BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Sunshine Coast News Oct 23, 1979

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xcoastnews-1.0175856.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xcoastnews-1.0175856.json
JSON-LD: xcoastnews-1.0175856-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xcoastnews-1.0175856-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xcoastnews-1.0175856-rdf.json
Turtle: xcoastnews-1.0175856-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xcoastnews-1.0175856-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xcoastnews-1.0175856-source.json
Full Text
xcoastnews-1.0175856-fulltext.txt
Citation
xcoastnews-1.0175856.ris

Full Text

 mAttL        -9Km\\  legislative library  parliaments buildings  ���victoria, b.c.   80.1  The Sunshine  Published at Gibsons, B.C.  15<t per copy on news stands  Second Class Mail Registration No. 4702  Serving the Sunshine Coast since 1945  October 23, 1979  Volume 33, Number 43  Regional directors (ear centralization  The Tyee Princess of the Coast Ferries line m/ide her first call into Gibsons Harbour last week.  Carl At Council  The Big Bubble Burst!'  This week I expected the sewer bubble to burst in Council,  spraying every one within fallout distance with a sticky,  malodorous substance that would require copious amounts of  Mr. Clean, Mr. Muscle and Nil-Odor to purge from the  atmosphere. But all I listened to was light opera.  First, a presentation was made by the Belles of Binnacle Street,  led by Nel Jager. The tune was familiar but the words wen:  strange. They went like this:  " We're forever blowing bubbles,  prftty bubbles in the air.       t_     ���,.,-  They fly so high, that they reach the-sky.  but like my dreams, they fade and dief  Speaking of dye, the substance that was introduced into the  Binnacle Street system has yet to surface. They have been  watching and waiting but still no sign. I would have offered a  possible solution (if you will pardon the pun) by informing them  of the strange phenomenon I observed around Poise Island the  other day. The water had a coppery sheen and was as smooth as  glass while Sechelt Inlet whitecaps were pounding up the  surrounding beaches. Was this the oil that was supposed to quiet  the trouble waters that had escaped into the creek? The slick  seemed to originate from the slopes in question.  But being a member of the press I was not allowed to talk so the  mystery will probably never be solved.  The Binnacle Belles completed their contribution to the  performance with a final rendition of the beautiful old song:  "Answers are so fleeting,  and we've looked everywhere.  It looks like we'll jusl go on  blowing bubbles,  pretty bubbles in the airr  It was at this point that Malcolm Shanks, the Village Clerk,  read a letter from the Health Department that stated previous  percolation tests that were submitted by a former inspector, were  incorrect; that the lots were too small for the drain field; some  installations were made improperly; and that a recommendation  be made to go on sewer.  Malcolm Shanks pointed out that field extensions were possible  but would be expensive; approximately $2,000. The question then  arose, "Who Pays?" Well, I guess you know who, in the long run!  Alderman Morgan Thompson suggested that a minimum of 12  to 18 months would be required for planning and implementation  of the sewer hook-up, which brought a rejoinder from Nel Jager  of, "But what do we do in the meantime about the definite health  hazard; the neighbour who can't wash her clothes; the toilet that  can't be flushed without a plunger follow-up; and many other  obvious repercussions???"  Council was at a loss for answers other than speculation on a  bacteria speed-up method which was expensive; 'Erobic action' as  suggested by Alderman Thompson, which introduces air into the  system; and a letter to Gibsons Council to see if they have run into  similiar problems.  Alderman Thompson commiserated with residents of Binnacle  Street by offering a short rendition of another fine old basso-  profundo solo:  "Ah, sweet mystery of life  I'd like to find you.  Why is Council always led down garden paths?  Why cannot our neighbours flush their toilets,  and others be deprived of evening baths?"  I would like to have applauded but you know about the press...  At one point the phone rang, then the Clerk announced that the  developer was on his way and it might provide a possible answer.  But on arrival, Mr. Van Egmond reported he had not had time to  prepare a script but would make a full report at the next Council  meeting. This was accepted and the matter was closed for the  moment.  I sort of expected a short chorus of Goodnight Ladies, but  Council had other duties to perform so the meeting went on. But  don't go away folks. The plot thickens and the curtain will rise on  the first Wednesday in November. There are five Wednesdays in  October so Council gets a week off. But don't wait. Get your  tickets early!  Joint Use Facility  It was pointed out that Sechelt and the Regional Board are back ��� . _ , ,     ���     . ���  to 'square one' in the Joint Use matter. Acting Mayor Joyce "?*�� .  Pf T8 ,f*��  ir-iiu. a.a .x. .... u. ..1.1.J ....?i .u. ���. _* critical  of the  paper from  Kolibas recommended the matter be tabled until the return of  Mayor Nelson from holidays.  Paving  A heated discussion broke out about paving of Inlet Avenue.  Alderman McDonald pointed out that widening to 80 feet from 66 Department finds it difficult to  should be taken into consideration now rather than later. ��'fe.r   ���"y  constructive  Alderman Thompson pointed out that it would lead to an off- cnjicism...  centre allignment into the cul-de-sac and the area serving Hank .. '". ��_apparent that Mr.  Hall's lots and would affect gutters and curbing,  Regional Board directors seemed to achieve a rare unanimity  last Thursday night in a special meeting convened to discuss a  discussion paper from the provincial government on Regional  Government Reform.  Regional Director Joe Harrison expressed serious misgivings  about the government's intent based on the discussion paper. "It's  going to be one big pork barrel," declared Harrison, pointing out  that the main thrust of the paper seemed to be to centralize the  planning of land use in the cabinet's hands.  IR The pertinent section of the discussion paper reads:  "Improvements would be introduced into the contentious land use  planning and regulatory field. The provincial government would  assume the responsibility for regional planning, removing this  burdensome taks from regional government."  This passage comes in what regjona| government. County  planning activities would be  confined to the preparation  and completion of settlement  plans. It is therefore implied  that there will be a division of  powers, however the report  does not specify the  jurisdiction."  The memorandum from  planning staff continues, "A  number of questions can be  raised at this point:  1. Who will be responsible for  subdivision regulations and  land use regulations within  the County?  2. Where will applications be  made for subdivisions?  3. Who will process Agricultural Land Commission  applications?  4. Will a County still be able to  prepare a Parks Plan and  have the resources to  implement such a scheme?  5. Will the Province establish a  local office where residents  may go when they have  inquiries?  6. Who will regulate the  development of mobile  home  parks  and private  . the discussion paper cites as a  third alternative. The first  alternative discussed is the  removal of regional government; the second is the  continuation of regional  government; and the third  contemplates a 'county' system  of government with undeveloped territories, boroughs, and municipalities  forming part of the system.  Director David Hunter of  Area F also was highly critical  of the discussion paper. "There  are no recommendations' or  anything else in this," said  Hunter. "I can't imagine a  $40,000 a year government  employee writing this rubbish."  A memorandum from the  the development of Crown  Land subdivisions for rural  residential use?  9. Is the Province willing to  absorb existing staff that  may be displaced as a result  of the restructuring of local  governments?  lO.How will this land use  appeal system be established? Will it be a local  body, similar to the Board of  Variance or will it be a  central committee located in  Victoria?"  Planner Bill Lindsay pointed  out that while the government  seemed to be heading in the  direction of a county system as  found in Ontario, the  provincial government in  Ontario seemed to be moving  in the direction of regional  municipalities decentralizing  control from Toronto.  Director Charles Lee said,  "Thc Minister is ignoring the 52  recommendations of the  Regional Review Commission  entirely. He is taking away the  planning responsibilities and  loading us with social costs."  Lee pointed out to his fellow  directors that 153 municipal  delegates had been invited tp  the October 22 meeting and just  22 regional board members. "If  thc Minister can rely on-tht  fancied hostility between  regional districts and  minicipalities then he, has won  the day.*  Local elected officials of the  Regional Board and the two  municipalities on the Sunshine  Coast were to attend a meeting  called by Municipal Aflairi  Minister Bill Vander Zalm id  Abbotsford at 10:00 a.m. oil  Monday, October 22, to disctlss  the future of regional  government. ��  Gibsons by-pass  discussed  Victoria. "The Minister is  obviously promoting the third  alternative, however this report  is so vague that the Planning  ,. Vander Zalm is proposing to  It was referred to next planning meeting, so once ���mil9iff)m^sm)Lm.iILm.!tt0" ���?'.*?' ..'n .��_ _..CBmj��ites?  voices modulated and one had to listen closely to catch tbe  nuances of the little 'asides' and 'brie-bats'.  Airport Committee  Alderman Thompson pressed for more action from the Airport  Committee, suggesting that at least one meeting a month be held  either at Sechelt or Gibsons on an alternate basis. Alderman Larry  Trainor of Gibsons is awaiting information from the Highways  Department regarding road location and access to the Airport  A letter was read from a Mrs. Allen requesting use of Hackett  Park for baseball games in 1980. Times would be from 6:00 to 8:30  p.m. each Thursday evening, from May through July. Alderman  Thompson agreed with the 'early bird and worm' theory but  pointed out that it should be tabled until spring or left for a new  Council to decide. Agreedl  Double last year's  ..'. ��  Church protests  tax increase  by George Cooper  Faced with a tax bill of $1,525.13 for 1979, almost double last  year's, representatives of St. Mary's Catholic Church attended the  October 16 meeting and asked Council to reconsider. Since all  assessments are made by the B.C. assessment authority, Council  urged church members to write the Authority giving their  arguments for lowering the taxes.  In a report to Council, Clerk Jack Copland stated that the  Assessment Authority had agreed to re-appraise the property by  October 29. The Village had already inquired about the inequity  in the assessment valuations for St. Mary's Church and the  response from the Assessment Authority was that the location  was in the category Business and Other and that the property was  appraised at its value as a marketable commodity in an area where  commercial land expansion has been occurring.  Actually, the Church property is sandwiched between two  municipal park areas and the commercial land development the  Authority could be referring to is Seamount Industrial Park near  Payne Road on Highway 101. A 50 x 125 foot lot in Seamount is  advertized at $11,950 and a 66 x 148 foot lot at$l9,950. A .83 acre  parcel on nearby Mahan Road is advertized at $27,500 and across  Park Road from St. Mary's is a parcel of about 2 acres with taxes  of $998.79 for 1979. The Church property is about 1 Vi acres in size,  and is valued at $139,400 for assessment purposes.  Church property used for worship is exempt from taxes but  improvements like residences for pastor or priest are not. Up Park  Road from St. Mary's the Baptist Church property of about 3/4  acre is valued by the assessor at $87,350 but has not caused any  more than negligible concern to the people there since there are no  taxes charged.  By way of comparison other church property valuations were  given to Council in a report by the Clerk. The United Church  property, exempt from taxes is given a value of $147,650; the  Pentecostal, now advertized for sale, is valued at $25,050 and  exempt; the Anglican with a residence pays $451.80 in taxes on a  valuation of $35,600; Glad Tidings with two properties at $41,500  and $32,850 is taxed at $451.24 a year.  ��Wifla-*by   assuming   the "t^WWwIU im development  responsibility    for    regional permits?  planning and removing this g. Will   Counties   still   be  "burdensome task' from the permitted to participate  in  When Minister of Highways  officials and Regional District  Directors from Areas E and F  met with Gibsons Council on  October IS, there was a renewal  of the discussion about access  roads to the new portion of the  highway which will go up  Langdale creek and westward  near the power line. Of the  several proposals made in the  past an access route by way of  Chambelain or Stewart Roads  to North Road was the one  acceptable to Gibsons and  Areas E and F.    -    ..�����������*.  There had been some  objection in the past, however,  to   the  North   road  access  Marina referendum  coming November 17th  "Do you favour the  permanent moorage Municipal  Marina?" will be the simple  question put to the residents of  the Village of Gibsons when the  referendum is held on  November 17, Commodore Ian  Morrow, chairman of the  Marina Committee, told the  Gibsons and District Chamber  of Commerce at their meeting  held on Thursday, October 18.  Morrow told the members of  the Chamber of Commerce  that the application for the  water lease has now been made  as has the application for the  Marina.  The cost of the Marina has  now been set at $1.66 million  dollars and Morrow emphasized' that the Marina  would be self-sufficient and  would not cause any increase in  the taxes of Village residents.  Morrow urged all who have a  vote in the Village to attend the  public meeting scheduled for  November 8 in the Legion Hall.  "Be informed and vote from a  point of knowledge," said  Morrow.  It was pointed out at the  Chamber of Commerce  meeting that the three banks in  the Village of Gibsons have  copies of the Feasibility Study  which can be perused by all  interested in informing  themselves.  It was said that the Marina  would provide 100 jobs afloat  and ashore with an expected  increase in business from crews  of commercial vessels who  would be able to berth at the  Government Wharf on  completion of the Marina.  The space utilized for  commercial vessels would also  provide moorage for tourists  during the summer season  when the commercial vessels  are out of the harbour.  because the route would then  pass two schools. Alternate  Director Gurney stated his  Area, E, was stoutly opposed to  a proposal to have an access  that would have Gilmour curve  through a number of properties  to avoid a T-junction at Reed.  Area E prefers the use of  present roads rather than  making new routes through  private properties. There was  general concurrence that Reed  not be used as a main arterial  route in the grid system.  Alderman Goddard stated  that any highway access west of  Park Road would take the  traffic past the shopping areas.  Other suggestions for a second  access are Pratt-Payne, or the  opening up of Mahan Road.  These will all be reviewed on  the ground by local snd  highway staff on October 29.  When Planner Rob Buchan  complained of the confusion in  highways about road width '  requirements, Steve Reynolds  of the Ministry of Highways  suggested this be examined in  detail at the October 29  meeting.  The situation Buchan  referred to concerned the  Cedars Plaza development  when in one week highways  sent out three letters each  stating a different requirement  for road dedication from the  developer.  Pictured are the elders of the Sechelt Indian Band and Ron Beaumont of U.B.C. Beaumont has been working with the  Sechelt Indians for nine years compiling a written record of the Salish dialect, he ia presently about half way through  the task of preparing lessons in the dialect for teaching to the young. Left to right are ex-Elphinstone teacher Frank  Fuller, Martha Mary Joe, Sarah Baptiste, Cecile August, Beaumont, Dave Paul, Band Manager Clarence Joe, and  Band Councillor Anne Quinn  |For 35 years the most widely read Sunshine Coast newspaper!!  ____________ MM  Coast News, October 23,1979  CHIT lllf-  A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER  Published at Gibsons, B.C. every Tuesday,  by Glassford Press Ltd. Phone 886-2622  Box 460, Gibsons, VON 1V0 or 886-7817  Editor-  John Burnside  Office Manager���  M.M. Joe  Production Manager���  Sharon L. Berg  Advertising���  Allan Crane  Ian Corrance  Copysetting���  Gerry Walker  f*cW  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Distributed Free to all addresses on the Sunshine Coast  British Columbia: $15.00 per year; $10.00 for six months  Canada, except B.C.: $16.00 per year  United States and Foreign: $20.00 per year  Centralisation cause for concern  If the apparent intention of the  provincial government to centralize land  use planning in Victoria is realized then it  would appear to be cause for very real  concern. It has been the consistent position  of this newspaper throughout all the  storms of controversy and discontent that  have swirled about the local Regional  Board that the residents of the Sunshine  Coast have been better served than many  of them realized and it may well be that  many will come to realize this should the  centralization that the Municipal Affairs  Department seeks come to be.  The reason for our consistent support of  the Regional Board generally has been that  we felt it preferable that as much control as  possible over local affairs should reside in  local hands. The difficulties and  frustrations of dealing with a distant  centralized bureaucracy are very real and  usually very difficult. In the case of a  dispute at the present time it is possible to  pop into the local office and make one's  views known to the person directly  involved. In Victoria, even if you go there,  it is often difficult to find out just who it is  you should be talking to and if you do find  out you then have the problem of gaining  access to them through the protective  layering of lesser bureaucrats.  There is always some irritation implicit  ir dealing with regulatory bodies  whereever they are and sometimes the  irritation of dealing with the local  regulatory body may be vexatious. Orderly  living does demand some regulation,  however, and on the whole the Regional  Government has served this area well. Nor  has the development of the area been  stultified during the period of Regional  Government, in fact the last ten years have  been years of almost constant growth here  on the Sunshine Coast and it will be a great  shame if local control is taken from us just  as it appears that we are learning how to  work co-operatively with each other.  Perhaps most unsettling of all is the fact  that the centralized control, if it comes, will  be in the hands of a government about  which some very serious doubts already  exist. In establishing an appeal board over  the heads of the Land Commissioners the  government effectively centralized control  over the disposal of agricultural lands in  the province of British Columbia and  recent developments in Langley and in  Chilliwack raise some very serious doubts  indeed about the responsiblility of the  present government. In the case of the  Agricultural Land Reserves, brought in by  the N.D.P. government and lauded by the  federal government as worthy of study and  possible emulation in the rest of Canada,  the Socreds did not dare dismantle the  program entirely but rendered it so  ineffectual that at the present time the  Land Commissioners are unable to meet,  lacking a quorum because of resignations  brought about by cabinet meddling.  "The Minister's developer friends are  screaming," said Director Joe Harrison at  a recent meeting and predicted that the  centralization of power would make one  giant pork barrel of the province of  British Columbia. If Harrison is right, and  he could well be, we could be soon looking  back with bitter regret on the loss of  Regional Government.  Let's consider the marina  Decision time draws near on the  "Question of the Gibsons Marina and  residents of the Village would do well to  think the question through carefully,  attend the public meeting, and generally  inform themselves before voting. It is  understood that there exists in many a  desire to leave the Village as unchanged as  possible. Change is always unsettling and  many residents, particularly older  residents are understandably not anxious  to undergo the unsettling process.  Nevertheless the lovely lower Village of  Gibsons has become in the last few years  something of the sick man of the Sunshine  Coast. Elderly residents have lost  convenient access to a pharmacy within  walking distance; the hardware store has  moved up the hill; the Elphinstone Co-op  after sixty years was forced to close its  doors and business after business has  struggled for existence, often  unsuccessfully.  If the Village around the lovely harbour  is to be restored to its rightful historic place  as one of the thriving jewels of the  Sunshine Coast it is possible that the time  has come for a positive step away from the  sad decline of the last few years, perhaps a  series of steps. As an entity which has long  called the harbour area in Gibsons its  home, the Coast News is most anxious that  the flavour and style of the historic Village  be preserved and strengthened. Such  preservation and strengthening must not  be confused with stagnation, however.and  the proponents of the Marina porposal  deserve a fair and thoughtful hearing.  At the present time Gibsons men who  for generations have gone to sea from this  harbour are finding it almost impossible to  tic up in their home port because of  crowding and the inadequate facilities.  They deserve a home port which offers  them a safe harbour and without some  provision being made for the pleasure craft  that choke the present facilities no such  decent berthing can be afforded them.  The time may come for the lower Village  to step bravely into the future. Hopefully it  will be a future different in kind but not in  quality. The Marina proposal deserves a  fair hearing and the thoughtful decision of  an open mind. We have been assured that it  is economically feasible and cost effective  and that it will be self-supporting. Let's  consider it.  ...from the files of the COAST NEWS  FIVE YEARS AGO  High freight rates between the  Sunshine Coast and Vancouver raise  the ire of the Gibsons Voters  Association.  Helene Wallinder opens her Attic  Antiques store in Lower Village.  Sechelt Council decides to wait till  next year to complete paving within the  Village.  Local  man Allan Plourde has a  perfect 29 hand in cribbage whilst a  patient in St. Mary's Hospital.  TEN YEARS AGO  Gibsons Pentecostal Tabernacle  completes the renovation of its  building after the recent increase in  size.  Coast Garibaldi Health Unit district  officials are still trying to get a third  health inspector for the area.  Bank of Montral announces reduced  service charges for those over age 65.  FIFTEEN YEARS AGO  Increased air mail costs have  produced a new eight-cent stamp to  cover cost of air mail.  Les Peterson of Elphinstone  Secondary School was awarded a $250  MacMillan Bloedel award for his  History Of The Sechelt Nation which  appeared in the Coast News.  Canada Savings Bonds are offered  to the public at a five percent interest  rate.  TWENTY YEARS AGO  Gibsons Council gives the Fire  Department its consent to purchase a  second fire siren to cover the upper  levels areas.  Sechelt will soon get a new R.C.M.P.  headquarters, MP W.H. Payne  announces from Ottawa.  Fresh local eggs are advertised for.  sale at 95 cents for two dozen.  TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO  Not available.  THIRTY YEARS AGO  Heavy wind and rain toppled a large  tree on the highway causing re-routing  of through traffic.  Forty-five women attended a shower  for the burnt-out Garry family in  Sechelt, providing necessities for their  new home.  THIRTY-FIVE YEARS AGO  Power shortages and the loss of the  newspaper material in the mail create  publishing difficulties for the Coast  News.  Ken Woods and Nick Gibbon are the  new owners of Peninsula Cabs.  Looking towards North Shore, 1928. Photo, obviously taken from  another plane, shows Western Canada Airways Catalina flying boat  against Lynn Valley. It also reveals the fact that, only two decades into  fixed wing aviation, aerial photography had become a precise art.  Marine Drive can be seen in the foreground, Keith Road across middle,  below Grouse Mountain, and Lynn Creek to right. Photo courtesy Jim  Leith, in memory of J.T. White, and Elphinstone Pioneer Museum.  L.R. Peterson  ^m*tma��  Musings  John Burnside  Slings & Arrows  >*  George Matthews  ^  The recent return of Premier and the details tell us how B.C.  Bennett must have gladdened Hydro intervened with two  the hearts of all Socred Sletters to the Environment and  supporters���as well as those of'* fLand Use Committee urging  us with a sneaking regard for 'that 626 acres of Fraser Valley  old Western movies. Agricultural Reserve be turned  Brought up on a cinematic    over  for industrial develop-  diet of Hopalong Cassidy  movies myself, and with visions  of Alan Ladd in Shane or John  Wayne in a hundred movies  dancing in my head, I must  confess I was moved to  admiration as the premier, all  steely-eyed determination and  blue-jowled grimness rode  figuratively into town to clean  up the mess that had developed  in his absence. It smacked of  Marshall Matt Dillon re-  imposing law and order with  tough authority after a few of  the boys had got out of line.  Sheriff, I beg your pardon,  Premier Bennett vowed to get  to the bottom of the so-called  'dirty tricks' business and to  run whoever was responsible  for the absurd campaign of  writing phony letters right out  of town. The impression he  sought to convey was that a few  of the party faithful had strayed  from the rigid line of ethical  purity laid down for their  guidance by the premier  himself.  There is some evidence,  however, that the party faithful  were reacting to a comment of  the premier's last year when he  lamented that NDP followers  were more active in writing to  thc papers than were his  supporters and the fact that an  executive assistant in the office  of Deputy Premier Grace  McCarthy was somehow  involved in thc whole seedy  nonsense is perhaps an  indication that the good  premier may not have been as  far removed from the unethical  conduct as he would have us  believe.  Nor, let it be said, is the  business of the phony letters  thc only thing that could lead  one to question the ethics of  this makeshift government of  political opportunists who rode  into office on the coat tails of  Old Papa Bennett a few years  ago from a variety of warring  camps.  I have beside me Page A4 of  the Vancouver Province dated  October 7. There are four main  headlines on the page. At the  top of the page is columnist  Allen Garr's column with the  headline B.C. Hydro was in  league with farmland developer,  ment. As we all know the land  .was in fact freed from the land  reserve with Langley MLA Bob  McClelland sitting on the  Committee. The land was  turned over to a group called  Gloucester Properties Ltd.  fronted by Ms. Ainslie Loretto,  a McClelland campaign  worker. Also on the committee  was Energy Minister Jim  Hewitt, the cabinet's man on  the Hydro Board of Directors.  | The letters from Hydro to  the Environment and Land Use  Committee were written by a  Mr. Hoz Maeno who referred  {to a company called Columbia  Estate Company Ltd., a private  and non-reporting company  with a Mr. Bob Bonner as its  president, saying that  Columbia Estate had holdings  in the area and would  participate in the industrial  development that Gloucester  Properties had in mind.  It was apparently enough to  get the huge chunk of  agricultural land turned over to  the developers and led to the  resignation of another member  of the Land Commissioners  who used to be in charge of  hearing appeals on agricultural  land until the Socreds  instituted an appeal procedure  over their heads recently.  The land in question had a 6 -  3 vote from the local regional  board that it stay in the A.L.R.  Twice previously the land  commission had rejected  appeals that it be released. The  Mayor of Matsqui had written  pleading that it stay within the  reserve. All to no avail.  The next headline down on  Page A4 of the October 7  Province read, Loss of prime  farmland worries two prominent  Socreds. The two prominent  Socreds were a past Minister of  Agriculture and a man reputed  to be a future Minister of  Agriculture.  The headline below that  reads, $15 million worth of land  fuels debate between Hydro and  the government, and then below  that we have Uranium  controversy to greet Bennett,  and deals with a story which  has a uranium company test  drilling for uranium on  Okanagan   farm   property  owned by the Bennetts. The  premier's brother says that he  told the company to put back  his fences, restore the land and  not to knock down any trees.  Now what could be more  environmentally conscious  than that?  The point is that there is  some distinct cause for unease  when one contemplates the  activities of the ruling party in  British Columbia in key areas  such as the Agricultural Land  Reserve. There are vast short-  term fortunes to be made in  British Columbia, never mind  if valuable farm land is lost to a  hungry world which will see its  population double again by the  end of the century. When  cabinet ministers sit in  committee to overturn  decisions to the benefit of party  workers  one  grows uneasy.  When even Socreds are worried  about the loss of agricultural  land, why should the  government's opposition, rest  easy. When uranium drilling is  going on on land associated  with the premier himself while  he continues to vow there is no  nuclear energy in the province's  future, one may be permitted to  wonder.  And finally when one  contemplates the meandering  document about the future of  regional government recently  released by the government and  notes that the only firm  proposals it seems to contain is  that land use planning be taken  out of local hands, or, at the  very least, there be an appeal  procedure which will leave the  future of all land development  in the province in the hands of  the Socred cabinet, one cannot  avoid considerable misgivings.  So, while Premier Bennett as  the Lone Ranger might bring  comfort to the minds of those  content with the simplistic view  of good and evil one comes  across in B-grade western  movies, there is little comfort  for the rest of us with a more  complex view of the world and  with lingering suspicions that  the problems of ethics  confronting the province of  British Columbia at the present  time are of a more serious  nature that a few silly letters to  the editors of newspapers over  forged signatures.  I had a special opportunity  to practice my trade last  Friday. Since I've been going to  school myself for a qouple of  months and sitting on the othet;,  side of the ledum I haven't had  a chance to do any teaching. I  find I really miss it, although  being a student is certainly  much easier than teaching.  Last Friday I had half a  dozen grade five students for  about an hour. These kids were  extremely bright and their  teacher, wanting to give them  something challenging to work  on while she tried to cope with  the 23 other less gifted students  suggested they put out a class  newspaper. My job was to take  the six of them and help them  get started.  The teacher suggested I take  the kids down to the staff room  where we could work in relative  peace and quiet. Now I've  never taught elementary school  before and I knew I had to  adjust my style to younger kids.  As it turned out, the usual  happened, the teacher ended up  learning more than the  students. I knew these were  bright kids because the teacher  told me, but I had no idea just  how clever they were.  The first thing I learned was  that ten year olds who are  mentally active are also  physically active. Where some  people have a tough time  thinking while sitting down  these kids could do about three  things at once and still come up  with bright ideas. Jeff, one of  the boys, displayed the  amazing ability of being able to  write with his right hand while  reading a newspaper at the  same time as he was explaining  to me how he was going to  approach writing an entertainment column. While all this  remarkable activity was going  on he was fighting off James  with his left hand and telling  Donna how to spell his last  name.  James, oh the other hand,  while fighting with Jeff, was  printing out his column while  carrying on a running dialogue  with Cheryl-Dean about some  totally unrelated matter while  at the same time asking me the  occasional question about how  he should track down a story  on an egg throwing incident  that had occurred the day  before.  The four girls were a little  mcye sedate. They weren't  fighting. I noticed however,  that each was doing three or  four things at once. One was  drawing a cartoon, carrying on  two conversations and  answering a puzzle all at one  time. On the surface, the whole  thing looked like total chaos,  but as I made the rounds from  one to another of the kids, I  could see that their work was  careful and precise and that the  questions they asked were  direct and to the point. The  interesting thing was that they  functioned in this atmosphere  extremely well, while it was me  who was having trouble  keeping up with the level of  mental activity.  Starting out, I had planned  to explain a few basic principles  of journalism; writing, layout,  production, editing and  distribution. I thought this  would be about all the children  could handle. As it turned out,  they grasped these principles in  about five minutes and were  ready for something else. Were  I to do the lesson again, with  these particular kids, I think we  could have planned, written  and proof read at least four  pages of copy in the one hour  we worked together.  I had fun working with these  kids; they were intelligent,  gregarious, polite and very  highly motivated, even the last  thing on a Friday afternoon.  I've often noticed that teachers,  Please tum to page three  I..I  (O  oO  ma  Twenty-four years  Twenty-lour year* remind the tear* ol my eye*.  (Bury the dead tor tear that they walk to tha grave  In labour.)  In the groin ot the natural doorway I crouched  Ilk* a tailor  Sawing a throud lor a Journey  By the light ot Ihe meat-eating tun.  Dressed to die, the sensual strut began  With my red vein* lull ol money,  In th* final direction ol the elementary town  I advance tor a* long a* forever I*.  Dylan Thorn** Coast News, October 23,1979  3.  8oW take  (lac da-ftan/taa)  -   t(VL3K>.<���b'  mmm.        ^   -    "       ���  ���  ^y��  lomasa.  o,mt$     mJii  DOING OUR BEST TO BE RIGHT FOR YOU  hir.mi.ii* hi* wrkl  Sitting on all th��5t  r��f*tfta ������.  Utters to the Editor *-���,..  Browning readies for defence  Editor:  Re your criticism of thc  recent mock attacks on our  Coast: it is probable that they  were carried out to study  problems of defence rather/  than attack. There is nothing  more unlikely than Canadians  attacking someone else's  coastline because we have  loom to expand and raw  materials a plenty. But when a  foreign power (no not Russia)  attacks us with our small  provision made for defence,  there   will   be   plenty   of  problems. For instance, the  problem of quickly deploying  forces at threatened points,  presumably by helicopter, also  supplies, armaments, ammunition, counter attacks.  There will be parachute  drops inland too. Also it is not  known except by experiment  how much and if the Americans  could help us with their own  coastline threatened.  An excellent place for an  enemy landing would be Davis  Bay. The Sunshine Coast  would be a difficult place for a  Not going to take it  Editor:  According to Dr. Gotham,  Professor of Medical Physics, it  can now be ascertained that a  person's cancer had a  probability, say of 43% or 98%  of being caused by radiation;  that while we cannot say that  everyone exposed to ionizing  radiation will develop cancer,  we can say that in any  particular area 37% might get  it. Dr. Mancuso's work  indicates that even miniscule  doses, far below the  "acceptable safe level" can be  carcinogenic. Dr. Bertell's  studies on the environmental  factors leading to cancer  conclude that cancer is  becoming an epidemic; that  one in three to four people will  contract cancer. Not all of these  people will survive. Many are  children.  This means that in your  community or close circle of  friends, one in three or four will  go the long painful route of  cancer. One of these might be a  child or a nephew, a niece.  If British Columbia goes into  uranium mining, our radio  active future is ensured in a  very short time. It would not be  long before we caught up with  radiant Ontario.  However, the situation is not  hopeless. It could be stopped. If  we insisted, en masse, that our  governments cease and desist  all promotion and support of  'the nuclear and uranium  industries, it would stop. (Did  you know that our tax dollars  are used to subsidize the Candu  reactor, here and abroad?)  If we could stop it now, we  might be able to rebuild the  human species, while there is  still a fairly strong genetic pool  to draw upon.  But lime is running out.  These doctors warn us that as  our genetic code becomes  damaged by radiation, we will  produce more and more  defective offspring. This is  already happening. THERE  ARE MORE CHILDREN  BEING BORN, PER CAPITA, WITH SERIOUS BIRTH  DEFECTS TODAY THAN  EVER BEFORE, IN SPITE  OF OUR SO-CALLED  HIGHER  STANDARD OF  lot of people to get oul of in a  hurry especially if the ferries  were on strike. But to avoid  some of the rush, we ancients  could be used in positions of  defence. Many of us are too  stiff and old lo run away, so we  would jusl have to keep on  tiring our machine guns, rifles,  spears or bow and arrows or  whatever weapons our  superiors thought we could be  trusted with to do less harm to  each other rather than the  enemy. Yours truly,  John. S. Browning.  LIVING.   '  If we do not act to prevent  this, because of our negligence,  apathy, self-centeredness and  fear, we will be responsible for  condemning the human species  to an ever-deteriorating future.  We will not be around to  shoulder the blame, but our  children will.  The pity and the outrage of it  all is, that there are safe, viable,  non-polluting alternate energy  technologies which would not  only maintain our standard o'f  living, but improve upon it by  way of refining the quality of  life and eliminating wastage  and pollution. However, our  governments and the Trilateral  corporatiohs behind them will  not give way on this unless  there is an overwhelming  public uproar.  Thus   our   silence   simply  paves the way for these vested  interests to grab the money and  run while our children are left  holding the bag. Therefore I  ask you, where is your voice?  Mad as hell and not going  to take it any more!  J. Hearne  Editor:  Perhaps there is some rhyme  or reason behind what begins  to look like an interminable  series of changes in the ferry  schedule following one another  in rapid succession. If there is,  explanations to the populace of  the Sunshine Coast and its  visitors would be appreciated.  It would be particularly  interesting to learn why the  6:30 a.m. ferry was moved back  to 6:20 a.m. These apparently  arbitrary changes have  inconvenienced commuters  and have also resulted in many  travellers from the lower  mainland missing ferries.  Yours truly  Allan Crane  Slings(cont'd)  particularly elementary  teachers, look a little shell-  shocked on a Friday afternoon.  After only one hour with six  kids I know why that is. I guess  the most important thing I  learned was that teaching  youngsters is very hard work.  How, for example, did the  teacher of these kids handle  their energy and diverse  abilities during a regular week.  She has to plan lessons which  help the slower children to  learn while at the same time  ttying to keep the very bright ���  kinds interested. She has 28  students and she has to help  them all learn at their own  speed five hours a day five days  a week for close to 200 days a  year.  I've been teaching school for  ten years, working mostly with  kids 15 to 18 years old. Just  between you and me, I don't  think I could keep up with this  grade five teacher.  Emergency Planning  proves its worth  Kditor:  The Emergency Planning  Committee of the Sunshine  Coast convened a meeting of all  emergency agencies that  attended the recent Sechelt air  crash to assess the effectiveness  of this community's ability to  respond to unexpected  emergencies.  It is our community's  responsibility to respond to this  type of disaster with the  resources at our disposal.  When these are used up  assistance is received from your  Provincial Emergency Program.  In this accident the local*  resources of Police, Fire,  Ambulance, Rescue, Hospital  and Auxiliaries gained much  experience. While we were  fortunate that this accident  turned out well, there were  many lessons learned.  These are:  1. Emergencies can happen at  any time. . '  2. All emergency agencies and  councils must have disaster  plans and must have the  ability to execute them.  3. Communications amongst  the various agencies must be  improved not only for this  type of accident but for the  day to day emergencies.  4. Crowd Control is a very  serious problem.  5. Responsibilities of outside  agencies (coroner - MOT  etc.) must be better  understood.  The residents of the Villages  and the Regional District  should be proud of R.C.M.P.  and the many volunteers in the  Fire, Ambulance, Rescue and  Auxiliaries    as   well   as   a  dedicated hospital staff for the  way they responded to this  emergency.  The Area P.E.P. Coordinator, Art MePhee has  worked tirelessly to put disaster  plans in place for every  emergency. This Real Accident  has proven once again that his  efforts have 'paid off.  David Hunter, Chairman  Emergency Committee  See our  Bargain Shelf  for good buys  NDP Bookstore 1  Stock Reduction  SALE  Ends Next Sat. Oct. 27  new XL-100  color TV  '20" picture tube (48 cm diagonal picture)  Reg. $669.95  Sal0 $535.96  save $133.88  FD450  )   |lfi/% ELECTRONICS  J&C & APPLIANCES  Closing Out Our Cowrie Street Store  885-2568   RATEPAYERS  R HAUL.  DISTRICT  HEAR HARRY ALMOND AND  JOE HARRISON OF THE  S.C. REGIONAL DISTRICT  DISCUSS  FUTURE WASTE DISPOSAL AND GARBAGE  COLLECTION FOR AREA A  POLLUTION, SEWERS AND DEVELOPMENT  CHANGES TO REGIONAL DISTRICTS  THE COUNTY SYSTEM  MADEIRA SCHOOL 2:00 P.m.  SUNDAY 0CT0DER 26th  ��1IJ m4 \m  Gibsons  SUNNYCREST  *%   CENTRE  100% Locally Owned & Operated  GOVT INSPECTED   SWIFTS PREMIUM  butterball turkey  8 lbs. & up    GR.  $1.25  O ($2.84 kg)  FRESH WHOLE  frying chicken  o  PREVIOUSLY FROZEN  pork ?ide spareribs  GOVT INSPECTED GR. A. BEEF  prime rib roast  Super-Valu Choice  whole  tomatoes  796 ml tin  Duncan Hines Deluxe II  layer cake  mixes  Cloverleaf  chunk light  tuna  184 gm tin  Maple Leal  canned  ham  ��  $1.29  $2.39  $3.69  $1.65  grape  juice  ! 1*. I lire Bottle  $3.89  $1.5��f  Oven Fresh  breads of  the world      2/$1.49  16 oz loaves  OverrFresh  crusty  buns95c  Maxwell House  coffee  Super-Valu  ice cream  All Flavours 2 litre ctr  Minute Maid  orange  juice $1.09  355 ml  Super-Valu  margarine  prints t  454 gm  Ingersoll  process cheese  spread $1.59  454 gm Bottle  Oven Fresh  apple  pies s        ��..���.... $1.69  Oven Fresh  cupcakes  CANADA tt 1  potatoes  $1.39  ARIZONA  lemons  mums  Prices effective:     Oct. 23,24,25, 26, 27  3.99  Tues.,Wed.,Thurs.,Fri.,Sat. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm  Coast News, October 23,1979  To Shear The Dark Shores   PartIV   During the 14 year span of  Rogers' logging activity for the  Hasting's Company and  Captain Stamp, there were  several men of lesser note  operating camps. One of these  was Jonathan Sitler who began  logging in the Lumberman's  Arch area of Stanley Park in  1866. He apparently worked  the rich timber of the Park  Peninsula until 1871, selling his  product to Moodyville rather  than the Hastings Mill.  Following this period, all the  logs gleaned from the Park area  went to Hastings who, while  they had no legal claim to thc  wood, had apparently pulled  some governmental strings.  There is little definite  information concerning the  subsequent logging of Stanley  Park although there were  reportedly five camps located  there at various times. One of  these was known to have been  in Coal Harbour opposite  Dead Man's Island. Where the  remaining three were situated is  anybody's guess. Some sort of  logging continued in the Park  until at least 188S. In 1890, the  reserve was leased to the City of  Vancouver and any further  timber removal forbidden.  Jerry Roger's successor as  chief contractor for Hastings  Mills was a crusty Scot called  Angus Fraser. He had begun  working for the Company in  I87S at an unspecified location  on English Bay. While the exact  site of this initial cutting is not  recorded, it was evidently in  prime timber. According to one  authority   he   cut   9,470,000  Pages from a Life-Log  Peter Trower  board feet from 80 acres during  1875.  Fraser worked for Hastings  in a sub-contractural capacity  until 1879 when Roger's  untimely death occasioned his  promotion to top-dog in the  lumbering division of the  Company. At this time, he took  over the reins at Jericho Camp  and also the Little Mountain  operation at Douglas Park.  Exactly how Fraser rated as  bull-of-the-woods in comparison with his doughty  predecessor is not known but  he was evidently a highly  competent logger. Under his  guidance things progressed  smoothly and with little  essential change for the next six  years.  During this period, steam-  yarding with wire rope was  tried for the first time, not by  Fraser but a man called J.M.  (Jack) Stewart, later to become  one of Vancouver's first police  chiefs. The system got its initial  test near Kitsilano Beach in  1882. It involved a steam-  capstan on a scow which was  nosed into the beach. A line  horse pulled the cable up the  skidroad where it was attached  to grab hooks driven into the  log. At the hooktender's signal,  the engineer threw open the  throttle and the log was  dragged to the water. This  earliest attempt at donkey  yarding was not markedly  successful as the logs tended to  slide off the skids and become  NIEBR00K LODGE)!  ��B  :n��l--  Iff  |On the Beautiful Sunshine Coast at Gower Pointj  ��� Guestrooms (BreakfastIncluded)  * Dining Room    886-9033  Your Hostess  ConnieAchterberg  hung-up behind stumps and  other obstacles. Stewart soon  discarded his device and  returned to the tried-and-true  bull-teams. But the maiden  attempt was a prophecy of  things to come.  In 1886, Angus Fraser  opened a new camp on the river  that bore his surname. It was  the first large operation on the  south slope of the Hastings  lease. This camp was located on  the property of a Charles  Cridland at the junction of  Fraser Avenue and River  Road. Fraser had purchased  timber on several preemptions  in the vicinity and now sent his  fallers into Lot C of the  Hastings holdings. Hc was  shortly to encounter a special  problem when hauling began  downhill to thc new booming  grounds on the Fraser River.  The timber on thisside of the  Peninsula did not extend to the  water's edge as was the case at  English Bay. In many places it  was separated from the  riverbank by half a mile or  more of muskeg or fiat, marshy  ground. The expense of  building roads and skidding  logs over this manner of terrain  was prohibitive. The dilemma  was solved by the excavation of  large ditches or canals down  which the logs could be floated  easily to the river. One of these  used by Fraser ran through Lot  311 to the east of the  Musqueam Indian Reserve and  was known as Magee's Ditch. It  was fed by a small stream, the  logs being let down in stages by  means of three floodgates as in  a lock system. Another such  canal called Daniel's Ditch  once existed further up the  Fraser, roughly halfway  between Cambie Street and  Westminster Avenue and there  were undoubtedly more at  various points along the boggy  river's edge.  Fraser continued to use the  steam traction engines that  Jerry Rogers had instituted but  their activities remained  confined to the English Bay  area. There is no record of their  ever being used on the North  Arm of the Fraser but the soft  ound undoubtedly precluded  the wheels only were employed  by Fraser in logging the timber  stands near Little Mountain  but exactly what such usage  implied is not made clear.  The Scotsman logged on the  Hastings lease until 1866. After  this time, the bulk of the lease  must have been cut over at least  once. Timber stands were often  logged several. times in this  period. At first, only the prime  Fir and Cedar was taken but in  subsequent cuttings, the  loggers were considerably less  picky although the despised  Hemlock was still generally  ignored. That a plentiful supply  of good timber still remained at  this late date, even on the well-  worked English Bay foreshore  is indicated by the fact that in  June 1885, Fraser applied for a  lease on the Jericho Reserve  and the area between it and  Point Grey. The lease was  denied since Hastings still  controlled the preemption  rights on these tracts. Shortly,  arrangements were made with  the C.P.R. that prevented any  further cutting privileges being  granted on English Bay.  While Angus Fraser was the  most important of the Hastings  contractors in the post-Rogers'  years, the partners Daggett and  Furry were also very actively  involved in cutting timber for  Hastings during the same  period. Although these men  presumably had Christian  names, they are not revealed in  contemporary records. They  were simply Daggett and  Furry. This intrepid team  logged Lot B of the Hastings  lease, also on the North Arm of  the Fraser but further west. In  addition to this, they cut timber  on the government reserve at  Point Grey. Robert Preston  who had been Rogers' foreman  and close friend throughout the  New Brunswicker's latter  career, entered into partnership  with Daggett and Furry after  Rogers' death. He established a  camp near the Musqueam  Reserve in about 1880 and  remained here a year.  Evidently, this association did  not work too well as by 1882 >  Preston is known to have been  working as a teamster for  Angus Fraser. It is conceivable  that there was some rivalry  between the two partners and  the Scotsman as they worked  their adjoining tracts.  Lynn Vernon as she appeared recently in the opera  Cavillirla Rusticana in Vancouver. See the review on  Page 5  Vernon successful in  debut as soprano  by Allan J. Crane  The opening of the opera  season at the Queen Elizabeth  Theatre on Saturday, October  13, was the occasion for more  operatic debuts than faces  familiar to the Vancouver  Opera Association's regular  opera goers. Both the director  and the conductor were making  their first appearances for the  Association, and five of the  nine featured roles were sung  by singers making' their  operatic debuts in Vancouver.  These were made with varying  degrees of success.  Lyn Vernon made her debut  as a soprano in Cavalleria  Rusticana. (She previously sang  a small part in La Traviata and  has sung major mezzo-soprano  roles in Europe and in  Australia as well as in Canada).  There was no sign of the voice  being pushed in the soprano  range for Santuzza, Turridu's  forsaken lover who tells Lola's  husband, Alfio, that Lola has  been deceiving him with  Turridu. Her big aria, Vol lo  sapete, O Mama, in which she  tells Turridu's mother Mamma  Lucia of her son's misdoings,  was expressively sung with  good vocal quality. From her  first moments on the stage, it  was apparent that she has an  impressive stage presence. In  her duet with Alfio informing  him of his wife's infidelity, she  swooped up to a note at one  point, but this was a small  distraction in the stirring and  dramatic rendition which Lyn  Vernon and Alan Monk gave  this music.  Lyn has expressed an interest  in singing the title role in La  Tosca which is to be performed  by the Vancouver Opera  Association in its next season.  On the merits of her  performance as Santuzza this  evening, she would make a fine  Tosca. She is not scheduled to  sing the role. Perhaps now that  Vancouver's opera goers have  heard Lyn Vernon's dramatic  soprano, they will look forward  to her Tosca in some  subsequent production of that  opera and to other roles also in  the dramatic soprano  repertoire.  In the role of Alfio in  Cavallaria Rusticana, Alan  Monk made a most impressive  debut. Singing in both operas,  the only performer to do so, he  was also Tonio in I Pagllaccl. In  the first opera, he had difficulty  in getting his whip to crack on  cue, but he was vocally and  histrionically splendid in both  operas.  Another impressive debut  was that of James McCracken  as Canio in I Pagllaccl, the  clown in the players who finds  that his wife, Nedda, is not  simply playing the role of the  faithless lover in their play but  she is also deceiving him in real  life. The fifty-two year old  tenor confounded any critics  who may have regarded his  career as in decline by giving a  stirring and moving performance in this celebrated  tenor role.  Making his Vancouver  Opera Association debut as  Turridu in that opera, Dennis  Bailey was loudly applauded,  but I found his voice  constricted and inflexible.  High-level noise. You can't see it or feel it,  but it's one of the worst hazards of the work  place. Where possible, employers should  control it at its source. In the meantime,  it's up to you to wear proper  hearing protection. Otherwise  your hearing may become  more and more impaired. And  that damage will be permanent.  Protect'yourself. Starting now.  $  WORKERS'COmPENSATION BOARD SSK  W55 Heatrer Sdetf Vjr  1. BC V5Z 3L8. Telephone ?fi6-03li Tcie�� 04 b  Clje  Cellars; 3fnn  886-9815  Live Entertainment  / Steppin ,  i  out ��  Thurs. Fri. sat.  Oct. 25.20.27  , o:oo p.m. to  by Rae Ellingham  General Notes: At last, three-  week astrological trend begins  to fade. What has been  concerning each one of us is  finally settled despite heated  and emotional interchanges.  Venus, planet of love and  compromise, squares the  impulsive Mars indicating a  time of stonger feelings and  desires. Next weekend, Venus  ���also conjoins the wayward  Uranus promising a brief  period of unusual experiences  with strange people.  ARIES (March 21 - April 19)  Circumstances surrounding  other people's money or  possessions continue to stir  your feelings. Realize there's  nothing you can do now to  influence loved one's ever-  changing financial situation.  Meanwhile, romantic and  social involvements become  more passionate and intense.  Resistance is lowest next  weekend. Those longing for  kids of their own are reminded  that conditions for propagation are just right.  