000 square meters more or lass.  The purpose for which the land is required Is to provide  private moorage facilities.  Comments concerning this application may be made to the  Senior Land Officer. Ministry of Crown Lands, 401-4603  Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. V5H 4M4. File relerence  2404819.  l��L��a��D  10  00  00  0)  o  111  I  co  CO  a  o  CO  *  III  z  H  CO  <  o  council. Council will set stalling  levels, determine policy and  establish the budget and spending priorities. It will be directly  responsible to the taxpayer.  ��� The major new initiatives  give the Trust the potential to  effect positive and enduring  land use policies and 'hands on'  preservation practices. These  are, of course, the long awaited  'Trust Fund', and the Regional  Policy Statement.  The Fund should become active immediately and will give us  positive inroads to our communities, as news items and  regular output reports document the exciting progress of  land acquisition, conservation  covenants, and other conservation strategies.  ��� The regional policy statement will, we hope, become a  model for the rest of the province. Our federation of Trust  communities, and all the provincial ministries involved in the  Trust area, must work together  to develop a policy statement in  which we all agree as to where  our special area is heading and  what policies will guide us as we  move into the future.  The importance of this statement is twofold. It will represent the wishes of a collection of  communities that share a sensitive ecosystem; and it will  create the forum for dialogue  and agreement among government agencies that traditionally  have worked and made decisions in isolation, based on their  own mandates. If we succeed in  this endeavour, other areas of  the province may benefit from  our experience.  ��� On the local level, each of  our communities will soon experience significant relief from  years of staff and budgetary  constraints. Saltspring and  Bowen Islands have been acutely short of local planning  together with research and  policy development.  In summary, the Islands  Trust hopes to have clear, environmentally sound development guidelines and 'preserve  and protect' policies that will  substantially reduce the present  level of conflict and find the  Trust and Provincial agencies  working together toward a common goal as responsible  stewards of our environment.  Superhosts  If you are an owner or operator of a tourism, hospitality or  retail business, consider enrolling yourself and your  employees in Ihe SuperHost training program.  Because SuperHost teaches you how to become more  knowledgeable, friendly hosts, and how to improve the quality of service and hospitality you offer your visitors, that will  mean more traffic, more repeat business, more satisfied  customers and guests.  We need to encourage our visitors to expect more, see  more, spend more, stay longer and return more often. That's  what SuperHost training Is all about.  Expect the most and become a SuperHost! For more information contacl the Sechelt Chamber of Commerce at  885-3100.  Sechelt Chamber  The Sechelt Chamber of Commerce's next general meeting  will be held on Tuesday, March 27, 7:30 pm, at the  Rockwood Centre - North wing.  The theme for the meeting will be Chamber Goals and Objectives for 1990. The Goals and Objectives that the Board of  Directors has adopted for 1990 will be presented and  members will have an opportunity to contribute their own input and ideas.  Come and have coffee and dessert and meet your fellow  members. For further information please contact Jane or  Glna at the chamber oflice, 885-3100.  Schools  accreditation  Elphinstone Secondary School and Sechelt Elementary  School are both undertaking the accreditation process created  by the Ministry of Education.  First step in the process is an internal evaluation undertaken by school staffs and involves a lengthy evaluation of all  aspects of school operation. The next step will be an external  evaluation conducted by a ministry team, and is expected to  take place soon.  life]  Province of  British Columbia  NOTICE OF INTENT  Gibsons Highway District  NOTICE Is given, pursuant to Section 9(4) of the Highway  Act, that the Ministry has received an application to  discontinue and close a portion of road allowance in the  Secret Cove area adjacent to Lot 'A', (except parts in Plans  13497,14S39 & 17666) District Lot 4537, Plan 10783, Group  1, N.W.D.  And that such closed road allowance be vested, pursuant  to Section 9(2)(a) of the Highway Act.  A plan showing the proposed road closure may be viewed  at the Sunshine Coast Highways Olfice, 1016 Seamount  Way, Seamount Industrial Park, Gibsons, B.C., during office hours. Any person having objection to this application  for road closure should state same In writing not later than  April 19, 1990 to this Ministry at Box 740, Gibsons, B.C.  VON 1V0.  District Highways Manager for:  MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION  AND HIGHWAYS  -,;��--*���������������  :��� .ji^fi-.. ��� ...:���.