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Sunshine Coast News Jan 22, 1980

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 legislative library  Parliaments buiW  victoria, b.c. ^ 80.1^  The Sunshine  Published at Gibsons, B.C.  15C per copy on news stands  Second Class Mail Registration No. 4702  Serving the Sunshine Coast since 1945  Delivered to every address on the Coast.  January 22, 1980  Volume 34, Number'3  Carl at council  Mayor suggests canal for Sechelt  by Carl Chrismas  The prawn boat Whispering Belle came to a sad end in Porpoise Bay last Tuesday. One partner Bill Mercer was In town  and the other Leonard Fritz had taken the deck hand to St. Mary's Hospital with a hook in his hand, when the accident  occurred. The owner of the Tillicum Bay Marina noticed that the boat had caught fire. He threw a line on it and hauled  it aground in the shallows. The boat was beyond saving and burned to the water line.  Regional Board resolution  Power line moratorium called for  Three members of Ihe Regional Board symbolically absented  themselves from the Board table at the Regional Board meeting held  on January 17 to signify their wish to be disassociated from the  leaked Hydro memorandum quoted fully in the Coast News last  week. The memorandum indicated for the first time that the  Cheekye-Dunsmuir line may cost as much as SI billion rather than  the $315 million that Hydro has released publicly.  Despite the actions of Gibsons and Sechelt representatives Larry  Trainor and Brian Stelck and Director Charles Lee in leaving the  table while the memorandum was tabled, Regional Director Joe  Harrison had no difficulty in having the Regional Board pass a  resolution calling for a moratorium on the construction of the  controversial line pending implementation of studies called for by  Dr. Marvin Shaffer in a report prepared last year on the power line,  as well as further governmental inquiries into all aspects of the costly  line. The complete text of Harrison's resolution, which passed by five  votes to two with only Sechelt's Stelck and David Fyles of Area F in  opposition, follows:  RE: CHEEKYE-DUNSMUIR 500 KV  TRANSMISSION LINE  Dear Mr. Premier:  WHEREAS the B.C. Hydro transmission project  known as the Cheekye-Dunsmuir twin-500-Kv.  transmission line would inflict inestimable environmental, social and economic costs on the Gulf Coast area,  and;  WHEREAS the Cabinet chose the Cheekye-Dunsmuir  line over alternative methods of providing new power  supply to Vancouver Island because it was the most  economical, and;  WHEREAS the cost of the line was represented to the  government and the B.C. public at the time of the Cabinet  decision as $3IS million but is now admitted to be more  than twice that figure, and;  WHEREAS major independent opinion in the  community is arrayed against installation of the line on  economic as well as other grounds, and;  WHEREAS it would be the height of economic  irresponsibility to proceed with such an enormous  expenditure in such economically uncertain times for any   ft  but the surest of reasons;  THEREFORE, be it resolved:  The Board of the Sunshine Coast Regional District in  regular sitting hereby demands:  1. A moratorium of six months on all line construction  and related activities;  2. Immediate implementation of studies listed by Dr.  Marvin Shaffer in his May, 1979 report to government  as being "required to justify from a governmental or  social point of view the construction of the Cheekye-  Dunsmuir line";  3. An immediate investigation of B.C. Hydro's handling  of the Cheekye-Dunsmuir powerline question by the  Crown Corporations Reporting Committee; and  4. A Royal Commission of Enquiry into all aspects of the  Cheekye-Dunsmuir powerline controversy by an  independent commissioner with expert status in the  > energy economics field (eg. Dr. Andrew Thompson)  and a mandate to pursue the investigation wherever it  leads.  Passed this 17th dav of January, 1980.  Environment Minister the Hon. Stephen Rogers will be in  Madeira Park Community Hall at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, January  22, to discuss routing of the Cheekye-Dunsmuir line.  Enumeration: Election'80 update  Before getting into Council business, 1 must explain something.  I'm beginning to find that reporting on meetings can be a  'stultifying experience' for a scribe born under the sign of Gemini!  Webster defines 'stultify' as; "to cause to appear foolish or  stupid".  Gemini as the third sign of the zodiac, the Twins; Castor as  being the Northernmost of the two bright stars in Gemini, and  Pollux as the other.  Being born under the sign of the Twins means a dual  personality. That person can see both sides of an argument and  can sympathize with both protagonists. In other words, he has  trouble making up his mind. They make good salesmen and pilots  but poor reporters.  It takes a lot to hold a Gemini's attention and interest, so to  follow the routine business of Council and report accurately on  the mechanics of running a Village, unless something arises that  titilates his imagination, his or her writing will become 'stultified'!  But wait, dear friends. Don't,go away yet. That titilating  something has just happened! Our good Mayor Boucher has had a  vision!  Is it to build a launch site for commuter trips to the moon? No!!!  Is it a refinery to extract silver from sea water? No!!!  In scope, it may compare, in cost, to the building of the Panama  Canal which was started by Teddy Roosevelt in 1904, completed  and opened on August 15,1914. Teddy was turned down on his  first bid to secure an agreement from Columbia, so he  immediately backed a revolution, secured his agreement from the  rebels and began construction of the Canal.  I am sure that Mayor Boucher has no intention of starting a  revolution, but he does intend to build a canal.  Discussion of the project began back in 1894 by the Sechelt  Indian Band. They were so determined to have a canal that they  actually began digging from Porpoise Bay to Trail Bay. However,  they were stopped in their efforts before water began to fill the  ditch. By whom we are not aware. It could have been by  government intervention or a rival tribe from the Skookumchuck,  protesting the syphoning off of the powers of their White Water  Gods.  A system of hauling boats across the isthmus was seriously  considered for a while but that also failed eventually.  The subject has come up many fifties over the years and some in-  depth studies have been done to determine the feasibility and  viability of such a scheme. This material may some day be  available to the committee which has been set up to study the  project and to add to the research already done by Mayor  Boucher.  He explained that approximately 2500 pleasure boats based in  the greater Vancouver area, and another 2500 in the American  Northwest come to visit our area or pass by each summer.  Between Gibsons and Secret Cove, a distance of approximately 30  miles, there is no safe anchorage or moorage for this fleet of  pleasure seekers and in many cases, some of these flat land  navigators get too far out or caught between safe harbours and  don't know how to handle a stormy sea. Sechelt is about the  middle of this exposed area and Mayor Boucher's plan could be  the answer to this situation.  Development of the Indian Band's Wilson Creek breakwater,  construction of breakwaters at Trail Bay or Sargents Bay, or some  such scheme could be the other. How far would money spent for  these projects go toward fulfilling a dream that has been around  for nigh onto a century? And what are the economics of building  locks and charging a fee to pass through? These are just a few of  the questions the Canal Committee must find answers to!  The Mayor has appointed, with the blessing of Council, a  committee of two. Alderman Henry Hall will chair the committee  and he will be ably assisted by Vic Walters to study the project. Vic  has much knowledge of the area and past history of the canal, and  Henry has been interested in the development of Porpoise Bay and  Sechelt Inlet for a considerable time.  The Mayor also pointed out that there are 150 miles of inland  . sea shoreline, several wilderness campsite areas already planned  for development by the provincial government, with hopefully, a  Salmonid Enhancement Program in the works for the future. All  of these amenities are only accessible to the boating public  through the portals of the much feared Skookumchuck rapids,  which can only be navigated on a slack tide. For the smaller craft  launched from trailers, there are ramps at Porpoise Bay but this  accounts for very few boats.  He also stressed that the co-operation of the Indian Band would  be imperative as the canal would extend along the east boundary  of the Village, adjacent to their lands.  Bridges and over passes would be required; locks or gates at  both ends; and some means of controlling them. Alderman Hall  said that three engineering firms had studied the project in the past  and some of that information may still be available.  Mayor Boucher feels that the canal could pay for itself in about  20 years if properly managed and Alderman Hall speculated that  the Economic Development Commission, who are now doing a  study on the Sunshine Coast, may be receptive to the idea as a  make-work program for the I980's.  Mayor Boucher wanted it emphasized that this project would  not be considered in conjunction with the Gibsons Marina nor  should it distract from that. Both Gibsons and Pender Harbour  are filled to capacity each summer and in the case of Pender, they  are booked up solidly each year. So there is a need for a large, new  boat harbour such as Porpoise Bay could provide with a canal to  serve it.  Now, what brought this vision to the Mayor? Well, 1981 will be  the 25th Anniversary of the incorporation of the Village of  Sechelt. What better way to celebrate the event than by  introducing a plan to build a dream that has been challenging and  exciting the residents of this isthmus-straddling community for  almost a century? Shades of Teddy Roosevelt? And this dream is  older than his!  Gentlemen, your work is cut out for you and I wish you luck���I  think!!!  And here is where my other Twin takes over? He thinks that  Sechelt Inlet should be closed at the Skookumchuck to  commercial enterprises of all kinds except removal of natural  resources such as timber and gravel that can be floated out of the  Inlet as has been done for a generation or more.  Commercial fishing of all kinds should be stopped in the Inlet,  including shell fish. Clam and oyster beds should be built up  again; prawn stocks should be allowed to regenerate; a fish ladder  should be built at Clowhom Falls to allow stocking of rivers and  streams that feed the Lake, (a not-insurmountabic task!); salmon  rearing pens such as the private enterprise at 'seven mile', should  be increased; and other lakes and streams stocked to build up a  generation of fish that would return each year and populate our  inland sea with enough fish to make this a sports fisherman's  paradise. Then our Indian neighbours could jump in their boats  and go out and catch a fish just as they did in the olden days.  The seal population should also be reduced so that the cod  fishery would rebuild itself to former levels. It is difficult to catch  even a rock cod, ling or red snapper anymore.  The wilderness camp sites should be developed now to attract  boating tourists into one of the most beautiful fjords on this  Pacific Coast. The so-called 'terrifying Skookumchuck' can b".  In Pender  Tyner resigns  from Clinic  In a surprise move, long time head of the Pender Harbour and  District Health Control Society Jim Tyner handed in his resignation  at a special meeting of the Control Board on Tuesday. In his letter of  resignation, Tyner referred specifically to criticism directed towards  him at a Board meeting January 8th by clinic staff physician Dr.  Ronald Estey. Tyner's letter stated many of the criticisms made by  Estey were "inaccurate" but that it would no longer be possible for  the two to work together productively.  Tyner said later that he was 'never as surprised by anything in his  life' as the criticism by Estey. In the recently approved budget, the  board had negotiated substantial raises and improvement of  conditions for the medical staff at the Clinic, and Tyner said that the  doctor had made a point of complimenting him on the way the  Society was being run. "I had absolutely no warning this was  coming," the former chairman said. He emphasized that his  resignation was "for the good of the Board only" and in no way  implied his acceptance of the charge.  Enumeration. From, but not  including the Girl Guide Camp,  Wilson Creek to and including  McNab Creek, Gambier and  Keats Islands. Ilk' process of  enumerating is taking place for  the oncoming Federal Election.  Cards stating poll number.  location of polling station, name  and phone number of the  enumerator responsible for the  poll, and the dates and location  of the advance poll have been  received by many electors. The  remainder are in the mail and  will  arrive  shortly.   It  is re  quested that everyone exercise  patience with this matter.  Receiving a card indicates  that the elector is on the voters'  list. The card is not valid for use  as identification at the polling  station if identification is  requested.  Three empty chairs at the Regional Board were emptied when three directors objected  to the presentation of the B.C. Hydro inter-office memorandum made public last week.  For those who do not receive a  card for this riding in the very  near future, maps showing the  poll boundaries and the names  and numbers of the enumerators  to contact, are on display in the  following Post Offices:  Roberts Creek  Gibsons (Lower Gibsons,  Winn and Gower Pt. Rd.)  Gibsons (Douglas Variety,  Sunnycrest Plaza)  Grantham's Landing  Hopkins Landing  Port Mellon  Eligible voters who are uncertain of the poll should consult  these maps and contact the  respective enumerator.  SOME QUESTIONS THAT  MAY ARISE:  1. I was "sworn in" at the last  Federal Election. Am 1 on the  Voters' List? ��� No, contact  your enumerator.  2. Your name is changed from  that on your election card. ���  Contact the enumerator so that  the correction can be made.  3. Your mailing address is  different to that on the card. ���  Contact the enumerator.  4. You have moved to another  poll area within the Comox-  Please rum to page eleven  Future of Harbour area discussed  The future of the Gibsons  Harbour area was discussed at  a meeting held in the Municipal  Hall on Thursday, January 17.  Under the chairmanship of  Alderman Larry Trainor the  meeting was attended by repre-  sentatives of the Gibsons  Landing Restoration Committee, representatives of the  Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation, and assorted business  people of the Harbour area.  Also in attendance were  Marcus Esmits, Small Business  Counsellor from the Ministry  of Industry and Small Business  Development of the Province  of B.C. and John Colville from  the Trade and Industry Divisions of the provincial Ministry  of Economic Development.  Esmits told the gathering  that the role of his department  has changed significantly in the  last four or five years. "Our role  now," said Esmits, "is to help  people do things they want to  do themselves as opposed to  doing things for them."  Esmits said that in beautifi-  cation   studies   such   as   the  Gibsons Landing Restoration  Committee were proposing the  provincial government would  contribute up to 50% of the  costs of feasibility studies to a  maximum of $5,000.  ~~7  The meeting was informed  that the Province of British  Columbia was engaged at the  present time in looking at the  Business Improvement Areas  legislation at present in place in  Ontario. Under such legislation  the municipality can collect  taxes from the merchants and  landowners in a Business  Improvement Area alter a two-  Plctsc U i-ii lo pn;c fifteen  Small Business Counsellor, Marcus Esmits makes a point at a recent meeting of the  Gibsons Landing Restoration Committee and the Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation.  For 35 years the most widely read Sunshine Coast  ���M  ���uflktSaaMkMa Coast News, January 22,1980  fillf  jar  A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER  Published at Gibsons, B.C. every Tuesday,  by Glassford Press Ltd. Phone 886-2622  Box 460, Gibsons, VON 1V0 or886-78l7  Reporter/Photographer���  Ian Corrance  Advertising���  Allan Crane  Editor���  John Burnside  Office Manager���  M.M.Joe  Production Manager-        Fran Seroer  Sharon L. Berg Copysetting-  Gerry Walker  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Distributed Free to all addresses on the Sunshine Coast  Canada $20 per year. $12 for six months.  United States and Foreign, $24 per year.  Oura not to reason why  (���gna  BLUE  RIBBON  AWARD  Sometimes the relationship between  Canada and the United States is enough to  make one squirm. Take for example what's  going on currently in the inter-relationships between the two countries, On the  one hand you've got our Joeand our Flora  dancing enthusiastically to whatever tune  the American President happens to play.  Ihe Soviet invasion of Afghanistan is a  most serious matter, says President Carter.  Yes, yes, squeaks Flora, the biggest threat  to world peace since the Second World  War. We must not go to the Olympics, says  Jimmy Carter. There's our Prime Minister  first in line to echo the sentiments of the  American President. It is sycophancy pure  and simple. Gone are the days when  Canada's was an independent voice in the  community of nations. Cynically the world  knows that we stand now in the same  relationship, or at least our leaders do, to  the United States as, say, Bulgaria does to  the U.S.S.R. An obedient lackey state,  that's us, folks.  You'd think that at least we'd be  rewarded for this unthinking subservience,  but no, the Americans obviously just take  it for granted. You'd think, would you not.  that Carter would endeavour to avoid  embarassing such ready and voluble  supporters but instead he chooses to  announce in the midst of the Canadian  election that he favours the Northern Tier  route for bringing Alaskan oil to the  continental states, a proposal which will, if  effected, see giant oil tankers negotiating  the treacherous waters of the British  Columbia Coast. He might have delayed a  month till the election was over before  embarassing our eager and obedient boy  scout of a Prime Minister but he didn't  have to concern himself about it. He  believes, quite properly, whatever Prime  Minister Canada is likely to have would be  j ust as subservient, just as ready to echo t he  American line.  In Europe, bloodied by two World Wars  and somewhat more sophisticated, some  doubt is being raised about the validity of  following the American lead into World  War 111 'just to guarantee Carter's reelection'. Cynical, perhaps, but a nagging  doubt in any case.  Nor should Trudeau take too much  delight in hammering Clark on the  question of tanker traffic. The potential  dangers of tanker traffic on the West Coast  were well chronicled years ago. In much of  the intervening time Trudeau was Prime  Minister and his Government could have  been pushing for an overland pipe line but  wasn't. No doubt if the Liberals had been  the present government Carter would have  embarassed them with as little compunction as he embarassed our Joe. After all it's  been a few years since American presidents  had to concern themselves with Canadian  feelings. To paraphrase Tennyson, "Ours  not to reason why/Ours just to echo and  supply."  A matter of perspective  i With all due respect to the three  members ofthe Regional Board who felt it  incumbent upon themselves to leave the  Board table rather than contemplate the  B.C. Hydro memorandum 'which had  been obtained by surreptitious means', we  must question their sense of perspective.  What exactly did Aldermen Trainor,  Stelck, and DirectorLeeimagine had taken  place in the procurement of the document.  Did they see Director Joe Harrison  masked with torch in hand skulking  stealthily into the B.C. Hydro building in  the middle ofthe night? Or was it Sakinaw  Rex that made the heist?  We don't know how the memorandum  came to be released but suspect it was  released by an employee of the Power  Corporation who still harbingers some  vestiges of social conscience.  Is it not more important that the  memorandum however 'surreptitiously  obtained' contained information that B.C.  Hydro has been lying about the cost of  their pet power line to the cost of several  hundreds of millions of dollars? Yes,  Martha, that's several hundreds of millions:  of dollars. Anywhere between $315  millions, if we can finally believe Charles  Nash, and $700 millions of dollars if the  Burton memorandum is correct.  This riveting fact should have kept our  elected representatives at the table,  particularly, perhaps, Director Lee who  has made considerable mileage out of  being a self-appointed guardian of the  public purse during his time on the  Regional Board.  May we point out, incidentally, that the  first information leaks from Hydro came  last summer when we learned there was a  body of opinion that felt a gas line was  vastly preferable ard may we commend,  finally, both Capt. Trainor and Director  Lee for overcoming their repugnance  sufficiently to see the merit in calling for  further studies of the Cheekye-Dunsmuir  project.  H��J  t  .from the files of the COAST NEWS  <e^m��mber\^  e>  FIVE YEARS AGO  Gibsons Council expresses itself as  being most unhappy with Liberal MP  Jack Pearsall. "Since Mr. Pearsall was  elected he has not been here once,"  said Mayor Larry Labonte.  Residents of Langdale, Hopkins,  Soames and Granthams are most  unhappy about not being consulted  before Gibsons announced its recent  plans lor expansion.  Wilson Creek Community Association is sending a formal petition to MP  Jack Pearsall protesting the proposed  dismantling of Davis Bay Wharf.  TEN YEARS AGO  The price reported set on the  purchase of Sechelt's Water System by  the Regional Board is $119,000.  Gibsons Chamber of Commerce  stresses the need for a credit bureau  for the area.  FIFTEEN YEARS AGO  The 1965 school budget looks as  though it will hit the $1 million mark for  the first time.  Donna Marlene, daughter of Mr. and  Mrs. Steven Holland, was the first 1965  baby born in the area.  New homes built on the Sunshine  Coast last year numbered 131 costing  $1,088,450.  TWENTY YEARS AGO  Robert Burns, Gibsons Municipal  Clerk, dies in hospital on the day he  was named Gibsons Good Citizen.  Richard McKibbin resigns as Chairman of Gibsons Library Board. He is  succeeded by Reg Adams.  The School Board discussed the  proposal for a Grade 13 class at  Elphinstone School.  TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO  Gibsons Board of Trade opposes the  proposed sale of Salmon Rock, asking  that it be retained as a fisherman's  landmark.  The B.C. Power Commission's  survey of power needs from Sechelt to  Oyster Bay is reported to be nearing  completion.  Gibsons Gun Club which started in  1952 has changed its name to Gibsons  Rod and Gun Club.  THIRTY YEARS AGO  A $1,000,000 Clowholm Falls hydro  project has been ordered with a 24-  mile transmission line to Sechelt.  Fire destroys Aldersprings Laundry  in the Headlands area of Gibsons. Loss  is estimated at $5,000.  Canadian Forest Products purchases the Port Mellon pulp mill and  announces that it will spend  $10,000,000 in improvements.  Gibson's Landing, early 1930's. From the time of its foundation,  members of the Howe Sound Women's Institute had worked to raise  funds for a community hall. They had presented dramatic skits, and  raffled quilts, had held bake sales, and had thrown afternoon teas. As  they neared their goal, the Great Depression struck. Local carpenters  and helpers rallied to the cause. They volunteered their skill and labour,  and Institute members carried hot meals from their kitchens to the site.  The hall was built, complete with kitchen, change rooms and stage. Ed  Kullander and Ted Winegarden wired the building and installed a Delco  power plant, also without pay. Ten years later, after having replaced the  drum heater with a furnace, the Women's Institute turned their hall over  to Howe Sound School District. Until the construction of Elphinstone  Secondary in 1952, the "W.I."Hall continued to servethe community for  drama performances, sports, dances, concerts, and public meetings. It  now houses Sunshine Coast School District Maintenance Centre.  Helen McCall photo, from the album of Gladys McNutt who, as Gladys  Disney, taught at Wilson Creek and at Gibsons. L.R. Peterson  '���*���**  Perhaps it would be timely in  view of recent developments to  attempt an overview of the  Cheekye-Dunsmuir controversy that has been a part of the  Sunshine Coast experience for  the last couple of years.  Without too much tedious  reference to the past it wouldibe  fair to say that the proposal for  a giant power line crossing the  Sechelt Peninsula in the vicinity  of Sakinaw Lake burst on the  local scene late in 1977. At the  time B.C. Hydro announced  that public meetings would be  held and the construction ofthe  line would begin within the  year. Already, right at the start,  it seemed that the Power  Corporation had its mind made  up and the public meetings  were just so much cosmetics.  At first the primary local  concern was with the massive  use of herbicides by the Power  Corporation and the undoubted eyesore that the line would  represent. No one who was at  the first meeting held in  Madeira Park in March of 1978  will readily forget it. Speaker  after speaker rose to address  the question of a giant power  line with eloquence and researched argument. It is fair to  say that the obvious reaction to  reasoned argument on the part  of the Hydro representatives  was one of arrogant condescension. Let these poor fools  prattle on, they seemed to say.  They're going to get a power  line across the Peninsula  whether they like it or not.  But the people of the Sunshine Coast continued, in the  best tradition of democracy, to  investigate and discuss the  matter of the power line and the  more they investigated the  more of a white elephant it  began to appear. If memory  serves me well, Hydro told us  the line was needed because of a  projected increase in residential  use. When the size of the line  made it unlikely that no  residential growth likely on  Vancouver Island would ever  need it, we began to hear that it  was needed for industrial use.  At a meeting in Madeira  Park in 1979 we learned from  Hydro's gas division for the  first time that more power  could be made available to the  Island by using natural gas at a  fraction of the cost and at no  environmental impact whatsoever.  At this point the issue of  herbicide use. though not  forgotten, and environmental  impact were beginning to take  second place to a wholesome  concern on the part of Sunshine  Coast residents about the  economic justification of the  line. Repeatedly we were told  that economic justification was  Musings  John Burnside  Slings & Arrows  >  George Matthews  ^  no part of our concern and that  only B.C. Hydro could determine this. This from a corporation which has seen its portion  of the public debt under Bob  Bonner skyrocket in just a few  years until it represented 60%  ofthe provincial debt of British  Columbia.  Eventually Jhe Environmental Land Use Commission was  persuaded to have an economic  study of the power line undertaken by economist Marvin  Shaffer. At first the Shaffer  report was kept under wraps,  the provincial government  refusing repeated requests by  MLA Don Lockstead that it be  made public. They kept it  under wraps until the Legislature was finished sitting and  then released a document  whose very existence they had  denied for weeks.  The report concluded the  line could not be justified. That  power needs on Vancouver  Island could best be served by  natural gas and wood wastes,  just as had been expected by  those on the Sunshine Coast  who had been investigating the  matter.  The Shaffer Report was no  sooner released for public  consumption when Hydro  announced a modernization of  a pulp mill belonging to Crown  Zellerbach which would justify '  the line after all. The new  process was highly energy  intensive abd relatively low  labour intensive, a strange step  if job creation was the primary  concern.  The first direct falsehood  from B.C. Hydro had in the  meantime be spotted. Hydro  officer Billy Ellis was overheard saying that local men had  agreed that any line norht of  the Sunshine Coast was not  feasible. He was overheard by  respected, retired geologist-  engineer Bruce Woodsworth  who had been one of the men  that had undertaken helicopter  surveillance of the more northerly routes and concluded that  such routes were in fact entirely  feasible.  The recent revelation that  the power line would cost  possibly three times as much as  B.C. Hydro had given the  public and the government to  understand is proof positive  that Hydro, for whatever  reasons, has no intention of  letting facts get in the way of  the building of this line.  The   present   call   by  the  Sunshine Coast Regional  Board, supported by MLA  Lockstead for a moratorium on  the construction of the line is  entirely justifiable. All over this  province from the Peace River  to the Kootenays to the coast  this crown corporation is  obviously running out of  control. While professing that  it is not a policy-making body it  is, by circumventing the process of policy-making, in effect  making policy. It seeks to turn  itself into a major energy  exporter at the expense of the  invaluable land soon to be  Hooded in the Peace River for  reasons which, to say the least,  have not been adequately  studied by the elected representatives of the people of this  province.  Compare, if you will, the  federal government's reluctance to spend $4 million to  guarantee 107 jobs on Vancouver Island with Hydro's  projected expense of $1,000  million to guarantee 125 jobs at  the Crown Zellerbach plant. If  this were not enough, Vancouver Island is said to be running  out of wood chips and to serve  the Crown Zellerbach import  of wood chips as well as power  will be necessary for the Crown  Zellerbach operation. High  level Hydro management is  beginning to question this  absurdity and, it would seem,  not without cause.  1 ran into a lady I know the  other day. I hadn't seen her for  a few months and 1 was ama/cd  at how she had changed. She-  had changed in a way that I've  seen happen a lot these last two  months. The phenomenon is  becoming all too familiar; a  quiet, gentle and religious  university instructor I know  succumbed in a similar way.  Another scholarly and decent  professor similarly fell from  grace, much to the dismay of  many of his most ardent  admirers.  Allow mc to outline the  symptons of this epidemic just  to see if you too have stumbled  upon this distressing affliction. As a case in point, a case  study so to speak, 1 will  describe the behaviour of the  aforementioned lady before  she was stricken and afterwards. When 1 first met the  dear woman I refer to she was  working part-time at the university, taking on secretarial  chores, for which she was well  qualified, while at the same  time studying at the university  in the social sciences.  At 42 or so, she was apparently making an attempt to  re-enter the "real" world having  raised her family. She seemed  reasonably happy, confident  and was clearly enjoying her  new found freedom.  When 1 saw her last week, all  that had changed. She looked  frenzied, slightly hysterical and  definitely hyper-tense. Her  The Wounds Of Their Going  The decade was his life-span  he came to me at its opening  and was taken from me at its end.  Simba had a torn ear  a stubby tail  and a small insistent voice.  he was a timid curious cat  happy with his world of house and garden  not a wanderer.  He had a justifiable fear of most dogs  having nearly been bitten in half by one  as a careless kitten.  He used to sit with cocked head  and pigeontoed paws  watching my mother cook or sew.  Simba looks just like Eeyore  or Charlie Chaplin  she used to say.  Perhaps he will watch her again  his small serious face eternally quizzical  in some celestial kitchen.  I only know they are gone from me forever  my dear gentle mother  my faithful orange cat.  Time may soften the sorrow  but the wounds of their going  will never heal.  Peter Trower  normal, jovial, oveiwveighl  smiling cheeks were no longer;  pink with good-natured lurr;  The only noticeable feature in'  that once friend lyface were two!  gleaming eyes filled with what,  could be described as nothing!  else but pure, naked, urw  abashed greed. The poor dear,  soul who once would not havei  allowed the subject of money to.'  pass her lips was caught up in,  the grips of the silver market;:  Old quarters, fifty cent pieces',,  silver dollars; she was even,  eyeing the old silver tea service!  with a covetous gaze.  1 frankly found the'whole*  display disgusting and riien1-'.  tioned the incident to two or!  three of my acquaintances only.  to discover that everybody is,  doing it. That is either buying,  or selling silver or gold. I mearfj  not'just a few hundred dollars')  in silver or gold certificates, but!  thousands, in some cases tens.,  of thousands of dollars worth i  of silver; real silver���silver!  coins. I was at a house the other/  night where my host signalled!  mc into a back room where he;  opened a closet, raised the lidi  on a cedar chest, removed a-  false top and showed me ten.!  large gallon jars filled with,  silver coins. He said hchadjust-,  bought them that morning. I.  asked him how much theycoslr.  he said, his "entire savings  account plus a substantial loaf  from the bank".  "What are you going to do  with them?" I asked.  "Save them of course." he-  replied. >'  "Where?" I queried.  "Right here! Where else?"  ������'  The very thought of being in-'  someone's  house which con- "  tained   thousands   of  dollars  worth of silver coins scared the  hell out of me. The whole  prospect is ludicrous, hundreds"  of thousands on honest, hard-:  working citizens hoarding  silver like so many citizens of  France with mattresses stuffed  with gold bullion.  As I was leaving my friend's  place I asked why he thought.,  this  was  happening find'he  replied, "Oh! Didn't you know? .  There's  going  to  be a war '  between Russia and the United  States this year and this is the-,'  only safe way to protect your  savings." -,'.  I can't tell you how good that  made me feel. But there is one-  last thing I would like to pass.  on to any potential burglars '  out   there���there   must'be  hundreds waiting in the wings. ''  I have never been so happy iii  my life now that I am as poor as ���.  a church mouse. If I had money  these days, I'd really be very  worried   about   it.   So  when.-,,  looking for jars full of silver,,  don't  bother  coming to  my  house,   the  cupboard  is  definitely bare. Letters to the Editor  Can/or unfortunately singled out  Editor:  It is unfortunate that Elphinstone Secondary School, a  ' fragment of the local public  ���sector, should single out Canadian Forest Products of the  ; private sector as the only uncooperative organization regarding involvement in a job exper-  ;lence program.  ;; A perusal of pages 30 and 31  ;of the current Sunshine Coast  ; Telephone Directory will give  ;4ny reader some indication of  ;the extent to which this area is  ���Jerved by federal, provincial,  ���regional, and municipal ministries and agencies. British  j Columbia Ferry Corporation  ���and B.C. Hydro and Power  -Authority, not listed directly  under  governments,  can  be  added to this rather impressive  list.  If these elements of the  public sector are cooperating in  this program, then it must be a  manifest success, and an announcement of this fact should  be the news item.  If, on the other hand, regulatory and practical consideration prohibit the functions of a  job experience program with 15  and 16 year old students within  these elements of the public  service, then surely these  considerations apply with  equal force at Port Mellon or  McNab Creek. Canfor supci-  visors have no moic spare time  than officers and staffs of  Canada Post, Forest Service,  Highways, Paiks or regional  and municipal personnel enjoy.  For safely reasons, regular job  training at the pulp mill is  carried out on a one-to-one  basis.  The particularly unfortunate  aspect of the Elphinstone-  Canfor incident is that this  industrial complex does, here  Coast News, January 22, 1980  DOING OUR BEST TO BE RIGHT FOR YOU  Editor:  My trips to Gibsons grow  fewer and fewer with the  passing years. Yet my deep  interest  lies  in  the growing  and elsewhere, provide summer  community.  employment to many students      My recent visit was a plea-  who need to eain money to pay   sant   one,   certainly   full   of  for their academic and technical learning. Throughout the  past 30 ycais, a very substantial  number of Elphinstone graduates have owed their post-  scondary education to their  having "been through the mill"  al Port Mellon.  Sincerely,  Lcslei R, Pcleison  A misconception  Editor:  !; There is obviously a widespread misconception that the  property at the end of Shoal  Lookout in Gibsons is public  property or owned by the  Village. This misconception  has been further aggravated by  reports of a presentation to  Council by Benny LePage on  January g during which he  demanded to know "why Shoal  Lookout has been closed off'.  The property abutting the  paved road on Shoal Lookout  is, and always has been, private  property. The area is comprised of Lots 49, 50 and 51,  District Block F, Plan 10362  and extends from the paved  road to the beach. In fact in one  area the paving actually encroaches onto private property.  