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Sunshine Coast News May 22, 1979

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 001  ,1  The Sunshine  Published at Gibsons, B.C.  15* per copy on newsstands  Serving the Sunshine Coast since 1945  May 22,1979      . . .  Volume 34, Numbed 2  Timber Days '79 underway  ���'��� 4-g%MJH  Senior Citizens spearhead opposition  Proposed bus increase opposed  Ronald the Clown was passing out tickets for free  goodies as Sechelt's Timber Days got underway on  Sunday.  A proposed increase in  Cites by Sechelt Motor Trans-  pott came in for sharp criticism at the tegular Regional  Board meeting held on Thursday, May 17.  Adele deLange of Wilson  Cteek made a presentation to  the board on behalf of Branch  No. 69 of the Senior Citizens  Association in Sechelt asking  for the board's support In  opposing the proposed increases.  Miss de Lange pointed to  the deterioration in service  provided by the S.M.T. over  the put few years and to the  brevity of notice given of the  proposed increase. She said  that the removal of buses from  the Sunshine Cout worked a  severe hardship on senior  citizens, many of whom were  dependent on the bus service  for transportation   to   Van  couver and up and down the  Sunshine Cout.  What particularly incensed  Miss de Lange wu the lack of  notice given. The notice of  intent wu published, she  uid, in the Cout News which  came out on May IS and protests were to be received by  the Superintendent of Motor  Carriers in Burnaby by  May 22. Miss de Lange  pointed out that with the intervening long weekend and  federal election this left  precisely three mailing days  from the publication date of  the newspaper.  "The over-riding of the individual's right to protest is  appalling," said Miss de  Lange The senior citizen's  representative also objected  to the feet that there wu no  way of ascertaining what the  degree of the fare increase  Free shares may help build theatre  Arts group suggests novel scheme  These orange-headed ladies were selling popcorn,  potato chips, and pop to raise money for Sechelt's  preschoolers.  Plans to bring the proposed  Eileen Glassford Performing  Arts Centre to the village of  Gibsons are reported to be  quietly going ahead. In recent  developments the Eileen  Glassford Arts Foundation hu  received its papers of incorporation from Victoria and is  now in a position to begin pur  suing the necessary fends for  the project.  In this connection, the  Steering Committee for the  Foundation are asking residents of die Sunshine Coast  to apply for and to hold in  trust for the theatre project  the five free shares in the  British Columbia Resources  At the Regional Board  Cheekeye Dunsmuir line dispute  A sharp disagreement was evident at the Regional Board  Meeting of May 17 when die directors discussed the proposed  Cheekye-Dunsmuir transmission line to Vancouver Island.  Director Joe Harrison of Pender Harbour told the board that  he had been in discussion with the Environment Land Use  Commission and from the information he had been given there  is a debate raging within B.C. Hydro itself u to whether the  line is worth the cost of construction. "There is a body of  opinion," said Harrison, "which feels that a natural gu line  would be more economical. Right now," said Harrison, "Hydro  is not too keen on this project and our best strategy would be  to continue to question its economic justification."  On the other hand Director David Hunter of Area F reported  from a meeting of the Association of Vancouver Island Municipalities which he and other representatives of the Sunshine  Coast attended Jiat Preside!  had told the'meeting"that fhe power supply situation on  couver Island wu crucial and depended on the Cheekye-Dunsmuir line. Hunter quoted Olsen u saying that ten major industries would be closing down on Vancouver Island by 1982 if the  line was not completed. Brown-outs would be occurring by  1981. Olsen wu quoted as saving that natural gu would not tie  Vancouver Island into the continental grid.  Director Harrison re-iterated that his information from the  Environment Land Use Commission indicated that they were in  the midst of an economic study of the project and preliminary  reports indicated that there wu no economic justification for  the line. Harrison moved that the Hunter recommendation be  tabled until the situation wu clarified. The tabling motion  passed.  Investment Corporation that  are being offered by the  provincial government.  "It is an idea that is being  utilized in Vancouver for a  projected Women's Building," said John Burnside  on behalf of the Theatre  Foundation, "and our best  advice is that it is a very good  idea and well worth hying."  Burnside said that those Sunshine Cout residents who  would like to throw their  support behind the project  in this wsy should so indicate  .Jong* provided in adwsi-  some time ago Burnside snd  architect Bruce Gorman  informed the village council  that they felt it would be  preferable to start the proposed theatre from scratch  locally rather than bring in  the half-finished building from  U.B.C. due to the minimal  size of that building.Members  of council expressed themselves u being completely in  accord with that proposed  change. "We have the people  here who can do it better,"  said Gorman.  Membership in the Arts  ..._ . F��i��d��|ian will be available  tisements in this paper and lh shortly for a nominal annual  the  Peninsula   Times.   He fee based on the type of  Negotiations open soon  Union presents position  pointed out that it would be  legally necessary for contributing individuals to pick up  the five free shares themselves and that the form in the  newspapers merely indicated  that die individuals concerned  were interested in participating and would hold the  shares in trust until such time  as they would be turned over  to the Foundation.  In Vancouver, on May 28  representatives' from 18 locals  of the Canadian Paperworkers  Union in B.C. will sit down  with the Pulp and Paper  Industrial Relations Bureau  which represents the companies Involved, to hammer  out a new contract. On Thursday lut week the bargaining  committee of local 1119, Port  Mellon, presented their 1979  contract demands to the press.  The ambition of the Union  is to win a contract which  will make up some of the lost  because the inflation rate  has risen faster than the wage  settlements allowed by the  Anti Inflation Board in 1975  and 1977. Also they hope to  be able to reduce the time  spent in the work place by  their members in order to  reduce work-related illness  and to create employment for  others.  The local negotiating team  of Steve Holland, Dave Gant  and Glyn Davies are optimistic  of a good settlement as the  companies are making record  ground which wu suffered Profits ���nd the PuIP *****  are strong. Furthermore the  Federal Government hu  pumped millions of dollars  into the industry to help up  grade existing mills and to  improve on pollution control  which will subsequently  save the companies money.  The following is a brief  outline of the contract demands: 1. A 2-year contract  with a 15% increase in each  year for all members. 2. 50*  an hour increase for all mechanics (tradesmen) to bring  them into line with mechanics  in other industries. 3. 35* an  hour increase for all tour  workers and an increase in  the shift differential - 5% on  the afternoon shift and 10%  on the midnight to 8 a.m.  shift. 4. An update of the  cost of living allowance which  includes a 1* raise every time  the B.C. Consumer Price  Index goes up 0.25. 5. Improved benefits in the Pension  Plan; Vacations; and Health  and Welfare.  membership desired. Residents of the Sunshine Cout  who would like to be involved  in the project or would like  to aid it can contribute in this  way also.  It should be noted by those  people who have not yet  applied for their free shares  but would like to use them to  aid the theatre project that  the deadline for applying for  would be.  The Regional Board moved  immediately to support the  senior citizens in this matter  and a motion wu pused  protesting both the increase  in fares snd the shortage of  time to object to the increase.  They further voted to ask for  reductions in fares for senior  citizens and the handicapped.  Director David Hunter of  Area F volunteered to deliver  the board's letter of protest  personally on Friday, May 18,  since he had planned a trip to  Burnaby in any case.  The following is the brief  presented by Miss de Lange:  "On behalf of the senior  citizens, the handicapped and  the general public of theSun-  shine Coast, I wish to ask for  the support of this Regional  Board against the proposed  price increase of fares snd the  service given by the S.M.T.  Bus Company.  "It is only a year ago since  this Company reduced the bus  service to the Sunshine Coast  at weekends, cutting out the  extra bus on Fridays which  hsd run for many years and  the early morning bus on  Saturday and Sunday and also  the midday bus from Vancouver on these same days.  They have since closed the  depot in Sechelt, and at the  present time have only a small  office open for fifteen minutes  prior to the arrival and departure of the buses. The freight  office is open only for three  hours daily.  "Now the Company gives  notice of intent to increase  further die fares which were  increased approx. eighteen  months ago, and for these  fares to be in force on June 1st  1979. No financial considera  tion is given to the senior  citizen or the handicapped in  the matter of feres.  "The most deplorable part  of all is that a public notice  of this intent of increase wu  published in The Cout News  issue of Msy 15th with submissions and representations  to be filed with the Superintendent of Motor Carriers ia  Burnaby before May 22nd  giving one week's notice with  a holiday weekend within that  time and no mail delivery In  the Vancouver area on Saturdays, i.e. three mailing days  only (Wed., Thurs., Fri.) for  anyone to make a submission  before the due date - always  providing the posts! serviot;  would be regular. This over-'  riding of any individual's  right to protest is appalling. -.  "It is to ask the Regional  Board if it would support the  protest of the Senior Citizens'  Association ��� Branch No. (*)���'  against the proposed increase  of the fares of the S.M.T. and  the matter of its being brought  before the public - the users of  the buses - that I am here  tonight. '���>',:  "Since the public notice Has  only been available for two  days, and brought before the  Senior Citizens General  Meeting of the Branch this  afternoon, it wu not possible,  to present a formal brief and  deputation within Board  regulations due to the urgency  of the time limit.  "I wish to thank you for  your consideration."  .See Page 9.  for  Hospitality Directory  In   another   development them is June 15.  Centre opening  in controversy  The new Art Centre in  Sechelt will be the setting for  the Annual General Meeting  of the Sunshine Cout Arts  Council on Friday, June 8  Negotiations on specifically at 8.00 p.m. The building, at  local issues will start on May the corner of Trail and Me  Union negotiators Dave Gant, Steve Holland, and Qlen Davies presented the  Union's position In upcoming negotiations at a press conference last week.  31 and run concurrently in  order that a package can be  presented to the local membership to ratify. The final list  of local demands hu not yet  been agreed on by the Union  Committee.  Mr. William Hughes,  Vice President Canadian  Forest Products and Manager  of Howe Sound Pulp hu sent  out s letter to all members of  local 1119 outlining the company's views on profits, the  pulp markets and inflation.  Summing up he says "Our  industry and our company are  doing well at present, but  some of the factors which  support our current prosperity will not lut. We must  not deceive ourselves into  believing thst the pie we all  share is bigger than really  exists."  Mr. Chris Crambje of the  Pulp and Paper Industrial  Relations Bureau said thst the  Union demands are still being  studied and coated and the  Company's proposals will be  put to the Union Bargaining  Committee on   May 28.  dusa, will not be completely  finished, but it will be sufficiently functional to accommodate the meeting.  The official opening of the  Centre will be held once the  sewer hook-up hu been  made. This is expected towards the end of June, and  the opening date will be  announced later.  Progress on the Art Centre  wu s topic for some discussion and disagreement at  the regular monthly meeting  of the Sunshine Cout Arts  Council held st Sechelt Elementary School on Tuesday,  May 15,1979.  One segment of the assembly of approximately fifteen  people attending the meeting  felt that progress had not been  satisfactory, and accounting  of the fends spent wu called  for. Council President Doris  Crowston said that an oral  accounting had been given  at an earlier meeting, but  project co-ordinator Clarke  Steabncr said he would prepare a written account for the  Annual General Meeting.  Another segment of the  assembly felt that outstanding  value for money had been received, and enthusiasm over  the building which hu been  constructed for about $60,000  wu expressed. Clarke's  work in this regard wu commended by this segment.  In a newsletter presented  at the meeting, the past and  coming events since the lut  General Meeting of November  1978 were outlined. These  consisted of s fund raising  Plant Sale; the mid-March  opening of the successful  Gallery Shop in Gibsons;  watercolour demonstration  by Allan Edwards, President  of the Federation of Canadian  Artists; s piano workshop by  Lee Kum-Sing; and performances by the Bell Ringers  of Highland United Church,  North Vancouver, (with the  Sunshine Choristers); the Terminal City Dance Company;  and Susan Elek and Anthony  Elliott in concert.  Please ton to page seven  *���  Nell Neilson shows the shooting form which saw him  defeat American crossbow champions In his first.  attempt recently. ��  jj Local boy beats  crossbow experts  A local boy set the experts back on their heels when he travelled with representatives of the Sunshine Cout Mediaeval  Society to a crossbow meet in Arkansas recently.  Forty exponents of the crossbow were gathered in Huntsville,  Arkansas, in what is known as the Duster Shoot. Sixteen-year  old Neil Neilsen had never shot a crossbow before, had no sights  on his crossbow where his competition were all using fitted  sights. Despite these handicaps and with only a half hour's  coaching Neil beat the best in North America in the Hunt Shoot;  Among those he defeated were Rodney Boyce, Star of the  National Crossbowmen, and John Harris, Star of the American  Crossbow Association. "The boy is a phenomenal shot," a  much surprised Harris is reported to have conceded at the conclusion of the Hunt Shoot. '���''  The Mediaeval Society will be staging their annual meeting  locally on September 1-2,1979. "Anyone on the Sunshine Coast  is welcome to participate," said Mediaeval Society President  Robyn Allen.  Delivered to EVERY address on the Sunshine Coast every Tuesday Coast News, May 22,1979.  A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER  Published at Gibsons, B.C. every Tuesday,  by Glassford Press Ltd. Phone 886-2622  Box 460, Gibsons, VON 1V0 or 886-7817  Sharon L. Berg���  Production Manager  Nirmal Sldhu ���  Ian Corrance ���  Advertising  Belinda MacLeod ���  Copysetting  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Distributed Free to all addresses on the Sunshine Coast    ^^^^^^^  British Columbia: $15.00 per year; $10.00 for six months  Canada, except B.C.: $16.00 per year United States and Foreign: $20.00 per year  John Burnside ���  Editor  Ian Corrance ���  Photographer  M.M.Joe ���  Office Manager  It's all over now  but for how long?  By the time this paper comes out there  will be nothing left of the 1979 election  except the results. Surely few times in  the recent past could a populatin have  suffered through such a surfeit of electioneering as the people of British Columbia  have endured this spring. There ought to  be a law passed forbidding provincial  elections and federal elections coming  within a year of each other but there isn't  so there we are.  It seems almost certain that there will  be a minority government in Ottawa  when all the ballots are counted and, despite Joe Gark's earnest trumpetings,  that in itself is no bad thing. The lut  minority government passed some very  worthwhile legislation indeed, notably  the present Election Act which in the long  run will free the political parties from outside influence, and the legislation  effected which brought Petrocan into  being.  In terms of governing, then a minority government poses no great difficulties. Let us remember that we are  dealing with three parties only whereas in  Europe in most countries they have to  juggle as many as a dozen.  It is not unlikely, however, that this  period of minority government will not  last as long as the 1972-74 minority  government for a couple of reasons.  If the Conservatives are the government in a minority situation they will be  anxious to turn their minority into a  majority. With the Liberals on the ropes,  so will go their reasoning, all we will have  to do is have another election and we will  finish them off. They will problably be  wrong but such will be their reasoning.  If, on the other hand, the Liberals form  a minority government they will find it  difficult to obtain any kind of enduring  support. The NDP's greatest point of  vulnerability in this put election and in  the election of 1974 which saw their  seats in parliament reduced from thirty to  seventeen was, in both cases, thst a vote  for the NDP was tantamount to a vote for  the Liberals. The New Democrats simply  cannot afford to risk the loss of identity  implicit in support, again, of the Liberals  over any extended period.  Sated with electioneering u we are,  then, it is entirely possible that we will  have to do it all again within the year,  possibly even in 1979.  This can truly be said to be one of those  periods in a nation's life when a watershed is reached and the future direction  of the country and its government is  very difficult indeed to predict. What  Pierre Eliot Trudeau decides to do in the  event of defeat in this election or the next  will be of crucial importance. It is possible that Trudeau, with Claude Ryan  establishing himself as a French-Canadian federalist of the first rank in Quebec,  and with Trudeau's own distaste for  parliament and the role of opposition  leader, will decide to own distaste for  parliament and the role of opposition  leader, will decide to retire to devote himself to scholarly pursuits and his children.  If he does retire the Liberal Paty could  conceivably become Canada's third party  unlikely as that may seem to all of us who  have become accustomed to Canadian  Liberal governments. It is a faceless  party st the moment except for Trudeau  and it should be remembered that when  Diefenbaker swept to power there were  only just over forty Liberals in the House  of Commons.  In any event we, the electorate, have at  least a brief breathing spell before we  have to consider all these imponderables.  And we have earned it, have we not?  . .from trie files of Coast News  FIVE YEARS AGO  A letter to the Coaat News calls  for some recognition by way of parks  naming or roads of the Inglis family  who for two generations provided  medical services on the Sunshine  Coast.  Sechelt Council offers to take over  from federal authorities the Gibsons-  Sechelt Municipal Airport.  Club member Harry Turner of  Gibsons Winter Club Informed Gibsons Council that the Winter Club  would be financed at no cost to the  taxpayer.  TEN YEARS AGO  Coast News editorializes "The time Is  ripe for the government (federal) to  stem the Inflationary movement.  Sunshine greeted Sechelt's 21st  May Day celebration.  Charles Mandelkau of the Shell  Service station waa commended by  Gibsons Council for clearing the  brush off the property on School Road  opposite the Harris Block. It Is felt  that the area will add twenty or thirty  parking spaces to the centre of the  Village.  FIFTEEN YEARS AGO  Fire destroyed the Malaspina Riding  and Guest Ranch in the Kleindale  Road vicinity of Pender Harbour.  The picturesque two-storey home,  belonging to Mr. and Mrs. William  Peters, was completely destroyed.  Mr. Edward Atlee saw two bald-  headed eagles soaring over the  Headlands last Friday, the first he  has seen In several years aa they are  becoming quite scarce.  The Roberts Creek Community Hall  marks Its thirtieth birthday thla v  TWENTY YEAR8 AGO  Mr. and Mrs. J. Marshall, Sr., of  Marine Drive In Gibsons had their  seven sons, including local residents  Jack and Jim, in their home at one  time last week. It was the first time  the family had been together In 25  years.  Port Mellon Community Club forwards to MLA Tony Gargrave a  signed petition calling for the extension of the road from Port Mellon  through to Squamish.  TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO  U.B.C. Players presented a production of George Bernard Shaw's  "Major Barbara" to an enthusiastic  audience in Elphinstone Auditorium  last week.  Village Council writes to the  Department of Public Works requesting that lines for pedestrian  lanes be placed on the highway near  the church corner.  Customers of the Bank of Montreal  in Gibsons will soon receive speedier  service as a result of the Installation  of a combination posting machine.  Japanese fishermen are beginning  to be a competitive factor in Pacific  Coast fishing.  THIRTY YEARS AGO  Coalition candidate Batt Mclntyre  In an election speech points out that  socialism has not brought Utopia to  Great Britain In the four years since  the Second World War. He sees the  coming election as a straightforward  battle between free enterprise and  socialism. Mclntyre also tells a  Sechelt audience that it will not be  long before a highway links the  Sunshine Coast with Squamish.  Roberts Creek, May 24, 1934. At one time or another, localities  along the Sunshine Coaat from Port Mellon to Irvines Landing  managed in one way or another to build community halls. However  austere the walls and roof, the dance floor was Invariably of edge-  grain fir. This hall, complete with stage and kitchen, was quite like  its counterpart at Gibson's Landing. Changing times have seen the  building used for changing functions. Whether or not a new $200,000  structure, planned as part of the recently aborted plebiscite, will  become a reality Is a moot point. Meanwhile, however, the Roberts  Creek Community Hall continues to be as much needed as It was  forty-five years ago. Helen McCall photo courtesy OJ. Merrick and  Elphinstone Pioneer Museum. L.R. Peterson.  The swallows are in fell  swooping and chattering flight  outside the Cout News windows on this fine Saturday  in May and their familiar  and exciting aerial dance takes  me to places where I have  met them before in abundance  My sister lived after her  marriage in a village in  Lincolnshire, England, which  was called Old Somerby. I  ' don't know why it wu called'  Old Somerby since there was  no New Somerby or even a  Somerby in the county but  Old Somerby it wu, just down  the road from Boothby Pagnell  and up the long hill put  Spitalgate Airport from the  town of Granthams which wu  at one time noted for the  manufacutre of gingerbread  and had a soccer team called  the Granthams Gingerbreads.  As anyone who has been to  Lincolnshire will attest, it  is not known for its hills. It is  a flat fen land reminiscent  of the Canadian prairies in  miniature and the hill up from  Granthams accorded Old  Somerby its only claim to  prominence. It wu, the locals  informed one solemnly and  with pride, the highest point  in the county. The forests  that gave Robin Hood shelter  in the middle ages have long  gone to make the wooden  ships with which Britannia  once ruled the waves and the  flat land is given over to grain  crops and fat, white-faced  Hereford cattle.  The village itself in 1950  when I first made its acquaintance was a single street of  white stone houses with red  tile roofs. Apart from the  paved highway through the  village along which the competing green and blue buses  provided service to Granthams  twice or three times a day with  little other traffic in those  post-war yesrs, there was  little evidence that the village  had changed in a couple of  hundred yesrs. The low doors  to the houses made even a  man of average height duck to  enter. Hooks in the kitchen  ceilings held cured hams and  every house seemed to have  its own pig in the back yard.  There was no running water  and no electricity. Unbelievably, the village still  drew its water from the Una  of peaked roof well that I  thought didn't exist outside  Mother Goose Nursery Rhyme  books. It stood in a field called  .'the common' whose only  function seemed to be to provide a locale for the Sunday  afternoon after-church cricket  games in which even 'the  Squire', as the district's  largest land-owner wu called,  took part. The little square'  towered Norman church  looked quite justifiably u  if it had been there for  centuries and the whole village, so English and so ancient, looked like some  strange living museum that  neither world wars nor  scientific advancement could  alter.  My brother-in-law worked  with his father in the family  Wheelwrights and Carpenters  business which had been in  the family for generations.  They made wooden wheels for  farm carts, hen houses, and  coffins. In one of their workshops wu a blacksmith shop  which wu still shoeing the  local horses.  In those long-ago summers  the swallows inhabited  the work sheds. One of the  large, high windows was  always open and generations  of swallows had swooped  through the narrow opening  and built their mud nests in  the high rafters. The din of the  hungry young was incessant  in the summer-time and I  never tired of watching the  tireless adults swoop down  and through the open window  space at suicidal speed.  The swallows in the springtime come back to many  places besides Capistrano.  Though one rather thinks of  them as aerial acrobats or  feathered sprinters, they find  their way back to the distant  Yukon in the springtime too.  There is a bluff at the south  end of Dawson City overlooking the confluence of the  Klondike and Yukon rivers on  which I used to sit and watch  them at their aerial antics.  There they nested in the cliff  below my vantage point and  though the scene before me  was as far removed from rural  England as one could possibly  imagine the dance of the  nesting swallows was the  same.  The first spring I saw in  Dawson City I made a brief  and close acquaintance with  an individual swallow. It  had been a late spring and  many, many birds had made  their return to the north to find  the land still snow-bound.  Ducks and owls, swallows,  and a host of others faced a  dismal fate alleviated only by  the bread-crumbs that the  townsfolk provided them.  As soon as the snow began  to leave the streets of the town  I took my old bicycle from the  furnace room and rode it  eagerly around puddles and  melting snow. The swallow  was sitting on the road and  I stopped and picked him up.  I held him in my hand thinking  to take him home to revive  him. He opened one eye and  then closed it again seeming  indifferent that he sat on the  palm of a human hand. As  I searched my pockets for a  means of transporting him  without injury he suddenly  flew away, apparently more  discouraged than afflicted by  his fate.  Whether in the English  village of my visiting boyhood  or in Canada's Yukon, outside  the Cout News windows,  or in Capistrano, the return of  the swallows and the swooping, jerking aerial display  which is their trademark are  earnests that springtime is  at its peak and summer is  imminent. They are surely not  the only harbingers of these  facts but these perky, tireless chatterers are among  the most familiarly omni-  preset and this year, again, it  is good to welcome them.  