-  ,  ���     ���  i  - ���'.,._��� RCMP hearing Canada's first  Coast News, March 19,1990  ��.  Continued from page 1  One of the key matters considered by the panel was that  Robinson's removal from the  cell was not entered into the  shift's log book. During an  RCMP detachment shift, written log is kept to track the  movement of prisoners, including the time they're booked  in and regular observations of  their activities while in the cell.  When asked by Sorokan why  no such record was made when  Waite took Robinson to the interview room, Waite said:  "That's my fault. I took him  out, I should have made an entry or instructed the guard to  make an entry. I don't know  why 1 didn't do it, but I  didn't."  The action was also not mentioned in the officers' subsequent reports for the internal investigation. Corporal Sorokan  testified that it was merely an  oversight. "I should have indicated that in the report," he  said. "I'm sure in the eyes of  this hearing it looks suspicious,  but there was no intention to  cover up."  The three member panel that  heard Robinson's case in Gib  sons was chaired by former BC  Attorney General Allan  Williams and included Yellow-  knife lawyer John Bayly and  Director of Native Court-  workers Rosemary Trehearne,  also from Yellowknife.  In his questioning of Waite,  Bayly stressed the importance  of the police log "as the only  detailed record of events within  a detachment." He said that irregularities in the log of the  night in question "compromises  the record and places it in  serious doubt."  Bayly pointed out that as the  senior officer, it was also  Waite's responsibility to read  Sorokan's report for the internal investigation and sign it as  accurate. He reiterated that the  report had not included the  removal of Robinson from the  cell. "You have in a sense certified this report and yet it omits  an important detail of what  happened that night," commented Bayly.  In his testimony Waite said  that over all he'd "handle the  matter quite differently now",  by taking such protective  measures as having polaroid  pictures taken of prisoners at  the time of booking and release;  never going into the cell or  removing someone from the cell  by himself; and taping the activities of prisoners while in the  cell.  He also said that when faced  with a night as busy as the one  in question, he "would today  not hesitate to call out extra  men or remove loud, rowdy  persons from the cell."  Living  with  twins  Twins are a unique experience, both for their families  and the general public.  Occurring once in every 90  births, twins give people the  chance to watch and enjoy the  closest of human relationships  unfold from conception.  The adage 'double the  pleasure' is balanced by 'double  trouble' and the parents and  families of twins often feel overwhelmed by the amount of  work and fatigue that can accompany caring for twins.  Twins clubs can be found in  major cities throughout North  America, providing a source of  support, experience and the  special equipment used to make  life with twins easier.  The Sunshine Coast has its  fair share of twins and a twins  club had its first meeting Thursday, March I at the Gibsons  Health Unit, 1538 South Fletcher at 7:30 pm.  Subsequent meetings will be  held the first Thursday of every  month.  For more information call  enise at 886-8847.  Photo  winners  Winners of the photo contest  sponsored by Intra World  Travel in Trail Bay Mall were:  first prize, Maybeth Hoagland  for 'Planting New Rice'; second  prize, Bernard Mourier for  'Pushkar Camel Fair'; and third  prize, Mrs. K. Tucker for 'The  Flower Lady'.  Response to the contest was  good and judging was done by  Photo Works.  Counsel Sorokan pointed out  that while it might be advisable  to make such measures part of  standard RCMP procedure, it  didn't address the question of  providing prisoners with adequate medical attention.  Robinson and three other  witnesses who were in the cell  with him that night testified that  they'd repeatedly asked for  medical help. Civilian jail guard  David Marshall told the panel  that although Robinson had  complained to him of sore ribs,  he had not sought medical attention and neither did he recall  Robinson asking for it, though  he would have had "plenty of  opportunity" to do so. In his  report for the internal investigation, Marshall said that he  believed Robinson "was faking  he was sick."  Waite said that when he  learned of Robinson's hospitalization he "couldn't believe  it," because when he went off  duty "in my opinion he was in  perfectly fine shape except for  marks on his face."  Chairman Williams asked  Waite why in three subsequent  altercations between Robinson  and other cell mates, no one else  was ever removed to the interview room or the prisoners  somehow separated. "My actions that night in handling  things were not very professional," Waite replied.  Bayly commented that Waite  knew that Robinson was obviously hostile toward him, yet  he did not ask one of the other  officers on duty to handle the  situation. "You took on the  role of enforcer, not only in the  interview room but in the cells."  