1 There has been no closure of  public or Village land on Shoal  Lookout and Mr. LePage was  made fully aware of this fact  when he was campaigning for  Council and collecting signatures for a Teen Centre. The  only action that has been taken  by Council on Shoal Lookout  is to place stones to prevent  people from driving onto  private property and to protect  the privacy of residents in the  area. Additionally, it was  intended as a deterrent from  dumping garbage over the edge  of the bluff and despoiling a  beauty spot.  As residents of Shoal Lookout, we feel that we are just as  entitled to our privacy as those  living on any other residential  street in the Village. We should  not have to endure a nightly  ritual of noisy parties and a  daily chore of cleaning up a  disgusting array of garbage and  broken bottles. We therefore  ask that our property be  respected for what it is���our  homes for which we have  worked and saved a lifetime.  Having experienced life in  Communist countries with  their myth of "public ownership of all property", we  jealously preserve the right to  enjoy our property in peace in  this great country. Needless to  say, we deeply resent being  threatened   or  abused  by  a  Heart fund  Editor:  The month of February is the  official appeal month for the  B.C. Heart Foundation.  It is my pleasant responsibility to publicize this appeal. I  look to you for co-operation  now, even as you have given it  in the past.  I hope to send you some  information regarding the  work of the Heart Foundation  at intervals between now and  the end of February, and hope  you will have interest, concern  and room for it.  Thank you - in advance.  A Family Affair ofthe Heart  To keep a family in good health  Is something we must learn  Especially when each one's heart  Is everyone's concern.  So we must watch our diets,  It's not so hard-you'llfind,  If everyone plans their cooking  With 'heart health' meals  in mind.  Together with your family  Enjoy more exercise -  And plan to give up smoking,  Because it's really wise!  A doctor's check-up  now and then  Will also do its share  lit giving each a healthy heart  And that's a Family Affair!  Yours truly,  Joan B. Rigby  string of four-letter words from  trespassers on our property.  There are still those of us  around who prefer the beauty  of the English language unadorned by such disgusting  profanity. Take note drivers of  DED 607 and DAT 183 that to  date you still hold the dubious  record for hitting the bottom  line with foul language in the  presence of ladies.  E. Somogyi        J.I). Dickson  Unfair  Editor:  Re the letter in the January 8  paper by M. Waldrom'We too  have had the same experience  as a customer in You Del's at  the shopping centre in Gibsons.  There are two of us and they  wouldn't sell me three slices of  ham. I have worked with the  public all my life and would  never refuse a customer any  amount of anything, needless  to say our businesses were all  successful.  Since this happened there  has been none of our money  spent there. I have been in a  couple of times when friends  have invited me in for coffee  etc., but if I want to treat  anyone to coffee etc., I take  them through to Henry's  Bakery where they seem  pleased, or at least treat their  customers well all the time.  I do not want to ruin any-  business for how well we know  the struggle it is at times but  this is very unfair practice in my  opinion.  Thank you for your time.  Sincerely,  Mrs. Alice E. Smith  History  Lditor:  Northern Vancouver Island  has played a fascinating role in  the development of B.C. In an  effort to record some of its  unique history, I am actively  gathering information for a  book, based on the recollections of living residents.  I ask that past residents of  Northern Vancouver Island  (from Zeballos to Cape Scott)  contact me with any information, stories, recollections or  photos they may have, from  any period, which may help  complete the historical picture.  In doing so, they would be  providing worthwhile and  much-appreciated information.  Judy A. MacCallum  P.O. Box 1653,  Port Hardy, B.C.  V0N2P0  surprises, expansions, new  buildings, new faces and improvements at every turn. It did  my heart good to see at last  such progress in Gibsons.  However, I was deeply  saddened and somewhat disturbed and annoyed at seeing  the tomb stone marker of the  founding father, George Gibson, toppled from its base.  Truly this must be the work of a  nut who has no civic pride. This  corner has been a bone of  contention for a number or  years and much time and  money has been spent to make  it a place of beauty and a  resting spot for a weary  traveller.  I cannot understand why  anyone would want to disturb  the marker on Mr. Gibsons'  grave. The stone not only  marks the resting place of Mr.  Gibson, but is a symbol of the  early, hard-working settlers  who carved the community of  Gibsons Landing from the  virgin forest. Please think twice  before it is toppled again.  F.Ross Gibson  ZXPR���S$  ltm  Super Loto  YOUR CHANCES AT GOOD FORTUNE  For winning numbers ask your lottery retailer, your  nearest branch of Canadian Imperial Bank of  Commerce or write to:  WESTERN CANADA LOTTERY FOUNDATION  1 Lakeview Square, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C3H8  The Fisher woodstove:  Canada's number one cold remedy.  No, not the "sniffles" kind of cold.  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TIIEOHICIALWOODSTOVEOF  S THE I960 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES  ��JJ m&\  Gibsons SS"S  100% Locally Owned & Operated  GOV T INSPECTED SMOKED  pork picnic  CANADA GR  A   CHUCK  cross rib roast  WILTSHIRE FROZEN  dinner sausage  NEW ZEALAND FROZEN  lamD    leCJS   Whole or Butt Portion  OLYMPIC BRAND  COltaC|e    rOIIS   Ready To Serve  GOVT INSPECTED SLICED  beef liver  Aylmer  vegetable  SOUP 10 oz  tins  Nabob  strawberry  jam  682 mil tins  Kleenex  facial tissue  Super-Valu  long grain  rice  5 lb. bag  Sunspan  orange  juice  1.36 litre tin  Oven-Fresh  trench bread  397 gm loat  Oven-Fresh  spice buns  MEXICAN GROWN  4/$1.00  $1.99  Monarch Mom's  margarine  1.36 km pkg.  Super-Valu Medium  Cheddar  cheese  Thorofed  $1.69  $1.39  $1.89  $1.79  $1.49  $1.88  77'    dog food  723 gm tin  10% off  /Reg. Price  2/89  $2.19  quaker  oats  5 lb. bag  Capri  tomato  $1.39   paste  $1.88  3/99  5Vs oz. tins  Oven-Fresh  cinnamon  buns  Oven-Fresh  6/89  j    bran  muffins  6/99  6/99'  green peppers  CALIFORNIA GROWN  swiss chard or bok choy     b 2/49  B.C. GROWN  mushrooms  $1.19  Prices effective:       Jan. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26  Tues.,Wed.,Thurs.,Fri.,Sat. Coast News, January 22, 1980  iilff ffIf-  A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER  Published at Gibsons, B.C. every Tuesday,  by Glassford Press Ltd. Phone 886-2622  Box 460, Gibsons, VON 1V0 or 886-7817  Editor���  John Burnside  Office Manager���  M.M. Joe  Production Manager���  Sharon L. Berg  Reporter/Photographer  Ian Corrance  Advertising���  Allan Crane  Fran Berger  Copysetting���  Gerry Walker  (tCNA  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Distributed Free to all addresses on the Sunshine Coast  Canada $20 per year, $12 for six months.  United States and Foreign, $24 per year.  Ours not to reason why  Sometimes the relationship between  Canada and Ihe United States is enough to  make one squirm. Take for example what's  going on currently in the inter-relationships between the two countries. On the  one hand you've got our Joe and our Flora  dancing enthusiastically to whatever tune  the American President happens to play.  The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan is a  most serious matter, says President Carter.  Yes, yes. squeaks Flora, the biggest threat  to world peace since the Second World  War. Wc must not go to the Olympics, says  Jimmy Carter. There's our Prime Minister  first in line to echo the sentiments of the  American President. It is sycophancy pure  and simple. Gone are the days when  Canada's was an independent voice in the  community of nations. Cynically the world  knows thai we stand now in the same  relationship, or at least our leaders do, to  the United States as, say, Bulgaria does to  the U.S.S.R. An obedient lackey state,  that's us, folks.  You'd think that at least we'd be  rewarded for this unthinking subservience,  but no, the Americans obviously just take  it for granted. You'd think, would you not,  that Carter would endeavour to avoid  embarassing such ready and voluble  supporters but instead he chooses to  announce in the midst of the Canadian  election that he favours the Northern Tier  route for bringing Alaskan oil to the  continental states, a proposal which will, if  effected, see giant oil tankers negotiating  the treacherous waters of the British  Columbia Coast. He might have delayed a  month till the election was over before  embarassing our eager and obedient boy-  scout of a Prime Minister but he didn't  have to concern himself about it. He  believes, quite properly, whatever Prime  Minister Canada is likely to have would be  just as subservient, just as ready to echo the  American line.  In Europe, bloodied by two World Wars  and somewhat more sophisticated, some  doubt is being raised about the validity of  following the American lead into World  War 111 just to guarantee Carter's reelection'. Cynical, perhaps, but a nagging  doubt in any case.  Nor should Trudeau take too much  delight in hammering Clark on the  question of tanker traffic. The potential  dangers of tanker traffic on the West Coast  were well chronicled years ago. In much of  the intervening time Trudeau was Prime  Minister and his Government could have  been pushing for an overland pipe line but  wasn't. No doubt if the Liberals had been  the present government Carter would have  embarassed them with as little compunction as he embarassed our Joe. After all it's  been a few years since American presidents  had to concern themselves with Canadian  feelings. To paraphrase Tennyson, "Ours  not to reason why/Ours just to echo and  supply."  A matter of perspective  , With all due respect to the three  members ofthe Regional Board who felt it  incumbent upon themselves to leave the  Board table rather than contemplate the  B.C. Hydro memorandum 'which had  been obtained by surreptitious means', we  must question their sense of perspective.  What exactly did Aldermen Trainor,  Stelck, and DirectorLecimagine had taken  place in the procurement of the document.  Did they see Director Joe Harrison  masked with torch in hand skulking  stealthily into the B.C. Hydro building in  the middle ofthe night? Or was it Sakinaw  Rex that made the heist?  We don't know how the memorandum  came lo be released but suspect it was  released by an employee of the Power  Corporation who still harbingers some  vestiges of social conscience.  Is it not more important that the  memorandum however 'surreptitiously  obtained' contained information that B.C.  Hydro has been lying about the cost of  their pet power line to the cost of several  hundreds of millions of dollars? Yes,  Martha, that's several hundreds of millions  of dollars. Anywhere between $315  millions, if we can finally believe Charles  Nash, and $700 millions of dollars if the  Burton memorandum is correct.  This riveting fact should have kept our  elected representatives at the table,  particularly, perhaps, Director Lee who  has made considerable mileage out of  being a self-appointed guardian of the  public purse during his time on the  Regional Board.  May we point out, incidentally, that the  first information leaks from Hydro came  last summer when we learned there was a  body of opinion that felt a gas line was  vastly preferable ard may we commend,  finally, both Capt. Trainor and Director  Lee for overcoming their repugnance  sufficiently to see the merit in calling for  further studies of the Cheekye-Dunsmuir  project.  i  rl  .from the files of the COAST NEWS  emenibei  I  igjfc  &  a  FIVE YEARS AGO  Gibsons Council expresses itself as  being most unhappy with Liberal MP  Jack Pearsall. "Since Mr. Pearsall was  elected he has not been here once,"  said Mayor Larry Labonte.  Residents of Langdale, Hopkins,  Soames and Granthams are most  unhappy about not being consulted  before Gibsons announced its recent  plans for expansion.  Wilson Creek Community Association is sending a formal petition toMP  Jack Pearsall protesting the proposed  dismantling of Davis Bay Wharf.  TEN YEARS AGO  The price reported set on the  purchase of Sechelt's Water System by  the Regional Board is $119,000.  Gibsons Chamber of Commerce  stresses the need for a credit bureau  for the area.  FIFTEEN YEARS AGO  The 1965 school budget looks as  though it will hit the $1 million mark for  the first time.  Donna Marlene, daughter of Mr. and  Mrs. Steven Holland, was the first 1965  baby born in the area.  New homes built on the Sunshine  Coast last year numbered 131 costing  $1,088,450.  ���mm���wpn���h>MBaBaaBHBHHM  TWENTY YEARS AGO  Robert Burns, Gibsons Municipal  Clerk, dies in hospital on the day he  was named Gibsons Good Citizen.  Richard McKibbin resigns as Chairman of Gibsons Library Board. He is  succeeded by Reg Adams.  The School Board discussed the  proposal for a Grade 13 class at  Elphinstone School.  TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO  Gibsons Board of Trade opposes the  proposed sale of Salmon Rock, asking  that it be retained as a fisherman's  landmark.  The B.C. Power Commission's  survey of power needs from Sechelt to  Oyster Bay is reported to be nearing  completion.  Gibsons Gun Club which started in  1952 has changed its name to Gibsons  Rod and Gun Club.  THIRTY YEARS AGO  A $1,000,000 Clowholm Falls hydro  project has been ordered with a 24-  mile transmission line to Sechelt.  Fire destroys Aldersprings Laundry  in the Headlands area of Gibsons. Loss  is estimated at $5,000.  Canadian Forest Products purchases the Port Mellon pulp mill and  announces that it will spend  $10,000,000 in improvements.  Gibson's Landing, early 1930's. From the time of its foundation,  members of the Howe Sound Women's Institute had worked to raise  funds for a community hall. They had presented dramatic skits, and  raffled quilts, had held bake sales, and had thrown afternoon teas. As  they neared their goal, the Great Depression struck. Local carpenters  and helpers rallied to the cause. They volunteered their skill and labour,  and Institute members carried hot meals from their kitchens to the site.  The hall was built, complete with kitchen, change rooms and stage. Ed  Kullander and Ted Winegarden wired the building and installed a Delco  power plant, also without pay. Ten years later, after having replaced the  drum heater with a furnace, the Women's Institute turned their hall over  to Howe Sound School District. Until the construction of Elphinstone  Secondary in 1952, the "W.I." Hall continued to serve the community for  drama performances, sports, dances, concerts, and public meetings. It  now houses Sunshine Coast School District Maintenance Centre.  Helen McCall photo, from the album of Gladys McNutt who, as Gladys  Disney, taught at Wilson Creek and at Gibsons. L.R. Peterson  l%*9MMt��m*  Musings  John Burnside  Slings & Arrows  ��  George Matthews  Perhaps it would be timely in  view of recent developments to  attempt an overview of the  Cheekye-Dunsmuir controversy that has been a part of the  Sunshine Coast experience for  the last couple of years.  Without too much tedious  reference to the past it wouldibe  fair to say that the proposal for  a giant power line crossing the  Sechelt Peninsula in the vicinity  of Sakinaw Lake burst on the  local scene late in 1977. At the  time B.C. Hydro announced  that public meetings would be  held and the construction ofthe  line would begin within the  year. Already, right at the start,  it seemed that the Power  Corporation had its mind made  up and the public meetings  were just so much cosmetics.  At first the primary local  concern was with the massive  use of herbicides by the Power  Corporation and the undoubted eyesore that the line would  represent. No one who was at  the first meeting held in  Madeira Park in March of 1978  will readily forget it. Speaker  after speaker rose to address  the question of a giant power  line with eloquence and researched argument. It is fair to  say that the obvious reaction to  reasoned argument on the part  of the Hydro representatives  was one of arrogant condescension. Let these poor fools  prattle on, they seemed to say.  They're going to get a power  line across the Peninsula  whether they like it or not.  But the people of the Sunshine Coast continued, in the  best tradition of democracy, to  investigate and discuss the  matter of the power line and the  more they investigated the  more of a white elephant it  began to appear. If memory  serves me well, Hydro told us  the line was needed because of a  projected increase in residential  use. When the size of the line  made it unlikely that no  residential growth likely on  Vancouver Island would ever  need it, we began to hear that it  was needed for industrial use.  At a meeting in Madeira  Park in 1979 we learned from  Hydro's gas division for the  first time that more power  could be made available to the  Island by using natural gas at a  fraction of the cost and at no  environmental impact whatsoever.  At this point the issue of  herbicide use. though not  forgotten, and environmental  impact were beginning to take  second place to a wholesome  concern on the part of Sunshine  Coast residents about the  economic justification of the  line. Repeatedly we were told  that economic justification was  no part of our concern and that  only B.C. Hydro could determine this. This from a corporation which has seen its portion  of the public debt under Bob  Bonner skyrocket in just a few  years until it represented 60%  ofthe provincial debt of British  Columbia,  Eventually Jhe Environmental Land Use Commission was  persuaded to have an economic  study of the power line undertaken by economist Marvin  Shaffer. At first the Shaffer  report was kept under wraps,  the provincial government  refusing repeated requests by  MLA Don Lockstead that it be  made public. They kept it  under wraps until the Legislature was finished sitting and  then released a document  whose very existence they had  denied for weeks.  The report concluded the  line could not be justified. That  power needs on Vancouver  Island could best be served by  natural gas and wood wastes,  just as had been expected by  those on the Sunshine Coast  who had been investigating the  matter.  The Shaffer Report was no  sooner released for public  consumption when Hydro  announced a modernization of  a pulp mill belonging to Crown  Zellerbach which would justify '  the line after all. The new  process was highly energy  intensive abd relatively low  labour intensive, a strange step  if job creation was the primary  concern.  The first direct falsehood  from B.C. Hydro had in the  meantime be spotted. Hydro  officer Billy Ellis was overheard saying that local men had  agreed that any line norht of  the Sunshine Coast was not  feasible. He was overheard by  respected, retired geologist-  engineer Bruce Woodsworth  who had been one of the men  that had undertaken helicopter  surveillance of the more northerly routes and concluded that  such routes were in fact entirely  feasible.  The recent revelation that  the power line would cost  possibly three times as much as  B.C. Hydro had given the  public and the government to  understand is proof positive  that Hydro, for whatever  reasons, has no intention of  letting facts get in the way of  the building of this line.  The   present   call   by   the  Sunshine Coast Regional  Board, supported by MLA  Lockstead for a moratorium on  the construction of the line is  entirely justifiable. All over this  province from the Peace River  to the Kootenays to the coast  this crown corporation is  obviously running out of  coritrol. While professing that  it is not a policy-making body it  is, by circumventing the process of policy-making, in effect  making policy. It seeks to turn  itself into a major energy  exporter at the expense of the  invaluable land soon to be  Hooded in the Peace River for  reasons which, to say the least,  have not been adequately  studied by the elected representatives of the people of this  province.  Compare, if you will, the  federal government's reluctance to spend $4 million to  guarantee 107 jobs on Vancouver Island with Hydro's  projected expense of $1,000  million to guarantee 125jobsat  the Crown Zellerbach plant. If  this were not enough, Vancouver Island is said to be running  out of wood chips and to serve  the Crown Zellerbach import  of wood chips as well as power  will be necessary for the Crown  Zellerbach operation. High  level Hydro management is  beginning to question this  absurdity and, it would seem,  not without cause.  1 ran into a lady I know the  other day. I hadn't seen her for  a few monthsand I was amazed  at how she had changed. She  had changed in a way that I've  seen happen a lot these last two  months. The phenomenon is  becoming all too familiar; a  quiet, gentle and religious  university instructor 1 know  succumbed in a similar way.  Another scholarly and decent  professor similarly fell from  grace, much to the dismay of  many of his most ardent  admirers.  Allow me to outline the  symptons of this epidemic just  lo see if you too have stumbled  upon this distressing affliction. As a case in point, a case  study so to speak, 1 will  describe the behaviour of the  aforementioned lady before  she was stricken and afterwards. When 1 first met the  dear woman 1 refer to she was  working part-time at the university, taking on secretarial  chores, for which she was well  qualified, while at the same  time studying at the university  in the social sciences.  At 42 or so. she was apparently making an attempt to  re-enter the "real" world having  raised her family. She seemed  reasonably happy, confident  and was clearly enjoying her  new found freedom.  When I saw her last week, all  that had changed. She looked  frenzied, slightly hysterical and  definitely hyper-tense. Her  Jfe��3  The Wounds Of Their Going  The decade was his life-span  he came to me at its opening  and was taken from me at its end.  Simba had a torn ear  a stubby tail  and a small insistent voice.  he was a timid curious cat  happy with his world of house and garden  not a wanderer.  He had a justifiable fear of most dogs  having nearly been bitten in half by one  as a careless kitten.  He used to sit with cocked head  and pigeontoed paws  watching my mother cook or sew.  Simba looks just like Eeyore  or Charlie Chaplin  she used to say.  Perhaps he will watch her again  his small serious face eternally quizzical  in some celestial kitchen.  I only know they are gone from me forever  my dear gentle mother  my faithful orange cat.  Time may soften the sorrow  but the wounds of their going  will never heal.  Peter Trower  normal, jovial, overweight  smiling checks were no longer  pink with good-natured fun-;  The only noticeable feature in'  that once friendlyface were two!  gleaming eyes filled with what  could be described as nothing'  else but pure, naked. un<  abashed greed. The poor dear;  soul who once would not have,  allowed the subject of money to!  pass her lips was caught up in.  the grips of the silver market-.!  Old quarters, fifty cent pieces;,  silver dollars; she was even-  eyeing the old silver tea service!  with a covetous gaze.  I frankly found the whole-  display disgusting and riicnL'<  tioncd Ihe incident to two or!  three of my acquaintances only,  to discover thai everybody is,  doing it. That is either buying)  or selling silver or gold. I mearri  not-just a few hundred dollariti  in silver or gold certificates, butd  thousands, in some cases tens.,  of thousands of dollars worth i  of silver; real silver���silveri  coins. I was at a house the other/  night where my host signalled 1  mc int'i a back room where he;  opened a closet, raised the lidi  on a cedar chest, removed a,  false top and showed me ten.I  large gallon jars filled with,  silver coins. He said he had just-���  bought them that morning. l-<  asked him how much they costr.  he said, his "entire savings  account plus a substantial loai*  from the hank".  "What are you going to do'  with thorn?" I asked.  "Save them of course," he-  replied.  "Where?" I queried.  "Right here! Where else?"  ������'  Ihe very thought ol being in-1  someone's  house which con-'  tained   thousands  of  dollars  worth of silver coins scared the  hell   out  of  me.   Ihe whole  prospect is ludicrous, hundreds','  of thousands on honest, hard-:  working  citizens  hoarding  silver like so many citizens of  Trance with mattresses stuffed  with gold bullion.  As I was leaving my friend's  place I asked why lie thought,  this  was  happening and'fie  replied, "Oh! Didn't you know? .  There's  going  to  be a  war"  between Russia and the United  States this year and this is the-,'  only safe way to protect your  savings." -,'.  1 can't tell you how good that  made me feel. But there is one  last thing I would like to pass.  on to any potential burglars '  out   there���there   must'be  hundreds waiting in the wings."''-  I have never been so happy in  my life now that I am as poor as >���.  a church mouse. If I had money  these days, I'd really be very  worried   about   it.   So  wheny.  looking for jars full of silver,,  don't   bother coming to  my  house,   the  cupboard   is  definitely bare. Letters to the Editor  Can/or unfortunately singled out  Coast News, January 22,1980  Editor:  It is unfortunate that Elphinstone Secondary School, a  fragment of the local public  -, sector, should single out Canadian Forest Products of the  ; private sector as the only uncooperative organization regarding involvement in a job exper-  ; tence program.  ;; A perusal of pages 30 and 31  ;of the current Sunshine Coast  ; Telephone Directory will give  ;4ny reader some indication of  ; the extent to which this area is  ���Served by federal, provincial,  ��� tegional, and municipal ministries and agencies. British  ; Columbia Ferry Corporation  ���and B.C. Hydro and Power  -Authority, not listed directly  under  governments,  can  be  added to this rather impressive  list.  If these elements of the  public sector are cooperating in  this program, then it must be a  manifest success, and an announcement of this fact should  be the news item.  If, on the other hand, regulatory and practical consideration prohibit the functions of a  job experience program with 15  and 16 year old students within  these elements of the public  service, then surely these  considerations apply with  equal force at Port Mellon or  McNab Creek. Canfor super-  Visors have no moic spare lime  than officers and staffs ol  Canada Post, Forest Service,  Highways, Paiks or regional  and municipal personnel enjoy.  For safely reasons, regular job  training at the pulp mill is  carried out on a one-to-one  basis.  Ihe particularly unfortunate  aspect of the Elphinstone-  Canfor incident is that this  industrial complex does, here  DOING OUR BEST TO BE RIGHT FOR YOU  Editor;  My trips to Gibsons grow  fewer and fewer with the  passing years. Yet my deep  interest  lies  in  the growing  and elsewhere, provide summer community,  employment to many students My recent visit was a plea-  who need to earn money topay sant   one,   certainly   full   of  for their academic and techni- surprises,    expansions,    new  cal learning. Throughout the buildings, new faces and im-  past 30 \ eais, a very substantial provements at every turn. It did  number of Elphinstone gradu- my heart good to see at last  .itcs  have   owed   their   post-  scondary education to their  Living "been through the mill"  al Port Mellon.  Sincerely,  Lestei R, Peterson  A misconception  Editor:  ; There is obviously a widespread misconception that the  property at the end of Shoal  Lookout in Gibsons is public  property or owned by the  Village. This misconception  has been further aggravated by  reports of a presentation to  Council by Benny LePage on  January 8 during which he  demanded to know "why Shoal  Lookout has been closed off".  The property abutting the  paved road on Shoal Lookout  is, and always has been, private  property. The area is comprised of Lots 49, 50 and 51,  District Block F, Plan 10362  and extends from the paved  road to the beach. In fact in one  area the paving actually encroaches onto private property.  ! There has been no closure of  public or Village land on Shoal  Lookout and Mr. LePage was  made fully aware of this fact  when he was campaigning for  Council and collecting signatures for a Teen Centre. The  only action that has been taken  by Council on Shoal Lookout  is to place stones to prevent  people from driving onto  private property and to protect  the privacy of residents in the  area. Additionally, it was  intended as a deterrent from  dumping garbage over the edge  of the bluff and despoiling a  beauty spot.  As residents of Shoal Lookout, we feel that we are just as  entitled to our privacy as those  living on any other residential  street in the Village. We should  not have to endure a nightly  ritual of noisy parties and a  daily chore of cleaning up a  disgusting array of garbage and  broken bottles. We therefore  ask that our property be  respected for what it is���our  homes for which we have  worked and saved a lifetime.  Having experienced life in  Communist countries with  their myth of "public ownership of all property", we  jealously preserve the right to  enjoy our property in peace in  this great country. Needless to  say, we deeply resent being  threatened  or abused  by  a  Heart fund  Editor;  The month of February is the  official appeal month for the  B.C. Heart Foundation.  It is my pleasant responsibility to publicize this appeal. I  look to you for co-operation  now, even as you have given it  in the past.  I hope to send you some  information regarding the  work of the Heart Foundation  at intervals between now and  the end of February, and hope  you will have interest, concern  and room for it.  Thank you - in advance.  A Family Affair ofthe Heart  To keep a family in good health  Is something we must learn  Especially when each one's heart  Is everyone's concern.  So we must watch our diets,  It's not so hard-you'll find,  If everyone plans their cooking  With 'heart health' meals  in mind.  Together with your family  Enjoy more exercise -  And plan to give up smoking,  Because it's really wise!  A doctor's check-up  now and then  Will also do its share  In giving each a healthy heart  And that's a Family Affair!  Yours truly,  Joan B. Rigby  string of four-letter words from  trespassers on our property.  There are still those of us  around who prefer the beauty  of the English language unadorned by such disgusting  profanity. Take note drivers of  DED 607 and DAT 183 that to  date you still hold the dubious  record for hitting the bottom  line with foul language in the  presence of ladies.  E. Somogyi       J.D. Dickson  Unfair  Editor:  Re the letter in the January 8  paper by M. Waldron:'We too  have had the same experience  as a customer in You Del's at  the shopping centre in Gibsons.  There are two of us and they  wouldn't sell me three slices of  ham. I have worked with the  public all my life and would  never refuse a customer any  amount of anything, needless  to say our businesses were all  successful.  Since this happened there  has been none of our money  spent there. 1 have been in a  couple of times when friends  have invited me in for coffee  etc., but if 1 want to treat  anyone to coffee etc., I take  them through to Henry's  Bakery where they seem  pleased, or at least treat their  customers well all the time.  I do not want to ruin any  business for how well we know  the struggle it is at times but  this is very unfair pi actice in my  opinion.  Thank you for your time.  Sincerely,  Mrs. Alice E. Smith  History  Editor;  Northern Vancouver Island  has played a fascinating role in  Ihe development of B.C. In an  effort to record some of its  unique history, I am actively  gathering information for a  book, based on the recollections of living residents.  I ask that past residents of  Northern Vancouver Island  (from Zeballos to Cape Scott)  contact me with any information, stories, recollections or  photos they may have, from  any period, which may help  complete the historical picture.  In doing so, they would be  providing worthwhile and  much-appreciated information.  Judy A. MacCallum  P.O. Box 1653,  Port Hardy, B.C.  V0N2P0  such progress in Gibsons.  However, I was deeply  saddened and somewhat disturbed and annoyed at seeing  the tomb stone marker of the  founding father, George Gibson, toppled from its base.  Truly this must be the work of a  nut who has no civic pride. This  corner has been a bone of  contention for a number or  years and much time and  money has been spent to make  it a place of beauty and a  resting spot for a weary  traveller.  I cannot understand why  anyone would want to disturb  the marker on Mr. Gibsons'  grave. The stone not only  marks the resting place of Mr.  Gibson, but is a symbol ofthe  early, hard-working settlers  who carved the community of  Gibsons Landing from the  virgin forest. Please think twice  before it is toppled again.  F.Ross Gibson  Amwesmw  ZXPR&S  Super Loto  YOUR CHANCES AT GOOD FORTUNE  For winning numbers ask your lottery retailer, your  neaiest branch of Canadian Imperial Bank of  Commerce or write to:  WESTERN CANADA LOTTERY FOUNDATION  1 t nkevipw Square, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 3H8  The Fisher woodstove:  Canada's number one cold remedy.  No, not the "sniffles" kind of cold.  Rather, the kind of cold you feel  when you've cut your thermostat  back to 65�� to save money on your  heat bill (only it didn't). When  you've got that kind of raid, you  need a Fisher Stove.  Wood is inexpensive, plentiful, and  best of all it's renewable. When the  sheiks reach the bottom of the  barrel, Canada will still have trees.  If your heat bill leaves you cold,  it's time you wanned up to your  own Fisher woodstove. As Authorized Fisher Stoves Dealers, we'll  help you select the Fisher model  that best solves your heating problem. Visit us today���we've got the  extra strength  cold remedy.  J&C  ELECTRONICS  Trail Bay Man. sactwit 885-2588  alJ mm  Gibsons sr=  100% Locally Owned & Operated  GOV T INSPECTED SMOKED  pork picnic  CANADA GR. A. CHUCK  cross rib roast  WILTSHIRE FROZEN  dinner sausage  NEW ZEALAND FROZEN  lamD    leQS   Whole or Butt Portion  OLYMPIC BRAND  COttaCje   rOllS   Ready To Serve  GOVT INSPECTED SLICED  beef liver  Aylmer  vegetable  SOUP 10 oz  tins  Nabob  strawberry  jam  682 mil tins  Kleenex  facial tissue  Super-Valu  long grain  rice  5 lb. bag  Sunspan  orange  juice  1.36 litre tin  Oven-Fresh  french bread  397 gm loaf  Oven-Fresh  spice buns  MEXICAN GROWN  4/$1.00  $1.99  Monarch Mom's  margarine  1.36 km pkg.  Super-Valu Medium  Cheddar  cheese  Thorofed  s1.69  '1.39  $1.89  s1.79  $1.49  $1.88  77*    dog food  723 gm tin  quaker  $2.19    oats  5 lb. bag  Capri  tomato  $1.39    paste  5V2 oz. tins  Oven-Fresh  ^    cinnamon  buns  10% off  /Reg. Price  2/89  $1.88  3/99  6/89'  Oven-Fresh  bran  muffins  6/99(  6/99  green peppers  CALIFORNIA GROWN  swiss Chard or bok choy     ������. 2/49'  B.C. GROWN  mushrooms  $1.19  Prices effective:       Jan. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26  Tues.,Wed.,Thurs.,Fri.,Sat. Coast News, January 22, 1980  Entrances and Inklings  Part III  Now we're standing on the  steps of the old Andrew  Carnegie Library building that  was once, years gone, Vancouver's original City Hall. It  stands pillared, sedate and  pigcon-shit-covered, a monument to palmier times before  this whole area w?s by-passed  by progress and left in the  backwash. Cater-corner across  the street stands the old City  Bucket with its grim barred  windows and dirty brown  walls. "Boy, l sure don't ever  want to end up in there," says  Hircl sincerely. "I hear some of  those cops are real mean.  I leke's brother knew a guy got  beaten up so badly there that he  died. He wasn't even guilty  cither."  ".Icsus!" 1 say. "I'm starting  to wish I'd stayed in the sticks."  "Dammit!" says Dapper,  "my back teeth are floating.  Let's head someplace where  there's a can."  "Isn't that a public John over  there?" I say, pointing up Main.  "That place is supposed to be  lull of old homos," warns Bird.  "They hang around there  waiting to proposition guys."  "Ah, to hell with it," says  The  Sunshine  Coast  | Arts Council  wishes to  announce the  postponement  of the Jan. 27th  concert to  Feb. 17th of  Countryside  Concerts  Pages from a Life-Log  Peter Trower  Dapper. "I can't wait. Let's all  three of us go."  We walk over to the green  cupolaed public lavatory and  gingerly descend the stairs. The  dim-lit, grubby-tiled room  appears to be quite empty. We  relieve ourselves and are just  taking shots from what remains  in our respective bottles when a  man steps suddenly from an  apparently unoccupied cubicle,  he is wearing a soiled raincoat,  a shapeless hat and thick  glasses. "My God! It's a fruit!"  gasps Dapper. We turn as one  and take the stairs two at a  time the hell out of there. Safely  away from there, underground  biffy, we explode in drunken  laughter. "My oath!"  splutters Bird. "Did you see  that guy? I swear he was a real  one!"  "Well, I'm sure not going  back to find out!" I choke.  Pulling ourselves together, we  prepare to resume our vain  quest for girls. We realize we  are standing in front of a store  window. The place is quite  empty except for a gypsy  woman who sits alone on a  chair before a bright green  curtain, eyeing us inscrutably.  