Sonnet #25  Let those who are In favour with their stars  Of public Honour and proud titles boast,  Whilst I, whom tortune of such triumph bars,  Unlooked lor, joy In that I honour most.  Great princes' favourites their fair leaves spread  Bul as the marigold at the sun's eye,  And In themselves their pride lies burled,  For at a frown they In their glory die.  The painful warrior famoused for fight,  Altera thousand victories once tolled,  Is from the book of honour razed quite,  And all Ihe rest lorgot for which he tolled:  Then happy I, that love and am beloved,  Where I may not remove nor be removed.  William Shakespeare  Slings & Arrows >*    to  George Matthews  Gibsons, May 24, 1989.  The Gibsons Municipal  Council was more than  pleased last week with the  announcement that its long  term objective, to make  every Gibsons citizen a business owner, was finally  achieved.  In his announcement to  Council, Mayor Jones said,  "It has long been the desire  of the Gibsons Council to  bring the benefits of business  ownership to even the most  humble of our citizens. Once  the benefits of free-enterprise  have been distributed equitably amongst the populace,  all class distinctions will  disappear and peace and  prosperity will reign."  Special guest at last week's  Council meeting was 83-year  old Joseph P. Wisen, the last  Gibsons citizen to found his  own business. Wisen's  used wine bottle collection  service joins eight other wine  bottle collecting businesses  in the area.  Mayor Jones' good news  was not without its darker  side. Half of the 78 supermarket owners interviewed  this week reported no customers in their stores. Of  the others, only 3% reported  sales sufficient to cover expenses for the month ending  April 30. Complained one  owner, "Everybody is so  busy running their own  businesses they have no time  to shop."  This has been a chronic  problem in the community but  Mayor Jones has recommended to Council a new  by-law permitting stores to  operate any hours they choose  so that store owners will now  be able to shop in other stores  during their own store closing.  Another by-law forbidding  business owners from doing  business with themselves wu  narrowly defeated in Council  by a vote of 5-4, with Alderman Mortis, one of 18 local  funeral parlour operators,  abstaining.  On the positive side, it wu  announced last month that  the C.B.C.is interested in a  new TV series called "The  Storeowners," starring Bruno  Gerusi u a Gibsons fruit  vendor.  One of the most interesting  aspects of the Gibsons business boom is how it all came  about. In the early stages,  Council cleverly passed  around rumours that Gibsons  wu about to become a suburb  of Vancouver. It was suggested that engineers had discovered a way to tow both  Keats and Bowen Islands  into a straight line from  Horseshoe Bay to Langdale  and were in the process of  planning a super highway  from the Lower Mainland to  the Sunshine Coast.  Once this rumour was firmly  established, all land from  Langdale to Roberts Creek  was rezoned for commercial  development and the business  boom was underway. By 1982,  23 shopping centres, 13 office  buildings, 8 amusement parks  and 3 convention centres were  under construction. The  Council advertised municipal  subsidies for businessmen  moving into the community.  Anyone opposed to business  development was offered a  free subsidy to move to  Sechelt. Provincial government grants for small business  and interest free loans were  secured and tax breaks for  the first two years of business  life were offered. Federal  grants for business development were obtained and  offered to anyone starting  a business that no more than  10 other people were already  operating.  By 1985, all shopping  centres were in operation and  every building lot along  Highway 101 between Landale  and Roberts Creek was occupied by a business. Some of  the initial over-development  problems were eased by the  double ownership by-law  which prohibited anyone  owning more than one business.  Most people managed to  get around this however,  by transferring title of other  business to family members.  "No profit" Ben, owner of  Ben's Golden Mile, transferred his used car business  to his grandmother, Honest  Ethel, and title of his profitable enbalming business to  his 3-year old daughter,  "Cadillac" Mary.  Despite the bright picture  presented to Gibson;.  Council last week, there are  gloomy clouds on the horizon.  Business failures are up  3000% over the past six  months. Terry Karkabe,  president of the 328 member  Gibsons Restauranteurs  Association, claims that it is  so difficult to get competent  help the;c days that he hu  had to cook, serve, wash  dishes, and run the cash  register all by himself during  the busy weekend trade.  Further, local publisher and  media magnate. John Burnside, owner of 10 of the  communities' 47 newspapers  claimed in an editorial lut  month that the entire village  of Gibsons was on the verge of  bankruptcy. It has been  rumoured that a consortium of  Japanese businessmen hu  offered to buy the Gibsons  Please turn to page three Coasl News, May 22,1979.  Ohhhh...And what's this election about then?  Letters to the Editor  Another educational perspective  Editor:  Views such as those expressed by Valerie Tomkies  in the May 8 edition bring a  number of questions to mind.  First let me confirm my  deepest appreciation for the  warmth     and     hospitality  We were told that old people  were removed from responsible positions and humiliated  in the streets.  Chairman Mao and his  advisors apparently thought  it wise to let the Red Guards,  as they  called  themselves,  and  afforded many times to my  have free rein. We learned  family and myself by Valerie that a few people were killed.  and Richard Tomkies.  Is Canada truly the last  bastion of freedom on earth?  Surely Valerie is aware of the  steady erosion of freedom by  legislation that I have witnessed during more than forty  years of being a Canadian.  Why do some people persist in  believing that we have a great  deal of freedom? George  Matthews has pointed out that  5 percent of the people make  the legislation, or something  to that effect. Thanks, George.  Those who think we are free  blind themselves to the numbers of Canadians who disagree with legislation and find  themselves in the care of  government agencies as a  result. I refer to courts, jails,  group homes, reform schools,  mental institutions and a host  of thers probably including  hospitals.  Vandalism. What is it?  It is hostility towards misplaced authority, arbitrary  authority, unreasonable and  unthinking authority. Do not  think that it limits itself to  broken windows and scrawled  messages, 'industry has had  to adopt harsh measures to  minimize intentional damage  to machinery by men made to  feel little more than slaves  by poor and dangerous working conditions.  A few years ago we were  told that a powerful organization of young people in China  spent a number of weeks or  months    upsetting    things.  I don't know if this was true  or not. But I think that Chairman Mao was wise. I think  it's time we stopped mistrusting our young people and  our non-violent demonstrators. I think it's time some  of us learned to differentiate  between   the    violence   of  breaking   a    window  beating someone.  Money buys freedom in  this country. A great deal of  money can buy a great deal of  freedom. Let me remind you  that great numbers of people  in this country have no money.  I refer to children, housewives, and the unemployed.  I speak as one of the unemployed. But I will not stoop to  being a slave or a law-enforcer  just for the sake of an income  for myself. And I wish they  would turn the power back on  because it's hard to write with  cold fingers.  i Arthur Shaw  ���Jubilee celebration  Editor:  On March 15, 1979, Williams Lake became incorporated as a village.  Now in 1979, fifty years  later, the town is celebrating its jubilee year.  People who at one time  lived in Williams Lake, please  come to celebrate with the  town and meet old friends.  Although celebrations continue all year, the highlight  is homecoming week, August 3-12, as exciting events  take place day and night  all week.  The caravan stage show is  coming to town - a horse-  drawn travelling show with  a colorful carnival and musical  extravaganza. There will be  a parade on the morning of  Saturday, August 4th, and  during die week there will be  class reunions, car races,  trail riders shows, dances,  etc. There will be a reunion  garden party, Saturday, August 4th, at 2.00 p.m. at the  residence of Anne Mackenzie  Stevenson, where old friends  may meet to talk over old  Slings and arrows(cont'd)  business district for 3 cents  on the dollar. Gibsons Council  has denied the rumour but  there is little doubt that local  businesses are in some  difficulty. Mayor Jones  blames Ottawa for its total  inability to stimulate business  activity in the country.  One can only hope that  Mayor Jones' latest proposal,  to promote the building of a  community of consumers in  the Sechelt area over the next  five years, meets with some  success.  ATTENTION OLD AGE PENSIONERS  The Gibsons Lions Club Is undertaking a  programme to assist you in having a smoke  detector Installed in your home.  If you are interested please fill in the  following form and forward it to  Gibsons Lions Member:  Sam Hauka  RR#1,ReldRd.,  Gibsons, B.C.  Name....  Address.  Phone....  days.  Please direct all inquiries  concerning registration,  programmes, etc. to: Town  Hall, 450 Mart Street, Williams Lake, B.C. V2G 1N3.  Or Phone 392-2311.  Old-timers say, "One  alwavs returns to Cariboo."  Here is your chance this  Jubilee Yeari  Violet Bedford  Secretary  Williams Lake Homecoming  Jubilee Celebrations  Gratitude  expressed  Editor:  Thank you for your assistance with our Work Experience programme on May  9th. The grade 5 students who  took part were very enthusiastic about their afternoon in  the "business world", and  our staff members feel that  it was a very valuable experience for them.  It was encouraging to us to  receive such excellent cooperation from our local  businesses in this enterprise  and we hope that this "Community Study Workday"  can be repeated next year.  Thank you.  Colleen J. Elson  Principal,  Principal, Cedar Grove  Elementary School.  WMHHMMMI  Elphie news  By KeDy Henry  The warm weather hu  brought students out after  school to practise track and  field. The Elphie track team  has so far been to two meets -  the Squamish meet and the  Chatelech meet.  At the Squamish meet of  May 11 there were six schools  present: Squamish, Elphie,  Pemberton, Mt. Curry,  Brackendale and Chatelech.  The Elphie team had s very  /short time to practise for the  meet but still placed second in '  the overall point total.  The Chatelech meet of  May 17 saw Elphinstone snd  Oceanview pitted against the  host team. In the total points  standing, Oceanview placed  first, Chatelech second and  Elphie third. The lesser  placing of the Chatelech meet  is due to the lack of male  participants. This fact is  brushed uide by girls' track  coach Miss Wilson, who says,  "This only proves females  have superiority in numbers,  strength   and   endurance."  There is another meet  coming May 30. Maybe the  males could then change the  coach's statement.  The team practises daily,  but the thing to be stressed  is that it is a personal thing.  It's the athlete against the  clock, or the tape measure. It  takes something special to  compete in that form. "We  go because it's fon, you can  always improve your technique by competing, you meet  people, it also gives a sense  of participation and a feeling  of achievement," says Mairi  Robertson, track athlete,  whose statement sums up  why students participate in  track.  Also, the Provincial Girls  Rugby Tournament ssw the  Elphie squad tie for first place  with Port Coquitlam. Elphie  was the only undefeated team  in the tourney. Congratulations must be extended to this  new team for their excellent  efforts.  HARRISON'S  APPLIANCE  Sales and Service  TALK ABOUT PRICE CUTTING I  We're Almost Wholesale  Superior Products      We Take Trade-Ins  886-9959   Pratt Road, Gibsons  MNSWat^MSWMHMMMMMIM^WMWMMM  DOING OUR BESTTO BE RIGHT FOR YOU  ClI ��W i'k]  Gibsons ST=  ^  100% Locally Owned & Operated  Gov't. Inspected Gr.A Beef  chuck blade steak.  Chuck  cross rib roast  Gov't. Inspected  Gov't. Inspected Previously Frozen  Into Chops  6-Centre  1-Rib End ,  2-Loin End  sirloin steaks  Eversweet  side bacon..  Super-Valu  New Zealand Frozen  By The Piece it>.  Foremost  '1.39  11.98  *i .59  !2.39  11.19  margarine  ice cream  M.59  1 Ib. Print  2 Litre Ctn  Super-Valu  bleach              05*  64 02. Jug  Capri  bathroom          *QQ<  llSSUe        4 R0|| pkg  Fraser Vale  tomatoes 59*   fish. & $1 .39  28oz.Tin ChipS   20oz.  .... Super-Valu  Nabob  coffee $2.49   beans   3/M.00  "-r Grind 1 Ib. Pkg. &    pOTR     14 oz. Tins  14 oz. Tins  Minute Maid  Foremost All Flavour  orange juice  ice cream  2 Litre   Ctn.  M.59  Savarin  dinners  W.....W.W     11 oz_ Pkg.       \m" m*  Frozen Chicken, Beef, Turkey & Salisbury  QQt detergent    $9   19  Salisbury pOWdef      2.4 Kg. Pkg.  Soft Drinks  pepsi or  7 up  Mount Seymour  1.5 Litre ���     '  Bottle    & Deposit  78* dog food    2/99*  Oven-Fresh Econo Pak  Mrs. Willman's Round  g-|t  potato  donuts  bread  pkg.ofs *"| .89 _.  Unsliced White or 80% WW. C3Ke  Venice Italian Oven-Fresh  french Q-jt  potato  bread donut  California Canada No. 1  carrots   B.C.Grown  bunch spinach   Large Size  hawiian pineapple   M.19  3/89  M.19  Prices effective:   May 22,23,24,25 & 26.   Tues.,Wed.,Thurs.,Fri.,Sat. Coast News, May 22,1979.  Over The Edge  Part II  How did Steve come to lose  his eye? Well, it wasn't in  the woods at all, nor in a car  smash-up   for   that   matter.  Happened  in  the  machine-  room  at  the   Port   Mellon  pulp-mill. Most of us got fed  up with the bush at one time  or another and decided to try  our luck  there.   It  was  no  picnic either, but at least you  were out of the rain. Anyhow,  they used to bale the pulp  by hand then. We'd fold the  wrappers, jam in a steel pick  to hold them, shoot the wires  around and hand-crank 'em  tight with a baling machine.  It was a highball sonofabitch,  let me tell you. Had to eat  your lunch on the run half  the time. I wan't on tr)e shift  when Stevie got it but I've  heard the story a dozen times.  He was baling with a partner.  Maybe   the   guy   was   half  loaded or asleep on his feet.  He goes to stick in his pick  but somehow misses the bale,  swings wild and catches poor  Littljohn right  in  the  eye.  Wasn't a hope of saving it,  and it had to be removed.  Compensation offered him a  pension or a cash settlement.  Took   the  cash   of   course  and went on one hell of a  booze-up. Then he went back  to the woods.  He heads the rig for the  outcropping. She's going at a  hell of a dip now bnt It might  work. Not a damn trick else  he can by. It's the only hope.  The track hits the rocky bank  with Jarring Impact, bnt Ha  momentum la already too  great. The wheels twist, It  bounces, sheen violently  right and beads dead for the  drop-off. Steve's blown his  last possibility. A snowball  In bell would rate better  odds than him right now. He  hugs the wheel, bracing himself a* solidly as he can,  vaguely trying to remember  some prayers as the maverick  Kenworth peeb off the edge of  the cliff Into space.  Sure    Steve's     haywire,  Pages  from a Life-Log  Peter Trower  but he ain't had much of a  chance to be any other way.  Both his parents died within  a year of each other. After his  old man went he moved to  Vancouver with his mother.  They rented a place in the  West End for awhile. About  all they had left of the old  home   were   four   Siamese  coupling snaps, the trailer  lean away too. Relieved of  much of Its mass, the half  track spins once more and  then again. On the fourth  roll, It reaches the brink of  a totally sheer rock bluff  and twists end over end.  Steve still gripping the wheel  stubbornly,    Is    Anna    oat  cats. Then, a few month's  later, his mother died too,  and Stevie's past was pulled  out from under him forever,  that's damn hard lines for anyone. He just sort of drifted  for awhile. There was nothing  you could say to help him.  The track hits (be eighty-  eight percent grade of die  side-hill on Its aide, and begins to roll. All at once,  there's no horizon, only a  whirling madacape of log-  strewn slope and sky. He  clings to the wheel, somehow  managing to keep his grip  while loose objects fly around  Inside the cab aa though It  were a apace capsule hi free  Call. A half-empty thermos of  coffee shatters against the  roof with a thin tinkle "Goddamn," he thinks Ulogically,  "It waa a brand-new one tool"  The track reds again, breaking  the streps that hold the load  on so that the stacked logs  ���WnMe free. As the reach-  horribly over It, backwards  and upsldedown. This Is Itl  Steve got a job driving longdistance semi-trailers that  made freight hauls between  Vancouver and Calgary. Spent  a lot of his time in Alberta,  and I didn't hear much of him  for several years. Used to  get the occasional drunken,  garbled phone call from him  in the middle of the night.  Guess he was homesick.  Wanted to know all the latest gossip. Then the calls  stopped and there was no  word from him for a couple  of years. Heard later he had  got tangled up with gang of  bad actors and shaken a bit  of time.  It's a howling, surreal  nightmare, a carnival ride  gone beserk. Coherent though  Is Impossible. He can only  ding like a limpet to that  hopeless wheel, preparing to  die aa the doomed mass of  oat over  the  bluff. It Is about tUriy-fect  Ugh, and the rained track  plunges down It to hit the  continuing slope below with  such ferocious force that  Steve's deatfagrip on the  wheel la broken at hat. Like  a rag-doll be la thing agalmt  the opposite door. Ihe windshield pops out in one piece,  and the wreck, toppling aide-  ways, begins to roll yet again.  Lying stunned on the door,  he notices that the tram-  mission has been ripped away.  Nothing left but a couple of  dangling rods.  Maybe the farthest-out  caper Steve ever pulled was  the time he faked his own  death. After the hassle in  Calgary, he came back to  the Coast, and that's when he  started skinning logging-  trucks for real. Working  someplace on the Island,  he got into a two-truck, head-  on collision. Although the  other guy was killed, Steve  came out only slightly injured,  but somehow they got the  names mixed up in the papers.  He had a lot of debts and  other problems at the time,  so he just dropped out of sight  for a while. I was coming off  a drunk when I got the phone  call, and my nerves were  jangled anyhow. It really  shook me up. Poor Steve, he  couldn't win for losing, and  now it was over for him.  I actually cried. He seemed  like a hellhound, delinquent  kid-brother I'd been unable to  help. It wasn't for several  days that I began to smell  something bogus about the  whole business. For one  thing, the Mounties, whom  finally phoned, had no record  of his death. Still, I really  didn't know for sure. Maybe  five months later, I was awakened about two in the  morning by someone tossing  pebbles at my window. And  there he stood under the  streetlamp, back from the  grave  and  chuckling  slyly,  Frank Roosen performed "Jake the Peg, The Three-  Legged Man" at the Pender Harbour Variety Night  last Friday. Many Sunshine Coast residents are  probably familiar with the number as performed by  Australian Rolf Harris, but how many are aware  that the entertaining number was written by Pender  Harbour's Frank Roosen who sold It to Harris in  1965.  Superb pianist  I coming here  By Susan Elek  It has been my experience  that one can hear a hundred  superb pianists but be profoundly moved by only one or  two of them. In my opinion,  our next artist' in die series,  What can'youdo wiS a'gdy Judith Kenedi Peleg, I. the  like that? We went to a booze  can and got loaded to celebrate his resurrection,  kind of musician who can  communicate the essence of  music to her audience in  such a meaningful way.  Here's YOUR chance to help the  EILEEN EbASiPBRB  THEATRE PQDNBATIBN  Are you wondering what you can possibly do with your  five free shares In the British Columbia Resources Investment Corporation? We have a suggestion I  The Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation has now been  incorporated as a provincial society. Our next task is to  raise the capital for the proposed Eileen Glassford Theatre.  Let's put our free shares to work to provide a quality  Performing Arts Centre for the Sunshine Coast. Everyone  in the family can help. Just fill out the attached form and  mail it to the Coast News office, Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.  In this exciting and painless way we can enrich our lives and  this beautiful area in the name of a woman who loved and  served it for over sixty years.  We can all help.  DECLARATION OF TRUST  of   _, Province of British Columbia, HEREBY DECLARE that  I hold my right to apply for and all my interest in five (5) free common shares In the  capital of British Columbia Resources Investment Corporation, IN TRUST for the  sole benefit of the Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation, a society incorporated under  the Societies Act of British Columbia (hereinafter referred to as "the Society").  I FURTHER DECLARE AND AGREE that I have (or will, as  the case may be) made application for such five (5) shares and that upon the delivery  to me of the share certificates representing such shares, I will, at the expense of the  Society, do all such things as may be required to effect the transfer thereof to the  Society.  Columbia, this  Dated at   day of  , In the Province of British   , 18Z_  WITNESS  Name   Address  Occupation  Signature  Name  Mailing Address  Telephone   The Toronto Daily Star  said of Miss Peleg "this young  lady can become one of the  world's great artists...this is  surely her potential...(Her  performance was) one not  likely to be exceeded by  anyone during our lifetime.''  Born in Hungary, Judith  Kenedi Peleg began her  studies at the age of Ave.  When she was eleven she became the  student of Paul  Kadosa at the Franz Liszt  Academy of Music, Budapest,  in a special class for exceptional children. After seven  years at the Academy she  emigrated to Canada, where  she earned an Artist Diploma  and a Bachelor Degree at  the University of Toronto,  studying with Anton Kuerti.  Her first Canadian appearance became a sensation,  when in 1968 she won the  Kiwanis Festival in Toronto,  receiving the Ugliest credits  ever awarded by British  adjudicator Joseph Cooper.  She received several grants  from the Canada Council and  the Canada Israel Cultural  Foundation to participate in  the Master Classes of Guido  Agosti in Italy, Geza Anda in  Switzerland and to study with  Mindru Katz at the Rubin  Academy of Tel Aviv. She  completed her Master's  Degree at the Indiana University in Bloomington, as  a pupil of Gyorgy Sebok.  Judith Kenedi Peleg  moved to Vancouver two years  ago, after her graduation.  Since then she has given  several performances as  soloist and Chamber Musician  on the CBC as well as on  stage.  litis next concert will be  on Sunday, May 27 at 2 p.m.  at Elphinstone School. The  programme will feature works  by Mozart, Schubert, and  Chopin. There will be refreshments   after   the   concert.  By Rae Ellingham  General Notes: Saturn,  planet of caution and common  sense, has returned to 'forward motion' bringing more  practical ways to solve current  problems. Meanwhile,  Mercury, Mars and Venus  continue to pass through the  sign of Taurus indicating similar conditions to those  experienced last week.  Remember that accurate  astrological forecasting can  be made only after consulting  carefully a personalized horoscope calculated to exact  time and place of birth.  The following prognostications should be more meaningful to those of you born  between the hours of 4 a.m.  and 6 a.m.  ARIES (March 21-Aprfl 19)  Accent is still on your personal finances, possessions,  investments, assets, stocks  and shares. Spending spree  continues but common sense  will leave you something in  the bank. Employment situation stabilizes. Saturn reminds  you it's time for health check  up. Domestic pet may also  require attention.  TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  You continue to be the  centre of attention. Mars and  venus in your sign increase  popularity and draw others to  you. Improved personal appearance boosts confidence  and self-image. Remember  to say 'yes' to all invitations  and opportunities. It's your  month so make the best of  it. Saturn urges you to treat,  seriously any romantic encounter.  GEMINI (May 21-June 21)  Spotlight is still on secrecy,  confidential matters, private  schemes, doing things alone.  Those who have recently  sought seclusion will be glad  they did. Remember that any  present limitation or loneliness is only temporary. Upcoming summer months will  see you in happier frame of  mind. Meanwhile, Saturn is  preparing you for serious  domestic reorganization.  CANCER (Jane 22-July 22)  Accent is still on making  fresh social contacts at local  meetings or group gatherings.  Advice is to make the effort  to go out and socialize. Looks  like a casual acquaintance  could become a trusted friend.  Letter or phone call confirms  mid-summer venture. Meanwhile, Saturn helps settle  the affairs of your closest  relatives or neighbours!  LEO (July 23.-Aug.22)  It is assumed you're  working hard to promote  career, position or community  standing. It's no time to lay  back and allow others to glory  in your achievements. Make  sure those-in-charge are  aware of your talents and capabilities. Attractive assignments will be offered soon.  Meanwhile, Saturn urges you  to stabilize financial position.  VIRGO (Ang.23-Sept.22)  Emphasis is once again on  your life philosophy, spiritual  convictions and the expression  of these viewpoints. You're  still in the mood for mental  explorations and challenging  the ideas of those close to  you. Seems you can't acquire  enough knowledge at this  time. Long-distance messages  and events are still in focus.  Saturn in your sign encourages greater personal responsibility.  LIBRA (Sept.23-Oct.23)  Other people's money and  possessions still demand your  attention. Looks like a close  associate is ready to take your  advice. Don't miss opportunity to borrow cash or equipment. Remember that financial institutions still categorize you as 'low-risk' client,  Saturn reminds you that any  present restrictions or delays  have to be patiently endured.  SCORPIO (Oct.24-Nov 22)  Improved relations with  close associates, partners  and loved ones enable you to  forge ahead confidently with  contracts, agreements and  long-range plans. Looks like  other people are shaping your  life more than you realize.  Marriage or commitment  benefits from down-to-earth  discussions. Saturn warns you  that an old friend or acquaintance may soon be leaving.  SAGITTARIUS (Nov.23-  Dec.21)  Focus is still on the employment scene, daily chores,  routines and service to others,  It's time for hard work whether you like it or not. As relations with colleagues improve, it is hoped that any  disagreements over schedules  and methods will be settled.  Meanwhile, time is running  out for those seeking a steady  occupation. Saturn says stop  running from your responsibilities.     ���  CAPRICORN (Dec.22-Jan.19)  Social life, pleasures,  amusements, sensuous enjoyments continue to wear  you out. Enjoy them while you  can. Hard work, toil and  sweat are on next month's  agenda. Love affair blossoming this week looks like the  real thing. Save time and be  honest from the start. Gambling, speculation and risks  are favoured. Cheap lottery  ticket is best investment.  Saturn says get your philosophical facts straight.  