Waite objected to the term  'enforcer' but admitted his actions showed "an error in  judgement."  Sergeant Ed Hill, commanding officer of the Gibsons  RCMP detachment took the  stand on Thursday when the  commission moved its hearing  to Vancouver.  Hill acknowledged that there  had been a delay in starting the  investigation because he did nol  realize the severity of  Robinson's injuries. The injuries took place on September  30, 1988 but the investigation  did not begin until October 26.  Sergeant Hill also acknowledged that there were  discrepancies of the official  RCMP log of the events of the  night of September 30 in the  Gibsons RCMP detachment.  Former BC Attorney General  Allan Williams, the commission  chairman, commented "Frankly the log is so full of errors it  destroys the credibility of the  whole document."  The internal investigation  launched by Hill laid no assault  charges against Corporal Waite  but found he had erred by not  providing adequate protection  of prisoners.  After deliberating on the  hearing's evidence, the PCC  panel will issue a report detailing its findings and recommendations, with copies going to the  parties concerned in the case,  the Solicitor General of Canada  and the Commissioner of the  RCMP who will make notification of what further action will  be taken.  Davis Bay Roofing  Residential���Commercial  "All Roofing Applications"  Re-Roofing               Repairs  Renovations            Skylights  24-hr. Emergency Service  885-S788  FREE ESTIMATES  Complete Liability Coverage W.C.B.  SHOP LOCALLY���  m it in Me hands  of the pros-'  SKOOKUM CHRYSLER  SERVICE Coast News, March 19,1990  Guess Where  The usual prize of $5 will be awarded the first correct entry drawn  which locates the above. Send your entries to reach Ihe Coast  News, Box 460, Gibsons by Saturday of this week. Last week's  winner was Sarah Olsen of General Delivery, Roberts Creek who  correctly guessed that the live bait and crab sign was located by  the Light House Inn and duck pond In Sechelt.  NOTICE  to NDP members  supporting  HOWARD  WHITE  FOR MLA  All ballots not mailed as of  Monday, March 19,1990 must  be couriered. For free service  phone one of these numbers  immediately:  883-2730  885-7866  886-3136  Thanks for your support  THE COMMITTEE TO ELECT HOWARD WHITE  SECHELT AREA  Business Operators  and  Entrepreneurs.  The B.C. Government is committed  to stimulating economic growth that creates  employment in your community.  Are you considering expanding your  current business or starting a new one? Are you  considering manufacturing a product in B.C.?  Are you considering exporting your product?  Fxonomic Development Officers from the  Mainland/Southwest Region can help. These  business professionals will be in Sechelt on  March 21 and 22, and they invite you to make  an appointment for a one-on-one discussion of  your business proposals and ideas.  To book time with an Economic  Development Officer, or for information on any  of the Ministry's business incentive programs,  please contact the Government Agent's Office  in Sechelt: at 102 Toredo Square, Sechelt,  B.C., VON 3A0, Phone: 885-5187 or  Fax: 885-3810.  n-  Together���A Belter B.C.  Haro/J Long, MLA  HonoumUt Stanley H. Htrgrn  Minister ofRegional"andEconomic Development  RCMP called  to school  board meeting  Panasonic,  just slightly ahead of our lime.  by Rose Nicholson  Police were called in when  two people refused to leave the  school board offices at the end  of a board meeting on March  13. Earlier in the meeting Laara  Dalen had demanded that the  board reinstate early French Immersion or adhere to Policy 38  that would give parents one  year's notice of the change in  programming. "If you can't do  this I must request your resignation," she told the board. "I'm  prepared to stay here until you  decide."  "This board will not be  threatened by you," replied  chairman Carol Adams. "We  are listening to all sides of this  issue and are trying to reach a  decision that will be the best for  all concerned."  Later when the meeting was  adjourned, Mr. and Mrs. Dalen  refused to leave and the police  were called. The Dalens then  left quietly.  "We have contacted our  lawyers," District Superintendent Clifford Smith told the  Coasl News. "This is illegal.  We could prosecute."  A large contingent of parents  was again on hand to express  their dissatisfaction with the  board's decision to phase out  early French Immersion (EFI)  and replace it with middle  French Immersion (MF1).  In several letters and  speeches, parents expressed the  concern that there is no ..  guarantee that MFI will actually  be available to their children  three years from now.  "My request to you," said  Wendy Berlin, "is to leave early  immersion in place until you  have middle immersion established and running."  "The offering of EFI is a major component for some purchasers with families when considering this area as a place to  live and work," pointed out real  estate agent Dave Oldham. He  went on to say that with only  two other areas in Canada offering MFI, many young families arc concerned about the  portability of their children's *"  education. "Families tend to *"  move every so of ten... I feel it  would be imprudent to implement such a geographically  restricting program."  