She is quite young and wearing  some sort of red robe. She  seems to our fevered eyes,  darkly mysterious and infinitely seductive. Suddenly, she  smiles and crooks a beckoning  finger. "Jesus!" blurts Bird. "I  think she wants me to come in.  She was looking right at me.  Do you suppose they actually  do it?"  "I think they're just fortune  tellers mostly," says Dapper.  "Maybe this one's different,"  I suggest.  Bird looks a bit confused and  doubtful. He glances at the  enticing gypsy woman again.  She certainly looks as though  \ NOTICE  ^ The Gibsons Public Library Association will  k'hold their Annual General Meeting at the  k Gibsons Public Library, January 28,1980 at  L  7:30 p.m. All members are invited to attend.  fflUSiC FESTIVAL  Entries close Feb. 15  For Syllabus phone Evelyn Cooper, 886-9344   or Aletta Gilker. 885-3491,  she has more in mind than  dubious clairvoyance. "Hell,"  he decides finally, summoning  his courage, "I guess it can't do  any harm to find out what she  wants."  "Watch out for Black Syph!"  hisses Dapper.  "Ah, I'm just going to talk to  her, that's all." Bird enters the  store. Dapper and I watch  intently, nudging each other  and nervously snickering.  Almost simultaneously with his  entrance, the curtains part  behind the gypsy girl and a  hawk-faced woman of advance  years emerges. Taking the  obviously startled Bird by the  arm, she draws him back to her  inner sanctum. He seems too  stunned to offer any resistance.  The girl rises and follows tham  through the green curtains.  "Holy shit!" I say, "1 wonder  what's going to happen?"  They remain behind the  curtains for several minutes.  We stand smoking cigarettes  and burning with curiosity.  "Shit! Maybe they've kidnapped him or something!" Dapper says. Suddenly Bird re-  emerges, looking sheepish and  makes hurriedly for the door.  "Wow! What went on in there?"  we demand.  "Why, I got put, of course,"  he smiles, regaining his composure.  "Aw, bullshit!" declares  Dapper. "Come on, what really  happened?"  "Okay, okay. You were right.  I got my damn palm read, is all.  Cost me a buck too.  She told me I was going to  inherit some loot and travel.  That'll be the day. All my  relatives are broke. Anyhow,  we know for sure now, they  ain't whores. She just uses her  daughter as a phoney come  on."  A naive myth has been put to  rest but we are still womanless.  "Didn't Deke tell you where all  these easy pick-ups are supposed to hang out?" I ask Bird.  "He said something about a  cafe called the Mount Shasta.  Hell, I can see the place from  here on the other side of Main.  Let's check it out."  We cross the street and head  for the restaurant. "Jesus! This  is the East End Gangs' territory," reminds Dapper. "I hope  we don't run into any of them."  Entering the sleazy and garishly accoutered restaurant, we  flash a quick look around.  Damned if there aren't three  girls about our own age, sitting  alone in a booth. We com-  NORTHERN  FRIED CHICKEN  &  Pizzas ��� Sub Sandwiches ��� Salad Bar  #101 ��� Cedar Plaza  "Under the Green Canopy"  Gibsons, B.C.  886-7454  L ��� 7 days a week ��� Licensed A  mandeer the booth next to  them and order cokes to cut the  last of the nasty rye. Dapper  strikes up a conversation with  one of the girls. They seem  friendly and open to suggestions. It looks asNhough we  may have struck paydirt at last.  All at once, the cafe door  swings open and in strut about  six of the hardest-faced punks  any of us has ever laid eyes on.  They are led by a diminutive  hood who puffs on a cigarette  through a long holder. Their  clothes are much more extreme  than ours: the strides wider-  kneed and tighter-cuffed; the  suit jackets fingertip length or  longer. They look feisty and  primed for trouble. With the  exception of their apparent  leader, they are a physically  formidable crew of hoodlums.  They occupy the booth directly  across the aisle from us and eye  us disdainfully. "Hey, Betty,"  says the little guy to one of the  girls, "are these squarejohns  bothering you?"  "It's okay, Flea," says Betty,  "they ain't causing no trouble."  "Well, they'd better  not, that's all!" says the Flea as  if we weren't there. "We don't  dig no strange punks messing  around with our broads."  "Jesus," whispers Dapper,  "let's get the hell out of here!"  He doesn't have to suggest it  twice. We gulp our cokes, pay  the bill and vacate those  dangerous premises without  further delay. Half expecting to  be followed, we make rapid  tracks back to Main Street.  Thankfully, the Flea and his  gang do not deem us worthy of  pursuit.  It is around 11 o'clock now  and quite dark beyond the  penumbra of neon and street  lights. "Hell, it's too early to  quite yet," says indefatiqable  Bird. "If we can't get any  women, let's at least try to  crash another bar." Dapper  and I aren't any too fussy but  we try the Balmoral on Hastings. The place is a bedlam of  last call drinkers and loaded  tables. We find an empty one  but the waiter comes over with  a stern look. "You guys better  have some I.D.," he says. "We  had the Liquor Inspector in  here last week and I don't need  any $300 fine!"  So we're back out on the  street again, boozeless, girlshy  and generally disillusioned.  "That's about enough for me,"  says Dapper. "We can't seem to  win for losing. I'm heading the  hell home."  "Me too," I say. "There's no  future in this." Even Bird has  run out of ideas. We head for  the corner to wait for our  respective streetcars. So much  for another strikeout Friday  night.  ft*********  NOP  ^r0  Poet Gerry Gilbert is shown here during his spirited  recital at the Arts Centre Thursday night.  Poetry reading  by Ian Corrance  I'm a skeptic; I always go to  poetry readings with a closed  mind. So last Friday when I  realised that I would be going  to Gerry Gilbert's reading at  the Arts Centre in Sechelt for a  picture, I phoned Peter Trower  about ten times to get him to  cover it, so that I could stand  outside and smoke till it was  over. Peter was in the city, so I  was stuck with it.  Gilbert started the reading  with what I consider as random  word association poetry. And I  settled down to listen to  another academic out from the  big city to bring culture to the  yokels. It looked as if I were  going to have to get my  enjoyment from watching him  chain-smoke through the recital while Keith Wallace fretted  about the carpet.  Mercifully the style soon  changed to the point where I  enjoyed the images the words  created. Somewhere in the  middle of the first part of the  reading he not only had my  attention, but also entertained  me with an amusing, clever,  and sympathetic defence of  these much maligned co-  inhabitants of this earth, the  slugs.  S.C, Lapidary Club  He finally won me over with  his poem "Starshit". I have no  idea what the poem was about,  but soon after it started, the  lines " You climb up top of one of  those spinetingling mountains for  a look" started me off daydreaming about standing on  top of a mountain. It was the  outside edge of a spaceship.  Sherpa Tensing was standing  beside me, We were at Everest's  peak, I wiped away the snow at  the summit and uncovered the  top ofthe world. The wind was  blowing and while I was  looking for a good handhold I  heard someone reading poetry  in Sechelt.  Here's Gilbert's comment on  our present election:  federal infection  Trudeau means false money.  Everything Joseph Clark says is  a vast distraction. As for Edward  Broadbem, let's leave social  democracy out of this, this  traitor of the mouth club.  History has instructed me to say,  "Grit big shit poured through  Tory small bore sound like  Socialism farting." (History has  a Chinese accent.)  There's nothing worse than  going somewhere, determined  to have a lousy time, only to  end up enjoying yourself.  The Sunshine Coast Lapidary and Crafts Club is starting  off the '80's with the Club  meeting February 6, 7:30 p.m.  at the Roberts Creek Elementary School. The Club has a  display case in the Gibsons  Library and at the present time  is showing our Nursery  Rhymes shadow boxes which  were made for and displayed in  the B.C. Gem Show last year.  They received many favourable  comments. There are a total of  nine boxes and are being shown  consecutively.  We look forward to a busy  and happy year in 1980 and  welcome new members, experienced or beginners. Any  information needed call Ev  Vernon, 886-2887, secretary  pro tern or club member.  by Rae Ellingham  General Notes: Venus, planet  of luxury, opposes extravagant  Jupiter indicating a week of  excessive indulgence, overspending, laziness and waste.  Parasitical, pleasure-seeking  persons will display their most  tasteless, slothful, self-indulgent behaviour for the next few  days.  Advice is to postpone purchase of clothes or decorative  items until next week. Ability  to choose quality goods and  appropriate colour co-ordinations is poor at this time.  If spoiled or pampered,  babies born this week could  become sickeningly sweet.  They should be 'toughened-up'  and made to work for their  rewards.  ARIES (March 21-April 19)  Accent is on self-indulgence  in private place. Contentment  is having a splurge with  someone you're not supposed  to see. Don't become enchanted with mid-week romantic  promises. Talk is still cheap  and deceptive. Say no to get-  rich-quick scheme. Having eyes  bigger than your belly may  account for passing health  upset.  TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  The rest of the month finds  you making new friends and  contacting old acquaintances.  You'll enjoy sharing your ideas  and interests at group meetings. Realize plans intended for  local project are too ambitious  and may have to be trimmed  later. Your falling in love with  steady companion surprises no  one. Guard against overeating, gluttony and excess at  noisy social get-together.  GEMINI (May 21-June 21)  You'll have the charm and  personality to impress superiors and boost position. Advice  is to be modest when promoting latest achievements.  Watch over-exposure. Gushing  attitude may lose rare chance.  Flirting with the boss is definite  no-no. Those attending job  interviews should dress conservatively. Avoid plunging  neck lines, gaudy suits or ties.  CANCER (June 22 - July 22)  You'll be attracted to people  and places far away, educational pursuits, literature that  makes you think. Day-dreaming over future escape plan or  extended journey hinders immediate tasks and responsibilities. Infatuation with local  teacher or instructor deepens  love for present academic  interest. Long-distance message of affection warms the  heart on Wednesdav.  LEO (July 32 ��� Aug. 22)  Emphasis is on expansive  financial manoeuvers. Check  personal cash flow before  presenting serious proposal to  banker or promoter. Guard  against over-optimism regarding inheritance, settlement or  over-due loan. Have all facts  and figures at fingertips. Ik-  understanding of loved one  guilty of over-spending or  extravagance. Realize surprise  gift is meant to show love and  appreciation.  Celiarsf  3mt  Features  BOB CARPENTER  & THE BAND  Mellow & Swinging Sounds  to Rock your Soul!  Thure.. Fri.. ft sat.  Jan. 24th. 25th. 128th  8 p.m. - midnight  Watch this paper for our  NEW EXPANDED MENU  Soon to be announced!  886-9815 The Heart of Cedar Plaza  Wooden,  Aluminum,  and  Conversion  Windows  FRAMED ft  CUT MIRRORS  (MM  UrUee  k Hwy 101 & Pratt fid , Gibsons,  886-7359  VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  Relations with loved ones -  and close associates become so  sweet  and   tender, you'll be '  embarrassed  and  suspicious.'  Others' desire to please and  provide you with the best is'  indeed  rare occurrence. Ad-'  vice, of course, is to lie back1'  and enjoy it while you can.' ���  Jupiter in your sign, opposed  by  loving  Venus  is  key to"-  increase   personal   attention.' :  Have a luxurious week.  LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)  Work-scene atmosphere im-'  proves. Where you perform  dreary duties becomes place of'  romance and harmless llirta-  tions. New person on the job is  a big hit, Boss surprises'  everyone with promises and' i  good intentions. Pet or small  animal brings unexpected happiness. Mid-week health upset'  is result of over-indulgence and1  loo much rich food. Weight'  watchers' will power breaks  down.  SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nuv. 22)  Social life, pleasures and  pastimes bring extra joy. Rest  of January highlights romance,  speculation, children's affairs,  doing a favour and taking a  risk.- Pursuing someone you  long for is easier now. Doing  nothing encourages curiosity  and greater interest. Sitting by  the phone is best bet. Child's  affectionate gesture makes it all  worthwhile. >  SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-  Dec. 21)  There's no place like home  during the  next  few  weeks. I  Happiness   is   simply   sitting,,  around with those you love the.  most. There's opportunity to.  discuss   plans  for  household,  alterations or decorations., -  Family member's choice of new, ���  colour   scheme   may   be  too |  ambitious for present budget.  Stick with traditional patterns  and arrangements, , -  CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-  .lan. 19).,;  All forms of short-distance  communications increase your.  sense of well-being during the .-  next few weeks. Long awaited,  letter or phone call enables you  .  to make crucial decision. Short   .  trip introduces new friend with .  the idea you've been searching . ���  for. It's the time ofthe year to   ;  drop in on old friends unan-,  nounced.   You're  welcome.  everywhere,  AOUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb, 18) ,'  Accent is on money, posses-,  sions.  overspending, careless  ;  use of resources, being fooled  by fancy packaging. Advice is .  to consider carefully whether.  you   really   need  so-called  bargains   or   mass   produced .  trash. Wise Aquarians decide   ���  to restore or repair forgotten or  shoddy items. Best place for  your cash this week is in the  bank.  PISCES (Peb. 19-Mar. 20)  Venus in your sign, opposing  .  Jupiter, brings to a peak your ,  increased charm and personality.   Others   may   find   you ,  disgustingly  pleasant, helpful ,  and optimistic. Seems nothing ,  will cloud your present hopes,  happiness  and  good  moods.  Those born around lebruary  28 have much to smile about. .  Meanwhile,  March   16 birthdays must face responsibilities ,  and delavs a little longer.  The permanent  Vinyl Sundeck     durodek  duradek  WOOD HEATING CENTRE  Gutters  &  Siding Off the shelf  From our correspondent in the East  Toronto doesn9t impress  Coast News, January 22,1980 5.  white porcelain and for some    four inches thick and which  by John Moore  The native people of the  Canadian Arctic had a saying  about the white man in their  country..."The white man is an  old woman in the Arctic". In a  land where men are necessarily  judged, to a great extent, on  their mastery of certain basic  survival skills, they observed  that the white man, in spite of  his impressive technology,  couldn't erect a simple shelter  from natural materials to  protect himself from the  storms, lacked proper clothing  and couldn't take the cold, and  couldn't hunt well enough to  feed himself and a team of dogs  he couldn't manage in the first  place. Though time has proved  a few exceptions to the rule, the  native people of the north and  the white men who have chosen  and learned to liveamongthem  now have another saying that  reveals the extent to which the  real circumstances of life in this  inhospitable environment are  still misunderstood by the rest  of the country..."If you come  up here from the south and you  stop over at some place in the  north for an hour, you can  write an article for a newspaper; if you stay overnight you  can write a big article for a  magazine; and if you stay for  three days, you're an expert  and you can write a whole  book".  One of the few white men  who can truly savour the ironic  humour of this joke is Ernie  Lyall, a man who has earned  the Eskimo approbation "an-  gutimmarik"���a real Arctic  man���by spending almost all  of his 69 years in Canada's  north, most of that time above  the Arctic Circle. Born in  Labrador, he joined the Hudson's Bay Company at 17 and  worked for them for 30 years,  helping to found several posts  and the community of Spence  Bay where he still lives. He  learned to speak Inuktitut at an  early age and has since proved  to be an often invaluable  interpreter for the people, the  Company, the government and  the R.C.M.P. Heleftthe Bayin  1940, when he refused to  transfer posts without his  Eskimo wife, Nipisha, who is  currently active in the Eskimo  native rights movement. Their  marriage has lasted 42 years  and produced 11 children. For  almost ten years he lived as an  Eskimo himself, as an independent hunter and trapper,  and has the distinction of being  perhaps the only white man to  have a government Eskimo  identification disc number���  E5-I. He says he decided to do  a book about his 63 years in  Canada's Arctic because, "I  finally got fed up with all the  baloney in so many books  about the north". The result is  An Arctic Man (Hurtig Publishers, 1979).  In the course of his fascinating autobiography Lyall  delivers a good many well-  placed kicks to the backsides of  self-proclaimed 'experts'  who've written about the north.  Author Farley Mowat takes by-  far the worst licking, mostly  over a story called Dark  Odyssey of Soosie from his  book The Snow Walker, in  which he seems to have mis-  understoon or misconstrued  just about every aspect of the  incident described. Lyall has no  quarrel with those who write  fiction about the north. (One  senses he doesn't have much  time for fiction, and with a life  as full as his. that's not hard to  imagine.) But he quite rightly  insists that when real people  and real incidents are described, the facts, at least,  should be correctly set down.  Mowat is by no means the only  writer he admonishes, however, and it is to Lyall's credit  that he deflates several tales  which portray him personally  in a very favourable, even  heroic, light with the same  unflinching honesty. The casual, sitting-around-the-stove  tone of his narrative, his refusal  to dramatize himself or to  exaggerate beyond what he  knows to be true, is the most  charming feature of An Arctic  Man. I found him frustratingly  reticent about the shamanistic  practises of the Eskimos, for  instance, but though he hinted  that he'd heard a lot of strange  tales, he wouldn't say anything  beyond what he had seen for  himself.  Ernie Lyall has seen a good  bit of the history of the  Canadian Arctic, from the  dramatic episodes, like the St.  Roch's navigation of the  Northwest Passage, to the  subtler, more profound changes in the life of the people,  changes in which he has been  an active participant. Many  people these days, some among  the Eskimos and others in the  south who have never been  anywhere near the Arctic  Circle, and worst of all the  "three-day wonders" who write  books and articles about a  country they haven't taken time  to understand, romanticize the  Eskimos' vanishing nomadic  way of life, seeing only the  "noble savage" exploited and  degraded by organized rapa-  ciousness of civilized man bent  of profit alone. Lyall's book is  not merely an apologia for the  Bay, though he readily admits  his bias as a long-time employee of the Company.  (Again, it seems like a case of  the observers not having spent  enough time actually observing  the situation.) Certainly the  Bay were in the north to make  money. Lyall, just to set the  record straight, points cut that  the Company freely extended  credit to trappers who needed  grubstakes and traps, and when  game was scarce fed whole  communities who would other  wise have been decimated by  famine without expectation of  repayment. Not to mention the  Bay personnel, like Ernie Lyall,  who have acted as doctor,  dentist, midwife, legal counsel  and messenger service to  isolated mobile groups.  Lyall says that from his own  observation, the majority of  Eskimos don't look back on  their old way of life as the good  old days. The coming of the  white man disrupted their  culture in a sense, yet it freed  them from the bondage shared  by all nomadic peoples inhabiting demanding environments, that bondage in which  one's total energy is devoted to  survival alone. The rapid  emergence and development of  Eskimo artistic creativity and  the revelation that many ofthe  people seem to have a latent  natural talent for mechanics  are tow of the more obvious  things that otherwise might  never haveemerged. Like many  of the other men and women  who have dedicated their lives  to the north, Lyall believes, as  do most of the Eskimos themselves, that their only hope of  survival is to acquire the skills  to deal with the world on its  own terms. An Arctic Man is a  fine book. I recommend it to  anyone interested in finding  out something of the truth  about the north and its people.  All for now.  by Joan Huestis Foster  My foam-flecked editor has  asked that I give some comment on the art and activity I  encountered during a recent  incursion through the woolly  urbs and suburbs of Ontario  and Quebec. These somewhat  spotty opinions were garnered  on the fly so please accept them  for what they are. I remember  being Very angry when the  English writer J.B. Priestly  wrote a series of opinions on  Canada after a two week tour  of this grand country and so I  shouldn't be surprised if 1 cause  a little Toronto-inspired antipathy hereabouts. I must  repeat that my resistance to and  rejection of certain types of art  is purely personal and is the  sum of my own particular  experience and education in  that field. My opinions are  exclusively my own and should  exert no pressure. From someone else in the art field you  might easily obtain a totally  different view.  Toronto is a "trendy" city,  sort of "off New York" and  trying too hard. As a city  Toronto has always struck me  as totally Nouveau, trying  desperately to impress its fine  new friends to the south and  trying just as forcefully to hide  its poor Ottawa Valley cousins.  If only Toronto could relax,  admit to its Methodist roots  Corrance remembers  Memoir of an Arctic Man  by Ian Corrance  The review this week is about  Ernie Lyall's book An Arctic  Man. Having worked with the  Hudsons Bay Company in  many of the posts that Ernie  was in, I thought I would write  a wee bit about him and the  area.  My first memory of Spence  Bay in 1964 was not of Ernie  Lyall. It was the extraordinary  interest everyone had in my  pack of cigarettes. It took me  about two minutes to realise  that the settlement was dry, the  last butt had been found, re-  rolled and smoked and was  only a pleasant memory. My  half pound of tobacco and  carton of cigarettes went up in  smoke very quickly.  It was just coming on spring  bread up and large areas of the  tundra were free from snow.  This didn't stop the brave men  of the mounted police, who set  off overland to the closest Dew  Line station and returned a bit  worse for wear, but victorious  with a case of the finest  cigarettes you ever laideyeson.  Ernie had quit The Bay and  was working with the Department of Northern Affairs  (DNA) by the time I arraived.  But even in the light of my  novice fervour that the Company of Gentlemen Adventurers was the only respectable  reason for a white man to be in  the Arctic, Ernie was considered the man who was  around when H.B.C. meant  Here Before Christ and unlike  the rest of the D.N.A. he knew  what was really going on.  George Porter from Goa  Haven and Ernie were the only  two people 1 met in the Arctic  who successfully spanned the  gap between Eskimo and white.  He shares my opinion about  the role of religion in the North.  I think it caused more confusion than anything else.  While I was in Spence Bay there  was only one Catholic family,  the rest ofthe market had been  cornered by the Anglican  church. The priest spent a good  deal of time hunting. While he  was over at Thorn Bay checking  his seal nets, one of his flock  died. The family had been  taught that for a soul to make it  past the pearly gates, it needed  an experienced earthly guide to  send it on its way, so they asked  the Anglican minister if he  would do the honours. They  were turned down flat. I know  that I was confused, so God  knows how the Eskimo family  felt.  Ernie's contribution to my  social graces came when I  became part ofthe bridge game  up at his place. I can't remember if I was invited back to  play after I bid seven clubs with  13 points then asked someone  else to play my hand because I  had a radio sched. I do  remember the shout that came  from the house as I ran away  laughing.  Throughout Ernie's book it's  refreshing to read his .opinion  of what is right or wrong and  true or false. This comes from  his living so long in an  environment where it's easy to  differentiate between black and  white. If you make the correct  decision, you're around to tell  about it. If not, then you were  wrong.  One memory that was triggered by the book, was that  Ernie used to collect match  books. I think I'll collect some  from this part of the country  and sent them up to him.  and knock off a few rhinestones  it would be more popular in the  rest of Canada.  Toronto's transportation  system is amazing, speedy,  frequent and comfortable. The  subway even has up escalators,  and the fact that the tile used  makes it resemble the longest,  most complicated latrine in the  world is of little importance. I  would imagine that the shiny  tile discourages graffiti. There  are buses and streetcars going  in all directions within seconds of each other and if you  are a group goinga short haul a  taxi is actually cheaper than a  bus. Taxis cruise constantly  and all you have to do is stand  on a corner for two seconds and  away you go. Why bother with  a car?  Enormous wall hangings are  currently "in" and in Toronto  everything must be "in" or it is  out of the question. Your own  private taste has nothing to do  with it. These wall hangings  consist of various wools and  fabrics, bits of fish net, shreds  of carpet, old pillows, burrs,  satins and anything you are  able to drag out of your long  haired dog. The stuff is knotted, knitted and woven together to hang in a huge clotted  mass. (Average size 6ft. by 3 ft.,  many larger.) Preferred colours  are pervading puce, C.P.R. red,  dark gray-brown-blue clinging  to universal mud. Their thickness is variable and their shape  amorphous, usually a lumpy  oval with many hanging shreds.  The prices are comparable to  original paintings but do  remember "If you have to ask  then you can't afford it". That's  Toronto and the O'Keefe  Centre had a great crop on  view. My advice to weavers and  macrame people here is, if you  want to be avant garde with  leftovers clean out your attic,  clip your doggie and go to it,  bearing in mind that nothing is  allowed to resemble an owl on a  branch. Actually I have always  liked wall hangings but I think  the faddish-band wagon aspect  of proliferation got to me. I  wonder if they are over-  compensating for an abundance of glass, chrome and  shiny tile.  Clever pop art and eye  bending op (optical) art still  flourish in the smaller decor  type gallery shops and the  imagination seems endlessly  fresh. I feel that we run a little  short on the imagination end of  things and our little art world  on the Coast is inclined to take  itself far too seriously. In  pottery I truly thought ours  was away ahead of theirs but  our ceramic sculpture fell  short. (Imagination again.) In  regular sculpture we are so far  behind that we may never catch  up. It's strange, when you're  wandering through shops and  galleries such as these, the  funny things you would like to  buy to bring home to friends  for no more obvious reason  than that they arc clever.  Someone had made moulds of  fruits and vegetables in pure  reason I wanted to buy a whole  glass bowl of these peppers,  bananas and pears etc....pure  white. I knew they had been  made from moulds and were  both shiny and breakable but I  wanted them. Then there was a  set of three casserole dishes that  when fitted together formed a  complete male torso or a  complete female torso, (and I  mean complete), again pure  white porcelain and of course  you could mix up and match!!  What a lark for $ 1,200���for the  housewife who has everything!  They would cost about $2 to  make once you had the moulds.  I wonder if we shouldn't open  some kind of foundry here and  start cranking this stuff out to  send to Toronto. I did not sec  any of our ubiquitous local  ceramic frogs there.  In Toronto, hydro towers go  everywhere, straight through  the centre of the city and  suburbs. It is an astonishing  sight and much worse than  their T.V. antennae used to be.  We complain about overhead  wiring but with their population they have overhead  cables that look to be about  have become super highways  for plump gray squirrels. And  finally, only in polyglot Toronto could planners and heritage people be so far apart that  they would carefully preserve  the old Massey Mansion but  sell its surrounding gardens. At  night this magnificent old  home is gracefully flood lit but  it's towering grandeur is nullified by the glaring orange and  blue of a large Gulf gas station  and repair shop which the  planners in their wisdom have  allowed to operate within a few  feet of the old brick mansion,  completely obliterating one  side of your view. You need one  blinker to admire the home.  The city fathers have not even  bothered to plant a hedge  between the two and the  separation consists of an alley  lull of garbage and old oil cans.  The freeway system goes  straight through the centre of  town and every which way,  cloverlcaf upon cloverleaf, over  and under, round and round at  60 miles an hour and is effective  and sinfully ugly. You can get  anywhere  in  a   trice.   Also,  Please turn to page twelve  TRAIL BAY SPORTS  The Sechelt store will be closed from  January 22 until January 20  inclusive. We reopen at our new location  at the corner of Trail Ave. & Cowrie St.  Tuesday. January 29  watch For  Opening Specials  Gibsons store open as usual.  Menu Of The Month  "TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT"  books-pnrus-stahonery-art supplies  Time to Drum up on winter sports techniques.  Learn To IM    B.C. Gross country SM Routes  Chris Landers Richard & Rochelle Wright  CUIilN HanUDOOH Roy O. Thiessen  ice Hockey  Playing and Coaching    James H. Fullerton  WARNING!  PROTECT YOUR FAMILY FROM  CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING!  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a very real hazard in many hotjnes throughout  British Columbia. This odorless, invisible killer is produced when combustion  takes place without a proper supply of air. With the recent drive to conserve heat  and energy, many homes have been made much more air-tight, and with the  combination of a burning fireplace, a gas-burning furnace and the normal  compliment of appliances and exhaust fans in operation, a potentially lethal  situation can occur. Gas furnaces normally have their own air supply, however, it  is often not of sufficient size to supply the additional air demands of fireplaces  and exhaust fans. A fireplace should have its own air supply duct or a window  should be opened in the room where a fireplace is being used. Don't take  chances���learn about the hazards of carbon monoxide ... have a qualified  heating expert check your home for its air supply needs.  If further information is required contact your local Gas Safety Inspector.  Province of  British Columbia  Ministry of Labour  Safety Engineering  Services Division  Gas Safety Branch  501 West 12th Avenue  Vancouver, B.C  Tel: 879-7531  Nest Lewis  (former Home Economics Teacher)  Shrimp Dip & Vegetable Platter  Roast Beef  Yorkshire Pudding  Horseradish Sauce  Hot English Mustard  Almond Beans  Parsleyed Carrots  Roast Potatoes  Gravy  Spiced Peaches  Whipped Cream  Yorkshire Pudding  2 eggs   ,  1/2 teaspoon salt  1 cup flour  2 tablespoons dripping  Place the flour and salt in a bowl and add Ihe  eggs. Add the milk gradually, beating till mixed,  Place in the refrigerator for an hour or more.  Thirty minutes before you are ready to eat heal  the oven to 400 degrees. Get a 10 x 15 x 2 1/2 inch  and place the drippings in it over a moderate heat  till it sizzles. Pour the batter into the pan and bake it  in the oven for 15 minutes. Reduce the heat lo 375  degrees and cook for a further 15 minutes till the  pudding is crisp and brown. Serve immediately.  Is your gravy lumpy? Try placing the flour in a  screw top jar half filled with water. Give il a good  shake before adding it to your meat drippings.  Your gravy should come out perfectly smooth.  Almond Beans  Cook your green beans in the usual way. When  Ibey are cooked, loss them in butler, seasoning  and two tablespoons slivered almonds.  Spiced Peaches  Drain one can of peaches and place upside down  in an oven proof serving dish. Slick a whole clove :n  Ihe middle of each peach. Sprinkle with some  cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice. Blend two  tablespoons of brown sugar wilh lour tablespoons  ol peach syrup and drizzle it over the peaches.  Place under the broiler for 5 minutes or so until the  peaches have thoroughly warmed through. Serve  wilh whipped cream flavoured with vanilla sugar  and freshly ground nutmeg.  Vanilla Sugar? just place regular sugar in a  screw top jar with a vanilla pod so that the flavour  of Ihe vanilla permeates the sugar-delicious.  KEN'S  LUCKY DOLLAR  Free Delivery  to the Wharf  GOWER POINT RD., GIBSONS  886-2257     WHATEVER YOUR NEEDS -  FOODS LTD.  Hours  9-6 Dally  9-7 Friday  10���5 Sunday 6. Coast News, January 22,1980  Unwelcome visitor  Maryanne's viewpoint  Reading tutors needed  by Maryanni' West  John Hind-Smith's delightful account of his successful  eviction of an unwelcome  intruder from his house evoked  an amusing picture in the  mind's eye���a rat jct-propel-  Icd from a vacuum cleaner  wielded by John while Gypsy,  the dog, looked on with  disdain. Il also brought back  memories.  Most of us who live in older  houses without a lull basement  probably give shelter to rats in  the winter monilis. especially if  we feed birds. Ihe only winter I  remember being without a  couple under the house was  when a skunk took up resilience and now, alas, we have a  cat which is paianoid about  skunks though tolerant of rats,  Grandfather while he lived  wilh us was successful in  catching them but it's an art  none of the rest of the family  lias mastered. The cheese or  bacon rind is gone but the trap  unsprung, or the rat has  skillfully evaded the guillotine  if the trap has gone off. They're  wily beasts and not easily  fooled.  Last spring was the first time  a rat got into the house, by a  complicated series of coincidences not necessary to the  story.  Janie, the Boxer, discovered  it in the early hours of the  morning as it presumably  reconnoitred new territory and  the ensuing chase and scuffle  woke everyone up. "What on  earth's going on'.'" I called.  "Janic's got a rat cornered  under the chest in the hall,"  I ran replied.  Chi ista took Janie out ofthe  fray. Boxers have lots of  enthusiasm and good hunting  instincts but those fore-shortened noses so often result in  mal-occluded teeth. They may  be good for holding on, bulldog  fashion, but with all that  hanging lip their mouths are  not constructed for that quick  snap and shake essential to the  lnt of rat catching.  Fran persuaded her Father  to help and armed with a  broom and the poker respectively, they set about chasing  the rat out. Whatever your  feelings about rats you have to  admire their courage. This one  kept up a continuous, bloodcurdling scream while taking  the initiative and jumping at his  attackers, The battle probably  lasted less than five minutes but  it seemed an eternity. The noise  was terrific, the rat screamed,  Fran yelled, Frank swore  cverytime he hit with the poker  and missed, Fran wielded the  broom wildly trying to prevent  the rat from running up her  nightdress, sometimes hitting  the rat but also the walls, doors  and furniture, Eventually the  intruder was swept out the door  and down Ihe steps and he took  off apparently little the worse  for his fright.  A couple of weeks later  another rat, or maybe the same  one woke us around 2 a.m.  (Don't be too sure yours won't  return for a re-match, John!)  This time it was my turn to get  up as I'd been severely criticized for doing nothing but lie  in bed helpless with laughter  during the previous debacle.  The rat was cornered in the  dining room this time, so with a  broom each Fran and I herded  him hopefully towards the back  door. After the earlier experience we decided against trying  to kill it. "Just let's get it out  without all that screaming!"  Obligingly he headed  straight through the kitchen,  no awkward detours under the  fridge and on into the untility  room by the back door. There  he took refuge in the cupboard  under the laundry tubs. So far  so good.  While we took a breather  and mapped strategy the cat  appeared at the kitchen window. "Hey, that's an idea," I  said, "maybe the cat will catch  it if we let him in."  We opened the back door, let  the cat in, opened one door of  the cupboard and stood back to  watch. Cat walked into the  cupboard to investigate while  we stood with bated breath,  Maulers  versus  Mumps  The Mailers (locally known  as the Maulers) accept the  challenge of the R.C.M.P.  Mumps. They have thrown  down the gauntlet. We shall  meet the Mumps at 8:00 p.m.  