AQUARIUS (Jan.20-Feb.18)  Activity around the home  continues to sap most of your  energy. By now, the results  of any domestic alterations  or beautification projects  would have proved your  ideas worthwhile. Take a bow  and keep at it. Meanwhile,  it's the right time to sign any  rental or real estate agreements. Saturn reminds you  that loved one's financial  position has to be handled  firmly.  PISCES (Feb.19-Mar.20)  Focus is still on busy short-  distance communications.  Realize that propositions received by mail or phone are  worth looking into. Local  journeys or visits may present  similar tempting opportunities. Remember that your  common sense can now  be trusted. Meanwhile,  Saturn urges you to treat  loved one with more respect  and consideration.  SUMMER SCHEDULE  7p.m. Sunday    Channel 2  June 3 NICK AND THE AMAZONS  June 10 THE COLONEL'S PRINCESS  June 17 SHOTGUN AND LOVERS  June 24 CHARADE  Julyl INVISIBLE RELIC  JulyS THE ALCHEMIST  July 15 LIAR LIAR  July 22 A ROVER'S DREAM  July 29 QIBSONOSAURUS  August 5 HITCHHIKER  August 12 A MATTER OF LANGUAGE  August 19 POPPING THE QUESTION  August 26 SERPENT'S TOOTH  Sept. 2 EYE IN THE SKY  Sept. 9 BANDITS  For Good Times  vffnd Qood music  \. By Popular Request  Brian & Graham j\  (formerly the Pen Kings)       J*  Fri. and Sat.      May 25th and 26th  9 p.m.-1a.m.  (Next Week)  ONE NIGHT ONLY  Thursday, May 31st  THE CEMENT  CITY COWBOYS  from Calgary  May 1st and 2nd  BRIAN AND GRAHAM  IjOTEL  886-9334  [  J Book review  A truly great Canadian novel  By J Wa Moore  hn sitting here trying to  flglre out why Howard  Organ's novel Tay John haa  nerer crossed my path before.  Tie teachers who, at various  pant* in my academic career,  attempted to acquaint me with  the literature of my own  cwntiy seem to have had an  uacanny genius for choosing  eump.es that were tedious,  second-rate, and utterly  vninspiring. It's no wonder,  I suppose, they missed Tay  Mb. It is compelling, first-  ate and thoroughly Inspiring.  I found my copy in a secondhand bookstore for $1.00  but it's only S2.95 retail,  published in McClelland and  Stewart's excellent New  Canadian Library series  (N.105). It wu originally  published in 1939, then republished in 1960 and 1974.  Its reappearance in 1960  seems to have caused tome  confusion among the critics.  Aa Patricia Motley relates,  in her fine critical introduction, one critic found It  "a sequence of melodramatic  yarns without any satisfactory  resolution." Morley admits  that "On a first reading, this  story of a yellow-haired half-  breed and a few colourful  individuals whose lives are  loosely connected with his  strikes one u being a strange  mixture of Indian myth, tall  tale, Bar-room aaecdote,  romantic melodrama, and  comic farce." I suspect  that, for Western readers at  leut, these element), far from  detracting from (he work,  are what gives it its extraordinary effect.  The tall tale, tie bar-room  anecdote, with their melodramatic, romanlc and comic  elements, are the stuff of  our popular mythology.  They are the sprititual history  of our trials in the wilderness  we inhabit. Ona good night in  almost any beer parlour in  western Canada you can turn  up a man lik< Jack Denham,  narraior of ink last two of the  novel's thre�� parts; a man  who hu knocked around at all  sorts of odd jobs and seen a  good bit of the country, a  natural raconteur with an  inexhaustible repertoire of  tales so polshed with telling,  so reduced by elaboration and  simplification to their essential truth, that they bear the  unmistakable stamp of  legend. Melodramatic they  may be, but, played out on  the austere soul-swallowing  stage of the wilderness, u  Tay Jobs is set against the  backdrop of the Canadian  Rockies, any human situation  takes oa an exaggerated significance. It is a popular  truism to say that such a landscape reduces man and his  actions to insignificance, yet  in fact the effect of such a  setting is to raise the dramatic  intensity to the Nth power.  Jack London's short story "To  Build A Fire" is one of the  best illustrations of this effect.  O'Hagan uses the effect  masterfully. The landscape  is so dominant that he keeps  his cut of characters small to  maximize the drama of their  actions. "Legend," the first  part of the book, is concerned with the origins of  Tay John. A trapper named  Red Rorty, having acquired  a bad case of religion on one  of his infrequent sojourns to  the fringes of civilisation,  burns his cabin and all his  possessions and goes off  to preach to the Shushwap  Indians. The Shushwap ate  waiting for a leader who they  believe will be sent to lead  them back through the mountains to their traditional homeland on the B.C. Coast.  For awhile, they suspect  that Rorty may be this leader,  but he settles down and be-  comes a kind of Holy Fool  CARS AND TRUCKS  Rental���Leasing  -Also-  Domestic and  Industrial  Equipment  next to the liquor store  in Sechelt.  Seaside Rentals  685-2848  in their village, until he rapes  a woman whose husband is  away hunting. The women of  the village tie him to a tree,  place a atone in his mouth to  stop his cries, flay him and  set fire to the tree. The girl,  pregnant u a result of the  attack, dies near the end of  her term. She Is duly buried,  but a short time later, a dark-  skinned blonde haired boy is  discovered living like a wild  thing in the den of his  mother's tomb. Lured to the  village, he Is raised with  the other boys and grows to  be a fine hunter and woodsman. The white trappers,  for whom he acta u guide,  nicknamed him "Tete Jaune"  - Yellowhead - which is soon  corrupted to Tay John.  Among the Shushwap,  the idea grows that Tay John  is the leader for whom they  have waited, and for a time  he accepts the role. Leading  them away over mountains  and through forbidding  forests towards the coast.  He hu set himself above tribal law before by keeping the  gifts trappers had given him  for himself instead of sharing  them communally, but when  he tries to do so again, challenging one of his friend's  engagement to a girl he himself desires, the tribal elders  put their collective foot down.  They do not want to be u  other men, but to retain his  "spiritual" identity. They tell  him he is "married" to the  tribe. Tay John rejects his  role and abandons them in  the wilderness.  When Jack Denham first  encounters Tay John, he is  already a legenday figure;  a "failed prophet" living a  hermit existence u a trapper  in the Rockies. Denham  witnesses a titanic battle  between Tay John and a she-  grizzly, from which the man  emerges victorious and from  that time Denham begins to  keep track of ihe scattered  stories and scraps of information concerning Tay John  that drift in on the fluid grapevine of trading-posts, survey-  camps, and saloons. The two  thirds of the book Denham  narrates, "Hearsay" and  "Evidence-without a finding"  are, in a sense, ironically  titled since it is Denham who  assembles the elements of  the Tay John legend and  weaves them into a powerful  myth. The under-played,  easy-going style of his barroom narrative reminds me  of the very similar way  Somerset Maugham used to  introduce stones that would  become major epics of human  pusion and conflict.  I'm not going to spoil the  rest of the story by capsulizing  Denham's tale. The players  in the final act of the drama,  Alf Dobble, the entrepreneur  and eternal optimist who tries  to build a tourist resort in  the Rockies seventy years  ahead of his time, Ardith  Aeriola, the beautiful mistress  of an eastern VIP, "taking a  discreet "vacation" in the  mountains, and Thomu  Rorty, a priest who cornea to  the mountains seeking his  brother and finds himself  embarked on the spiritual  quest of his own life, are all  worth discovering at first  hand.  Tay John is one of those  marvellous novels whose plot  seems to unravel, spreading  finer and finer until, at times,  it seems that the thread is  about to break, then winds  itself together again like  spiralling strands of rope,  finished off u neat and free  of loose ends u a tight  sizing. It can stand with the  best novels of any country in  the world.  Coast News, May 22,1979.  By Isaac  Does the name Graham  Parker mean anything to  you? How about Bob Dylan,  Van Morrison or Bruce  Springsteen? For three yean  and four albums Graham  Parker hu been compared  with the great singer-songwriters by a host of music  critics. Now he hu a new album out which should establish him as a great rock voice  and get him out of the shadows. The album, his fifth,  is called Squeezing Out Sparks  and hu already lit a fire under  the English record buying  public and looks set to do the  same here. Each song is finely  crafted in the Parker tradlti. a  but with the help of some good  production they flow together  to create his best album to  date.  Graham Parker emerged in  the summer of 76 at the same  time as the early punk bands  but other than energy he had  little in common with the back  to the basics movement.  His band The Rumour wu  assembled from two of the  best pub rock bands of the day  and the skill of the members  gave G.P. and The Rumour a  loyal following on the concert  circuit. The first two albums  by the group established them  as a  musical  force  to be  Positive vibrations  THIS WEEK'S  IR  1   presented to you by   <Jl\a^ia <Jv{uJ..o<mi  885-2522      "The Coast's Music Centre"  1) Dk*State  2) DoucettelhaDsaosis  6)   Rod Stewart  3) Supertrsmps  kAnka  4) SuzlQuatro  VYsa  Kan Sari  5) The Doobie Brothers  MlMtobyMMa  7)   Csn  t)   AmiiStewart  9) Village People  G��  Wast  10) Tsta  watched. Howlin Wind and  Heat Treat are mixtures of  R N B and rock songs and both  are worthwhile additions to  any record collection. The  second album made the U.K.  charts u did a single Hold  Back The Night which la only  available on an import LP  called the Pink Parker.  The future looked rosy for  GP at this time but fete  stepped in and slowed down  his career. The third album  Stick to Me had to be recorded  twice u the original recording  session produced a hum in  the muter tapes. The album  hu some great songs on it  but lacks the excitement of the  early albums, no doubt a  result of the group having to  go back and remake the record. Also at tills time the  music press which had helped  promote Parker uthe next big  thing began Ignoring him in  favour of the punk and new  wave bands.that were sprou  ting up everywhere. The  greatest irony of all wu the  little guy who came along  and stole GP'a audience.  Elvis Costello with the help of  Parker's producer, record  company executives and even  some members of the Rumour  managed in a year to establish  himself u a major act while  GP still hun't been heard on  our radio. To further damage  Parker's shaky career his re  cord company released i  rather lacklustre live album  which did nothing to help his  reputation.  The new album hu to be  the most important of GP's  career, he is either going to  become famous or be back  playing the pubs. One listen  to the album and you know GP  and the Rumour are going to  be around for a while yet. All  he needs is some radio play  and a tour or two and he will  be up there at the top where  he belongs. Get a copy of  Squeezing Out Sparks now  and avoid the tush I  Band's last  to*.,. N  ^  unc sloci concert  Elphinstone Band will  present its lut concert of the  year at Elphinstone Secondary  School at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 29. Gueat bands  during the evening will be  from Port Hardy Secondary  School and Port McNeil  Secondary School.  The cost of tickets for the  concert is only $1.00 and anyone interested in fine band  music is urged to attend this  final concert.  CAMpbcll's shoes  ��� and   LEATHER GOODS  In the Heart of Sechelt  Summer SANDALS for the Whole Family  Chuck Stephens entertains in one of the newly arrived 'hot tubs' Ip front of his store  on Cowrie Street last week.  Pretty soon everyone got Into the act. Brunell and John Gordon, Joan Stephens and  Emma Campbell enjoy a cool drink In the hot tub.  Wilson Creek Reading Centre  The Wilson Creek Community Library hu now become the first Reading Centre  in British Columbia. We have  received a rather large grant  of children's books and reference books, that will enable  us to increase our circulation.  We will also be given a yearly  financial grant to maintain  and increase our stock. These  grants are being sent to us  from the Library Services  Branch of the B.C. Government.  We are open on Wednesday  from 11.30 to 1.30 and Friday  from 2.00 to 4.00. All visitors  are welcome. We have stories  for children and many games  for those who wish to participate.  As part of Family Fun Day  on May 27 at the Wilson Creek  Community Centre the Library will be open. Please  come and visit us at 3.00 p.m.  European CLOGS for Men and Women,  Orthopeodlcally shaped for comfort,  Children's RUNNING SHOES  Ladles'Summer HANDBAGS  Cowrie St.,      885-9345  Your friendly neighbourhood drop-off point for  QOAVT   Ilffl    Classified Ads  Classifieds should be prepaid and pre-written  All information in classified ad section of Coast News.  MICROWAVE COOKING  It's a new Idea but not one that  takes long to grow accustomed to  It's easy, It's convenient, and It's  economical. The time saved Is Important  working family. And the energy saved Is  substantial. Because the oven operates on 11  current and needs no preheating, and the  food cooks so rapidly, the savings amount to between  thirty- three to eighty percent.  It's your  funeral.  So spare your family the added grief and  confusion of funeral arrangements.  You can have the list word on the list !"       ---.-------------.--.*--.���.-.-..-,  thins In your life. Your funeral. I To: MEMORIAL SOCIETY OF B.C.     !  Protect your family from the stress of j p.o. Box 5240, Vancouver, B.C.  deciding your final arrangements. Plan j V6B4B3  ahead for the possibility that you could I I  unexpectedly die. You can specify a simple ( l/we arc interested in the aims of the Society,  j  and dignified funeral, burial, cremation or \ n want more informaiion  memorial service. And it won't cost your i p wish lo enrol now.                         i  family unnecessary expense. ���  It's your funeral. So have your wishes ! w     , ,                                 ���  recorded now. Join the B.C. Memorial | Nom��� ���    \  Society and lake a worry off your mind. I . ..                                                       i  For'the sake of the family you love. ' Address ------     '  TheMemorialSocietyofB.Cs _,   , "*������  contract undertaker for Oils area, First i CIty/WWn Code    ���  Memorial Services Ltd., now has a facility ' ���,                           Amouni                    i  at 2808 Mt. Lehman Rd., Abbotsford, B.C. j ���"* enclosed         J  Memorial Society of B.C. AK\      Membership is $5 for each adult  Telephone 688*6256      V IV       iNn-*.��� lor children under 191  It doesn't eliminate the need for a conventional range but serves as  a useful addition to the kitchen. One of its beet features Is the ease of  clean-up. Often It Is possible to cook right in the serving dish, eliminating the scouring of pots and pans.    The personal energy saving Is  Important.    Use if for everything - femlly meals, quick snacks and,,  entertaining.  It's great for heating leftovers or for defrosting.  FAVOURITE 8TUFFED PEPPER8  For variety, fill large tomatoes Instead of green peppers  3 large green peppers        i egg 1 tip. M|t  11b. ground be* 2 tbi. mine* onion JJgWg,       1/3 cup rolled oats Vi cup tomato sauce Sour Cream Sauce  Vash peppers. Cut In half lengthwise. Remove core and seeds. Arrange In a 8 x 12-Inch  glass baking dish. Add V* cup water. Cover tightly with plastic wrap. Microwave 4 minutes,  {turning dish after 2 minutes. Combine remaining Ingredients In a 1-quart casserole. Microwave  7 to 8 minutes until meat is cooked. Lightly fill the peppers. Arrange In a 8 x 12-Inch baking dish.  -   *J J V4 cup water. Cover with plastic wrap. Microwave 10 minutes. Coast News, May 22,1979.  How did Steve come to lose  his eye? Well, it wasn't in  the woods at all, nor in a car  smash-up for that matter.  Happened in the machine-  room at the Port Mellon  pulp-mill. Most of us got fed  up with the bush at one time  or another and decided to try  our luck there. It was no  picnic either, but at least you  were out of the rain. Anyhow,  they used to bale the pulp  by hand then. We'd fold the  wrappers, jam in a steel pick  to hold them, shoot the wires  around and hand-crank 'em  tight with a baling machine.  It was a highball sonofabitch,  let me tell you. Had to eat  your lunch on the run half  the time. I wan't on the shift  when Stevie got it but I've  heard the stoty a dozen times.  He was baling with a partner.  Maybe the guy was half  loaded or asleep on his feet.  He goes to stick in his pick  but somehow misses the bale,  swings wild and catches poor  Littljohn right in the eye.  Wasn't a hope of saving it,  and it had to be removed.  Compensation offered him a  pension or a cash settlement.  Took the cash of course  and went on one hell of a  booze-up. Then he went back  to the woods.  He heads the rig for the  outcropping. She's going at a  hell of a clip now but It might  work. Not a damn trick else  he can try. It'a the only hope.  The track hits the rocky bank  with Jarring Impact, but Its  momentum la already too  great. The wheels twist, It  bounces, sneers violently  right and heads dead for the  ���bop-off. Steve's blown hb  but possibility. A snowball  In hell would rate better  odda than him right now. He  huge the wheel, bracing himself aa solidly aa be can,  vaguely trying to remember  aome prayers aa the maverick  Ken worth peels off the edge of  the cliff Into apace.  Sure     Steve's     haywire,  Pages from a Life-Log  Peter Trower  bluff. It la about  high,  the  y-feet  but he ain't had much of a  chance to be any other way.  Both his parents died within  a year of each other. After his  old man went he moved to  Vancouver with his mother.  They rented a place in the  West End for awhile. About  all they had left of the old  home   were   four   Siamese  ^^^^^ the trailer  tears away too. Relieved of  much of Its mass, the half  track spins once more and  then again. On the fourth  roll, It reaches the brink of  a totally sheer rock bluff  and twists end over end.  Steve still gripping the wheel  stubbornly,    to    flung    out  plunges down It to hit the  continuing slope below with  such ferocious force that  Steve'a deathgrip on the  wheel la broken at but like  a rag-doll he la flung agalnet  the opposite door. The windshield pops oat In one piece,  and the wreck, toppling aide-  ways, begins to rail yet again.  Lying stunned on thu door,  he notice* that the tram-  mission haa been ripped away.  Nothing left hot a couple of  cats. Then, a few month's  later, his mother died too,  and Stevie's past was pulled  out from under him forever,  that's damn hard lines for anyone. He just sort of drifted  for awhile, There was nothing  you could say to help him.  The track hits the eighty-  eight percent grade of the  slde-hlU on Its aide, and be-  gins to roll. All at once,  there's no horizon, only a  whirling madacape of log-  strewn slope and sky. He  clings to the wheel, somehow  managing to keep his grip  while loose objects fly around  inside the cab aa though It  wen a apace capsule In bee  fall. A half-empty thermos of  coffee shatters against the  roof with a thin tinkle "Goddamn," he thinks Ulogically,  "It waa a brand-new one tool"  The truck rolls again, breaking  the straps that hold the load  on so that the stacked logs  tumble free. As the reach*  horribly over It,  backwi  and upsidedown. This Is It)  Steve got a job driving longdistance semi-trailers that  made freight hauls between  Vancouver and Calgary. Spent  a lot of his time in Alberta,  and I didn't hear much of him  for several years. Used to  get the occasional drunken,  garbled phone call from him  in the middle of the night.  Guess he was homesick.  Wanted to know all the latest gossip. Then the calls  stopped and there was no  word from him for a couple  of years. Heard later he had  got tangled up with gang of  bad actors and shaken a bit  of time.  It's a howling, anneal  nightmare, a carnival ride  gone beserk. Coherent though  Is Impossible. He can only  ding like a limpet to that  hopeless wheel, preparing to  die aa the doomed mass of  metal pHyota put over  the  Maybe the farthest-out  caper Steve ever pulled was  the time he faked his own  death. After the hassle in  Calgary, he came back to  the Coast, and that's when he  started skinning logging-  trucks for real. Working  someplace on the Island,  he got into a two-truck, head-  on collision. Although the  other guy was killed, Steve  came out only slightly injured,  but somehow they got the  names mixed up in the papers.  He had a lot of debts and  other problems at the time,  so he just dropped out of sight  for a while. 1 was coming off  a drunk when I got the phone  call, and my nerves were  jangled anyhow. It really  shook me up. Poor Steve, he  couldn't win for losing, and  now it was over for him,  I actually cried. He seemed  like a hellhound, delinquent  kid-brother I'd been unable to  help. It wasn't for several  days that I began to smell  something bogus about the  whole business. For one  thing, the Mounties, whom I  finally phoned, had no record  of his death. Still, I really  didn't know for sure. Maybe  five months later, I was awakened about two in the  morning by someone tossing  pebbles at my window. And  there he stood under the  streetlamp, back from the  grave and chuckling slyly.  What can you do with a guy  like that? We went to a booze-  can and got loaded to celebrate his resurrection.  Here's YOUR chance to help the  EILEEN GkflSSFQRB  THEATRE FOUNDATION  Are you wondering what you can possibly do with your  five free shares in the British Columbia Resources Investment Corporation? We have a suggestion!  The Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation has now been  incorporated as a provincial society. Our next task is to  raise the capital for the proposed Eileen Glassford Theatre.  Let's put our free shares to work to provide a quality  Performing Arts Centre for the Sunshine Coast. Everyone  in the family can help. Just fill out the attached form and  mail it to the Coast News office, Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.  In this exciting and painless way we can enrich our lives and  this beautiful area in the name of a woman who loved and  served it for over sixty years.  We can all help.  DECLARATION OF TRUST  I.  Of   , Province of British Columbia, HEREBY DECLARE that  I hold my right to apply for and all my Interest In five (5) free common shares in the  capital of British Columbia Resources Investment Corporation, IN TRUST for the  sole benefit of the Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation, a society incorporated under  the Societies Act of British Columbia (hereinafter referred to as "the Society").  I FURTHER DECLARE AND AGREE that I have (or will, as  the case may be) made application for such five (S) shares and that upon the delivery  to me of the share certificates representing such shares, I will, at the expense of the  Society, do all such things as may be required to effect the transfer thereof to the  Society.  Columbia, this  Dated at   day of  WITNESS  Name   Address  Occupation  Signature  In the Province of British  Name  Mailing Address  Telephone   Frank Roosen performed "Jake the Peg, The Three-  Legged Man" at the Pender Harbour Variety Night  last Friday. Many Sunshine Coast residents are  probably familiar with the number as performed by  Australian Rolf Harris, but how many are aware  that the entertaining number was written by Pender  Harbour's Frank Roosen who sold It to Harris In  1965.  Superb pianist  coming here  By Susan Elek  It has been my experience  that one can hear a hundred  superb pianists but be profoundly moved by only one or  two of them. In my opinion,  our next artist' in die series,  Judith Kenedi Peleg, is the  kind of musician who can  communicate the essence of  music to her audience in  such a meaningful way.  The Toronto Daily Star  said of Miss Peleg "this young  lady can become one of the  world's great artists...this is  surely her potential...(Her  performance was) one not  likely to be exceeded by  anyone during our lifetime.''  Born in Hungary, Judith  Kenedi Peleg began her  studies at the age of five.  When she was eleven she became the  student  of Paul  Kadosa at the Franz Liszt  Academy of Music, Budapest,  in a special class for exceptional children. After seven  years at the Academy she  emigrated to Canada, where  she earned an Artist Diploma  and a Bachelor Degree at  the University of Toronto,  studying with Anton Kuerti.  Her first Canadian appearance became a sensation,  when in 1968 she won the  Kiwanis Festival in Toronto,  receiving the highest credits  ever awarded by British  adjudicator Joseph Cooper.  She received several grants  from the Canada Council and  the Canada Israel Cultural  Foundation to participate in  the Master Classes of Guido  Agosti in Italy, Geza Anda in  Switzerland and to study with  Mindru Katz at the Rubin  Academy of Tel Aviv. She  completed her Master's  Degree at the Indiana University in Bloomington, as  a pupil of Gyorgy Sebok.  Judith Kenedi Peleg  moved to Vancouver two years  ago, after her graduation.  Since then she has given  several performances as  soloist and Chamber Musician  on the CBC as well as on  stage.  This next concert will be  on Sunday, May 27 at 2 p.m.  at Elphinstone School. The  programme will feature works  by Mozart, Schubert, and  Chopin. There will be refreshments   after   the   concert.  SUMMER SCHEDULE  7p.m. Sunday    Channel 2  June 3 NICK AND THE AMAZONS  June 10 THE COLONEL'S PRINCESS  June 17 SHOTGUN AND LOVERS  June 24 CHARADE  July 1 INVISIBLE RELIC  July 8 THE ALCHEMIST  July 15 LIAR LIAR  July 22 A ROVER'S DREAM  July 29 QIBSONOSAURUS  August 5 HITCHHIKER  August 12 A MATTER OF LANGUAGE  August 19 POPPING THE QUESTION  August 26 SERPENT'S TOOTH  Sept. 2  Sept. 9  EYE IN THESKY  BANDITS  EUinuham s     :  4   Astrology   ��  ByBae  General Notes: Saturn,  planet of caution and common  sense, has returned to 'forward motion' bringing more  practical ways to solve current  problems. Meanwhile,  Mercury, Mars and Venus  continue to pass through the  sign of Taurus indicating similar conditions to those  experienced last week.  Remenjber that accurate  astrological forecasting can  be made only after consulting  carefully a personalized horoscope calculated to exact  time and place of birth.  The following prognostications should be more meaningful to those of you born  between the hours of 4 a.m.  and 6 a.m.  AWES (March 21-Aprll 19)  Accent is still on your personal finances, possessions,  investments, assets, stocks  and shares. Spending spree  continues but common sense  will leave you something in  the bank. Employment situation stabilizes. Saturn reminds  you it's time for health check  up. Domestic pet may also  require attention.  TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  You continue to be the  centre of attention. Mars and  venus in your sign increase  popularity and draw others to  you. Improved personal appearance boosts confidence  and self-image. Remember  to say 'yes' to all invitations  and opportunities. It's your  month so make the best of  it. Saturn urges you to treat,  seriously any romantic encounter,  GEMINI (May 21-June 21)  Spotlight is still on secrecy,  confidential matters, private  schemes, doing things alone.  Those who have recently  sought seclusion will be glad  they did. Remember that any  present limitation or loneliness is only temporary. Upcoming summer months will  see you in happier frame of  mind. Meanwhile, Saturn is  preparing you for serious  domestic reorganization.  CANCER (June 22-July 22)  Accent is still on making  fresh social contacts at local  meetings or group gatherings.  Advice is to make the effort  to go out and socialize, looks  like a casual acquaintance  could become a trusted friend.  