TAURUS (April 20 ��� May 20)  Accent is on unusual  relations with close associates,  business partners and daily  companions. Most people will  not react the way you expect.  Loved one may display  strangest mood yet so have  patience. Pent up emotional  issue could be reason for  domestic spat. Postpone all  rental or real estate decisions.  Taurus persons marrying this  week are wished the best of  luck. Those born around May  11 must prepare for shocks and  surprises.  GEMINI (May 21 - June 21)  Work scene or place of  drudgery is still centre of  sudden disagreements.  Complaints concerning quality  of workmanship or services will  keep phones ringing and  messages arriving. A few of you  will be tempted to down tools  and abandon assignments.  Urge to charge around madly  should again be controlled.  Highway driving needs extra  care all week.  CANCER (June 22 -July 22)  Emphasis is still on unusual  social activities and enjoying  yourself where you're  forbidden to go. Those  romantically enmeshed must  prepare for sudden break-ups  or infatuation with stranger  who's not really your type.  Stormy weekend love-life will  leave a few of you wrecked.  Silly disagreement over who  should pay may be cause of  emotional scene.  LEO (July 23 - Aug. 22)  Looks like many of you will  be rushing into original venture  without first checking facts and  figures or informing those with  whom you live. Remember that  any upset around the home is  still linked to your selfishness  and noise. Any rental or real  estate papers should be put  aside until November. Leos  born Aug. 9 - 14 experience  craziest week yet.  VIRGO ( Aug. 23 - Sept. 22)  Final week to tolerate all  forms of exasperating short-  distance communications.  Routine journeys or visits face  Elliiiiiliain s  ���   .Astrology  unexpected diversions. Rude  letter demands you put aside  top priority. Harsh words with  person you least suspect  uncover shady scheme.  Weekend disturbance is linked  to your nearest neighbours.  Meanwhile, for a good night's  sleep, leave the phone off the  hook.  LIBRA (Sept. 23 - Oct. 23)  Matters linked to personal  cash situation or possessions  remain unstable. This is the  week you could lose  everything. Advice is to ignore  friends' pressure concerning  how your resources should be  channeled. Stay away from  impulsive venture you don't  understand. Don't purchase  unusual item for the sake of  impressing associate. For the  sake of peace and quiet, repay  overdue loan to whining  companion.  SCORPIO (Oct. 24 - Nov. 22)  You have only till the end of  this month to take advantage of  your irresistible personality  and increased sex-appeal.  Enjoy all the attention you can  get while you can. Many of you  are still in the mood to change  appearance with daring  hairstyle or outrageous outfit  of clothes. However, realize  that bosses and superiors may  already be tiring of your  excessive vanity and self-  indulgence. November 13  birthdays will soon be jolted  back to reality.  SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -  Dec. 21)  Once again spotlight is on  personal hidden matters.  Chances are you'll resent noisy  interference during activity you  assumed was private.  Unexpected visitor from  remote place could be source of  intrusion. You're reminded to  stay clear of known tricksters  and fly-by-night operators.  Prepare for sudden visit to  hospital or other institution.  CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 -  Jan. 19)  Looks like long-range  project or group activity faces  delay through argument over  shared expenses. Uninvolved  friend or bystander may be  dragged into the fracas.  Meanwhile, avoid bankers and  financial experts. Fascinating  or unusual person now appears  on social scene. Passionate  entanglement with old  acquaintance proves what you  already suspected.  AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Matters linked to personal  advancement and community  standing are again subject to  unexpected disruptions. The  idea of quitting monotonous  position in favour of more  stimulating opening stirs you to  action. Be warned that close  associate may attack unfairly  your need for variety and  change. Interviews with bosses  or superiors will be emotional  and memorable.  PISCES (Feb. 19 ��� Mar. 20)  Accent is still on disagreements where you perform  routine services and duties.  Seems that co-workers have  had enough of your 'high and  mighty' ideas. They'll remind  you that your philosophy has  become outdated and  impractical.  'I'  5pm. - x  midnight  iV>  \llI#IIL4l|-%  886-2888 ���BOTH  MM  RM  MMMMl  Off the shelf  by John Moore  Civilization, as we understand it, is almost inseparable  from the ideas of settled,  ordered existence, reasonably  complex technology, and  consequent freedom from the  fundamental uncertainties of  survival. It might seem to  follow then, that the tent, home  and hearth of nomadic culture  in almost every part of the  world, and the simplest shelter  of man, (most versions can be  erected in less than one hour), is  also the most primitive.  Torvald Faegre's book Tents:  Architecture of the Nomads,  currently available from  Doubleday/Anchor Books  (1979) at $7.75, should put that  comfortable notion to rest once  and for all. It reminds us that  simplicity is no guarantee of  primitiveness; often it is rather  one of the more significant  ingredients of sophistication.  True nomadism, Faegre  points out in his introduction,  is not man's "primitive"  original state, nor is the tent his  original dwelling. Though only  a fine line of definition  separates the portable tent  from the stationary hut, these  two structures represent  radically different states of  being. The mutual distrust and  hostility of the nomadic  shepherd and the settled farmer  or urbanite is as old, he  observes, as the Biblical story  of Cain and Abel. Cain, the  farmer, slew his herdsman  brother out of jealousy of his  favour with God, and  throughout the Old Testament,  God is unmistakably on the  side of the nomads. Abraham,  a city-bred man, takes to the  tents -and finds such favour  with God as to become the  father of his people. His  brother, Lot, by contrast takes  up residence ip the infamous  city of Sodom and it is only  through Abraham's intercession that he escapes  destruction when God  punishes the city-dwellers for  their wickedness. Abraham's  first son, Ishmael, becomes the  father of perhaps the greatest of  all nomadic peoples; the Arabs.  Nomads have never been  popular with their settled  counterparts. They have been  accused of creating the very  deserts they inhabit with their  close-grazing herds. Faegre  points out that while, animals  iike the goat and the camel do  graze closely, they also manure  the pasture they survive on and  thus insure its renewal. He  observes that when the Soviet  government depopulated the  Kazakhstan grasslands in order  to "relcaim" them, the minimal  forage rapidly disappeared and  the area reverted to complete  wasteland.  Nomads have been stigmatized as thieves and vilified  for their arrogance and  laziness, and behind it all lurks  the ancient inferiority complex  of the "civilized" man, the  jealousy of Cain. More than  anything the farmer and the  city-dweller envy the nomad his  freedom, the streamlined  simplicity of his existence. They  have their comfort, their  security, but they are trapped  by their technology, at the  mercy of power structures and  bureaucracies, imprisoned by  their own property. The nomad  owns nothing he cannot carry  on his liprse or camel. He  plants his portable house where  he pleases, knowing that no  man can "own" the earth. The  logistics of his life are exacting  and harsh, but through self-  discipline he retains his  freedom. His shelter is a  masterpiece of engineering;  light in weight, suited to the  climate, simple to erect and  take down, yet strong enough  when raised to withstand the  most severe storms.  In addition to the fascinating  insights he offers into the  nature of nomadic life in  general and the lives of  particular groups that inhabit  the desert places of the world,  Torvald Faegre's Tents is a  mine of information, a  handbook on the construction  of tents. Though not intended  as such, it offers copious  illustrations and diagrams,  floorplans and notes on the  utilitarian use of minimal  space. He covers almost every  kind of tent in use, from the  Black Tent of the Bible, (still  standard issue in one form or  another in most of the Moslem  nomadic world), the mat and  skin tents of the Tuareg, the  Mongolian yurt, (so efficient  that modern designers,  including the Soviet government, have seen fit to create  "pre-fab yurts" out of modern  materials), to the most efficient  tent of all, the tipi of the North  American Plains Indians.  The nomadic world is  shrinking daily. Satellite  communications, supersonic  travel, and land reclamation  erode the great deserts and the  children of nomads attend  schools, listen to transistor  radios and ride motorcycles.  Torvald Faegre's Tents is not  only a significant contribution  to our knowledge of a  vanishing way of life, but a rich  source of ideas and insight into  the way the space in which we  live determines who and what  we are. All for now.  Coast News, October 23,1979  Robert Silverman gave a very successful piano recital in last Sunday's Countryside  Concert.  A memorable concert  by Allan J. Crane  Communicating with men  by Karin Hoemberg  Mary Bennett and Paul  Avery from Capilano College  are known for their successful  workshops on Communication.  Most women recognize that  the way they communicate with  men often differs from the way  the communicate with women.  Adults are well underway to  break the traditional roles  where the men take sole  responsibility for the economic  welfare of the family and where  the women carry out the  mother and wife role. The  picture is far more complex  today where these roles no  longer are clearly defined and  where a high percentage of  women are permanent  members of the work force.  Women often wonder why  they only earn part of the men's  salaries, why they have to be  twice as good as men to get into  higher positions, etc.; the  questions are endless and the  answers few and unsatisfactory  to most women. It is not only  the economic factor that  lothers women, but the whole  question about their approach  to men and vice versa.  It is well known that men and  women often communicate on  different frequency, otherwise  we would not see as many  tensions or marriage breakdowns. Many women hold on  to the image of the helpless  woman wanting protection  from the big strong man, and  when he later treats her like  that she gets furious! Or the  man who feels he belongs to the  superior male race demanding  his "rights" at all times and is  left wondering why she  deserted him because he always  supported the family to the  very best of his ability. The  examples of misunderstandings  due to lack of proper  communication are countless  as the stars in the sky on a  moonlit night.  This workshop aims at  clarifying roles, expectations  and behaviour. It will help  women to begin to understand  how they can identify the  reasons for the problems and  look at ways to better and more  effective communication.  When a sufficient number of  men are interested I will  schedule a similar workshop  for them; my hope is that the  third event will be a joint  venture, and we will see if the  proof really is in the puddingl  Communication With Men  takes place on October 27,9:30  a.m. - 4:30 p.m. in Roberts  Creek Elementary School. A  bag lunch is suggested. Please  mail the registration fee, $15,  before October 22, to  Continuing Education, Box 6,  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0.  For futher information  please call 885-3512.  The Sunshine Coast Arts  Council and Susan Elek the  organizer of the Countryside  Concerts, are to be congratulated in presenting the  exceptional and outstanding  piano recital by Robert  Silverman, which was heard in  the cafeteria of Elphinstone  Secondary School on Sunday  afternoon, October 21. Mr.  Silverman's talents were not  well served by the second rate  piano and the lifeless accoustics  of the cement rectangle in  which the concert was  presented, and I had to make  aural adjustments to compensate for the piano's muddy  bass and other limitations.  Mr. Silverman introduced his  concert by telling his audience  that they were about to hear an  unusual concert and that those  who were hoping for old  chestnuts wouldn't get them.  He started his concert with a  late composition of Frederick  Chopin (he was only 39 when he  died in 1849), his Fantasy in F  minor. This piece was  unfamiliar to me, as indeed was  everything else on the  programme. Even unfamiliar  Chopin, however, is like an old  chestnut for me particularly  when the nuances of his style  are captured as expressively as  they were in Mr. Silverman's  playing.  Robert Silverman explained  that the next piece on his  programme, a Sonatina by  Maurice Ravel, was an entry in  a contest sponsored by an Arts  Group in 1905. The contest was  cancelled because Ravel's was,  in fact, the only entry and it was  ineligible because it was 84  measures long rather than the  mandatory 75. This generally  quiet and reflective music made  an effective contrast to  Chopip's more flamboyant  style, and the essence of this  music of the French  Impressionist school was most  effectively captured in Mr.  Silverman's interpretation.  Continuing t programme  demonstrating contrasts in  style, the pianist next  performed the last ofa series of  24 Preludes and Fugues by the  recently deceased Soviet  composer Dimitri Shostakovich who is better known for  his symphonies that for his  piano music. I would heartily  endorse Mr. Silverman's  assessment of this piece as a  worthy composition, and his  belief in its worth was apparent  from the way he played the  music.  Robert Silverman concluded his concert with a  Sonata by Sergei Rachmaninoff  in B minor, Opus 24. Describing  this as a neglected masterpiece,  Mr. Silverman went on to say  that this technically very  difficult piece of music had not  even1 been   performed, in  I    3.  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  SUNSHINE COAST  ARTS COUNCIL  Juried Show  Entry Form  NAME OF ARTIST:  ADDRESS:  PHONE:  WORKS:  1. TITLE  MEDIUM  2. TITLE  MEDIUM  TITLE  MEDIUM  ^EGKk��&b  Artists to deliver up to three works  (labelled and ready to hang) to St.  Hilda's Anglican Church HaU,  Sechelt, between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m.,  .Saturday, November 3; 1979. Fee per  artist, $5.00.  Mall thli form to Sunshine  Coast Arta Council Juried  ���how, Box 15*5, Sechelt, B.C. or  dellrer to Artt Centra, Seehelt.  Vancouver and had probably  not been played previously  anywhere in Canada. He  thought the reason for its  neglect might be its length. Its  performance time is approximately 40 minutes but this  captivating Sonata did not  seem at all long. The artist  handled the scintillating and  technically demanding first  movement with poise and  assurance. The quiet and  meditative middle movement  was followed by a Final third  movement   which   well  illustrated Mr. Silverman's  wonderful control and fine  gradation of tone. Hereceived a  well deserved standing ovation  from the capacity audience, 162  strong.  This Rachmaninoff Sonata Is  to be recorded by Robert  Silverman during his next  recording session. It has  previously been recorded by  Michael Ponti and by John  Ogden. I will wait for the  Silverman recording before  adding a 'recording of this  lovely music to my collection.  The Sunshine Coast is indeed  fortunate in having an artist of  this calibre play here. This  concert was worthy of the  attention of the most particular  concert goers from Vancouver  or from anywhere else. One  soon forgot the indifferent  piano and poor accoustics as  Mr. Silverman wove his magic  through a most interesting  thrilling and memorable  concert.  WANTED  or Whai Have Vou  AL'S  USED FURNITURE  (D\ SUNSHINE  \*J KITCHENS  FINE CABINETS  886-9411  Gibsons,  Remember  Mother-ln-Laws  Day is Sunday,  October 28.  THIS WKK ORDER  OURFTDCflARM-HER"  'E BUY BEI-I  BOTTLES  For sll your Carpets  ��' 7IM iTj  Name:  Address:  City:  Phone:  O TIME IN YOUR FLIGHT  Local author Hubert  Evan's tale of small town  life in southern Ontario  before the turn of the  19th Century.  $15.50  & up  "A good mother-in-  law Is a treasure  without price. Indeed  lor a successful  marriage the moat  Important thing,  beside a good wile, ia a  good mother-In-  law...and I'm not aure  which ot the two is  more essential."  mm  mm*nm-tJL*f  Irimwws $  Box 4, Sechelt.  885-9455  Friendly service for the  entire Sunshine Coast  Carrots  Nest Lewis formerly Home  Economic Teacher  The carrot is such a versatile vegetable that it  should figure high on anyone's grocery list. Not only  will your body like them���Ibts of vitamin A and  minerals���but they're such a pretty colour, and they  even taste good. The carrot deserves a better place  in society than to be stuck next to rubber chicken  and squishy peas. There is, of course, no tastier  carrot than the one you have grown with your own  fair hands and picked fresh and crunched crisply  between your pearly white teeth, but maybe some of  the following recipes will convince, you of the  carrots versatility.  Start your baby off on the right nutritional road.  When he's old enough to have finger foods give him  sticks of cooked carrots. Don't give him raw ones.  They're much too easy to choke on when you're  little. And of course, watch him carefully anyway.  Your family will probably enjoy Carrot Muffins.  This recipe makes 12.  Vh cups all purpose flour  % cups brown sugar  3 teaspoons baking powder  'h teaspoon salt  Vh cups finely shredded carrot  la cups cooking oil  Vh tablespoons lemon juice  1. Stir the dry ingredients together well in a mixing  bowl and make a well In the center.  2. Mix the remaining ingredients, drop in the well  and stir till fully mixed.  3. Fill well greased muffin pans 2/3 full.  4. Bake at 400�� for 18 ��� 20 minutes.  When you're preparing carrots, try not to peel  them unless It's absolutely necessary. Scrub them  with a vegetable brush or nylon scourer. They can  be flavoured when cooked with interesting things  like sour cream, dill, almonds or sherry. Try this  recipe for Spicy Glazed Carrots  2 cups carrots cut diagonally  2 tablespoons butter  1/3 cup brown sugar  '/a teaspoon dry mustard  2 tablespoons parsley, chopp  till  1965-1976  1. Boil the carrots In salted water till tender  2. Melt butter, add sugar and heat gently  dissolved.  3. Add carrots and remaining ingredients and cook  over medium heat, stirring for about 10 minutes  till fully glazed.  Then of course there's Carrot Marmalade  6 oranges  4 lemons  4 cups water  6 cups diced carrots  5 cups sugar  1. Peel oranges and lemons thinly. Chop the peel  finely and soak overnight, then drain.  2. Chop the oranges  3. Place the oranges, carrots, water and sugar in a  pan and cook as for jam.  4. Squeeze the lemon juice  5. Five minutes before setting time add the lemon  ,    juice.  6. Place in jars and seal as for jam  To pep up the most jaded palate try this as an  appetizer-Carrots Cssa Blanca  2 lbs. carrots 2 tablespoons vinegar  6 tablespoons weter       'U  teaspoon cayenne  pepper  4 tablespoons oil '/< teaspoon paprika  2 cloves garlic 'h teaspoon cumin  powder  silt and pepper 2 talbespoons chopped  parsley  1. Place the carrot, water, oil, chopped garlic, salt  and pepper in saucepan and simmer till tender.  Drain.  2. Add vinegar, salt and pepper, cayene, paprika  and cumin   Chill.  3. Garnish with parsley and serve quite cold-  delicious.  May you all see in the dark.  KEN'S  LUCKY DOLLAR  Free Delivery  to the Wharf  145 West 15thStreet,  North Vancouver, B. C. 980-6571  GOWER POINT RD., GIBSONS  886-2257    WHATEVER YOUR NEEDS -  FOODS LTD.  Hours  9-6 Dally  9-7 Friday  10-5 Sunday  ���MMM  �����������������������  ���MM ***��**^m^ ���"^������^��<*>��i**ww.^^OT����*iasssss��nsBesesesssHSSBMHHnHHn��B||Hm  Coast News, October 23,1979  A walk in the park  This truck made a somewhat unorthodox'entrance into a garage on the Highway 101  hill in Gibsons last Tuesday morning...  ���m,  #  ���W H* :hsMA>'f li ��^flfi ���Bf""V. tt  :'   -' I w i. Kl-WIK^,^?��f5-  and stayed there for a few days while the twoing company tried to figure out how to  remove it without having the garage collapse. The problem was not solved.  Music of Man series starts Wednesday  The Music Of Man, an eight-  !   part  television  series  which  explores the evolution of man's  ,   musical   heritage   begins  Wednesday, October 24 at 9:00  p.m. on Channels 2 and 6.  Five years in production,  costing an estimated $2 million,  The Music Of Man is in the  tradition of B.B.C.'s famous  Ascent Of Man andClvillzatlon  classics.  World renowned violinist  Yehudl Menuhin will host the  series produced jointly by the  C.B.C, the Mississippi  Authority for Education T.V.  and Ontario Educational  Communications Authority. It  will be sponsored by General  Foods Ltd., but each episode  will be telecast without  commercial interruption.  Programme One - The  Quiver Of Life focuses on  man's first awareness of sound.  Host Vehudi Menuhin has  written the following greeting  as an introduction to the series.  "Music bridges the gulfs not  only between cultures arid  nations, but between the  centuries. The man who first  blew into a hollow bone has  something in common with  todays rock musicians. Both  are making their own kind of  music.  "As your host and guide to a  unique television experience,  The Music Of Man, it gives me  great pleasure to welcome you  on a voyage of musical  discovery. It is a voyage I have  been living and enjoying all my  life, and never more excitingly  than in the past several years  since I was approached by the  C.B.C. to involve myself in this  unique television project of real  international scope.  "The Music Of Man is  intended as a celebration of our  musical heritage, from prehistory to thc electronic age.  The making of the series has  been a stimulating, demanding  and challenging experience for  me. I hope il will carry the same  significance for you as viewers.  Music is the ultimate human  communication, and this  television series has afforded  me a rare opportunity to  communicate with you, not  only through music, but in  ideas and words about music  down through the ages. We can  all learn here something about  our civilization and ourselves.  "My heartfelt thanks go to  the artists of today's world of  music who participated with  me with such good fellowship  in The Music Of Man, and  whose skill and talents, as will  be seen and heard add so much  to its excellence.  "To these I must add my  gratitude to the indefatigable  researchers who gathered the  archival audio tapes and films  of those musical pioneers and  performers of the past whose  contribution to the series are  thus made possible.  "And to you who will be our  audience, I want to say that The  Music Of Man is your series.  May it engage your emotions,  and enhance your appreciation  of the rich musical heritage we  all enjoy."  Methuen Publications has  published The Music Of Man  co-authored by Yehudl  Menuhin and Curtis W. Davis a  producer of the series to coincide with the telecast.  It is available from C.B.C.  merchandising, Box S00,  Station "A", Toronto, Ont.  M5W 1E6; $19.95 hardcover  until January 1, 1980, $24.95  thereafter.  A special viewers guide with  commentaries by Yehudl  Menuhin can be obtained for  $1.00 from Continuing  Education, Open Learning  Institute, Box 94000,  Richmond, B.C. V6Y 2A2.  Granthams employment  Granthams Landing Improvement District employed  three teenagers during the  summer months under a  Summer Youth Program  sponsored by the Federal  Government and the G.L.I.D.  The teenagers, Steve  Kirkland, Geoffrey Spence and  Clint Webb, cleared and  cleaned up the playground  adjacent to Granthams  Landing Community Hall.  Considerable work was done  on the Hall itself, including a  complete remodelling of the  kitchen���new cupboards,  stove, refrigerator and double  sink. In addition the Hall has  been completely rewired and an  additional washroom is under  construction and should be  completed soon.  The trustees wish to thank  those residents who have made  contributions towards  Granthams Landing share of  WANTED  Used Furniture  or What Havn Vou  AL'S  USED FURNITURE  WE BUY BEER  BOTTLES  the costs and would be grateful  for any further contributions to  this worthwhile project.  Supervisors of the project  were trustees Martin Carlson  and Bill Chinnick and recently  retired trustee Mrs. Joanne  Park.  Mary  [Dr. Janet Webb  is pleased to announce  the opening of her practice  in General Dentistry  in association with  Dr. T.C. Webb & Dr. P.S. Collinson  in the Gibsons Dental Centre  For appointments call  886-9110  ROMAN CATHOLIC  SERVICES  Rev. Angelo De Pompa  Parish Priesl  Times of Masses  Saturday, 5:00 p.m.  St. Mary's, Gibsons  Regular Sunday Masses  9:00 a.m. Our Lady of Lourdes  Church, Sechelt  Indian Reserve  10:00 a.m. Holy Family  Church, Sechelt  12:00 noon St. Mary's Church.  Gibsons  Confessions before Mass  Phone: 885-9526 or 885-5201  GIBSONS PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  Highway & Martin  Sunday 9:45  Morning Worship 11:00  Evening Fellowship 7:00  Home Bible Study  Call Pastor Ted Boodle  886-7107 or 886-9482  Affiliated with thc  Pentecostal Assemblies of  Canada  by Maryanne West  Come walk with me in Cliff  Gilker Park. For the benefit of  those who are too busy chasing  little white balls to walk in the  Park, let's take the north trail  through the area the Golf Club  covets.  Park the car by the children's  adventure playground and  continue up the road. On a  sunny summer day this clearing  holds the heat and it's pleasant  to move quickly into the cool  and shade of the big trees. Not  much undergrowth here. The  firs stand close together and  little light filters through to the  forest floor. The Park trail  branches off to the right and  there is one of those beautiful  old cedar snags on the corner.  For a short distance before  squeezing through a salmon  berry patch the path is the  width of an old corduroy road.  To the north the ground is wet,  black earth from which skunk  cabbage grows, and even in the  driest summers dark pools of  black water lie between the  trees, still and mysterious.  They're probably not deep but  with little light to reflect from  the surface they appear  bottomless and sinister and you  remember those old folk tales  about people who just  disappeared into bogs and  haunted meres. A tiny  streamlet which carries the  overflow, briskly in winter, is  bridged with a broad walk and  the next hundred yards tends to  be wet and muddy.  The path now leaves the old  logging trail, winding its way  towards the creek, choosing  where possible the drier ground  and taking you dry-shod over  board walks where the water  lies all winter; circling the  remains of a giant felled in the  days before power saws from  which a young hemlock grows.  Beside the creek is a stand of  mature timber and a path soft  and dry with the accumulation  of many years fir needles. The  creek in summer sings quietly  to itself, ducking under fallen  logs richly embossed with  brilliant mosses and ferns,  exposing tiny bays and pebble  beaches in their lee, but after  fall or spring storms the creek  becomes a swirling brown  cedar-stained torrent, foam-  flecked roaring in crests and  eddies which can be heard from  a distance, threatening to  overflow its banks and take the  bridge with it. Winter's arctic  spells produce fringes of icicles  along the banks, hanging from  logs and overhanging  branches. Herons sometimes  fish in the creek in late summer,  rising awkwardly with much  flapping of wings and  complaining in hoarse croaks  at being disturbed.  