February 16, 1980 at the  Sechelt Sunshine Coast Centre  in aid ofthe B.C.T.V. Telethon.  Our finely tuned athletes  have had a fine summer camp  and we have studied the game  films from last year.  Two things were noted in the  films: Corporal Wade seems to  be the "sleeper" of the Mumps  team. In fact when the film was  run at slow speed, Wade did  not seem to move at all, and  when the film was run at fast  speed he was noted to have  opened his eyes twice during  the contest. The other notable  thing found during the film  was, they as a team made a  serious game plan mistake:  they showed up to play.  Our star, Hurrican Housley,  has not blown himself out since  last year as erroneously reported. In fact, from reliable  sources, it is said he has not  passed any wind in the last  year.  WANTED  and What Have You  AL'S  USED  FURNITURE  WE BUY BEER  BOTTLES  Barry Friesen  Law Office  Barry Friesen  Barrister & Solicitor  Notary Public  Uncontested Divorces  Separation Agreements  Marriage Agreements  Real Estate Transfers  Wilis  Estates  Incorporations  GIBSONS OFFICE  Sunnycrest Shopping Centre  Oflice Hours: Saturdays, 9:00  ��� Phone 886-2277  3:00  VANCOUVER OFFICE* Phone 683-1515  Suite 519 - 925 West Georgia Street  (opposite Hotel Vancouver)  Office Hours: Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:00  PHONE OR WRITE FOR COPY OF  CURRENT FEE SCHEDULE  brooms at the ready in case the  rat decided to make a run for it  and headed in the wrong  direction. There was a snarl  and a hiss from inside the  cupboard, but it wasn't the rat  which came running out, but  the cat! Tail upright he made a  brisk exit from the cupboard  seemingly apologetic for having intruded upon the rat and  went quickly outside, lying  down on the porch.  When Fran and I had recovered from laughing, who was it  had that brilliant idea about the  cat, we opened the other  cupboard door and as the rat  came out Fran connected with  a mighty sweep of the broom  sending it flying through the  open door where it landed on  top of the cat. A great yowl  went up from the cat and cat  and rat split in opposite  directions!  Hopefully there won't be a  next time. I can admire rats  outside, their perfect little pink  hands and feet, handsome  whiskers and bright, shiny jet  black eyes, but they're unwelcome indoors. However,  should a rat again be so bold I'll  try John's patented jet-stream  vacuum cleaner method.  Adult Basic Education is  happening all over the Sunshine Coast. From Port Mellon  to Pender Harbour, students  and tutors are meeting privately to work on reading and  writing skills.  Have you ever run across  someone who can't read or  write? Chances are you have,  but you may not have known it.  The skills you take for granted  are not possessed by everyone.  You can teach another adult  to write his own letters, read his  own birthday cards or enjoy a  novel. Tutors are needed for  the Adult Basic Education  program. Tutors are also  needed to assist with English as  a Second Language classes.  Adults who arc tired of  committees and meetings but  who would still like to help  their community may be interested in volunteering as  A.B.E. tutors. After an initial  training session tutors work on  their own with one student.  Time, place and materials are  worked out between the student and the tutor with the help  of a coordinator.  Working with an adult  student is very rewarding. They  know what they want to learn  and why. The tutor's task is to  guide their learning and provide feedback for the student.  The coordinator, Sheila Page,  provides backup resources for  the tutor.  Stimulating adults have  realized that learning and  growing do not have to stop  when school days are over.  There are a variety of adult  education programs available  through Continuing Education  and Capilano College.  If you know someone who  wants a high school certificate  or entry to a vocational  program, Capilano College  may be for them. There are  many adult students who do  not need a certificate or general  upgrading. They would like to  improve a particular skill,  perhaps reading speed, handwriting, spelling or sentence  construction. Individual tutors  working with the A.B.E. can  work with students at their  own speed, in their own home,  on the particular area they wish  to improve. To register as a  tutor please call the Volunteer  Bureau, 885-5881. To register  as a student call Continuing  Education, 885-3512.  Professional Repair & Service ,  to your  oil & electric heating equipment  -AUTHORIZED DEALER FOR-  tsso  Gulf  CALL NOW   886-7111  THOMAS HEATING  14 yean experience. Serving the Coeit line* 1987.  Chargex Maitercharge  mm  ���JWMWM  WESTERN ALUMINUM LTO.  Ottering a Full Line ot Construction Services lo Ihe Sunshine (oust  WIndOWS: Inside Storms, Thermal  Conversions, Windows for New Homes,  Replace Wooden Windows with  Aluminum Sealed Units.  AISO: Light Backhoe Work & Septic  Fields, New Home Construction,  Insulation, Renovations, Roofing.  Aluminum: Siding, Soffits, Gutters,  Storm Doors.  we Guarantee Our workmanship  885-3515 (Bus.) 886-7049 (Res.)  All Estimates Are Free     Doug Goertzen  mmmmwm0tmm*mmmmmmmmBt0mmmm  BQNNIEBROOK LODGE}]  On the Beautiful Sunshine Coast at Gower Point  ��� Guestrooms (BreakfastIncluded)  * Dining Room    886-9033     &��*,��  VLASSIFIEDADS  (KEEP FOR REFERENCE)  THIS CARD?  if not,you may lose your right to vote  FEBRUARY 18th!  IF YOU HAVE NOT RECEIVED  YOURCARD-  Check this list  ofphone numbers.....  ARE YOU ELIGIBLE TO VOTE?  Yes, If you area Canadian citizen, ago 18 or over,  and were residing in Canada on December .'II,  1979. You will already have received your Notice  of Enumeration Card in the mail, if you were  enumerated for the last General Election, This  card confirms that your name is on the Voters'  List for the Pebruary IHth Pedoral Election.  YOU MAY NOT HAVE  RECEIVED YOUR CARD IN THE  MAILBECAUSE-  Sinoe hist May 22ml...  ��� You've moved  ��� You've turned 1H  ��� You've changed your mime  ��� You've become a Canadian Citizen  ��� You were not enumerated for the  last (ienernl Election,  If you don't have the above CARD and live in  a City or Town listed below, call (collect if  necessary) the phone number shown.  GIBSONS  CALL  POWELL RIVER  485-9756  Langdale, Roberts Creek,  Sechelt call Powell River  485-9756  ELECTIONS  CANADA  Elections Canada is ftirliament's nonpartisan Agency  responsible fur holding Federal Elections,  under the directum of the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada.  Mr. Jean-Mart Hamel.  Published by the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada.  K/80 Ifl Christ's service  Problems merely minor  j     Rev. George W. Inglis  J'i-*1     Sunshine Coast  United Churches  j Jlany pessimistic Christians  I predicting a dismal future  the  mainline  traditional  Ittrch, with the inroads of  ttdamental evangelical sects,  ttronic ministries and the  personal urban culture, all of  nch tend to make inroads to  the close tics and extended  family relationship of the  hifinlinc congregation.  S These doom and gloom  ^merchants, however, arc not  making into account the 2,000-  Sycar histoiy of the church of  -���Christ in the world, and its  Ninthly to survive wars, persecutions, plagues, and internal  ���strife and heresies, which  ^���would have felled a Icsscr-  wntjowed institution, but only  jseryed to strengthen the pur-  ���ipoSc and integrity of the  'church.  ] ��� The church is an institution  'which has a heritage of enduring, through its Judaic  origins, at least another 3,000  wears of captivity, exodus, war,  and deprivation which have  made it a lough and viable  entity���one that is not easily to  bjj beaten.  ��� j The Jewish people, whom  God selected so many centuries  ago to be His people���the  people lo whom was entrusted  ihe delivery of His Word to the  world���have passed on their  icritage of toughness of fibre,  beauty of articulation, literary  integrity, and indomitable  courage to those who follow  the Judaeo-Chrislian faith. It is  a tradition of courage and  determination in the face of  insuperable odds, and a realization of man's incompleteness  without God's saving grace.  I lie Gentile church, from the  day it was brought inlo being  by the fiery little Jew from  Tarsus, the apostle Paul, has  had that heritage alternately  blunted by fat and luxury, and  sharpened by periods of siege  and danger. Those who predict  these as dangerous times for the  mainline churches should remember that this plastic era is  only one of the threats that  have been posed for the church  in its long histoiy.  True, a great deal of the  problems which face the church  today come from within the  institution itself���where apathy, indolence, materialistic  preoccupation, and other ailments erode Ihe sinews of the  church. It is these ailments that  ,11 e causing divisiveness in the  church, and arc driving more  and more people to the enthusiasm and out-going sects, cults  and movements where the  spirit of Pentecost is acknowledged with joy and sought  after with relish.  As the result of these comparatively recent schisms,  which are added to an already  bewildering number of denominations and doctrines,  which have been dealing an  increasingly confusing picture  lor the person of simple faith  ind unsophisticated belief  since the days of the Reformation, Ihe picture is sufficiently  hew ildering lo cause ihe skeptical observer to picdict with  some assurance the demise of  the mainline traditional  church.  Add lo these problems of  divisiveness, the cold fact that  Ihe chinch has gone from its  position as a minority religion,  one which could probably be  called a cult, into the powerful  status as a world-wide state-  endorsed institution and Ihen  back again into Ihe position of  being once more a minority  g'Olip.  In today's world, preoccupied with self-interest, self-  indulgence, sell-gratification,  self-adulation, it is true that the  teachings of the carpenter from  Nazareth appear to ring very  hollowly. It does not appear to  make very much sense to talk to  the brittie, sophisticated and  CARSANDTRUCKS  Rental���Leasing  ���Also-  Domestic & Industrial  Equipment  Sechelt next to the  liquor store  Gibsons al Pratt &  Hwy  101  Seaside  Rentals  885-2848      886-2848  acquisitive youth of today  about a belief in loving all  mankind, and in following the  teachings of a man who saw  himself in the role of the  Suffering Servant, and who  went willingly and without  resistance to an ignominious  death on a wooden cross,  flanked on either side by low  criminals.  It never made sense, even  back then, that a man would go  to his death willingly, to death  by hanging on a cross, which  was held by mosl people to be  an accursed way to die.  The words of the apostle  Paul, written about 30 years  alter the Christian church had  started to struggle into being,  sounded pretty ominous for the  infant body of believers:  "For Jews demand signs and  Greeks seek wisdom, but we  preach Christ crucified, a  stumbling block to Jews and  folly to Gentiles..."  If that had been where Paul's  words ended, it would indeed  have  looked   black,  but  he  added:  "...but to those who are  called, both Jews and  Greeks, Christ the power of  God and the wisdom of  God. For the foolishness of  God is wiser than men, and  the weakness of God is  stronger than men."  I Cor. 1:22-25.  If the church is suffering a  recession today, it is not  through any cessation of that  power and wisdom of God  through which the church  served as his instrument to  carry the word of salvation and  the hope of eternal life to many  millions of people in its  alternately turbulent and flatulent history.  It lies more certainly in the  "weakness" and the "foolishness" of we humans, who bore  the glorious Word inadequately and uncertainly, permitting  our preoccupation with self to  muddy the clarity of the  message, and to present a  divided and confusing garble of  words and deeds in its stead.  But it was the weakness of  mankind, and his foolishness,  that created the need for the  crucifixion in the first place,  and it was upon that crucifixion  and the resurrection that  followed, that the Christian  church is founded.  And the story of the founding of the church and its history  of achievement is a tremendous  tribute to the ability of man to  achieve magnificent gains  against overwhelming odds of  human contrivance���aided  only by the power and wisdom  of God!  Against this history, today's  problems are only minor setbacks.  Coast News, January 22, 1980  Sechelt death  Sechelt man, 27 year old  Davis Russel Henry of 1277  Pebble Crescent died as a result  of a domestic dispute.  The incident occurred at 7  a.m. on Saturday, January 19 at  the Sechelt Provincial Wharf.  An investigation is in progress. The cause ofdeath had not  been determined at the time of  the press release.  This was the last run of the day for Tom Clark of T & T Logging. His fully loaded truck  caught the soft edge of the road and rolled over. The accident happened on Tuesday  morning on a logging road just south of the Garden Bay Road turn off.  Trudy Small exhibition  The month of February is Heart Month. Blain  Hagedorn of Super-Valu is shown above presenting a  cheque to the Heart Fund President, J.E. Milburn.  Careers Day  On Wednesday, March 19,  1980 there will be a Careers  Day at Elphinstone Secondary  School for all Grade 10, Hand  12 students on the Peninsula.  Students will have the opportunity to gather up-to-date  information from community  members who arc actually  involved in various occupations.  Many community members  will be receiving letters requesting their participation in  this Careers Day and it is hoped  that they will respond favourably by offering their services.  Please direct all enquiries to  Ron Breadner at Pender Harbour Secondary School, 883-  2727 or Linda Giza at Elphinstone Secondary, 886-2204.  All are welcome to come to  the Arts Centre in Sechelt for  the opening of an exhibition of  paintings and drawings by  Trudy Small on Friday night,  January 25 at 7:30 p.m. Born in  Sudbury Ontario, and presently a Gibsons resident,  Trudy claims to have been  unaware of "Art" until a friend  in Toronto took her to the "Art  Gallery" in 1943. She was  hooked, and her constant visits  to the gallery resulted in her  enrolling at the Ontario College of Art from 1946 to 1950,  and participating in several  years of night classes.  Of her years at art school  Trudy says, "1 related most to  the theories of Jock Mac-  Donald while learning all the  other do's and doh't's of the  forties. Jock MacDonald set us  free to explore as he himself  had been set free by the theories  of Hans Hoffman in New  York."  Her family now grown up,  Trudy is again set free to  practice her theories and  experimental processes of paint  application. This concept of  experimentation and exploration is the essence of her work.  Viewing the exhibit, one will  see how quickly Trudy is  developing her techniques. An  ink drawing shows the beginnings of * her concept and-  walking around the gallery one  sees the progression of ideas  and techniques which will  continue beyond this exhibit,  for Trudy is a prolific artist and  an exhibit does not necessarily  represent a conclusion.  Don't look for recognizable  scenery  or  objects  in her  MOTHERS' MARCH  KINSMEN  tfoAfotity ?W i* g#  SHOW  YOU  CARE!  Jan.27-Feb.2  KINSMEN CLUB Of Gibsons  paintings as the forms created  arc suggestive, allowing the  viewer to interpret and feel for  themselves what is happening.  Trudy explains, "Painting for  me evolves from the images  stored layer on layer and  sometimes triggered into visual  images by colour. If that image  says "something" to you then  we are communicating: a  mood, a memory, or a feeling.  A Rose is a Rose, but a painting  is only paint on paper on a fiat  surface. The viewer must  participate to make it "Art"."  Trudy Small's exhibit continues until February 14.  K irttvlv  Decorative  IXIlMJX     Rods  10% Discount  on all rods in stock for January only.  eood selection of Classic  and contemporary Designs.  Bambler \ Keats Residents  Choose your floor coverings  from our wide selection  & we'll be pleased to install them for you.  All Products & Workmanship  CONDITIONALLY GUARANTEED  Ken De Vries c\~ Son Lid.  ^Campbell's!  Christmas Decorations & Wrap   1/2_PrtC_8_   Winter Clothing i Snazzie Slacks  1/3I1/2PPICB !    *..�����.�� If."  Toys  now 25% Oil  Small Appliances  10% Ott  ������* (Hurry! This won't last much longer!) ***  sic Crayons  Approved by Canadian  Toy Council. Great Colours  ���Ink-Felt, Won't dry out.  ��.*'i   HOW 75*  200 Sheet  Filler Paper  now ii."  This Friday Night Only!  January 25, 1<)8()  Beginning ol Campbell's  Friday mte Specials!  Kxamplev Mpn's  ])rjj|(.rs  Wonder Bra     Pants & Shirts  15% Off 15% Off  Kaiex New Freedom Maxi Pads  ���   i   Now Only 60c  We reserve the right  to limn Quantities  K  DEPARTMENT STORE  Cedar Plaza Teredo Square  Gibsons, B.C. Sechelt, B.C.  886-2510 885-2321  Owned & operated on the Sunshine Coast,  i    ��� ��� ���  GettingWfor  your shift  can be a downer  for everybody.  Playing around with mood altering drugs is  dangerous anytime. But in a work situation.  it can be more than dangerous - it can be  deadly! For you. And for the coworkers  who are depending on you.  And uppers aren't the only villains.  Any prescribed medication,  misused or mixed with  ,  alcohol, can cause problems. Problems you  may not be able to cope with.  Before you pop any kind of pill, prescription  or otherwise, be aware of the problem involved  WORKtRS'  COMPENSATION  ,v%-< 8. Coast News, January 22, 1980  Pender pool  makes progress  The Pender Harbour Aquatic Society reports that work is  tiniiig very well on the Pender  Harbour Pool Everything is in  full swing once more following  the inevitable holiday lull.  Work is progressing rapidly on  the wall partitions, the finishing of the pool shell, electrical  iviring, plumbing, and venti-  ting equipment, etc., that are  oncealed by walls, concrete  oors, and ceilings; the count-  ess pounds of every con-  eivable kind of nail that arc  poinded into wood and concrete; and the everyday mcasur-  ng, sawing, hammcring.dig-  ing, fetching, and packing that  iocs into such a big project.  \nd the) are doing a great job  md still smiling!  Ilk- \quatic Society finds  he project extremely inter-  i-sting and challenging. Endless  hours of meetings, discussions  sometimes rather lively), writ-  ng letters, phoning, taking  ourses, planning and rc-plan-  ling are resulting in what looks  like an exciting pool facility  and program. The delay in the  pool opening has given the  Society much needed time for  program planning. The Society  has been able to distribute by  mail to every householder in  Egmont, Garden Bay, and  Madeira Park, a program  questionnaire. It is sincerely  hoped that residents will  complete their questionnaires  and drop them at the Egmont  Post Office, Taylor's store,  I.G.A., Holiday Market, or  parents can return them  through the schools with their  children. The more information given, the better programs  .an be given, so any input  would be greatly appreciated.  T!,e Aquatic Society wishes  to stress that this is a community pool which has been  incorporated into P.H.H.S. to  provide a facility for the  community for a greatly reduced cost. It must be emphasized that the pool is being  built by the community and  will be totally operated and  maintained by the community;  the schools will rent pool time  at designated hours from the  facility just as any other  organization may rent pool  time. ALL inquiries concerning  the pool should be directed to  the Pender Harbour Aquatic  Society, NOT to the schools or  the School Board. The com  munity nas its own public  entrance which must be used.  Parking facilities for the pool  are available behind the gymnasium.  Yearly memberships to the  Aquatic Society will be available opening day ($3.00 each,  $5.00 per family). It is hoped  many people will join, Pool  programs will be out following  the assessment of the questionnaires in February. It must also  be made clear from the onset  that the pool will be operated  on a yearly budget which has  been already designated by the  referendum. Pool operation  will be related directly to public  demand. Pool programing is  currently based on 40 weeks per  year which will be reassessed  each year to ensure no financial  strain on our community. The  program can be cut back or  expanded accordingly. The  society hopes to stimulate  public use through as flexible a  program as possible. To this  end, two more individuals have  attained Red Cross/Royal Life  Saving Instructor status.  There has been great interest  expressed in a "universal gym"  exercise apparatus as an addition to the exercise room at  the pool. The Society is most  anxious to include this apparatus in the exercise room.  Any group or organization  wising to donate or raise funds  towards the purchase of this  apparatus please contact the  Society. It is the goal of the  Aquatic Society to encourage  all segments of the population  to use the pool facility. Any  contribution, whether it be in  the form of funds, used equipment, or personal expertise,  would be truly appreciated.  The Pender Harbour Lions  Club have already donated  $500 to the equipping of the  First Aid Room at the pool.  Many thanks to the Lions.  More good news���the first  half of the Provincial Recreation Grant just arrived in the  form of a cheque ($44,500). The  second half of the Grant is  funded upon the completion of  the project. This money has  been long awaited as there are  still some major expenditures  coming up.  The Grand Opening will be  announced. Bells will ring,  banners will fly, and everyone  will know something great is  happening! See you there!   ,__/rr^_  l//*%llll       "ot.ce sow  Dhnnn   OOC    OflOO    \m���---     -          ...  Phone 886-2622  886-7817  The Gibsons Public Library Association  will hold the Annual General Meeting at the Gibsons Public  Library, January 28, 1980 at 7:30 p.m. All members are invited to  attend. ��3  Gibsons Tot Lot  Every Friday, 9;30a.m, to 11:30a.m. Gibsons United Church Hall  Call Eileen. 886-9411 lor information. t.F.N.  Bridge  Heron Cafe every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.  Pender Harbour Library  Every month new books are added to the Library. Tuesday and  Thursday, 130 to 3:30 and Saturday 1:30 to 4:00 are the Library  hours  Bridge al Sunshine Coast Golf Club  Games will be held the first and third Tuesdays of each month  at the Golf Club, starting prompity at 7:30 p.m,  Sunshine Lapidary & Craft Club  Club meets 1st Wednesday every month at 7:30 p.m. For Information phone 885-2375 or 886-9204. tfn  Country Stars Square Oanct Club  Dancing  every  Friday night 8  -   11  at the Roberta Creek  Elementary School 885-8027  Elphinstone Aerial Club  Meetmg every second Wednesday of Ihe month at B p.m., at the Wilson Creek Club HOUM.  Sunshine Coast Arts Council  Regular meeting 3rd Tuesday of every month at 7:30 p.m. at the  Arts Center in Sechelt tfn  Western Weight Controllers  Meet every Thursday al 10 00 a m   Everyone welcome   For regis-  irahon phone 86S-93B0  Roberts Creek Hospital Auxiliary  Every  2nd  Monday-Roberts Creek  Hospital Auxiliary.   11  am  SI Aula" s Hall  Thrift Shop  t..-, Fnday   1-3 p m Thrift Shop, Gibsons Uniled Church base-  Al Anon Meeting  Fvery Thursday In Gibsons al 8 00 p m For information call 886-  ��%9c>'686-9037  Bargain Barn  The Bargain Barn ol the Pender Harbour Health Clinic Auxiliary  is open on Thursday and Saturday afternoons from 1 00 until  3 30 T.F.N.  Swap Meet and Craft Fair  First Saturday of every month at Madeira Park Community Hall,  10 00 a m to 3 00 p.m. Call 683-9258 or 883-9375 for table bookings  or arrive before 10.00a.m.  Tops B.C. 579 Gibsons  Tops B C  578 Gibsons will now meet in the Athletic Hall at  Armors Beach Lower Gibsons. Thursdays at 1:00 p.m.  Sunshine Coast Navy League of Canada  Cadets and Wrenettes ages 10 to 13 will again meet Tuesday  nights. 700 - 9 00 pm, United Church Hall, Gibsons New  recruits welcomed  Women's Aglow Fellowship  meet every third Tuesday of the month at Harmony Hall. Gibsons  Babysitting is available All ladies welcome For more  information please pnone 886-7426 or 885-3356  Canadian Calorie Counters  Meetings  every  Wednesday  evening,  7 30  Landing  Phone 886-8354  The Elphlnstone Pioneer Museum  is open Saturdays from 2 00 to 4 00 p m for speci  Sheila Kitson after 5 00 p m at 886-9335  I  p m .  Granthams      l|  T.F N       ||  jm ���  ;aal tours Phone   i J  Creative Job Searching Techniques  Louisa Dadswell celebrated her 95th birthday with a  friend at the Bonniebrook Lodge last Thursday.  Helping her with the cake is Lucille Mueller.  If you have been looking for  work for ages and always been  turned down, chances are that  you need to know some Creative Job Searching Techniques. The same might be the  case for those who feel caught  in a dead end job or for women  who stopped working for a  time and now have decided to  return to work outside their  homes.  Mary Nichols, who is an  excellent job search specialist,  is a private consultant in  Vancouver. Wc have asked her  to conduct a one-day workshop  in   Sechelt   on   February   I,  Friday 9:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  The workshop will deal with  attitude, knowing how to plan  and developing the tools to  engage in successful job searching. Men and women of all ages  will be able to profit from this  event.  The purpose of Creative Job  Search Techniques is to help  those who have a poor knowledge of their true capacities  and do not know how to look  for work. Even after a person  succeeds in obtaining an interview with an employer, she/he  often show the worst side just  when she/he should be show  ing her/his best by making  mistakes in approach, and by  becoming awkward and hesitant in answering the employer's question.  Mary Nichols will go  through the different stages in'  job search and show how to  prepare a job search plan' how  the labour market operates  from the employer's viewpoint  how to make a list of the  industries, businesses and  services in the area; how to  make a self-assessment; how to  prepare a resume, complete an  application for employment  and   draft   an   introductory  letter; how to act during an  interview.  The instructor will also  pinpoint all the ways available  to remain unemployed, and  some of us will recognize a few  of those!  This workshop is guaranteed  to have so many positive hints  and pieces of useful information that it is worthwhile to  invest a day and $7.  Please pre-register with 885-  3512, Continuing Education,  9:00-I6:00h, Monday to Friday.  Deadline is January 28.  Working together to improve Gibsons Landing.  Gibsons Harbour Business Association meets the 1st Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. in the Heron Cafe?  Next Executive Meeting:   Thursday, January 17th, 7:30 p.m. in the Heron  Peninsula  Cleaners  2 Locations to  serve you better.  SECHELT    GIBSONS  885-9554        886-2200  Open Tues.-Sat.  May's  886-2715  Starting Thursday  POTTED TULIPS  on Special  $3.��s  Open 9:30-5:30 p.m.  Lower Gibsons  Helen's Fashion Shoppe  Lower Gibsons 886-9941  SALE C0HTMUES  with fantastic savings on even  more items.  Mix & Match Sets  Co-ordinates  Shoes ��� Slippers ��� Bags  Snuggle Gowns  & Sleepwear  Vmttp  Jfoob*  Snack Bar  & Deli  Health Foods  886-2936  Gibsons Harbour  | * sandwiches     i  tUfittmmt}frmmijf/^tmt*l\finm���t]fiem   HfcHiiUfH*  MARINE  ELECTRONICS  Wm  Dccca Marine Radar  S&TVHF&SSB&  Universe CB  ATTENTION FISHERMEN!  i, Start thinking NOW about  Upgrading &/or Servicing your  ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT        ,  <' for the coming season ' !  See Lome, 886-7018  ,   Across from the Co-op. ^^ #T*����  < ' ���frm m*t\?   mtflp   H<W��   '��%n>   "*t\P   M^A>   I >  L/l I y\f\\\ I IIIKUV////m'JlHr7A  PalchworK.Pine  and oilier Pleasures  // you haven't  visited  Granny's,  please drop in  and browse!  January Hours:  Tues. to Sat.  11 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Bottom Ot School Road  886-8355  Many of you in past years left the renewal of your  car insurance for the last few days and were  caught in long line-ups. We can discuss your  coverage and prepare documents, you can come  in later at your convenience and complete the  transaction quickly. This is especially important  if you wish to finance. _.nncttS:  f^tm^mmmmm  TIM'   n " T�����FJT     TT I     T-l  I.   Ah .'COME SHOP IN OLD GIBSONS LANDING  W  "        1   I!  ! ! On becoming a Rover  Ramblings of a Rover  Hospital Auxiliary  Coast News, January 22, 1980  by Dee Cee  I am firmly of the opinion  that the older one gets the more  perplexed one becomes over  certain aspects of life that in  one's younger days were never  even thought about. Why for  instance is it, that after 70 years  of living, one can .remember  incidents and events that  happened over 50 years ago so  vividly that they could have  occurred only yesterday, while  at the same time one cannot  even remember what one was  doing or, for that matter, what  one had for lunch a couple of  days ago? There is one thing  however, that is certain and  that is I shall never forget my  last night in London before  embarking on the ship that was  to bring mc to Canada.  After a tearful leave-taking  of my parents', particularly my  Mother and Sister, who acted  as if I was going to my certain  death and that there was no  possible hope of their ever  seeing me again, I caught the  train from the sleepy little town  of F. to Victoria Station, a  route 1 had taken so many  times before during my telegraphy career. However, I  could hardly wait this time as  my beloved Lilian was there in  the city awaiting me and we had  so arranged it that we were  going to spend what was left of  the day and the last night  together. We had mutually  agreed that there was to be no  sadness, no tears or recriminations, we were going to enjoy  ourselves and one another's  company to the utmost, as  possibly it might be a very long  time before we had that chance  again.  My Father had not only  booked my passage on the S.S.  Alaunia, a ship of the Cunard  Line, to the port of Quebec but  also had so arranged it that I  had a ticket from that city to  Toronto with no definite date  set as to when 1 could use it. In  I addition to all this he had given  me the princely sum of 60  pounds sterling (around $300  at that time) to start me off in  my new life, so I was well  supplied with money for the  time being which was, of  course, a "night on the town"  with the gorgeous Lilian.  She was there at Victoria to  meet me and, after checking my  considerable luggage with  instructions to ship it via  Waterloo to Southampton, we  were free to enjoy ourselves in  any way we saw fit. She had  bought theatre tickets for the  show Rain by Somerset  Maugham which was then  playing at the Adelphi Theatre.  So after a really nice dinner  with wine in an intimate and  cozy little Greek restaurant in  Soho (in those days it wasn't  the tough, sleazy neighbourhood it has become today), we  proceeded by cab to the  Adelphi.  I don't know how many of  you are familiar with  Maugham's story of the disintegration of a young missionary when he was sent to the  South Seas to minister to the  needs of the natives of the  Island and how his downfall  was in large measure due to his  infatuation for a voluptuous  half-caste girl of dubious  morals, but I do know the play,  and particularly the sultry siren  who palyed the part of Sadie,  had a most profound effect on  me! During the show one half  of my mind was trying to  concentrate on Lilian and her  whispered comments and the  other half was thinking what an  idiot I had been not to have  acceded to my Mother's wishes  and entered the Church. If this  was the locale to which young  ministers were sent to further  the Word, with apparently a  plentiful supply of not only  young brown-skinned beauties  but all the gin one could quaff,  then obviously that would have  been the place for me! Without  a doubt I wouldn't have been  there long before word of my  scandalous behaviour would  have reached the authorities  and I would have been unfrocked, but then I could have  always "gone on the beach" as  so many others had done  before me.  I came out of the theatre in a  bemused state and a trifle  drunk as we had consumed a  whole bottle of wine with our  dinner and during intermission  I had knocked back quite a few  whiskies, but Lilian did not  appear to notice anything  wrong with me or, if she did,  wisely said nothing.  Another cab and wc were  back to her flat. I say "hers" but  it was actually her girlfriend's,  who had conveniently gone  down to Brighton for the  weekend. We spent the night  together and all too soon it was  morning and if I was ever going  to make it to the ship that was  to take me to Canada I had  better get going.  Lilian came with me as far as  Waterloo and I can see her as  clearly as if it was yesterday,  standing forlornly on the  platform and waving as the  train pulled out. We had made  all kinds of promises to each  other and I was confident that  it would only be a short time,  say a year, before I had struck  gold in the New Land and I  would be sending for her. Life  Exams  Elphinstone Secondary  School examinations will be  held from January 25 to 29  inclusive. Students will be in  attendance for exams only  during that period of time.  January 30 is a turn-around  day for the semester change  and, as a result, no students will  be in attendance that day.  Second sememster will begin  Thursday, January 31, with a  regular school day. Registration and timetabling for students new to the school are  being held now. Any members  of the community who would  like information of full or part-  time programs are asked to  contact a Counsellor at  "Elphi", 886-2204.  Opening  new doors  fg-Ao small  Ubusiness  On Wednesday, January 30  one of our representatives  will be at  Bella Beach Motel, Sechelt  Tel: 885-9561  It you require linancing to start, modernize or  expand your business and are unable to  obtain it elsewhere on reasonable terms and  conditions or it you are Interested in the  FBDB management services ol counselling  and training or wish inlormation on  government programs available lor your  business, talk to our representative.  FEDERAL  BUSINESS  DEVELOPMENT BANK  145 West 15th Street,  North Vancouver, B.C.  doesn't work out that way  unfortunately and I was never  to see her again. The best I  could do was to honour her  memory when, sixteen years  later with the'war raging, I  walked out to the quiet cemetery where she was buried and  laid flowers on her grave.  Poor, dear, lovely Lilian you  were my first love and I shall  never forget you, never as long  as I live! It was a hopeless love  affair from the start but wc  were, in spite of the difference  in our ages, so suited to each  other. Wild, crazy, mixed-up  we may have been but it was  glorious while it lasted and  although it ended so sadly the  memory of how you looked,  how you laughed and how you  loved is etched indelibly in my  mind forever. >  by Elizabeth Johnston  The first meeting of 1980 of  the Gibsons Hospital Auxiliary  was held at the Calvary Baptist  Church Hall on Wednesday,  January 16 with 28 members  present. The meeting scheduled  for January 9 was cancelled due  to inclement weather with bad  road conditions.  Outgoing president, Joan  Rigby, chaired the meeting due  to the inability ofthe incoming  president, Jean Longley, to  attend. Family matters unavoidably required Jean's  presence in Vancouver.  We all welcomed Mrs. Elsie  Willis, a longstanding Auxiliary member, who very kindly  installed the new executive in a  delightful candlclighting ceremony. The new executive is as  follows:  President-Jean Longley  Secretary-Pearl Dove  1st Vice-President-Marion  McConnell  2nd Vice-President-Betty  Cochran  Publicity Chairman- Elizabeth Johnston  Many thanks from us all, Elsie.  The Auxiliary is catering for  a Lions Club dinner to be held  on Tuesday, January 22. Heading the committee is Marion  McConnell assisted by helpers  Betty Cochran, Clem Cruick-  shank, Oncy DeCamp and  Helen Weinhandl.  All members are reminded to  save Nabob coupons as these  are invaluable in exchange for  catalogue items for St. Mary's  Extended Care Unit, raffles,  door prizes, etc. You need not  be a member to donate, the  Auxiliary will be delighted with  coupons from anyone who can  spare them.  Isobcl Leech, assisted by  Nancy   Strandt,   has   kindly  offered to carry on providing  that most welcome cup of tea  with cookies which bring our  meetings to a close. In future  the knitting department will be  looked after by Kay Wall (886-  2166). Inquiries about wool  etc., after January 29, please.  Many thanks to Kay and many  thinks to Irene Jardine for her  hard work.  Joan Rigby thanked all  members of the Auxiliary and  of the community for the hard  work and cooperation which  led to a very successful year.  The following is a list of  hours worked at St. Mary's  Hospital by volunteers during  the year.  Volunteers: Thrift Shop - 16-  747 hours - headed by Helen  Weinhandl; Extended Care  Unit - 7-248'/i hours - headed  by Annie Metcalfe; Gift Shop  and Ward Cart- 18-209 hrs. -  headed bv Winnifred Elrick:  Physio - 5-306 hrs.  Monica Hautala's Jr. Volunteers worked 103 hours during  the Fall season. Judy Spence,  Rosana Hastings and Yvonne  Valencius, all three Gibsons  girls, have become active  members  this  season. Ida  Leslie's Sunshine Committee  sent two cards this month.  In conclusion, I would like to  say 'thank you Joan' from all  the Auxiliary members, for  your inspiration, and gentle  persuasion to bigger and better  efforts.    