Letter or phone call confirms  mid-summer venture. Meanwhile, Saturn helps settle  the affairs of your closest  relatives or neighbours.  LEO (July 23.Aug.22)  It is assumed you're  working hard to promote  career, position or community  standing. It's no time to lay  back and allow others to glory  in your achievements. Make  sure those-in-charge are  aware of your talents and capabilities. Attractive assignments will be offered soon.  Meanwhile, Saturn urges you  to stabilize financial position.  VIRGO (Aug.23-Sept.22)  Emphasis is once again on  your life philosophy, spiritual  convictions and the expression  of these viewpoints. You're  still in the mood for mental  explorations and challenging  the ideas of those close to  you. Seems you can't acquire  enough knowledge at this  time. Long-distance messages  and events are still in focus.  Saturn in your sign encourages greater personal responsibility.  LIBRA (Sept.23-Oct.23)  Other people's money and  possessions still demand your  attention. Looks like a close  associate is ready to take your  advice. Don't miss opportunity to borrow cash or equipment. Remember that financial institutions still categorize you as 'low-risk' client.  Saturn reminds you that any  present restrictions or delays  have to be patiently endured.  SCORPIO (Oct.24-Nov 22)  Improved relations with  close associates, partners  and loved ones enable you to  forge ahead confidently with  contracts, agreements and  long-range plans. Looks like  other people are shaping your  life more than you realize.  Marriage or commitment  benefits from down-to-earth  discussions. Saturn warns you  that an old friend or acquaintance may soon be leaving.  SAGITTARIUS (Nov.23-  Dec.21)  Focus is still on the employment scene, daily chores,  routines and service to others,  it's time for hard work whether you like it or not. As relations with colleagues improve, it is hoped that any  disagreements over schedules  and methods will be settled.  Meanwhile, time is running  out for those seeking a steady  occupation. Saturn says stop  running from your responsibilities,     i  CAPRICORN (Dec.22-Jan.19)  Social life, pleasures,  amusements, sensuous enjoyments continue to wear  you out. Enjoy them while you  can. Hard work, toil and  sweat are on next month's  agenda. Love affair blossoming this week looks like the  real thing. Save time and be  honest from the start. Gambling, speculation and risks  are favoured. Cheap lottery  ticket is best investment.  Saturn says get your philosophical facts straight.  AQUARIUS (Jan.20-Feb.18)  Activity around the home  continues to sap most of your  energy. By now, the results  of any domestic alterations  or beautification projects  would have proved your  ideas worthwhile. Take a bow  and keep at it. Meanwhile,  it's the right time to sign any  rental or real estate agreements. Saturn reminds you  that loved one's financial  position has to be handled  firmly.  PISCES (Feb.19-Mar.20)  Focus is still on busy short-  distance communications.  Realize that propositions received by mail or phone are  worth looking into, Local  journeys or visits may present  similar tempting opportunities. Remember that your  common sense can now  be trusted. Meanwhile,  Saturn urges you to treat  loved one with more respect  and consideration.  For Good Times  .find Qood music  ^. By Popular Request  Brian & Graham j\  (formerly the Pen Kings) .     J*  Fri. and Sat.      May 25th and 26th  9 p.m. -1 a.m.  (Next Week)  ONE NIGHT ONLY  Thursday, May 31st  THE CEMENT  CITY COWBOYS  from Calgary  May 1st and 2nd  BRIAN AND GRAHAM  PERIRSBLfl  IjOTEL  I ���  Book review  A truly great Canadian novel  J     By Jo^ Moore  Fm sitting here trying to  figure out why Howard  O'Hagan's novel Tay John hu  never crossed my path before.  Tie teachers who, at various  points in my academic career,  attempted to acquaint me with  the literature of my own  csuntry seem to have had an  Uncanny genius for choosing  examples that were tedious,  second-rate, and utterly  uninspiring. It's no wonder,  I suppose, they missed Tay  John. It is compelling, first-  late and thoroughly inspiring.  I found my copy in a secondhand bookstore for $1.00  but it's only $2.95 retail,  published in McClelland and  Stewart's excellent New  Canadian Library series  (N.105). It was originally  published in 1939, then republished in 1960 and 1974.  Its reappearance in 1960  seems to have caused some  confusion among the critics.  As Patricia Morley relates,  in her fine critical introduction, one critic found It  "a sequence of melodramatic  yarns without any satisfactory  resolution." Morley admits  that "On a first reading, this  story of a yellow-haired half-  breed and a few colourful  individuals whose lives are  loosely connected with his  strikes one as being a strange  mixture of Indian myth, tall  tale, Bar-room anecdote,  romantic melodrama, and  comic farce." I ' suspect  that, for Western readers at  least, these elements, far from  detracting from the work,  are what gives it its extraordinary effect.  The tall tale, the bar-room  anecdote, with their melodramatic, romantic and comic  elements, are the stuff of  our popular mythology.  They are the aprititual history  of our trials in 'the wilderness  we inhabit. On a good night in  almost any beer parlour in  western Canada you can turn  up a man like Jack Denham,  narrator of the last two of the  novel's three parts; a man  who has knocked around at all  sorts of odd jobs and seen a  good bit of the country, a  natural raconteur with an  inexhaustible repertoire of  tales so polished with telling,  so reduced by elaboration and  simplification to their essential truth, that they bear the  unmistakeable stamp of  legend. Melodramatic they  may be, but, played out on  the austere soul-swallowing  stage of the wilderness, as  Tay John is set against the  backdrop of the Canadian  Rockies; any human situation  takes os an exaggerated significance. It is a popular  truism to say that such a landscape reduces man and his  actions to insignificance, yet  in fact the effect of such a  setting is to raise the dramatic  intensity to the Nth power.  Jack London's short story "To  Build A Fire" is one of the  best illustrations of this effect.  O'Hagan uses the effect  masterfully. The landscape  is so dominant that he keeps  Ms cast of characters small to  maximize the drama of their  actions. "Legend," the first  part of the book, is concerned with the origins of  Tay John. A trapper named  Red Rorty, having acquired  a bad case of religion on one  of his infrequent sojourns to  the fringes of civilisation,  burns his cabin and all his  possessions and goes off  to preach to the Shushwap  Indians. The Shushwap are  waiting for a leader who they  believe will be sent to lead  them back through the mountains to their traditional homeland on the B.C. Coast.  For awhile, they suspect  that Rorty may be this leader,  but he settles down and be-  comes a kind of Holy Fool  in their village, until be rapes  a woman whose husband is  away hunting. The women of  the village tie him to a tree,  place a stone in his mouth to  stop his cries, flay him and  set fire to the tree. The girl,  pregnant as a result of the  attack, dies near the end of  her term. She is duly buried,  but a short time later, a dark-  skinned blonde haired boy is  discovered living like a wild  tiling in the den of his  mother's tomb. Lured to the  village, he is raised with  the other boys and grows to  be a fine hunter and woodsman. The white trappers,  for whom he acts as guide,  nicknamed him "Tete Jaune"  - Yellowhead - which is soon  corrupted to Tay John.  Among the Shushwap,  the idea grows that Tay John  is the leader for whom they  have waited, and for a time  he accepts the role. Leading  them away over mountains  and through forbidding  forests towards the coast.  He has set himself above tribal law before by keeping the  gifts trappers had given him  for himself instead of sharing  them communally, but when  he tries to do so again, challenging one of his friend's  CARS AND TRUCKS  Rental���Leasing  -Also-  Domestic and  Industrial  Equipment  next to the liquor store  In Sechelt.  Seaside Rentals  885-2848  engagement to a girl he himself desires, the tribal elders  put their collective foot down.  They do not want to be as  other men, but to retain his  "spiritual" identity. They tell  him he is "married" to the  tribe. Tay John rejects his  role and abandons them in  the wilderness.  When Jack Denham first  encounters Tay John, he is  already a legenday figure;  a "failed prophet" living a  hermit existence as a trapper  in the Rockies. Denham  witnesses a titanic battle  between Tay John and a she-  grizzly, from which the man  emerges victorious and from  that time Denham begins to  keep track of the scattered  stories and scraps of information concerning Tay John  that drift in on the fluid grapevine of trading-posts, survey-  camps, and saloons. The two  thirds of the book Denham  narrates, "Hearsay" and  "Evidence-without a finding"  are, in a sense, ironically  titled since it is Denham who  assembles the elements of  the Tay John legend and  weaves them into a powerful  myth. The under-played,  easy-going style of his barroom narrative reminds me  of the very similar way  Somerset Maugham used to  introduce stones that would  become major epics of human  passion and conflict.  I'm not going to spoil the  rest of the story by capsullzing  Denham's tale. The players  in the final act of the drama,  Alf Dobble, the entrepreneur  and eternal optimist who tries  to build a tourist resort in  the Rockies seventy years  ahead of his time, Ardith  Aeriola, the beautiful mistress  of an eastern VIP, "taking a  discreet "vacation" in the  mountains, and Thomas  Rorty, a priest who comes to  the mountains seeking his  brother and finds himself  embarked on the spiritual  quest of his own life, are all  worth discovering at first  hand.  Tay John is one of those  marvellous novels whose plot  seems to unravel, spreading  finer and finer until, at times,  it seems that the thread is  about to break, then winds  itself together again like  spiralling strands of rope,  finished off as neat and free  of loose ends as a tight  sizing. It can stand with the  best novels of any country in  the world.  Coest News, May 22,1979.  By Isaac  Does the name Graham  Parker mean anything to  you? How about Bob Dylan,  Van Morrison or Bruce  Springsteen? For three years  and four albums Graham  Parker has been compared  with the great singer-songwriters by a host of music  critics. Now he has a new album out which should establish him as a great rock voice  and get him out of the shadows. The album, his fifth,  is called Squeezing Out Sparks  and has already lit a fire under  the English record buying  public and looks set to do the  same here. Each song is finely  crafted in the Parker tradition  but with the help of some good  production they flow together  to create his best album to  date.  Graham Parker emerged in  the summer of 76 at the same  time as the early punk bands  but other than energy he had  little in common with the back  to the basics movement.  His band The Rumour was  assembled from two of the  best pub rock bands of the day  and the skill of the members  gave G.P. and The Rumour a  loyal following on the concert  circuit. The first two albums  by the group established them  as a  musical  force  to be  Positive vibrations  THKWSSK,  TOP    DISCS  presented to you by   ^Aiacjic <cl%xi)ixoom  885-2522  "The Coast's Music Centre'  2)   DoucettelteDeiMls  3)   Supertramps  4) SuriQitatro  I Yen  KatwSul  5) The Doobie Brothers  MhatebyMfastt  6) Sod Stewart  Have Man Fan  7) Cm  ()   Ami! Stewart  Waed  9) Village People  Go  Wast  10) Tsas  watched. Howtin Wind and  Heat Treat are mixtures of  R N B and rock songs and both  are worthwhile additions to  any record collection. The  second album made the U.K.  charts aa did a single Hold  Back The Night which ia only  available on an import LP  called the Pink Parker.  The future looked rosy for  GP at this time but fete  stepped in and slowed down  his career. The third album  Stick to Me had to be recorded  twice as the original recording  session produced a hum in  the muter tapes. The album  has some great songs on it  but lacks the excitement of the  early albums, no doubt a  result of the group having to  go back and remake the record. Also at this time the  music press which had helped  promote Parker as the next big  thing began ignoring him in  favour of the punk and new  wave bands,that were sprou  ting up everywhere. The  greatest irony of all was the  little guy who came along  and stole GP's audience.  Elvis Costello with the help of  Parker's producer, record  company executives and even  some members of the Rumour  managed in a year to establish  himself as a major act while  GP still hasn't been heard on  our radio. To further damage  Parker's shaky career his re*  cord company released a  rather lacklustre live album  which did nothing to help his  reputation.  The new album hu to be  the most important of GP's  career, he ia either going to  become famous or be back  playing the pubs. One listen  to die album and you know GP  and the Rumour are going to  be around for a while yet. All  he needs is some radio play  and a tour or two and he will  be up taiere at the top where  he belongs. Get a copy of  Squeezing Out Sparks now  and avoid the rush I  Band's last  lamc Buocij concert  Elphinstone Band will  present its last concert of the  year at Elphinstone Secondary  School at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 29. Guest bands  during the evening will be  from Port Hardy Secondary  School and Port McNeil  Secondary School.  The cost of tickets for the  concert is only $1.00 and anyone interested in fine band  music is urged to attend this  final concert.  See our  Bargain Shelf  for good buys  NDP Bookstore  CAMDbEll's shoES  " and   LEATHER GOODS  In the Heart of Sechelt  Summer SANDALS for the Whole Family  European CLOQS for Men and Women,  Orthopeodlcally shaped for comfort,  Children's RUNNING 8HOE8  Ladies' Summer HANDBAGS  Cowrie St.,     885-9345  Your friendly neighbourhood drop-off point for  GOASr  VIWI    Classified Ads  Classifieds should be prepaid and pre-wrltten  All information in classified ad section of Coast News .  Chuck Stephens entertains In one of the newly arrived 'hot tube' ip front of his store  on Cowrie Street last week.  Pretty soon everyone got Into the act. Brunell and John Gordon, Joan Stephens and  Emma Campbell enjoy a cool drink In the hot tub.  Wilson Creek Reading Centre  The Wilson Creek Community Library hu now become the first Reading Centre  in British Columbia. We have  received a rather large grant  of children's books and reference books, that will enable  us to increase our circulation.  We will also be given a yearly  financial grant to maintain  and increase our stock. These  grants are being sent to us  from the Library Services  Branch of the B.C. Government.  We are open on Wednesday  from 11.30 to 1.30 and Friday  from 2.00 to 4.00. All visitors  are welcome. We have stories  for children and many games  for those who wish to participate.  As part of Family Fun Day  on May 27 at the Wilson Creek  Community Centre the Library will be open. Please  come and visit us at 3.00 p.m.  It's your  funeral.  So spare your family the added grief and  confusion of funeral arrangements.  You can have the lut word on the lut | "    ---------------------a  thins In your life. Your funeral. i To: MEMORIAL SOCIETY OF B.C. i  Protect your family from the strew of J        p.o. Box 5240, Vancouver, B.C. !  deciding your Anal arrangements. Plan ,        V6B4B3 i  ahead for the possibility that you could i I  unexpectedly die. You can specify a simple j l/we are interested in the aims of the Society, j  and dignified funeral, burial, cremation or ; Q want more information  memorial service. And it won't cost your i         ��� wish lo enrol now. I  family unnecessary expense. ��� J  It's your funeral. So have your wishes        .,     , ,  recorded now. Join the B.C. Memorial | Namelsl -  I  Society and take a worry off your mind. I ...  Foi-the sake of the family you love. ' Address    The Memorial Society of B.C.'s                ���.   ,                      fosul \  contract undertaker for this area, First , City/town Code  ,  Memorial Services Ltd., now hut facility > Amount  at 2808 Mt. Lehman Rd., Abbotsford, B.C. j H***"* enclosed  j  Memorial Society of B.C. AK\      Membership is $5 for each adult  Telephone 688*6256      \\J       iNoch.i��e for children under l��l         MM  MICROWAVE COOKING  It's a new Idea but not one that  takes long to grow accustomed to.  It's easy, It's convenient, and It's  economical. The time saved Is Important  working famlly. And the energy saved Is  substantial. Because the oven operates on 11  current and needs no pre-heatlng, and the _  cooks so rapidly, the savings amount to between  thirty- three to eighty percent.  It doesn't eliminate the need for a conventional range but serves as  useful addition to the kitchen. One of its best features Is the ease of  clean-up. Often it Is possible to cook right In the serving dish, eliminating the scouring of pots and pans.    The personal energy saving Is  Important.   Use If for everything - family meals, quick snacks and^  entertaining.  It's great for heating leftovers or for defrosting.  FAVOURITE 8TUFFED PEPPERS  For variety, fill large tomatoes Instead of green peppers,  3 large green peppers  11b. ground beef  1/3 cup rolled oats  legg  2 tbs. minced onion  ti cup tomato sauce  1 tsp. salt  Va tsp. pepper  Va tsp. oregano  Sour Cream Sauce  Vash peppers. Cut In half lengthwise. Remove core and seeds. Arrange In a 8 x 12-Inch  glass baking dish. Add V* cup water. Cover tightly with plastic wrap. Microwave 4 minutes,  Burning dish after2 minutes. Combine remaining Ingredients in a 1-quart casserole. Microwave  7 to 8 minutes until meat is cooked. Lightly fill the peppers. Arrange in a 8 x 12-Inch baking dish.  ���jAdd 1/4 cup water. Cover with plastic wrap. Microwave 10 minutes,  "ye with Sour Cream Sauce. Makes 4 to 8 servings.  m Coast News, May 22,1979.  VLASSIFIFD ADS  On the Beautiful Sunshine Coast at Gower Point  ��� Guestrooms (BreakfastIncluded)  * Dining Room    886-9033     fflKWS&te,  A sour perspective  On politics and television  By Maryanne West  It was the White Queen who  advocated believing in the  impossible - "as many as  six impossible things before  breakfast!"  Now I imagine myself to be  about average when it comes  to gullibility and I've been  trying all week to swallow  this one, but I just can't  bring myself to believe eight  million Canadians were  conned into watching the  debate between Tweedledum,  Tweedledee and the White  Rabbit, with all those self-  acclaimed gurus thrown in.  How do they come up with  those figures I wonder?  Maybe phone everyone in a  couple of blocks in Media  City (Toronto) and then multiply? Did they forget it wu  aired between 5 and 7 p.m.  on a sunny afternoon in B.C.?  What was the statistical  margin of error and was that  included or debited? They  never tell us.  Wasn't the exercise just a  media stunt anyway as Gallup  had informed us a couple of  days before that only 11%  Canadians were still undecided. A pretty extravagant  way to persuade 11% how to  choose! And the figures don't  make sense because more  than 11% of the electorate  won't vote ��� who ever heard of  a 90% turnout? What did all  that hoopla cost us the taxpayers I wonder. We'd heard  all that posturing ad nauseam  for the past eight weeks and  I personally do not buy that  media mythology about how  much we can learn about  people from TV which conveys  the all important body  language.   FEDERAL ELECTION  POLLING STATIONS  AREA  POLLING DIVISION NO. 125,  EGMONT (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 126,  PENDER HARBOUR (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 127,  FRANCES PENINSULA (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 128  SILVER SANDS (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 129,  HALFMOON BAY (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 130,  WAKEFIELD (RURAL)  POLLING STATION  Egmont Community Hall  Garden Bay Motel  Madeira Park  Community Hall  Madeira Park Community Hall  Former Wharf Realty Office  Highway 101  Senior Citizen Hall, Sechelt  Senior Citizen Hall, Sechelt  POLLING DIVISION NO. 131,  SECHELT SOUTH & CENTRE (RURA!  POLLING DIVISION NO. 132 St. Mary's Hospital, Sechelt  SECHELT EXTENDED CARE WING (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 133,  SECHELT EAST (RURAL)  POLLLING DIVISION NO. 144,  GIBSONS HEIGHTS (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 145,  GIBSONS HEIGHTS (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 146,  GIBSONS HEIGHTS (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 147,  GIBSONS & CHEKWELP INDIAN RESERVE  Senior Citizen Hall, Sechelt  Chaster Road School  Chaster Road School  Saint Bartholomew's Church  United Church Hall  POLLING DIVISION NO. 148,        St. Bartholomew's Church Hall  GIBSONS VILLAGE BLOCK 1 (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 149,  GIBSONS CENTRE (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 150,  GIBSONS SOUTH (RURAL)  United Church Hall  United Church Hall  POLLING DIVISION NO. 151, Grantham's Community Hall  GRANTHAM'S LANDING (RURAL)  POLLING DIVISION NO. 152,  SOAMES POINT (RURAL)  Grantham's Community Hall  NOTE:  1. Voting Is from 9.00 a.m. till 8.00 p.m.  2. See Upper & Lower Post Offices In Gibsons for maps of  polling divisions.  It's outdated now even if  it once could have been justified, by the presence of  cameras in the House. We've  all seen the real thing and this  "debate" was shown for what  it was, artificial and phoney.  Clark's reaction was possibly  the only rational one at the  time, the whole thing was so  silly it was laughable.  In retrospect one should  perhaps weep, but I'd suggest  a more practical reaction, that  of constructive anger and a  determination to demand  responsiblity from the media.  Leadership is a complex,  many-faceted talent requiring  commitment, integrity,  imagination and especially a  great sensitivity to the feelings and aspirations of  others. To be really successful it has to be more than a  power trip. What wu it  Gandhi said about the Leader  having to be also a follower?  A TV debate isn't structured to illustrate those real  qualities of leadership, only  to show off a star performer,  something any ham actor can  excel at. It hu little to do with  leadership in the Parliamentary sense.  Anyway Canadians were  electing a Parliament I  thought, not a President or a  Fuehrer.  We know something about  former members of the  Government who have been  Cabinet Minsters, but the  Media concentrating on the  leaders have totally failed to  give us any understanding  of the teams and talent these  leaders expect to field. The  nightly newscasts have religiously trailed back and forth  across the country covering  the same rallies of the party  faithful responding like robots  to their puppet leader voicing  the latest thoughts of the back  room boys.  But who is going to represent Canada at the U.N.  or the Common Market?  Which party hu been able  to attract experienced, knowledgeable and articulate  people? I haven't a clue.  We do occasionally get a  glimpse of a local candidate  trotting obediently at his  master's heels, but that's all.  Who is to cope with the  economic problems? Who hu  the sensitivity and understanding to bring the Native  People of this country into  their rightful place? Who hu  the knowledge and expertise  to deal with pollution and the  environment? Who will care  for the welfare of Canadians  who are unemployed or sick?  Those leaders upon whom the  media have bestowed their all  can't be everywhere. Canada  is still at leut nominally a  democracy, whatever that  means these days.  Of course I don't think TV  coverage is valueless but it  could be used intelligently.  Discussions of issues should  be a continuing process between candidates and those  with experience and knowledge in many fields and if  a debate between the leaders  is part of these discussions  then it should be early in the  campaign giving voters time  to weigh pros and cons, time  to see more clearly through  the political half-truths  which the media, particularly  TV, hu done little to expose.  It's becoming increasingly  difficult to reduce complex  issues to simple black and  white terms, and tf democracy  is to survive television will  have to stop manipulating  everything to fit its showbiz image.  And tf you really want to  assess someone's sincerity  and real character, listen to  them instead on radio in a natural and relaxed situation.  Without the interference of  the visual and your built-in  prejudices or preferences for  physical appearances and  mannerisms, with nothing between you both except the  spoken word, real communication can take place. Ego-  tripping, shallow insincerity  are euy to detect and you can  differentiate between those  who would use an issue for  personal aggrandizement  and those who are genuinely  concerned in the public  interest.  Happily by the time you  read this all those would gurus  and analysts and what-have-  you will be packing their bags  and we can have a rest from  "if it wu so, it might be;  and if it were so, it would be;  butuit isn't it ain't!!"  P.S. If you haven't read  Alice Through the Looking  Glass recently, hunt up a  copy ��� it's more relevant than  ever.  This young lady was one of the many who braved the  static electricity ball at the Science Fair at Sechelt  Elementary School last week.   ICBC Radio  AMKadlo.  Saturday.  The Hornby CoDectioni  8.05 p.m. The Arts Around  Me ��� a collection of the favourite paintings, poetry,  memories and music by David  Watmough.  Wilson Creek Community Association  plans Family Fun Day  The Wilson Creek Community Association is holding  a Family Fun Day on Sunday,  May 27 starting at 3 p.m.  At 3 p.m, there will be open  house at the Library and also  at Day Care. A mini Marathon  walk is planned for the whole  CLASSIFIED NOTE  Drop otf vour Coast News  Classifieds al Campbell's  Family Shoes 4 Leather  Goods In down-town Sechelt.  family starting at 3.30 p.m.  Those who stay behind can  have their choice of playing  dodgeball, baseball, volleyball  or participate in races and  games. At 5.30 p.m. it's  picnic time so everyone bring  something for supper. Coffee  will be supplied. The day will  be ended with a family dance  with music by the Rainbow  Riders at around 6.30 p.m.  There will be a small charge of  $3.00 for families, $1.00 for  singles. Pillows and foam pads  will be supplied for the little  ones who fall uleep during  the dance.  Hot dogs, coffee, popcorn  etc. will be for sale during  the days. Everyone is welcome  to come.  If it is raining the activities  will be held inside the various  buildings. The walk will go on  so bring rain gear.  \bu can get a car loan at  your local Royal Bank  Branch... as low as  *  with up to 60 months  to repay.  ��� On approval we'll tailor  a repayment plan that  won't strain your budget.  ��� Your loan will be life insured  at no cost lo you.  ��� On approval you can get  the whole amount you need,  usually within 24 hours.  24 Month!  48 Months  60 Months  Rale  Amount  Monthly  Paymeni  Cosl of  Loan  Monthly  Payment  Cost of  Loan  Monthly  Paymeni  Cosl of  Loan  \Vti%  $3,000  5.000  7.000  $141.92  236.34  331.IS  $406.13  676.88  947.63  $ 79.74  132.90  186.06  $  827.S2  1.379.20  1,930.88  $ 67.49  112.49  157.49  $1,049.63  1,749.38  2.449.13  ' Nominal annual mitral rale Inictetl may he charged on irrcan al the appk-ihle W* "I the l-uu  When you succeed...we succeed.  ROYAL BANK  Sunday.  CBC Stagei 1.05 p.m. The  Clay Pigeon by Eric B. Mad-  dish, a crime thriller, a professional killer seeks revenge  on the crime syndicate which  put him behind bars.  Celebnationi      9.05      p.m.  