Across the creek, its bank  fern-fringed, solomon seal  grows   and   in   fall   white  GLAD TIDINGS  TABERNACLE  Gower Point Road  Phone 886-2660  Sunday School - 9:45 a.m.  Worship Service -11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship 6 p.m.  Bible Study - Wed. 7:30 p.m.  Pastor Nancy Dykes  yanne s viewpoint  UNITED CHURCH  Davis Bay-St. John's United  Worship, Sunday 9:30 a.m.  Study Session  Thursday, 2:30 p.m.  Gibsons-Gibsons United  Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.  Sunday Worship, 11:00 a.m.  Study Session  Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.  Prayer and Share  Wednesday, 1:30 p.m.  Pastor  The Rev. George W. Inglis.B ih  Phone 886-2333  SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST  CHURCH  Sabbath School Sat., 10 a.m.  Hour of Worship Sal., 11 a.m.  St. John's United Church  Davis Bay  Pastor C. Drieberg  Everyone Welcome  For information phone:  885-9750 or 883-2736  H Church Service:  angelwing mushrooms. Watch  for roots as the. path slips  between two firs into a small  bright glade. An all year round  tiny pool reflects the deer fernt  and if you're quiet in spring you  may catch a glimpse of an  emerald frog.  On into the shade of mature  firs and spruce rising again  from boggy ground where  sword and lady ferns grow in  profusion giving an almost  tropical illusion. Another  board walk keeps feet dry. Here  is a grotesque, mossed and  lichened remains of a small  tree, broken limbs at odd  angles and fungus helping the  recycling process; it's quite  spooky in the daylight, in  moonlight or the half-light of  mist one's imagination could  conjure up a monster! Crimson  and white russulas grow here,  unpleasant to human taste if  not poisonous but apparently  a delicacy for squirrels and  slugs.  Now the path is bordered by  salmon berry again, there are  more angelwings and  pholliota's bright yellow caps  flecked with brown scales shine  briefly from the mossed logs. A  couple of years ago pileated  woodpeckers nested in a  nearby tree. A couple of  corners and there's a leaning  alder which some years  produces a magnificent harvest  of honey mushrooms, and the  path now runs beside a  magnificent nurse log along  whose length huckleberry  bushes and young trees sprout.  A sharp right angle turn and  we're overlooking the small  valley another creek is wearing  away for itself; just here the  ground slopes fairly easily to  the water, but there are rocks  and cliffs on the other side and  a little further on the bank is  steep on this side too.  Our path wanders gently at  first, past the burnt shells,  reminders of an earlier forest  fire, now happy hiding places  for children, a rotting stump  "alive" and wreathed with tiny  fragile,   orange    toadstools,  behind the fern grown roots of  a huge windfall, then quickly  down the steps and under  another fallen tree and we're  walking beside the creek. A  creek which meanders in  summer in and out among logs  and islets, over sandbars and  into deep pools. You could  spend days here with a camera  or sketch pad or just looking  and still find something new.  This weekends rain will have  turned it, too, into a roaring  torrent jostling and shouting in  its hurry to reach the sea.  Now we're in the fern grown  natural amphitheatre and have  three choices, over the creek  and the long way home; along  the creek or pathways along the  creek then back through the  bush to the playground. But  why not explore yourself, each  trail is unique with its special  beauties and each one of us can  write a different description of  how it looks through our own  eyes.  Dr. J. Farrer & Dr. A. Cairns  Wish To Announce  The Opening Of Their Office For General Practice  In Trail Bay Shopping Centre, Sechelt  in the near future.  Box 1760 Sechelt  Phone 885-5196  Unfortunately this number will not be available tor  approximately 10 daya. In the meantime call   885-5480      8 a.m. - 4 p.m. ^  CAMpbEll's  FAMILY SHOES and LEATHER GOODS  IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SECHELT"  1  British Columbia Hydro  and Power Authority  PUBLIC NOTICE  POWER OUTAGE  Electric power will be interrupted as follows:  Tuesday, 30 Optober 1979  Power OFF from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon and 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.  NOTE:   Outage time could vary and power may be restored  earlier.  AREA AFFECTED:   Reed Road east of North Roa<  and Stewart Road, Gibsons, B.C  REASON:   Improving present  distribution system  E. HENSCH  District Manager  c-  sons, o.im.. ,^���. m  MAINLAND MOTOR PRODUCTS tt   . . Hiahwav 101 k, Clio��� PH D.L. #6606  886-8314  Highway 101 & Shaw Rd.  _m. Gibsons       -^  n*1    ��     i&s  886-8344  ����S  OF  A  1978 CHEV I Ton   "Big Dually"    I  Crew Cab    4 Wheal Drive      M  mi  A  c       u  TRUCK: I  350 V8,4 bbl., dual exhaust, P.S., P.B., 4spd. transmission, air ���  conditioned , AM/FM 8 track, sliding window, driving lights, A  engine oil cooler, trans, cooler, ground grips all round. West H  Coast mirrors, dual tanks, fog lights, much more. T  CAMPER: I  Quality lOVz ft. "CAVEMAN", fully self contained, furnace & E  oven. __  12,000 miles or 12 months Power Train Warranty available on these units I i  Carefree gardening "  Carl  s corner   by Sandy Loam  Any "go by the book-  compulsively tidy gardener  has, by now, ripped out all his  annuals, piled leaves around  (mulched) his roses and in  general cleaned and cleared his  garden. By so doing he has  missed the last blazing surge of  riotous summer colour. The  annuals' 'last mad fling' which  tones in with autumn's colour  scheme so vividly. It should be  remembered that we live'on the  West Coast and old rules  brought from the east do not  apply. We have many a sunny  day in the dead of winter when  these tasks may be accomplished.  My Marguerites are  enormous, still pickable and so  profuse I am able to supply all  my friends with cut flowers  which last a good two weeks in  ihe house. Last year I was able  to take a huge bouquet of  Marguerites down to my  daughter's house for Christmas. They lasted well into  January. The Cosmos are still  flambouyantly everywhere as  are the giant Marigolds though  the latter are inclined to mug up  with ' too  much   rain.  The  Nasturtiums are beginning to  straggle and look feeble,  touched, I think, by a vestige of  frost. They have been blooming  steadily since the middle of  June. Occasionally, if we have a  light winter the Marguerites  will survive and become almost  a shrub by next year and so,  you see, sometimes it pays to be  a slacker.  I would like to comment on  the approaches to both  Gibsons and Sechelt. They are  both tacky-TACKY. Is there  no puny budget that councils  could put aside for some  flowers or shrubs on a  boulevard or small plot to alert  the tourist that he is now  entering a Village with a little  pride? Please bear in mind  Courtenay's "Mile Of Flowers"  put together, I believe, by the  townsfolk themselves. I have  heard it is a most inspiring and  magnificent sight. In  Vancouver I notice all the  boulevards and shopping malls  are gorgeously landscaped  while up here the shopkeepers  seem to consider the lack-luster  planting of five funeral  evergreens and their subsequent neglect, landscaping!  In memory of  Lillian Ewart  Jennifer Ewart, a young  friend or ours, will be bringing  you, for your consideration, her  memoir of her grandmother, the  late Lilian Ewart, who died  recently in St. Mary's Hospital.  "LU" Ewart was our next-door  neighbour for fifty years, and  was a member of the summer  community here from the early  yean of this century. She was  indeed j link with the Roberts  Creek past.  Hubert Evans.  by Jennifer Ewart  . Lilian May (Duke) Ewart, or  Slugbeater Lil, our Gram as we  knew her, was born in Ontario,  November 24,1890 to Thomas  and Margaret Duke. She  moved west as a babe in arms  and grew up in Vancouver.  Lil graduated from Normal  School in 1904, continued on at  j Vancouver College where she  got her University Matriculation in Arts in 1907 then  ��� received her First Class  ; Certificate in 1909 which  ���allowed her to become a  {teacher.  ! It was around this time Lil  | started coming to Roberts  ; Creek camping with her  ! girlfriends where the Kewpie  Camp used to be. In 1910 her  'father, Thomas Duke, bought  waterfront acreage at Roberts  ; Creek where his family spent  the summers in a big tent beside  Stephens Creek. v  Around 1912 Lil met Austin  Ewart, better known as Autti,  whom she married. They lived  in Vancouver, belonged to the  West Point Grey Tennis Club,  played badminton, went to  dances and did absolutely  everything together including  camping at Roberts Creek.  They had two children,  Noreen and Kenneth, and  bought a piece of Lil's father's  property. Lil and her two  children spent all summer at  Roberts Creek with Autti  coming up on weekends. They  added onto Mr. Robert's house  and stayed there.  Grampa Duke stayed with  Lil during those summers  organizing trail clearing to the  wharf, bonfires, singalongs and  games of horseshoes and golf  all of which Lil participated in.  Children could be heard  everywhere as Lil used to take  care of other people's children  for the summer. She loved  swimming and worked harder  than any of us clearing the  rocks for a path down to the  sandbar. Lil and Autti were to  move here permanently when  Autti retired but he took iU and  died in 19SS. Lil moved up but  spent every second winter with  her daughter in Fairbanks,  Alaska.  She belonged to the Red  Cross in Roberts Creek,  knitting and quilting for them,  took painting classes, played  bridge with the girls, hooked  rugs and kept a big vegetable  and flower garden.  I remember her best walking  with one of her garden tools  (which she said was for killing  slugs but really it was a cane) as  she inspected her garden,  watched her great grandchildren and collected  windfalls (rotten apples which  we kids hated eating) or at the  kitchen counter with dough or  pastry up to her elbows and  wonderful smells coming from  her kitchen. She made bread up  to her 80th year and continued  baking cookies and Lazy Daisy  cake after that. No matter who  you were or when you dropped  in tea, goodies and a cheerful  smile welcomed you.  Lil lived in her house at  Roberts Creek on her own  (with a little help from our  great homemakers), right up  until she was hospitalized last  August. She hated being  dependent on anyone, loathed  not being able to do all the  things she used to and finally  decided this wasn't the place  for her; time to go on to better  things. Lil passed away  October 5, 1979 after spending  the better part of 70 years in  Roberts Creek.  Skating rep  aged six  B.C. Coast Zone Competition is October 26, 27 and  28 at Richmond. Our club will  be represented by Naomi  Hunter at the Opening  Ceremonies on Friday evening.  Naomi is six years old, lives in  Sechelt and has been skating  for one year.  Qlbsons Public  Library  Tuesday 2-4 p.m.  Wednesday 2-4 p.mj  Thursday 2-4 &  7-9 p.m.  Saturday 2-4 p.m.  886-2130  This same wilted looking  section, which has just been  extended a block farther with  the deliberate removal of  several dozen Dogwood trees,  should be given the Sour Apple  Award for 1979 for insensi-  tivity. Imagine the chagrin of  the poor souls who live across  Cowrie Street and are faced  with the prospect of the  continued march of those  droopy trees in their tacky tufty  swamp grass to replace the  former grandeur of their solid  Dogwood and Salal bush.  I know the Village of Sechelt  requested that the Dogwood  remain but one morning they  were just all gone. Depressing. I  would like to see more Village  tub and basket planting and  (wouldn't everyone?) more tiny  Village parks complete with  benches for between shop  resting and budget mourning.  In response to some  questions, I think all the Dutch  bulbs come in fives and tens  and fancy packaging. I just  want everyone to know that  Canadian bulbs have babies  too and they still come in  dozens. I can't see that much  difference in the final bloom.  Happy Gardening.  by Carl Chrismas  A Pot Pourri!  Mayor Harold Nelson is off  to the frozen north on a big  game hunt. Let's hope he took  along more than his peashooter. Those northern moose  play rough!  We would like to see him  return with a 50 inch spread on  his bumper. Not the other way  around!  Snow!  We had our first taste of Pete  Trowers Grease For The Wheels  Of Winter up at Clowhom on  Thursday. Snow on the upper  levels made for slippery and  miserable working conditions  and high winds sent the fallers  back to the bunkhouse. My  mind recalls the opening verse  of Pete's poem, the words  coming sharply and clearly:  Quickening In the valley,  the white flutter  blurs the road-slashed  relief map the  valley floor tips  in the salted distance  sueh damp confetti  will wed these boondocks  to qultt.  The poem goes on in tight, very  descriptive words, written by  one who has gone through the  Sandy Loam's home is brightened late in the season by  dried flower bouquets such as this.  CENTRE  HARDWARE & GIFTS  PENDER HARBOUR CENTER     ... ....  MADEIRA PARK 883-9914  Is now serving PENDERHARBOUR  as drop off for  OOAIf IIVI  Classified Advertisements  Deadline 1.00 p.m. Fridays  Classifieds should be prepaid and pre-wrltten.   All Informalion In Classified Ad aactlon of Coast News.  Holy Family  Parish  FALL BAZAAR  AND TEA  ^Saturday, November 3  From 2:00 - 4:00  Senior Citizens Hall  Sechelt  KilIlliaH!H^  Notice To Our Customers  THE MUPPET SHOP  Our new space isn't ready; Joe Benner has kindly offered us a home away from home.  We applogize to our customers for the inconvenience and look forward to  seeing them in our temporary premises where there will be business as usual until further notice j!  "whole bothersome business"  of sweating out logs in the  summer, freezing to tbe  marrow in winter. I'm happy to  be out of it but I wouldn't have  missed the experience.  Toba Inlet:  Off to Toba Inlet this week  for a bit of a work project.  Hope to re-visit a little side  valley where in the early  "forties* Pinky Forbes and I  walked the primeval forest on a  cold and wet October day. We  munched our cold sandwich in  a crumbled and ancient  trappers line cabin to get in out  of the rain and snow and to  speculate on the age of  newspaper and artifacts we  found among the ruins.  If I'm lucky, I hope to get a  few shots of grizzly bear at the  camp garbage dump. There  used to be a lot of'em!  In later years, I flew an  amphibious aircraft into  Weldwood's gravel strip, 16  miles up the valley. The  airplane was fast becoming a  tool and a sales aid at that time  and the psychology was good.  When my customers bought  from me they expected and  received fast service.  ' I'm happy that I was a part of  that era.  When I think back from  retirement (so called), to my  pilot-sales days; to the loggers  life and the wonderful  characters I have met; to the  necessity of forgoing an  education to help support a  family; and to my formative  years as a farm boy on the  Saskatchewan prairies, I find it  hard to believe that the years  have flashed by like the  fractionalized T.V. glimpses of  'the year that was'!  I am just beginning to realize  that time is catching up; that I  had better get the old lure of the  woods out of my system and  settle down to the business of  'telling it like it used to be'!  There are so many incidents to  be written of that I often amaze  myself in the recalling of them.  But I suspect there is a certain  amount of self-dramatization  in the telling and in many cases,  the telling is prompted by a  snap shot or the visit of an old  friend who only has to say, "Do  you remember the time...?"  As I learn to use the tools of  this trade, I find there is a  certain amount of freedom or  poetic license that can be used  to make it a bit more  entertaining in the telling.  Here's to the new career!  *****  If anyone knows the  whereabouts of Jeannie Billis  or Michael Dolphin will you  please call 885-5200. I have a  'girl and boy athlete of the day'  trophy for you!  *****  I promised a story now and  then if I could clean one up  sufficiently to be told. This  week I acquired a list of 25  ethnic stories which I am going  to change to 'local' stories as I  feel they still retain their  humour. Here are a couple:  The grocer told a local lady  Coast News, October 23.1979  that eggs were $1.00 per dozen  and the cracked ones were 50' a  dozen. She said, "OK, crack me  a dozen!"  skeptic who didn't believe in  flying saucers until he goosed a  waitress. Wow!  And  then  there  was  the  That's all for this week!  Carl  Stock Reduction  SALE  Ends Next Sat. Oct. 27  new XL-100  color TV  ���J0" picture tube (*$ cm diagonal picture)  Reg. $669.95  Sale $585.96  Save $133.89  J&C  ELECTRONICS  & APPLIANCES  FO450  Closing Out Our Cowrie Street Store  885-2568   &  uccaneer  Marina 6? Resort Ltd.  Secret Cove, R.R. 1     Halfmoon Bay, B.C.   1  time to think about correcting those *  problems which you noticed last summer for trouble J  free boating in 1980. J  Our new fully equipped shop is available now for 5  ff winter repair service. Have your repairs done now and 5  ' avoid the spring rush. O.M.C and Mercruiser stern drive 3  Now  and outboard repair.  LaaB��a%b3&SL��JH����Hi  Anew way  to help you buy  your first home.  Buying that first home is a big step for everyone.  That's why we've expanded our program to make it easier for more British  Columbians to buy a moderately priced home as their first home.  Our new FIRST HOME GRANT of $1,000  is available for all eligible British Columbians.  This grant can be used to buy any type of hotne���new, old, single family, condominium,  mobile home, townhouse. Any type of home purchased after July 18 can be acceptable, so  long as it falls within certain price limits. From July 18 to December 31,1979 these limits  are $54,000 in the Greater Vancouver and Capital Regional Districts and Fraser Valley  communities up to and including Chilliwack, and $50,000 elsewhere in the Province.  Remember this grant is available for FIRST  HOMES ONLY. If you've owned a home before  ���whether in British Columbia or elsewhere���  you are not eligible.  The purchaser must also meet one of the following residential requirements:  (1) Lived in B.C. for a continuous period of not  less than two years immediately prior to the  purchase of the home, OR  (2) Born in B.C. and a Canadian citizen at the  time of application, OR  (3) Lived in B.C. for a continuous period of five  years at any time, and a Canadian citizen at  the time of application.  Of course, our F/VMILY FIRST HOME GRANT  of up to $2,500 still remains available for those  with a dependent child under 19.  If you have not received any previous benefit,  and are unable to qualify for either of the above  FIRST HOME grants, remember the NEW  HOME BUILDING GRANT of $1,000 is still  available until December 31,1979. To qualify for  this grant, you don't need to be buying your  FIRST home, but it does have to be a NEW  home.  For further information and application forms for  any of these grants, please contact Ministry offices.  Province of British Columbia  Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing  Honourable James R. Chabot, Minister  mmm_mmm  ___t________ ��� . . . mmmmm^mmmmmm  ***^^e***^^Aamm----------------------m-m*-m  Coast News, October 23,1979  A walk in the park  This truck made a somewhat unorthodox entrance into a garage on the Highway 101  hill in Qibsons last Tuesday morning...  ��� ��j>--*d  >  . j*j'���* > -,52." 'uiijr  ������ *&.}. *fi'j"��� '  and stayed there for a few days while the twoing company tried to figure out how to  remove it without having the garage collapse. The problem was not solved.  Music of Man series starts Wednesday  The Music Of Man, an eight-  !   part  television  series which  explores the evolution of man's  I   musical   heritage  begins  Wednesday, October 24 at 9:00  p.m. on Channels 2 and 6.  Five years in production,  costing an estimated $2 million,  The Music Of Man is in the  tradition of B.B.C.'s famous  Ascent Of Man andCivlllzation  classics.  World renowned violinist  Yehudl Menuhin will host the  series produced jointly by the  C.B.C, the Mississippi  Authority for Education T.V.  and Ontario Educational  Communications Authority. It  will be sponsored by General  Foods Ltd., but each episode  will be telecast without  commercial interruption.  Programme One - The  Quiver Of Life focuses on  man's first awareness of sound.  Host Yehudl Menuhin has  written the following greeting  as an introduction to the series.  "Music bridges the gulfs not  only between cultures arid  nations, but between the  centuries. The man who first  blew into a hollow bone has  something in common with  todays rock musicians. Both  are making their own kind of  music.  "As your host and guide to a  unique television experience,  The Music Of Man, it gives me  great pleasure to welcome you  on a voyage of musical  discovery. It is a voyage I have  been living and enjoying all my  life, and never more excitingly  than in the past several years  since I was approached by the  C.B.C. to involve myself in this  unique television project of real  international scope.  "The Music Of Man is  intended as a celebration of our  musical heritage, from prehistory to thc electronic age.  The making of the scries has  been a stimulating, demanding  and challenging experience for  me. I hope it will carry the same  significance for you as viewers.  Music is the ultimate human  communication, and this  television scries has afforded  me a rare opportunity to  communicate with you, not  only through music, but in  ideas and words about music  down through the ages. We can  all learn here something about  our civilization and ourselves.  "My heartfelt thanks go to  the artists of today's world of  music who participated with  me with such good fellowship  in The Music Of Man, and  whose skill and talents, as will  be seen and heard add so much  to its excellence.  To these I must add my  gratitude to the indefatigable  researchers who gathered the  archival audio tapes and films  of those musical pioneers and  performers of the past whose  contribution to the series are  thus made possible.  "And to you who will be our  audience, I want to say that The  Music Of Man is your series.  May it engage your emotions,  and enhance your appreciation  of the rich musical heritage we  all enjoy."  Methuen Publications has  published The Music Of Man  co-authored by Yehudl  Menuhin and Curtis W. Davis a  producer of the series to coincide with the telecast.  It is available from C.B.C.  merchandising, Box S00,  Station "A", Toronto, Ont.  M5W 1E6; $19.95 hardcover  until January 1, 1980, $24.93  thereafter.  A special viewers guide with  commentaries by Yehudl  Menuhin can be obtained for  $1.00 from Continuing  Education, Open Learning  Institute, Box 94000,  Richmond, B.C. V6Y 2A2.  Granthams employment  Granthams Landing Improvement District employed  three teenagers during the  summer months under a  Summer Youth Program  sponsored by the Federal  Government and the G.L.I.D.  The teenagers, Steve  Kirkland, Geoffrey Spence and  Clint Webb, cleared and  cleaned up the playground  adjacent to Granthams  Landing Community Hall.  Considerable work was done  on the Hall itself, including a  complete remodelling of the  kitchen���new cupboards,  stove, refrigerator and double  sink. In addition the Hall has  been completely rewired and an  additional washroom is under  construction and should be  completed soon.  The trustees wish to thank  those residents who have made  contributions towards  Granthams Landing share of  WANTED  Used Furniture  or What Have Vou  AL'S  USED FURNITURE  WE BUY BEER  BOTTLES  the costs and would be grateful  for any further contributions to  this worthwhile project.  Supervisors of the project  were trustees Martin Carlson  and Bill Chinnick and recently  retired trustee Mrs. Joanne  Park.  Mary  yanne s viewpoint  Dr.  Dr. Janet Webb  is pleased to announce  the opening of her practice  in General Dentistry  in association with  T.C. Webb & Dr. P.S. Collinson  in the Gibsons Dental Centre  For appointments call  886-9110  ROMAN CATHOLIC  SERVICES  Rev. Angelo De Pompa,  Parish Priest  Times of Masses  Saturday, 5:00 p.m.  St. Mary's, Gibsons  Regular Sunday Masses  9:00 a.m. Our Lady of Lourdes  Church, Sechelt  Indian Reserve  10:00 a.m. Holy Family  Church, Sechell  12:00 noon Sl. Mary's Church,  Gibsons  Confessions before Mass  Phone: 885-9526 or 885-5201  GIBSONS PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  Highway & Martin  Sunday 9:45  Morning Worship 11:00  Evening Fellowship 7:00  Home Bible Study  Call Pastor Ted Boodle  886-7107 or 886-9482  Affiliated with thc  Pentecostal Assemblies of  Canada  by Maryanne West  Come walk with me in Cliff  Gilker Park. For the benefit of  those who are too busy chasing  little white balls to walk in the  Park, let's take the north trail  through the area the Golf Club  covets.  Park the car by the children's  adventure playground and  continue up the road. On a  sunny summer day this clearing  holds the heat and it's pleasant  to move quickly into the cool  and shade of the big trees. Not  much undergrowth here. The  firs stand close together and  little light filters through to the  forest floor. The Park trail  branches off to the right and  there is one of those beautiful  old cedar snags on the corner.  For a short distance before  squeezing through a salmon  berry patch the path is the  width of an old corduroy road.  To the north the ground is wet,  black earth from which skunk  cabbage grows, and even in the  driest summers dark pools of  black water lie between the  trees, still and mysterious.  They're probably not deep but  with little light to reflect from  the surface they appear  bottomless and sinister and you  remember those old folk tales  about people who just  disappeared into bogs and  haunted meres. A tiny  streamlet which carries the  overflow, briskly in winter, is  bridged with a broad walk and  the next hundred yards tends to  be wet and muddy.  The path now leaves the old  logging trail, winding its way  towards the creek, choosing  where possible the drier ground  and taking you dry-shod over  board walks where the water  lies all winter; circling the  remains of a giant felled in the  days before power saws from  which a young hemlock grows.  Beside the creek is a stand of  mature timber and a path soft  and dry with the accumulation  of many years fir needles. The  creek in summer sings quietly  to itself, ducking under fallen  logs richly embossed with  brilliant mosses and ferns,  exposing tiny bays and pebble  beaches in their lee, but after  fall or spring storms the creek  becomes a swirling brown  cedar-stained torrent, foam-  flecked roaring in crests and  eddies which can be heard from  a distance, threatening to  overflow its banks and take the  bridge with it. Winter's arctic  spells produce fringes of icicles  along the banks, hanging from  logs and overhanging  branches. Herons sometimes  fish in the creek in late summer,  rising awkwardly with much  flapping of wings and  complaining in hoarse croaks  at being disturbed.  Across the creek, its bank  fern-fringed, solomon seal  grows   and   in   fall   white  GLAD TIDINGS  TABERNACLE  Gower Point Road  Phone 886-2660  Sunday School - 9:45 a.m.  Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship 6 p.m.  Bible Study - Wed. 7:30 p.m.  Pastor Nancy Dykes  UNITED CHURCH  Davis Bay-St. John's United  Worship, Sunday 9:30 a.m.  Study Session  Thursday, 2:30 p.m.  Gibsons-Gibsons United  Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.  Sunday Worship, 11:00 a.m.  Study Session  Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.  Prayer and Share  Wednesday, 1:30 p.m.  