li\\\\w\\V" vv^vvocv> w.s'nV^ \\\v-'  Office Opening  ^KEVIN RYAN  M.A. (Arch.)  Energy Effective Design, Planning and  Project Development Consultant  Full Architectural  & Drafting Services  Located next to the Gibsons Medical Clinic  886-2922    Res:  CHECKTHESE NEW BENEFITS  AND OPTIONS FOR AUTOPLAN80  It's getting close to renewal time for Autoplan insurance. The deadline  is February 29th for the majority of B.C. motorists.  Although rates are up by 10% because of increased costs, individual premiums may  increase or decrease because of changes in ICBC's rating structure  and the introduction of Phase I of the F. A.I.R. program.  Your Autoplan insurance for 1980 also features some new built-in benefits for  everyone and some n^w options you should consider for your  personal protection when you renew.  CHANGED  COVERAGES  .INCREASED  LIABILITY  COVERAGE  Like everything else, the cost of  settling bodily injury claims continues to rise. So, for your  greater protection, we have increased the compulsory  minimum for Third Party Liability  insurance to 5100,000 from  $75,000. For the nine out of 10  motorists who carry more  than just the minimum coverage,  there will be no extra cost.  2. INCREASED NO-FAULT  ACCIDENT BENEFITS  Recognizing thehighercostof  living, a number of no-fault accident  benefits are being increased.  ��� Weekly benefits increased to 5100  from 575.  ��� Dependent benefits increased to  525 from 515 a week.  ��� Funeral expenses increased to  51,000 from 5750.  3. SAFE DRIVING VEHICLE  DISCOUNT CHANGE  A major change in the discount  program came into effect last  September. It waives the earlier  requirement that drivers in  British Columbia had to be insured  under Autoplan for six months  before they became eligible for a  Safe Driving Vehicle Discount.  Now, the discount can be applied  without the waiting period and  it is based on the owner's previous  claim record. A one-year claim-  free record earns a 15% discount;  two years earns 25%; three  qualifies for 32H%. This change  principally benefits people buying an additional vehicle and new  residents to the province.  NEW  COVERAGE  INVERSE  | LIABILITY  j COVERAGE  In some U.S. states and Canadian  provinces, your rigiit to recover  costs for damage to your vehicle  through the courts is legally  prohibited when a resident of that  state or province is at fault in  the accident. This new Autoplan  feature, which is included as  part of your basic coverage at no  extra cost to you, provides for  payment of your collision damage  cost to the extent that you are  not at fault for the accident.  1. UNDER  INSURED  MOTORIST  COVERAGE  For an additional premium you can  now extend your protection to  cover accidents where the insurance  of the driver at fault is not sufficient to cover claims for bodily  injury and death. If you are  the victim of an accident, and you  carry this option you are protected to the limit of your own  Third Party Liability coverage.  2. SUPPLEMENTARY NO-FAULT  ACCIDENT BENEFITS  If you feel the current disability and  death benefits offered under  the No-Fault Accident Benefits  schedule are insufficient to  cover your needs, this option allows  you to buy a higher level of  benefits for an additional premium.  ANDTHE  EA.I.R.  PROGRAM  STARTS  NEW  ornoNS  Autoplan '80  | will also introduce Phase I  of the F.A.I.R.  program.  The premium you pay may be  affected by one or more of these  changes:  ��� Sex and marital status will be  removed as rating factors. This  will mean a decrease of about  30% in the average premium paid  by male vehicle owners or  principal operators under 30 years  of age.  ��� The first step will be taken towards removing geographical  location as a rating factor. As a  result, premiums will increase  in some territories and decrease  in others.  ��� The Safe Driving Incentive Grant  will be discontinued because  the young, single, male drivers  who received this grant will  benefit more from the new lower  premiums  ��� An additional premium is no  longer required for an occasional  operator under 25 years of age.  If you have any questions, consult  your independent Autoplan agent,  or your Motor Licence Office. Be sure  to pick up your Motorist Kit when  renewing your insurance. It contains  a handy pocket to protect your insurance and registration documents,  useful information if you have  an accident and details of Autoplan  insurance for 1980.  Renew early and take time to  discuss the new coverages and your  requirements with your agent.  ��� INSURANCE  CORPORATION  Of BRITISH COLUMBIA  980-6571  Sunshine Coast Credit Union  Cowrie Street, Sechelt     Tel: 885-3744 Coast News, January 22,1980  till  Here is some of the fine action in the final boys'game in  the Cougar Basketball Tournament at Elphinstone last  weekend Aldergrove in the dark uniforms came out  the Tournament winners over Lord Tweedtmulr in the  light. The result of the girls' Tournament was the same  with Aldergrove taking it over Lord Tweedsmulr  Strikes and spares  bv Bud Mulcaster  Only two 300 games last  week, une by Harold Boyce, his  first, a 300 even and Brian  Butcher a 323 single, both in  The Ball and Chain League.  Brian totalled 733 and Harold  748 with Don Slack in the  middle with a 740 total.  High rollers in Ihe Classic  League were Ken Skylte with a  296 - 101)6 score and Owen  Edmonds with a 294 - 969  score.  In The Gibsons 'A' League  Andv Spence rolled 259 - 729  and Lome Christie 298 - 752.  Alice Smith rolled 271 - 710 in  The Slough-Off League and in  The Legion League Jim Peers  rolled 260 - 714 and Dave  Neumann was high man with a  267 - 773 score.  Highest Scores:  Classic:  Dianne Fitchell  Owen Edmonds  Ralph Roth  Ken Skytte  Tuesday Coffee:  Joyce Stublcy  Marg Ivcrson  Nora Solinsky  Swingers:  Cathy Martin  Dick Oliver  Ciibsons 'A':  Nancy Carby  lidie Ford  298-697  269-691  259-729  298-752  266-660  270-675  Pat Prest  Bob Ford  Andy Spence  Lome Christie  Wednesday Coffee:  Nora Solinsky  Janet Flumerfelt  Marjorie Henderson270-693  Bonnie McConnell 250-6^8  Slough-Offs:  Gail Mulcaster 236-625  Alice Smith 271-710  Ball and Chain:  Vivian Chamberlin 233-647  Dianne Fitchell 233-653  Brian Butcher 323-733  Harold Boyce 300-748  Phuntastique:  Orbita de los Santos267-625  273-946  294-969  283-958  296-1006  283-632  258-652  253-695  204-570  204-577  246-665  296-679  Jim Middleton  Ralph Roth  Legion:  Joan Peers  Vickie MacKay  Jim Peers  Dave Neumann  Youth Bowling Council  Pee Wee's:  Hanna Skytte  Ricky Reed  Bryon Fitchell  Bantams:  Alan Jay  David Kirsch  Scott Spain  Juniors:  Janet Butcher  Michele Whiting  Arlene Mulcaster  Glen Hanchar  246-631  229-642  224-589  216-591  260-714  267-773  94-172  122-197  132-221  187-417  145-419  198-466  216-532  294-667  287-687  217-504  From the Fairway  bv Emle Hume  The annual meeting of the  Sunshine Coast Golf and  Country Club will be held on  Wednesday, January 23 at 7:30  p.m. at the clubhouse. Let's  have a good turnout. Many  interesting and timely topics  will be up for discussion,  Once agaii "ur golf course  gave up a "I I' le In One" lo l-il  Eraser. Playing the 18th hole  on winter gn ns, I_.il holed her  tee shot, to j.mi the elite 'Hole-  In One Gang' I would think to  hole a tee sli i on winter play  would be moic difficult than on  lush summer greens, Congratulations Lil.  It is quilt possible a new  manager may be on hand for a  visit during our annual meeting. Let's hope that this search  will be concluded soon, to the  satisfaction ol all. -  The snow slopped our ardent  ~l_  Gibsons Public  library  Tuesday   2-4p.m.  Wednesday   2-4p.m.  Thursday 2-4 & 7-9pm.  Saturday 2-4 p.m.  886-2130    v _;  Hockey scheQ  Thursday, January 24,1980  lule  Roberts Creek vs Cozy Court  8:00  Saturday, January 26,1980  A's vs Pender Harbour  8:00  Roberts Creek vs Gibsons  9:45  Sunday, January 27, 1980  A's vs Gibsons  6:45  Thursday, January 31, 1980  Roberts Creek vs Pender Harbour  8:00  Iliursday, February 7, 1980  Cozy Court vs A's  8:00  Saturday, February 9, 1980  Gibsons vs Roberts Creek  8:00  A's vs Pender Harbour  9:45  Sunday, February 10, 1980  Gibsons vs Cozy Court  6:45  Thursday, February 14. 1980  Roberts Creek vs A's  8:00  Saturday, February 16. 1980  ���Pender Harbour vs Gibsons  6-7:45  Sunday, February 17, 1980  Pender Harbour vs Cozy Court  6:45  Iliursday, February 21, 1980  Roberts Creek vs Cozy Court  8:00  Iliursday, February 28, 1980  Gibsons vs Cozy Court  8:00  Saturday, March 1, 1980  A's vs Gibsons  8:00  Roberts Creek vs Pender Harbour  9:45  Sunday, March 2, 1980  Cozy Court vs A's  6:45  Thursday, March 6, 1980  A's vs Pender Harbour  8:00  Saturday, March 8, 1980  Roberts Creek vs A's  8:00  Pender Harbour vs Cozy Court  9:45  Sunday, March 19, 1980  Gibsons vs Roberts Creek  6:45  Thursday, March 13,1980  Pender Harbour vs Gibsons  8:00  Saturday, March IS, 1980  ���Make-up games or possible exhibition  Sunday, March 16, 1980  Cozy Court vs Roberts Creek  6:45  Senior Soccer  League Schedule  Sunshine Coast Senior Soccer League - Second Half Schedule  January 27,1980  Catch up games from 1st Half of Season.  February 3,1980  Pender Harbour vs Chiefs  United vs Redskins  Raiders vs Slompers  February 10,1980  United vs Raiders  Pender Harbour vs Redskins  Chiefs vs Slompers  February 17, 1980  Raiders vs Redskins  Chiefs vs United  Pender Harbour vs Slompers  Chatelech 2:00 p.m.  Hackett Park 12:00 p.m.  Langdale       12:00 p.m.  Hacked Park 12:00 p.m.  Hackett Park 2:00 p.m.  Chatelech       2:00 p.m.  Slompers  Chiefs  Raiders  United  Bananas  Redskins  Langdale  Chatelech  Pender  Harbour  League Standings  W  7  7  4  4  2  I  12:00 p.m.  12:110 p.m.  2:011 p.m.  PIS  15  14  9  9  4  3  Halfmoon Bay  STOVES  Welded Steel Airtights  Custom work done.  Suncoasl  ,   Po.wer &  Harine  Tel. 885-9626  Ltd.    Cowrie St. Secheltl  "The Chain Saw Centre"  I *  Minor Hockey Association  Homelite ��� Pioneer - Husquarna - Poulan  Stihl ��� Oregon Saw Chains  Splitting Mauls, Splittion Wedges,  Axes, Falters Supplies, Chains,  Bars, accessories  ���m^lfi  �� i ���.,-   Mercury Outboards    V��' & Mercruisers  Toro and Case Mowers & Tractors  H^^'W^i   m^Sjf MUlfcli ��WV" mll\f  Men's Hockey League  After an initial week of  practices, the SCMHI. will get  back into action with a full slate  of games the week of January  24th.  League action begins Thursday with second-place Roberts  Creek attempting to close the  gap on front-running Cozy  Court Bruins. Game time is  8:00 p.m., each and every  Thursday evening. On Saturday, January 26, there are two  games on tap; the 8:00 p.m.  game has the much improved  Anderson A's trying to keep  the winning touch over (he.  Pender Crowns, currently in  m*tU>  ��^b"��^Ui��  fourth spot. The later game has  the Creek playing last-place  Gibsons, Gibsons looking for  their first win since early in the  season. Sunday at 6:45 p.m.  sees the A's continuing their  rivalry with Gibsons, each  team having won games against  the other.  The following week will be  highlighted by a visit by a team  from the Haney Commercial  League; they will do battle  against the SCHML GIBSONS  AND  against the SCHML Gibsons  and A's teams. Also later in the  month the SCHML will host  Is Your Car  BEGGING For A  ���^���--������������^���^���������- t  i Second Chance?  BEAUTIFUL BODIES  $ARE OUR BUSINESS^  t BRIAN'S AUTO BODY  ]   ft PAINTING LTD.  1     Fully equipped for all body & paint repairs  T    BOX 605 SECHELT   885-9844  w^mmmi^ffi   m+l\p  ��vV' m^|<i  m^ ��V|)"��^I  golfers during its stay but play  has resumed again and the  winter tournament is once  more trying to catch up to its  posted schedule. Crib and  bridge players are enjoying  good turnouts on their allotted  Wednesday nites and Tuesday  afternoons.  Don't forget the annual  meeting. Please attend and  contribute your thoughts and  ideas.  Drop off your (nasi News  Classifieds al Campbell's  tamill Shoes & Leather  Goods in down-town Sechelt.  885  PENINSULA  MARKET  21    Davis Bay, B.C.  tables  tide  Reference: Pacific  Point Mkinsim Standard Time  Wed. Jan. 23 Fri. Jan. 25  0300               6.0 00(10 II  (W55               15.8 0450 9  lf>40                6.9 1115 15  2225               12.0 1845 5  Thurs. .Ian. 24 Sat. Jan. 26  0350                7.7 0145 12  1030               15.5 0600 10  1740                 6.1 1205 14  1940 4  ��� Groceries ��� Fishing Tackle  ��� Sundries ��� Timex Watches  Open 9���9  7 Days a Week  Sun. Jan. 27  0305 13.3  0730 11.3  1250 14.4  2035 3.8  Mon. Jan. 21  j 0410 14.1  ' 0855 11.5  1350 14.0  ' 2125 3.3  I    Tun. Jan. 29  ? 0500 14.7  5 1010 11.4  1435 13.7  2205 3.0  Gibsons Ready Mix  WORKING  IN THE COMMUNITY  86-9412  Drainrock 'Washed Rock  "Road Mulch  'Concrete Anchors!!  Avail. $20  Mon.���Friday 8a.m.���5p.m.  At the Sechelt Ice Arena on  Saturday the Gibsons Legion  109 went down to defeat  against the Trail Bay Sports by  a score of 2 to 0, in the Peewee  League.  In a midget game, Super-  Valu beat the Sunshine Coast  Credit Union 6 to 2.  Games played on Sunday  were; Twin Creek 7 vs GT's 2  (Bantam); Elphi Rec 3 vs T& T  Truckers 3 (Atom); Legion 109  I vs Standard Oilers I  (Peewee) and Weld wood I vs  Sunshine Coast Credit Union 0  (Midget).  the top team in the Burnaby  Commercial League to a pair of  weekend games.  Playoffs will take place the  last week of March. The top  four teams will compete in a  best-of-three series.  It is expected that the  Champions of the SCHML will  play a best-of-five series against  Squamish in a "Challenge Cup  Series", early in April.  Finally, the League plans to  host a dance in mid-February,  more on this later.  Drummond insurance  Decals & Replacement Plates, etc.  || Available NOWl  AMPLE PARKING  00 IT HOW!  Cedar Plaza, Gibsons     886-7751  MONARCH  FAIRMONT   MERCURY   ZEPHYR  GOOD SELECTION!  Test Drive The 1980's  I960  Mustang  1980  Fairmont  Lease or Buy  Lease or Buy  "Only 3 New 1979's Left - Saue $"  fSJ "Fine Selection Of Used Cars & Trucks" ft  including 4x4's, Vans, Pony Cars, Transportation Specials  "Trade up ��� Trade Down - On The soot Financing"  Test Drive The All New 1980 Ford Truck'  "Best Selling Truck In America"  *&  Genuine  Ford  Parts  full Una Ford-mercury Dealer"  ^ice  0 SOUTH COAST FOKO SALES LTII  1326 Wharf Rd.,  Sechelt, B.C.  ttS5-3*2S1  mDL 5936  Toll free: 684-2911  VANS PINTO BOBCAT GRANADA MONARCH Election update  continued from page one  Powell River riding. ��� Contact  the enumerator so that your  name can be removed from the  previous poll and placed on your  current poll list.  5. You have moved from any  riding in Canada to the Comox-  Powell River riding. ��� Contact  the enumerator so that changes  can be made.  'Please remember the e-  numerators are private citizens,  the phone numbers are not office  numbers. They can take electors'  names before January 30, but  have to be available from 10:00  a.m. to 10:00 p.m. on January  30.  IMPORTANT DATES TO  REMEMBER:  1. 10:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY,  JANUARY 30, 1980 - deadline  for qualified electors' names to  be on the revised voters lists.  2. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY  9, 1980; MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1980; TUESDAY,  FEBRUARY 12,1980- Datesof  the advanced poll. 12:00 noon to  8:00 p.m. - Times of the advance  poll.  Advance Poll ��� United Church  Hall, Lower Gibsons.  Returning Officers  Wilson Creek and up  #125 Egmont Dorothy Silvey 883-2272  #126 Pender Harbour        George Ibey 883-2425  #127 Frances Peninsula     Carol Reid 883-2320  #128 Silver Sands Joan Ross 885-2958  #129 Halfmoon Bay Peggy Connor 885-9347  #130 Wakefield Norma Branca 885-2376  #131 Sechelt South  #131 Sechelt South* CentreKeith Comyn 885-2378  #132 Extended Care Wing Flora Gardener 885-5338  #133 Sechelt East Eve Moscrip 885-9322  #134 West Porpoise Bay    Ethel Jure 885-2868  #135 East Porpoise Bay     Joan Foster 885-5251  #136 Tillicum Bay Rita Willoughby 885-2920  #137 SelmaPark Carol Joe 885-3952  #138 Wilson Creek West    Dorothy Carter 885-5352  #139 Wilson Creek East     Vega Brannan 886-2998  or call Lorraine Mitchell, 885-2670  Carl at council  continued   from   page   one  navigated by anyone in any kind of boat if only they have patience  and a tide book. They have only to wait for a high slack tide and  sail through as on a mill pond, a trip which might take five minutes  in a fast boat and ten in a slow one. People go down and look at it  when it is in full bore. Go take a look sometime when it is high  slack. It's beautiful!  Anyone who has been up Salmon Inlet and Narrows Inlet on a  leisurely trip will agree to its beauty. And the many beaches and  picnic spots can be enjoyed for family outings. It is very seldom  wind and rough water get to the point where one cannot travel,  but there are many protected bays where one can wait for quiet  water.  If immediate steps were taken to improve the fish stocks in the  Inlets so that a boater would have a fair chance at a salmon, cod,  prawns, oysters and clams, our campsites and local stores would  be so busy we could keep up with the expansion that is presently  going on in the Village and would have to double our campsite  facilities. And we wouldn't have to wait for three governments to  agree on the canal concept or start a revolution to get one built. It  could be started RIGHT NOW!  So there you arc! You can easily see the trouble I have with these  Twins of mine. I can get as excited as Castor about the canal, but  somehow, I feel safer and more at home with Pollux and his  scheme. So I will cast my lot with him and suffer the jibes and  catcalls of the other. God help me!  One more thing before we go. Both Twins have an ingrained  sense of responsibility and feel duty bound to report a few other  items of Council business.  Mayne resigns  We were all sorry to hear of Jack Mayne's resignation from the  Board of Variance over a regulation in the Act. Alderman Hall  expressed his concern and agreed to meet with Jack before the  resignation is accepted.  Replotting  Mr. David O'Brien presented a re-plotting scheme covering a  large area into which Medusa Street will be extended westward  and up the hill. For a short time, the Village will be proud owners  Pictured above are the Legion 109 executive and the executive of the Ladies Auxiliary.  The swearing in took place last Tuesday evening.  of the total package for all ownership titles have been cancelled.  However, this won't last long as the new plan is being in the  process of being registered in the Land Registry Office.  As soon as this is done, new titles will be issued to the former  owners, 92?; of whom had agreed to the plan. The other 8%  involved underground rights of Union Steamships and the  signature of a gentleman who is presently in hospital.  Access trails  Alderman Hall questioned Mr. O'Brien on inclusion of access  to hiking trails, a plan on which he is presently working. He was  told that access has been assured.  Alderman Hall has requested thai all residents of the  community who arc interested in the development of trails  throughout the area, please contact him at any time for input  which would assist him in completing the plan.  Accident Claim  A letter from L. Hunter regarding an accident to his wife's car as  she entered traffic from the 'Dock' parking area, was considered.  Mr. Hunter requested damages of $ 1.375 from the Village, stating  that the accident happened because the Village has not restricted  parking of vehicles close to the exit. The request was turned down,  but the Mayor assured that parking restrictions would be looked  into. ��� - ���> " .'  And on that note, in (he hope that I still have an editor and a  reader or two and have satisfied both Castor and Pollux. I will end  my Sechelt Council report!  Bazaars  Although it seems a bit early  to start thinking about Christmas bazaars, this is the best  time to arrange the dates.  An example of this is that the  Gibsons Legion Hall has been  already booked by the Anglican Church for November 8.  The Legion will be holding  their own bazaar on December  6.  In the interest of good  planning and to avoid overlapping, clubs and societies should  book now.  Political  wives  Politicians' wives seem to  suffer particularly from an  illusive sense of self-worth.  Margaret Trudeau has been  on a long, public, and often  tedious quest to find herself.  Joan Kennedy and Betty Ford  suffer variations of the same  trip.  Although Joe Clark's wife  Maureen appears to enjoy her  first lady role, she carefully  keeps all options open retaining her maiden name, aiming to  continue her law career and  even run for office. The quest  for self isn't exclusively a  female problem as Prince  Philip and Britain's Prime  Minister Margaret Thatcher's  husband can testify.  Philip lets off steam playing  polo, flying planes, and taking  pot-shots at cheeky journalists.  Ian Thatcher stolidly kept up  his own career (he's rich), and  delicately circumvented the  wives' inevitable round of  cocktails, shopping and hospital tours during a recent  Commonwealth conference in  Zambia by, as the press put it,  "playing a great deal of golf".  Journalist-broadcaster, Mi-  chele Landsberg, wife of former Ontario N.D.P. leader  Stephen Lewis, who has been  there herself, says no matter  how she acts and what she says  a political wife can't win. The  only solution she sees is to pay  wives a salary and spell out  their duties and treat them with  the impersonal respect accorded public servants���if  wives are to play a public role  and be publicly accountable.  Landsberg warns a political  wife's job is..."a muddle of  conflicting demands and ambiguous rewards. No one elects  her and no one pays her."  Coast News, January 22, 1980  11.  Sunshine Coast SnooHer Tournament  to be held at  THE DCCL HALL  downtown Sechelt  Senior Citizens 1/2 Price Dally 11 a.m. -1 D.m.  [ Monday Nile Groups Of Four 7-8:30 p.m. 1/2 Price  Tuesday Nile Couples 7-8:30 p.m. 1/2 Price  Wednesday Nile Ladies 7-8:30 p.m. 1/2 Price  The Pool Hall Question 01 The weed  ire you uonu with me  attar aamr mat-to-do's?  AliHIDRb  CEDHR  Mil  lEu      Product of British Columbia  QUALITY LIVING WITH CEDAR  Every detail in a Llndat Cedar Home radiates gracious, yet sensible  living.  And  every Lindal floor plan permits almost unlimited design  flexibility. Over 60 original plans are available. Each can be modified  to fit your particular needs and tastes. Or we can help you design  your very own plan.   AbinDMiCEORRHOmES   INDEPENDENTLY DISTRIBUTED BY  M.C. MacKenzie Limited  6342 Bay St., Horseshoe Bay  West Vancouver, B.C. V7W 2G9  (604)921-8010   921-9268  Enclosed is $3 for Planbook and Design Guide  Name   Street ,   City _Prov. Code_  Phone  -location of building lot-  ZsA SUNSHINE  \jy KITCHENS  FINE CABINETS  886-9411  Gibsons  885-9666  SWANSON'S  Ready-Mix Ltd.  Quality Concrete  0    Excavating Ltd.    O  Excavating Ltd.  Wharf Road, Box 172  Sechelt, B.C.  Septic Systems  Excavations  Dralnflelds  885-5333  L & H SWANSON Ltd.  Sand-Gravel  Dump Trucks  The Pender Harbour Aquatic Society  is now accepting applications for Junior Life-Guard  positions. Applicants must be the holder of a valid  certificate. Please write your letter of application by  February 15, 1980, and send to:  Directors,  Pender Harbour Aquatic Society,  Box 361, Madeira Park, B.C.  VON 2H0  For further information please phone 883-9257 or 883-9923  Come  cry     ���������  Dear Ann,  I'm in love and walking on  air. I'm looking at life through  the proverbial rose coloured  glasses. Will this love continue  to have this euphoria? What  I 'm wondering is will this prove  to be the love of my life? How  can I tell this hasn't happened  to me before.  In A Trance.  Dear In A I ranee.  What a wonderful time of  >mir life when everything beloved does is perfect. When  ever} touch and glance is a thrill.  Who cares if It's the love of your  life, it's a wonderful feeling and  everything takes on new meaning and delight. Time will tell if it  has foreverness.  Dear Ann,  I'd just like to bounce this  situation off of you. I lived with  a man part-time for around a  year. We had high points but  lots of lows. So much so 1 was  losing my confidence and love  of life. I broke off and feel  much better but he keeps  hanging on. He pops up where  ever I go. He keeps wanting to  get together. It is upsetting to  say the least. When I'm out for  the evening or at my place of  business. I don't want to be  hurtful but I can't go back.  How to conclude this affair?  Finished  Dear Finished,  You've said it all. Just don't  encourage him. Be firm and no  way allow him to interfere with  your job. Just be firm and don't  look back. It's no kinder to end  an affair slowly. This keeps the  other person's hopes up. That's  easy in love affairs.  Waterbeds on Display  doniodown quilts  and Waterbed Bedding  Polyester Pillows     Feather Pillows  Queens - $9.����  Kings - ��12.00  $17.00  $23.00  Queens  Kings  J.P. Stevens  Custom     Bath Towels  Drapes Reg.,13i���0 Special: $6.5��  Free Estimates No Obligations  VMjrjrjr^Jrjirjr.jtrj0rjrj0'jr^jrjrjrjrj0-jrj0'jrjv^  Burn up to  2/3 LESS WOOD!  Cozy Comfort C-110  * Uses less fuel  * Long burn 8 to 14 hrs.  * Thermostat controlled  * Converts to fireplace  instantly  * Even temperatures  * Cook lop feature  * No waste of wood gases  * Air tight  8" SMOKE OUTLET  VALLEY COMFORT  SAFETY DESIGNED  THERMOSTAT  PREHEATING MANIFOLDS  Made In Canada  Made In Canada i I  The secondary air intakes above Ihe primary firs  zone adds even more efficiency by burning wood  gases otherwise lost up Ihe chimney.  Cozy Comfort  FIREPLACE ADAPTERS  in Stock  Take Note: A heater that is not thermostatically controlled and is without preheated  primary or secondary air intake gasket sealed door, averages well below 50% burning  efficency. Valley Comfort heaters operate at 80% efficiency.  Buy your wood heater direct from Thomas Heating warehouse in Lower Gibsons and  Save Big Dollars���Also see other Valley Comfort wood heaters.  ^1  THOMAS  HEATING LTD.  14 years experience.  Serving the Coast  since 1967.  CALL NOW  886-7111 12.  Coast News, January 22,1980  Hi   Yeur Mtjtstv! ifou  aoinj   io   fha Bio Hydro  MeeJinQ Tonijht ?  Aft   tfcu   KidJinj? All  -fhcy mill tkf��i   ��'������  Stmt elephnils and" clowns 1  Wc'//   *�� t*er��i  Some questions for B.C. Hydro  b> Terr) Cowderoy  According to B.C. Hydro,  "the besl solution" to Van-  couver Island's long term  energj needs will be the  transmission of power from the  mainland,  Al ;i meeting in Madeira  Park on March 31.1979, Hydro  gave us our last chance to  Jim-US', their proposal to meet  those additional energy needs,  (Justification ofthe Cheekye-  Dunsmuir Line).  March 31 was a long time  ago and now B.C. Hydro is in  Phase 2 of implementing their  proposal. Phase I was to:  a) decide the Cheekye-Dunsmuir line was needed.  b) publically declare Hydro's  intention to build it.  c) allow the public to let off  steam in the form of disapproval, then move right on  into Phase 2 which seems to  be:  a) refusing to hear publicly any  more questions of justification, (because they already  dealt with these in Phase 1).  b) holding a public meeting to  make il look like the people  have a meaningful choice in  the matter.  c) patting each other on the  back for all the effort put  into being publicly responsible and moving quickly into  Phase 3- Building the Line.  January 22 is the rescheduled  date of the Phase 2 meeting at  Madeira Park Community  Hall. There you can talk till  Hydro's heart is content,  (probably about 10:30p.m.)on  whether the Cheekye-Dunsmuir line should cross over  Sakinaw Lake or between it  and Ruby Lake or go over the  hill by the river between this  tree or that tree. Which way  should this thing go anyway���  over our dead bodies or under  them?  If the people ofthe Sunshine  Coast or Vancouver Island  discuss any routing questions  at this or any other meeting  before the question of justification has been completely  dealt with (and it has not) then  we will surely get what we  deserve.  There are hundreds of possible questions to be answered.  ! lere are a couple off the top of  my head:  V Why has the true nature of  the actual cost of this project  been concealed from the  public until now? $315  million becomes $700 million becomes almost a  billion.  II. Why will it cost the people of  British Columbia more than  ���$700 million to provide  Crown Zellerbach's $171  million newsprint mill with  electricity when, according  to IL dro's own William A  future il monolithic and ulti-  matelj   unhealthly   energy  sources arc viewed as the only  Burton "The net effect ofthe  Crown Zellerbach expansion on the Island seems to  be 125 jobs!" And if, as  Hydro Vice-President Nash  suggests, that the public  doesn't necessarily understand the facts of inflation,  might that be partially  because the "experts" do not  readily provide the public  with those facts?  C, Why, when according to  Vice-President Nash "it is  Hydro's responsibility to  supply power requested by  its consumers", and when  many responsible people arc  questioning the Island's  need for large energy using  industrial projects, hasn't  there been equal economic  enthusiasm developed to  study packages of indigenous power sources, hydro as  well as sun, wind, tide, hog  fuel and methanol as alternatives to costly transmission lines?  D.Does B.C. Hydro plan to  construct nuclear power  sources on the Island or is  there a nuclear connection  in the works for the Cheekye-Dunsmuir Line?  E. Would it not ultimately be  more feasible (i.e. less  ��� costly) for any industry  considering plant expansion  to move to Mainland locations, especially when  their necessary raw materials must all be purchased  from the Coast or the B.C.  Interior?  From the recently leaked  memorandum of W.A. Burton,  Head of Building Programs  Section���"There may be some  extra costs to industry in  ancilliary facilities such as  docks, warehouses, etc., but at  least the province would not be  required to provide hidden  subsidies in the form of transmission crossings and government owned shipping facilities."  On almost all levels this  project still requires basic  justification economically,  politically, environmentally,  and esthetically. What is the  long-term overall impact for  the people of B.C. and their  Toronto  realistic alternative?  As usual the experts have  moved into Phase 2, while the  people of B.C. are still trying to  come to terms with Phase 1.  The  only  discussion  at  the  meeting tonight in Madeira  Park must be discussions of  justification. Any discussion of  routing gives B.C. Hydro the  Public O.K. to move into Phase  3.  continued limn page five  almost unwillingly, Toronto is  a city of many churches and a  great many cemeteries but it is  not a mellow city. It is rich and  cheap (witness Ihe Massey  Mansion), n is vulgar, clever,  imitative and guarded. You  would know, even if you didn't  know, that Toronto is the home  of the C.B.C. but you would  have lo remind yourself that it  is also ihe home of the Banting  and Best Institute and of the  magnificient Art galleries.  1 oronto is a foreign country  and in between biting each  other on street corners they do  not know we exist. They think  only as far west as Thunder  Bay. Get down on your knees,  Sunshine Coasters, and give  thanks that we live where we  do. Let's not let that sort of  thing happen here.  <IH&^  YOUR AUTOPLAN  CENTRJ  Taking care of  __ all your Real Estate Needs |  Seaside Plaza Evenings  886-2000    Norm Peterson Dennis Suvege  _ 886-9121    886-2607       or 886-7264  ROMAN CATHOLIC  SERVICES  Rev. Angelo De Pompa.  Parish Priest  Times of Masses  Saturday, 5:00 p.m.  Si. Mary's, Gibsons  Regular Sunday Masses  9:00 a.m. Our Lady of Lourdes  Church, Sechelt  Indian Reserve  10:00 a.m. Holy Family  Church. Sechelt  12:00 noon Si. Mary's Church.  Gibsons  Confessions before Mass  Phone: 885-9526 or 885-5201  tilHSONS PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  Highway & Martin  Sunday 9:45  Morning Worship 11:00  Evening Fellowship 7:00  Home Bible Study  Call Pastor Ted Boodle  886-7107 or 886-9482  Affiliated with the  Pentecostal Assemblies of  Canada  hone 886-2660  Sunday School - 9:45 a.m.  Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship 6 p.m.  Bible Study - Wed. 7:30 p.m.  Pastor Nancy Dvkes  UNITED CHURCH  Davis Bay-St. John's United  Worship, Sunday 9:30 a.m.  Study Session  Thursday, 2:30 p.m.  Gibsons-Gibsons United  Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.  Sunday Worship, 11:00 a.m.  Study Session  Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.  Prayer and Share  Wednesday, 1:30 p.m.  Pastor  The Rev. George W. Inglis.H n.  Phone 886-2333  SEVEN 111-DAY ADVENTIST  CHURCH  Sabbath School Sat., 10 a.ni.  Hour of Worship Sal., 11 a.m.  Si. John's Uniled Church  Davis Bay  Pastor C, Drieberg  Everyone Welcome  For information phone:  885-9750 or 883-2736  i\ Church 5ervices  rMitten Realty Ltd.  rWhere Real Estate Is Serious Business  - But A Pleasure!  885-3295  ANNOUNCEMENT  MITTEN REALTY  is pleased to announce that  they have moved to a better  and bigger location in the  Trail Bay Mall.  Entry from Cowrie St. parking lot  as well as from the Mall passage.  The management and staff  would like to welcome all their  customers and friends, old and new,  to visit them in their new location.  Corry Ron   Rene Sutherland   Terry Brackett   Don Lock   Emllie Henderson  885-9250 885-9362 885-9865        885-3730 885-5383  Ray Bernler        Suzanne Dunkerton   Terrl Hanson  885-5225 885-3971 886-8295  Sunshine Coast Historical  Calendar  Now Only  The Second Annual  -tLstHistp/...  !{*/  V  jOf����  ~r''.' ���   w..i'��'~0'" ���  '-:'���'': ��� .��   ���. ��  v,80.     -,.    |W*S        -  \0  ��4i,s  "3$  ^  ���J?*  ***,  ���iV*  i&$  fes  9-fV.  \f>  2*  i  mi  W  fc  rasa  .<&���.  te"  3  3��  7.9  U-': ;���-'.���:'������  A Coast News Production  at   these  stores.  Miss Bee, Sechelt  Madeira Park Pharmacy  B & J Store in Halfmoon Bay  Jay-Cee Store, Horseshoe Bay  Sea view Market, Roberts Creek  Fawkes Books, Sunnycrest Mall  Books and Stuff     Trail Bay Mall  Duthies Books, Robson St. Vancouver  Douglas Variety Goods, Sunnycrest Mall  N.D.P. Bookstore, Lower Village, Gibsons  The Coast News Office (behind the Co-op)  The Bookstore in Sechelt, (formerly Windflower)  A treasury of early Sunshine Coast photographs with text by noted local  historian  L. R. Peterson, lay-out by Sharon L. Berg and monthly astrological  notes by the Coast  News' resident astrologer Rae Ellingham. m  Coast News, January 22,1980  13.  Wildlife  corner  by Ian Torrance  I've just finished reading u  January 15 press release Irom  Stephen Rogers, the Minister of  the Environment, li looks like  we are going back to poisoning  the wolves again. Here are a  few excerpts from il.  "The Minister of the I-n-  vlronme'nt, Stephen Rogers,  said today he had instructed Ihe  Fish and Wildlife Branch to  reapply for a permit to use  certain pesticides for predator  control where no other method  of control has proved effective.  "When Ihe use of peslicides  was halted by Mr. Mair's  moratorium, livestock losses  caused by wolves were up more  than 30% from the previous  year.  "The decision to resume the  limited use of pesticides���1080  and cyanide���is based on the  most reliable information that  my staff have been able to  gather on the subject.  "We are not embarking on a  massive campaign to poison  wolves, or to wipe out the wolf  population in British Columbia.  "Much of the poison passes  through the victim's body in  the urine, while the remainder  is spread throughout the body.  The chance of secondary  poisoning���non target animals  being poisoned from the original carcass���is practically eliminated.  "The Branch expects to use  no more than five grams of this  poison during a full year of  predator control. Compare this  amount with the two to three  metric tonnes of 1080 that are  used each year in New Zealand  for pest control, and you can  see that we are not going  overboard."  The six page release all  makes sense on the surface,and  1 will probably be accused of  being an arm chair ecologist  when 1 try to poke holes in it,  but...  Looking through some press  clippings, 1 notice that a farmer  in the Kispiox Valley complains about the wolf problem.  She says that although they  have lost no stock, the animals  are nervous and won't put on  any weight. That's a little bit of  a change of statement from  when the wolves were munching up the herds.  In Tony Ebert's column in  the Province, he notes that in  Alberta 35,000 coyotes have  been dusted in the past year and  farmers are worried about  being overrun by rodents. He  goes on to mention that the  U.S. Government has dropped  development of 1080. A four  man team in Alberta managed  to kill 1,000 coyotes last year. If  this is possible in Alberta, then  what is wrong with the rugged  outdoorsmen in our province,  do they spend so much time  shooting off their mouths that  they have forgotten how to  shoot a gun and have to revert  to poison?  At the pound  There are several dogs up for  adoption at the Village pound.  A toy male pomeranian; an  unspayed lab cross; a male  Samoyed husky cross and a  male brown collie.  If you are interested in any  of  these  dogs,  contact   the  Gibsons Village office.  It's oil wrong  I sec that two bays in the  Arctic are going to be deliberately polluted with oil in order  to calculate the environmental  effect it will have on the area.  This will be a four year study  conducted by the oil industry.  It seems a wee bit strange to me  that the pollution will be in  Canadian waters, when most of  the oil conglomerate is owned  by the U.S. Are there no  suitable bays in Alaska that  would do just as well?  Last week's tanker breakdown in Alaska couldn't have  come at a better time. The  super tanker was coming down  the Coast fully loaded when it  lost the power in its generators.  