Academies   of  Religious   -  a   documentary   study   of  of training in Christian and  Jewish liturgical music.  FM Radio.  Saturday.  SIgnatiirei 7.05 p.m. Pianist  Reginald Godden will give  the broadcast premiere of  Hindemlth's monumental  fiigal composition Ludus  Tonalis and an entertaining  and illuminating talk about the  composer and his work,  Sunday.  Celebration. 10.05 p.m.  Spanish composer Tonus  Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)  exponent of religious mysticism in music and the subject of this programme of  music and text, performed by  the St. Mary Magdalene  Singers of Toronto  Television.  Wednesday! Post Election  Special with Knowlton Nuh,  Don MacNeil and David  Dal ton.  Fridayi The Astonishing  Odyssey - featuring the Montreal Symphony - space theme  music, laser and light show  report.  Sunday! All Creatures Great  and Small. 10.00 p.m. Episode  Two Dog Days.  Monday! This Land. 10.00 p.m  Paint it Wild - a profile of  Glen Loates.  Tuesday.  The Dpchat Line - a new  comedy from Britain.  The Rare Breed. 8.30 p.m.  Those who contribute to food  production in Canada. Tonight  Just Watch Me ��� profile of  rancher Ken Beswick.  CBC Talent Competition  Finals - from Quebec City.  Police news  May 9. Break and Entry at  a business in Gibsons. Entry  wu gained through a back  window. A few packages of  cigarettes were stolen.  May 14. break, Entry and  Theft reported Rosamund  Road area residence. Entry  was gained through the kitchen window. Small quantity  of beer and liquor wu stolen.  May 14. Theft from residence on Abbs Road. New tire  and rim stolen ,.om the car-  port.  May 14. Break, Entry and  Theft reported from summer  residence Gower Point Road  and Chaster Road. Sometime  during the put month a  Lloyds Stereo, AM-FM Radio,  and two small speakers were  stolen.  May 16. An Apollo 5 speed  bicycle wu reported stolen  from outside the theatre.  Marine Patrols have reported infractions concerning  small vessels in Howe Sound,  particularly incidences of no  life jackets.  D. D. (DAVE) HEIBNER  MANAGER  The Royal Bank of Canada  P.O. BOX 310  GIBSONS.  B.C.  (604) 681-4626  OR 886-2201  ��  SUNSHINE  KITCHENS  FINE CABINETS  886-9411 Gibsons Cemetery causes concern  Coast News, May 22,1979.  It's a bit early, perhaps, but this young lady was checking out the peri-natal clinic in  Sunnycrest Mall last week.  Come cry with me  By Ann Napier  Write Box 3, c/o Coast Newa  Dear Aim,  There's an old saying'  'Three's a Crowd'. I've heard  the saying, but hu my girl  friend's ex? He is on the  scene quite frequently. Should  I take his presence for granted  as an old friend, or are there  flames in the coals? I can't tell  which way the wind is blowing  so I just go along wondering.  Waiting.  Dear Waiting, '  I think you are doing the  right thing. These tilings  resolve themselves. If she had  wanted to be with him ��� he  had first chance - he must  have blown it ��� he may get  another chance. In the meantime if all is OK between you  and your girl, just take it  for what it is. The future will  sort itself out.  Dear Ann,  I'm tired of hearing our  Prime Minister blasted.  Look at the States - no gu.  But wise Pierre didn't wait, he  made a pact with Mexico, so  we have gu. Imagine the  screaming if we had to sit at  gas pumps half-an-hour to two  hours and couldn't carry on  our business or get to work.  Give him some credit, he's a  bright man.  for Pierre.  Dear for Pierre,  I know you are right.  Canada is respected everywhere. It hu the most desired  passport in the world. We  should give him a lot of credit,  but I don't know if our Editor  will print this. Good leaders  are rare. Being so interwoven  with the States, I'm pleued to  see any autonomy in Canada.  Arts Centre (cont.)  The latter concert was the ��y AiitiB Edwards used for  first in a series of four known "*> demonstration is presently  as Countryside Concerts. The on vlew at *e Bank of Mont-  next concert will be a piano real in Gibsons. It will later be  recital by Hungarian born shown in Secheit. The pain-  Vancouver pianist Judith nn8 * being auctioned  Kenedi Peleg this coming and v"a oe presented to the  Sunday, May 27 at 2.00 p.m. hi8hest bidder at the up-  in Elphinstone School. Further coimn8 General Meeting,  details appear elsewhere in Sealed bi<ls (minimum S150)  this newspaper. may be left where the painting  The th& aiid fdtirth can- is exhibited,  certs to be held at the same     T���5 A���  Councl1  mv������  time and place will be by the members and non-members  Hortulani    Musicae    early *�� ** Meeting on Friday,  music ensemble on June 3, J.une ����� at 8-���� P-���- 8t ���  and the Powell River Boys' ** Centre wne�� "e�� will  Choir on June 17th. be entertainment and refresh-  The watercolour  painting ments as well u the Meeting.  NOTICE BOARD .  ���41  'hone 886-2622 '��� ������  PENDER HARBOUR DISTRICT CLINIC AUXILIARY  A meeting ol tho Pender Harbour CNMrtct Clinic Auxiliary will bo  hold it trwCllnlc In Pender Harbour on vVedneeday, tatty 23, !97�� ot  7.30 p.m. RUMMAGE AND OARAGE SALE  May 24lh at C.W.L. Rummage and garaoe sale. Holy Family Church  Hall, Sechell. 11.00a.m. -2.00p.m.  MONTHLY COFFEE PARTY  May 25-Wllson Crook Hall. 11:00-1:00.  SUNSHINE COAST POWER SQUADRON  May 26,1979, tha Sunehlno Coeet Power Squadron welcome member! and Irlende to dinner, Change ot Welch, dance. Taking plan ot  tho Sechelt ARENA, Salurday at 1830...? For further Inlormatlon  contact: 686*9025,866-2864 or 863-6298.  SUNSHINE COAST POTTERS GUILD  Sunshine Coasl Pollers Guild Is sponsoring a workshop wilh Greg  1  Deacon ol Old Egmont Craltswork Pottery on Saturday, May 26,  1   9.30a.m. - 5.00 p.m. at the Craft Shop. 110.00 for members, $12.00  lor non-members. Call 885-2015 lo register.  FAMILY FUN DAY    .  May 27 - at Wilson Creak Community Centre, starting at 3 p.m.  FLEA MARKET AND CRAFTS FAIR  2 nd Annual Fantaallc Flea Market and Crafts Fair. Glbaona Winter  Club. Sunday, June 3rd. 10.00 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. For etall rental  886*9619 or 886-7712.  GIBSONS HOSPITAL AUXILIARY SPRING RAFFLE  First Prize: Extra large hand-quilted spread; Second Prize: Afghan ���  48"x60". To be drawn June 6,1979. Tickets $1.00 each, Phone 886-  2810 or 886*9458. prenatal   oass   SERIES  May 22,28, June4,11,16,26. 7:30.9:30P.M. at Chatelech Secondary School, Room 112. Please pre-register: Phone 886-2228.  WOMEN'S AGLOW FELLOWSHIP  Meets every third Tuesday of the mon|h at Harmony Hall In Gibsons.  Ladles ol all ages welcome. Phone 886-7426 for Information.  SUNSHINE LAPIDARY & CRAFTS CLUB  Club meels 1st Wednesday every month et 7:30 p.m. For information phone 865-2375 or 886-9204. ttn  PARENT8 WITHOUT PARTNERS INC.  Are you a single parent? Divorced? Widowed? Separated? Never  Married? P.W.P. Is an International non-profit, non-sectarian,  educational organization devoted to the welfare and Interests of single parents and their children. A chapter Is now being co-ordinated  on the Sunshine Coasl. For Information please phone Gordy at 666-  7421 or Lily al 868-9337.  SECHELTGARDEN CLUB  meels Ihe first Wednesday of every month al SI. Hilda's Hall,  7:30 p.m. oender HARBOUR LIBRARY "  Membership fses ere due In January and are $2.00 tor four books, or  $3.00 for six books for e two-week period. This is an annual membership. HOURS: Tuesday and Thursday, 1:30���3:30 p.m.; Salurday,  1:30-4:00p.m. ELPHINSTONE AERIAL aUB  Meeting every second Wednesday of tha month at 6 p.m., at the Wilson Creek Club House. Now RECRUITING  ROYAL CANADIAN ARMY CADETS  Will parade Monday, 7���9 p.m. at Sechelt Elemenlary for training  in: Search & Rescue; First Aid; Map Using; Communications; Water  Safely; Marksmanship; etc. Interested males end females aged 13  lo 18 apply lor further information to: G.Banyay 883*9012;  R.Summerfleld 885-2160; T.Goddard 886*2858.  WESTERN WEIGHT CONTROLLERS  Meet every Thursday al 10:00 a.m. Everyone welcome. For regis-  tratlon phone 886-9386.  ROBERTS CREEK HOSPITAL AUXILIARY  Every 2nd Monday���Roberts Creek Hospilsl Auxiliary, 11 a.m.  SI.AIdan'sHall.              THRIFT SHOP  Every Friday, 1���3 p.m. Thrift Shop, Gibsons United Church base*  ment.      SUNSHINE COAST ARTSCOUNCIL MEETING  Third Tuesday ol each month, at Sechelt Elementary main building.  Mr. Llzee's room, at 7:30p.m. All Welcome.  AL-ANON MEETING  Every Thursday In Gibsons et 8:00 p.m. For Information call 866*   yj  9569 or 886-9037.  14  i/nMrAmm��i%i77/wnynft^  There have been complaints  recently about the state of  Seaview Cemetry which hu  been the responsible of the  Regional Board for about two  years. On the whole the older  part of the cemetery near the  main gate is reasonably tidy  although the grass around  many of the graves was in  need of cutting when visited  on Saturday. However, at  the far end in the area of the  most recent grave sites, it is  most unsightly with no grass  and heaps of stones and  gravel. Alder trees have  sprung up between the graves  which for the most part are  unkempt. Mr. Jack Marshall,  Gibsons Alderman is most  unhappy about the state of  affairs. Mr. Devlin of Devlin  Funeral Home, has received  numerous complaints from  people who are upset because  of the lack of maintenance.  In a letter to the Regional  Board dated April 25, Funeral  Director Dan Devlin acknowledged that improvements had  taken place since the Cemetery's maintenance had been  in the charge of the Regional  Board. Devlin said in part:  "At the outset I wish to  state that the SCRD is to be  commended for certain, improvements already made to  the cemetery. The road into  the cemetery hu been extended into a through road to  eliminate backing vehicles  out the entrance gate. Also a  large new tract hu been  cleared and planted in grass.  The grave digging service  been efficient and prompt,  a welcome change from the  situation prior to SCRD operation of the Cemetery. Liaison  with SCRD personnel is excellent. Also, some maintenance of the grounds hu been  provided during the summer  months.  "Having said the above, it  is necessary to draw attention to a number of serious  problems. Maintenance is  the major problem and reason  for complaints from the  public. A number of blocks  (particularly 87, 88, 93, 94,  & 95) are an utter disgrace  and must be landscaped,  seeded, and improved. These  blocks are ones which have  been most recently filled and  have been left in bad order.  Many justified complaints  have been received by me  from families having burials in  these blocks. There are uncleared old flowers, rocks,  sods, mud, uneven terrain  etc. over this area which make  it a source of distress to families with deceased relatives  buried there.  The  grounds  were not even cleaned up for  Easter, when many families  wish to visit graves. The only  maintenance hu been summer youth employment groups  funded by senior levels of  government; during most  months of the year there. is  nothing. Headstones are not  being installed u per the bylaws and the bylaw prohibiting  the construction of curbs etc.  is not being enforced. The  bylaws indicate that the  cemetery is to be a perpetual  care, lawn-type cemetery,  which is certainly not the case  at this time."  The main problem seems to  be that the site is not suitable  for a cemetery but the  Regional Board was unable to  locate an alternative one.  Gordon Dixon, Public Works  Superintendent pointed out in  a telephone conversation that  the problem as he sees it is  lack of funds not lack of  inclination and pointed to the  improvements which have  been made since the Board  took over including the gravel  road and newly cleared areas.  There is little or no top soil  in the newer part of the cemetery which accounts for  the problem of unsightly  stones and lack of grass.  Until this year no tax was  levied specifically for the pur-  pose of maintaining the  cemetery. It would seem that  if the community would like  the cemetery to be attractively landscaped and main  tained, the people must be  prepared to pay for it and  make their wishes known to  their elected representatives  _       Hear  Evangelist  LEE BARROWS  from Tacoma  at  Glad Tidings Tabernacle  Gibsons  Saturday, May 26th,    Sunday, May 27th  7:30p.m.        11:00a.m. & 7:00p.m.  A Warm Welcome to All I  Kern's Electronics  886-9733  ^SttonT-  QUALITY TV AND STEREO SERVICE  AVAILABLE  14 YEARS FACTORY EXPERIENCE  Ul  ��� Audio Reflex  ��� Sankyo  ��� Wharfdale  ��� Wharfdale and Leak Speakers  ��� Introducing Kenwood Stereo*  ���tNnwMWlMMMnMM  MB REPORTS: The last in a series of five.  Wekproid  of our  einBC.  It is the nature of the forest industry that,  to a large extent, we live where we work.  At MB we believe that as good citizens we  should help enhance the quality of life in  the province. MB Place, our forest  information centre at VanDusen Garden  in Vancouver is our gift to the people of  B.C., our contribution to a better  understanding of the forest resource.  ~K JTT_% Place attracts thousands of  i-VLXD people every year. Many  schools use it as a teaching facility.  Other visitors find it a source of  delight, mystery and information.  The centre is one example of our  commitment to British Columbia,  but there are others. The company  contributes to education, through  bursaries and scholarships, helps the  arts, sports, and charitable organiza  tions. At MB we have a simple  philosophy that helps guide us  in assisting a variety of causes  "Will this improve the well-  being of people in the community,  in the province?" It is a philosophy  you can expect from this independent  B.C. enterprise. We are committed  particularly to the communities in  which we operate. Our people who  live there devote a lot of time to  community affairs. The company  helps too, by providing funds for  local projects.  MB operations in the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island are  tangible evidence of the company's  presence in British Columbia, but  there's more to a company than mills,  plants and logging shows. There are  the people, and from their skills and  efforts flow many benefits, including  thriving communities, social services, taxes and purchasing power.  When all of these are combined with  MB's commitment to worthy causes  it strengthens and enhances the  quality of life in the province.  MacMillan Bloedel has a place in  B.C., and our roots are right here.  leA   __tR  If you would like more information about  MacMillan Bloedel, we'll be happy to  send you some material. Write to MB  REPORTS, 1075 West Georgia  Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 3R9.  MACMILLAN BLOEDEL  m_____m Coast News, May 22,1979.  THE LOOK OF WORLD LEADERSHIP  For Family Month  Children are human  by Valerie Joe  dahnsan  OUTBOARDS  TRAIL BAY SPORTS  SECHELT-  885-2512  GIBSONS -  886-8020  The Sunshine Coast Chapter of the B.C. Council for  the Family has invited comments about the family from  members of this community.  This is the third of a series  of weekly articles to focus on  May as family month.  Further opinions about aspects of the family would be  welcomed through letters to  the editor.  As adults we often demand  respect from kids but we are  often unwilling to return their  respect. Grown-ups sometimes fail to consider their  children as human beings, but  rather as objects that they  own. A child has the right to  be an individual. Children  are expected to change their  attitudes and faults, but  parents become hostile when  asked to change theirs.  These are a few comments  expressed by people in this  area: "Sometimes parents  are unkind because they tell  me not to drink and smoke  but they can drink and  smoke." (Age 12). Parents  usually find that they can  give advice but they never  take their own advice.  "I wish you'd stop getting  mad" (Age 9). Adults never  expect anyone to yell and  scream at them for their  mistakes, but they like to be  told about them constructively.  "I wish my dad was nicer  to me and my brother, he's  mean to us." (Age 9). "I  would like my parents to take  us with them more often,  instead of leaving us home.  Then to make it up to us they  spoil us." (Age 12). "I wish  my mother would be nicer to  me when I'm late." (Age 9).  "My parents have a party at  our house, then I have to clean  it up." (Age 9). These are  young people with feelings  and their feelings are not  respected by adults. It's as  if to say that they shouldn't  have feelings because they are  too little to feel.  "Phoning me wherever  I am, and when I'm home,  she's out." (Age 14). "Telling  me not to drink because it's  bad for me." (Age IS).  Becoming more aware of  our mistakes as adults rather  than being aware of our  children's mistakes will make  families grow together in  respect and understanding.  If an adult were to speak to  another adult, they listen to  each other, that's communication and it's paying one  another the courtesy of  listening. Giving children  this same courtesy will often  make your child a responsible  person as an adult. In most  cases where a teen-ager  has become a problem, it's  because the adults have  never taken time to listen to  them as they were growing  up.  "My  parents  never  told  me they loved me or showed  me affection." (Adult). "My  mother used to promise me  that on holidays she'd help us  do special things at home but  would never carry out het  promise." (Adult).  When you think of things  that your parents used to do  wrong don't you find yourself  getting a little bitter towards  them? If adults could sit  down and think of mistakes  their parents made they might  become more understanding  and aware of the mistakes  they are making as parents.  Adults must always remember  that: "Children Learn What  They Live," so let's make it a  good life for them and for us.  *? i. -  Dramatic action during the baseball game between Weldwood and Cedars Inn  teams last Sunday. Despite the dramatic dive the Cedars Inn's runner was tagged  out.  Some impressions from overseas  By Allan Crane  I met John Hyde at a place in  Liverpool known as "Paddy's  Market", a flea market in  the real sense of the word.  Throughout the week, it  was a market, indoor and  outdoor for wholesale fruit  and vegetables. On Satuiday  afternoon, the outdoor section  was crammed with vendors  who brought their wares in  various ways: in vans, in  prams, in taxis, by horse and  cart they came from near  and far - gypsies, tinkers,  junk collectors, dealers. A  motley crew indeed.  885-9666  SWANSON'S  Ready-Mix Ltd.  Quality Concrete  9    Excavating Ltd.    O  Excavating Ltd.  Wharl Road, Box 172  Sechell, B.C.  Septic Systems  Excavations  Drainfields  885-5333  L & H SWANSON Ltd,  Sand-Gravel      Dump Trucks  Gibsons Ready Mix  WORKING  IN THE COMMUNITY  886-9412  *Drainrock   *Road Mulch  ���Sand *Washed Rock  *Fill ��NavyJack  Monday���Friday  8a.m.��� 5 p.m.  ��� ������������������������a ���*���*���*�� ���������"���*   ���  Last call for  WHITE PAGE LISTINGS  SUNSHINE COAST  DIRECTORY  This action sailing shot was taken by Anna Vaughan  aboard her father, David Vaughan's boat  STIXSTOBER enroute to a second place finish overall in the recent race around White Island. The  Stlxstober with Its Gibsons crew is ready for the  Swiftsure race this weekend.  HERE'S YOUR LAST CHANCE TO CHECK YOUR  LISTING FOR THE NEW TELEPHONE DIRECTORY!  THE YELLOW PAGES SECTION has already closed.  THE ALPHABETICAL (While Pages) SECTION is closing NOW.  So, please check your listing right away ��� and call us if you wish to make  any changes.  Have you thought of listing other members of your family?  Adding the names and positions of key employees ��� or other firms you  represenl?  CHARGES APPLY FOR CHANGES AND EXTRA LISTINGS.  FOR INFORMATION CALL OUR BUSINESS OFFICE.  B.C.TEL<d  Like me, John was looking  for old gramophone records.  "A rival," I thought, but we  got to know one another and  it transpired that his collecting tastes differed from mine.  He was mostly interested in  English singers singing the  best of Boosey and Hawkes  ballads, Victorian ballads and  Roger Quilter. My own preference was for records of  opera and concert singers  singing lieder and opera most  of which was not sung in  English. And so we became  symbiotic collectors, and  friends.  John Hyde was born in that  jewel of English cities,  Chester, and he attended  the* Cathedral school there  which laid the foundation for  his skill in and interest in  music. (He is a fine pianist  and accompanist.) He is  liberally educated and has  wide ranging interests. I  met him in 1964. Since coming  to Canada in 1967, I have  corresponded with him regularly, and when I have had  holidays in Britain, I have  visited him. Many splendid  letters have crossed the water,  and I have kept them all  including carbon copies of  the ones (or most of them)  which I have sent to him.  Since'I have recently been  writing and reporting for  the Coast News, I sent him  a number of copies, and I  would like' to share with readers the thoughts from abroad  with regard to our little newspaper.  "What struck me straight  away was how truly rural  (remember Ronald Frankeau's  record, or was it Bernard  Miles) your community is.  All the talk about bears,  cougars, fish and fowl, not  forgetting the poachers and  the Red Indians and the theft  of outboard engines) It all  reeks of fresh air."  I learned from John one of  my favourite sayings, the  defiant cry of the sufferer  who refuses to succumb to  Fate's Discourtesy ��� "Dum  spiro, sperol While I breathe,  I hope." In the letter most  recently received from him,  he writes further of the Coast  News in connection with a  festival of Woody Allen  films he saw in the company  of a lady friend. "Bananas  contained good ideas but  was rather patchy. I read your  comments in the News with  interest. Incidentally, enjoyed  George Matthews. Now  there's a talent worthy of a  greater circulation. Up to  'Guardian' standards, I  think."  These unsolicited comments  _iJ , -.. ,       .- ...-..,-. u..aw,ivaaa.u -.uaiaiiicills  your articles. Thought them from an educated and  cul-  splendidly  written,  informs- tivated Englishman speak for  tive and free from cant. Well themselves. Knowing whence  done. Have also enjoyed the they come, I regard them as  'Slings and Arrows' article by high praise indeed.  In your garden  By Sandy Loam  For the Lazy Gardener.  To spend a little time with  the aristocratic rose is sometimes rewarding and often  upsetting. Like most aristocrats, the rose is persnickitty,  subject to strange fungi  and diseases. In general the  rose is a nuisance bat what  is lovelier than a long single  rose? Thirteen long yellow  roses? So, in spite of mould,  sucking insects, dreaded black  spot and general malaise,  most of us try for a few  roses..,if only to keep the bugs  off our other plants.  When buying a new rose  do not buy one that has plenty  of greenery showing. This  does not mean the rose is'  healthy or vigorous, it simply  means it has been stored in  too warm a place. Look at the  graft (see diagram) and pick  a round plump well waxed  graft. See that your plant has  two or three thick stalks  and no skinny stragglers.  Look for fat red buds on the  thick, short branches. Name  brands help. Madam Henri  Goulot has a lovely shiny leaf,  seems disease resistant and  produces that much desired  long bud in a flaming deep  coral. Golden showers is a  hardy pillar rose. Don't  spend too much money unless  you can find an old fashioned  single rose (not wild). Then  do plant as shown in diagram;  and plan to spend some time  in prayer as roses are fussy  and inconstant. They are prey  to everything the philistine  world of insect and weather  may throw at them. They may  also be loftily ignored and  produce a magnificent display. Toss in a couple and retain your philosophy. Dogs arc  prone to editorializing on  roses. Sometimes)! agree with  the pups, sometimes I don't.  Some roses are worth the  effort as are some aristocrats.  Always ask the advice of your  supplierl Supermarket roses  are a good buy only if they  have not been neglected in too  warm a storage area. Good  luck.  Deserted Bay  flow own  For Mechanical Service Work  ���   TUNE-UPS  J  ���    ELECTRICAL REPAIRS  ���    BRAKE WORK  ���   OIL A LUBE JOBS  ���   EXHAUST WORK  ���    VALVE GRINDS     ^^^^^^  ���    TRANSMISSION WORK  ���   VW SERVICE WORK  We're pleased to announce that  Herman Vandeberg has joined our Service Department  ^^   ^vjtpr Appointments call 885*3211  COPPINGS CAR TOWN SALES LTD.  Across from Sechelt Legion"        Wharf Street, Sechelt, B.C.  Car Sales, Trucks & Vans M.D.L. 5936  By Rob Graham  This week was a very hectic  one. It started on Monday with  the arrival of Mr. John Denley  District Superintendent of  the Schools. He took a tour of  the camp and later met with  the students. Then on Monday  night Leonard Silvey and Jon  Van Arsdell came up on  Leonard's Seine boat. With  special permission we made  a herring set early Tuesday  morning. Everything went  very smoothly until we hauled  in the net and the purse line  broke so we lost the whole  set but it was a very good  experience.  Later in the day Mr. Barry  Boulton and Mr. Tom Rothney  both principals of local schools  came up for our course  selections. They picked a good  day because by about three  ���t was almost 80 degrees  farenheit. We all selected our  courses and 1 got a vicious  sunburn.  On the early morning of  Wednesday Clarence Joe and  Lawrence Jackson arrived.  Lawrence came to show us  how to dig for the special  cedar roots needed for  weaving cedar baskets. By  the time we had collected  the roots, it.was time for all  our gests to go home, including Mr. Roily Hawes  from Chatelech, who came  late.  Then things kind of slowed  down a bit and so did the  weather. But we had a great  week thanks to all the guests  and invaluable resource  people;        Mr. Denley,  Mr. Boulton, Mr. Rothney,  Mr. Hawes, Jon Van Arsdeil,  Clarence Joe, Leonard Silvey  and to Lawrence Jackson and  special thanks to Seehelt Book  and Stationary for thc box of  books they sent up.  PENINSULA  MARKET  885-9721   Davis Bay, B.C.  tide tables   7  Reference:  Point Atkinson  Wed.May23.  0240 14.9  0940 3.9  163S 13.4  2135 9.3  non-May 24.  0320 14.7  1025 3.0  1720 14.2    2240 9.7  ��� Groceries ��� Fishing Tackle  ��� Sundries* Timex Watches  Pacific  Standard Time  ft). May 25.  0350 14.4  1055 2.5  1805 14.8  2325 10.0  Sat.May.16.  0435 13.9  U40 2.2  1850 15.1  Open 9���9  ' Days a Week  Sun.May27.  0015 10.2  0515 13.5  1205 2.3  1930 15.2  Mon.MayM.  0110 10.3  ,0550 13.0  1255 2.6  2025 15.2  Tuei.May 29.  0155 10.4  0620 12.5  1325 J.2  2105 15.1 Guides need help  Coaat Newt, May 22,1979.  9.  By Gloria Fyle.  There was also moto-cross action at the opening of Timber Days.  I recently had the opportunity of attending the Annual  Provincial Conference of the  Girl Guides of Canada at  U.B.C. The main discussions  and workshops pertained to  the new age grouping to be  implemented during the coming year. A completely new  programme has been designed to cover Brownies from  6-9, Guides from 9-12, Pathfinders from 12-15 and Rangers from 15-18. It Is a new  concept and a very exciting  one, giving girls of all ages  new challenges. There will  be more choices for a girl In  Brownies working towards  her Golden Hand and Interest  badges have been'adapted to  suit each age group.  We had various speakers  at the conference, mainly to  do with the benefits of change  but one in particular, a Detective from the Vancouver  Police force, spoke of the invaluable service volunteer  groups such as Girl Guides,  did towards keeping young  people on the straight and  narrow snd even caring  enough to take girls and boys  that already were running  slightly afoul of the law and  turning them into responsible,  resourceful, happy members  of our society. As gratifying  as this might be to those of  us who work with Girl Guides,  I can't help but wonder, de we  really care, or mote important,  does the pabHc really caret  At this moment in time, I  am doubtful.  This past season we have  worked with dose to 80 girls  with 7 volunteer Guiders.  