Pastor  The Rev. George W. Inglis.B rh  Phone 886-2333  SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST  CHURCH  Sabbath School Sat*. 10 a.m.  Hour of Worship Sat.. 11 a.m.  St. John's United Church  Davis Bay  Pastor C. Dricberg  Everyone Welcome  For information phone:  885-9750 or 883-2736  i\ Church Services  angelwing mushrooms. Watch  for roots as the. path slips  between two firs into a small  bright glade. An all year round  tiny pool reflects the deer ferns  and if you're quiet in spring you  may catch a glimpse of an  emerald frog.  On into the shade of mature  firs and spruce rising again  from boggy ground where  sword and lady ferns grow in  profusion giving an almost  tropical illusion. Another  board walk keeps feet dry. Here  is a grotesque, mossed and  lichened remains of a small  tree, broken limbs at odd  angles and fungus helping the  recycling process; it's quite  spooky in the daylight, in  moonlight or the half-light of  mist one's imagination could  conjure up a monster! Crimson  and white russulas grow here,  unpleasant to human taste if  not poisonous but apparently  a delicacy for squirrels and  slugs.  Now the path is bordered by  salmon berry again, there are  more angelwings and  pholliota's bright yellow caps  flecked with brown scales shine  briefly from the mossed logs. A  couple of years ago plicated  woodpeckers nested in a  nearby tree. A couple of  corners and there's a leaning  alder which some years  produces a magnificent harvest  of honey mushrooms, and the  path now runs beside a  magnificent nurse log along  whose length huckleberry  bushes and young trees sprout.  A sharp right angle turn and  we're overlooking the small  valley another creek is wearing  away for itself; just here the  ground slopes fairly easily to  the water, but there are rocks  and cliffs on the other side and  a little further on the bank is  steep on this side too.  Our path wanders gently at  first, past the burnt shells,  reminders of an earlier forest  fire, now happy hiding places  for children, a rotting stump  "alive" and wreathed with tiny  fragile,    orange   toadstools,  behind the fern grown roots of  a huge windfall, then quickly  down the steps and under  another fallen tree and we're  walking beside the creek. A  creek which meanders in  summer in and out among logs  and islets, over sandbars and  into deep pools. You could  spend days here with a camera  or sketch pad or just looking  and still find something new.  This weekends rain will have  turned it, too, into a roaring  torrent jostling and shouting in  its hurry to reach the sea.  Now we're in the fern grown  natural amphitheatre and have  three choices, over the creek  and the long way home; along  the creek or pathways along the  creek then back through the  bush to the playground. But  why not explore yourself, each  trail is unique with its special  beauties and each one of us can  write a different description of  how it looks through our own  eyes.  Dr. J. Farrer & Dr. A. Cairns *  Wish To Announce  The Opening Of Their Office For General Practice  In Trail Bay Shopping Centre, Sechelt  in the near future.  Box 1760 Sechelt  Phone 885-5196  Unfortunately this number will not be available lor  approximately 10 days, in the meantime call  885-5480      8 a.m. - 4 p.m. a  CAMpbEll's  FAMILY SHOES and LEATHER GOODS  "IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SECHELT  Your friendly neighbourhood     ���}&,  drop-off poi nt for Coast News  Classified Ads.  "British Columbia Hydro  and Power Authority  PUBLIC NOTICE  POWER OUTAGE  Electric power will be interrupted as follows:  Tuesday, 30 October 1979  Power OFF from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon and 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.  NOTE:   Outage time could vary and power may be restored  earlier.  AREA AFFECTED:   Reed Road east of North Roai  and Stewart Road, Gibsons, B.C.  REASON:   Improving present  distribution system.  E. HENSCH  District Manager  c-  SVSI19, \\a.\m*. i____. *  b  MAINLAND MOTOR PRODUCTS   ���  Itio-tWav Ml S. Chan, IM D.L.  886-8314  Highway 101 & Shaw Rd  _m Gibsons       ,  886-8344  LTD.  #6606  i&&*  ����?  lip-  1978 CHEV 1 Ton   "Big Dually"  Crew Cab    4 Wheel Drive  OF  A  I  M  m  A  G  U  L  A  T  E  12,000 miles or 12 months Power Train Warranty available on these units  TRUCK: -_��� ^.a^MBa^MMMM  350 V8,4 bbl., dual exhaust, P.S., P.B., 4spd. transmission, air  conditioned , AM/FM 8 track, sliding window, driving lights,  engine oil cooler, trans, cooler, ground grips all round, West  Coast mirrors, dual tanks, fog lights, much more.  CAMPER:  Quality WA ft. "CAVEMAN", fully self contained, furnace &  oven. mmm  ************wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm*m  Carefree gardening "  Carl's corner   by Sandy Loam  Any "go by the book"  compulsively tidy gardener  has, by now, ripped out all his  annuals, piled leaves around  (mulched) his roses and in  general cleaned and cleared his  i garden. By so doing he has  missed the last blazing surge of  riotous summer colour. The  annuals' 'last mad fling' which  tones in with autumn's colour  scheme so vividly. It should be  remembered that we live'on the  West Coast and old rules  brought from the east do not  apply. We have many a sunny  day in the dead of winter when  these tasks may be accomplished.  My Marguerites are  | enormous, still pickable and so  profuse I am able to supply all  my friends with cut flowers  which last a good two weeks in  the house. Last year I was able  lo take a huge bouquet of  Marguerites down to my  daughter's house for Christmas. They lasted well into  January. The Cosmos are still  flambouyantly everywhere as  are the giant Marigolds though  the latter are inclined to mug up  with ' too  much  rain.   The  Nasturtiums are beginning to  straggle and look feeble,  touched, I think, by a vestige of  frost. They have been blooming  steadily since the middle of  June. Occasionally, if we have a  light winter the Marguerites  will survive and become almost  a shrub by next year and so,  you see, sometimes it pays to be  a slacker.  I would like to comment on  the approaches to both  Gibsons and Sechelt. They are  both tacky-TACKY. Is there  no puny budget that councils  could put aside for some  flowers or shrubs on a  boulevard or small plot to alert  the tourist that he is now  entering a Village with a little  pride? Please bear in mind  Courtenay's "Mile Of Flowers"  put together, I believe, by the  townsfolk themselves. I have  heard it is a most inspiring and  magnificent sight. In  Vancouver I notice all the  boulevards and shopping malls  are gorgeously landscaped  while up here the shopkeepers  seem to consider the lack-luster  planting of five funeral  evergreens and their subsequent neglect, landscaping!  In memory of  Lillian Ewart  Jennifer Ewart, a young  friend or ours, will be bringing  you, for your consideration, her  memoir of her grandmother, the  late Lilian Ewart, who died  recently in St. Mary's Hospital,  "Lil* Ewart was our next-door  neighbour for fifty yean, and  was a member of the summer  community here from the early  years of this century. She was  indeed �� link with the Roberts  Creek past.  Hubert Evans.  by Jennifer Ewart  . Lilian May (Duke) Ewart, or  Slugbeater Lil, our Gram as we  knew her, was born in Ontario,  November 24,1890 to Thomas  and Margaret Duke. She  moved west as a babe in arms  and grew up in Vancouver.  Lil graduated from Normal  School in 1904, continued on at  j Vancouver College where she  got her University Matriculation in Arts in 1907 then  {received her First Class  | Certificate in 1909 which  ��� allowed her to become a  j teacher.  J It was around this time Lil  | started coming to Roberts  | Creek camping with her  ! girlfriends where the Kewpie  Camp used to be. In 1910 her  'father, Thomas Duke, bought  waterfront acreage at Roberts  ; Creek where his family spent  the summers in a big tent beside  Stephens Creek. v  Around 1912 Lil met Austin  Ewart, better known as Autti,  whom she married. They lived  in Vancouver, belonged to the  West Point Grey Tennis Club,  played badminton, went to  <dances and did absolutely  everything together including  camping at Roberts Creek,  They had two children,  Noreen and Kenneth, and  bought a piece of Lit's father's  property. Lil and her two  children spent all summer at  Roberts Creek with Autti  coming up on weekends. They  added onto Mr. Robert's house  and stayed there.  Grampa Duke stayed with  Lil during those summers  organizing trail clearing to the  wharf, bonfires, singalongs and  games of horseshoes and golf  all of which Lil participated in.  Children could be heard  everywhere as Lil used to take  care of other people's children  for the summer. She loved  swimming and worked harder  than any of us clearing the  rocks for a path down to the  sandbar. Lil and Autti were to  move here permanently when  Autti retired but he took iU and  died in 1955. Lil moved up but  spent every second winter with  her daughter in Fairbanks,  Alaska.  She belonged to the Red  Cross in Roberts Creek,  knitting and quilting for them,  took painting classes, played  bridge with the girls, hooked  rugs and kept a big vegetable  and flower garden.  I remember her best walking  with one of her garden tools  (which she said was for killing  slugs but really it was a cane) as  she inspected her garden,  watched her great grandchildren and collected  windfalls (rotten apples which  we kids hated eating) or at the  kitchen counter with dough or  pastry up to her elbows and  wonderful smells coming from  her kitchen. She made bread up  to her 80th year and continued  baking cookies and Lazy Daisy  cake after that. No matter who  you were or when you dropped  in tea, goodies and a cheerful  smile welcomed you.  Lil lived in her house at  Roberts Creek on her own  (with a little help from our  great homemakers), right up  until she was hospitalized last  August. She hated being  dependent on anyone, loathed  not being able to do all the  things she used to and finally  decided this wasn't the place  for her; time to go on to better  things. Lil passed away  October 5,1979 after spending  the better part of 70 years in  Roberts Creek.  Skating rep  aged six  B.C. Coast Zone Competition is October 26, 27 and  28 at Richmond. Our club will  be represented by Naomi  Hunter at the Opening  Ceremonies on Friday evening.  Naomi is six years old, lives in  Sechelt and has been skating  for one year.  Library  Tuesday 2-4 p.m.  Wednesday 2-4 p.m]  Thursday 2-4 &  7-9 p.m.  Saturday 2-4 p.m.  886-2130  This same wilted looking  section, which has just been  extended a block farther with  the deliberate removal of  several dozen Dogwood trees,  should be given the Sour Apple  Award for 1979 for insensi-  tivity. Imagine the chagrin of  the poor souls who live across  Cowrie Street and are faced  with the prospect of the  continued march of those  droopy trees in their tacky tufty  swamp grass to replace the  former grandeur of their solid  Dogwood and Salal bush.  I know the Village of Sechelt  requested that the Dogwood  remain but one morning they  were just all gone. Depressing. I  would like to see more Village  tub and basket planting and  (wouldn't everyone?) more tiny  Village parks complete with  benches for between shop  resting and budget mourning.  In response to some  questions, I think all the Dutch  bulbs come in fives and tens  and fancy packaging. I just  want everyone to know that  Canadian bulbs have babies  too and they still come in  dozens. I can't see that much  difference in the final bloom.  Happy Gardening.  by Carl Chrisam  A Pot Pourrl!  Mayor Harold Nelson is off  to the frozen north on a big  game hunt. Let's hope he took  along more than his peashooter. Those northern moose  play rough!  We would like to see him  return with a 50 inch spread on  his bumper. Not the other way  around!  Snow!  We had our first taste of Pete  Trowers Grease For The Wheels  Of Winter up at Clowhom on  Thursday. Snow on the upper  levels made for slippery and  miserable working conditions  and high winds sent the fallers  back to the bunkhouse. My  mind recalls the opening verse  of Pete's poem, the words  coming sharply and clearly:  Quickening In the valley,  the white flutter  blurs the road-slashed  relief map the  valley floor tips  In the salted distance  such damp confetti  will wed these boondocks  to quiet.  The poem goes on in tight, very  descriptive words, written by  one who has gone through the  Sandy Loam's home is brightened late in the season by  dried flower bouquets such as this.  CENTRE  HARDWARE & GIFTS  PENDER HARBOUR CENTER     BB- mm., a  MADEIRA PARK 883-9914  Is now serving PENDERHARBOUR  as drop off for  COAIf IIV!  Classified Advertisements  Deadline 1.00 p.m. Fridays  Classifieds should be prepaid and pre-written.  All Information In Classified Ad section of Cout News.  Holy Family  Parish  FALL BAZAAR  AND TEA  ..Saturday, November 3  From 2:00 - 4:00  Senior Citizens Hall  Sechelt  Notice To Our Customers  THE MUPPET SHOP  Our new space isn't ready; Joe Benner has kindly offered us a home away from home.  I We applogize to our customers for the inconvenience and. look forward to  ] seeing them in our temporary premises where there will be business as usual until further noticejj  "whole bothersome business"  of sweating out logs in the  summer, freezing to the  marrow in winter. I'm happy to  be out of it but I wouldn't have  missed the experience.  Toba Inlet:  Off to Toba Inlet this week  for a bit of a work project.  Hope to re-visit a little side  valley where in the early  "forties" Pinky Forbes and I  walked the primeval forest on a  cold and wet October day. We  munched our cold sandwich in  a crumbled and ancient  trappers line cabin to get in out  of the rain and snow and to  speculate on the age of  newspaper and artifacts we  found among the ruins.  If I'm lucky, I hope to get a  few shots of grizzly bear at the  camp garbage dump. There  used to be a lot of'em!  In later years, I flew an  amphibious aircraft into  Weldwood's gravel strip, 16  miles   up   the   valley.   The  airplane was fast becoming a The ",toldaiocarMady  tool and a sales aid at that time  and the psychology was good.  When my customers bought  from me they expected and  received fast service.  ' I'm happy that I was a part of  that era.  When I think back from  retirement (so called), to my  pilot-sales days; to the loggers  life and the wonderful  characters I have met; to the  necessity of forgoing an  education to help support a  There are so many incidents to  be written of that I often amaze  myself in the. recalling of them.  But I suspect there is a certain  amount of self-dramatization  in the telling and in many cases,  the telling is prompted by a  snap shot or the visit of an old  friend who only has to say, "Do  you remember the time...?"  As I learn to use the tools of  this trade, I find there is a  certain amount of freedom or  poetic license that can be used  to make it a bit more  entertaining in the telling.  Here's to the new career!  *****  If anyone knows the  whereabouts of Jeannic Billis  or Michael Dolphin will you  please call 885-5200. I have a  'girl and boy athlete of the day'  trophy for you!  ��� �����������  I promised a story now and  then if I could clean one up  sufficiently to be told. This  week I acquired a list of 25  ethnic stories which I am going  to change to 'local' stories as I  feel they still retain their  humour. Here are a couple:  Coast News, October 23.1979  7.  that eggs were $1.00 per dozen  and the cracked ones were 50' a  dozen. She said, "OK, crack me  a dozen!"  *****  And  then  there  was  the  skeptic who didn't believe in  flying saucers until he goosed a  waitress. Wow!  That's all for this week!  Carl  Stock Reduction  SALE  Ends Next Sat. Oct. 27  new XL-100.  color TV  ���20" picture tube (48 cm diagonel picture)  Reg. $669.95  Sale $585.96  Saw $133.99  J&C  ELECTRONICS  & APPLIANCES  FO4S0  Closing Out Our Cowrie Street Store  885-2568   Bi.  j  eaucat��� to help support a fi     Now is the time to think about correcting those J  family; and to my formative l problems which you noticed last summer for trouble j  years as a farm boy on the    %   7        ,       .. .man V  J free boatma in 1980. 9  buccaneer  Marina 6? Resort Ltd.  Secret Cove, R.R. 1     Halfmoon Bay, B.C.  Saskatchewan prairies, I find it  hard to believe that the years  have flashed by like the  fractionalized T.V. glimpses of  'the year that was'!  I am just beginning to realize  that time is catching up; that I  had better get the old lure of the  woods out of my system and  settle down to the business of  'telling it like it used to be'!  Sfree boating in 1980. o  t Our new fully equipped shop is available now for 9  9 winter repair service. Have your repairs done now and 3  2 avoid the spring rush. O.M.C and Mercruiser stern drive w  ^ and outboard repair. ^  Anew way  to help you buy  your first home.  Buying that first home is a big step for everyone.  That's why we've expanded our program to make it easier for more British  Columbians to buy a moderately priced home as their first home.  Our new FIRST HOME GRANT of $1,000  is available for all eligible British Columbians.  This grant can be used to buy any type of home���new, old, single family, condominium,  mobile home, townhouse. Any type of home purchased after July 18 can be acceptable, so  long as it falls within certain price limits. From July 18 to December 31,1979 these limits  are $54,000 in the Greater Vancouver and Capital Regional Districts and Fraser Valley  communities up to and including Chilliwack, and $50,000 elsewhere in the Province.  Remember this grant is available for FIRST  HOMES ONLY. If you've owned a home before  ���whether in British Columbia or elsewhere���  you are not eligible.  The purchaser must also meet one of the following residential requirements:  (1) Lived in B.C. for a continuous period of not  less than two years immediately prior to the  purchase of the home, OR  (2) Born in B.C. and a Canadian citizen at the  time of application, OR  (3) Lived in B.C. for a continuous period of five  years at any time, and a Canadian citizen at  the time of application.  Of course, our Fi\MILY FIRST HOME GRiUMT  of up to $2,500 still remains available for those  with a dependent child under 19.  If you have not received any previous benefit,  and are unable to qualify for either of the above  FIRST HOME grants, remember the NEW  HOME BUILDING GRANT of $1,000 is still  available until December 31,1979.To qualify for  this grant, you don't need to be buying your  FIRST home, but it does have to be a NEW  home.  For further information and application forms for  any of these grants, please contact Ministry offices.  Province of British Columbia  Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing  Honourable James R. Chabot, Minister  ���MMMfl mm  mmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm  Coast News, October 23, 1979  <  This page sponsored by TRAIL BAY SPORTS LTD.  k     TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU  Cowrie St. Sechelt, 885-2512 Sunnycrest Shoppftig Plaza, Gibsons, 886-8020  Hockey League has youthful look  It appears the S.C.M.H.L.  will begin its first full season of  operations with a youthful  look, as many ex-juveniles have  joined the five team league. It is  anticipated that high scores  and plenty of fast action will  highlight the first season with  the "no-hitting" concept  agreeing with everyone so far.  Although sponsors have  been located from all around  the Sunshine Coast, players  from all areas are mixed into all  five teams. The five teams will  be vying for the "Rick  Radymski Sr. Memorial  Trophy"  in  memory of the  longtime owner of the  Wakefield Inn and an avid  sports backer in the area. As  well, the "Dale Stcphanson  Sportsmanship Trophy",  honouring skill as well as good  sportsmanship will be up for  grabs. Finally, a new trophy, in  remembrance of local hockey  buff and respected goaltcndcr  for the old Roberts Creek team,  "Thc Rick Jacobsen Memorial  Trophy" will be up for grabs for  thc top goaltender in the  league.  The league will attempt to  iron out tbe kinks and have all  the players placed onto teams  for thc regular season in thc  next two weeks over the  exhibition schedule. The league  has had a fine response from  fellows offering to help referee,  so thc exhibition games will  give them the opportunity to  get the feel of "no hitting"  hockey as well as all the  players.  A final suggestion to any  players still "thinking" about  playing; league and team  rosters will bc frozen after thc  final exhibition game, and  players wishing to join a team  at that time will bc placed on  weaker teams by the league.  The Exhibition Schedule Follows  Thursday, October 18  8:00    p.m.    -   Crown  Zellerback vs Cozy Court  Bruins.  Saturday, October 20  7:00    p.m.    -   Crown  Zellerback   vs   Anderson  "A's"  9:00 p.m. - Gibsons vs The  Creek  Sunday, October 21  6:30  p.m. - Cozy Court ,  Bruins vs Gibsons  Thursday, October 25  8:00   p.m.   -   Gibsons   vs  Crown Zcllerbach  Saturday, October 27  7:00     p.m.     -     Crown'  Zellerbach vs The Creek  9:00   p.m.  -  Cozy  Court",  Bruins vs Anderson "A's"  Sunday, October 28  6:30 p.m. - The Creek vs"  Anderson "A's"  \mm>4%ssm*lltm.  From the Fairway  .jp^Suncoasl  HILiPOWQP ft     Tel. 885*9626  IHqpiii^ tld Cowrie St Sechdt'  ltd.  "The Chain Saw Centre"  Family skating was a popular feature as Sechelt Arena opened its season last week.  Strikes and spares  by Ernie Hume  The scores are down a bit for  some of us in thc Classic  League but there is only 9  points separating first to fifth  place so the run for thc first  quarter is interesting. Big  games last week by Jeff  Mulcaster, a 347 and Carole  Skytte, a 308.  . Vicki Allen spared in the  Tuesday Coffee League and  rolled a 318 single and 715 lor  three. Alice Smith had a 319  single in the Slough-Off League  and in the Ball and Chain, Don  Slack a 307 and Freeman  Reynolds a 312. In the  Hhuntastiquc League Henry  \tira roP'-d a 308 single and  Dan Weinhandl finished the  week in the Legion League with  a 303 single.  > Highest Scores:  Classic:  .* Carole Skytte 308-917  Freeman Reynolds  298-984  Cauleen McCuaig  240-645  Jeff Mulcaster  347-985  Brian Butcher  291-707  Tuesday Coffee:  Don Slack  307-756  Lee Larsen  225-633  Freeman Reynolds  312-798  Nora Solinsky  273-692  Phuntastique:  Sue Whiting  257-700  Edna Bellerivc  243-631  Swingers:  Rita Johnston.  254-641  Art Tcasdale  204-543  Ralph Roth  249-690  Hugh Inglis  205-572  Henry Hinz  308-699  Len Hornett  287-667  Don Slack  273-711  (iibsons 'A':  Mavis Slanley  286-679  Legion:  Kathy Clark  240-684  Verna Cockriell  217-599  Phyllis Gurney  249-688  Dan Weinhandl  303-656  Jim Gurney  275-696  Jeff Mulcaster  291-702  Lorne Christie  255-721  Bob McConnell  268-728  Youth Bowling Council  Wednesday Coffee:  Bantams:  Carole Skytte  247-671  John Richardson  213-455  Denise Kennett  256-685  Scott Spain  179-468  Slough-Offs:  Andy Solinsky  182-499  Alice Smith  319-641  Sean Tetzlaff  205-574  Gilda Symes  290-701  Juniors:  Ball & Chain:  Michele Whiting  211-575  Jane Coates  250-641  Dan Hurren  207-461  Some pretty wet and foggy  weather for golfing last week,  however, there were still a  goodly number of golfers  taking advantage of the few  good days available. The  Saturday morning low  handicappers are still enjoying  a good turnout.  The inclement weather  caused the ladies day events to  be   cancelled   last   week.  However, a big day is planned  for Tuesday. A nine hole  tournament followed by  luncheon and election of  officers, also the presentation  of trophies to the ladies for this  year.  Wanderers win  On the Rocks  [ Gibsons Winter Club curling  got under way on Saturday,  October 13, with our Annual  (fereenspiel. Fifteen rinks  turned out to make this a  particularly successful  Ijeginning. First in thc "A"  event went to thc Dan Reitlo  ijnk and the top of the "B" to  tjie Ken Skytte rink. Luckiest  cjurler of the evening was  ijsabelle Rindleman who won  tjie draw prize ofa season's free  durling offered to a new curler.  t League curling has now  sjarled but there is still time to  get in touch with Drawmaster  tarry Boyd at 886-2030 or  (i)ine in to thc rink, fill out a  form and Larry will find a'spot  for you. There is time available  dn the Monday night Mens and  on the Tuesday, Wednesday or  Hriday Mixed.  '. The following was submitted  by Gordon Shcad, sponsor of  the school curling teams. It is  included in its entirety because  we felt it applied to curlers ot all  ages.  Curling!  The Sport For Everyone  Curling is a game of many  revels ���from the very  competitive to the social level.  Ij is a great way to introduce  yj.ung people to a game that  tjley can enjoy and play for a  lifetime. As well, it is an  etcellenl way lot them to meet  other young people both in  then oun community and in  other adjacent communities,  ; The combined junior and  High school program includes  (lie following main areas:  '. - instruction  ; - mini-games for practice  - weekend games > -  - zone playoffs  -bonspiels  Instruction and mini-games  take place after school on  Mondays at the Gibsons  Winter Club from 3:30 or 3:45  to 5:30 p.m.  Weekend events include  travelling to curlingclubs in the  surrounding area (Squamish,  Powell River, Vancouver,  Nanaimo) for a day of curling  (usually Saturday) and some  informal socializing and  instruction. In turn, teams  from these areas are invited  back to Gibsons to curl against  our teams with our curlers as  hosts.  Thc high school and junior  programs both lead to  provincial champions. Teams  from our club will be entering  these competitions.  Students will have thc chance  to attend junior bonspiels away  Irom Gibsons as well as hosting  one of their own in March. A  fun type "adult-junior  bonspiel" may also be held.  The program will cost $20.00  I for., the. (Octoher-Mai;ch)  season and will help pay for 1)  instruction,  2) games, 3) a  broom, and 4) transportation..  This program is available to  boys and girls from the ages of  10 - 11 to 19 years. All are  welcome.  If you desire more  information, please call the  Gibsons Winter Club at 886-  7512 or come on out on  Mondays and join our club!  Thanks very much Gordon  and good luck to your junior  curlers.  The Elphinstone Wanderers  played their second home game  of the season last Sunday at  Langdale. The game was a onesided affair throughout with  the local lads easily emerging at  the winning end of a 3 - 0 score  over the visiting Metros of  Vancouver.  It was the best performance  of the year so far and the  victory lifts the Wanderers to a  3-1-1 record in league play so  far.  The whole team played well  with Nick Bergnach coming  Skating  registering  It's still hot too late to  register for Figure Skating! All  levels of skating available -  come out and join the fun.  Adult and teen beginners, as  well as more advanced skaters,  skate from 6:45 to 7:45 on  Thursdays. Youngsters skate  Wednesdays and Saturdays.  For the more advanced club  members there is Precision  Skating on Sunday afternoons.  Call Nancy Douglas at 886-  2103 to enroll.  through with an outstanding  offensive and defensive game,  scoring the third goal in the  second half. Bergnach's goal  followed first half goals by  Cory Mottishaw on a blistering  shot. Hustling Graham  Chapman had his hard work  pay off when he connected for  the second goal from a corner  kick.  Elphinstone's next game is  on Sunday, October 28, at  McBride Park in Vancouver  against the R.S.S. Football  Club. Once again the local  players would like to express  their appreciation for the solid  and enthusiastic fan support  they have enjoyed at their home  egames. ��� ���   ���   ��� ��  Some of you old-time golfers  will recall our guard dog  "Melch" that Roy Taylor kept  in thc club house during the  nights, to discourage the  numerous break-ins at that  time. She died recently of a  heart attack at the age of 10'/:  years. "Melch" used to chase  the aircraft flying over the golf  course, down the fairway, and  although she never caught any,  she prevented any from ever  landing!!! Hope she stills has  lots of running room in "Doggy  Heaven".  