It drifted to within four miles of  the Coast before it regained its  power. Now surely the Canadian government will have  enough backbone to stand up  to Carter and his ideas about a  tanker route down the West  Coast.  Odds'n'ends  Mr. Rouse of Chapman  Road called to say that while  his wife was feeding the  sparrows, a Pygmy Owl came  down and made off with one.  Any chance that she could start  feeding starlings?  Just about every week I hear  reports that there are dog  problems in the Pender area.  Last week's one was pretty  straight forward. A female  German Shcphard in heat was  roaming around with a large  entourage at the Madeira Park  school, apparently it's now  under control. Two wceksago I  was going into the Ponderosa  grocery store in Garden Bay  when a bad tempered little mutt  started snapping at my leg. It  wasn't big enough to do  anything except annoy me, but  it was getting the larger dogs  into the act. The owner of the  dog had no control over it and  began walking away quite  unconcernedly. Needless to say  she was followed by a stream of  oaths from me, until the lady in  the store tapped me on the  shoulder and told me that the  girl was deaf. I felt a bit silly,  Skelly blasts Clark on tankers  by Ray Skelly, M.P.  Powell River: Ray Skelly, New Democrat M.P. for Comox-  Powell River, said today the Clark government's "fuzzy position"  was one reason President Carter decided in favour ofthe Northern  Tier Pipeline with an oil port at Port Angeles.  "This is a disastrous decision," Skelly said. "It will mean oil  tankers���supertankers���will be travelling along the B.C. Coast  between Alaska and Port Angeles, Inevitably there will be an oil spill.  It is only a matter of how big that spill will be."  He said the Conservative government has failed to make clear to  the United States that such tanker traffic is completely  unacceptable.  "The Conservatives will try to use as an excuse the fact that the  Prime Minister was unable to discuss the matter with President  Carter in person because the Carter visit to Ottawa was cancelled in  Creek Auxiliary  November," Skelly said. "If that is what they say, it means Mr. Clark  does not know how to use a telephone. There is no excuse for the  Americans being uncertain about our position."  Skelly said he has sent a letter to Clark, Premier Bennett, and  Federal Environment Minister John Fraser calling on them to  pressure the U.S. government not to proceed with the Northern Tier  Proposal.  In his letter to Clark he said Canada should immediately take five  measures to ward off impending catastrophy:  1. Express Canada's unequivocal oppostition to the plan.  2. Advise the United States that Canada would not view tankers  travelling within our 200 mile limit as being in "peaceful passage".  3. If the Americans proceed with the plan advise them that we would  have to re-examine our energy agreements with them.  4. Upgrade Canadian Coast Guard inspections and standards for  tankers travelling in Canadian waters.  5. Acquire adequate oil spill clean-up equipment for the West Coast.  The Roberts Creek Hospital  Auxiliary met January 14 with  president Pauline Lamb in the  chair. Nineteen members attended and a new member was  received; Ms. Win Stevens.  Reports showed continued  activity in spite of holidays and  but was still damn mad. If  people are going to own  animals, then it is their responsibility to control them.  The same people will probably  be the first to complain about  their rights when they notice an  increase in their tax bill to cover  the cost of a dog catcher.  That's all for the moment, if  you want to contact me, call me  at 886-2622/886-7817 or 886-  9151, ta.  climactic conditions. It should  be noted that the library cart  which makes hospital rounds is  one of the Auxiliary services  and is offered free to hospital  patients. At this time our  librarian would be pleased to  receive donations of westerns  or of science fiction. They may  be left at the information desk  or the gift shop in the hospital.  The Bursary which this  Auxiliary offers to a student  enrolling in one of the health  sciences was discussed and will  be available again in 1980.  The date was selected for  the 1980's Fall Bazaar���October 18, at the Community  Hall in Roberts Creek.  Delivering the haggis is a serious bus ess. John  Wilson was doing the honours at last Saturday's Burns  Supper in the Gibsons Legion Hall.  J"~U   Coast Business Directory J-}**  I ACCOMODATION I  n  \&\  ��p  HALFMOON BAY. B.C.  885-2232  * Heated Pool    * Sauna  WINTER DINING HOURS  Fri. to Sat. 6 to 9 p.m.  Sun. 5 to 8 p.m.  Catering To Small Groups  Monday Thru Thursday  Reservations Only  Open 7 Days For Lodge Guests  BOflMEBROOK    LODGE  OCEAN BEACH ESPLANADE GOWER POINT ROAD GIBSONS. B.C.  Comfortable accomodation by the day, week  or month. 886-9033  BLUE SKY MOTEL  "On the waterfront at Davis Bay"  Overlooking Georgia Strait and the Islands  SLEEPING & HOUSEKEEPING UNITS  ^Colour Cablevision & Complimentary Collee    885-9987>  BELLA BEACH MOTEL  ON THE BEACH AT DAVIS BAY  1 & 2 bdrm. housekeeping units  Colour T. V., Cable  885-8581  UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP  Haikonens,  .  R.R.m (Davis Bay)  Sechelt, B.C.  VON 3A0  I APPLIANCES I  HARRISON'S APPLIANCE SALES  Parts and Service  Tuesday ��� Saturday 9 ��� 5  !��*!.     886-9959 Pratt Rd., Gibsons  JOHN HIND-SMITH  REFRIGERATION & MAJOR APPLIANCE SERVICE  Port Mellon to Pender Harbour  Res. 886-9949  I AUTOMOTIVE I  ��� ���, specialize in Volkswagen Repairs  4K��> European fflatata  Darts   885-9466 *honda*  need lires?  ,-. ... Come in to  *il      COASTAL TIRES  nt the S-BENDS on Highway 101  Phone 886-2700  SUPERIOR MUFFLER  Gibsons       BING'S EXHAUST LTD.      886-8213  100% Warranty on Parts and Labour  All Exhaust Systems, Plus Dual Exhaust Conversions J  Economy huto parts bid.  Automobile. Industrial  and Body Shop Supplies  Sechelt     885-5181  CABINETS I  SUNSHINE    KITCHENS  ^HINEtT- REMODELL1NU  Showroom in Twilight TheatreBldg.        8X6-9411  OPEN SAT. 10-5 OR BY APPOINTMENT  I CONTRACTING I  SUNCOAST TRUSS LTD. SJJuT  (Gibsons) 886-7318  Located next to Windsor Plywood p.o. Box 748  Residential & Commercial Roof Trusses Gibsons B.C J  w  CONSTRUCTION LIMITED  We specialize in:      Concrete Foundation Work and Framing  Free advice on building questions to do-it- yourself builders.  Vern Koessler Box 888, Sechelt. 886-2344 Anytime885-2525  I ELECTRICAL I  ^Holland Electric Ltd.  W #        Bill Achterberg  11)        886-9232  r. aim ELECTRIC  General Wiring &  Qualified Workmanship  f:R#2MARLENERD.,  ^    ROBERTS CREEK  885-5379  T.V. SERVICE  Sunshine Coast T.V.  Mon. to Sat. 9:30-5:30 885-9816  J  ANDREASSEN    ELECTRIC  (GIBSONS CO.I Serving the Sunshine Coast  ILIXTRK'AL CONTRACTOR  Per Andreassen 886-9439  General Delivery Granthams Landing, B.C.  Tom Flieger   Phone 886-7868  LECTRICAL  P( Box 214. Gibsons. B.C.  ONTRACTING V0N 1V0  I EXCAVATING I  J.B.EXCAVATING  886-9031  Water, sewer, drainage installation  ��� Dump Truck ���  Backhoe  ��� Cat ��� Land Clearing  ��� Free Estimates ��� Septic Fields  I FLOOR COVERING I  BI mi installations  17 Years Experience  Commercial And Residential  Floor Coverings  88B-SN1  SEAVIEW CARPETS - CABINETS  SHOWROOM OPEN  Open 10 6, Tues. to Sat. Friday to 9  886-2417 922-2017    TOLL FREE  CARPET-CABINET-CERAMIC CENTRE  Open Tues. - Sat.   10 a.m. ��� 5 p.m.  Howe Sound Distributors Ltd.  North Road. Gibsons, B.C. 886-2765  THOMAS HEATING  OILBURNERSERVICE       ......  Complete Instrument OOO" /111  jOmptete Inslru  set-up ol turn  II MISC. SERVICES I  Trouble waking up?   Alarm clock broken down?  WAKE UP SERVICE  885-5115  24 hour service  reasonable rates  "'  1  P. M. GORDON  1  B.C. LAND SURVEYOR  11  ,1       P.O. Box609  y       Sechelt, B.C.                                              Bus. 885 2332  P       VON3A0                                                    Res. 886-7701  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  885-9973     Port Mellon to Ole's Cove     886-2938  Commercial Containers Available  b��-����6 GIBSONS LANES Hw*101fv  Open Bowling Hours: Friday & x->:  * Saturday 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.    t. }A  and Sunday 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. u*^*r  MOVING AND STORAGE  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER LTD.  Household Moving & Storage Complete Packing  Packing Materials for Sale  Phone 886-2864     Member Allied Van Lines     R.F). 1, Gibsons  Box 65  Sechelt  Village Tile Co.  PROFESSIONAL CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATIONS  BATHROOMS - KITCHENS - ENTRANCE HALLS  Joe Jacques  Phone  885-3611  Mickey's Drywall  * machine Taping     * steal Stud     * Ml wort auaranteed  ��� Boarding    * suspended Callings      * Tanning  Sechelt, B.C. 885-3115  /^J\ TRANSWEST HELICOPTERS /AN  \0gk) (1965) LTD. \*P)  >���' Charter Helicopter Service ^"^  Box 875 886-7511 Gibsons  ms  afflffijr.  U CARPET I      ��� u  7~JUPH0LSTERY  \3mm  A***** DRIFTWOOD CRAFTS * AND****^  CRAFT SUPPLIES  *- ���  *  SEWING NOTIONS  H   JEWELRY^  WOOL  Sunnycrest   Shopping   Centre/Olbsons   886-2525  Pager system  receiver - Doctors, Lawyers, Fishermen, etc.  885-5115  ^Upholsterers  '     Serving Sunshine  Coast and Vancouver  883-9901 All Furniture - Marine - Boat Tops  TREE TOPPING  VIEW DEVELOPMENTS LTD.  Clean up your wooded areas.      Marv Volen  Remove lower limbs for VIEW.      886-9597  Top tall trees adjacacent to building  PICTURE FRAMES  Custom Made  Needle Point A Specialty  885-9573  1450 Trident Ave.  CIA Plumbing  New Installations  Alterations & Repairs H/W Heating,  Water Heaters, Etc.      Commercial & Residential  All Work Guaranteed     Phone 885-2558  I PAINTING I  Terry Connor  880-7040 Jj  PAINTING CONTRACTU  Box040.GibiOM.IIC.  I RESTAURANTS I  Having a party   or get-together?  DIAL A BOTTLE  Also sod drinks,   mix and cigarettes. .  Sen ing I'url Mellon. Gibsons. 885"u115/  Roberts (reek, Davis liu>. Sechelt, Hallmoon Hay.  Quality Form & Garden Supply Ltd.  886-7527  Pratt Rd  Gibsons  Chinese & Western Food Licensed Premises  Tuesday to Sunday  Lunch: 11:30 am -4:00 p.m. Dinner:   4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.  Chinese Food now on Lunch Menu  Lower Gibsons 886-9219    Take Out Available  Li  Feed  Pet Food  * Fencing  * Fertilizer  ^tm  PENDGR HARBOUR RESTAURANT  CANADIAN AND CHINESE FOOD  Madeira Park Shopping Centre  Eat In & Weekdays      t1:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.  T��ke out Friday & Sal. 11:30 a.m. -11:00 p.m.  883-2413     Sunday 4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.ni.^ 14.  r  Coast News, January 22, 1980  COAST NEWS CLASSIFIED ADS  birth/  Phone ihe Coast Newi for this free  service. ^T*  obiluoiic/  Raines: On January 14, 1980 at St.  Mary's Hospital. Sechelt, Melville  Raines, laic of Roberts Creek, age  70 years. Survived by his loving  wife Charlotte, 2 sons, ferry of  Roberts Creek and Phil ol Ciib-  sons, I grandson, Douglas, 1 sister,  Mrs. Gloria Bland. Memorial  Service was held on Saturday,  January 19, ma Irom Devlin  Funeral Home Rev. J Paetkau  officiating. Cremation. Devlin  Funeral Home directors.  Jackson: Reginald I (Keg.) of  Vancouver. B.C. on January 13,  1980 in his 86th year. Survived by  his loving family, wife Reba;  daughters. Norma and Marjorie;  son-in-law Bob VVhytc of Connecticut; sister. Mr-. B. Dunfieldof  Vancouver and his nieces and  nephews; also his sisters-in-law,  Mrs. Charlotte Jackson ol Wilson  Creek, B.C. and Mrs. Evelyn  lackson of iNanaimo. He was  oredeceased by his sisters, Joan,  Marjoite and Dorothy and by his  brothers. George. Al, Stonewall.  Terry and Tom. The Rev. W.  Stephens conducted a Memorial  Service on January 16 in St.  Phillip's Anglican Church, Vancouver. Cremation. Flowers gratefully declined. Arrangements  through the Memorial Society of  B.C. and First Memorial Services.  pci/oftol  I have never written an anonymous  letter lo Doreen Lee or to anv  other person. Violet lyner.      #5  Fists up to Archie who is a petty  stranger with hidden motives,  locking people out of their own  homes is going too tar! No. Class.  T-C fl3  Alcoholics Anonymous 886-S089.  T.l N  live/lock  te  For Sale: 2 doe 1 oggenberg goats.  Bcjl oiler. 886-2778. ��3  Urgent: Need pasture with shelter  for 1 marc. Also: 2 Western saddles  lor sale. Make an offer. 886-9622  announcement/  Upstairs  Downstairs Shoppe are  pleased to announce that Donald  Dombroski won the Cuisinart  food processor.  thanks  Special thanks to Drs, Hobson,  Rogers, Lubin and ait the nurses  and staff at St. Mary's Hospital  and all m\ friends for their flowers  and cards. [ can't speak too highly  of St. Mary's and the excellent care  I received there. Leonard B.  Mac-Donald. ��3  [Transcendental Meditation  program (TM) as taught by  Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.  Personal and private instruction. 886-7988. tfn  IMMM tor I wiuTitMNff   |  llllllll  MIU1  IIHI1 I  GREENHOUSE     I  See us ha COROPLAST   ]  km uonoiitirv l aoii tods lu.I  m-7111  help wonted  We require experienced power  sewing machine operators. Apply  in person to Pcnco Manufacturing  Ltd., Gibsons. 886-8161. #5  Sunshine Coast Community Services Society is seeking applicants  for a 2 day per week position as a  clerk in the Society office. Duties  consists of typing, filing. Mini-bus  scheduling, dispatching and telephone handling. Please submit  resume to the Society, Box 1069,  Sechelt. B.C. 03  Woman to help new mother with  light housework and babysitting,  part-time, in late February and  March. Live-in or out. 886-9411,  03  1 utors needed to work with adults  in Mil programs on Reading,  Writing and Spelling skills two  hours per week. Pay in satisfaction  only. Please call 885-5881, The  Volunteer Bureau. #5  oppoflunUie/  ������������������������i  CRAZY BLUE JEANS  Operale your own discount outlet  store wilh brand name jeans, shirts,  sweaters, etc Exclusive areas lucrative   deal    complete   set-up    small  capital outlay, training  Call or wnle [include tel no.)  CRAZY BLUE JEANS LTD.  77 Mount Royal Street West  Montreal. Quebec H2T 2S5  Tel  (514) 842 3821  y��m$5  ~Jt\NET/Q  TUB dt TOP  SHOP  S.��*i.*>PI��c.   ,  Hours: Fri. & Sat.  10 a.m. -5 p.m.  Appointments anytime  Call 886-7621  pet/  PROFESSIONAL  DOG GROOMING  for small breeds.  Call Sharon 886-2084  Peninsula Kennels  Boarding &  Professional  Grooming  ALL Breeds  Phone 888-7713. Blbsons.  lo/l  Approx. 8" x 12" brown zippcred,  leather case with Bible and private  papers inside. Lost in Gibsons area  Wednesday 9. Please contact  Kathrvn Warn, Halfmoon Bay,  885-9397. 83  found  A 3 month old great dane-type  male puppy. Two tone brown with  some light markings. Picked up  Ihursdas evening near St. Mary's  Hospital. Call S.I'.C.A. 886-9652  or 885-5482, Hi  Found in (iarden Bay. man's gray  sun and shirt wilh Kinsman  button. Regal Clothiers make. 883-  2451 Hi  PB#-#5  Announcement/  Gibsons Legion Branch #109  Jj Presents      J. i  JJ "BULLET" #  Fri. & Sat.  Jan. 25th & 26th    9 p.m. - 1 a.m.  LUNCHES AVAILABLE  11:00 to 6:00 p.m. Monday-Saturday  Friday, Saturday also 9:00 p.m. - 12:30 a.m.  wonted  32 year old man with tools and  some carpentry experience wants  to learn cabinet and furniture  making. Learn on the job or at  night. Call Jacques, 886-2186.  US  For Cottage: Wardrobe, Chest ol  Drawers, wooden chairs. 885-  9210. Weekends. 886-2622/7817.  Ask lor Lyn or Allan.       T.F.N.  Alio, tenor and bass recorders.  885-9210. T.F.N.  Warded!  Older furniture, china, etc., bought  or sold on consignment llaiboui  Antiques, 1585 Marine Dr., Gibsons. T.F.N.  To buy or consign. Used furniture,  appliances, boats, trailers, old  cars, building supplies, etc., etc.  Pick up and delivery available.  Gibsons Second Hand. Phone886-  2650 eves. ��8  Wanted to Buy: Lugs or Timber.  Fir, Hemlock, Cedar ��� Porpoise  Bav Logging Ltd., 885-9408 or  885-2032. T.F.N.  Timber Wanted: Fir, Hemlock.  Cedar and Poles. Top prices. Let  us give you an estimate. D&O Log  Sorting Lid. Phone 886-7896 ot  886-7700. T.F.N.  Log Salvage gear, 886-2758 anytime. 1/5  LOGS WANTKU  Top Prices Paid For  Fir-Hemlock-Ccdar  L&K LUMBLK  (North Shore) Ltd.  Phone 886-7033  Sorting grounds. Twin Creek  monk wonted  Clean ups; rubbish removal; light  moving. Also 19 year old male high  school grad wants work. 886-9503.  Most trees, like pets, need care and  attention and trees are our  specialty.  * Topping  * Limbing  * Danger tree removal  An insured guaranteed service.  Peerless Tree Service Ltd.  885-2109  PENINSULA  ROOFING  & SHEET METAL  All Types of Roofing  & Re-Roofing  Henry Rodriguez  Sechelt     885-9585  MUSIC  LESSONS  YOU ENJOY  886-9030  Mom  essie  tSOH  Piano & Organ  Begin at age 4 and older  1614 Marine Drive, Gibsons  TELEPHONE  ANSWERING  SERVICE  886-7311  foi /ok  2 West Coast mirrors, $20 o.b.o.  Small B/W T.V., $25. Electric. 2  brush rug shampooer. Phone 886-  2SI2. h  Portable washer spin dry, as  new. $175. Clothes dryer, very  good. $80. Phone 886-7250.     Hi  1971 Gremlin sell for parts. Right  side smashed. New battery. ��xc.  motor, dutch, tires, etc. $250.886  9513.  03  Scuba diving buddy lor weekends.  Phone Jim 886-2096. M  Need Railing?  Think Wrought Iron  Phone  Coast Industries  886-9159  attic  l Antique*  j FABRIC SALE:  Cottons: $2-3/111  Poly Silks: $5/1111  Pongee: $2/m  '  40% Wool Blend !  60 in.: $9/111    <  Jersey       <  Interlock: <  $2-3/111 j  uiofh wonted  Batdorf bookkeeping services,  payrolls, monthly write-ups, tax  returns and financial statements.  886-7224 (Res.). ��5  CALL  The Sunshine Boys for your spring  cleaning needs. Indoor/outdoor.  Reliable service. No job too big or  too small. Pick up truck available.  Phone 886-7370. Special rates for  Seniors. rf5  I ton truck. Will haul, clean  basement, etc. 886-9058. #5  Antique furniture re-finishing.  Phone 886-9058. Hi  Needs Fixing Up?  Renovations and repairs, interior  and exterior. Call Brent at 886-  2551. T.I.N.  For Explosive Requirements  Dynamite, electric or regular caps,  IJ line V. cold and safely lu.se.  Contact Ciwen Nimmo, Cemetery  Road. Gibsons. Phone 886-7778.  Howe Sound Farmer Institute.  T.F.N.  WINDOW  CLEANING  Hourly or Contract  Free Estimates  Call for Appointment  Wednesday Morning  885-S735  T I N |  88S-S851.  or  885-2533  Complete Janitorial Supplies  Rent Professional Steam  (leaning Kquipment  laws: II-: Tins. Hi. 10-2 Sit.  for /ale  Tclcphoto Lens $50. 886-7725.  tiuruge Sale  Jan. 26    III a.m. Top of Lockyer  Rd. Household furnishing. 25 cu.  Ii. freezer, lots more, tti  H:iik Mulch. Large and small  orders. $13.50 yd. S86-9Q3I.  T.F.N.  Oil space heater; 45 gal. drum and  stand. S75. 886-2937. 114  Heavy duly tandem trailer with  adjustable reach. $1,200. Offers.  Suitable for small cat or iumber  carrier. 886-9316. K4  2 used Sundance trampolines. I  8'x8'-$300 and I 5'x7'-$150or$400  for both. 886-9316. #4  Canoe 14' fiberglass, $200. 886-  8261. #3  marine  Miller Marine  Electronics  Miller Marine  Manufacturing <;  t Miller Marine  metrical Services  886-7918   '!  property  One modern bathtub with fixtures,  including shower plus copper pipe.  Phone after six, 885-2964.        H  V.H.F. Two-way Radio sales and  service. 886-7215. T.F.N.  S3  Cushion Forms - $3.50 & up.  RliMNANT CLEARANCE  W.W. Upholstery & Boat Tops  Ltd, 886-7310. M  Shower doors, 60", $20; llohner  President Tenor Sax, $300; Knee  length red leather coal, ladies si/c  14, $50; I cord split firewood.  Phone 886-7159, i/5  Oirls Daoust skates, size 2'/i,$l5.  886-7949. ��5  Wotcrbed, 4' x T. $225. 885-3306.  Hi  I pair of Craig 3-wuy speakers.  Good condition. 886-9892 after 5  p.m. Hi  Queen size bed, $200. All wave  antenna, $50. 886-7669. 115  5' cast iron bathtub plus toilet and  vanity bowl. 2 child's desks.  Offers. Phone 886-2838. Hi  Large Olde F.nglishc Antique  Wardrobe. 886-9839. ��5  Sears 295 amp arcwelder wilh 50'  extension cord. Helmet and rods  used twice. $250 firm. Sanyo  portable washer/spin dryer. Good  condition. $125. 886-7938.        #5  Fleetwood stereo cabinet (good),  $150; Chesterfield chair, $35; 3-  stcp stool, $8; Bar stool, $8; Comb,  telephone chair & bookcase, $25.  886-8370. M  3' x 6' slate sheets. 2" thick. Great  for patios or bathroom floors.  $l.50/sq. it. Phone 885-3113.  #3  Shaladin II "Mexican Rust" saxony  carpeting. $7.95/sq. yd. Shaladin I  "Tangerine", $5.95/sq. yd. Ken  Dcvries Floor Coverings. 886-  7112. 1/5  Specials!  Mahogany china cabinet, $225; 4  inlaid Mahogany chairs, $50 ea.;  Plenty of cabinets, dressers, etc.,  dated from 1830 to early 1900's.  New stock every week. Harbour  Antiques, 1585 Marine Dr. Open  Thurs. through Sun., 11-5.      Hi  Used blonde dining room suite  with   buffet,  $150.   500  watt  Mercury floodlight, $58.886-9352.  Hi  Now $29,900! Widow must sell.  2.87 acres approx. 600 ft. Hwy.  frontage. Older, clean and comfortable home. Stove, fridge and  heater. Bus and mail at door. No  steps. Carport. Peter R. Gook  Realty. Phone 886-2747 evenings  for appt. to view. tti  Gibsons, by owner. 4 bdrm., full  basement. Landscaped lot. Oil and  elec. heal. Also Fisher wood stove.  Water view. Assumable 12%  mortgage, $59,000. 886-9321.  Hi  Roberts Creek by owner. On  Lower Rd. 2 bdrm. near store.  I lee heat. Air tight wood stove.  Fenced yard, easy terms. $39,000.  886-9321. Hi  Lower Gibsons, 2 bdrm., fully  remodelled w/ assumable 11%  mortgage. Flee, heating. $39,000.  886-9321. #3  4 acres in Roberts Creek on Hwy,  101. Level, some merchantable  limber. Over 300' Hwy. frontage.  $25,000. 885-9698. #3  By owner - Good terms available.  Large view lot for sale. Ready to  build. 886-9232. T.F.N.  A number to mile:  885-5171  WHARF REALTY LTD.  CENTURY 21  SLINGER REALTY LTD.  Duplex zoned lot  $16,900. 1713 Martin  Rd., Gibsons B.C.  Owner anxious to sell.  Lot size 110' x 109' x  148'. Call Charles  Libke, 980-3276 or 922-  1224 (24 hrs.).  i BLOCK BROTHERS  1100 ft. of waterfront  i Downtown Gibsons  j Municipality will  I consider proposal  ��� for developemnt.  :+���  IAN MORROW & CO. LTD.  Marine Surveyors, condition and  detail surveys for Evaluation.  Surveys for insurance claims.  Phone 886-2433, 886-9458.  T.F.N.  HIGGS MARINE  SURVEYS LTD.  Insurance claims, condition and  valuation surveys. Serving the  Sunshine Coast and B.C. Coastal  Waters. Phone: 885-9425. 885-  9747. 885-3643, 886-9546. T.F.N.  22'   Fiberform  new   165  motor.  Hardtop,   6   h.p.   John,   depth  sounder. Anchor. Lots of extras. 3  props. $7,500. Phone 886-2096.  114  21 it. Davidson hull, new, wilh keel  and bulk heads installed. Double  coder made of glass. Asking  $2,500 o.b.o. 886-7152. 03  Venture 22 sloop. 4 sails. 5 berths.  Galley head 6 h.p. outboard.  Trailer. Good condition. $7,250.  886-7906. 05  35' work boat. Good condition.  $2,500 obo. 886-2758. HS  34' converted Gilncttcr. Chrysler  440. Stainless fuel tank. Hydraulic-  steering and controls. Hot & cold  water. Must sell. No reasonable  offer refused. Phone 886-9615.  Hi  Heavy duty boat trailer. Will lake  up to 20' boat. $450 o.b.o. Phone  886-2512. #3  Two Excellent  Building Lots  End of Grady Rd.,  Langdale.  Electricity, water  approved for  septic tank.  Nice  mountain view.  LMnsley   007-9950  or     990-8311  Langdale: sloping lot near Hwy.,  ferry and school; view; area of new  homes. Offers lo $10,000. 886-  9381. Hi  By owner, 12 acres; Roberts Creek;  1 uncompleted house; 1 workshop:  I habitable A frame; 6 acres of  grazing; 6 acres limber; trout  pond; fenced creek. 886-9321.  1/5  foi fioi  automotive  1974 Olds Regency 98, 2 door.  Treat yourself to a beautiful low  mileage, rust free Alberta luxury  car. Has every option. Never  damaged. Must be seen. $3,295.  Phone 886-2179. Hi  1973 G.M.C. pick-up. 350 4 spd.,  air cond., heavy duty. $2,300.886-  8261. tti  tot icnt  Completely furnished collages by  the week. Ril/ Motel.        T.F.N.  1 bedroom suite. Kitchen still  under construction. Phone 885-  5471 after 6 or 885-9466 during  day. ��4  2 bedroom house. No steps. Ideal  for older couple. 3 blocks from  shopping. 886-2155. 04  For rent or sale: Double wide  trailer on Lockyer Rd., Roberts  creek. $350 per month. 886-9163.  Available February I. 04  APARTMENTS FOR REM  Available immediately. No pets.  Phone 886-2417 or 886-2743 or  Toll Free 922-2017. T.F.N.  1800 sq. ft. on one level, 5 bdrm..  12x26 heated workshop, fireplace,  patio, 100' x 96' lot, separate  carport, eilsuile plumbing and  utility room. $29,900 on assumable  mortgage at lO'/VK. 886-9489.  T.F.N.  Free room and board plus pay in  return for standing by to answer  telephone. For more information  please phone 885-9437 after 5 p.m.  Hi  Deluxe Ige. 3 bdrm. suile in triplex.  L.R. with sliding glass doors  opening onto large sundeck. Green  w/w. Feature wall of red tile with  hooded electric F.P. Novelty bay  window, swag lamps. Lovely  vanity bathim. with large gilt  mirror. Area with upholstered bar.  stools & mirrored back bar.  Dining room, crystal chandelier,  lighted valanccd pass-through into  cabinet kit., range & fridge.  Drapes throughout. Friendly,  peaceful location on Port Mellon  Hwy. 20 minutes drive to Gibsons  Shopping Crt. Rent $300 a month.  Available Feb. 1st. 886-9352.  Hi  2 bedroom upstairs apt. in 4-plex.  1258 Trueman. Quiet tennants,  suitable for older couple. Free  laundry facilities. $190. 886-7487.  Hi  FOR RENT  Back office of building  when renovations are  finished. School Rd. &  Gower PL Rd.  581-0995  Former NOP Bookstore location  FOR LEASE  2,000 sq. ft.  Commercial Space  on Hwy. in Davis Bay  Reasonable Rent  For information call  A. Rink  885-5778  COMMERCIAL PREMISES  Located next to Mr. Mike's  Phone: 886-2417 or 886-2743  or Toll Free: 922-2017  w��  COMMERCIAL PREMISES  FOR RENT,  LOCATED NEXT TO  MEDICAL CLINIC, GIBSONS  PHONE 885-2515  FOR PARTICULARS.  ���automotive  '68 GT Cortina, Lotusi7.cd,$l200.  Mags, spare engine, etc. $500.885-  2383, eves. #4  1973 G.M.C. window Von. Auto.,  P.S./P.B. $1,100 o.b.o. Phone 886-  2512. #3  1971   Bconoline  Van  302.  New  motor august. Shag carpet interior. Mag wheels. $21X8). 886-7040  05  3-'64 Ford P.U.J l-'67 4 ton with  PTOahd 16 It. box; l-'67 Sunbeam  Minx. Paris or whatever, Best  offer, All must go. 886-7186.  03  1969 Corvette Stingray. 350 4  speed. 2 tone lliiigundy. T top  Fxc. cond. $8,500 obo. 886-7057.    #3  1974 Mercury Montego. Excellent  condition. $1,7(81. 886-7048.     #3  '68 Ford Custom 500. Reliable  transportation. Some spare parts.  Runs well, 886-9974. 04  '78GMC'/rT. P.U. 6 cyi. 4 spd..  32,000 km. $5,500.00 obo.886-  2180. Hi  1974 G.M.C. 3/4 ton pick-up. 350  4 spd. No rust. $2,800. 886-8261.   03  1968 Firebird Sprint. New red  paint and white interior. Rebuilt  high performance 350 engine. New  4 spd. transmission mags. Air  shocks and many options. Car is in  excellent condition. $3,500 or  consider trade for small car. 886-  9826. T.F.N.  ***1HHHHHHHHMr*r*r*i>  I MAINLAND t  * MOTOR      *  * PRODUCTS ��  * Ltd. $  �� We Buy, Sell and Trade   J  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  1977 Ponttac  La fflans  Station Wagon  Premium  One Owner  Air Cond.  Warranty Incl.  *3.995.��  1974 Ponoac Rstra  2 Dr. Hatchback  4 Cyi. Auto.  One Owner  29,000 Miles  S2.950."  1975 Ford 3/1TMI  V8 Auto.  P.S./P.B.  Sliding Window  Dual Tanks  55,000 Miles  S2.995."        t  1973 Vaga      j  i KammoacN wagon J  * 4 Cyi., 4 Speed *  I Air Cond. }  t       M.I95."        *  * 1971 Cheu. iropaia t  I   Custom Coups  I       V8 Auto.  * P.S./P.B  * ��795.��  J    1969 meteor  J 4 Door  * Excellent Cond.  J ��650.��   j   nanybtiiersTo  * ChoosaFromi  {'"itt'ttB'nr'  * Warranty      *  I Don't Forget.   I  * We are now located J  * on Hwy. 101, just J  J west of Pratt Rd. *  }****+* ��1#*****+*J  J   MAINLAND  MOTOR  PRODUCTS  Ltd.  800-8344  884-8314  j Hwy. 101, just west L  J     of Pratt Rd.    1 hovel  hovel  for  Spring-Break  Holidays  peninsula  travel  ���,       886-9755  [Registered Travel Agent|  m     mobile home/  help wonted  Coast News, January 22, 1980  G��t^W 'holkloy/  Double wide Moduline mobile  home. This unit is on a pad on the  Sunshine Trailer Park in Gibsons.  Fully furnished, yard and separate  fenced garden area. Fridge, washer  and dryer, stove, furnished,  carpets throughout, storage shed  with deep freeze. $19,500.        03  Mobile home pads available.  Single and double-wide lots.  Sunshine Coast Trailer Park.  886-9826. tfn  wonted to cent  Impecunious artist seeking inexpensive studio space. Robert's  Creek preferred but willing to  consider Gibsons or Sechelt  locations. Lyn 885-9210.   T.F.N.  Garage storage wanted for small  car. Phone 886-7354. 05  Resp. family of 4 requires 2 bdrm.  house. Preferably with bsm't and  main appliances. 886-2758.      05  We have Airline Tickets  Immediate ticketing  Around the World  j 885-3265 j  j Fully experienced consultant travel agent 1)1  ovtomotive  1972 Plymouth  Fury III Sedan  1971 Plymouth Fury I  Sedan  1969 Pontiac Sedan  V8 Auto  1968 Chev Bel Aire  Sedan  1970 Ford 1/2 Ton P.U.  Clearing At  Wholesale  1977 Cougar  2 Dr. Air Cond.  Very Clean  Throughout  4.680."  1977 Ford LTD II  2 Dr.  Also Very Clean  *3.M5.m  Also a vary good  sanction ol Economy  Gars ��� station wagons  sailing at Bargain  m  AUTOMOTIVE  Open 9 til 5  Weekdays  Hwy. 101 & Payne Rd.  Gibsons  Phone: 886-7919  MDL 5848  b.c.C yyfcon  SUBDIVIDABLE RANGE-  LAND $750 per acre in Ihe sunny  Okanugun Valley. Custom homes  reasonably priced. Write Lebert  Construction Ltd., Box 1056,  Oliver, B.C. VOH 1T0. #3  HANDYMAN WANTED to assemble Houseboats in local area.  Your own business. Full or part-  time. Minimum investment $2,500  stock and lease. Call 576-9559 or  write: Poor-Will Boats, 19025  Fraser Hwy., Surrey, B.C. V3S  5MI. Hi  WATERFRONT FARM, preferably in the Gulf of Georgia or B.C.  Coast. Require year round sheltered moorage, southern exposure  and ample water. Must be in excess  of 10 acres. Farm preferred, but  will consider acreage that has farm  potential. Principal dealings preferred. Bonafide private buyer.  Write Box 151, B.C.Y.C.N.A.,  808, 207 West Hastings St.,  Vancouver, B.C. V6B 1H7.      Hi  1977 500-K AMERICAN LOG  LOADER (5100 hours) D8 undercarriage, Cummins NH 250 engine, two main drums, twin Disc 3  stage torque convenor, 40 foot  Bohemian Boom with 60" young  two-poinl grapple. This machine  completely overhauled in April  1979 and used only one month  since overhaul. For further information contact Dave Karran,  Assistant Woodlands Manager,  Jacobsen Bros. Forest Products,  Williams Lake, B.C. V2G 2V7.  Phone 392-4121. #4  36" JONSERED RESAW and  cuber powered by 33 h.p. Yanmar  diesei, hydraulic conveyer, barn  shake machine, clipper saw powered by 10 h.p. Yanmar diesei,  both mounted on 40' trailer.  $20,000. Phone 749-3760 or 749-  3609. S3  The  Beachcombers J  require  furnished rental  accomodation  Mid-February to $|  Mid-September  it you have any  rentals Mease  call Sharon at  112-885-7041  M  b.c.C. yukon  DIVORCE! $100 plus filing fees.  We prepare your divorce papers  over the phone���fast. For more  information call The Law Shoppe  of Jack D. James, M.B.C., LLB,  toll free, 112 800 663-3035 (in  Vancouver area call 687-2442).  Chargex and Mastercharge welcomed, tfn  INCORPORATE! $200 plus filing  fees. We process your Incorporation over the phone fast. For  more information call The Law  Shoppe of Jack D. James, M.B. A.  LLB., toll free 112-800-663-3035.  (In Vancouver area call 687-2442)  Chargex and Mastercharge welcomed, tfn  1978 CASE 850B complete with  dirt and clearing blades, ripper,  1500 hours. $41,500 obo. Phone  847-2092. #5  THE LADY MINTO GULF  ISLANDS HOSPITAL seeks  applications for the new position  of acute care head nurse. Salary,  etc. in accordance with R.N.A.  B.C. contract. Apply giving full  details of post-basic education and  supervisory experience to: Director of Nursing, Box 307, Ganges,  B.C. V0S 1E0. #3  CERTIFIED DENTAL assistant  required in Williams Lake. Phone  collect 398-8633 (days) or 392-2615  (evenings). S4  Classified Ad Policy  All listings 50' per line per week.  or use Ihe Economical i for 2 rate  3 weeks for the price of 2  Minimum  $2.00   per   Insertion.  All fees payable prior to Insertion.  CLASSIFIED DEADUNE  NOON SATURDAY  * In Ihe event of an error the  publisher shall be responsible for  one corrected insertion only.  This offer is made available for private Individuals.  Thete CuuslOcatlons  remain free  - Coming Events  Lost  - Found  Print your ad In the squares Including the price of the Item and your telephone number. Be aure to leave a blank apace after each word.  No phone orders Pleaae. Jut mall In the coupon below accompanied by cash, cheque  or money order, lo Coast News, Classifieds, Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON IVO, or  bring In person to Ihe Coast News office, Gibsons  DROPOFF POINT : Campbell's Shoes & Leather Goods Store, Sechelt  4 |  il  ��� J  ��i  >!  j ���  i a  '1  11  .��� i  ��� ���  I;  Coast News  Classifieds  Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.  VON1VO  CLASSIFICATION:  Eg. For Sale, For Rent, etc.  !       I I   I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I  IJ   LLLLLLL  ,    ,���,���,���,���,���,���,���,���,���.���,���.���*������.���m  'I LTD  DEADLINE SATURDAY NOON ���  M��A>'   WA" w*��lai��l��i��iV��  icrT?l  VOLUNTEERS REQUIRED  MADEIRA   PARK   AMBULANCE   SERVICE  urgently requires volunteers (male or female) to'  assist in first-aid treatment and transportation to  Pender Harbour Medical Clinic and/or to St. Mary's  Hospital. ^^^^^^^~  An  Industrial  First  Aid course commencing  f February 2 will be conducted at the expense of the JI  J Ambulance Service. Those interested only in taking fl  l*?the first aid course may do so without joining the  **Ambulance Service.  All Interested applicants call Al, 883-9046; Meg, f|  K883-2637; Flora, 883-9190.  U^fjmtmf^l/tmm^mtm^g/m tffflgmmffjm  sac  ak  b.c.fi yukon  JOAN'S FLOWER SHOP, Van-  dcrhoof, B.C., for sale or will  consider working partner. Only  the serious need inquire. Phone  567-4949 or write Box 487,  Vandcrhoof, B.C. V0J 3A0.  #3  PERSONAL:  RICHARD HOWITT or anyone  knowing his whereabouts, phone  390-2754 or write Box 384, c/o The  Nanaimo Times, P.O. Box 486,  Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 5L5. All  replies confidential and to his  advantage. Hi  PRIVATELY OWNED GARAGE includes land, building and  equipment, 2 pumps. Greyhound  agency. $97,000. Walter Laidlaw,  Fowlie Nicholson Realty, Chase,  B.C. V0E IM0. Phone 679-3224 or  679-3963 (evenings). 03  BEAUTIFUL GREENHOUSES  that will tickle anyones fancy! You  can grow all your vegetables all  year round and save money! 6' x 7'  $475; 8' x 9'. $616; Other sizes  available. Pre-fab components  assembles in 30 minutes. NUFAB  530-6201, 22470 Fraser Highway,  Langley, B.C. V3A 4P6. #3  GENERAL STORE--I800 sq. ft.  of modern store area. Fully air-  conditioned. Equipment like new.  Volme $240,000. 3 bedroom living  quarters. Also 1800 sq. ft. with  w/w carpet. Air conditioning.  Modern kitchen with built-in  dishwasher. Owner will carry  mortgage and/or will consider  house in trade. Full price $199,000  plus stock, approx. $20,000. Write  Box 8000, Salmon Arm, B.C. V0E  1T0. Ph. 832-3044. #  2T0. Ph. 832-3044.  #3  OUR MAILORDER CATALOGUE contains many old-  fashioned, hard-to-get items, farm  bells, cider presses, canning aids,  stainless steel bowls, apple parers,  cherry stoners, hand grain mills,  buggies, harnesses. Send self-  addressed stamped envelope for  details. The Pioneer Place, Box  639, Aylmer, Ont., N5H 2R3.  #3  NORTH OKANAGAN CHALET home, excellent view of town  and Shuswap Lake. Large tack-  room, workshop, hayshelter, barn,  corrals and riding ring. Box 2200,  Salmon Arm, B.C. V0E 2T0.   S3  Carl's corner  by Carl Chrismas  Timber days  When winter's gone, can Timber Days be far behind? I'm afraid  not, so it's time to get the new show on the road and start a brand  new organization. ���-  1 have finally sorted out my priorities, and Timber Days  Committee is not one of them this year. I will be chairing Loggers'  Sports with a committee of local loggers so feel I can handle that,  but most other activities must go by the board.  So here we go into a brand new year and this will be my first  appeal to some good citizen of the community to step in and take  over the reins of steering this year's activities into the biggest  'Funfest '80's' ever.  Last year we had 45 entrees in our parade which is really  outstanding for a community of this size. The support ofthe local  business community, service clubs, charitable organizations and  just plain, good citizens were outstanding!  Kathy Acton's Special Events Committee did an excellent job  of promoting interest and generating funds to make our show the  best ever, so the budget is getting off to a good start this year to put  on a REALLY good shoooo!!!!  Homer Glass chaired the Parade Committee last year and with  the help of Joe Belanger, did a bang-up job. We are hoping Homer  will play a big part again this year.  Dorothy Goeson and Sandy Cavalier looked after the May  Queen activities and really worked their hearts out doing a great  job. They have taken their girls to other parades in the bigcity and  represented us proudly.  Staff-Sgt. Bob Evans ofthe R.C.M.P. was a big moral booster  for us all and he and his boys handled the kids bike decorating in a  manner that created a lot of good public relations in the  community with our youngsters.  Cliff Acton was a big help as Treasurer but he really shone at the  kids' sports day. He is part of the Madeira Park community this  year but we can hope both he and Kathy will be able to help out  with advice, etc.  