Next season we aire looking  st an Increased enrollment  through a waiting list of 7  year olds, acceptability  of 6 year olds and a great  Pathfinder programme which  will bring in girls not previously in Guiding plus the  fact that girls hopefully will  not leave Brownies or Guides  because of the new, exciting  and challenging programme.  To take these girls, we need  help, help that has not been  forthcoming although I have  stressed this need both to  Guiding mothers and those  outside of Guiding. We also  need a District Commissioner,  five years being the time  allotted to hold this position,  to hold Elphinstone District  together, to look after the  paper work and finances and  to make sure that the Gui  ders and girls are well informed and happy.  We know we have many  working mothers, mothers  with younger children at home  and other viable reasons why  they cannot or will not help  out once a week. If this is  true, where do we go for  help? Where do we find those  who care enough about our  young people to give of their  time so those of us who  already care are not over  burdened? I don't know.  Would someone please give  me the answer.  All enquiries should be directed to Gloria Fyles, District Commissioner, Elphinstone 886-7714.  ACCOMMODATION  BIG MAPLE  MoAjf  , un Hwy ,  k #101   I  4 km south of Sechelt  L HOUSEKEEPING UNITS J  Sandy beach  400 metres  Colour TV Cabli  olf Course nearby!  Skm 23  itonniEBROOk  LODGE  Ocean Beach Esplanade  Gower Point Road  Gibsons, B.C.  Enjoy home-cooked meals in  cozy dining room overlooking  the private beach.  Skm 9  886-9033  Cozm      Court  rUl  Inlet Avenue  Centre of Sechelt  ���k 17 modern units  it Kitchen units V. ColourT.V  it Wall to wall carpeting  Cloae to shopping a tithing  885-9314 Owner-Operator  Skm 27        Cliff & Liz Lindsey  y>  Ole's    Cove,  HattnoonBay.B.C  it Excellent dining facilities  it Heated swimming pool  it Sauna  it Cocktail lounge  Under New Management  Skm48      Tel: 8.95-2232  Duncan  Cove  Resort  "follow signs on  Sinclair Bay Road"  Garden Bay, B.C.  Cottages Motel Unite Trailer  Sites Laundromat Beat and  Tackle Rentals Ramp Moorage  Propane SanltaiyDump  Skm 74 883-2424  To the scenic  v   \_y  SUNSHINE COAST:  *"' PUBLIC HOUSE  Miss  Sunny's  Hair  Boutique  Pander Harbour  Centre  In Madeira Park  883-2715  24 hrs.  !   oh.,,        Glbsons.B.C;  : ��o��y skms V0Nwo :  PENDER HARBOUR  REALTY LTD.  JOCKHERMON,  JOHN BREEN  REAL ESTATE  ��� INSURANCE  Box 190, Madeira Park  (On Hwy 101 f  Francis Peninsula Rd.  SkmS1  883-2794  your hospitality directory  "'"automotive"" "'  *BLUE SKY MOTEL*  "On the waterfront at  Davis Bay"  Overlooking  Georgia   Strait  and the Islands  SLEEPING 4 HOUSEKEEPING UNITS  Colour CablevMon A  Complimentary Coffee  skm 24 885-9987  Utatora  .HONDA  Skm  $artg  24885-9466  RESTAURANTS  [Jiggers  PK>ost  I \estaurant  /fl Ihe Pender Harbour Hotel-  Madeira Park  Open: Monday - Saturday  7.30a.m.-10p.m.  Sundays    10 a.m.-9 p.m  I Reservations Recommended i  Skm 63        883-9311  mSunnucie.it  Jliototjfotd  Hwy. #101,  Upper Gibsons  Sleeping a Housekeeping  Units  Individual tubs It showers  Colour Cablevision  Close to new Shopping Mall  ��� Skms 886-9920  Edgewater  ��Aulo  SERVICE  Ltd.  At the traffic light  in Sechelt  COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE  SERVICE  7:00a.m.���9:00 p.m.  7 days a week  Skm 27.2 88S-2812  GIBSONS SHELL  SERVICE  ���  Downtown Gltnoni  Monday thru Saturday  B a.m.���8 p.m.  Sunday: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.  Gerieral Service  Skms 886-2672  GIBSONS MOTORS  LTD.  Shaw Road, across from  Sunnycrest Mali  TOTAL MECHANICAL  REPAIR  for all Model  Cars & Trucks  Ope.  Mon.���PH. I am.���3 p.i  SkmS  ta.mim  I. 8 ��.���.���5 p.��.  MfcMlj I  ISISISSSSSIII  %���������������������������������������������������������������  GIFTS  3fnn  MON-SAT  NEIGHBOURHOOD  PUBLIC HOUSE  Across Irom Sunnycrest Mall  skmsolbMM 886-9815  Madeira  Marina  MARINAS & RECREATION  ��� ������������������^���������������������������������tv  MdRTmez^  RCSTdURMIT  "On the waterfront!  at Davis Bay  Open 7 days a week  Specializing In Spanish  Paella and Seafood  fully licensed premises*  PLEASE PHONE FOR  RESERVATIONS  Skm 24 885-2911  anoys  famWy  rzestaunant  'Uptown Plaza'  Caleand  Dining Room  Breakfasts,  au.      ��� ���*.. Lunches, Dinners.  "Specializing in Greek Food"  SkmS   <��������; 5:30 p.m.)  open 7 days a weak  a llconted promises ���>  rcam.  THE HERON  GOOD_WHOLESOME  FOOD  7-5  7 days a weak  Home Made  Soups, Salads, ate.  OUR PIES ARE  DELICIOUS  Gower Pt. Road  Gibsons Harbour  Skm 5  '   CENTRE  HARDWARE  AND GIFTS  883-9914  ��� Fulling Tackle  w Housewares, Giftwares  ��� Hardware, frtCL  ��� Small Appliances J*?  w Pop Shoppe        $$])  PeaderHarixw Centre  Skm 62     in Madeira Park  |fe Helen's  <* Fashion  Tg    Shoppe  Gifts & Souvenirs  Everything for  the Ladles  &  uccaneer  Marina  Secret Cove, B.C.  JERVIS  PRINCESS LOUISA  DAY CRUISE tun. and Than  (July and August)  2���4 hour scenic cruises  available other days In surrounding area.  Skm si 885-9563  the Pender Harbour  Fisherman's Resort  & Marina  Garden Bay, B.C.  BOAT RENTALS  9H.P.-5SH.P.  Bait, Ramp, Moorage, Waterfront cabins, and R.V.Sites  883-2336  Skm 72  MARINE SALES  & SERVICE  OMC, Evinrude, Volvo,  Honda, Chrysler, Mercruiser  Housekeeping Units,  Campsites, FlsUng Tackle,  Party A Block Ice.  Madeira Park, B.C.  Skm 62 883-2266  Pen-Ga  Marina  & Shipyards  Full Marina Service ft Engine  Repair to all Makes  Diving-Moorage-MarineWays  883-2535  5��S3ffe  CCNe  Moorage���    ioosiipb  ���Permanent & Transient  Block & Party Ice  Peaceful Quiet Setting  Skm 52 885-3529  |ALL SPORT  tdviaxina.  Your Outfitter  for  Fishing  Camping  Outdoor Supplies  Gibsons Harbour  skm.s  886-9303  Uo ,  [clILHH  ��� Housekeeping Cabins!  MERCURY SALES  AND SERVICE  Certified Mechanics  Marine Ways, Moorage,  launching Ramp  SllvorlinoBom  COHO MARINA RESORT  1883-2248  Skm 62  SiviiTTy's  Marina LtcI.  HENRY J. SMITH -OWNER  'Ice & Bait  ���Fishing Tackle  p.o! box 96     886-7711  GIBSONS, B.C. VON 1V0  CAMPING  65 C.S. ��� some on beach  Full Faculties  HORSE RIDING  By Reservation  Instruction & Supervised  Trail Rides  * BONNIEBROOK*  CAMP & TRAILER  c   o        PARK  Skm 9  Gower Point  886-2887   * 686-9033  Irvines Landing  Marina  Pender Harbour   \~*,/^i  Marine gas. bait, ;��^��^  tackle, moorage  boat rentals, launching ramp  ice, campground facilities  Waterfront Restaurant  ���licensed Premises'  883-2296  i  886-PMl        8SS-9222����      __fW*  ctilMM&WMUniFnd  Lower Gibsons  Tues.-Thurs.  11:30 a.m.-9 p.m,  Fri, & Sat.  11:30a.m. ��� 10p.m.  Sun. 11:30 a.m.-9p.m.  Take Out Available  Skms 886-9219  The Estuary  Ocean Beach Esplanade  Gower Point  Artist's Studio  For Viewing phone i  886-2681  Follow Gower Pt. Rd. west  Skm 9  to the creek mouth  "POST  CARDS  * Tourist  Information .  * Complete  Selection of Books  skms       886-9711  SUPPLIES  Wharf St. Sechelt, B.C.  CHINESE &   Cbeed  CANADIAN   t��s.  CUISINE  Skm27.2        665-2511  Canadian propane  gas & oil ltd.  I��rvm Wort on AIIOM Awn Know  vOfltpste)witefesesinaT eiQtf  mthwaanm       WMnraorym  m**"*" (CANADIAN!  n>Hi I II I  Full Snoot S.V.Awltom  ���  Porpoise Bay Rd.    S85-2360  AC RENTALS  & BUILDING  SUPPLIES  Highway 101 ���  Francis Peninsula  Rentals,      vSy  Garden Contrary  & Building Supplies  skm 61  883-2585  I.G.A.��    ^arictp  Jfoob*  Fresh Meats and  Produce  Open Mon.-Sat.,  9-6  Pender Harbour  Centre  In Madeira Park  Slimes   HEALTH FOOD  and DELICATESSEN  Snacks In the Sun  Just Past  Ken's Lucky Dollar  Qlbsons  8km.s       886-2936  THE COMPLETE FOOD  STORE  KENS  Gibsons, B.C.  Open 7 days a week  ��� Fresh bakery products  I'runi our bakery  ��� Fresh mid cooked meals  ��� Finest fresh produce  ��� Ki'. pop. icecream.  and dairy products  7<fy��*'��t  Garden Bay Store,  Ice-Propane-Frozen Bait  Groceries-Meat-Produce  Chevron gu, oil A supplies  Open 7 days a week  8 a.m.-Midnight  883-2253  KEN'S     Gibsons, B.C.  ��� Large selections  ol'groceries  and import foods  ��� Non-food sect htu  includes camper items  STORE HOURS  9 a.m. to 6 p.m.  Friday lo 7 p.m.  Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m,  "It will pay you to stop  SkmS and shop with us."  ��� I 10. Coast News, May 22,1979.  Delegates to Rupert Conference  The  Sechelt  Indian  Band Councillors   for   the   Band,  took part in the Aboriginal Anne Quinn and Stan  Joe  Council of B.C. Conference attended on behalf of the Band  at Prince Rupert, B.C. on the together with Clarence Joe Sr.  18th, 19th and 20th of May. It   is   proposed   that   an  SUMMER HOURS  goto car  I CHINESE & CANADIAN CUISINE  Monday 4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.  Closed Tuesday  Wednesday, Thursday Sr Sunday  11:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m.  Friday & Saturday 11:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.  Wharf St. Sechelt, B.C.  ���>      m  m  >���^^fcl^^fc^Sfc  Church Services  Roman Catholic Services  Ke\ .T.Nicholson. Pastor  Times of Sunday Mass:  8:0(1 p.m. Saturday and 12 Noon  Sunday al Sl.Mary's Gibsons  III Sechell:'1:00 u.m.Our Lady of  Lourdes Church, Indian Reserve  10:00a.m. Holy Family Church  885-9526  GIBSONS PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  Highwat .V Martin  Sunday School 9:*I5  Morning Worship 11:00  Evening Fellowship 7:00  Bible Study Wednesday    7:30  PiislorTci Boodle  886-7lll7iii 886-9482  vAlliliiikv uiilillic  Penleeoslal \ssemblies of  Canada  UNITED CHURCH  9:30 a.m. ��� St.John's  Davis Bay  11:15a.m. -Gibsons  88(i.23J3  SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST  CHURCH  Sabballi School Sol.. 10 a.m  Hour of Worship Sal.. II a.m.  St.John's United Church  Davis Bay  Pastor C.Drieberg  Everyone Welcome  For information phone:  885-9750 or  ��� 883-2736  GLAD TIDINGS TABERNACLE  Gower Point Road  Phone 886-2660  Sunday School ��� 9:45a.ni.  Worship Service -11:00a.m.  Revival ��� 7:00 p.m.  Bible Study  Wed. 7:30 p.m.  Pastor Nancy Dykes"  Aboriginal Council of B.C.  be formed from the 25 tribal  groups as well as the major  Indian Organizations in the  province. Indian Organizations sending representatives to the Aboriginal Council  Conference are the Alliance  of Indian Bands (of which the  Sechelt Band is a member)  United Native Nations,  the Native Brotherhood of  B.C. and the Union of  B.C. Indian Chiefs. The Aboriginal Council of B.C. would be  comprised of 33 native Indian  People each representing a  tribal group or a political  organization.  It is also proposed that the  Aboriginal Council of B.C.  be registered as a legal society  in order to ensure proper  accounting   procedures  It is anticipated that the  basic educational and organizational work will take place  over the first year. This proposal is only for the first two  years of a process which  may well take five to ten  years to complete. It is proposed that the Federal Government provide 50% of  funding requirements, the  Province 30% and the Native  Indian People the remainder.  Funding would not be to fund  another bureaucracy, rather,  it would be used to do a  necessary job that is long  overdue.  Indian People in B.C. are  an important part of the  makeup of this country.  We always want to be, but  in our present state we may  be prevented from taking  our rightful place. This  proposal presents a plan  whereby we as Native People  can improve our present standing with the cooperation  and assistance of the Federal  and Provincial governments.  The success of this proposal  will not only bring us all  closer to resolving the Aboriginal Rights question but it  will lay the foundation for  education, awareness and  organization upon which  Native People can build their  new place in B.C. and Canadian Society,  Band Jamboree  That's Dan McGrew pitched on his head stage left while the Lady who's known as  Lou bends over the man from the creeks. "The Schooling of Dan McGrew" was  part of the excellent Variety night at Pender Harbour last Friday.  'Sunday loggers9 danger  'Sunday loggers" are  making their annual spring  assault on B.C. Hydro's  powerlines.  In the most serious incident  this year to date, a tall tree  was felled against a half  million volt transmission line  near Langley.  There was a spectacular  flash as the current shorted  through the tree to the ground  and started small fires in dry  grass and shrubs. A circuit  breaker tripped immediately  and shut off the power before  it could either burn through  the wire or set the whole tree  ablaze.  The logger and his helper  were alerted by the first  crackling sound and jumped  clear. They could have been  electrocuted. In this instance  service to Hydro customers  was not interrupted as other  transmission lines took over  the load, and the tree was  removed by Hydro linemen  later in the day.  But in other incidents amateur woodmen have been injured and power outages have  affected large numbers of  customers.  Sunday loggers are usually  taking down unwanted trees  on their own property, and  either fail to consider the  proximity of power wires,  or feel competent to do the  job safely.  They probably do not remember that Hydro will  provide professional assistance - normally at no charge.  "For their own safety, we  ask people not to take down  trees around power lines by  themselve," advises Hydro's  Sechelt District Manager,  E. Hensch.  These are Hydro's policies  regarding trees near power  lines:  LT ��� tne appears hi  danger of falling or being  blown onto a power line,  Hydra will take It down at  no charge.  tf an owner wishes to take  down a healthy tree near a  power line Hydra will provide  a lineman to stand by if reasonable notice Is given.  Then will be no charge daring  normal working hoars, bat  a charge will be made If this  service la required outside  regular working hours.  tf a tne b felled through a  power line with no lineman  standing by, fall cost of repairs Is charged.   5 A AN  SUNNYCREST  SHOPPING CENTRE  GIBSONS  886-9413  SUPER SPECIAL    M  COOL CRISP  POLY COTTON  SUN DRESSES  'rlced so low you'll want more than  one! Featuring tie shoulders with  a super-fitting bodice, or the ever  popular peasant style tiered skirt.  Choose from a colorful assortment  of Summer prints. Sizes: S, M, L.  SAVE $1.80 Reg. $777  YOUR CHOICE 16.97  Thick n'Thirsty  JACQUARDBEACH  TOWELS  Attractive design, 100% cotton  just In time for at home or the  beach - buy several at this low,  low price.  30x60  Save $2.00  Reg. $6.88  $4.88  BOYS BLUE DENIM JEAN  EMBROIDERED POCKETS  Special purchase of Blue denims  with a variety of embroidered  pockets. Sizes: 8-18.  Reg. $6.99  SAVE $1.99 $5.00  LADIES' BLOUSES  Just in time for Summer. Polyester  cotton blouses have the latest  DISCO" look In an assortment of  prints and pastel shades.  Sizes: S,M,L.  SAVE $1.33  Reg. $10.99  $9.66  GIRL'S  SHORTSET  Spun polyester athletic style with  contrast piping trim. Colors:  Red, Navy, White in sizes S,M,L.  Reg. $5.99  SAVE $1.02 $4.97  "BOYS'ACTION WEAR"  SWEATSHIRTS  All are heavy weight, 100%  acrylic knit with fleece lining In  Navy, Powder, Red and Beige  colors and styles suitable for boys  or girls, sizes: S,M,L,XL to fit 8 to  18 years. With full zipper front and  two pockets.    Hooded Jacket Style $9.97  Reg. $11.99 SAVE $2.02  Silky  LONG GOWN  Daintily styled with empire  elasticlzed waistline and neck.  Puffed sleeve, 100% acetate.  Colors: Pink and Blue.  Sizes: S, M, L.  Reg. $7.97  Save $1.00  $6.97  KIDDIES'SHORT SET  Athletic jogger style suitable for  boys or girls, tank style top end  Jogger style short. Blue, Red and  Green. Sizes: 2 to 6X.  Reg. $4.99  SAVE $1.02  $3.97  Men's Polyester  DRESS PANTS  100% polyester twill, styled with  2 front scoop pockets, single hook  & bar closure, french fly front. In  assorted shades of Navy, Brown,  Tan & Grey collectively. Sizes:  30 to 40.  Reg. $14.99  SAVE $2.02 ttt.-7  CASUALS  Men's and ladles' tough leather-  look vinyl moccasin styled casuals.  Stitched foam sole and heel.  Assorted colors.  Men'seizes 7-11 Ladles' sizes 6-10  Reg. $4.99 Reg. $4.29  Save 50* Save30��  $4.49 $3-99  GIRLS'  SLEEVELESS DRESS  A variety of styles, all sleeveless  In 100% polyester knit.  Sizes 2 to 6X.  Reg. $5.99    $3.97  GIRLS'SKIRT SET  Dainty feminine skirt with neat  pastel pattern and cool grown up  halter top. Sizes 4 to 8X.  Reg. $6.99 SAVE $1.99 $5.00  Men's Long Sleeve  WESTERN SHIRTS  Polyester/cotton woven check,  permanently pressed western  shirts featuring two-piece point  collar, 2-chest pockets, front dome  snap placket and tall bottom.  Choose from a large variety of  patterns. Sizes: small, medium,  large and extra large collectively.  Reg  SAVE $3.02  $11.99  $8.97  Disposal of felled trace k  the responsibility of owners.  The policies apply to trees  near the wires between Hydro's poles and a customer's  house as well as to the lines  on roads, streets and lanes.  "These procedures are provided primarily for the safety  of the public, as well as to  protect security or service to  customers," Hensch says.  "If they were fully observed,  much sorrow and inconvenience would be avoided.''  Ladies  softball  Roberts Creek Ladies Soft-  bail team will be hosting a  double knock-out softball  tournament In Hackett  Park on May 25,26, and 27.  The teams participating in  the tournament are Roberts  Creek, Gibsons Blues, Cedars  Inn, Sechelt Legion, and  Pender Harbour. To add to  the competition, three teams  from Powell River will be  attending.  Two games will be played  on Friday, May 25 starting at  6.45 p.m. On Saturday, May  26 games will start at  10.00 a.m. and continue  throughout the day, Sunday  games will also start at  10.00 a.m. with the final  games being played in the  afternoon.  Come out and support your  favourite team.  See you then.  The second annual Community Band Jamboree to  be held in the Pacific Northwest will take place in the Lad-  ner Anna, Sunday, June 3,  when ten bands are expected  to take part.  Sponsored by the Delta  Community Band Society, the  gathering of community bands  is being organized by Rob  Colquhoun, associate conductor of the Delta Community  Band and music director of the  South Delta Senior Secondary  School.  Seven bands from the Lower  Mainland and Fraser Valley  have been invited, along with  a band from Bellevue, Washington, and two bands from  Vancouver Island.  Over five hundred musicians will join in the massed  band numbers, which will  close the jamboree.  Each band will play a program of its own choosing and  after an intermission to rearrange seating, the bands  will be massed together to  play four selections.  Then will be no adjudication or criticism of any kind  given of the playing. The purpose of the jamboree is to let  amateur musicians hear other  community bands and to give  the public an opportunity  to enjoy an afternoon of band  music.  It is planned to make the  jamboree an annual event in  Delta Municipality, and it is  hoped that eventually community bands from all over British Columbia and the Pacific  Northwest can be included  in a two-day event.  Contact: Edgar Dunning,  946-6419.  Doubles  tournament  A Spring Doubles Tennis  Tournament is scheduled for  Saturday and Sunday, May 26  and 27. Events will include  Mixed Doubles, Ladies'  Doubles, and Men's Doubles.  Those interested in participating should register for  the tournament by 6.00 p.m.  Thursday, May 24, at Trail  Bay Sports in Sunnycrest  Mall, Gibsons.  as  Dick and Eve Oliver celebrated their 45th Wedding  Anniversary at Harmony Hall last week.  Roberts Creek Auxiliary  By Louise Doray  Roberts Creek Hospital  Auxiliary meeting was held  at 7 p.m. at St. Aidan's  Hall, Roberts Creek, with 23  members present.  President Pauline Lamb  opened the meeting by reading a poem. This wu followed by Marjorie Gibb,  secretary, reading the minutes  There were several delight-  fill knitted animals on display  for our Fall Bazaar. We are  really fortunate to have such  talented knitters.  We were reminded of the  Blood Donor Clinic for June  25th. Blood is urgently needed  so let's have a good turn out.  Gladys Ironside reported  the Thrift Shop's ten volun  teers worked 53 hours and  packed eleven boxes for the  Opportunity Rehabilitation  Workshop.  Bunny Shupe, Volunteer  Chairman, reported fourteen  workers had put in 50 hours  at the hospital.  We are pleased to have  Grace Cummlngs, Edith  Fraser and Jessie Naylor  back to our group. Welcome  to you all.  We are looking forward to  our Early Bird Boutique  November 10th with Gladys  Ironside convening, Jean  Carey has consented to look  after our Grand Raffle of  six beautiful prizes which  will be raffled off at 3 p.m.  November 10th.  There is a need for extra  hairdressers, so anyone  interested please call Bunny  Shupe 885-9264.  Sorry to hear that Bessie  Rowberry will be leaving our  Auxiliary the end of the month  Bessie has been a faithful  and valuable member of our  group for over ten years. She  is moving to North Vancouver.  Bessie was presented with  gifts of our appreciation.  We hope she enjoys her new  home.  Next meeting will be held  at St. Aidan's Hall, Roberts  Creed, B.C. June 11th at  7 p.m. Let's have a good turn  out. Everyone welcome.  MLWN AGT6 �����0Y  BBB-7199  Hwy. 101, Gibsons  We handle  I.C.B.C. claims Coast News, May 22,1979.  COAST NEWS CLASSIFIED ADS  11.  Classified Ad Policy  All listings 50* per Hue per week,  or use the Economical 3 for 2 rate  3 weeks for the price of 2  Minimum $2.00  per  Insertion.  All fen payable prior to Insertion.  This offer Is made available tor private bxUvlduk  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE  NOON SATURDAY  * In the event of an error the  publisher shall be responsible for  one corrected Insertion only.  ��� bee  Camlni Events  -Lost  Feud  Print yaw ad la th* aqaaraa lododlng tha price of the Hem and you telephone number. Be sure to have a Wank space after each word.  No phone orders Please. Jnat mall In the coupon below accompanied by cash, cheque  ot money order, to Coaat Newa, OaasHkda, Boa 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON IVO, or  bring hi person to the Coaat News office, Gibsons  DROPOFF POINT : Campbell's Shoes & Leather Goods Store, Sechelt  Coast News  Classifieds  Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.  VON1VO  CLASSIFICATION:  Eg. For Sale, For Rent, etc.  n::::::::::::::::i:::::: ::::  c::_: ::    : ::: :: :   birth/  Mike Danroth, your local Sunlife  representative is pleased to  sponsor this space for your  Birth Announcements. Phone the  Coast News for this free service  and a free Baby Book.  Announcing die birth of their new  baby boy Christopher Jordan,  born May 9, 1979, weighing  8 lbs. 4 m. Proud parents are Pat  (nee Hogue) and Harold Pratt.  Grandparents are Oscar and Bv  Hogue, and Howard and Maxlne  Pratt.  obHuorlt/  Feaaejri Frederick O'Neill,  passed away peacefully May 15 In  Chilliwack Hospital at 57 yean of  age. He leaves to mourn his  loss his wife Pearl, daughters  Penny Latham and husband,  Dave of Prince George, Patty  Hunter and husband Terry of  Prince George and Shannon at  home. 4 grandchildren, James,  Frederick and Sharonlee Latham,  and Kevin O'Neill and Eiynn  Lee Hunter. Mother Eileen of  Vancouver, sister June and BUI  Manson of Sqamish, Bill and  Shirley Feeny of Kamloops, Sally  and Susan Powell of North Vancouver. Memorial Service waa  held at Henderson's Funeral  Home Friday, May 18 at 1 p.m.  in Chilliwack, In lieu of flowers,  donations to the Canadian Cancer  Society for Research would be  appreciated by the family.  tofol  NOTICE TO  CREDITORS AND  OTHERS  RE: ESTATE OF LOUIS  HARRY ROBERTS  formerly of Nelson Island, B.C. who died at  Sechelt, In the Province  of British Columbia,  on the 4th day of April,  1979.  NOTICE IS HEREBY  GIVEN that Creditors  and others having claims  against the Estate of  Louis Harry Roberts,  are required to send  full particulars of such  claims to the Executor of  the Estate, care of the  address below listed,  on or before the 30th  day of July, 1979, after  which date the Executor  will distribute the said  estate amongst the  parties entitled thereto  having regard only to  the claims of which he  then had notice.  RICHARD L.ATKINS,  Executor,  500-475 Howe Street,  Vancouver, B.C.  V6C2B6  COWAN &. COMPANY,  Solicitors.  onnoimccmonl/       opportunist/        opportunities  _   The NEW  A HAMMOND  \t) ORGANS  ����� ARE HERE.  Demonstrations  886-7591  Get In on the fun I  Learn to play anything  In a couple ol hours on  tha new Hammond  Romanes Series. Fully  transistorised, one  linger full chords, aulo  rhythm, 8 voices,  Aulo walking baas etc.  ADAM McBRIDE  Is giving lessons on  the great NewiftsaBEd.  Organs. Learn to play  the easy, quick, fun way.  Phone 886-7591  5  DEADLINE SATURDAY NOON-  Sat. May 26 at 7.30 p.m. Sunday,  ln>y 27,11.00 a.m. & 7.00 p.m.  Evangelists Lee and Brian will  speak at Glad Tidings Tabernacle  Gibsons. Phone 886-2660. A  warm welcome to all. #21  WORKING PARTNER  required Immediately for this area.  Prefer someono with either painting  or carpentry experience. Mutt be  able to work well with labour type  help, and demand respect from same.  EXCELLENT INCOME  NO SELLING  $7,500 Investment or take trades.  Phone 339-4629  Plumbing Future*  . Hours:  Fri, & Sat  10a,m���5p.m.  Appolntm iitsanytime  Call 886-7621  Western Canada School  of Auctioneering Ltd.  Canada's first, and die only  completely Canadian course  offered anywhere. Licensed  under the Trade Schools  Licensing Act R.S.A., 1970  C.366. For particulars of the  next course write: Boi 687,  Lacombe, Alberta or phone  782-6215.  pti/onol  Non-profit organization seeks  individuals or groups Interested  in retailing provincial lottery  tickets. Mrs. Davidson, 2-2405  Cornwall, Vancouver, V6K 1B9.  121  Baha'i Faith. For information  write Box 404, Gibsons, or phone  886-2078. |2$  Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings.  For information call 886-9696  or 886-9904. Ir26  Coast Business Directory  ********* AUTOMOTIVE  *********  ECOIIOmy HUTO PRRT8 Ltd.  Automobile, Industrial  and Body Shop Supplies  Sechelt    88S-SI8I  jjgrgemen log Construction  Homes ��� Cabins ��� Outbuildings  No Job Too Small  For Free Estimate Phone 888-8050  ********* PLUMBINS **********  SEASIDE PLUMBING  PLUMBING-PIPEFITTING-STEAMFITTING  HOT WATER HEATING  686-7017  '  All Work Guaranteed j  need tires?                    .  Come in to                    if,  COASTAL TIRES      1  at the S-BENDS on Highway 101    ���  Phone 886-2700                ����  $��&^7  t��M^s Tom Flieger   Phone 886-7868  ^taJLECTRICAL  v3  Box 214, Gibsons, B.C.  ONTRACTING V0N ,v0  CARPET-CABINET-CERAMIC CENTRE  Open Thurs.. Fri.. Sat.  10a.m.���5p.m.  Howe Sound Distributors Ltd.  North Road, Gibsons, B.C. 886-2765  d^5fo iEurflpwn iKofara  " " We ���jpecialize in Volkswagen Repairs  flarts   885-9466  *honda*  and Electric Ltd.  BIN Achterberg  886-9232  ******** MISC. SERVICES W********  fa***** DRIFTWOOD CRAFTS * AND*****!  CRAFT SUPPLIES ^  SEWING NOTIONS  JEWELRY.  WOOL  ******* BUILDING SUPPLY ********  I^Tm  J rl - 1     Gonstt  i Panels, Insulation, Doors, Bifolds,  Construction Plywood, and all Accessories.  Delivery Phone 886-9221 Highway 101, Qlbsons  ' Cabinets.  SUNSHINE    KITCHENS  CABINETS���REMODELLING  Showroom in Twilight Theatre Bldg.        886-9411  \m.OPENSAT. 10-5 OR BY APPOINTMENT  ********* CARPENTRY ********  ANDREASBEN    ELECTRIC  (GIBSONS CO.I Serving the Sunshine Coast  ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR  Per Andreessen 886-9439  General Delivery Granthams Landing, B.C.  R.Qinn Electric  General Wiring &  Qualified Workmanship  RR��2 MARLENE RD.,  ROBERTS CREEK  ^Sunnycrest    Shopping    Centre. Gibsons    686-2525  885-5379  VILLA CONSTRUCTION  CUSTOM HOMES & ADDITIONS  Sat.���Sun.    PH: 885-3929       Weekly  All Day After 5 p.m.  /LAMBERT  ELECTRICAL  CONSTRUCTORS  LAMBERT ELECTRIC LTD  R.S.(BOB) LAMBERT  TOM MORRISON  RESIDENTIAL ��� COMMERCIAL  BUMJS-J151   RE8.SSS.7Ma  ���f  SOX 1160  GIBSONS. B.C.   