The lady hosts have started  the voluntary lunch counter  services for the winter  months���another example of  what makes our club so unique  in it's successful operation.  CARS AND TRUCKS  Rental ���Leasing  ���Also-  Domestic and  Industrial  Equipment  Seaside Rentals  885-2848  i Homelite - Pioneer ��� Husquarna - Poulan  V     < Stihl - Oregon Saw Chains  . p-Hni      Splitting Mauls, Splittion Wedges,  Axes, Fallers Supplies, Chains,  Bars, accessories  P'  *��*m\f  Mercury Outboards  & Mercruisers  Toro and Case Mowers & Tractors  i mm*aflfii aa*a%i   m*J\l' < **At'   "**%���   ������������At   PENINSULA  MARKET  885-9721   Davis Bay, B.C.  tide tables  Open 9���9  7 Days a Week  Reference:  Point Atkinson  Pacific  Standard Time  Wed. Oct. 24  Fri. Oct. 26  0120                3.2  0240  3.2  0800               14.2  0955  14.3  1355                9.1  1530  10.0  1845               13.0  2005  12.4  Thurs. Oct. 25  Sat. Oct. 27  0155                3.1  0330  3.4  0855               14.2  1055  14.3  1430                9.6  1640  10.1  1935               12.7  2110  12.0  ��� Groceries ��� Fishing Tackle  ��� Sundries ��� Timex Watches  Sun. Oct. 28  0420  1145  1755  2225  Mon. Oct. 29  0525  1245  1905  2350  Tues. Oct. 30  0640  1345 1  2010  ^  i **************lAiWllAllAi-i������A�� 3  P.O. Box 1586  Sechelt  Phone:  885-2122  STAR SECURITY AND PATROL  Guard Dog Patrol  Patrolling: Commercial Sites  Industrial Sites  Private Residences  Registered with Ihe R.C.M.P., Sechelt Licensed Private  Fully Bonded and Insured Investigators  Private Consultation ��� No Fee Barbara Fox  All Services art Tax Deductible Anne Schulberg  885-9666  SWANSON'S  Ready-Mix Ltd.  Quality Concrete  )    Excavating Ltd.    O  Wharf Road. Box 172  Sechelt, B.C.  Septic Systems  Excavations  Dralntlelds  885-5333  L & H SWANSON Ltd.  Sand-Gravel  Dump Trucks  Gibsons Ready Mix  WORKING  IN THE COMMUNITY  886 9412  *Drainrock 'Washed Rock  ���Sand 'Road Mulch  "Fill "Concrete Anchors  Avail. $20  Mon.���Friday 8a.m.���5p.m.  TRAIL BAY SPORTS  SHOE SPECIALS  BAUER ADIDAS���  Famous Names In Shoes For Quality, Style And Comfort  III STOCK  Five Models Of Shoes Specifically For Girls and Ladies  Including Court, Leisure And Jogging Shoes  BAUER: EQUIPE  Sale $25.05  Assorted Sizes  Reg. $28.95  LADV OCEANIA  "26*95   Sale $24.50  BAUER: TURFPRO JR.  Children's Soccer Shoes. Sizes 12 - 6  Reg. $14.95  Sale   $12.05  BAUER: TARQA  Sale $10.05  Children's Sizes  Reg. $20.95  ADIDAS SOCCER SHOES for Children and Adults  3 pr./$7.oo  National Sports Socks  Reg. $2.95  NOW III STOCK  Tyrol Dress, Rugby Jerseys,  * and  Canterbury International Heavyweight Rugby Jerseys  IN STORK SPECIALS  ON GIRLS' AND LADIES'  FIGIRE SKATES  GIBSONS  Sunnycrest  886-8020    TWO CON VENIeJvJ^^CATION^O^ERVEYOU BETTER    885"2512  SECHELT  Cowrie  Street  __________  mamm  ______________ w  Fiction Corner  The Audience  Coast News, October 23, 1979  by John Moore  At last the poet was granted  his long-awaited audience with  the Emperor. In spite of his  rags and the snickers of the  courtiers, he crossed the vast  Audience Hall with dignity and  knelt as a supplicant before the  Imperial Throne. The Throne  was an enormous, austere  chair, carved from a single  massive block of indifferent  stone. Seated there, dressed in  simple white robes and  unburdened by crown or  sceptre, the wizened Emperor  seemed oddly childlike.  "in the shadows to the  Kroperor's right stood his  Treasurer, resplendent in  golden robes and an ornate  mask of hammered gold.  Ajpout his neck he wore a thick  gold chain, from which  depended the great golden key  to the coffers of the Empire. To  tl$ Emperor's left, almost  invisible in the shadow of the  gigantic throne, stood his  Executioner. Swathed in a  black cassock surmounted by a  featureless mask of iron, his  neck was encircled by an iron  chain, from which hung the  heavy iron key to the Imperial  dungeons.  In a faint, slightly quavering  voice, the Emperor invited the  poet to rise and bid him tell  some tale of his own country  and of how he had come to be  so far from his home, seeking  sustenance among strangers.  The poet bowed, paused for a  moment, and began to speak.  His voice was surprisingly  resonant and commanding.  Even the most arrogant  courtiers, whispering behind  fans and perfumed scarves, fell  silent.  "In a distant land," said the  poet, "there lies a great range of  mountains. But for a single  narrow and precipitous pass,  this range is impenetrable.  Once, long ago, there were two  villages on the plains in the very  shadow of the mountains  which separated them. The  people of these villages knew  little of one another, since their  knowledge was limited to the  legendary intelligence of  occasional travellers who had  survived the hazardous journey  through the mountains. The  mountains were venerated as  the natural home of the gods by  the people of both villages and  this lent an air of sanctity to  these vagabonds. Drawing  upon narrative skills cultivated  by a life of such obligations,  they elaborated on the wealth  and generosity of the village  from which they had come. The  pride of their hosts guaranteed  their hospitality...  "In time great kingdoms and  empires arose in lands far  distant from the two villages  and the mountains. Hearing  one another's wealth and  splendour celebrated in  traveller's tales, these powers  began a lively diplomatic and  commercial exhange along  routes which ultimately led to  one of the villages, then  through the pass in the  mountains to the other. The  villages prospered as a result of  this trade. They became  bustling staging towns, then  great cities themselves, fabled  places of clusters of towers and  shining domes, girdled by  massive walls of dressed  stone...  "Inevitably the ancient  rivalry of the two cities led to  war. Unscrupulous poets have  invented the abduction of a  princess of one city by the  TECH ?990  Nova Scotia Tech, Atlantic Canada's only university  directed solely to advanced technological education  and research, is putting in place programs directed to  the challenges and opportunities of the future. Nova  Scotia Tech's faculty and students are drawn from all  Canadian Provinces and from nations world-wide.  Your corporate or individual donation to the Nova  Scotia Tech 1990 Fund is needed. It will be your  investment in improved productivity through applied  technology.  Visits to the campus are welcomed. Details of Nova  Scotia Tech's programs will be forwarded promptly  upon request. Opportunities for Nova Scotia Tech  representatives to meet with corporate officers are  invited.  Or, you may mail your cheque directly to ��� The  Nova Scotia Tech 1990 Fund, Post Office Box 1000,  Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3J 2X4.  You will receive a receipt for tax purposes.  Is there room in your budget for Nova Scotia  Tech?  J.CIairCallaghan.P.Eng.  President  Nova ScotiaTech 1990 Fund  prince of another, for  audiences are known to love a  tragic romance, but the real  causes of the war were mutual  suspicion of each other's  wealth and power and the  desire for monopoly of the vital  trade route. Each hoping to  catch the other by surprise, the  two cities marshalled their  armies and marched into the  mountains. The Savage  tribesmen who inhabited the  crags had a reputation for  devising imaginative and  protracted torments for those  who trespassed upon the  mountains of the gods. In the  past they had even attacked  well-armed caravans, but never  had so many armed men  invaded their fastness and they  retired to their caves and eyries  to watch and wait...  The advance parties of the  two armies encountered one  another in the narrow pass.  After an inconclusive skirmish,  they returned to make their  reports. The generals were  dismayed by this unexpected  development. In such rugged  and confined terrain, their  cavalry and siege weapons were  useless. Still, they exhorted  their footsoldiers to cover  themselves with glory by  capturing the pass. To further  inspire the men, the poets  chanted the odes to Victory  they had already composed to  the rumble of drums and the  rant of pipes...  "Thus began a battle which  mounted in fury as the summer  waned. At its height, the pass  was a charnel-house. The  stench of unburied dead fouled  the mountain air and clouds of  fat flies seemed to blot out the  sun. Sentries swore that at  night they heard the clash of  shattered arms and a ghostly  paean rising from the pass as  the spirits of the slain  continued the terrible struggle  from dusk to dawn...  "In the end, the season  acomplished what courage and  sacrifice could not. One  morning the men rose to find  the carnage in the pass  obliterated by a fine white  shroud of snow. Against this  possibility, the generals had  constructed fortified camps in  the approaches to the pass and  to these the armies retired.  They fought only the wild  mountain men who had  recovered their courage  sufficiently to raid the supply  convoys of the armies as they  foundered in the deepening  snow. In the drafty barracks,  the poets sang songs of the  cities they had left behind, of  trysts in the scented bowers of  hanging gardens and of festival  nights aboard delicate barges  adrift on moonlit canals. By  spring the ranks of the armies,  already decimated by battle,  had been thinned by cold,  starvation and suicidal  despair...  "Spring   brought   no  resolution to the stalemate in  K&C AUTO  WRECKING  886-2617  Oct. 2 - 11 open 9 a.m. ��� 2 p.m.  Oct. 12 -18 open 5 p.m. - 9 p.m.  Oct. 19 - 31 open 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.  Oct. 12 - 18 Phone In Orders  From 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.  Closed  Sunday & Monday  the pass. Neither army was able  to advance or dared to retreat.  Both were reinforced by  "volunteer" detachments from  the cities, but when these  arrived, understrength, they  proved to be little more than  penal battallions of thieves,  cut-throats, beggars and  wastrells, the scum of the cities,  officered by disgraced  noblemen and bankrupt  merchants whose friends and  relations had purchased their  commissions...  Columbia Hydro  and Power Authority  PUBLIC NOTICE  POWER OUTAGE  Electric power will be interrupted as follows:  Wednesday, 31 October 1979  Power OFF from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon and 1:00 p.m. to4:00 p.m  NOTE:   Outage time could vary and power may be restored  earlier.  AREA   AFFECTED:   Prowse,   Dougal,   Truman  Headlands, Cochrane and Bay Roads; also,  Harmony Lane, Wells Lane, the entire Bluff  area and all of Keats Island.  REASON:   Improving present  distribution system.  HENSCH  District Monogw  ft  \m**'  Free Announcement Courtesy  Coast Newt  SUNSHINE  GM  Wharf Rd. & Dolphin St., Sechelt  885-5131  CHEVROLET'S SPORTY CORVETTE FOR 1980 - has a recognizably new, aerodynamic  appearance, plus extensive weight-reducing changes. Front air dam and rear spoiler are Integrated into bumper covers. Significant reductions in front-end weight were achieved by use  ' of a new bumper system and two fiberglass comer braces. Corvette engines are Ihe same as  1979, but the 4-speed manual transmission has wider gear ratios allowing a lower axle ratio  (or Improved fuel economy wilh no loss of lower end performance. An energy-saving lock-up  torque converter clutch assembly Is used wilh all 1980 Corvette automatic transmissions. New  options include a roof panel carrier that attaches directly to Ihe body.  1980 PONTIAC FIREBIRD TRANS AM TURBO  CHEVROLET'S 1980 CHEVETTE FEATURES - a new aerodynamic rearend with a  repllchcd, more vertical hatch lid. Hatch glass Is flush mounted. Rear quarter paneb are  redesigned with new wnparound talllamps. Engineering highlights Include a new, Improved  performance braking system which requires less braking effort. New optional steel belted  radial tires give aboul 25 percent better wear life and improved handling. Model lineup is Ihe  same: 2-door and 4-door hatchbacks and Scooter coupe.  1980 PONTIAC ACADIAN  SUNSHINE  GM  Wharf Rd. & Dolphin St., Sechelt 885-5131  iMMMMMiMaMMiMiaMMaMnMMMMIMHMIilMMHiiMMiMMaHl mmm  mm  10. Coast News, October 23,1979  In Christ's service  Ecumenical reach-out  Gibsons Council news  Rev, George Inglis  Sunshine Coast  United Churches  One of the finest tools for  unity in the Christian church  has become somewhat blunted  by misuse���the ecumenical  movement.  Originating from the Greek  ui.rd Oikoumene. "the whole  inhabited world", the word at  first meant just that���the  ecumenical councils of thc 4th  and 5th centuries, which  included the bishops of the  "whole world". Somehow,  today, thc word is generally  understood in many circles,  particularly in thc grass-roots  areas of thc mainline  traditional Protestant polity, to  be synonymous with a  relinquishment of denominational integrity.  The feeling seems to bc that  being ecumenical means being  a true Christian, painted with a  broad stripe, and truly united  in brotherhood and sisterhood.  In practice, there are frequently  denominational undercurrents  which are not appreciated or  understood by the rank and file  practitioner of ecumenicity.  The problem with this loose  interpretation of ecumenicity is  that it may truly be far ahead of  its time, truly looking forward  io the time when the rifts of the  greal Protestant Reformation  of the I6th century, and the  post-Reformation diversity,  may once again be healed, and  thc church becomes once again,  called to "...one Lord, one  faith, one baptism," without  denominational diversity.  The difficulty is that this  does not work out in practice,  and most frequently participants in "ecumenical worship"  as il i.. loosely called in many  cases, find themselves moving  unknowingly into paths which  oppose their own denominational beliefs. They often find  themselves questioning some of  the worship practices and  doctrines of their traditional  church, while not fully  understanding them.  This side-effect of "ecu-  mcnical" worship and study is  an unfortunately divisive  influence in many church  families, at a time when greater  unity is being sought, and when  ecumenical movements arc  voicing the desirability of  unity.  The problem is arising  actively today, 100 years after  the first modern ecumenical  movement was formed, in  London, Hngland. There the  Anglicans. Baptists and  Presbyterians joined together  to present a common front to  battle the poverty, filth,  sickness and despair that was  so prevalent in that large city.  The splendid work .done by  this ecumenical alliance was  taken over, in large part by  Gen. William Booth, after he  left the Methodist ranks and  undertook thc mammoth task  of cleaning up London's vice  and crime-ridden East End,  using "Christian soldiers" to  form the still-serving Salvation  Army.  The modern ecumenical  movement, however, is usually  thought to have started a  century later than that first  informal alliance, and its  genesis is traced to the  Edinburgh Conference of  missionaries in 1910. Mission  field workers from all over the  world and from the major  Protestant denominations  joined forces ecumenically,  realizing that all missionaries  faced pretty much the same  problems in the field,  regardless of denomination,  and could draw strength from  one another.  The main thing to highlight  in this union, and in subsequent  alliances, which eventually  emerged in 1948 as the World  Council of Churches, is the fact  that participating members  espoused llieir own doctrines  and denominational beliefs,  and stood firmly on them. It  was in areas such as social  reforms, intcr-faith dialogue,  welfare work, medical  missionary work, etc. that the  major churches have contributed their resources and  energy, to the bettermeijt of  mankind, and certainly to the  greater understanding and  toleration between denominations.  It seems feasible that this  world council, with its  continued activities and growth  in inter-denominational  communication, may very well  be the arena from which will  one day come in great mutual  understanding, and as close to  ecumenicity as it is possible to  bc in this diverse and contrary-  minded world of human  beings.  However, this desirable  circumstance, it seems, should  .be based upon a firm  knowledge of one's own  doctrine, giving thc participating members a firm ground  to stand upon in studying the  strengths and weaknesses of  ecumenicity and in shedding  new light on some doctrinal  and ecclesiastical practices  which have become altogether  stultified and static, and might  be re-examined profitably.  It cannot come about by the  devious practice of claiming  ecumenicity and surreptitiously injecting doctrinal  beliefs into the unwary  participants. Inevitably, these  participants are bound to feel  betrayed! when they discover  their search for ecumenicity has  resulted in duplicity, and they  are actually being weaned  unwillingly from their beliefs.  It is truly most desirable,  however, and should be  cultivated unceasingly by all  who believe that Christ calls  believers to be members of his  church in the world, especially  in this day of secularism, when  the Christian church is  becoming a sorely beleaguered  minority group.  But true ecumenism can only  come about when all races,  creeds, colors, wearing all their  cultural and traditional  diversities, will come together  at the grass-roots level, ready to  honor and defend the other's  beliefs while retaining their  own.  It should be a reach-out, not  a sell-out!  Benoit Lepage attended thc  October 16 Council meeting to  announce his candidature as a  Gibsons alderman. "Since you  haven't done anything yet  about the sewer on Burns  Road, I am therefore  presenting my nomination  papers for alderman," said  Lepage. "You are out of order,"  said the Mayor. "You turn  these in at the Village office,  not here."  "All right," said Lepage, "but  I'm going to get this sewer  going somehow. If Bennett can  use dirty tricks, I guess I'll have  to, too." A voice from the  spectators' chairs; "He did  not."  Kiwanis  by George Cooper  At a dinner meeting October  20 at the Peninsula Hotel, the  Sunshine Coast Kiwanis Club  with their ladies as guests  presented their newly elected  officers for 1980 to the  Lieutenant Governor of the  Pacific Northwest District for  formal installation in office.  The Lieutenant Governor,  Gordon Cameron of Vancouver, spoke of the  commendable public service  the Sunshine Coast Club has  rendered the community in its  25 years of existence. "The  senior citizens apartments,  built some five years ago, arid  the intermediate care facility  now in the working drawings  stage are outstanding examples  of the practical service that I  would like to see other clubs  emulate," said Cameron.  Cameron and his wife Jeanette  were given a standing ovation  by the club members.  Newly elected president,  Maurice Girard, told the club  members that he looks forward  to his year in office. "With this  fine executive to support me, 1  am confident the club will  continue its great record of  service," he said.  Vice-president is Larry Farr,  secretary, Ozzie Hincks,  treasurer, Ken Goddard, and  directors, John Robinson, Bill  Wright and Bob Emerson.     '���'  Letters to Council included  an urgent invitation from  William Vander Zalm for as  many members as possible to  attend the discussions on  regional government reform.  The meeting on October 22 in  Abbotsford is for the upper  Fraser Valley districts,  Squamish-Lillooet, and the  Sunshine Coast.  A letter from insurance  adjuster, J.W. Parsons of  Halfmoon Bay, advises Coucil  that no claim on the Village of  Gibsons' liability insurance for  the Cavalcade explosion will be  considered by I.C.B.C. Their  grounds for turning the claim  down were that the Cavalcade  was a separate organization  and besides that the policy does  not cover the person using the  explosive since he cannot be  classed as an independent  contractor.  A letter from Transport  Canada concerning mandatory  frequencies (MF's) at  uncontrolled airports states,  "We recognize the valuable  service your UNICOM  provides the pilots using  Gibsons-Sechelt airport. Since  122.8 is already the frequency  which most aircraft use at the  airport, we wish to consider it  the MF at Gibsons-Sechelt."  Committee reports showed  that swim pool attendance  averages 4600 a month.  "Although this is a drop of 2300  in total attendance from a  similar period last year, I feel  the benefits of the pool to the  community are worth the extra  cost 'to the Village," said  Alderman Goddard. Alderman  Trainor   reported   that   the  information   brochure  marina development wil  distributed to taxpayers  before the public meetinj  November 8.  **mm\*mAml*llemmm*Ammlemmm*mmm^^  If you get a  bump in the night.... i  call Brian  in the morning!...  BRIAN'S AUTO BODY  A PAINTING LTD.  Fully equipped for all body & paint repairs  ^mmmMMM.m    BOX 605 SECHELT   885-9844  ^^^^^WETAKE THE DENTS OUT OF ACCIDENTS"  MaYA-MMAmaaa-mtatavmaavtaiMWaaaviawaaamavaaV'a'MaValirMAmMflAmAMA*  Phono 6S6 2S22���"  W^-.  NOTICE BOARD .  WWli/f/Ti  on  be  well  on  J or  ���86-7817  Stock Reduction  SALE  Ends Next Sat. Oct. 27  new XL-100  color TV  ���20" picture tube (46 cm diagonal picture)  Reg. $669.95  Sale $535.96  SIU6 $133.88  |0/% electronics  JIkW & appliances  FD450  Closing Out Our Cowrie Street Store  -     885-2568 i  Bridge M SumNm Coaot 0M CM  Games will be held the first and third TuMdayt at etch month  <l th. Golf Club, mating promplty at 7:30 p.m.  Gibsons Hospital Auilllary  Aloha Buffet  Gibsons United Church Hall  November 16.1979, 11:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m., S3.7S each  OomShow  Qlbaona United Church Hall   Friday. October 2010 to 9  Saturday. October 27 10 to 6 Silver Collection  Everyone Welcome  SUNSHINE LAPIOARV a CRAFTS CUM  Club mean lat Wadneeday every month at 7:30 p.m. For infer*  mallon phone 666-2376 or 6664204. Hn  Render Harbour library  During October. November and December, tingle memberihlpt  will ba $1 and lamily membershlpe will ba $1.50.  T.F.N.  Sunehlno Coaat Arte CouncU  Regular meeting 3rd Tuesday of every month at 7:30 p.m. at tha  Arts Center in Sechelt. T.P.N.  Country tiara Square Danes Club  Dancing every Friday night 8 - 11 at tha Roberta Creek  Elementary School. 895-8027.  ELPHINSTONE AERIAL CLUB  Meeting every second Wednesday of the month at S p.m., at the Wilson Creek Club House.  WESTERN WEIGHT CONTROLLERS  Meet every Thursday at 10:00 a.m. Everyone welcome. For regis*  Iration phone 885-9386.  ROBERTS CREEK HOSPITAL AUXILIARY  Every 2nd Monday���Roberts Creek Hoepitel Auxiliary, If a.m.  SI.Aidan's Hall.  THRIFT SHOP  Every Friday. 1-3 p.m. Thrift Shop. Qlbsons United Church base-  ment.  AL-ANON MEETING  Every Thursday in Gibsons et 8:00 p.m. For information call 686-  9569 or 886*9037.  Tetrahedron Ml Club  First official get together. 7:30 p.m. Wedneeday, October 17 at the  Sunahine Coast Golf and Country Club. Our guest speaker���  Sigge B|orklund of Slgga'a Sports Villa.  BAROAIN BARN  The Bargain Barn of the Pender Harbour Health Clinic Auxiliary  is open on Thursday and Saturday afternoons from 1:00 until  3:30. T.F.N.  SWAP MEET AND CRAFT FAIR  First Salurday ol every month at Madeira Para Community Hall,  10.00a.m. to 3.00 p.m. Call 863-9258 or 863*379 lor table booklnga  or arrive before 10.00a.m.  Tope B.C. S7I Ofeaone  Tops B.C. 578 Gibaons will now meet In the Athletic Hall at  Armors Beach. Lower Gibsons. Thursdays at 1:00 p.m.  SUNSHINE   COAST  NAVY  LEAGUE   OF  CANADA  Cadets and Wrenettes agea 10 to 13 will again meet Tuaaday  nights, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.. United Church Hall. Gibsons. New  recruits welcomed.  Women's Aglow Fellowship Mealing  Every third Tuesday ot the month at Harmony Hall In Gibsons.  Babysitting available. Phone 886-9774. Ladlaa of ali agea  welcome. Trensportetlon available. For mora Information phone  . 886-7426 or 885-3356.  'U\l\'.f.\\\\\}\.l\AWMWil>iM  Be An informed  voter  Public Meeting On The  Marina Referendum  Thursday, November 8,1979  Gibsons Legion Hall  8:00 p.m.  (confirmed)  Voter Eligibility  - All those who's prinicipal residence is within the Village of Gibsons boundaries.  - All property owners within the Village of Gibsons boundaries.  Be Sure To Register To Vote  For Further Information  Contact The Gibsons Chamber Of Commerce, 886-2325  Or The Village Of Gibsons, 886-2274 Wildlife  corner  by Ian Corrance  The geese are flying south,  ��jtherc's snow on the mountains,  (salmon in the creeks, and I lit  HJmy oil stove yesterday*..winter  1 is coming.  j   I   was   speaking   with   a  jubilant   Peter  Gordon   the  'other day. He seemed very  enthusiastic about a wee bit of  ���white stuff on the hill tops. I  realized that I was talking to a  skier, one of those strange  breed that never want "spring to  a come and can't wait for the end  I'of summer. Not that I have  li anything against skiing, it's just  HI that to slide down a hill you  ' must first climb to the top, this  I exertion is usually accompanied by sub zero temperatures.  This may be a hangover from  the three years I spent in the'  arctic, the last of which I spent  pouring over maps of Canada  trying to figure out where I  could stay warm all year. I have  done a bit of skiing (towed  along by a Skidoo), so I'll make  a foolhardy resolution, that ifl  can find a warm gentle slope  this winter, I'll give it another  try. In the words of a friend,  "I'll try anything twice".  Salmon  I was over at Angus Creek  today. Charlie Cairns had just  come back and informed me  that the dog salmon are  running. It's a place I like to go  every year. Hopefully I can  watch them for many more.  Here's something that came  across my desk; it's from the  Salmonid Enhancement  Program and is well worth  paying attention to.  They're Vour Fish  by Alex Whltecross  There's something pretty  exciting going on in British  Columbia, but it's costing a  couple of hundred million  dollars. That's a lot of loot, and  whether you know about it or  not, you're paying for it.  The former federal Liberal  government committed the  money in 1977 and B.C.  Environment Minister Rafe  Mair signed an agreement last  March which committed the  provincial government to an  initial stake in the game with a  promise of $7.5 million from  the province's coffers. It's  probably no surprise to you  that neither former Fisheries  Minister Romeo LeBlanc nor  Rafe Mair had any intention of  dipping into their private  household budgets to live up to  the multi-million dollar  contract they co-signed. They  expect you to handle the shot,  so you better pay attention.  The whole thing got started a  number of years ago when a  group of respected biologists  got together at a seminar and  concluded that Canada had  enough know-how to increase  the anadromous (freshwater-  searun) fish stocks of the  Pacific watersheds to what they  were at the beginning of the  century. What that conclusion  really means is that these guys  say that we have enough  scientific knowledge available  in this country to increase the  present salmonid stocks by 100  per cent after three-quarters of  a century of screwing up the  streams, rivers and estuaries  that are essential for the  spawning, rearing and  maturing of these fish.  Out of this came the concept  of the Salmonid Enhancement  Program (SEP) and the  subsequent decisions by the  two governments to invest your  money in the scheme.  (For   the   record:   the  pronunciation is sal-MON-id,  and it refers to the five species  of Pacific salmon���coho,  Chinook, chum, pink and  sockeye���as well as searun  Dolly Varden, steelhead and  cutthroat trout.)  