Nancy Downs brightened up our meetings as Secretary and put  out well'organized minutes, etc. Hubby Jim's time was limited but  he helped.  Bill Huges ofthe Foresters was in there pitching and promoting  and creating interest, and he and his gang put on a great feed in the  blockhouse.  1 could go on ad infinitum on the help and support wc had  leading up to and during the celebrations, but space would not  permit. My wife Lucy, though concerned about my involvement  because of a repair job to a short circuit in my ticker works, was a  big supporter, once we got the show on the road.  To the new person taking over as Chairman of Sechelt limber  Days for 1980. I can most enthusiastically say that it was the  greatest experience of my life.  The new Chairperson would not have to start cold for every one  that helped in the past, I am sure, would be willing to help in some  way this year. I would gladly attend meetings and help in any way  I can. 1 wouldn't mind a bit ofthe M.C. work in a pinch or just  throw in moral support. But to be physically active in putting it all  together this year, I must beg off.  Lucy and 1 will be going on holiday about the end of January. 1  would very much like to hear from prospective Chairpersons  before that time to arrange a meet with all former committee  members that participated last year and who would be willing to  join in the fun again this year.  lam free during the week but go to Clowhom on the weekends.  Please give mc a call at 885-5200 or drop a line to Box 1507.  Sechelt, B.C.  Gibsons(cont'd)  thirds majority has signified  approval. "Under this legislation the onus would be on the  dissenters to round up more  than one-third of the voting  strength," said Esmits.  Both Esmits and Colville  praised the ideas being presented for the future ofthe Harbour  Area. "You are talking people  places," said Colville, "and that  is what downtown isallabout."  Last week the Forestry Crew No. 7 under the direction of Jim Gowrluk began  helicopter fertilization of the Gray Creek area. The picture above shows the Bell 205  Conair helicopter being loaded with 3500 pounds of fertilizer.  All told, 96 loads of the nitrogen based fertilizer will be spread over the area. The inset  shows a close up of the fertilizer. This is being seeded over second growth, 25 year old  trees. The soil in most of this area is nitrogen poor. This program is intended to correct  the shortage.  Taxes on baby clothing  So you can be taxed from the  crib to the grave after all!  Children's clothing is exempt  from provincial sales tax, but if  you try to save a few dollars by  making your own, the cash  register will ring up that extra  4% for the government.  The proprietors of Sechelt's  Sew Easy store, Roberta Fox-  all and Mary Ellen Turner have  been fighting this ruling since  last July. Their contention is  that both patterns and materials purchased to make  children's clothing should also  be tax free of the sales tax.  Letters to past Finance  Minister Evan Wolfe fell on  deaf ears. "The exemption of  fabric only for children's  clothing would, 1 believe, be  confusing for some sellers and  purchasers, however your  views are appreciated."  This attitude prevailed, even  when it was pointed out that  there would be very little  chance of a mother buying a  dress pattern for a four year  old. then cheating the government out of their rightful 4% by  wearing the dress herself.  Materials could also be signed  for at the time of purchase and  the record kept. The letter was  accompanied by a petition  containing 247 signatures from  customers in agreement with  the exemption.  When it was obvious that  this line of reasoning was going  nowhere, Roberta contacted  consumer action columnist  Nicole Parton of the Vancouver Sun.  In Parton's column in last  Monday's Sun, she printed an  excerpt from a letter written by  Gina Hartley. Branch President of the B.C. Consumer's  Association to Finance Minister Hugh Curtis. "I he Consumer's Association of Canada  (B.C.) strongly recommends  that you take action to amend  the Social Service Tax Act so  thai all dependent children. IX  years of age and under, are  treated equally.  "We specifically ask that the  sales tax be removed from  knitting yarns, fabrics and  patterns to be used in the  making of homemade children's clothing and that the sales  tax be removed from the  clothing for dependent children  15 to 18 years of age.  "With the cost of ready made  children's clothing rising at an  alarming rate, it seems illogical to penalize families who  are willing and able to make  their own children's wear. It  also seems illogical to tax a  child's clothes simply because  he or she is over 14."  Along with this, she also  received  900  letters from  concerned parents around the  province. They will all be  forwarded to the office of Hugh  Curtis.  In a prior column Parton  had asked that in the interest of  their customers, children's  wear stores or departments  should prominently display a  petition asking for the above  changes.  Local parents interested in  supporting the cancellation of  this sales tax, should write to  Hugh Curtis directly, or let  your feelings be known in  writing to the ladies at Sew  Easy in the frail Bay Centre  and they will forward them.  On CBC TV  CBC-T.V. has a new magazine, current affairs programme, Thursday nights at 9:00  p.m. on Channel 2. The Medicine Show will investigate  medicine and health care using  people's first hand experiences.  Il will examine research, clinical techniques, alternative  treatments and social implications, Host is Ken Lefolii.  Andrew Cochran, executive  producer, explains the intent of  the ten week scries, "All of us  are both consumers of medicine and owners of the health  care delivery system. We hope  the programme will be both a  consumer's guide and an  owner's manual".  Topics to be discussed include: Agoraphobia, aspirin,  health food stores, depression,  emergency wards, housecalls,  sports medicine, native healing,  etc.  On Tuesday, January 29 at  9:31) p.m. Channel 2 and 6. the  Fifth Estate will present a 90-  minute special Fighting Back.  the story of four remarkable  young people, ranging in age  from 9-16 years, all of whom  arc lighting for their lives  leukemia. The children are  patients at the War Memorial  Hospital for Children in London, Ontario and the film  captures movingly the warmth  and strength of the bond  formed between the children,  their parents and he medical  and nursing stuff.  The film crew found them-.,  selves an important p;i-t of the.''  children's lives, creating a vital;  distraction from their illness, ,v  way of keeping the shadows aC  bay. Many attitudes changed..'  To their friends the children'  were no longer "victims" but  important T.V. stars.  Although Fighting Back is  about cancer, it is also about  the courage, dignity and compassion of which human nature  is capable when the chips are;  down. An inspiration to us all.  Fighting Back is produced by  John Kastner whose lust major  documentary was Four Women  which won many honours for  Canadian television.  Election  Maureen Clayton of Sechelt  has been elected by acclamation to fill the Sechelt vacancy  on the School Board created by  the recent resignation of Len  Van Egmond,  ���mmmMlmmtal 16.  Coast News, January 22, 1980  Tyner made valuable  contribution to Clinic  By Pender Harbour ft District  Ratepayers Association Publicity Committee  In spite of all the talking that  has been done about community health clinics being the  saviours of our universal  medicare system, the Pender  Harbour and District Health  Centre in Madeira Park is one  of the very few community-  owned, community-operated  clinics now existing in B.C.  ITicre is one inescapable reason  why Pender Harbour has a  clinic when so many other  Communities do not: the dedication and hard work of Jim  I yner.  Tyner, who resigned lasl  week after serving as head of  Ihe clinic's governing board  since it was formed in July,  I974. has sometimes been  criticized for his single-minded  approach to clinic affairs, but  even his critics agree there  would be no clinic to worry  about if he hadn't been around  to get the ball rolling twelve  long years ago.  The campaign to obtain the  Pender Harbour clinic was a  true epic of bureaucratic  trailblazing, and looking back  over all its twists and turns it is  difficult to believe anyone  could have had the patience to  last it out.  An accountant and former  civil servant who has made a  career of helping people fight  red tape since coming to the  area after the war, Tyner was  uniquely suited for the task.  Medical needs in Pender  Harbour had been well served  up until 1966, when the original  St. Mary's Hospital had been  operated in Garden Bay.  During the referendum debate  on the replacement of that  facility with the current St.  Mary's in Sechelt, the group of  doctors then serving the area  circulated a letter promising to  build "a modern medical clinic  in Madeira Park...with minor  surgical facilities and with x-  ray unit...[and] providing an  active qualified doctor and  covering for him when he is  away." The letter was signed by  Walter Burnick, T.L. Master-  son, R.A. Swan, and E.J.  Paetkau.  The promised clinic did not  materialize and as late as July  29, 1971 the Vancouver Sun was  able to report, "on Tuesday and  Thursday afternoons, a Sechelt  doctor treats patients in a  makeshift clinic...If residents  become ill on any other day, it  takes up to 2'A hours for an  ambulance to get from its base  and back to Sechelt...."  According to Frank White,  who was a director of the  Pender Harbour Ratepayers  with Tyner at the time, Tyner  originated the idea of a publicly-operated clinic in the middle  of negotiations with the Regional Board.  "I forget what we were even  negotiating, but right out of the  blue Jim said/We'll support  you on this, but you will have to  support us in getting a medical  clinic up here.' That was the  first anyone heard of it, right  '.here."  Having enlisted the District's  support, Tyner and the Ratepayers proceeded to draw up  rough plans for their clinic.  Then began the endless letters  with various levels of govern-  ment-an exchange Tyner estimated ran to 1,800 letters  before the clinic finally went  nlo business.  At first they approached the  B.C, Hospital Insurance Service to build and operate the  facility, but B.C.H.l.S. responded only by putting the  ���natter "under study" and  keeping it there for over a year.  Realizing for the first time the  ���-���normity of the task before  !hem, many early clinic supporters gave up hope at this  point.  For Tyner, however, it was  only time to start another  approach. He was on the  Regional Board, and he used  this position to get the chairmanship of the regional hospital board. From here, he  bombarded the government  from a new angle: the clinic  would be built and equipped by  the community itself, using  local taxes under a specified  area of the Regional District.  Now the government only had  to come halfway and provide  an   operating   budget.   This  proposition proved too reasonable to be readily dismissed,  and on November 21, 1971,  Health Minister Loffmark  found himself at a meeting of  300 vociferous ratepayers in  Madeira Park. Before he left he  promised "to turn heaven and  eiirth" to bring them the  medical facility they asked. A  few months later Loffmark  announced in the Legislature  thai a specially formed "Medical Manpower Committee"  would meet with the Pender  Harbour Ratepayers to get the  project underway. The battle  seemed won. Rejoicing in  Pender Harbour was great, but  it proved premature.  It was at this point politics  clouded the picture. A local  real estate developer who was  close to then-MLA Isabel  Dawson and claimed to be an  old friend of Loffmark's,  brought the Minister up on a  fishing trip, and the latter told  the local press in an interview  he had "no intention of establishing a government doctor  and clinic", but said he had  found a Vancouver physician,  Dr. Brand, who was willing to  move to the area. Loffmark  suggested the new doctor  would be located in an office to  be part of the real estate  developer's proposed shopping  centre. The Vancouver Province  greeted this new turn of events  with an editorial asking, "Is  Health Minister Loffmark  coming or going on the question of medical clinics and  salaried doctors? ... Last  November he grandly announced in Pender Harbour  that a medical clinic to be  established there would make  'medical history'....Nine  months later residents are  complaining that Mr. Loffmark and MLA Isabel Dawson  revealed only hurried preelection plans to install a 60-  year-old doctor in a converted  house. The visions of a brave  new experiment in efficient  community health care have  become clouded."  Through the Ratepayers and  the Regional District, Tyner  kept querying the government  about the promised "brave new  experiment in community  health care" but the door had  been tightly closed. The most  he got out of Loffmark were  terse messages saying, "Thank  you for your letters, the  contents of which have been  noted." Then in the fall of 1972,  both Isabel Dawson and Loffmark were defeated in a  provincial election, along with  the Socred government of  W. A.C. Bennett. The new NDP  MLA, Don Lockstead, had  made the clinic a firm promise,  and he delivered. By September 1973, Tyner had a letter of  approval from the new Health  Minister, Dennis Cocke, authorizing the Ratepayers Association to start working on  plans for the facility.  Once again success seemed  assured but the strain of ever-  increasing public responsibilities took its toll: a severe heart  attack forced Tyner to resign  his Regional Board seat and  withdraw from all community  activities. Work on the clinic  came to a full stop. Worse, a  new executive assistant notified  Tyner that the government had  changed its position on the  clinic. Figuring that worrying  at home was as harmful to him  as getting out and fighting,  Tyner shelved his doctor's  orders and began trying to  arrange a high-level meeting  with Health Department officials. After manydelays.it was  held on December 23, 1974. In  a tense, head-to-hcad session  during which Tyner was forced  to draw upon a repertoire of  negotiating skills built up over  years of dealing with government, he and Health Society  lawyer Carl Jonsson managed  to get the government's commitment to a clinic in Pender  Harbour re-established. After  it was over, Tyner went back to  his hotel room and fainted.  There were many such meetings to follow, and Tyner  cannot remember how many  trips he made at his own  expense to Vancouver and  Victoria. For one period of a  year he averaged one trip every  two weeks, and once calculated  that the clinic work personally  cost him fifteen thousand  dollars. Some people began to  feel   the  clinic  business  had  become a kind of unhealthy  obsession with the man, but  this talk soon turned to praise  when the results of his labours  began to appear. Although the  Minister had originally committed the Provincial Government only to provide operating  funds for a physical facility to  be built entirely at community  expense, the deal Tyner eventually presented to voters on  March 22, 1975, called for a  government contribution of  $150,000 toward land and  buildings as well as an operating budget and doctor's salary.  The local public's only contribution would be made up from  a local tax estimated at I mill.  The referendum was passed  with a near-record majority of  91%.  Although his health was  improved, Tyner was looking  forward to being able to retire  from the clinic work as soon as  the facility was secure. Unfortunately the pioneering venture  continued to face problems  which demanded his continued  attention. There was a series of  crises involving joint use ofthe  Sechelt hospital with doctors  there, and political controversy  continued to plague the facility.  A period of uncertainty followed the change of government in 1975 and opponents to  the clinic, boasting they would  turn it into a pool hall,  succeeded in having its budget  cancelled in August of the  following year. Only by prevailing on some of his high-  placed friends in Victoria was  Tyner able to get the budget  reinstated. Again in 1978, the  government was on the verge of  withdrawing the budget because of low patient utilization,  a move which was averted only  by some controversial staff  changes. In spite of such  difficulties Tyner is proud of  the fact that the clinic under his  leadership has always been  kept in good financial condition. Unlike so many community projects on the tax roll, the  taxes have been kept at a very  low level and the operation has  kept at all times within its  budget. ..... ,...,  Although Tyner feels Pender  Harbour's little clinic has  demonstrated the economic  advantages of the community  health clinic concept and more  than proven its usefulness in  terms of public service, he  warns that its future is still far  from guaranteed.  "Government involvement  in social programs is being  questioned more now than at  any time since we started," he  says, "even in projects like this  that save the government  money in the long run." He  feels the clinic must grow and  develop if it is ever to become  secure.  "In a way it is still not much  more than a glorified doctor's  Lockstead  supports  MLA Don Lockstead, NDP  member for Mackenzie riding,  says he supports the resolution passed last Thursday by  the Sunshine Coast Regional  District calling for a moratorium on the construction of  the Cheekye-Dunsmuir 500 kv  transmission line to Vancouver  Island.  Lockstead said that the B.C.  Hydro memoranda which have  now been made public confirm  that the position taken by the  NDP caucus on the construction of the line is the correct  one. B.C. Hydro memos confirm that the cost ofthe line is  likely to be more than double  the $315 million originally  estimated and that the need for  the line has not been adequately established.  Lockstead said, "Wc are very  much aware of the need to plan  and provide for a secure energy  source for Vancouver Island,  however wc feel all the alternatives should be thoroughly  explored before we rush into  building a billion dollar line  JANUARY SALE  GReen onion st���R���0  moo on  26"  remote control  Magnavox T.V.'s  $100  worth of free records or tapes  with selected stereo packages.  Metric Converters  884* 5240 U.V rivmnil PM  MIMNDOM  Dunham Rd.,  Port Mellon  Bo fiiimint nil Fttmirv  UPIOHIMMMTIPW  MMtmrtOnM  The usual prize of $5.00 will be awarded to the first  entry drawn from the barrel which correctly locates the  above. Send your entries to the Coast News, Box 460,  Gibsons. Last week's contest drew a bumper crop of  entries with the lucky winner being R. Frederickson of  Box 1357, Gibsons, who correctly located the pictured  drawing as being on the wall of Gibsons Winter Club.  Children's Corner  Sport and the  Raccoons  by Beverly Seton  Mr. and Mrs. Karhone lived  on Keats Island. They lived  there all the year around and at  one time had a cow, chickens, a  vegetable garden and fruit  trees. They had a constant  battle with all the raccoons  around who loved eggs and  fruit. So they bought a German  Shepherd pup and called him  Sport, hoping he could guard  their chickens and garden. This  he soon learned to do, and did  for many years always being on  guard outside at night.  But he finally got very old  and all the raccoons held a  council of war and made a plan  to get rid of their long time  enemy.  One fall night when it was  dark and cold fifteen raccoons  marched over to Sport and  surrounded him. He barked  and barked but they just  marched  forward  in  a half  office," he says, "It must  become more than this, a real  first-class medical centre, before it will be able to fulfill its  real potential. This was always  my hope for it, and I hope it will  ultimately happen."  If those who take up Tyner's  work also take up his dedication, then surely it will happen.  circle backing him towards the  beach, then into the water, then  he swam and they all swam out  around him, preventing him  from getting back to shore.  Poor old dog was tired and very  cold, so he howled loudly and  luckily his master heard him  and rushed out in his row boat  and chased the coons away so  Sport was saved and made it  back to shore. But they had  planned to keep him there until  he drowned. Who says coons  can't think?  SUNSHINE  X/        KITCHENS  Will be having a SALE  ��f au CITATION caw����*  from Feb. 15th to March 15th  7ut  M  Come in to our Showroom above the Twilight Theatre|  Saturdays, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.  to look at our products, or call us  for a Professional In-Home Evaluation  < of your individual needs.  886-9411  rirriiiiiixiixiiiiiriiiiiiiii  South Coast Ford  RENT A CAR  South Coast Ford  -1980 Mustang  -1980 Fairmont  -1980 T-Bird  -1980 Ford Pick-ups *  From $23.'V'>  -   ��� Plus Gas  "24 hour day unlimited mileage"  J * Plus Mileage flflli-39,r$ %  J] South Coast Ford Sales Ltd.  1326 Wharf Rd., Box 1759, Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  I gggggggg^TO^S^ggg  W  Sunshine Coast Credit Union  Cowrie Street, Sechelt  Tel: 885-3255  For Community owned Financial Services  * sauings  ��� Chequing Sauings  * Term Deposits  * Safety Deposit Boxes  * Personal Loans  ��� Mortgages  Completely locally owned and operated.  Every member is a voting shareholder. Gibsons Harbour taken from the Bay.  Ian Corrance photograph.  A Little Caution Can Prevent Home Repair Problems  This is the time o( year when we all want change. To some, it could mean changing  the very home you live in, but to others, changing the present home into something  more comfortable and convenient may be in the springtime wind."  The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver reminds homeowners that the kind of  workmanship you choose could have a lasting effect on the re-sale value of your  home, as well as on the comfort and convenience that you hope to gain by having  renovations done.  Before contracting for any home improvements, follow a few wise rules:  * Call your Better Business Bureau to check out the prospective contractor's  reputation.  * You could further check the contractor's financial stability with information he  himself should be willing to give. If he hesitates to allow this action, you should  beware.  * If it is a major job, get at least three bids.  * Be leery of companies that insist you pay 40% or more in advance. Ten or fifteen  percent should be plenty.  * Put a holdback clause in the contract. This stipulates that you don't have to pay the  last 10 or 15% until 30 days after completion of the work, so you have leverage if  something is done improperly.  * Make sure your contractor maintains property damage and liability insurance and  workmen's compensation.  * If the contract is for over $1,000, be sure to have it checked by your solicitor.  * Legitimate contractors will give you a detailed, written estimate of the cost of  labour and material. One who gives you a quick estimate after only a few moments  thought could either be inexperienced, inefficient or out to make a fast profit.  * Don't allow yourself to be high pressured into an immediate decision. A good  contractor will give you time to consider other offers and check facts.  * If a contractor cannot give you the names of at least two satisfied customers, be  very leery.  Renovations and improvements can make your home more livable, attractive and  enhance its value for future selling. But caution in making the final renovation  contract is good common business sense. Sunshine Coast Realtor, January 22, 1980  Doug Joyce  885-2761  Bob Bull  885-2503  Don Hadden  885-9504  M5-3211  iderson  REALTY LTD.  Post Office Box 1219. Sechelt  Stan Anderson    885-2385  FREE REAL ESTATE  CATALOGUE  Jack Anderson  885-2053  Gordon Hall  885-9986  Vadim Kobasew  885-3158  Vancouver Toll Free:  684-8016  HOMES  WILSON CREEK-BROWNING ROAD $62,500  Spacious 3 bedroom home across from beach access. This 1344  sq. ft. full basement home is located on large wooded lot in quiet  neighbourhood. Sundeck looks south to possible future view.  Two bathrooms plus rough-in in basement. Electric hot water  heat as back up for Fisher stove. Call Bobto view.  WILSON CREEK: View home. Urge 1700 sq. ft. home. 3  bedrooms, family room, formal dining room, livingroom with  sunken conversation area has hcatilator fireplace. 2 1/2 sets of  plumbing, built-in vacuum system, Fully fenced yard with  swimming pool. An excellent value at $86,000. Call Stan  Anderson.  SECHELT: $3,500 down payment - Sea View - 3 bedrooms.  Two full bathrooms plus extra in full basement. View from  sundeck. Landscaped lot, close to waterfront and marina boat  launch. 12 per cent mortgage.  GIBSONS: Small cabin on sea view lot. No plumbing.  Landscaped fruit trees. Lot serviced with sewer and water, etc,  F.P. $18,500.  ROBERTS CREEK: $49,500. l,2acres of treed property, 960  sq. ft., two bedroom home. Some appliances. See Doug.  STARTER HOME: A very good buy on this 1000 sq. It.  basement home on a close to the beach lot in Davis Bay. One  bedroom on the main floor and 2 in the basement. Aluminum no  maintenance siding, 2 fireplaces and close to the elementary  school. F.P. $44,900. Stan  THE ENERGY EFFICIENT HOME: New, 1120 sq ft  situated on large corner lot. 3 bedrooms with ensuite off master  bedroom, w/w carpets throughout. Sundeck off dining room.  Carport with outside storage and asphalt drive way. Roughed in  plumbing in basement. Energy saving features include 2x6  construction with 6 in. (R 20) insulation in walls and 8 in. (R-28)  in ceilings. Double pane windows with screens on both floors,  heatilalor type fireplace upstairs, flue in basement for easy  installation ol wood burning slove. Heavy duty 220 wiring,  electric heat with separate controls in every room and electric  lint walcr. Close to shopping and schools. This atlractivehome  is built to save you money! F.P. $64,900. Call Vadim.  BUSINESS  GIBSONS LAUNDROMAT: $15,000 F.P. Sleady year  round trade. This price includes all equipment in excellent  condition. 12 washers, 7 dryers. Renewable least al $350 per  month. Ideal for semi retired couple.  SELMA PARK: 197b 3 bdrm. 12 ft. x 68 ft. mobile home. In  new condition. It is set up on a rental space now but could be  moved to your lot. Has wheels and axles. Asking $15,000.  FARMLAND  f   ' W-U4*  BRUSHWOOD FARM: The areas most beautiful smalTlarm  Full 5 acres of well tended paddocks. Many large evergreen and  fruit trees. Attractive 2 bedroom rancher with guest suite.  Large, well built 6 stall barn with auto water system. Huge sand  ���training arena. This property is completely level and has  unlimited subdivision potential. Zoned R2. F.P. $154,000-  WEST SECHELT - FARMLAND: Opportunity to start a  small farm or nursery on 21 plus acres. This land has  road, power, water and privacy. One of a kind, waiting for your  plans. F.P. $80,000. To view call Bob.  ACREAGE  VILLAGE ACREAGE: 2.11 acres cleared and ready lor a  home. Power and water close by. Quite secluded. F.P. $ 19,900.  Call Stan.  WEST SECHELT: 3 acres in West Sechelt. Potential  subdivision, treed property with some view. F.P. $35,000. Call  Gordie.  VIEW ACREAGE: 5 acres in West Sechelt. Some view ol the  ocean. Nicely treed. Good access. No logable timbers. F.P.  $25,900.  A FINE ACREAGE: $33,900 full price. Sechelt Village. Just  under 5 acres with an attractive view and lots of garden soil.  Treed property with a developed well and good road access.  Partly cleared. Call Stan.  LOTS  SUNSHINE HEIGHTS: $10,000. Extra large building lot in  area of new homes. All services including paved roads. Call  Doug.  SUNSHINE HEIGHTS: Inlet view lot 50 x 120 x 90. Close lo  marina. Asking $13,500. Call Don.  SANDY HOOK: Spectacular view lot in quiet residential area.  55 x 163 zoned RII. Mobile homes permitted. Asking $10,500.  MEDUSA STREET: Large level treed lot on quiet street,  close to Post Office. Leave your car at home and walk to all  shops. Full price $14,800. Call Don.  SECHELT VILLAGE: Only available duplex lot in Village of  Sechelt. Cleared and on sewer. Build now or hold for polential  service industrial use. $22,000. Call Bob  PEBBLE CRESCENT LOT: Save some trees* and have a  garden on this level lot. Easy walking disiancc tuall shops, Price  now only $13,500. Call Don.  ROBERTS CREEK $ 16,000 ea.  Country lots 2 to choose (rom. These lots are l'2acreorover,  close to school, store, goll course and beach access. Call Bob,  BROWNING ROAD: 1/2 Acre cleared building and garden  site, plus a very unusual rock formation which would make lor  some interesting landscaping. Good quiet area. F.P, $16,000.  C.L.A. HOLDINGS: A 5 lot subdivision on Fawn Rd. Each lot  has a gentle southerly slope and has been selectively cleared  Services including Regional District water are available. A  prospectus giving full particulars of the subdivision may be  obtained upon request.  CHASTER ROAD: $9,900. Good, level lot, 67 x 123fl,close  to school and all local services, on paved road. Call Don  WATERFRONT  IF you want a quiet waterfront retreat  IF you don't have time to build a new, solid house  IF your boat is 40 leet it will fit the boathouse  IF you arrive by plana there is a 44 foot float  IF you are content with Vh acres, mostly forest  IF you want to invest $75,000���CALL DON!  ROBERTS CREEK WATERFRONT: 125 ft. of easy access  waterfront on approximately 1/3 acre of landscaped land.  Nicely treed beach is sandy and shale. The house is 1100 sq. ft.,  has 2 bedrooms, a stone fireplace and a large sundeck. As a  bonus, there is a 1 room, self-contained cottage which rentsout  at $125 per month. $134,500. Call Stan.  GIBSONS: The ultimate in waterfront���immaculate 2 bdrm.  home with basement. Large vessel moorage right in front of the  property. Your own dock, total protection from all seas.  Excellent commercial potential, The lot alone is worth the price.  $105,000. Call Bob lor appointment to view.  SECLUDED WATERFRONT ACREAGE: Do you want a  quiet waterfront retreat with no roads or cars? We have a few  parcels of evergreen forest, 5 lo 10acres each. Minimum of 250  feet of waterfront and stream thru most lots. Located 22 miles  from Sechelt by water or air only. Fly in with Tyce Airways Ltd  from Vancouver or Sechelt, or use your own boat. Call Don.  WATERFRONT ��� WEST SECHELT: level W/F property  with older well maintained home. 2 bedrooms, large den. 2  bathrooms, basement, electric heat. Large tot 68 x 281 ft.  Excellent view of Trail Islands, F.P. $89,900. Offers welcome.  Call Vadim.  WATERFRONT - GIBSONS: Treed building lot on "The  Bluff". Excellent view. Area ol prestige homes. Pebble beach,  $39,900. Call Vadim.  REDROOFFS ROAD WATERFRONT $140,000  Tremendous investment polential. List of large waterfront  properties on RedrooffsRd.R2J zoning allows subdivision in 1/2  acre parcels. There is a road right lo water which has 610 ft.  frontage. Area is 5.1 acres. This could also make a great estate  property or group purchase. Investigate the polential with Bob.  SECHELI - SANDY HOOK $135,000  Waterlront muor your sailboat at this dock. Urge cedar home  wilh su|ier sauna, decks everywhere. Privacy and expansive  view. Phone Bob for a viewing. Tins is a unique home.  SARGEANT BAY  IMMACULATE WATERFRONT PROPERTY: 1232 sq. ft  home on one level. Carport and a 500 sq. ft. sundeck. 1.02 acres  ot land will, approximately 86 ft. of waterfront on Sargeant'i  Bay. The lot is all landscaped with 2 outbuildings, municipal  water plus a well (or garden sprinkling year round. Lot is all  usable. F.P, $89,900. To view call Stan.  tfttttat��W4V��S8 4MWBWI ''���   f Ill  ' ���  I  Sunshine Coast Realtor, January 22, 1980  Box 1189, Gibsons  886-9238  Toll free  922-2017  owned and operated by  AELBERS REAL  ESTATE  APPRAISALS LTD.  CUL DE SAC-HILLCREST RD., GIBSONS  $58,000,  First Mortgage $40,000 at    11 1/4%  $433. PM  Completed in September 1979   3 Bedroom  1 1/2 Bath        Unfinished Basement  Cathedral Type Entrance Carport  Double Windows and Southerly Exposure  Qualifies for $5,000 Government 2nd Mortgage  CRUCIL ROAD, GIBSONS $18,500.  A 1/2 acre single family lot with deeded lane access. All services available including sewer. Lot is  partly ravine, but has very good building site. Lot is in natural surroundings, has westerly  exposure and enjoys complete privacy, Owner who is a contractor is prepared to build  according to instructions. Area is away from any traffic noise, but within walking distance of  services. Good view over Strait of Georgia.  WINN ROAD ACROSS FROM ABBS ROAD, GIBSONS $17,000  Single family, residential lot, 80 x 134 with all services including sewer. South westerly exposure  with a 12% grade from road. 20 ft. gazetted lane along side easily constructed for access. 180  degree view over Gibsons and Strait of Georgia. Within walking distance of all civic and  commercial services including the to be constructed Municipal Marina for pleasure boats only.  All surrounding lots been built upon. Privacy, therefore can be guaranteed.  Property Management  We have an extensive list of well screened tenants wishing to rent. As an agent I will take the  responsiblity for the rental of your property and will arrange for any repair needed with your  approval. To discuss this service, please contact C.A. Peter Aelbers, RI(BC) F.R.I, at 886-9238.  Market Value Evaluation  When considering selling your property, I will execute an independent documented written  appraisal for the standard fee of $150 for residential and recreational property. Commercial and  Industrial property on quote.  I am an accredited appraiser, who conforms to the Rules of the Professional Ethics of the  Appraisal Institute of Canada. If you decide to list you property with Solar Realty and a sale is  completed, 1 will reimburse the appraisal fee. To discuss this service please contact C.A. Peter  Aelbers Rl(BC) F.R.I., at 886-9238.  We are Agents for Westwood Homes Ltd, Write  to us for an illustrated booklet of quality homes  which we can construct on your lot.   GOWER POINT ROAD ��� GIBSONS $225,000  Almost 1 Acre of property zoned Comprehensive Development allowing commercial  development including retail commercial and tourist development. 257 ft, of waterfront on the  Bay. Government Wharf on one side and the new to be constructed Municipal pleasure boat  Marina on the other side. Commercial retail across the street and the Municipal Hall and  Firehall. Post Office. Museum, Library and Garibaldi Health Unit all within easy walking  distance. Also the area mostly exposed through the seven years T.V. series known as the Beach  Combers by the C.B.C. Vancouver, All services including sewer available. Owner is prepared  io carry first mortgage at excellent rate or take income producing property in trade. At present  the best site for development on the Sunshine Coast. The growth factor ofthe area is better than  most areas in B.C.  DEERHORN DRIVE, SANDY HOOD . $12,800  Duplex lot. Frontage on two roads and borders onto designated Public Park. Measurement,  113.52 x 181.24 x 84.67 radius x 187.77. Permitted under present zoning���two residences  including mobile homes. Services present���good septic tank percolation. View over Sechelt  Inlet Area 7 km from Village of Sechelt over paved road. Improvements a mixture of residential  and recreational. Country like surroundings. Subject giving excellent privacy.  COMMERCIAL & APPARTMENT COMPLEX HWY 101, GIBSONS  Constructed in 1977-78. 12,000 sq. ft. commercial and 13 apartments, situated between Upper  and Lower Gibsons on the only H'wy on the Peninsula. Size of property, 1 Acre, which is paved  and landscaped. Commercial Leases are on triple net basis and apartments pay for heat and  light. Complex has pleasing appearance and is in very good state of repair. Good first mortgage  in place. Postitive cash flow after debt service. For particulars, contact listing agent.  BUSINESS: FURNITURE STORE IN SEA VIEW PLACE - GIBSONS  At present the only furniture store in Gibsons, which has a trading population of 6=7,000 people.  Open lease area 2000 sq. ft. in conjunction with appliance and stereo and T.V. store. Can be  separated. Triple net lease for 5 years at $5.95 per sq. ft. Reason of sale, too little time available to  obtain full potential. Several good lines including waterbeds from United Waterbeds,  Vancouver. Asking price $22,000 plus stock at invoice. Been in Business for one year and  already shows healthy return. Year end October 31, 1979.  MARINE DRIVE, GIBSONS: Up and down duplex. $13,000 spent in 1979 on R.R.A.P.  programme. Good view. Within walking distance of all amenities. $47,900.  NEWLY CONSTRUCTED CUL-DE-SAC OFF BEACH AVE.. ROBERTS CREEK  $17,500  Two 120 x 140 ft. lots. Duplex or two residences allowed. Services installed. Westerly exposure.  Complete privacy, topography level, good soil and excellent percolation for septic tank. Within  walking distance of excellent beach and small grocery store and post office. Bus transportation  by S.M.T. on Beach Ave. to Vancouver, daily.  H.B. GORDON A6ENCIES LTD.  Real Estate  30 Years At Cowrie St. Sechelt  Insurance      Box 123, Sechelt   Phone 885-2013  WEST SECHELT  Three bedroom basement home.  Fully developed lower level  including third bathroom.  Landscaped.  F.P. $67,900.  21 ACRES  HANSEN ROAD   and    GOLF COURSE  660 ft. deep, 1425 ft. on No. 1 and 2 fairways. 5  acre zoning. Treed. Fairly level. Excellent  investment at F.P. $110,000.  WATERFRONT LOT FOR SALE: Come in and talk it  over with John Wilson.  PEBBLE CRESCENT: 54.6 It. lot, rear lane. $14,900.  WINTER ROAD OFF NORWEST BAY RD: 70 ft.  Asking $13,900.  UPLAND RD. TUWANEK: Only $7,500.  LANGLEY: Subdivisj  priced Irom $25,500  883 2701.  isjpfajtNAilii  mds Golt Course. 44 lots  Please phone Jack Noble,  SECHELT  SECLUDED WATERFRONT ESTATE  West Coast contemporary design.  