VDN 1V0  MOVING ANDSTORAGE  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER Ltd.  Household Moving & Storage Complete Packing  Packing Materials lor Sale  Phone 88b-2664     Member Allied Van Lines     RR  I. Gibsons  ^20M GIBSONS LANES wpp *  LJi  Open Bowling Hours: Friday &*T&r>  Saturday   7p.m. to 11 p.m.  i JL.  and Sunday 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.  OJH*)  -Quality Form & Garden Supply Ltd. -  * Feed * Fencing     886-7527  im.  * Pet Food    * Fertilizer  Pratt Rd.  Gibsons  **********   EXCAVATING    *******  '    Free ^  PERMATRUSS FABRICATORS     Estimates  (Gibsons) Ltd. 886-7318  Located next to Windsor Plywood p.o. Box 748  Residential & Commerciai Rool Trusses Gibsons, B.Cy  J.B.EXCAVATING 886-9031  Water, sawer, drainage Installation  e Dump Truck ��� Backhoe  e Cat e Land Clearing  e Free Estimates ��� Septic Fields  Pickup &  Delivery  886-7742  886-2500  Cadre Construction Ltd.  Framing, remodelling, additions,)  HOUSES BUILT TO COMPLETION-  ^ Payne Road, Gibsons 886-2311  Stimuli ftereftmtmettt <dtd  mmwwm^ammamaTW      mtW %\mWmAwm^mmr^^m*WWmaMmvWW    mmmWWWWg}  EXCAVATING ��� LAND CLEARING  ROAD BUILDING GRAVEL  aggregates     886"9830  JOHN HIND-SMITH  REFRIGERATION & MAJOR APPLIANCE SERVICE  Port Mellon to Pender Harbour  Res. 686-9949  Gutters Phone: Eaves Troughs  CUSTOM CRAFT PRODUCTS  Commercial 885-2992       Maintenance  Residential ' Continuous  GIBSONS SAND & GRAVEL LTD  EXCAVATING - LAND CLEARING  ROAD BUILDING GRAVEL  Classified aggregates      883-9313  Concord Carpet Care  886-9351  CARPET & UPHOLSTERY  SAME DAY SERVICE    IGIBSONS-SECHELT-PENDER HARBOUR   ,  P. M. GORDON  I  B.C. LAND SURVEYOR  ;i    p.o. Box era  U     Sechell. S.C.                                        Sua. 885*23*32  i  H    von3a.o                                 Rt$.m-mt.  COAST INSULATION COMPANY  Ph. 886-9297  "INSULATION-INSTALLATION"  'FIBERGLASS BATTS" "BLOWN IN INSULATION'  Residential (New & Existing Houses) & Commercial  X  PACIFIC-O-FIBERQLASS  FIBERGLASS LAMINATING - REPAIRS  BOATS-SUNDECKS, ETC.  13 years experience        885-2981  C & S Construction  Fiberglass Sundecks S^iTiahinV  Daryll Starbuck                        Dennis Collins  WMi-ITW 88h*7IOO J  CUSTOM BACKHOE WORK  SEPTIC TANKS INSTALLED  Government Approved  Free Estimates  Excavations-Drainage Water lines etc  Ph 885*2921 Roberts   Creek  THOMAS HEATING  OIL BURNER-SERVICE  Complete Instrument 000"/ 111  Cadre Construction ltd.  Replacements and Storm Windows  Expertly Installed  Payne Road, Gibsons  866-2311  CERAMIC-QUARRY TILE- MOSAIC  RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL  RR#1 I I FPORF-TII P      JOHNLEPORE  Gibsons, B.C.       J.LCKWHC IILfc      ph()ne  VON 1V0 886-809/" .  "Serving  Langdale  to  Earls Cove";  Terry Connor  886-7040  PAINTING CONTRACTi  BtkMO, GltlOAi. B.C.  /^JN TRANSWEST HELICOPTERS fmk.  \mja) (1965) LTD.  >���' Charter Helicopter Service  Box 875 886-7511 Gibsons  T.V. SERVICE  Sunshine Coast T.V.  Mon. to Sat. 9:30-5:30 885-9816  Merv Volen  TREE TOPPING  VIEW DEVELOPMENTS LTO.  Clean up your wooded areas.  Remove lower limbs tor VIEW  Top tall trees adjacacent to building  886-9697  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon to Ole s Cove  885*9973 886-2938  Commercial Containers available  Custom Engine & Marine  MOBILE MARINE SERVICE  COMPLETE ENGINE REBUILDS  Kerry Drake  Mtii-2i)yt  Iku-tlTu  i,ii.*,***��. ur. i��.v n u       J -m-m��^wmm*wAmtmwaaaaamaaammmmmammmmmmmjm  mmmmmmmmmmmmmm  12.  Coast News, May 22,1979.  ���announcement/  Money Back Life  Insurance. Income  Protection. Mortgage  Payment. Retirement  Funds. Education  of Children.  Business Insurance.  Let me show you  how you can benefit.  Mike Danroth  Representative  P.O. Box 1220  Gibsons, B.C. VON 1VO  886-9408  Get your life in shape.  work uionled  Furniture     Refinishing:     Free  Estimates: Pick up & Delivery.  886-2650 after 5 tfn  Landscaping and Garden maintenance. Fruit Trees, ornamentals  pruned; hedges irimmed. Flower  gardens installed and maintained.  Rototllllng . Callafter5p.m.  886-9294 tfn  work wonted  for /ole  mobile homo/  for rent  for Explosive Requirements!  Dynamite, electric or regular  caps, B line E cord and safety  fuse. Contact Gwen Nlmmo,  Cemetery Road, Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound Farmer  Institute. tfti  PROFESSIONAL  DOG GROOMING  for small breeds.  Poodles a Specialty  Bathing, Grooming,  Nails & Ears  For Information:  Call Sharon 886-2084  TELEPHONE  ANSWERING  SERVICE  886-7311  Are you tired of searching a  ready-to-wear rack looking for  what you never find? Then  treat yourself to a made-to-  measure outfit, for men or  ladies. Speciality *��� formal  wear. Also alterations, designed and assembled by a  qualified European tailoress  (formerly of Hamburg Tailors  Inc., Germany). By appointment. 886-2415. tfn  PENINSULA  ROOFING  & SHEET METAL  All Types ol Roofing  8. Re-Rooling  Henry Rodriguez  Sechelt     885-9585  help wonted  help wonted  P.O.Box 1341,  Sechelt  CLAPP'S  CONCRETE  ��� Placing and finishing of  all types of concrete work  ��� old concrete broken out  and hauled away  ��� guaranteed results on  any concrete water  problems  885-2125  Wayne Clapp after 7 p.m.  Most trees, like pets, need care  and attention and trees are our  specialty.  * Topping  * Limbing  * Danger tree removal  An insured guaranteed service.  Peerieaa Tree Servlcea ltd.  885-2109  Journeyman Carpenter ��� finishing carpenter and cabinet maker.  If a quality job at a competitive  rate is what you are after, you'v-  found it, no job too big or small.  For a free estimate, call Ouy  Curwen, at 885-5328, eves.      tfti  We Do Housecleaning  Phone Joyce 886-9067 or Bonnie  886-9635. #23  Bedding  Plants  Vegetable  Plants  Hanging  Baskets  Fertilizers  OPEN  SUNDAYS  Through May  10a.m. - 4 p.m.  Quality  Farm & Garden  Supply Ltd.  th*************a*i  Bob Kelly Clean-Up  Basements ��� Yards ��� Garages  ��� Anything  Dumptruck for hire  7 davs a week  XW.-W.l Box 131.Gibsons  tfn  '*******:****** A* 61\  ���MWMWe������1  New console stereo with warranty, $200. Fridge, perfect  condition, $200, and 21 cu  ft freezer, $200. 886-7424  after 6 p.m. Ask for Al tfn  a���������������������  found  Part-Time Instructors  Instructors are needed for the  fall program in the following  areas:  Automotive Know How, Basic  Automotive Mechanics, Basic  Automotive Tune Up  Bartending  Cooking, Gourmet  Diesel Theory  Drapes & Bedspreads  Drawing  Fiberglassing  Furniture Refinishing  Guitar  Knots & Splices  Logscaling  Microwave Cooking  Office Machines  Oil Painting  PrurtlBlf-  '  Shorthand  Small Engine Repair  Speedreading  Speedwriting  Weaving  Winemaking  If you have other skills you would  like to share with others pleaae  let us know.  Before June 1:885-3512  Karin Hoemberg, Co-ordinator  Continuing Education  Box 6, Sechelt, B.C. VON 3X0*21  Planting a garden this spring?  Give us a call to have it tilled.  885-5328 eves. tfn  Puppy ��� He followed ua along  Seaview home. Two months or so  old. Two or so feet long. Blonde  mostly.886-9443.  ��1  nTusic Weavers  New* Used  Albums & Tapes  The Home of People's Prices  t,        886-9737       4  Experienced clerk for Sechelt  office. Good typing and bookkeeping skills essential. Friendly  co-operative manner in dealing  with the public necessary. Reply  to Postal Box 218, Sechelt, B.C.   tfti  Two child care workers needed  for Sept. 1,1979 for the Alternate  Schools in Gibsons & Pender  Harbour. Apply by June 4 to  Sunshine Coast Community  Services, Box 1069, Sechelt, B.C.  _^____ #22  Domestic help wanted for light  housekeeping 2 days per week.  Gibsons area. 886-2160. tfn  HELP WANTED: PIPELINE  AND NORTHERN JOBS. Earn  up to $3,000 month. Learn how  to secure these and other high  paying jobs throughout Canada.  Send long self-addressed  stamped envelope for details  regarding our services. LMES-10,  Box 7810 (Sta A), Edmonton,  Alberta, T5J3G6. tfn  MUSIC  LESSONS  YOU ENJOY  886-9030  Ggsie  Piano & Organ  Begin at age 4 and older  1614 Marine Drive, Gibsons  lo/l  WINDOW  CLEANING  Hourly or Contract  FREE ESTIMATES  885-5735 mornings  VILLAGE OF GIBSONS  NOTICE  SPRINKLING RESTRICTIONS  EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY SPRINKLING RESTRICTIONS ARE  IMPOSED ON ALL USERS FROM THE MUNICIPAL WATER SYSTEM  AS FOLLOWS:  1 * ODD NUMBERED properties on Highway #101, from Henry Road  to Bals Lane, Wyngaert Road, Martin Road, North Fletcher, Fairmont,  School Road, O'Shea, Abbs Road may sprinkle on:  Odd calendar dates from  6:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.  Also, ALL properties on North Road, Poplar Lane, Shaw and Davis  Roads may sprinkle on:  Odd calendar dates from  6:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.  2. Even numbered properties on Highway #101, (from Henry Road to  Bals Lane), Wyngaert Road, Martin Road, North Fletcher, Fairmont,  School Road, O'Shea and Abbs Road may sprinkle on:  Even Calendar dates from  6:00a.m. to 9:00a.m.  Also, all properties on Reed, Park, Henry, Hillcrest and Crucll  Roads may sprinkle on:  Even calendar dates from  6:00a.m. to9:00a.m.  3. Odd numbered properties In the Village not listed above may continue  to sprinkle on:  Odd calendar dates from  6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.  4. Even numbered properties in the Village not listed above may  continue to sprinkle on:  Even calendar dates from  6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.  5. Soaker (soaking) hoses are NOT permitted and the use of same  will be considered to be in direct contravention of the Village  of Gibsons Water Regulation By-law  6. Sprinkling is permitted from one (1) outlet only per carcel on  days of permitted useage.  ALL SPRINKLERS MUST BE TURNED OFF IF ANY FIRE SIREN IS SOUNDED  Ron Webber  SUPERINTENDENT OF WORKS.  Red 5-speed boy's bicycle.  Appollo make, no mudguards,  speedometer. Lost beside Twilight. No questions asked. Just  return itl #21  In Gibsons general area, pair  dark rimmed reading glasses.  Substantial reward. 886-9546. #21  P��\t  TreeWoik  Topping for sunlight, safety &  view. Jeff Collins 886-8225.    #22  Moving, hauling, cleanups,  rubbish removal. Gutters cleaned.  Also teen age boys want work  of any kind. 886-9503. #22  For hire 4 x 4 Pick-up with  12,000 Ib. winch. Light clearing  & logging, wood lots, etc. Small  jobs accepted.885-9750. tfn  To Be Given Away  One dog-Cross Shepherd/Collie  eight years old. Good home in  country required.984-0839 collect  ttn  C.M.H.C.Approved 14' and  Double Wide mobile homes  on sewered lots now available. 10'/i% interest. 25 yr.  mortgage, S% down on total  cost of home and lot. Down  Pmt. starts as low as $1,695.  NOW ON DISPLAY  NEW UNITS  3 MONTHS  FREE RENT  with purchase  24x48 Atco - 2 B.R. at den  2 full bathrooms, full lap  siding, 16* eaves, 3rd gable  roof. Tastefully decorated.  Used Units:  12x68 Manco - 2 B.R. Front  kitchen with patio doors.  All appliances. Fully carpeted.  Like new.  24x28 Statesman - 2 B.R. k  Den. All appliances.  197412x68 Safeway 3 bdrm.,  frig & propane stove, washer  & propane dryer. Utility room  with entrance. Front kitchen  with bay window. Good con*  dition.  1973 12 x 68 Safeway 3 bdrm.  frig & stove, washer St dryer.  Partially furnished.  SUNSHINE COAST  MOBILE HOME PARK  1 mile W of Gibsons.Hwy 101  Open 7 DAYS A WEEK  Ph. 886-9826  for /ole  3 wide trailer axles; 4 tires;  oil range. Good condition.  886-2762. #22  Double cement tubs. Excellent  condition. S50OBO. 886-7839.#21  wonted  You lust can't beat  Macleod's   prices  on  electrical  and  plumbing supplies.  See us in Sechelt.  Macleods  1' B.W, TV and stand. A.l.  shape $70 O.B.O. Sunbeam Elec.  Mower for parts S10.886-2644.#23  Dry Steer hides. Geo. Elander.  Shaw Rd. Gibsons. 886-2400 after  6.30 p.m. #23  Electric Stove $100. Fridge $100.  Liquor cabinet (complete with  plate glass mirrored back shelves  $75. Large 8 pc. set of dishes with  completer $50. Misc. household  articles. Swing set $20. (2 swings  & glider). 886-2512. #21  Coldspot fridge $30. Twin bed  $20. 4 speed GE stereo $25.  Upholstered chair $15. 885-3943.   #23  HO train aet in good cond.  4 engines, lots of track $150.  Pair of roller skates $15.885-9294  after 5 p.m. #23  Stereo - JVC 4 Channel amp.  4 Hart speakers. Audio reflex  turntable. $800 O.B.O. Phone  886-7235, #23  MMMMMMMMMN  ' Girl's  bike for  10  year  old.  886-9154. #22  Pair of full length bamboo drapes.  Phone 886-7238. #21  Small boat or dinghy ��� can repair  885-9750     tfe  LOGS WANTED  Top Prices Paid for  Fir-Hemlock-Cedar  LtK LUMBER  (North Shore) Ltd.  Phone 886-7033  Sorting grounds, Twin Creek  tfn  Macleod's Sechelt  for all your  garden needs:  fertilizers  poisons  herbicides etc.  MMMMHMHMMMMW  Wanted to Buy: Logs or Timber.  Fir, Hemlock, Cedar ��� Porpoise  Bay Logging Ltd. 885-9408 or  885-2032. tfn  Timber wanted: Fir. hemlock,  cedar and poles. Top prices.  Let us give you an estimate.  D&O Log Sorting Ltd. Phone  886-7896 or 886*7700. tfn  wonted to rcnl  Want to rent a house for the  1st of July? 3 or 4 bedrooms &  baaement or garage. Call after  6 p.m. 224-6630, Vane. #23  Working mother seeks small  house with yard preferably rural  area. Please phone Christel at  886-8361 or 886-2524. #22  Responsible couple seek cottage  or small house on Gower Point  Road (or other sunny location)  for year-round rental, or to buy.  Please call 886-2693 in the evenings.  mobile home/  Two mobile home sites near  beach. Free vegetable garden  plots if desired. "Bonniebrook"  886-2887. Sorry, no dogs.        tfn  Very clean responsible family  requires three bedroom house by  May 31. Excellent references.  Please phone 886-7237. #21  Must Sell!  1974 12'x68' 3 bdrm. Safeway.  All appliances. Good cond. Asking $ll,800.Phone 885-5444. #22  Furnished 50'xlO' mobile home.  Full price $5,500. One yearfree  On secluded pad on private  property. 886-2962. #21  Mobile home pads available.  Single and double-wide lots.  Sunshine Coast Trailer Park.  886-9826. tfn  tor rent  PRIME RETAIL SPACE  1.557 Gower Point Rd.  Professional Building  Also upstairs office space rental  Inquire      886-9250  FOR RENT  School Rd. & Gower  Point Rd.Presently  NOP quarters.Please  call collect 561-0995.  Willing to alter to customer's liking.      tfn.  MMMWMMMMMWMM  STORE FOR RENT  Lower Gibsons  Phone:  886-9941  ���������������������e���si  morlne  3 bedroom furnished 10x55 trailer  on rented pad with 2 decks.  Large fenced grassed yard with  fruit trees & veg. garden. Workshop, storage area & greenhouse.  Fridge, stove, washer, some  carpet & built-in shelves. Phone  886-9472 after May 16. #21  Trillium Travel Trailer with stove,  furnace, fridge, two gu bottles,  awning, spare wheel, $2,650.  886-9792. #21  H.T. Tent trailer "Kaplan".  Propane stove, sink, icebox,  plus awning, spare tire, 20 lb.  propane tank. Good condition.  Firm $900.886-2946 tfa  PUBLIC TRUSTEE  Estate Sale  . The Public Trustee as Administrator ��f the -estate of Frank  Townsend Lewis offers for sale  the following estate asset:  1970 Marietta Mobile Home  Registration No. 30414, located at  ; Pad 65, Sunshine Court Trailer  Park. Highway 101, R.R.#2  Gibsons, B.C.  Two-bedroom, 12' by 60' mobile  home, wood panel walls, carpet,  fake wood celling beams, double  sink, connected to water and  sewer. Wall furnace and 60 amp  fuse box. Monthly pad rental is  $78.00.  The property will be open for Inspection on Thursday, May 31/79  between the hours of 10.00 a.m.  & 4.00 p.m. Written offers for  this property will be received by  the undersigned up to 12.00  noon on Monday, 18 June/79.  No representations are made with  respect to the condition of or title  to the property. The highest  offer or any offer not necessarily  accepted. Cash preferred but  terms considered. Enquiries may  be directed to the Property  Department, office of the Public  Trustee, 685-2431, Local 16.   #22  oulomotlve  76 Maverick. 4 door. P.S. P.B.  6 eye. aut. AM-FM cassette.  34,000 miles. $3,200. 1754 Marine Crescent. #21  1973 Datsun P.U. Good running  condition, 4 extra tires and  wheels. $1,200 firm, 885-5530.#23  1969 /datsun 510 $275. Boat  Trailer $125. 5 ft. by 6 ft. Glass  $10. Want to buy older, small,  station wagon. 886-9503.       #21  73 Caprice Estate Wagon. Auto  P/S, P/B, air shocks, tilt wheel,  elect, windows & locks, radio,  trailer hitch with elect, brake  control, 886-9197. #23  Brand new Ford Pick-up. Box  never used. Phone 886-9192.  $600 O.B.O. #23  8 ft. OH camper, stove, icebox  good condition $1,500 O.B.O.  250 Suzuki Dirtbike needs work  carb. rebuilt $250. O.B.O. Phone  886-2647or886-233S. #23  1970 Ford V. ton Ranger XLT  dual tanks sliding rear window.  390 P.S. P.B. Good rubber.  $995 O.B.0.886-9154. #21  1975 Dodge 1 ton pick-up with  dual wheels 56,000 miles SZ995.  886-9154. #21  House for  Rent.  Main  floor.  2 bedrooms, fireplace, fenced  yard, carpeted, all cedar, In Bay  area. $250 per month. June 1.  Phone 886-9453, #23  1 bedroom back duplex behind  Mr. Mikes. 886-7277. #22  3 bdrm split level house. Very  nicely located. Available end of  May. $285 a month. PH.874-9574.   #22  2 bdrm duplex on North Rd.  VA Bath. Utility room, Garage  with storage. Available June 1.  $235 per month. Ph.886-7625  after 6 p.m. #22  Deluxe 6 room suites with deck.  S. Port Mellon Hwy. & Dunham  Rd. $300.886-9352. #21  Furnished  suite.   One  person.'  Non-smoker. $155 includes heat  & light. Very private. 886-2923.         #21  Madeira Park. 1 bdrm furnished  house. Wall to wall carpets,  fireplace. 738-5704. #21  2000 square feet upper floor office  Rent as is at $450.00 per month,  or we will renovate to suit. Heat  and parking included. Phone  885-3224 for appointment to view.       tfn  2 bdrm, duplex furnished. All  electric. Sony no children or pets.  $185 per month plus hydro.  Available June 1. Apply Sunshine  Coast Trailer Park. tfn  Newly decorated 2 and 3 bdrm  apts. Stove, fridge, heat and  cablevision incl. in reasonable  rent. Sorry, no pets. Close to  schools and shopping.  886-8058 *>  oulomotive  ^lauusuuuAsassagy  Miller  Marine Electronics  886-7918  Dccca Marine Radar  S&TVHF&SSB&   X  Universe CB        "  See Lorne or Lee \  Lower Gibsons, next to  Dogwood Cafe  SgggSggSggggggg  1969 MGB. Clean $1,695. 1969  Datsun Pick-Up $475. 1958  Buick limited edition. Classic.  Ready for restoration. Appraisal  & all papers available $1,990.  886-2888 or see Terry st the  Dogwood. #22  1961 Dodge 2 ton furniture van.  6 cyl. Good shape. $750. OBO,  886-2332. #22  74 Dodge van slant 6 std. CB  radio, tape. Partially camperized.  885-9551. #22  64 GMC half-ton stepslde 4x4  Body in rough shape but running.  Gear sound. Lots of parts. $550.  886-9004after5p.m, #21  '74 Chev. S400.886-8101,      #21  Low Cruise Travel Liner 16 ft  Holiday Trailer, sleeps 5, furnace, toilet, stove with oven,  carpeted. Like new. Ph. 886-7389.  #22  1973 Datsun 510 4 door automatic  new radials, radio, rear window  defog. ph. 886-9064. #21  14 ft. aluminum boat, as new  with oars and trailer. $750. OBO.  886-M24afterj>pjmAskforAI.  ^<*m**m��w*^mmmt+*\t\_Zm-%mt_r  Marine Multiple Listing Services  If you are having  difficulty selling  your boat and  would like the  benefit of 20  brokers working  for you call  Gary White  White cap  Yacjit Brokers  Seizing the>  ^JJundhineCoas1  iers  he\  loaslx  886-7434  Oil....-       *m   *  Gibsons  IAN MORROW if CO.  LTD. **��J  Marine Surveyors, Condition and jj  detail   surveys   for  Evaluation. 3  Surveys  for  insurance  claims. <  Phone 886-2433,886-9458. >  23'    Bayliner   diesel   engine.     J*  Skiff & kicker included. 886-9351.     <  #21     |  80 HP Evinrude  outboard  V4 j|.  needs electrical work. As is $50. : a  OBO. 15 gallon bow tank galva- J J  nised  $25.   12'   double hulled >  fiberglass   boat   $150.   OBO. >  886-7839 after 6 p.m.             #21 ;J  18 ft. plywood boat fibreglassed  bottom. 1974 Evinrude motor  50 HP. Good cond. $1,350 OBO.  Moorage avail, at Smitty's.  885-5467. #22  Sears 12' utility hull boat. $150  firm. 886-7357. #21  20 foot Cabin cruiser, inboard  outboard, head and all hardware.  Needs work. $400.886-8101.  #21  HIGGS MARINE SURVEYS LTD.  Insurance claims, condition and  valuation surveys. Serving the  Sunshine Coast and B.C. Coastal  Waters. Phone: 885-9425, 885-  9747,885-3643.886-9546.       tfn  I  ! ���MM  Coast News, May 22,1979  int  Irowel  Inboard  225 H.P.  re parts  c. $1,450.  with  280  IO.  board 454  i 2V4-1  Gear re-  0.  Mercruiser  igine with  xchanger.  irive   Leg  Dtion    to  & Elect  is $350.  Trim  >g.  $300,  pair  ike    Ltd.  For All  Your  Travel  Needs  peninsula  travel  886-9755  Registered  Travel Agent  ock  - 50 laying  i and white,  I86-7540.     #21  >red     Gelding  gentle.   $500  5-9285 or 885-  #21  :. Will kid soon.  #21  e or full board  re. Will supply  !. #21  syck/  v mileage. 1974  rglass carrier,  tires. Excellent  '154. tf"  SeU  00.  1300 mis.  rring. Excellent  OBO. 886-7963  #21  b.c.fl yuhon  BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES:  Experienced general insurance  agent for expanding offices  In Central Interior. Some managerial experience required.  Write Box 1100, Vanderhoof,  B.C. VOJ 3A0. Phone 567-2231.   #21  BUSINESS OPPORTUNIES:  Commercial Building 2600  square feet large lot, Chilliwack.  Two stores, one presently Health  Food store. Trade equity $26,500  for acreage and or ??. Box 295,  Saidis.B.C.VOXlYO. #21  BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES:  Ideally situated Electronics  business in downtown Nakusp,  B.C. Only licensed TV repair in  and around the area. Phone  265-4524 or 2654572. Write  Box 372, Nakusp, B.C. V0G1R0.   #21  BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES:  Marina - Kootenay Lake. 24  slips, full service shop. Booming  business, 180 miles of shore line.  Good family business, unlimited  boating opportunities. Box 330,  Nelson, B.C. V1L5R2. #21  BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES:  Franchise Opportunity. Company is currently expanding  new franchise locations. Potential of $20,000. $5,000 Investment. Write Benel Holdings  Ltd., 204, 1157 - 12th St.,  Kamloops, B.C. V2B 712.     #21  b.c.fl yuhon  HELP WANTED:Advertising  Salesperson: lor community  weekly newspaper. Experience  an asset. Base plus commission,  Contacxt George Lanctot,  Grande Prairie Booster, (403)  532-0606, 10022 - 99 Ave.,  Grand Prairie, Alta. T8V 0R9.   ��1  HELP WANTED: Marine  Mechanic ��� must be experienced  on Mercury outboards and Mercruiser outdrives. Phone  334-4822 or 339-5365 evenings.  #21  HELP WANTED: Nurses Re-  quired: Part time ce-ordinstor,  maternity nurses required  immediately. Assistant Head  nurse (ICU), Medical and ICU  Nurses needed September.  Apply: Nursing Director,  Mission Hospital, Mission,  B.C.V2V3HS. #21  HELP WANTED: Licensed  Relators required. Small, personalized operetta with inhouse  Building and Development.  General and Farm Sales In North  Okanagan. Monashee Realty  (Heritage) Ltd., Enderby, B.C  VOE IVO, Phone 838-6466,    #21  FOR SALE: 33' x 72' Quonset  Building (dismantled) used -  as ia, inc. large door. To view,  phone 2954914 or 2954731,  9 a.m. tp 4 p.m. Sealed bids  received until NOON, June 12,  1979. Any or all bids not necessarily accepted. Mail bids,  marked "QUONSET TENDER"  to: Secretory-Treasurer, School  District No. 17 (Princeton),  Box 460, Princeton, B.C.  VOX IWO, #21  FOR SALE: Fotofun Camera,  405 West Hastings Stree,  Vancouver V6B 1L4. Phone  685-2517. Your complete photographic supplies centre in Downtown Vancouver, Mail orders  and trade-ins welcome. This  month's special: Yshica Fr  D Automatic 35 mm SLR.  $299.00, #21  HELP WANTED: Legion Manager, Qualified experienced  manager required September 1st  for busy diversified Legion  operation. Good salary. Send  detailed resume to: President,  Royal Canadian Legion, 32965  Lougheed Hwy., Mission, B.C.  V2V1B4. #21  Property  SUNSHINE COAST REGIONAL DISTRICT  NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING  Land Use Regulation Amendment By-law No. 96.43  sections 703 and 798A of the Municipal Act, a Public Hearing  to consider the following by-law of the Sunshine Coast Regional  persons who deem their interest in property affected by the pro-  shall be afforded an opportunity to be heard on matters contained  6.43 will amend the zoning map of Land Use Regulation By-law  by designating a parcel at the intersection of Garden Bay Road  101 as an Industrial 1 - H land use zone. Pender Harbour Diesel  ties to establish an automotive and marine engine repair shop on  operty.  vill be held In the library of the Madeira Park Elementary School,  , B.C. at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, June 1,1979.  a synopsis of By-law No. 96.43 and is not deemed to be an Inter-  he by-law. This by-law may be inspected at the Regional District  Wharf Street, Sechelt, B.C. during office hours namely Monday  y, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Thursday and Friday, 8:30 a.m. to  st Regional District  Mrs. A.G. Pressley  Secretary-Treasurer  May 22,1979  Family home, Wilson Creek.  2 Irg bdrms up ft 2 down. Ensuite  PImg. 2 F.P. Finished Rec. Room.  Thermal windows. Elec. heat.  Cupboards galore. Built in dishwasher. Newly dec. Lrg. Sundeck  Carport. Front landcscaped.  $56,500 885 5736 #22  Beautiful ocean view lot. Gower  Point area. By owner. Cash offers  886-2887. tfti  A number to note:  885-5171  WHARF REALTY LTD.  b.c.fl yuhon  HELP WANTED: Industrial  Education Teacher required for  the G.M. Dawson Secondary  School in Maaset, B.C. Applications should be sent to  Mr. W.R. leper, Director of  Instruction, Box 69, Queen  Charlotte City, B.C. VOT ISO.  Telephone enquiries are welcome at 559-4491.  PROPERTY FOR SALE:  Year round cottage overlooking  Shuswap Lake, Electric heat,  carpeted, new stove and fridge.  Asking $39,000. For more information call Kamloops  376-5670 or Cellsta 955-2476. #21  BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES:  3,800 square feet small business,Stedmans franchise,  Burrard St., Vanderhoof, B.C.  Contact Ward McGowan,  Box 1017, Vanderhoof, B.C.  VOJ 3A0, Phone 567-4554,    #21  BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES:  Salesmen. Lucrative position  In the sale of advertising specialties. Commissions up to  25%. No investment. Lucar,  11655 - 4th Ave., RIv. des  Prairies, Montreal, Que.  H1E3C2,      #21  FOR SALE: Slumberdown European down filled quilts. Best  prices and quality In Canada.  Example: doble size $154.oo.  Money back guarantee. CC.  Quilts, Box 667, Lazo, B.C.  V0R2K0. Phone 338-8994,   #21  REAL ESTATE: Non-operating  coffee shop with living quarters,  on Highway #16. dose to  Smithers. Prime location. Full  utilWee. Apply to Box 405,  Telkwa, B.C. VOJ 2X0. Phone  846-5660. #21  REAL ESTATE: Fishing Camp.  One acre waterfront, Lillooet  Lake. Rustic summer chalet.  Running water, wood stove,  dock, picnic table. Asking  $27,500. Call Debbie, 932-5434  or 932-5377. Capilano Highlands Ltd. #21  PROPERTY: Attention Electrical Contractors. 1400 square  feet house, 200x120 lot, double  carport, shop. Will sacrifice  business for house sale. Reason-  health. $58,000. Phone Clear-  water674-3586. #21  WANTED: Remote parcel of  titled land In mountains, patented mining, trapping, or outfitting property preferred.  Jeff Shryer, Box 36, Lewsiton,  Montana 59457, #21  PERSONAL: Divorce! Quick.  Inexpensive. We prepare your  divorce papers over the phone-  feat. For more Information  call Self-Cojnsel Services,  the law office of Jack D. James,  M.B.A., LL.B. Toll Free -  112-800-663-3035 (In Vancouver  area call 986-3366). tfn  Incorporate!  Quick  ���  Inexpensive!  Obtain yor Incorporation  over the phone - bat. For more  information call Self-Counsel  Services, the law office of Jack  D. James, M.B.A., LL.B, TOLL  FREE 112-800-663-3035  Vancouver area call 986-3366. tfn  BEU BST1TE  Langdale  Lge. view lot amongst all new  homes,    school.    Cash    offer.  Private sale. 922-2097. #21  For sale by Owner. $39,500.  