The decision, however, was  not an arbitrary one. You may  recall the public meetings that  were held throughout the  province in November 1976.  They were called to test the  citizen's reaction to the SEP  proposal and the results of  these meetings were positive,  but with certain reservations.  Backed by this public approval  the proponents of the program  Coast News, October 23, 1979  11.  Dog salmon are spawning already in Angus Creek.  approached the federal  government and got an  affirmative nod from cabinet  and treasury board but, here  again with reservations or, if  you like, with strings attached.  Some of the strings were that  the cost be recoverable within a  reasonable time frame, that the  program would provide  increased employment, it  would be a catalyst for regional  development, it would provide  social and economic benefits  for native Indians and it would  preserve resource and  environmental values. Then to  really tie up the package, the  government decreed that there  should be heavy public  participation in the program.  It's this final string I want to  bring to your attention because  I think it's important you're  aware of it.  As stated earlier: it's your  money that's backing this  ambitious scheme of doubling  a resource that's dependent on  a deteriorating base (streams,  rivers and estuaries). In other  words, you are a shareholder in  a resource industry that, like  any other industry, required  capital investment if production was to be increased.  You've already been committed to this investment but, as  with other investments you  might make, you should expect  a reasonable return.  In the original planning of  the SEP it was anticipated by  your industry's advisors that  this return, or profit, to the  shareholders would be about a  buck-and-a-half for every buck  invested in the short run and  probably much greater than  that over a longer time span. It  was also anticipated that there  would be other benefits���  mostly social���to which dollar-  values are difficult to assess.  Now���as in any other  business or industry, things can  sometimes get off track and a  profitable plan can end up as a  break-even situation or worse,  as a loss. There are many ways  the latter can happen.  Unwillingness to change from  the original plan despite  changing conditions is one  way. Straying from the original  plan when there is no need, is  another. And withdrawal of  investment capital is a sure way  of scuttling an otherwise viable  venture.  As a shareholder in this  venture you should make a  point of becoming as informed  as possible about the salmonid  resources and how the program  is progressing so that you can  put forth valid opinions if you  suspect the project is getting off  course. Fortunately, there's a  mechanism built into SEP for  just this purpose and you  should use it.  The B.C. Task Group is an  advisory body made up of  individuals (voluntary)  representing specific interest  groups (sports fishermen,  commercial fishermen,  chambers of commerce, forest  industry, etc.) and the public at  large. It is responsible to the  public and the SEP staff at the  same time, as a means of  attaining two-way communication. It also passes on  recommendations to the SEP  Board who, in turn, advise the  two responsible ministers and  treasury boards.  If you require information  on salmonids and how the  enhancement program is  progressing or should you have  knowledgeable suggestions you  feel should be heard, write to  the Head of Public Involvement, SEP, 1090 West Pender  Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E  2P1.  If you want to know more  about the B.C. Task Group,  contact our office at #501, 535  Thurlow Street, Vancouver,  B.C. V6E 3L2.  Remember, it's your  business. You better look after  it.  That's all for now. Oh! By  the way, Maryanne West saw  an immature golden eagle out  at Gower Point, so keep your  eyes open if you are over there.  My numbers are 886-2622/886-  7817 or 886-9151, give meacall  if you see anything interesting,  ta.  Gibsons Public  Library  Tuesday 2-4 p.m.  Wednesday 2-4 p.m.  Thursday 2-4 &  7-9 p.m.  Saturday 2-4 p.m.  886-2130  ��*>  Coast Business Directory  I ACCOMODATION I  I CONTRACTING I  Ole's Cove,  Halfmoon Bay, B.C.   32  885-2232  * Heated pool    * Sauna  * Excellent dining facilities  Monday to Sunday  6:00 to 9:00 p.m. Dinner  8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Brunch  BELLA BEACH MOTEL  ON THE BEACH AT DAVIS BAY  1 & 2 bdrm. housekeeping units  ColourT.V., Cable  PERMATRUSS FABRICATORS     Estimates ^  (Gibsons) Ltd. 886-7318  Located next to Windsor Plywood p O. Box 748  Residential & Commerciai Roof Trusses Gibsons, B.C J  6855151     B.A.BLACKTOP LTD.  A\   '^K "Quality Service since 1956"  *aw      T7^>      Paving, Curbs, Drainage  East Porpoise Bay Road         Free Estimates _  THOMAS HEATING  OIL BURNER SERVICE .  ....  Complete Instrument OOO" /111  I FLOOR COVERING I  I UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP    Hilkonani, ���........ mm,., sechelt,B.C.  B.R,#1(OmiiB��y)  * M��-IMf V0N3A0  CONSTRUCTION LIMITED  We specialize In:      Concrete Foundation Work and Framing  Free advice on building question! to do-It- youraelt builders.    ,.  VernKoessler Box 888, Secheit. 886-2344 Anytime885-252��|  SEAVIEW CARPETS ��� CABINETS  SHOWROOM OPEN  10-6     Tues.-Sat.  886-2417   _922-2017   TOLL FREE H  BOnniCBROOK   LODGE  OCEAN BEACH ESPLANADE QOWER POINT ROAD QIBSONS, B.C.  Comfortable accomodation by the day, week  or month. 886-8033  '"' ,   ���<  P. M. GORDON  B.C. LAND SURVEYOR  JI      P.O. Box 609  M      Sechell, B.C.  k       IP      VON MO  Bus. 885-2332  Bet. 8867701.  CARPET-CABINET-CERAMIC CENTRE  Open Sal.  10a.m.���5 p.m.  Howe Sound Distributors Ltd.  North Road, Gibsons, B.C. 886-2765  BLUE SKY MOTEL  "On the waterlront at Davis Bay"  Overlooking Qeorgia Strait and the Islands  SLEEPING & HOUSEKEEPING UNITS  ^Colour Cablevlilon > Complimentary Cotloe   885-9987^  I APPLIANCES I  P.P. CONTRACTING  CUSTOM BUILT HOMES  885*9561  Halkonens,   R.R*��1 (Davli Bay)   Sachalt, B.C.   V0N3A0  I INSURANCE I  HARRISON'S APPLIANCE SALES  Parts and Service  Tuesday ��� Saturday 9 - 5  ! -Hi     886-9959 Pratt Rd., Gibsons  JOHN HIND-SMITH  REFRIGERATION & MAJOR APPLIANCE SERVICE  Port Mellon to Pender Harbour  Res. 886-9949  I AUTOMOTIVE I  ELECTRICAL I  ^_mm_m  .             VE IntVK mn tfctViNIN  4  Ithe co-opeiaiofs insurance  \  *     Wm.MForman  Judy Forman       e85.5022  ,     #201 Tha DOCK, Cowrie St., Stchtlt    885-2438 (afterhours),  MOVING AND STORAGE  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER LTD.  Household Moving & Storage Complete Packing  Packing Materials lor Sale  Phone 888-2664     Member Allied Van Lines     R.R.I. Gibsons,  SPECIALTY MACHINE WORKS  General Machine Work and Welding  Hours 9:00 a.m.��� 7:00 p.m.  Monday through Friday Incl.  Available 28 houre a day 885*2523  and Electric Ltd.  Bill Achterberg  886-9232  iLBimaEcmc  General Wiring &  Qualified Workmanship  RM MARLENE RD.,  ROBERTSCREEK^ 885-5379  MISC. SERVICES  /(���***** DRIFTWOOD CRAFTS * AND****A  CRAFT SUPPLIES .  SEWING NOTIONS  JEWELRY  ,  WOOL   '  ^Sunnycrest    Shopping   Centre, Gibsons    886-2525  2" GIBSONS LANES Hwy101f,;  Open Bowling Hour*: Friday ft  Saturday 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.   *  and Sunday 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. \ji  r~  -���  /T\  TRANSWEST HELICOPTERS  (J&  (��>  (1965) LTD.  Charter Helicopter Service  w  Box 875            686-7511  Gibsons  TREE TOPPING  VIEW DEVELOPMENTS LTD.  Clean up your wooded areas.      Marv Volen  Remove lower limbs for VIEW.      886-9597  Top tall trees adjacacent to building  We specialize in Volkswagen Repairs  1^5^ forflpwtt Motota  $art*   885-9466 *honda*  need tlrea?  Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  al tin- S-BENDS on Highway 101  Phone 886-2700  T.V. SERVICE) ruphpMerers  .  SUPERIOR MUFFLER  j Gibsons       BING'S EXHAUST LTD.      886-8213  ��� 100% Warranty on Parts and Labour  ��� All Exhaust Systems, Plus Dual Exhaust Conversions  Sunshine Coast T.V.  Mon. to Sat. 9:30-5:30 885-9816  ANDREASSEN    ELECTRIC  (GIBSONS CO.I Serving the Sunshine Coast  KLKCTRirAL CONTRACTOR  Per Andreessen 886-9439  General Delivery Granthams Landing, B.C.  Tom Flieger   Phone 886-7868  LECTRICAL  Box 214. Gibsons. B.C.  ONTRACTING VQN ,v0  1450 Trident Ave.  PICTURE FRAMES  Custom Made  Needle Point A Specialty  885-9573  Serving Sunshine Coast and Vancouver  All Furniture -  Marine - Boat Tops  V     883-990.1 or 669-6500 Local 119     J  ' SUNSHINE COAST '  DISPOSAL SERVICES  885-9973     Port Mellon t0 0les Cove     886-2938  Commercial Containers Available  salmon For AH Seasons  Marcel     Fishing Charters  Reasonable Rates  I PAINTING I  i&l  Quality Farm 6 Garden Supply Ltd. -  �� Feed �� Fencing    {"J���  * Pet Food    * Fertilizer   ���''  Terry Connor  880-7040        I  PAINTING C0NTRAC   Boxfi-W. Gibsons. OT.  Q  Economy ruto parts Ltd.  Automobile. Industrial  and Body Shop Supplies  Sechelt    88S-SI8I  I EXCAVATING I  I RESTAURANTS  I CABINETS I  f SUNSHINE    KITCHENS  dABINETS - REMODELLING  Showroom in Twilight Theatre Bldg.        886-9411  OPEN SAT. 10-5 OR BY APPOINTMENT  J.B.EXCAVATING        886-9031  Water, sewer, drainage Installation  ��� Dump Truck ��� Backhoe  ��� Cat t Land Clearing  ��� Free Estimates ��� Septic Fields  Chinese �� Western Food        Licensed Premises  | Weekdays 11:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.     Sunday 4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.  Friday & Salurdayl 1:30 a.m. -11:00 p.m.  Lower Gibsons        886-9219    Take Out Available  DANS BACKHOE  Daniel T. Johnson  m  Septic Tanks, Ditches, Excavations Sand & Gravel  VPhone 886-8003 P.O. Box 1429 Gibsons, B.C. VON 1VQ/  Concord Carpet Care  885-2533  CARPET & UPHOLSTERY  SAME DAY SERVICE    GIBSONS-SECHELT-PENDER HARBOUR_  w  P���ND6R HARBOUR RESTAURANT  CANADIAN AND CHINESE FOOD  Madeira Park Shopping Cantre  Eat In A Weekdays      11:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.  Take out Friday t, Sat. 11:30 a.m. -11:00 p.m.  883-2413     Sunday 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.^  \  ,___m____________ *^~^^^^^^^m***-*rm  *^^*^f*^^^^***^*aammaaammmm  mmm  Coast News, October 23,1979  COAST NEWS CLASSIFIED ADS  biflh/  Phone thc Coast News  for this free service  lo/l  Tim and Ruby Ardicl wish to  announce the birth of their  daughter Monica Ena-Marrie, 8  lbs. 2 oz. Special thanks to Dr.  Rogers and the hospital staff.  Geoff and Jan Madoc-Jones wish  to annoucc the birth of their  daughter Sian Lien Yuriko, born  4:24 a.m., Oct. IO, 1979 at St.  Mary's Hospital, Sechell, weighing  7 lbs. 9 oz.  o announcement/  Sunshine Coasl Branches of  Western Weight Controllers  present "FAIR DAY", Thursday,  November 8, Senior Citizens Hall,  Secheit. Admission, 50c. Door  Prize, raffles, gifts, loads of  surprises! #43  50% COMMISSION! MAKE  MONEY EASILY! Sell Christmas  & Everyday Cards, Jewelry, Gifts  & Decorations. Write for  particulars & "Free Xmas Card".  VERIBEST, Dept. N, 231  Lakeshore Rd. E., Mississauga,  Ont. L5G 1G8. #43  Women's Ice Hockey!  Wednesday, 10 to II, $2.50 per  session.   No   experience  needed.  Just for fun and exercise. 886-9095.  #44  Twenty-fifth Anniversary OPEN  HOUSE for Dick and Selma  Derby, October 27,1979 at Senior  Citizen's Hall, Sechell, B.C. from  8:00 lo 10:00 p.m. #43  Local World Book - Childcraft  Reps. 886-7557 or 886-7070.   #43  Vicinity Smitty's Marina, man's  navy blue gabardine jacket with  glasses in pocket. Reward. 886-  7398 or drop off at Coasl News.  #43  Medium sized female cat, white &  mottled colours. While collar with  black flea bauble. Lost in vicinity  of Bowling Alley. Phone 886-2086.  #43  Black neutered male cat. Veterans  Rd. 886-2740 #43  found  Young black cat found near Pratt  and Fircrcst. Was wearing collar.  Phone 886-7458. #43  per/onol  pel/  PROFESSIONAL  DOG GROOMING  for small breeds.  Call Sharon 886-2084  Transcendental Meditation  program (TM) as taught by  Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.  Personal and private instruction. ��86-7988. _   _   .        tfn  mayhave.  If someone in your  family is drinking, you  can see what it is doing  to them. Can you see  what it is doing to you?  Al Anon can help.  Phone: 886-9037  886-2596  886-8228  Bathroom Accent  And  Campbell's  Family Shoes  (Cowrie St., Sechelt)  Now Have A  Lay Away Plan  CATERING  The Royal Canadian Legion  Branch 109, Gibsons  Ladies Auxiliary  Cater To  Weddings And Banquets Etc.  At The Location  Of Your Choice  886-2411  1 Day Workshop:  FRENCH  CONVERSATION  with Peter Hauke on  Nov. 10, Saturday, 9:30  a.m. - 3:30 p.m. in  Elphinstone Conference Room 32.  Perfect your conversational skills in  good company.  Fee $10. Registration:  885-3512, Continuing  Education.  gggtaaaaHcgaaE*ac*i  -*a-*m-*a-  Gibsons Legion Branch #109    |  A     Presents    Jj !  ��� Clayton Hill Band *   ��  Prizes for best costumes Saturday Nite  October 26 & 27       9 p.m. -1 a.m  Lunches available:  11-6 p.m. Monday - Saturday  Friday, Saturday also 9 p.m. -12:30 a.m.  =MHBS  GEM SHOW  Sunshine Coast  Lapidary Club  Gibsons United Church Hall  Fri. Oct. 26 -10 to 9  Sat. Oct. 27 -10 to 6  Silver Collection Everyone Welcome  aamamamwaammam*amm*mamaa*wamaammaammam  Notice To Our Customers  PERMATRUSS FABRICATORS  (Gibsons Ltd.)  Will Now Be Operating Under The Name Of  SUNCOAST TRUSS LTD.  The Name la DHtereni  But the People And Service Are The Same  886-7318 Box 748, Gibsons, B.C.  oppoitunUle/  Interested in photography? Gain  experience doing team photos.  We'll train you. Good 35 mm  single lens reflex camera,  electronic flash, and car necessary.  Must be available about 20  minutes each morning and  afternoon, and about 1 hour each  evening for one week. Call colled  521-9593. #43  Solar Energy: information, design,  products, consultation. Tri-  Energy technique. I MOD, Hwy. 97  S., Kelowna. VIZ 1A8. 769-3080.  ��45  Income Tax preparation service in  the Sechelt area. Excellent profit  for the properly qualified person.  Please send all enquiries to S.  Brennan, Box 745, Sechelt. B.C.  Bshs'l Filth. For Information  write Box 404, Gibsons, or phone  886-2078.  Alcoholics Anonymous 886-8089  T.F.N.  Bathroom Accent  And  Campbell's  Family Shoes  (Cowrie St., Sechelt)  Now Have A  Lay Away Plan  Kittens free to good homes. All  while and all black, part Siamese,  three months. 886-9443. #43  German Shepherd cross. 6 weeks  old. $25 ea. 886-2952. #43  ���announcement/  Quiltmaker engaged in a study of  early quilts, tapestries,  embroideries, lace, pioneer  clothing, dolls and costumes  would appreciate Ihe opportunity  to see and photograph any  interesting items of Ihis nature  which you mayhave. Call Lyn,  885-9210.  2 only De Walt  10" Radial Arm Saws  $399.00  Link Hardware  Qlbsons  Are you tired of searching a  ready-to-wear rack* looking for  what you never find? Then  treat yourself to a made-to-  measure outfit, for men or  ladies. Speciality ��� formal  wear. Also alterations, designed and assembled by a  qualified European tailoress  (formerly of Hamburg Tailors  Inc., Germany). By appointment. 886-2415. tfn  TELEPHONE  ANSWERING  SERVICE  886-7311  Hours: Fri. & Sat.  10 a.m. - 6 p.m.  Appointments anytime  Call 886-7621  EMPLOYMENT  OPPORTUNITY  Full-time bookkeeper  or accountant for a  large Sechelt retail  firm. Duties will  include complete  accounting of companies books including  dally cash accounting,  accounts payable,  accounts receivable,  payroll and monthly  statements. Salary  negotiable.  Only responsible,  experienced male or  female need apply with  resume to Box 40,  Coast News, Box 460,  Gibsons, B.C.  wonted  Timber wanted: Fir, hemlock,  cedar and poles. Top prices.  Let us give you an estimate.  D&O Log Sorting Ltd. Phone  886-7896 or 886-7700. tfn  LOGS WANTED  Top Prices Paid for  Fir-Hemlock-Cedar  L4K LUMBER  (North Shore) Ltd.  Phone 886-7033  Sorting grounds, Twin Greek  uioik wonted       wontedtorent  tfn  Wanted to Buy: Logs or Timber.  Fir, Hemlock, Cedar ��� Porpoise  Bay Logging Ltd. 885-9408 or  885-2032.      tfn  18* front to back double stainless  steel sink. 2 solid core doors.  Remant T & G Cedar. 1 - 9'xl6'  carpel. 886-7289. #45  Older small dump truck for Roust*  A-Bout off Highway. Mechanically OK. 886-2887. T.F.N.  Private  Working couple with $5000 down  payment requires well kept  basement home (Langdale -  Gibsons area) with large  assumable mortgage or agreement  for sale. Eves. 886-2694.        #42  WANTED  Tenders for portable  Kiwanis Club House.  Located   on   Kiwanis  Way, off North Road.  Terms: Cash  Mail Bids To:  Box S15, Qibsons, B.C.  Tenders close Nov.  15, 1979. For further  Information phone  886-7896.  V.H.F. Two-way Radio sales and  service. 886-7215 T.F.N.  Housework. Have a car. Will do  shopping, laundry, pick-ups,  etc.Monday to Friday. 886-7290.       #44  Needs Fixing up?  Renovation and repairs, interior  and exterior. Call Brent al 886-  2551 for free estimate.      T.F.N.  Truck for hauling, rubbish  removal, etc. Handyman work  also. 2 teenage boys want work.  886-9503. #45  Handywoman available for any  type of chores. Wood splitting,  window washing, yard clearing  and housekeeping. Reliable. 885-  9579. #43  Most trees, like pets, need care  and attention and trees are our  specialty.  * Topping  * Limbing  * Danger tne removal  An insured guaranteed service.  Peerless Tne Services Ltd.  885-2109  For Explosive Requirements:  Dynamite, electric or regular  caps, B line E cord and safety  fuse. Contact Gwen Nlmmo,  Cemetery Road, Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound Farmer  Institute. tfn  WINDOW CLEANING j  Hourly or Contract ���  Free Estimates I  Please Call I  Wednesday Morning ���  885-5735  help mooted  Part-time cook. Experience  preferred. Phone 886-9815,  Cedar's Inn. #43  Daytime babysitter in my home.  (If possible). Soames Point. Call fT  886-7298 eves. #45 "  Experienced part time' help' for  office, mature person with current  experience in work force,  preferably in a bank or trust  company. Good prospects of full  lime work for suitable person.  Write Box 20,Coast News, Box  460, Gibsons. #44  Clerk-Cashier. Experienced only,  no trainees. Good prospects for  right person. Write Box 30, Coast  News, Box |60, Gibsons.       #44  MUSIC  LESSONS  YOV ENJOY  886-9030  essie  "uUowi'sbn'  Piano A Organ  Begin at age 4 and older  1614 Marine Drive, Gibsons  HELP WANTED  Contractors or  handymen who are  interested in doing  contract work on older  homes.  For further information please contact  the R.R.A.P. Coordinator at the Village  of Gibsons Office, 886-  2274.  I.R. Jones  R.R.A.P.  Co-ordinator  Village of  Gibsons  PENINSULA  ROOFING  & SHEET METAL  All Types ol Roofing  & Re-Roofing  Henry Rodriguez  Sechelt     885-9585  'CLAPP'S  CONCRETE  ��� Placing and finishing of  all types of concrete work  ��� old concrete broken out  and hauled away  ��� guaranteed results on  any concrete water  problems  885-2125  Wayne Clapp after 7 p.m.  pjOgCfj-aj  llwc/toch  hovel  For All  Your  Travel  Needs  peninsula  travel  886-9755  Registered  Travel Agent  10 week old chicks, lay in  December. $3.50 each. 886-7540.   #43  Brushwood farm fall riding  lessons, beginners to advanced,  English or Western lesson. Horses  available. Adult beginners a  specially. Also for sale, show  Quality foals. Trish Cramer  B.H.S.A.I. 886-2160 evenings  please. T.F.N.  April - 6 year old pony, greal for  kids. Including bridle and saddle,  $150. 886-9111 days. 886-2343  eves. #43  Urgently needed���Bull for stud  service for our milk cow. Any  breed or cross OK. Call anytime,  886-2877. #43  Live next to your own park. A  creek by your doorstep. 1 block to  beach. Solitude in the middle of the  Village. A one year old house with  unique design, over 2,000 sq. ft.,  quality finished throughout with  an excellent assumable first  mortgage. Phone 886-7668  evenings. View by appointment  only. #45  Big House Small Price  Madeira Park. A 3 bdrm. home for  bargain hunters. Master bdrm with  ensuile. Huge part. Dvlp. Bsmt.  Call collect 433-4086 or 438-1311,  Sarah K. McTaggart, BI. Bros.  Realty. #44  3 large prime lots. Panoramic view.  Gower Point Road. By owner. 886-  9033 or 886-2887. T.F.N.  A number lo note:  885-5171  WHARF REALTY LTD.  b.c.C yuhon  MACHINERY ft EQUIPMENT  FOR SALE: 1972 JD 350B  Crawler Loader, 1975 Case 480B  Backhoe, 1966 Chev. SA Dump,  1969 Fargo one ton; Fifth Wheel  trailer package deal, $28,000.  Phone 378-5203. #43  SNOWLANDER-LU1NG Cattle  "Polled" "Red" Record of 21 years  trouble free calving, highly  prolific. Steer sired by LUING  Bull wins Grand Championship at  P.N.E. For all climates and top  quality beef try SNOWLANDER-  LUING. Good breeding stock-  minimum $1000. per head at  Diamond Ranch, Edgewood, B.C.  V0G MO. #44  THOMPSON VALLEY HERE-  FORD BREEDERS Improver  Sale: KXA Kamloops. Oct. 27,  1979. Show 9 a.m. Sale I p.m. 75  head purebred herefords, bulls,  and heifers. Informalion Audrey  Fallis, phone 375-2200. #43  DAIRY HERDSPERSON:  Milkers, ranch workers wanted for  interior of B.C. Good working  conditions, near schools, good pay  according to experience and is  negotiable. Reference and resume  required to Canada Farm Labour  Pool, Box 129, Armstrong, B.C.  V0E 1B0. #43  MAKE MONEY IN YOUR  SPARE TIME. Learn income tax  preparation. For free brochure, no  obligation, write U ft R Tax  School, 1345 Pembina Way,  Winnipeg, Manitoba. R3T 2B6.  #43  mobile homo/  *-�����������������  Mobile home pads available.  Single and double-wide lots.  Sunshine Coast Trailer Park.  886-9826. _Jfli  McGinnis 8 x 30 trailer, completely  furnished. Incl. fridge, stove,  heater, drapes etc. $3,750. 885-  9355. #43  13' Oasis Travel Trailer, 3 way  fridge, 3 burner stove with oven.  Sleeps 4. Lou of storage. $1,500 or  best offer or trade for Tent Trailer  or whatever. Phone 886-7453 alter  6 p.m. T.F.N.  SUNSHINE COAST  MOBILE HOME PARK  AND SALES  Hwy. 101-Ph. 886-9826  1976 Meadowbrook  12 x 68 - 2 bedroom,  patio door, fridge,  range, built in dishwasher. Set up on nice  lot in Park.  $14,900.00  Double Wide  24 x 48 Statesman  2 bedroom plus den.  Fully carpeted, S  appliances. Full- sundeck, 2 paved driveways. Located on  corner lot in Park.  Priced to sell at  $23,000.00  lot /ole  Responsible family requires 2 or 3  bedroom home. Sechelt to  Langdale. Excellent care in  exchange for good home. Ref. if  required. Phone 884-5307 after  5:30 p.m. #44  for /ok  See us for your Halloween  costumes. Also books, clothing,  swim suits. Gibsons United  Church Thrift Shop. Open every  Friday 1:00 to 3:00. #43  World Book Encyclopedia. 886-  7557. #43  2 maple captain chairs, red leather  seats, $25. Maple coffee table, $ 10.  Fabric fool stool, $8. Bamboo fish  rod, $20. Sheared Beaver shawl  collar, $30. 3 mink neck pieces,  $60. Ladies spike golf shoes size 8,  $10. Authentic sailing ship prints,  some framed, $2.00 ft up. 886-7178   #45  Organ, electric. Lorry. Excellent  condition. $500. 886-8374.   #45  Infants car seat, GM type, $15.  Gas lawn mower, $60. '73 Audi  Fox, $2,495. 60" steel desk, $75.3  burner propane range, $35. 885-  3903. #44  1 double axle equipment trailer.  Offers. 886-7838 after 6.        #43  15 H.P. Evenrude, $500 obo. 886-  7924 after 4 p.m. Good running  condition. #45  Bark Mulch. Urge and small  orders. S13.50yd. 886-9031.  tfn  Telephone answering systems for  lease, rent, or purchase. See  J&C Electronics. 885-2568     tft  Bedford Diesel power plant, 37.5  kva Markon alt. ft com. Panel on  steel skids. $5,500 ono. 574-7084.  Call evenings. Good condition.  8,000 HR.T.S.N. #45*  Antique sewing machine with  cabinet. Has been converted eleclr.  Ornate, sturdy. $175 obo. Write  Box 7, Coasl News, Box 460,  Gibsons. Sorry no phone. Prompt  reply. T.F.N.  Bathroom Accent  And  Campbell's  Family Shoes  (Cowrie St., Sechelt)  Now Have A  Lay Away Plan  fZ.  JTowgoisMit.  JtrngoHdeslf  WOOD  HEATERS  from  $269.95  up  SELKIRK CHIMNEYS  Macleods  SECHELT  WWMMWI  ��������������������  You just can't beat  Macleods Prices on  Fridges,  Stoves  Dishwashers  and all major  appliances  See us In Sechelt  Macleods  Just a few of the  things we can do  for you: i  Household upholstery  Boat Tops  (bast on tha Coast!  Carpets (bast prices)  Automotive upholstery  Custom made Drapes  Ask us:  883-9901  Smohino Fireplace?  Our raincap chimney extension is Ji  i guaranteed to remedy 100% of all draft %  1 problem fireplaces and chimneys.  Draft controlled raincap.  Positively no down draft.  2' 4" chimney extension  constructed of non rust  galvanized iron.  Sealed at chimney lop.  1 ft. inside existing chimney  Cap is easily removed for  chimney sweeping.  All standard 8" x 12" flue sizes  $100.00 installed  AU other chimney sizes custom built.  can Nanaimo  back ft stone  . 7M-MH a nrs.  | Your order will be processed for installation date.  | If not satisfied in 30 days money refunded <  HMB aawmm  tot gent  Completely furnished collages by  the week. Riti Motel. #49  Qibsons large 2 bdrm. apt. Fridge  4 stove inc. $223 mon. Available  immediately. Phone Jerry, 885-  3771.      #44  1 ���   Furnished bachelor suite. 3 miles  north of ferry. 1 person only. No  pets. Non-smoker. Heat and light  incl. $135. 886-2923. #45  2 bedroom fully furnished, all  appliances, light and heat  included, $300 per month.  Langdale, 886-9890. T.F.N.*  3 bdrm. house on Pratl Rd. Large  fenced yard. 886-7260 eves.    #45  Roberts Creek, 2 bedroom duplex,  washer A drier. $230 per month.  886-7037. #45  Furnished 1 bedroom suile on  Reid Rd. Available immediately.  $160. per month. 886-7261     #43  2 bedroom house, Hopkins  Landing. Fireplace and  oceanview. $275 per month. 885-  3985. #43  I bdrm. basement apt.  Unfurnished, $125 per mon,  Granthams Ldg. Call 883-2318.   #43  3 bdrm. full basement, fireplace,  lower Pratt Rd., sundeck, carport.  References required. Phone  collect, 359-7650. Available  November I. #44  Newly decorated 2 and 3 bdrm.  apts. Stove, fridge, heat and  cablevision incl. in reasonable  rent. Sorry, no pets. Close to  schools and shopping. 886-8333.  T.F.N.  outomotiwe  '76 Ford 1/2 ton. Short bos. Step  side. 90 cu. in. motor. Must see.  886-8297 after 8 p.m. #44  Kawasaki 400. 2,000 miles. $800.  Aluminum Truck canopy, $250.  886-2975. #43  ***********  1871 Old* Cutlass  In-Good Condition  Asking $1,450  Open To Offers  .888-8444  1974 Ford 3/4 ton super van, blue.  Lots of room for dogs, cats and  relatives, paraphernalia and  earthly goods. Phone 885-5466.  #43  1974 Dodge maxi van. V8  automatic. Side windows. Sun  roof. $2,700. Phone 885-3808 after  6 p.m.  #43  1979 Toyota Truck with Galaxy  Canopy, 1,300 miles. 3 yr.  warranty. Phone 886-9879.     #43  1975 Honda Civic Hatchback.  Good condition. 50,000 miles. 4  speed, sun roof, AM/FM radio,  radial tires and snows on rims.  $2,995. Phone 886-9826.    T.F.N.  1976 Firebird formula 400,4 spd.,'  new TA's and Mags, new shocks,  brakes and stereo, $6,000. Phone  886-2754. #44  1973 Ford Ranchero, vinyl roof,  351 Cleveland, P.S., P.B., auto,  trans., new tires and shocks. Best  offer. Call 886-7453. T.F.N.  miminnmiiii  STORE FOR RENT  Lower Gibsons  Phone:  886-9941  mmwaa%maammmmmmmtma  ���aapBOooBOOBooBBBagtw  ROOM S BOARD  Coiy rooms with view  ���nd excellent home-  cooked meals.  Phone 886-9033.  *kjoa��sssssssssssaaac  FOR RENT  Back office of building  when renovations are  finished. School Rd. &  Gower Pt. Rd.  581-0995  Former NDP Sooftatorc location  1978 29' Travel Trailer  5' Thermo sliding door  Furniture never used.  Full Price $11,200  Bonus  73 Pontiac  Stationwagon  New Paint, Tires  Good Condition  With Trailer  $1,000.  1975 Ford 3 ton Truck  16' Van, 48,000 miles  Excellent Condition  $8,500.  