Cedar exterior with skylights.  Four bedrooms.  Three fireplaces.  Under construction.  Price $170,000  JOHN WILSON  885-9365 Sunshine Coast Realtor, January 22, 1980  Box 1490,  Sechelt, B.C.  VON 3A0  TBI  885-2235  Toll Free  689-5838  CENTURY WEST REAL ESTATE  HOMES LOTS & ACREAGE  ROBERTS CREEK CHARMER  No. 230  Drive down Marlene Road to see it from  the outside then phone for a personal tour.  The full price $36,500 includes washer,  dryer, fridge and stove. George Longman,  885-3400.  SUNSHINE HILL No. 309  Best buy in Sechelt Village for a 3 bedroom  full basement home, Eating area in  kitchen, large family room in basement. 2  baths. Only $57,500. Chuck Dowman,  885-9374.  WATERFRONT HOME - GIBSONS  No. 261  Bay area. Close to the best beach and  stores. Attractive, modern 3 bedroom  home, 2 fireplaces, master bedroom  ensuite. Home is conveniently designed  with large rec room, utility, workshop plus  laundry and mud room. Large sundeck  plus fully landscaped. Assumable mortgage at 12% plus FANTASTIC VIEW!  Priced at $77,900. Eva Carsky, 886-7126.  TWO HOMES - THREE ACRES  No. 4066  What a deal, about 250 feet of Lagoon  WATERFRONTAGE. Well treed with 2  good homes. A 3 bedroom and a 2  bedroom, both in excellent condition and  both are rented. Also a 567 sq. ft. insulated  and wired workshop. Near stores and  school in Madeira Park. Revenue is the  word or line in one and rent the other.  Your choice!! Full price just $114,900.  Peter Smith, 885-9463.  "ONE OF THE FINEST BEACHES"  No. 316  On the Coast is just a stones throw away  from this Quality VIEW home, with  heatilator fireplace in the large, inviting  living room overlooking Halfmoon Bay.  Huge master bedroom plus two other  good size bedrooms. Big bathroom, wall to  wall throughout. I could go on and on  describing the outstanding features.  Excellent garden area on .64 acre lot. Lynn  Wilson, 885-5755.          GIBSONS SPECIAL No. 240  Large 3 bedroom home, complete with  den, extra large formal dining room, family  kitchen with eating bar. Included are six  near new appliances. Separate master  suite with extra plumbing. Large carport  and attached storage area. All located on a  level landscaped lot for just $74,900. Larry  or Ruth Moore, 885-9213.  ECONOMICAL & CONVENIENT  No. 262  In Selma Park within easy walking distance  of the Village witha great VIEW of the Trail  Islands. The neat 2 bedroom home on  Lease Land would be ideal for a retired  couple or for a weekend residence. With  carport and storage shed. At $15,900 it'sa���  real buy! Bert Walker, 885-3746.  PERFECT LOCATION No. 278  For the well built family home. Quiet West  Sechelt area. Home is 1270 sq. ft. of good  value. Rock fireplace, plenty of sundeck, a  little view, large kitchen with eating area.  Attached carport and a full basement  ready to develop. All this for just $67,500.  Larry or Ruth Moore, 885-9213.  UPTOWN ROBERTS CREEK  No. 290  Modern, comfortable, 2 bedroom home  on 5.78 acres in the heart of Uptown  Roberts Creek. Invest in the future and in  the meantime live in complete luxury.  Asking $97,000. George Longman, 885-  3400,  FINE HOME - QUIET AREA No. 216  Ideally situated on quiet Fir Road with little  traffic, within easy walking distance of the  school or store and beach, This fine 3  bedroom home, finished on both levels  with attractive fireplaces, double carport  under large sundeck is well suited lor any  family. Vendor will discuss terms with  serious buyer. Let us show you this  attractive home then you can make your  offer on the $69,900 asking price Peter  Smith, 885 9463 or Bert Walker. 885 3746.  SANDY HOOK ROAD No. 295  One of the best located lots on Sandy  Hook with a Panoramic View of Sechelt  Intel that cannot be obstructed by  development in front. Power and water are  to the property line and the future looks  bright lor the area. The asking price is  $10,000. Make your olfer. Eric Rudland  8859857.  MARINE VIEW WAY: 6 Village lots.  Select yours at $9,900.  SUNSHINE BAY lots. $13,900 to  $14,900 on sewer, all with VIEW of Gulf.  INVESTMENT - VIEW No. 321  Buy this VIEW property in Gibsons Bay  area and turn property into a money  maker. Rent out existing structure on  main floor, retain basement area to store  building materials to build home on same  site. Or, add on to existing structure to  build quaint VIEW home. Priced to sell fast  at $24,900. Rita Percheson, 885-5706,  5 ACRE PARCEL No. 241  Invest your money in this nicely treed 5  acre parcel. Very close to Ruby Lake with  excellent swimming, fishing and boating.  Full price $19,800. Eva Carsky, 886-7126.  FRANCES AVE.  $2,000 down, balance by Agreement. 1/2  Acre lot, nicely treed yet good garden soil.  Water, hydro and paved road. Quiet area.  Zoned R2. Asking $12,500. Ed Baker, 885  2641..  ZONED FOR TRAILER TOO!  No. 277  Pender Harbour and close to shops or just  blocks from school, Medical Centre, etc.  164 ft. deep, about 88ft. on Lagoon Road.  Water, power and phone $9,950. Terms.  "Tiny Bob" Kent, 885-9461.  FIGHT INFLATION No. 297  With an excellent large, cleared and ready  to build on lot. Situated in a fine area in  West Sechelt. Owner will carry an A/S of  $10,000 at 13",, to qualified purchaser.  Asking $16,700. George Longman 885  3400.  MEADOWBROOK RANCH  22 ACRES  Comfortable 2 bedroom home - five-stall  barn, fruit trees, fenced and cross fenced  with two meandering streams through  property. Priced to sell at $122,500 with  good terms available. Phone Ken Wells,  886 7223 or Eric Rudland, 885-9857.  USUAL COURTESY TO LICENCED  REAL ESTATE AGENTS.  WEST SECHELT No. 322/324  DERBY & NORWEST BAY ROADS:  There is a choice of fine lots, Cleared lots  or lots in their natural state. Some have  Good Views, sizes and prices vary, but  buy now and build the home ol your  choosing at an interest rate you cannot  afford to turn down. On Norwest Bay  Road lots No. 30, 32, 33, 34 & 35 are  $12,900. Derby Road Lots No. 26 -  $12,500. Lot 24 $11,900 and Lot 20 -  $16,500. Larry Reardon. 885-3924.  ACRES OF VALUE No. 315  Strategically situated on Irvines Landing  Road, overlooking Hotel Lake, this natural  6 acre parcel offers the best of two  locations, with a View of the Lake and just  a lew minutes from your favourite fishing  spot in Pender Harbour. There's more, the  Vendor will consider terms with a  reasonable down payment on the $28,500  asking price. Bert Walker, 885-3746.  WATERFRONT  Gower Point  View Waterfront  50 x 217 WITH COZY COTTAGE  Fireplace, electric heat, carpeted, fabulous VIEW, year round home or summer  cottage, beach access, swimming and  boating are yours for the asking if you live  here. Price $57,500.  LOT WITH SUPERB VIEW of Gulf  Islands, Nanaimo. beach access, 57 x 217,  with 97 feet of View trontage, (ruil trees  and ready to build on. A fabulous site for  retirement; jusl watch the ships go by, all  for $59,500  BEST BUILDING SITE in the Gower  Point area, not waterfront, but all ofthe  advantages, without having to pay the  price. 2/3 acre of choice land with a  Fantastic View, $32,500.  For further information on these exceptional properties, K.H. Wells, 885 2235 or  886 7223 evenings.  WE'RE THE NEIGHBORHOOD PROFESSIONALS FOR YOU.  CHUCK DOWMAN ��� SALES MNG.  ED BAKER       EVA CARSKY     R.B. "TINY BOB" KENT       GEORGE LONGMAN  LARRY MOORE        RUTH MOORE RITA PERCHESON      LARRY REARDON  ERIC RUDLAND PETER SMITH BERT WALKER LYNN WILSON  Free Catalogue On Request  4 INSURANCE  What's Ihe value of your  SILVER AND GOLD  Coins  Tableware Jewellry  Insurance wise call  "TINY BOB"  885-2235  Homeowner policies, Fire, Theft, Legal Liability  Businessmen, practical Commerical Packages  FREE ESTIMATES Sunshine Coast Realtor, January 22, 1980  COSTA DEL SOL  Town Houses For Sale  OPEN HOUSE 10-5  Saturday, January 26 only  Marine View Estates Ltd.  ��� BEST BUY IN TOWN! ���  i-Waterlront Lots Excellent view of Porpoise Bay and mountains'  Bordering on trout stream, with maximum amount of privacy.  Close to ice arena, only 100 yds. from beach, 400 yds. to marina.   Owner says sell at only $9,900!  ��� WATERFRONT HOME ���  One Acre of Landscaped Privacy  Lovely sandy beach, protected moorage. Over 4,000 sq. ft. of deluxe,  custom built home with fabulous view. Close to all facilities in Sechelt.  Fireplaces, rec. rooms, 6 bedrooms. Six ft. bathtub and study in private  master bedroom suite overlooking Japanese garden. Low voltage wiring,  intercom, double carport.  $70,000 mortgage at 10 1/2% only $132,000.  LEN VAN EGMOND 885-9683  W -Waterfront  H -Homes  A - Acreage  R - Recreational  F - Farms  Bus. 885-5171  Box 1188, Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  SECHELT L121  Formerly Rockwood Lodge. This  1,5 acres creates a cozy backdrop  lor the lodge. It is within a short  walk to the schools, beaches,  churches, shopping facilities and  park. The lodge has seven large,  airy bedrooms and a real heart  warming brick fireplace in the  livingroom. F.P. $92,500. For  appointment call Pat, 885-5171.  LOTS  Trail Island  WATERFRONT L 184  Approximately 2 acres of protected  waterfront 1/2 mile from West  Sechelt. Access by water only.  Located on Trail Island. 311 ft. ol  waterfront. F.P. $16,500.  WATERFRONT   ACREAGE  Want Seclusion? Want room to  roam? Want waterfront? Well this  20 acres is secluded and has  approximately 1000 ft. waterfront.  Want more information? Call Pat,  8855171. F.P. $140,000.  MARLENE ROAD  Two half-acre lots on Marlen Road.  SUNSHINE HEIGHTS    L 185  View lot. Excavated and levelled,  120 x 100. Good building site. Call  now, 885-5171. F.P. $12,500.  <*6'  Now is the time to buy this 2.78 acres. This two bedroom home is  waiting for you to move in. Like a roomy kitchen? This home has  one. Like a comfortable livingroom? This home has one. Like lots  of light? Every room has windows. Like to garden? The rock garden  could use your tender lovin' care, So far so good���well, that's not  all. The mail is delivered and the S.M.T. bus and School Bus route  are close at hand. Pick up the phone and call 885-9487, ask for  Deirdre. Now is the time to make this one yours. Drastic reduction  (or quick sale. F.p. now $29,900.  PEBBLE CRESCENT     L I83  Good Buy! Here is a good building  lot situated in the Pebble Crescent  cul-de-sac. Close to the schools,  stores and beach. F.P. $14,000.  Pe.V)\Ae.  WATERFRONT L 153  Waterfront, 1400 sq. ft. home is  now on the market. 173 waterfront  x 469 depth. It's approximately 1.82  acre. Own private water system.  The 3 bedroom home also offers a  spacious rumpus room, and a 3 car  garage. Presently rented is the 600  sq. ft. 1 bdrm. guest cottage. F.P.  $115,000.  EAGLEVIEW PARK  WEST SECHELT      L 144  Eagleview Park, 4 miles west of Sechelt; 5 lots left,  all with excellent beach access. Start your new year  with a good investment; begin by calling   8855171.  j-     ' S0UD        .Ij  i'S-      '       ITS-'       (���  "Your Real Estate hosts on the Sunshine Coast"  Deirdre 885-9487       Pat 885-5171 Trev 886-2658 Sunshine Coast Realtor, January 22, 1980  Mitten Realty Ltd.  Visit us in our new location at Trail Bay Mall  leal Estate Is Serious Business - But A P  885-3295  Where Real Estate Is Serious Business ��� But A Pleasure  Vancouver Toll Free: 681-7931 _ _. _     ^ ^ _ _ BOX 979 Sechelt.B.C. VON 3A0  WATERFRONT  WATERFRONT  From the moment you enter this thoughtfully  laid out, immaculate, 3 bedroom, semi-  waterfront beauty you will feel comfortably at  home. The open-fired living room and dining  room with unobstructed ocean view, have lush  wool carpeting, and the cheerful kitchen, also  with ocean view, will delight the most discerning  person. There is a large rec room with wet bar  and brick fireplace, sauna, 2 1/2 bathrooms,  garage and workshop plus much, much more.  All this just a few steps to expansive beach  frontage. By appointment only, Corry Ross,  885-9250.  SANDY HOOK $68,500  This little charmer is loaded with extras. Wrap  around sundecks, steps and path to private  sandy beach. Garden soil, private treed lot. For  more information call Rene Sutherland, 885-  9362.  WATERFRONT ACREAGE $124,900  Situated on Sakinaw Lake, 16acres plus 2500 ft,  plus, minus of waterfront. Two bedroom home  and guest collage. Two floats and boathouse.  Private Ray. big enough for float plane.  TIGHT LITTLE ISLAND: Here is a super  spot in Gunboat Bay completely sheltered.  surrounded by deep water. Pilings in for a float.  Ideal for yachtsman and people interested in  outdoors. Syd Heai, 886-7875.  RUBY LAKE $43,000  Five acres and 400 ft. of waterfront on beautiful  Ruby Lake, There is road access to the  property. Call Suzanne Dunkerton for more  information.  GOWER POINT  Lovely two bedroom quality home on Gower  Point Road, close to shopping. Panoramic view  of North Shore mountains, Salmon Rock and  Vancouver Island. To view call Rene Sutherland  al 885-9362.  TUWANEK LOTS  Nicely treed, side by side, 95 It. and 110 ft. of  waterfrontage overlooking Lamb's Bay,  southerly exposure, these properties are priced  al $28,000 and $28,500 each. For more details  call Rene Sutherland at 885-9362.  SANDY HOOK  Nice low bank waterfront with almost 100 ft.  frontage Would be an ideal hideaway. Deep  moorage. This property is over one and a  quarter acres Call Terry Bracket!, 885-9865.  SELMA PARK $27,900  Delightful smaller home right on the beach.  Living room, kitchen, full bathroom and one  bedroom lor two, if you don't want a music  room). The deck looks over Sechelt sunsets  and deep moorage fully protected by the  breakwater. Have a good look at the  remodelling too. on this lease land gem. Call Dal  Grauer. 885-3808 or Terry Brackett, 885 9865.  THINKING OF RELOCATING  Don't delay. Use our Trade Plan. Call (or more details.  WATERFRONT  [   S 'Hi   V HB  7  Vfywrnr^ I  - *��  PRIME WATERFRONT              $50,000  Located on a private road on 120 ft. of level  waterfront, this two bedroom A frame with loft  and   workshop   is  ideal  for  recreation  or  permanent residence. Price includes 14 year  prepaid lease. Call Rene Sutherland at 885-  9362.  SOAMES POINT AREA $76,900  This little two bedroom old timer needs a facelift  but the lot is truly choice. 50 ft. of good  waterfront with an almost unbeatable view of  Howe Sound and Keats Island. Five minutes to  Langdale. Call Corry Ross, 885-9250.  JUST LISTED $300,000  Approximately 11 acres lowbank waterfront at  Long Arm, Secret Cove. Nicely treed, sheltered  moorage. Zoned R2L. Ideal for small group. Call  Rene at 885-9362.  ACREAGE  NORTH ROAD, GIBSONS $65,000  4 1/2 acres 1 mile from shopping centres,  schools and medical clinic. This 1440 sq. (t.  mobile home boasts two full bathrooms, one  with step-in tub and separate shower, 3  comfortable bedrooms, aden with wood healer,  livingroom. wet bar, kitchen/dining area, utility  room, and lots of closet space. Oil fired furnace  takes over if you run out of wood, Come and see  for yourself, Call Dal Grauer, 885-3808.  ACREAGE-PENDER HARBOUR  $49,000  19.5 acres of secluded land in natural state yet  within easy reach of stores, fishing areas, etc.  We have provisional plan for subdivison into  three five acre parcels. Call Don Lock, 885-3730  for more details, and to view.  LANGDALE  19 acres of tr  creek, Phone  details, 885-3971  jSQQp  $40,000.  Tty with a year round  '      lerton for more  HOMES  RETIREMENT PLUS $59,000  Call Don Lock, 885-3730 for all details on this  lovely mobile plus a 12 x 60 addition. Well built  and insulated, double windows, heated  greenhouse, beautiful landscaping. All this  located in Madeira Park -it may be possible to  subdivide iwo lots from the .86 acres and leave  you all the improvements.  TWO 2 BDRM. SUITES  ROBERTS CREEK $56,900  Located on Marlene Road this house is at  present rented as two suites. An excellent  investment for occupation and rental or rent  both suites. Call Don Lock, 8853730 lor all  details and an appointment to view.  HOMES  HOMES  SELMA PARK  $18,500  Cozy newly renovated two bedroom home on  lease land in Selma Park. Southerly exposure  overlooking Trail Islands. Excellent terms.  Spectacular view. Handy to all amenities. Call  Terry Brackett, 885-9865.  SECHELT VILLAGE $55,000  Three bedrooms in this bright immaculate 1320  sq. ft. home. Well designed space saving  kitchen. Dining room off from the kitchen,  livingroom has a floor to ceiling old brick  fireplace. Windows are all thermal and heating  costs are low. House has a large garage and lots  of storage area throughout. Property is all  fenced and is close to schools and shopping.  Call Suzanne Dunkerton to view this lovely  family home, 885-3971.  BRAND NEW ��� WEST SECHELT  Contemporary design view homes, quality  finishing, two bedrooms, potential third  bedroom, large utility on main floor. Dishwasher included. $72,900. Emilie Henderson,  885 5383, Ray Bernier, 885-5225.          CONTEMPORARY HOME $77,000  This architect designed 4 bedroom home must  be seen by the discerning buyer. Compare the  flawless workmanship, the fitted wardrobes in  every bedroomW|ie oak ship deck random  flooring, the, xM^jf-d view over Pender  Harbour. All winda*i/JouWe thermo sealed,  electric hot water heating,Jp*e does not allow  me to justify all the other feaTures so why not let  me show you this beauty���owner will even  consider terms. Call Don Lock, 885-3730 for all  details.  WEST SECHELT $9,000  Enjoy the view while relaxing in the livingroom  of this 2 bedroom 12 x 60 mobile home. This  home is fully skirted. Price includes fridge and  stove, Mobile only. Call Terry Brackett, 885-  9865.  GIBSONS $53,500  In the heart of Gibsons. One side has iwo  bedrooms, large living and dining room and the  other side has one bedroom. This property has  the potential of being zoned commercial. Phone  Suzanne Dunkerton for more information on  this well priced investment, 885-3971,  MOBILE HOME $10,900  Spotless 12 x 52 Homeco, many extras, partially  furnished. To view, call Rene at 885 9362.  EAST PORPOISE BAY $39,500.  Two bedroom JMDbiie home with a large rec  room and thiri\ljy^ur.ni added on. Purchase  price includes fridsyyve, washer and dryer.  Also 16 x 20 foot gara^ Ufck insulated located  on a large lot. Call Teny^JIckett. 885-9865.  CONTEMPORARY HOME $72,900  This year round, well insulated home overlooks  Lees Bay and is ideal for retirement living or  recreational use. Near to boat moorage and  launching and the excellent fishing grounds of  Pender Harbour. Call Don Lock, 885-3730.  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES  MR. BUSINESSMAN  We are planning a warehouse building suitable  for a variety of businesses. If you would like to  purchase, rent or lease with option to buy, a unit  of between 1000 and 1500 sq.lt. with all services  installed give me a call. We will see if we can fit  you in. Syd Heal, 886-7875.  BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY  Dry cleaning business situated in Gibsons and  Sechelt. No competition. Ideal family operation.  Priced to sell. For more information please call  Ray Bernier, 885 5225 or Emilie Henderson.  885-5383  COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITY  Great potential here tor new or used furniture,  auction room, stores, group activities or what  have you. This is a high visibility corner at  Martin Road and Sechelt Highway in Gibsons  with 2300 sq. It. of building on a site of 6590sq,  It. Vendor will consider all olfers. Call Syd or  Frances Heal, 886 7875.  POWELL RIVER Other offices to serve you  WEST VANCOUVER     Member of "Relocation Services Canada" Referral System  NORTH VANCOUVER  Ray Bernier Corry Ross Rene Sutherland Terry Brackett  885-5225  Emilie Henderson  885-5383  885-9250  Terri Hanson  886-8295  885-9362  Syd and Frances Heal  886-7875  885-9865  Dal Grauer  885-3808  KINGSWAY  SURREY  LANGLEY  Suzanne Dunkerton  885-3971  Don Lock  885-3730 Sunshine Coast Realtor, January 22, 1980  JUST LISTED MLS $14,950  Superb level building lot on Redrooffs Road site  cleared, many large trees left. Hydro and water  at lot line. Close to good fishing. For more  information call Rene Sutherland at 885-9362.  SECHELT VILLAGE  Located at the corner of Reef and Shoal Roads  in the Village of Sechelt, this 11 lot subdivision is  well treed, on regional water, all lots approved  for septic installation. Priced to sell at $10,500  each. For more details, call Rene at 885-9362.  SANDY HOOK $13,500  Sloping view lot, driveway in, servicesat lot line.  Unfinished cabin, potential view. Close to boat  launch. Call Rene at 885-9362,  WEST PORPOISE BAY $9,900  Here is a nice services lot within minutes of the  Village. This lot is partly cleared and has level  building site. Terry Brackett, 885-9865.  WEST SECHELT  Two lots side by side all ready to build on. Water  is all ready in with hydro and cable on road.  Each lot has a cleared level building site with  possible future view. Build on one lot and hold  the other for privacy or future development.  Priced at $12,500 and $10,000 or try offers as a  unit. Terry Brackett, 885-9865.  PENDER HARBOUR $14,000 each  Two large view lots on dead end road. Close to  access to beach with lots of fine fir trees. Both  are easy to build on and are on area water.  Mobiles allowed. You can purchase separately  or owner will consider offers on both as a  package. Owner may carry! Call Terry  Brackett, 885-9865 or Don Lock, 885-3730  SANDY HOOK $10,900  H Beautiful view lot, on Porpoise Drive, 51 ft. of  B frontage. Water and power. Call Emilie  ��� Henderson, 885-5383 or Ray Bernier, 885-5225.  WILSON CREEK $19,900  Approximately 3/4 acre corner lot on  McCullough Road. Well treed, hydro and  regional water available. Call Ray Bernier, 885-  5225 or Emilie Henderson, 885-5383.  HALFMOON BAY $12,900  Good view building lot on Truman Road. Close  to boat launch. More information with Ray  Bernier, 885-5225 or Emilie Henderson, 885-  5383.  GRANDVIEW - GIBSONS $12,500  Only a few lots left in this prestigious area, close  to schools, shopping and beach. Some lovely  trees on the lot; a potential view. Call Suzanne  Dunkerton for more information, 885-3971.  TWO LOTS IN ONE $13,000  Ready for survey and registration this lot is  approved for subdividing into two lots with  common field. Build on one and sell one or keep  it for investment. Don Lock has all details.  WEST SECHELT $16,750  Located on Wakefield Road these side by side  large lots are bordered by park and ravine for  privacy. Approved building sites, close to  Village. For further information contact Rene  Sutherland at 885-9362.  SIDE BY SIDE VIEW LOTS $13,900  These two lots are ideally suited for development and the owners will consider all offers, on  one or both. Services at roadside. Call Don  Lock, 885-3730 for all details.  PENDER HARBOUR  REALTY LTD.  Highway 101 at Francis Peninsula Rd.  883-2794  FRANCIS PENINSULA: Almost new 3 bedroom home with full roughed in basement. A  master ensuile beauty with carport and 2 fireplaces. Situated on a large lot on Rondeview  Drive. Full price $57,500. (About $23,000 down and balance at 10 3/4"., il assume existing  mtge.)  WATERFRONT: Approximately 7 acres with some 420 ft. of waterfront and older  cottage with perfect view towards Jervis Inlet. This parcel is close tosome of the finest fishing  and boating available. Paved Maple Road runs in from Egmont. $95,000 ($25,000 down).  BARGAIN BAY WATERFRONT: Beautiful strata title dwellings with south/westerly  view over islands and strait. Home No. 1 is a deluxe 1468 sq. ft. with carport...priced at  $75,000. Home No. 2 is a deluxe 1200 sq. ft. priced at $60,000. These are prices you can  afford.  GARDEN BAY WATERFRONT: Older two bedroom home with 250 ft. of low bank  waterfront. Excellent dock and safe moorage. Full price $110,000.  WATERFRONT: Francis Peninsula���2 side-by-side waterfront lots with fine moorage in  the Harbour. Lot 48 is approximately 1.8 acres and priced at $50,000. Pel. A is  approximately 1.2 acres and priced at $36,000.  BELIEVE-1T-OR-NOT: We have listed a pretty nice and fairly new home in Garden Bay  for $35,000. This is a clear title property, not lease land. See it fast!  WATERFRONT: A magnificent and unusual 15 acres with some 700 ft. of waterfront in  the lee of Harness Island. Haslam Creek runs through and a driveway enters from Highway  101. There is a 4 acre oyster lease included. Offers to $165,000 with 29% down.  LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO MOOR YOUR BOAT?  How about a l/3rd interest in a darned nice waterfront lot in Pender Harbour.  Has large dock with power and water plus small fisherman's cabin. Price $18,000.  John Breen  883-9978  Mike Rosse  883-9378  Jock Hermon  883-2745  Serving the Lower Sunshine Coast  Phone 886-2000 or 886-9121  Located in the Seaside Plaza, Gower Point Road, Gibsons  EVENINGS & WEEKENDS  CALL NORM PETERSON OR DENNIS SUVEGES  886-2607 886-7264  REAL ESTATE  GENERAL INSURANCE  AUTOPLAN  REED ROAD - GIBSONS Hobby Farm, ideal for horses  or ??? If you need more than 6acres and also wish to have an  all year round creek on property. Also need a big home (or  that large family or a trailer lor Ihe in-laws or ??? Trailer  presently rented for $225 per month. 12 It. x 64 ft. 2  bedroom. Total package $91,500.  HOMES  SOAMES POINT: Small, very old one bedroom, part  basement home. Not much value in house. The two lots  being well worth the full price. Well treed and close to a good  beach. Asking $39,000.  GIBSONS - Commercial building in the heart of the Village.  This 14 year old store sits on 4 lots with a total area of 17,886  sq. ft. The building is 11$ stories with 4471 sq. ft. on the main  floor and 1562 sq. ft. on the upper. The overall condition is  good and the building could be used lor a wide variety of  retail outlets. The store fixtures are NOT included in the sale  price of $200,000  O'SHEA RD.: Well built 2 bedroom full basement home.  Many extras in this house plus a 3 room self-contained suite  in the basement rented for $125 per month. The lot is fenced  and landscaped with nice garden area, all this on a Q.T.,  dead-end street. Asking price $67,000.  H1LLCREST RD: Need a sound studio for the band?  Check out the one on Hillcrest Road, Gibsons. Also has a 3  bedroom home with 2 bathrooms. The wood stove in living  room cuts down B.C. Hydro costs. Lot is wooded and zoned  R2. Listed for $49,500 ��� terms available,  WATERFRONT  GOWER POINT 150' of waterfront. If you are looking for  property in the $140,000 range you should see this large 2200  sq. ft., 4 bdrm. home plus basement. A good pathway leads  to a nice beach. Features include large open ceiling  livingroom with hand-hewn beams, a floor to ceiling stone  fireplace, double plate windows. Stone and cedar bark  exterior, shake roof plus much more. Some terms available.  WATERFRONT & SECLUSION - SECHELT INLET  Not 1 lot but 2 lots, crown lease land, Cabin on each lot,  water access only. Great summer and winter homes.  ACREAGE  GIBSONS ��� 20 acres at $3,506 per acre. Ideal for hobby  farm. Has gentle southern slope. Also a creek for  landscaping or ??? Located approximately 2 miles west of  Gibsons on Hwy. 101. Total price $72,500. Terms available  at 12 1/2 X, Adjoining acreage also available.  GAMBIER ISLAND - 9 acres of vacant land. Rare  opportunity to acquire one of the nicest parcels on the  Island. Good road frontage (574 ft.). Close to ferry and  moorage. Would make good holding property or use it as a  hide-away. Asking $49,000.  AGENTS FOR EVERGREEN PARKLAND  Over 60 large wooded lots in parklike setting, located 1200'  from highway on Veterans Road. Drive in and look around  as these lots are priced to sell from only $8,500. to $15,200.  GOWER POINT RD.: 3/4 acre of privacy. Full  basement, 3 bedroom home���well maintained. Fireplace  makes it a cozy country home. Close to the Village but in  regional district for lower taxes, Listed for $55,200.  LOTS  SOUTH FLETCHER ��� Great view lot. Easy tobuild on and  close to shopping area. Asking $16,000.  SCHOOL ROAD: Large view lot zoned for duplex or  single. If you are looking for a good building lot, this one  should be seen as it is priced to sell al only $13,500.  COCHRAN ROAD - 4 - 65' x 125' level lots to pick from. All  backing on Village park. Priced to sell at $12,000.  JOHNSON ROAD LANGDALE Large partly cleared  view lot in area of all new homes. This is one of the last  unbuilt lots in the area. Now only $13,500.  CHASTER ROAD ��� Bring all offers on 80' level cleared lot,  close to school. OK for trailers.  GIBSONS, WYNGART RD - Fairly level lot with view of  Keats Island and Shoal Channel, lot on sewer, is also duplex  zoned. $17,500.  m Sunshine Coast Realtor, January 22, 1980  LOWER RD: Two bedroom home close to  Roberts Creek Store. An older home with privacy  and charm. Lots of potential for this great little  place. $39,500.  1258 HEADLANDS RD: Very nice little two  bedroom home with an excellent Lower Gibsons  Village location. View of Gibsons Harbour. Has  new outside paint and roof. A perfect starter  homejisted at $34,900  TRICKLEBROOK DR: Large new home on  view lot. Quality built three bedroom home in  quiet residential area. This home has large  livingroom, fireplace, double carport, full  basement. The perfect family home. $62,900.  SANDY HOOK: Coracle Drive, WATERFRONT. Do you want a summer cottage on  approximately 75 ft. of sandy beach waterfront?  j An unbelievable view? Do you want a private  place to go on winter weekends just to sit around  the fire and relax? How about running water,  electric service but completely hidden in the trees  privacy? This little cottage has all this and more.  Phone to view any time. $54,900.  1597 SARGENT ROAD: Absolute privacy in  your own large beautifully landscaped back yard  with fruit trees. Spectacular view of the ocean  from the front. All this right in the heart ot  Gibsons. Close to schools, shopping etc.  Immaculate three bedroom well built home with  1/2 basement, fireplace and sundeck. May be  purchased with adjoining lot. $58,000.  HILLCREST RD: Tidy, well kept bungalow  with tidy well kept yard. Three bedrooms. Open  fireplace, partial basement makes an excellent  work room. Fully insulated. Nothing to do but  enjoy. $51,500.  MANATEE ROAD: Roberts Creek. Excellent  starter or retirement home in quiet area only a  block to super beach. Very nice two bedroom  home. Fireplace and on large lot. Prices are going  up, this is an excellent buy. $41,000.  SEACOT WAY: Creekside Park Estates.  Three bedroom home under construction.  Carport has closed storage area. Sunken  livingroom with fireplace, vaulted ceilings.  Bathroom has separate make-up vanity. Twin  seal windows. $57,500.  ACREAGE  GAMBIER ISLAND: 8.2 WATERFRONT  acres on Gambier Island. 270 ft. of waterfront x  1230 ft. Approximately 2 acres cleared plus 6  acres tall timber. Secluded bay wilh 2 year old  wharf, ramp and float approximately 40 x 15 ft.  Water, power and telephone in. Approximately  800 sq. ft. cabin yet to be finished. 200 degree  west-south-west view. 275 ft. supply train to  cabin. Ideal recreational and Investment.  $125,000.  SCHOOL RD: 1.56 acres adjacent to the  elementary school. Could be sub-divided to lots.  On sewei and all services. $58,000.  STEWART RD: 2.8 privata^crcs in quiet area  with nice evergreens* GVslns Creek runs  through back gf f\%4rClose to Village  amenities. $29,5  HWY 101: Approximately 16 acres. 2nd growth  trees, level, great for a hobby farm. Close to  Gibsons. Good holding properly and priced at  only $4,000 per acre. See this now. Large  acreages are getting scarce. $64,000.  LOTS  BONNIEBROOK SUBDIVISION: Extra  large view lots in quiel cul-de-sac. All services.  easy cartop boat launching. Only one block irom  Ihe beach and Chaster Park. Priced from  $18,900.  GRADY RD: Langdale. Building lot approximately 75 x 250 x 75 x 253. All services except  sewer. View. Selectively cleared. $14,000.  BURNS RD: Good building lot, 65 x 130 on flat  land in Gibsons Village. Four blocks from post  office, stores and transportation. Lightly treed.  Three blocks from ocean. Al! services available.  $11,000.  SHOAL LOOKOUT: View lot with approval  (or ordinary septic tank. Lots of nice homes in this  attractive area. $19,900.  SCHOOL &WYNGART: Beautiful view from  this duplex zoned lot overlooking the Bay. Close  to schools and shopping. Perfectly suited to side-  by-side or up-down duplex construction.  $16,500.  FIRCREST: Reasonably priced lots with nice  trees. Quiet no-through street perfect for family  homes. Priced from $10,500.  HWY. 101&ARGENTRD: 6/10 of an acre of  treed land in Roberts Creek two blocks from, the  Masonic Hall. Two dwellings allowed on the  property. 100 feet of highway frontage thai would  be ideal for domestic industry site wilh home  behind.On hydto and regional water. $14,900.  GOWER PT. RD. & 14th: Lovely view corner  lot. Two plateaus for your choice of building sites.  Two homes could be built on this 1/2 acre.  Partially cleared. Could be accessed from  Grandview Road for quiel rural setting. Approximately 85 ft. x 265 ft. $17,900.  SMITH RD: Good view lot 125 x 165 approximately with a good building site and an  unobstructed ocean view. $13,500.  YMCA RD: Langdale. Building lot 87 x 163 on  quiet dead end street and ready to build on.  $12,900.  POPLAR LANE: 70 x 130 panhandle lot on  sewer. Excellent neighbourhood only one block  to schools and shopping. Flat easy to build on lot  with private driveway. $13,900.  SANDY HOOK: Level corner lot with southwest exposure. Size 69 x 130 with paved road on  both sides. Power and water at site. Short  distance to beach and boat ramp. $10,500.  SUNNYCREST  SHOPPING  CENTRE  886-2277  ^mmjLmh  w^,  1065 FRANKLIN ROAD: Immaculate cozy  Iwo bedroom home. Covered sundeck. Nicely  landscaped grounds, Close to beach access.  Great retirement or starter home on level lot.  $41,000.    HILLCREST RD: Attractive two bedroom  home on extra large lot. Some view of water and  Keats Island. Possible subdivision of lot in future.  $39,900.  HWY 101  HOPKINS LANDING: Dramatic view to  Keats, Gambier. Lions Bay and Ferry from this  two bedroom home only 10 minutes walk to ferry  terminal. Sliding glass doors to wraparound  sundeck. Large family room and dining area with  eating bar. 27 x 19ft. basement. Includes washer,  dryer, fridge and stove. Owner must sell. Phone  for appointment to view anytime. $43,500.  INVESTMENT- COMMERCIAL - REVENUE  GIBSONS: 11 ��� three bedroom Townhouses  with Harbour view. 1564 sq. ft. on 2 levels, w/w  carpets, 1 1/2 baths, recreation room. Close to  schools and shopping. Priced below replacement  cost. You can't buy this size of living area for the  price, From $34,500, financing available.  WINN RD: Four-plex. Positive cash flow with  $11,000 revenue per year. Top units contain five  bedrooms with one and a half bathrooms. Lower  suites are large two bedroom units. Low  maintenance and good return make this an  excellent investment value. Close to all the  amenities. $89,500.  ROSAMUND RD: Two duplexes of approximately 1000 sq. ft. each. Two suites currently  rented at approximately $150 each. Potential for higher rents. Large lots. Ideal investment priced  to sell. Make an offer. $34,900 each.  IGART RD: Ideal investment. Large  duplex in Village, excellent condition. Good  rents, large rooms, full basements in each. Added  teatures (or your tenants include sundecks  combined wilh breathtaking view, large lot with  private backyard, landscaped with large cedars.  Quiet area, quiet street. Looking (or a good  investment? Vendor may consider terms. Phone  for appointment anytime. $67,500.  HWY. 101, GIBSONS: Fully rented nine unit  apartment block wilh over $18,000 yearly  revenue. Very neat and clean building in prime  location close to schools and shopping. Excellent  rental history. Nearly 1/2 acre ol property with  paved parking lot. This high cash flow building  produces excellent investment value. Contact  Jon McRae, 885 3670 for details. $155,000.  FAIRVIEW RD: Two year old duplex on a 1/2  acre lot represents the ideal investment property.  There are 1232 sq. It. in both of these side by side  units. Features are post and beam construction  with feature fireplace, sundecks. landscaped with  concrete driveway. Appeals to two separate  rental markets with a two and a three bedroom  suite. Yearly income is over $7,000. Simply  assume the $54,0001st mortgage at 10 1/4%, add  your downpayment to purchase this excellent  10".. M.U.R.B. investment value. $79,500.  DAVIS BAY: INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY. Trailer court near sunny Davis Bay. Large  three bedroom home for new owners, 18 trailer  pads and hook-ups for four campers. 2 1/2 acres  with large creek at back. $179,000.  GOWER POINT RD: Between the Ritz Motet  and the Post Office. Two lots each with 50 ft.  frontage across from the Marina site. Two older  homes on sewer, each on their own lot. Excellent  investment potential with rental revenue to pay  the bills. $54,900.  HOPKINS LANDING-WATERFRONT: Ex  cellent business investment on the Sunshine  Coast. This grocery and sundry store is located in  the heart of Hopkins Landing just minutes to the  Langdale ferry. Ideally situated on 90 ft. of level,  walkout WATERFRONT, being the only  commercially zoned property in this area, the  land itself is extremely valuable. Aside from store  profits there is additional revenue from other  sources, such as collection of wharfinger fees  from the government wharf adjoining this  property, plus post office and an upstairs revenue  suite. This is an ideal husband-wife situation.  Always wanted to be your own boss, then don't  miss this opportunity.  IBSON  s_R  in    EALTY  k/AND LAND DEVELOPMENT LTD.  VANCOUVER  TOLL FREE  682-1513  Sunnycrest Shopping Centre  CONVEYANCING-REAL ESTATE CONSULTING-APPRAISALS-     NOTARY PUBLIC  LORRIE GIRARD  886-7760  JON MCRAE  885-3670  ANNE GURNEY  886-2164  ARNE PETTERSEN  886-9793  GARY PUCKETT  886-9508  STEVE SAWYER  885-2691  DAVE ROBERTS  886-8040

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