Hopkins, walking distance to  Langdale feny, General Store,  Post Office. Panoramic view.  2 bdrm. Extra room space in  basement. Redecorated. New  w/w throughout. Carport, large  sundeck. Lots for sale on either  side. Phone 886-2658 eves.     #21  Lot for Sale  Fairview Road  324-4725 after 4 p.m.  #22  For Sale By Owner  '/l-plus acre with view Gower  Point area. All services. Offers to  $18,900. Ph. 886-2323. tfn  Prime Land for Lease  Approximately  2(30 feet of Highway  101 frontage for  lease directly across  from Sunnycrest  Shopping Centre,  Gibsons. Suitable for  Auto Sales, Mobile  Home Sales, Recreational Vehicles,  Boat Sales or what  have you. Will lease  all or portion to suit  your requirements.  Contact owner at  886-9962 or 885-9850  (after 6 p.m.)  &-  YOUR AUTOPLAN  CENTRI  Taking care of  __* all your Real Estate Needs  Seaside Plaza  886-2000    Evenings Norm Peterson  886-9121 886-2607  FOR SALE  $73,500       Phone 886-2034  NEW HOME on corner of Grandview Road & Pratt.  Compare these features - 3 bdrms, 3 bthrms, family  room finished In Cedar with Earthstove, vaulted  celling with clerestory windows, living room with  conversation pit and heatilator fireplace, custom  made cabinets In kitchen, complete with fridge,  stove, dishwasher. Thermo-wlndows. Landscaped.  A binDRb CEDRR HOMES  921-1010  921-9261  Independently Distributed by:  M.D.MACKENZIE LIMITED  Display Homo  and Office  6342 Bey St.  Horseshoe Bey  West Vancouver  V7W2G9  FOR ALL  YOUR  REAL  ESTATE  NEEDS  Trev Goddard  886-2658  Bob Beaupre  Pat Murphy  885-9487   J^B___W*\  DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITimP^  2.2 ACRES GOWER POINT ROAD. L-128.  Thla land Is subdividable Into 7 lots. It Is also enhanced by a .  charming 2 bedroom loo house with 1% baths, bright modern  kitchen and lovely stone lireplace In living room. Owner will  subdivide to purchaser's specifications should they want to purchase any portion of tha property. Price lor totem 10,000.  Call Pat Murphy 885-5171.  REVENUE PROPERTY.Modern duplex on Marian* Rd. 2BR  homes with separate laundry and heating facilities. Rants almost  $500 per month. Small subdivision of lot corner will slightly  reduce present asking price of $55,000.  5 suite block on GRANTHAM'S WATERFRONT nets over  $8,000 p.a. Tremendous location and excellent holding property.  F,P. $86,500  GIBSONS: Huge horn* In central Gibsons. 6 bdrms. plua an  almost finished basement. Duplex zoning la being applied for. I  Investors will aaa there Is money to mid* on thla foreclosure.  F.P. $82,500  SHOAL LOOKOUT: 4 BR, 4 brick lireplace horn* with three  levels of aundack looking north to Gambler. Ensult* and 2 full  bathrooms with roughed In plumbing for on* mora. Rae room  and further large den/bedroom part-finished. 2BR guast cottage  Included but next door neighbour would Ilka to purchase separately. F.P. $110,000.  GEORGIA DRIVE: 3 BR, with unobstructed view to Nanaimo.  Where else could you buy such a setting for only $48,5007  CENTRAL GIBSONS VILLAGE WITH TERRIFIC VIEW8:  SARGENT ROAD: 4 BR home with high aid* vlaw. Brick  fireplaces In living and rec rooms, enaulte, generous storage  and workshop areas. Carport. Solidly built, wall finished and  landscaped. F.P. $83,500.  BALS LANE: Totally remodelled 3 BR starter homa with vlaw of  Kaats and tha Bluff. Backs onto ravine. F.P. $34,(00.  CHERYL ANNE PARK: New 3 8R, custom iton* Fireplace,  high-grade bathroom fixtures, generous wiring throughout  with special lighting *ff*cta��� .and an ocean vlaw too.FP. $40,900.  SUNNYCREST  SHOPPING  CENTRE  c  A  VANCOUVER  TOLL FREE  682-1513  886.2277,    IBSONS  REALTY  �� l   JAND LAND DEVELOPMENT LTD.  RR#2, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0  CONVEYANCING-REAL ESTATE CONSULTING-APPRAISALS-    NOTARY PUBLIC  HOMES  ROSAMUND ROAD: Park Ilk* ttttlng on  Roaamund Rotd. Minimum upkeep for  thla two btdroom (could bt thrtt) Stft-  wty Doubt* WW*. Rug* throughout,  m Mth*. Fridge tnd stove, drape*,  covered sundeck, f*no*d gtrdtn !���  140 x 170. Undocapsd with rockeries,  thrubt and many ornamental tf***,  metal tool ah*d, pavtd driveway to  separata garage. 1*7,800  HILLCREST ROAD: A family horn* to-  oatad on qultt cul-d*-uc with torn* vltw.  Thrtt btdroomt upttilra and thrv* down-  ���tun. Kitchen haa built-in breokfaat  nook, gtrbagt compactor, and dish-  wtehtr. Ooubrt ilnka In th* main bathroom piue a four pi*c* *n*ult*. Full  btatm*nt haa 40 k 15 rec mom with  flnlehtd bar. Sundeck ha* t built In  barbatjut. MM00.  NORTH ROAD: 4Vi acr�� lav*, mostly  daarad In paatura. Muat at* tht Inalda  of thla oorgaoua deluxe double wtd*.  Hug* bathtub In antuitt off maattr bad-  room, plua aaparata ahowar. Three  btdroomt, large kitchen and famlly  living room. Earth atovt cut* htttlng  Win to t fraction. Qood Invtatmtnt tnd  holding proptrty. 8M.800  FIRCREST PLACE: Three badroom  famlly home vary nleily appointed.  Largt rte room with built-in bar nearly  completed. Many kitchen cabfneta, flrt*  plaoa. Ntoely treed lot altuatad on quiet  no through etrttt dot* to achoola and  shopping. 840,000  POPLAR LANE: Sunny location on popular Poplar Un*. Throe bedroom*, plua  eneulta, huge kitchen, with large dining  araa. Lota of room for expanalon.  Tha whole family will find tlwneetve*  within walking dlatanct to achoola, shop-  ping and recreation. 840,800  FAIRVIEW RD: Ranch style home on to  acre. Nleo aattlng with glimpses of th*  ocean through the Irees. Tastefully  decorated with largt rooms. Maattr  btdroom ia 16x11 Including enaulte.  Room for full alztd dining suite! Living-  room haa largt antique brick flrepiaoe  and aundack la full length of the house.  187,100  LORRIE GIRARD  886-7760  JON MCRAE  885-3670  ELPHINSTONE: A terrific view from thlt  larg* home on double lot. Two finished  fireplace* tnd a aundack with plenty of  room for summer entertaining. Thla la  a homa built for owner with the bait of  materials. 882,500  GRANDVIEW ROAD (off Pine): Lovely  Ihre* badroom ranch atyl* homa situated  on etcludtd tnd fully landecaped to acre.  Southern exposure combine* privacy  with view of Georgia Strail and Vancouver island. Huge carport allows for  aeay addition of a famlly room and still  itavta room for a carport. Sundeck  accaaasd from livingroom and maater  badroom. Floor to calling cu: rock fire*  plaoa, lharmopan* windows. Winding  concrete driveway and many other  leeturee. M1.S00.  HIGHWAY 101 A ARGENT ROAD: In  the heart of Roberto Creek. 8/10 of an  ���ere ot nlctly traad gontly sloping land.  With 600 square feat two bedroom homo  presently heated with wood burning  heater, bul wired tor 220 volts. Second  dwelling p*rmltt*d and could bt built  behind existing building. 124,000  O'SHEA RD: NIC* little house on very  nice lot at a terrific price. If It's your first  homt and you qualify you can receive th*  $2,500 grant which doesn't have to be  repaid. 827.800.  PARK ROAO: Three bedroom horn* on  5 acres in Glbaona. A good holding  property. 874,000  STEWART ROAO: Lowly Spanish style  home on IV* acres level land. Four  bedrooms, separata dining room, sunken  livingroom with flrepiaoe. Almost  1400 square feet of living span on  ono floor. Definitely a on* of a kind.  186,000.  ANNE GURNEY  886-2164       CHRIS KANKAINEN  885-3545  CONRAD RD: Two bodroom home with  two full bethrooms situated on 2Vi acrae  of ttymi treed land. Creek runs through  th* property only 60 feet from the front  door of the cottage. Ideal starter horn* or  recreational property. 821,000  THOMPSON A FORBES: Langdale.  New out of th* ordinary rancher on  79x 136lot. Featuring livingroom, dining  room, three bedrooms, famlly room and  utility. Garage, flrepiaoe. Very attractive  and practical floor plan. 848,600  SHAW ROAD: Largo three bedroow  homa, matter with ensuile. Urge living-  room with white brick lireplace. Archway lo dining room. All ready for a Franklin or Gibsons all-n'ghter In the basement. Situated on 4.6 acres of valuable  holding property. 888,000  CRUCIL ROAO: Big Family? Then this  four btdroom, two bathroom home could  be tha home you've been looking for.  Full baeemtnl with rec room, utility  and roughed In plumbing. Intercom  inside and out. Large sundeck over  carport. This home Is located on a quiet  vlaw lot, yet convenient to th* Village ol  Glbaona. 888,000  CHERYL ANNE PARK ROAP: Large  three bedroom home with finished heatilator flr*piao*s up and down. Situated on  approximately 1/3 of an acre on a no  through road. Neatly landscaped and  nicoly ireed. Rec room roughed In with  finished bathroom downstairs, Double  windows throughout. Excellent family  homa. 887,000  WHARF ROAD: Executive home, Larg*  Spanish style home. Deluxe In every  respect. Finished on two floors with que-  lily workmanship and materials. Large  aundack and carport plus separate  healed double garage. Larg* lot mostly  landscaped. 880,000  CHAMBERLIN ROAO: Almost square  4.38 acres located a couple of minutes  from Glbaona shopping. Three years now  2100 plus square feet trl-lev*i horn* ha*  th* beat of everything, includes Ihree  large bedrooms, master with full ensuite,  larg* famlly room, kitchen with famlly  eating arte, formal dining room, 2 fireplaces, all double glass, double carport.  Almost Vi acre landscaped with the balance of th* property mostly cleared  to put into pasture. Shown by appointment. 807,800  BRIDGEMAN ROAD: Two atoray thrc*  badroom family homa on 4,6 acres.  Acrsags is cleared with good garden  area Corral for animals, barn, chicken  houses and mostly fenced  50% In ALR.  LOTS  TUWANEK: 80 x 40 lol only on. block  lo beach. Full vim ol tht inlet PIpM  community wafer ovallable. 10,100  ABBS ROAO: Vim ol Bay ana tnd  Georgle Strait la youra Irom thla botutl-  lul lot In are. of elaborate hornet. Two  Weeks lo schools end shopping. 111,100  LANGDALE    RIDOE    SUB-DIVISION:  Fantaatlc vim Iota. An araa of nm and  varied homaa. Time Iota oft* thtm-  aelvea lo many different building loco-  tlona. Enjoy privacy and Ihe view of Horn  Sound. Priced from 113,000  SCHOOL a WYNQART ROADS: Only 4  of theee Duplex lota left. Beautiful vim  propertlea overlooking tho Bty. Ctoao to  achoola and shopping. All lots perfectly  Bulled to elde-by-elde or up-down duplex  construction.  PrlMd at 111,900 and ��1��,W0  FIRCREST ROAO: Over 30 nMy treed  building Iota to chooae from. St < 111  Wo will arrange to nave a home built  lor you. Located eahort drive down Pratt  Road. Priced al ��,m0aeah  CREEKSIDE PARK ESTATES: In  Glbaona Village on North Reed. Lota for  single wldee, double wldee and conventional homee. All on sewer, water, hydro  wd all within Ihree blocka of tht shopping cenlre, achoola and medial clinic.  Priced from 110,000 to SII.M*.  HIGHWAY 101 a ARGENT ROAD:  6/10 of an acre of treed land In Roberts  Creek Iwo blocka from the Maaonlc Htll.  Two dwellings allowed on the property.  100 feel of highway frontage that would  bt ideal for domattlc Industry site with  home behind. On hydro tnd reglontl  wattr. SM,M  FAIRVIEW ROAO: Nearly vt acre of flat  aeay lo build on land Mobile homaa art  allowed, urge coder trite provide privacy and enhance this telling. Close to  Coder Grove School. 111,100  DAVIDSON ROAO: tit H an ecre with  a fantastic vim from Langdale Ridge.  Thla lol haa a small creek on tht very  book ol the property. All net homee In  Ihis area    ��<��.����������<����. ���".I"  ACREAGE  MASKELL ROAD:  1.44 acrat Ot aub-  dlvldable property on Moakell Reed tnd  Lower Roberts Creek Rotd. Zoning  allows lor tt acre evertge. Thlt la a quiet  rural area only 3 miles from Olbsono.  GIBSONS: 4.S acree of excellenl MMIng  property close lo Sotmlt Perm, portltlly  cleared. Try your offers 1*7,100  NORTH ROAD: 3.4 peril ilka torn.  Acceaa Irom side rood will secure privacy.  Nicely ireed. Cloee lo the vlllege. W,0M  SCHOOL ROAO: 1.98 acree ad|tomt to  tht elementary school Could bo tub-  divided lo ton. On sewer tnd til  services. IM-OOS  GIBSONS: Approximately IS acree.  2nd growth trtaa, level, grttt for t hooey  firm. Cloee to Qlbeone. Good holding  property end priced et only 14,000 per  acre. See Ihis now. Large tcrttgtt trt  gelling scarce. 104,001  ARNE PETTERSEN JAYVISSER  886*9793        STEVE SAWYER   885-3300    DAVE ROBERTS   885-8691 886-8040 14.  Coast News, May 22,1979.  At Gibsons Council  Roads to be closed  negotiations ate completed.  Council will seek clarification of the Municipal Act  where it deals with Official  Community plans. Council's  question is, why is a municipality required to form one  when the Act says it amy.  Committee reports to the  Council meeting of May IS  disclosed the chlorination  plant is 80% complete, and  for recreation asked Council  approval of a grant of $500 to  the Sea Cavalcade and to the  Chamber of Commerce to be  given in July when the tax  money is in. Council approved  this  Reporting on a conference  of Vancouver Island Municipalities which he recently  attended, Mayor Blain said  that one of the resolutions  called for all costs of education  of the handicapped to be  borne by the Provincial  Government.  Creekside Park Estates,  North Road, requested the  Village   waive   the   sewer  Council decided at its  planning meeting of May 14  to close two roads in the Bay  area of the Village after  hearing petitions of residents.  The short undeveloped portion  of Burns Road that leads to  Pebbles Beach will be closed  to vehicles immediately.  Whether the cutting off of  beach access will lessen  the noise and mess of the  night-time use of the beach  remains to be seen. With the  intent of dealing directly with  the cause of the nuisance,  Council is writing the Attorney-General's Department  to request an increase in the  RCMP complement in Gibsons.  The   other   road   closing,  requested by petition of 31  taxpayers, is that of Glassford  where it joins Gower Point  Road near Franklin, with a  temporary    and    immediate  blocking   of   the   thoroughfare    while    awaiting    the  linistry  of  Highway's   ap-  roval. The reason was ex-  ressed a few months ago -  oaring, screechng late night  traffic - in a letter to Council  signed B. Kan-Tom. In this more than six months expo  action, however, the Village sure for sales," their letter  will also acquire two resi- stated, and continued, "this  dential lots for its trouble.        was done  on   Davis   Road  The committee examined a subdivision on 18 lots for the  preliminary draft of the road promoter who was working  network planned by the High- with borrowed monies."  ways Department for the dis- Alderman Goddard said,  trict and recommended that "These revenues are already  there be only one access road part of our 1979 budget and  torn the proposed highway to ���  Gibsons. The access could be  either an extension of Sunnycrest Road to the new highway  or an extension of Sunnycrest  by a north-easterly jog to Gil-  mour and then to the highway.  The planner will confirm  this decision with the Regional  district and will get in touch  with property owners who will  be affected by this new road  construction,  A ten-foot wide pedestrian  path between Poplar Lane and  the Gibsons Elementary play  fields may be a project in the  student summer work programme this year.  Other items from the  Planning Committee meeting  concerned the Marina, Cedars  Inn project, the acquiring of  property for Marina parking,  and the Official Community  Plan.  Ian Morrow reported that  representatives of the TIDSA  programme will meet with  Gibsons soon to look into  Marina funding. With the  Village Planner's report on  the land-side development of  the Marina, expected within  the week, Morrow stated  that the Marina and Harbour  Committee report should then  be ready for Council consideration.  Council will call for the  immediate construction of  these properties cannot be  exempted." Mayor Blain  added, "We have many  vacant properties that pay  sewer and frontage tax and  we could not begin to exempt  them."  Gibsons received two  cheques - $43,700 in all - from  Municipal Affairs, one for  $30,000 which is the basic  grant allotted by the Revenue  Sharing Act regulations, and  $13,700, the first of nine  instalments under Part VIII  of the same regulations.  Gibsons now has a bylaw  prohibiting living or sleeping  in a recreational vehicle  parked on a Village street or  municipal property during the  hours of night - 9.00 p.m. to  6.00 a.m. It would seem the  village official who checks  out such vehicles will have  to distinguish between those  parked for sleeping and  those parked merely for recreation, which is not prohibited in the bylaw.  The usual prize of $5.00 will be awarded to the first  name drawn from the barrel to Identify the location  of the above picture. Last week's winner was Nola  Frontager of Hlllcrest Avenue, Qlbsons, who correctly guessed that the ship's bell hangs at the  corner of Captain Raby's house on Bals Lane.  vaaaaagc      waaavc      me       SBWer        ��a      al ft I I a     ft a,  delSefor%^n�� ALthe Sechelt Council  subdivision has not had much    IT ��� ��� . ��� 1  Unanimity prevails  Howe Sound  charities  The employees of Howe  Sound Pulp Division donated a  total of $6,774 during 1978.  Participation is voluntary but  it is gratifying ro realize  that during 1977 donations  exceeded the previous year  by over $1,000.  The administration and distribution of all funds collected is in the hands of a committee comprised of five  members from both the hourly  and salary payrolls. Regular  donations are made throughout the year to the many  charitable organizations serving the employees and families living on the Howe Sound  and Sunshine Coast area.  Statement of Revenue and  Disbursements for the Year  January 1 - December 31,1978  Revenue: Opening Balance  Carried Forward from 1977-  $488.25. Payroll Deductions  from Members  Total Funds  $7,262.25.  Disbursements  stered Charitable  tions: B.C.Heart Foundation-  $500; Kinsmens Mothers  March - $250; Easter Seal  Campaign - $250; Canadian  Red Cross - $350; Canadian  Cancer Society - $400; Sal-  solid, 6-foot high fence on the vation Army - $300; Children's  south side of the Cedars Inn Hospital - $450; C.A.R.S. -  property to protect the pri- MOO: Retarded Children's  vacy ot adjoining properties Association - $500; C.N.I.B, ���  on Davis Road. Following an $400; Multiple Sclerosis  in-camera session the com- Society ��� $400; Christinas Seal  mittee recommended that the Campaign - $400; Girl Guides  Cler-Treasurer negotiate of Canada - $250; Boy Scouts  for blocks of land useful to Association ��� $250; St. Mary's  the land-side development of Hospital ��� $1,500. Total  the Marina, and that all con- Disbursements - $6,600.  sideration of Marina parking Balance Carried Forward to  be   suspended   until   these 1979-$662.25.  $6,774.  Available  to    regi-  Organiza-  CARPET- CABINET-  CERAMIC CENTRE  CABINETS       APPLIANCES  ���CARPETS  .... *  North Rd., Gibsons  STORE HOURS!  Sl 886-2765 JjSfliSt  There were no great debates at the Sechelt Council  Meeting last Wednesday  night and the Hems on the  Agenda were dealt with with  unanimity.  It wu agreed that Alderman MacDonald should attend  a Seminar in Nanaimo spon-  which will be held in Vancouver this September. In  order to avoid a repetition of  the mix-up in Penticton over  accommodation the Council  has registered early and in  writing with the Devonshire  Hotel.  A copy of the letter by Miss  sored  by the  B.C.Aviation   Helen Dawe to the Regional  Council to discuss various as  pects of community airports  The local airport which is  jointly owned by the Villages  of Gibsons and Sechelt is  "uncontrolled" - there are  no records kept of who uses  the facility and no-one from  either village supervises activities there on a permanent  basis. There are numerous air  strips like this in the province  and it is hoped that management problems and the rale  of the community will be  thoroughtly studied at this  Seminar.  Alderman MacDonald  wants to discuss the responsibilities of the community,  its legal liabilities and how to  insure against them. It was  agreed that the $20 registration fee and expenses should  be paid by Council.  The Council agreed to register Mayor Nelson, Aldermen  Thompson, Jorgensen and  Kolibas and Clerk Shanks for  the annual meeting of the  Union of B.C. Municipalities  Board was discussed. Miss  Dawe is concerned that if the  Sechelt Library is to be housed  in a new building (the proposed joint use facility) that  it should be "on the ground  floor of any structure provided  as a replacement of the present Centennial Building."  Mayor Nelson assured Miss  Dawe who wu present that  it would indeed by on the  ground floor of the new building and that any changes to  the library would be improvements.  , To date there are no Mew  developments in the proposed  new building to house the  Regional Board Offices, the  School Board Office, Sechelt  Village Office, and the Sechelt  Halfmoon Bay Centennial  Library. It would seem  that the purchase of the Stan  Anderson property west of  Trail Bay Mall extension is  still under discussion.  June 3-9 wu duly proclaimed Water Safety Week  by   the   Council   who   had  received a letter from the  Canadian Red Cross asking  for their co-operation in this  regard.  On the subject of the airport  again it wu agreed that the  Airport Committee should  take action of the Aero-Mar  Services Limited request for  a sign at the airport.  A cheque for the amount of  $34,500 was received from  the Ministry of Municipal  Affairs u part of the Revenue  Sharing Grant to improve  services in the municipality.  The Council expects to receive eight more cheques of  $4,500 each by the end of  1979. A letter was also received from Mr. Vander Zalm  which said that he had recommended to Mr, Hugh  Curtis that Sechelt should  receive a grant from the  lottery fund to help with  costs of the Arena.  A request to change the  Council Office hours to  8.30 a.m. - 4.00 p.m. for the  summer (May 22-Septem-  ber 30) was granted. The  office will remain open during  the lunch hour; It was suggested that this would be a  good idea throughout the year  CLASSIFIED NOTE  Drop off your Coast News  Classifieds at Campbell's  Family Shoes A Leather  Goods In downtown Sechelt.  FLORON  AGENCIES LTD 18M Marine Drive, Gibsons  Ron McSavaney John Black  885-3339  ABfc      REAL ESTATE * INSURANCE  w  OFFICE 886-2248  SELMA PARK: Luxurious custom built homa  has three bdrms, also completely finished  basement. Cathedral entrance la brightened  by mirror wall; deluxe carpeting throughout  and many extra features, I.e. built In oven,  dishwasher, etc. Exterior Is finished with  vinyl siding; property Is landscaped and has  view to Trail Islands. Just a V�� mils to school  and locatad In choice residential araa. Don't  fall to see this fine home. Asking $67,700.  LANGDALE: Panoramic view of Howe Sound  and North Shore Mtd., from this comfortable  2 bdrm famlly homa. Haa finished basement  with Kitchen and bath facilities (In-law ste.,  or?). Main floor Is 1022sq. ft., hu large L.R.  with F.P. and W/W carpeting. Range,  frig and drapes Included. Carport with paved  drive. Sundeck for summer relaxation. Only  $57,500.  LANQDALE: Many outstanding futures In  this contemporary styled 3 bdrm home.  Spacious master bdrm with sauna, wired and  lined; cathedral calling In L.R., finished In  Calif, redwood; F.P. finished with Arizona  sandstone. Kitchen hu barbecue & rotlsurle,  ceramic tile floor. Basement ready for finishing touches, hu a window wall. Cozy family  room adjoins kitchen. 2 F.P. with hutlla-  tors, double gluing on main floor. 185,000.  Call Geo. Cooper for App't.  GIBSONS: Bay aru, close to beach, stores  and P.O. Attractive 3 bdrm home on extra  large lot with good vegetable garden. Home Is  conveniently designed with large L.R. with  rec. room, utility workshop and spare room.  $62,000.  GIBSONS: Lower Village, fantutlc view from  L.R.; 2 bdrms on main floor with den or extra  bdrm In basement. F.P. In living room and  very good convenient kitchen. Close to  shopping, on sewer. Priced to Mil at $46,900.  GIBSONS WFT: Gower Point aru; 2 bdrms,  large living room with F.P., electric hut,  full bs'mt could be made Into rec room or  extra living aru. Garage with lighted drive,  beautifully landscaped. Very choice property.  886-7316  George Cooper  886-9344  ROBERTS CREEK: This well-built content*  porary home hu over 1040 sq. ft. Is located  on Hanbury Rd., and has over 20 acres with  all-year creek, power, young orchard, good j  gardening - buullfully treed. Thla property ���  offers complete seclusion and privacy. By I  appointment only, call John Black lor details.  ROBERTS CREEK: New subdivision, 2 bdrm -*-  house on large lot; lower floor hu utility I  room, storage and extra lavatory. Some view I  of Georgia Strait from upper floor; priced to ���  sell at $39,500. |  ROBERTS CREEK: 3 bdrm home on Lower I  Road; full basement with A/O hut; large lot |  110' x 145' hu some fruit trees, space for *  garden. House has F.P. In living room and |  sundeck for summer leisure. Priced at $48,000 ���  VETERANS ROAD: Comfortable 3 bdrm .  family home, lovely post and bum construe- I  tlon with stone F.P. In living room. Main I  rooms are arranged In attractive open style; ���  extra room In buement, A/O hut. Ensuite |  plumbing. Situated on large lot wilh good ���  ._   __..,  . bdrm home on I  Dunham Road; F.P. In living room; attached I  carport, nice size lot 70' x 173'. Asking  $37,500. LOTS  GLASSFORD ROAD: Nice building lot, on  sewer; good residential area. $13,000.  FIRCREST ROAD: New subdivision, lot size  61' x 131'. Priced at only $9,700.  LOWER GIB80N8:3 lots, corner School Road  and H'way 101, tremendous potential, high  traffic aru. Priced at $175,000.  GRANTHAMS: 3 lots on Reed Road. Good  Investment property, potential view. Asking  $8,750 each.  WHARF ROAD: Langdale, good retirement  area; lot 65' x 193'. Try your offer.  ROSAMUND ROAO: 3 lots clured, rudy to  garden aru. Musl be sun.  PORT MELLON: Cozy 3  ���UjMU,.,,.*~.v.K~. ���., r-r-.f bu||d.Only$10,500uch.  Rummage sale success  Bjy Betty B. Brawn  Though the weather wu  somewhat doubtful, there  wu no doubt at all In die  enthusiasm of those who  attended St. Bartholemew's  Anglican Church W.A.'s  rummage, bake and plant  sale, which wu held in the  Church Hall on May 5th.  In no time at all the plant  and the bake tables were bate  and other tables were being  searched for bargains. Rummage appears to breed and  though our bank balance wu  appreciably increased, there  wu enough rummage remaining to take a car load over  to W.A. Memorial House in  Vancouver and also to donate  rummage locally. As we  arrived at Memorial House a  large van wu just leaving  filled with bales of clothing  and blankets and other  necessities to help those who  have lost so much in the  Dawson City flooding. Thank  you to all those who helped  to make our rummage sale  such a success. The winner Of  the grocery hamper was  Mrs. Arlene Baba.  See our  Bargain Shelf  for good buys  NDP Bookstore  B.A. BLACKTOP=R\  "QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1956"  "JET SEAL"  Your driveway or parking lol I  Renews A protects against gas & oil spills  Paving - Curbs ��� Drainage  FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL"  885-5151  ?KTOP ltm  East Porpoise Bay, Sechelt  Members:  aMWa    Amalgamated Construction  Nmfa  Association  B.C. Road Builders  Association  BBi  9  #  CO-OP  %  AUTOmOTlUE  REPAIR SERVICE SPECIAL  COVERING THE PENINSULA  Work Guaranteed At All 4 Locations  Our Monthly Brake Special  20% off on all parts.  Drop in and have your1  Brakes inspected.  13 Point Minor Tune-Up Special  Including Plugs, Points & Condenser  4 Cylinder 6 Cylinder  $36.95       $42.95  8 Cylinder  $48.95  Heavy Duty Shocks        $13.95  Unconditional Guarantee  Bosch Head Lights  Reg. $69.95 Special $59.95  We Will Cover All Your Automotive Needs  Please call for Appointment  r������������i  I Jamieson Automotive!  ��� 886-7919 ��  1 Sechelt Esso 1  ���L_885-2812 J  ISunnycrest Esso 11 Madeira Park Service i  [     886-9962     J ^        883-2241 I  Transmission  Problem  Call Us  Any Problem  Call Us

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