In addition to the large  delegation present at the  meeting, the board received a  record 24 letters expressing opinions both for and against the  immersion issue.  Lome Blain, former mayor  of Gibsons, pointed out in his  letter that the $15,000 federal  and provincial start-up grant for  Trustees  facing  budget  problems  by Rose Nicholson  A preliminary school budget  of $19.1 million exceeds the new  Block Funding system recently  introduced by the provincial  government by approximately  $700,000.  School district management  staff is recommending that the'  board hold a referendum to  provide the additional financing  to cover tht costs of implementing the new primary program;  computer equipment; and  educational program support  for teacher recruitment, library  upgrading, music and fine arts  for smaller schools, special  education, French programs  and preparation for the implementation of (he new Intermediate Program.  If the referendum is passed as  presented, it would mean tax increases of 93 cents per $1000 of  assessment, increasing the taxes  on a median value house by  about $35 a year and on a  $100,000 house by about $93 a  year.  The school board is also  looking at a possible increase of  about 520 students in the district  by September of 1993, bringing  the population of local schools  up to around 3654 students.  "This means that we will  need more schools," said  Secretary Treasurer Tim Anderson. "We are discussing possible sites with the regional  district and the towns of Gibsons and Sechelt."  each Fl class is for the first year  only. "The taxpayers must  wholly support Fl from then  on...the taxpayers are expected  to support a special subject for  164 pupils, a mere half of one  per cent of the total enrollment  in our school district...with  block funding, the school board  is going to be really pressed for  funds and certainly is not in a  position to provide special  classes to a small minority...It  was difficult for the board to  make the decision they did, but  there was no other option."  Ms Eudora Bramham of Madeira Park wrote, "I wish lo express to the board my admiration for their determination in  working to consensus. The past  months have underscored for all  of us the dedication to  children...that the board  espouses."  Roberts Creek parent Ruth  Emerson's letter expressed  "outrage" at reports appearing  in the Vancouver news media.  "I am appalled at the inaccuracy of some reports and their  selective choosing of material to  cause an uproar. These people  have not delved into the history  of this matter stretching back  for almost five years."  Emerson went on to say that  she believed that the board had  thoroughly researched all  aspects of the issue and "picked  the best approach for the  deliverance of this program...It  is my hope that the board stand  by their decision."  Additional support for- the  board came from Pender Harbour parents Marg Gooldrup  and Lynne Monroe. "We support this board and we think  they have made a good  decision," said Gooldrup.  "There are a lot of people out  there that do not want Fl."  "We did a phone survey,"  added Munroe, "and we found  that the silent majority is silent  because they are tired of talking  about it."  The regular board meeting of  April 12 will be devoted exclusively to the immersion issue.  63 cm (26") diagonal  ConMUTV ��799��  ��529  48 cm (20") diagonal  Colour Portable  $1099����  66 cm (28") diagonal  Monitor Receiver  Home Electronics  Sales & Service  SUNSHINE COAST TV LTD.  Alter the Stile, it's the Service that Counts"   5674 Cowrie St., Sechelt  885-9816  SS 200  640K XT  5'��" Floppy Drive  12" Amber Monitor  30 Meg. Hard Drive  9 Pin Printer  1799  FOR INFORMATION  AT PLUS  286 - 12 MHZ. 1 Meg. Ram  40 Meg. Hard Drive  12" Amber Monitor  Expanded Keyboard  1699  ���atlas-  OFFICE SOLUTIONS LTD.  5511 Wharf St. Sechelt  Phone 885-4489 Fax 885-4696  WEAR-DATHT CARPET WITH STAINBL0CKER  THE PROOF IS UNDER  THE PUDDING  A Wear-Dated�� Carpet resists stains better than any other carpet you can buy.  And our warranty is all the evidence you need.  It guarantees your carpet for a full five years against hundreds of stains, such  as herbal teas and mustard. Hair dyes, shoe polish and paint, as well as stains  caused by pet accidents.  Wear-Dated Carpet with StainBlocker, the proven leader in stain resistance.  See our new assortment of colours at  DeVRIES  and save during this limited time tiller.  SAVE ON THESE WEAR-DATED*  SPECIALS          Burlington BELLEVUE $269a 8q.yd.  J.P. Stevens LAURENT $2895 8q.yd.  COTERIE $369*sq. yd.  dtl��ra>ii����f^rwd>i-wAo<Monionto Compony   ���       8867112  709 Hwy. 101, Gibsons  -YlTinjitti-rr'"-^   ���-----I-.. ;*���- ------ '.:������-. - :*������ ���    '      -    -    ���     ���     ���  5ass,  ut.vtysci*.; - ii*it>.< ������  ������ .,  ��� ���  ��� .���..-. iS .  ���  - . v. >������    ,��   >j

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