Days 883-2533  Eves. 883-9230  Highway 1^)1-  -rancls Penlnsulk Rd  ,C RENTALS  ���JUILDING SUPPLIFS  motoicycle/  1978 Suzuki RM 80. Immaculate  condition. Never raced. Used one  summer only. $700. Phone 886-  8258. #44  outomotlve  JEEP PARTS, CONVERTIBLE  TOPS. All Jeeps 1942 lo 1979.  Huge stock, lowest prices, fast  service. Gemini Sales 4736 East  Hastings, Burnaby, B.C. V5C2K7. ,  Phone 224-2623. #43  AUTOMOTIVES   FOR   SALE:  1976 BMW 5301 Sunroof  Standard, 42,000 miles original  paint, service records. Asking  $10,500, will consider trades.  Phone 837-6527. #43  One 302 Ford motor. Two 351  heads for Ford. Six prop. (4 at 16 x  15 cup. One 16x15 super cup. One  16 x 13 cup). One marine  distributor. New 2 barrel carb.  New fuel pump and waler pump.  Plus complete steering unit. 12 ft.  fibreglass boat. 886-7116 after 4  p.m. #44  16' Springbox. New 115 Merc and  trailer, $3,000 obo. 886-8074.   #44  1975 3 ton truck, 16' Van, 48,000  miles, excellent cond. $8,500.  Days, 883-2533, eves., 883-9230.   #45  '76 Ford 1/2 ton, short box, step  side, 390 cu. in. motor. Must see.  886-2891 after 8 p.m. #45  '75 Ford maverick. 4 door deluxe,  302 V8, P.S., P.B., air  conditioning, 30,000 miles.  Excellent condition. Asking  $3,200. 1978 Ford Bronco Ranger  XLT. Loaded, excellent condition.  Asking $7,400. Phone 886-8071.   #45  1971 Datsun truck. As is $130.  Good for tires & parts. 886-2433.  #44  1978 Cougar, low mileage, perfect  condition. Loaded. 886-2034. #44  1968 V.W. Baha Bug. Must be seen  to be appreciated. 885-3917.  #43  1977 Toyota P.U. with Easy Rider  canopy. In good working  condition. $3,600 cash obo. Call  886-2622 days. T.F.N.  1977 Pontiac Parisienne, 2 door  coupe, immaculate cond., electric  window, tilt steering. Phone 886-  7350 after 5:30. #44  for lent  am  COMMERCIAL PREMISES  FOR RENT,  LOCATED NEXT TO  MEDICAL CLINIC, GIBSONS  PHONE 885-2515  FOR PARTICULARS.  v  moiine  18 ft. wood boat, fiberglass  bottom, Cabin, sink, headstone,  CB radio, 115 HP Johnson, O.B.,  moorage at Smitty's. $2,600 obo.  885-5467. T.F.N.  IAN  MORROW  *   CO.   LTD.  Marine Surveyors, Condition and  detail surveys for Evaluation.  Surveys for insurance claims.  Phone 886-2433,886-9458.  o.c.8 jMfcon"  ATTENTION LOGGERS,  TRAPPERS, RANCHERS. We  have 5 good used twin track  skidoos available. $1000 to $2000.  Cariboo Tractor Parts. Box 4268,  Quesnel, B.C. 992-5354. #43  Coast News, October 23,1979  Gibsons Auxiliary CNIB Drive  13.  WBBBgSSgggggBSB  KAIIImm  Miller  Marine Electronics  886-79I8  Decca Marine Radar  S&TVHF&SSB&  Universe CB  See Lorne  Lower Gibsons, next to  Dogwood Cafe       |  RWTTSmtmw..TO  FKHOMM'StfECMl  14' Hourston  With'79-20 H.P.  Merc. O.B.  $1,100  Used  7V4 Merc. O.B. - '79  The Boat Centre  Horseshoe Bay  921-7438  hs-msm.  FOR SALE PIPER TRI-PACER  AIRCRAFT, green and orange on  while Stol lips.excellent condilion.  All offers given consideration.  $8,300. Phone 992-2151 days, 747-  2934 evenings, Quesnel, B.C. #43  JOIN THE SMART SET!! Grow  your own vegetables all year and  save money! GREENHOUSE  SPECIALS. 4' x T $395. 6' x T  $475. 8' x 9' $616. Olher size  available. Nufab, 530-6201, 22470  Fraser Highway, Langley.      #44  SAVE $ JUST ARRIVED-  500,000 sq. ft. Industrial grade  fiberglass panels for roofs, walls,  patios, garages, misc.: Buildings,  fences. Wide range of colours and  sizes DISCOUNT PRICES start at  30* sq. ft. Nufab, 530-6201,22470  Fraser Highway, Langley.     #44  moiine  HIGGS MARINE SURVEYS LTD.  Insurance claims, condition and  valuation surveys. Serving the  Sunshine Coast and B.C. Coastal  Waters. Phone: 885-942S, 885-  9747,885-3643,886-9546.        tfn  20 ft. wood-hulled cabin cruiser.  New 140 h.p. Mercruiser O/D,  flying bridge, toilet, trailer. H.  White. 883-2730. T.F.N.  16'boat. New IlSMerc and trailer,  $3,000 obo. 886-8074. #44  Gibsons Hospital Auxiliary,  CNIB 1979 fund raising  Campaign Chairpeople  officially launched this year's  drive in Gibsons stressing that  "With your help, a future can  be bright, even without sight".  "During the International  Year of the ChUd, we feel it  appropriate to focus attention  on the special needs of blind  children and children who  might needlessly lose their  sight."  CNIB provides a variety of  services for visually impaired  children, their parents and  blind adults. These include  counselling   and   training,  instruction in mobility, skill  development, recreation and  library services. They are  designed to broaden opportunities and horizons for blind and  visually impaired persons.  "In order to sustain these  programmes and further  develop them, CNIB requires  the continued financial and  volunteer support of all  segments of our community.  Your help will enable visually  impaired Canadians to develop  to their full potential in  society.  "Last year the CNIB  continued to provide a full  range  of  services  including  nge  helping to prevent blindness  with education research and  public awareness programmes.  "We feel confident that the  people of Gibsons will continue  to support our campaign as  they have in the past and that  we will be able to improve the  services and programmes  which are designed to help  blind persons help themselves  as productive members of  society."  For    further    information  please contact:  Joan B. Rigby  Pres. Gibsons Hospital Aux.  886-7660  ���jnn aaaaiwA hhhhuiimh ha v* ss ��* .. n art wa v<  FOR SALE  SELF PROPELLED  STEEL BARGE & BUSINESS  Barge 12' x 40', powered by a 4-53 G.M. with Hydro-  Drive propulsion system. Load capacity 20 tons.  Wheelhouse contains stove, bunk, toilet and  steering station. V.H.F. and CB. radios.  885-9906 evenings lljt  VILLAGE OF GIBSONS  NOTICE OF ELECTION  Public notice is hereby given to the electors of the Municipality of Gibsons that  I require the presence of the said electors at the Municipal Office, 1490 South  Fletcher Road, Gibsons, B.C., on Monday the 29th day of October 1979 at the  hour of ten o'clock In the forenoon, for the purpose of electing persons to  represent them as follows:  One (1) Mayor  for a two-year term  1980/1981  Two (2) Aldermen each for a two-year term  1980/1981  One (1) Alderman for the unexpired term of  1980 only  One (1) School Trustee : for a two-year term  1980/1981  The mode of nomination of Candidates shall be as follows:  Candidates shall be nominated in writing by two duly qualified electors of  the municipality. The nomination paper shall be delivered to the Returning  Officer at any time between the date of this notice and noon of Monday,  October 29th, 1979. The nomination paper may be in the form prescribed in the  Municipal Act, and shall state the name, residence, and occupation of the  person nominated in such manner as to sufficiently identify such candidate.  The nomination paper shall be subscribed to by the candidate.  In the event of a poll being necessary, such polls will be opened at the  Municipal offices as follows:    '  Advanced Poll - Friday, November 9,1979  between the hours of 8:00 a.m.  and 8:00 p.m.  Election Day - Saturday, November 17,1979  between the hours of 8:00 a.m.  and 8:00 p.m.  of which every person is hereby required to take notice and govern himself  accordingly. Given under my hand at Gibsons, B.C., this 15th day of October,  1979.  J.W. Copland  ,       . Clerk-Treasurer  outomotlve  �����*  p. NEW HONDA CIVIC  OR AN ACCORD?  Call White Rock Honda  collect 536-2111  For full information on models, colours and  the best price in B.C.  Many good used Hondas to choose from  as well.  '���  White Rock Honda (DL 6010)  1810 152 St.,  White Rock, B.C.  V4A 4N5  Classified Ad Policy  All listing* 50c per line per week.  or me the Economical 3 to; 2 rate  3 weeks for the price of 2  Minimum  $2.00 per hnertlon.  All feet payable prior to Insertion.  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE  NOON SATURDAY  ��� In the event of an error the  publisher shall be responsible for  one corrected Insertion only.  This offer Is made available tor private Individuals.  These Classifications  remain free  - Coming Events  -Lost  - Found  Prist you ad la the squares Including lb* price of the Item and your telephone number. Be sure lo leave a blank space after each word.  No phono orders Please. Just mall In the coupon below accompanied by cash, cheque  or money order, to Coaat News, Classifieds, Boi 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON IVO, or  bring In person to the Coast News office, Gibsons  DROP OFF POINT : Campbell's Shoes & Leather Goods Store, Sechelt  Cout Newt  Clauifleds  Box460,Qlbton(,B.C.  VON 1VO  CLASSIFICATION:  Eg. For Sale, For Rent, etc.  L  T             -  X  EE                   ZEE _ ��� ."I "   -I  DEADLINE SATURDAY NOON-  b.c.fi yuhon  B.J.'S CAKE DECORATING  SUPPLY: The complet Shop for  all your cake decorating needs.  Write for the 1980 Wilton  yearbook, $3.30 plus 80' postage.  456 West Cordova Street,  Vancouver, B.C. V6B 4K2.    ��43  EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: 1969  CAT 950, grapple and bucket,  good tires, ROPS, serviced and  ready to go���Cranbrook���  $47,500.  1975 CLARK Skidders, 18.4 x 34  new tires, Cummins engine,  excellent condition���Grande  Prairie Alberta���$29,500.  1975 KOMATSU D55S standard  bucket, fully enclosed cab, 80%  u/c,���excellent condition-  Vancouver $34,500.  1975 DROIT FELLER BUN-  CHER, new boom and centre  bearing, 20* head, new knives, 7/8  yard bucket, many recent  repairs���Hinton, Alberta���  $78,000. Phone 324-2446 or 985-  9759. ��  HANDYMAN wanted to  assemble houseboats in local area.  Your own business, full or part-  time. Minor investment necessary.  Poor-Will Boats B.C. 112-769 East  Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.  V6A 1R3. Phone 251-4916.    043  CERAMIC BUSINESS fully  equipped for teaching. Greenware,  tables, shelves, paints, kilns. 160  students. Only one in district.  Wholesaler close. Building rented.  Selling for health reasons. Phone  395-2133. "43  MAINLAND MOTOR PRODUCTS m  886*81*44  Highway #101 & Shaw Rd.  Gibsons  DL-6606  888-8344  s  A  1  E  ��224��,  ***, **.  *    w\  *5��SfcSSS**  "��*o��  ���**��??*  ITRV VOUR TRADEJ  *m*m\ammammMmmmmamammmmmmmmmmmmMmmmmmt0aal  12,000 miles or 12 months Power Train Warranty available on most cars.  mainiand.motor Products un.  886-8314  On The Spot Financing To Approved Credit  886-8344  ____________ ^^^����^��**����><��^^*W��W��^W��II*|*IBBJP*��!^^  wmmmmm  mmwmmmm  14.  Coast News, October 23, 1979  .  Elphinstone School news  I lu puhlicit) division of the  ommunications class at Elphie  i>. selected four stories for this  i'k\ press release,  1 ditor, Kelh Henry, covered  hi Friday night Hallowe'en  lance. Sports reporter Dennis  ijlor talks on the prospects of  this years Senior Boys  Basketball Team. Reporter Earl  Perry contributed two stories  this week. The Sports Council at  Elphie, under the direction of  Miss Wilson, has been  successfully and quietly  operating in the school for many  years. Earl talked to the new  president, Reg Morel, on Sports  Councils plans and activities.  Next, he spoke to Mr. Bill Forst,  English teacher at Elphie about  the newly formed Newspaper  Club.  BESL ESTATE  Elphinstone Hallowe'en Dance  Elphie Newspaper Club  In Kelh llenn  i oi an optional costume  mce, the masquerade turnout  ;illy surprised everyone���  en the hand I'aeheena came  ���.mined.  I'achecna played a very good  is nl (lie latest music Iront  ink and new wave to classic  ick'n'roll to keep the soldout  dience ol -4CH> dancing all  uhl  i ven though I'achecna was  joyed b) all. the imaginative  stumes stole Ihe show.  I here was, of course, thc  er populat parade of cats,  clowns, Raggedy Annes,  gangsters, Geisha girls and  ghouls. The ones that really  caught your eye included salt  and pepper shakers, iwo green  martians, the caveperson, the  diapered twins, the Siamese  twins and many others.  In thc final judging of the  costumes thc Jawa, otherwise  known as Marty Payne, placed  first and received two tickets to  the Little River Band concert.  Runners up were Tarzan and  Jane (Denis Turenne and Trina  MacLeod), Lady Half and Half  (Jenifer Tucker), the Priest and  Nun  (Brenda   Robinson and  . by Earl Perry  Lorianne Horseman), and  Dracula (alias Steve Gentles).  Each will receive a ticket to the  next dance.  Also winning tickets were  Ginny Derby���prize for  buying the first ticket���and  Lavonne Rudolf and her  partner for the Dance Contest.  Dawne Atlcc won thc door  prize of a twenty dollar gift  certificate from Cactus Flower.  Many thanks to the more  than ISO people who dressed  up���you made the dance a  success! Thc good behaviour of  the crowd should make the next  dance even better.  Senior boys basketball outlook good  li> Dennis Taylor  Will I Ipltie's Senior Boys's  ' tskclball team make il to the  C. Provincials? It looks very  omising.  Plenty of speedy action is  peeled as the team will lack  eight but. have great  :peiie��ce. This year's major  ante plans are to be very  ggressive,1 and probably  ���Mow through with fast break  ��� ancouvcrs along with zone  tttcrns.  There will bc a change in  ��� 'aches Ihis year as Gary Gray  ���is retired and Roger Douglas  :ll be accepting the position.  louglas arrived from Gibson's  lementaryin January of 1979,  nd    is    presently    teaching  Physical   Education  and  ommunity Recreation.  Plavers   will    bc   training  tensively   for   the   1979-80  ���ason. There will be various  sercises    including   jogging,  eight lilting, and play pattern  "rkouts.  I'his year's team of try-outs  . ill combine Sechelt and  ��� iibsons talent, along with new  names and faces from  Chatelech. Cheers from Elphi  fans will still go out for veterans  such as Clint Suveges, Mike  Partridge, Gary Knowles,  speedy Robert Jonas and  versatile Grant Gill. These  players became well known  when they played for the Elphi  Junior Boys team during the  1977-78 season. That team  walked away with the Howe  Sound Division trophy.  Basketball will begin in mid-  November with a tournament  in Powell River which the  players are already excited  about.  This group will be very high  spirited and determined to go  all the way. The team is  supported by members of the  community and the students.  Games at Elphi will be great,  there will be thorough  enjoyment for basketball fans.  Sports Council news  by Earl Perry'  Sports Council activities  have begun early this year with  the upcoming Junior Girls  Volleyball Tournament. The  Sports Council raises the  money to pay for referees of all  major sports events. They run  the concession to raise the  money to supply food for  teams. The money earned by  this also partially supports  Elphi teams on away games.  In addition to all that, the  council sells school sweaters,  cougar pins, school pens,  cougar shorts, t-shirts and  socks. These items are  presently on display in the  Library showcase, if you are  interested in a purchase,  contact Miss Wilson.  The Sports Council is in need  of more members, especially to  help with the tournaments. Reg  Morel is the president of the  Council, Kathy MaePhee is  treasurer and secretary is Joey  Hogberg. Any of these people  can tell you about the type of  , work needed to be done.  Once again, Elphie students  will attempt to improve  communications in the school  by starting a newspaper club.  Previous papers were  unsuccessful; but this club has  high hopes.  Mr. Forst, club sponsor,  started the club mainly because  hc wanted to contribute to thc  school.  Thc paper will cover; school  news, sports, student council  news, a rock music column  Al-Anon  What is Al-Anon?  If someone close to you has a  drinking problem there is a  message of hope for you. Al-  Anon groups are people with  problems similar to yours who  have discovered that the  program has renewed their  courage and confidence.  Currently there are four Al-  Anon groups on the Sunshine  Coast. These are the meetings  with an appropriate telephone  number for contact and  information.  Sechelt - Monday evening,  885-2464.  Roberts Creek - Tuesday  evenings, 885-394.  Pender Harbour - Wednesday evenings, 883-9260.  Gibsons - Thursday  evenings, 886-9037.  review, teacher interviews and  much more. The club hopes to  publish in two week intervals,  and plans to be two-four pages  in length, depending on the  amount of articles.  New  members are always  welcome, presently the club is  comprised of Earl Perry, Paulo  Tomasi, Ruth MacCaughtrie,  and Lois Erwin. The club needs  many more people as running a  newspaper demands a large  staff.  ac  FOR SALE  Church building 1800 tq. tt. with attached living  quarters of 725 sq. It. at corner of Martin Road and  Sechelt Highway, Gibsons. This is a high visibility  corner on a lot 50' x 131.80' or 6590 sq. ft. Presently  zoned duplex but rezoning to commercial  understood to be feasible. Conversion to stores,  offices, restaurant could make this an attractive  investment. F.P. $85,000 - For details call SYD or  FRANCES HEAL 922-5877 or  MITTEN REALTY LTD.  1586 Marine Drive,  West Vancouver, B.C.  922-9355 (24 hrs.)  ac  A UnDRL CEDRR HOmES  921-1010  921-9261  Independently Distributed by:  M.D.MACKENZIE LIMITED  Display Nome  ond Office  6342 Bay St.  Horseshoe Bay  West Vancouver  V7W 269  jMlti     YOUR AUTOPLAN  ^\W)mm    CENTRJ  Taking care of  __ al I you r Real Estate Needs  Seaside Plaza Evenings  886-2000    Norm Peterson   Dennis Suvege  886-9121    886-2607       or 886-7264  PENDER LAKES PROPERTIES  18 LARGE LOTS ��� Some with Excellent View ���  All with Power and Water Available ��� Paved Roads  - Prices from $11,000 to $18,000.  Pender Harbour Realty Ltd, 883-2794  anderson  REALTY LTD  Anderson Realty Ltd.  Is Pleased To Announce  That Gordon W. Hall  Has Joined Our  Sales Staff.  Gordon has been a businessman on the Peninsula for 18 years  and very active in community  affairs.  Gordon extends a cordial  invitation to his many friends and  clients to visit him at Anderson  Realty, 885-3211.  v....  !-' i:  sua  ���   rd  III!  ���!'���:  Doug Joyce  885-2761  Bob Bull  885-2503  Don Hadden  885-9504  885-3211  REALTY LTD  Post Office Box 1219, Sechelt  Gordon Hall 885-9986  FREE REAL ESTATE CATALOGUE  Jack Anderson  885-2053  Stan Anderson  885-2385  Vadim Kobasew  886-2355  Vancouver Toll Free:  684-8016  SUNNYCREST  SHOPPING  CENTRE  886-2277  VANCOUVER  TOLL FREE  VAND LAND DEVELOPMENT LTD.  RR#2, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0  CONVEYANCING-REAL ESTATE CONSULTING-APPRAISALS-  NOTARY PUBLIC  WATERFRONT  IF you want a quiet waterlront retreat  IF you dnn't have time to build a new, solid house  IF your boat is 40 leet it will lit the boathouse  IF you arrive by plane there is a 44 foot float  IF you are content with 7'/. acres, mostly forest  IF you want lo invest $75,000-CALL DON!  GiUSONS rue ultimate in waterlront���immaculate 2 BR home  with basemeni Large vessel moorage right in front of the  properly Your own dock, total protection from all seas. Excellent  commerciai potential. The lol alone is worth Ihe price. $105,000.  Call Bob for appointment to view.  15 5 ACRES WATERFRONT BETWEEN POWELL RIVER and  LUND 390 leet ocean frontage. Cabin and well on property.  Subdivision possible. Excellent investment. $150,000. See  Vadim  ROBERTS CREEK WATERFRONT: 125 ft. of easy access  waterfront nn approximately 1/3 acre of landscaped land. Nicely  Ireed beach is sandy and shale The house is 1100 sq. ft, has 2  bedmorns a stone lireplace and a large sundeck. As a bonus  there is a ' room sell-contained cottage which rents out at $125  per month S114 500  Call Sian  SARGEANT BAY WATERFRONT 3 bedroom home on over 1  acro ol land with 86' ol waterlront Paths on adjoining properties  straw a good access to the beach where boats may be kept Lot is  all landscaped F r> SB9.500 Call Stan  SECHELT ��� SANDY HOOK $135,000.  Wateifront - moor your sailboat at this dock. Large cr.dar home  with super sauna, decks everywhere. Privacy and expansive view.  Phone Bob lor a viewing. This is a unique home.  SECLUDED WATERFRONT ACREAGE: Do you want a  quiel waterlront retreat with no roads or cara? We hive a few  parcels of evergreen forest, 5 to 10 acres each. Minimum of  250 leet of waterfront and stream through most lots. Located  22 miles ou: of Sechelt by water or air only. Fly In with Tyee  Airways. LIU. from Vancouver or Sechelt, or use your own  boal. Call Don.  EGMONT WATERFRONTAGE: Over 20 acres with approx.  1000' ol waterfront. Could bean excellent Investment. Vendor offers terms with $50,000 dn.   Consideration given to  trades.  WEST SECHELT: Prime location���large, level waterfront  property with well looked after older home. Landscaped yard,  fruit trees Incredible view of the Trail Islands! Very reasonably  priced. Call Vadim.  HOMES  COTTAGE IN THE VILLAGE: 3 bedroom 1000 sq. ft. house with  ensuite. Large living room and water view lo the south. F.P.  $41,900. Call Sian.  WEST SECHELT $69,500.  Good buy for size of Lot and development of lower level of home.  Newly completed house with concrete drive and parking areas.  Room on Lot to build swimming pool or other uses. Landscaping  done complete with lawns. Move in and enjoy. See wilh Bob.  CREEKSIDE HOME: $68,500.  On 6/10 acre wilh parklike setting, towering trees and spacious,  easy to maintain level lawns. One year new expansive home has  two large bedrooms. Separate entrance hall leads to a large  livingroom with fireplace that invites gracious entertaining. A 23  x 28 attached garage could be converted to an extra bedroom &  lamily room. An added plus is a 440' workshop with 3 pee.  plumbing. Close to besl sandy beach in area.  3 BEDROOM DAVIS BAY: Good home on a flat level lot. close to  the beach, two fireplaces and some undeveloped basement.  Aluminum siding. F.P. $44,900. Call Stan.  WEST SECHELT $95,000.  1,500 sq. ft. of excellent 3 bedroom femily home situated on a  dead end street. Beautiful view of Trail Islands. Double garage  and basement. Immediate possession. Must be seen it you are  looking for a prestige home.  SECHELT VILLAGE: 2 storey stucco house wilh 3 bedrooms,  easy walking distance to the shopping area. Shake root and  fireplace roughed in, plumbing in the basement. F.P. $46,700.  Call Stan.  HOPKINS LANDING: Small, 1000 sq. ft. basement home on a  large view lot. Good auto access. Nice open living area, brick  fireplace. F.P. $42,900. Call Stan.  WILSON CREEK: View home. Large, 1700 sq. ft. home. 3  bedrooms, family room, formal dining room, livingroom with  sunken conversation area has heatilator fireplace. 2V. sets ol  plumbing, built-in vacuum system. Fully fenced yard with  swimming pool. An excellent value at $86,000. Call Stan  Anderson.       ,  SECHELT: $3,500 down payment���Sea View���3 bedroom. Two  lull bathrooms plus extra in full basement. View from sundeck.  Landscaped lot, close to waterfront and marina boat launch. 12%  mortgage. Call Jack, 885-2053.  FARMLAND  WEST SECHELT: Opportunity to start a small farm or nursery on  21* Acres. This land has road, power, water and privacy. One of a  kind, waiting for your plans. F.P. $80,000. To view call Bob.  LOTS  REDROOFFS: 2 side by side view lots, each 1.18 acres with 100  feet road frontage. Excellent buys at lull price $23,000 each.  WAKEFIELD RD: large corner lot 97' x 100'. Level, serviced,  nicely treed. F.P. $12,500. Call Vadim.  HOMES  ELPHINSTONE RD: Quiet and  private setting the panoramic view as  only the Granthams Landing area  can provide. This well, built home  features three large bedrooms,  sliding glass doors onto sundeck and  viewl view! view! The home is 1150  sq. ft. with partial basement lor rec  room and workshop. Nicely  landscaped grounds round out this'  comfortable living package.  tsajoo  MANATEE RO: Roberta Creek.  Excellent starter or retirement home In  quiet area only a block to super beach.  Very nice two bedroom home.  Fireplace and on large lot. Prices are  going up, this Is an excellent buy.  141,000  FAIRVIEW RD: All set up, two  bedroom 12 x 6*8 mobile home on  large fully landscaped lot In quiet  area near Gower Point Road. Has'  fireplace, double garage, sundeck  and storage shed. 134,900.  DAVIS RD: Exceptionally well built  three bedroom home. Heatilator  fireplace, two sundecks, lamily  dining room plus eating area in  kitchen.All this on main floor. Lovely  landscaped level lot with storage  shed, full garden in and double  garage. PLUS-two furnished suites  In basement, self-contained with  private entrances, rental $200.00  each suite. This Is a fantastic value  and only two blocks to shopping,  schools, etc. $07,500.  SOUTH FLETCHER: Three bedroom  family home. Large kitchen,  livingroom with fireplace. On view lot  in Gibsons Village. $31,500.  CHAMBERLIN RD: Very attractive  panabode on 3'. acres. House is bright  with large windows and has a large  cobblestone fireplace. Acreage Is  mostly in grass and trees. Very private  and peaceful. A nice studio for hobbles  and large sauna In the garden  complete this tranquil setting.  $79,000.  SELMA PARK: NOT ON LEASE LAND.  Try your down payment on this two  bedroom house with ocean view.  Would make a great summer place or  handy person could make it a  permanent home. $32,800  CEOAR OROVE RD: Three bedroom  log house of 980 square feet. Large  kitchen, fireplace, wood and oil  furnace. On well but could be hooked  up to regional water. Lot size la 80 x  160. Make an offer. $33,000  LORRtE GIRARD  886-7760  CHASTER RD: Two bedroom A-  frame on large lot for a small price.  024,900.  LANQDALE: Breathtaking view of  North Shore Mountains, Howe Sound  and Islands in beautiful Langdale area.  Minutes from ferry terminal. Finished  suite in baaement, complete with  fridge, stove, fireplace and four piece  bathroom and separate entrance  makes this well built home an ideal  revenue investment. Upstairs includes  fridge, stove, fireplace and large 21x6'  sundeck. Blacktop driveway, carport,  landscaped. Owner must sell. Make an  offer. $52,900.  1597 SARGENT RD: Absolute privacy  In your own large beautifully  landscaped back yard with fruit treea,  spectacular view of the ocean from the  front. All this right in the heart of  Gibsons. Cloae to schools, shopping  etc. Immaculate three bedroom well  built home with 'A basement, fireplace  and sundeck. May be purchased with  adjoining lot. $80,000  MOUNTAIN VIEW: New three  bedroom home in Creekside Park  Estates. Close to schools, shopping  and all amenities For first homB  buyers there are grants between  $1,000 and $2,500 which do not have to  be repaid. $40,500.  $41,500.  BALS LANS: SUPER BUY. Three  bedroom view home with part  basement. Quiet one-way street.  Completely remodelled and  renovated, new roof, foundation,  carpet, etc. All this for only  $34,500.  CHASTER RD: Now here's living in  stylel 1500 square feet full basement  home with many many extras. Three  bedrooms upstairs. Huge master  bedroom has full ensuite Including  bidet. Sliding glass doors open onto  the southern exposure sundeck. Extra  large kitchen hu built-in dishwasher.  Downstairs has a finished rec room  and finished two piece bathroom plus  lots of room left to your imagination  and handy work. Fully enclosed  garage. Lot is 150 x 160 with home  situated to allow sub-division of the lot.  Assume existing 10'/< mortgage and  live happily ever after. $70,900.  NORTH RO.: VA acres level and  mostly cleared in pasture. The inside  of this gorgeous deluxe double wide  must be seen. Huge bathtub In  ensuite off master bedroom, plus  separate shower. Three bedrooms,  large kitchen and family livingroom.  Earth stove cuts heating bills to a  Good investment and  $03,500.  PARK RD.: Three bedroom home on  5 acres in Gibsons. A good holding  property. $74,900.  CONRAD RD.: Two bedroom home  with two full bathrooms situated on  Wh acres of level treed land. Creek  runs through the property only 60  feet from thefrontdoor of the cottage.  Ideal starter home or recreational  P'��P��rty. $31,500.  GRANTHAMS: Beach house located at  Granthams on a aandy beach with  SHOAL LOOKOUT: View lot with  approval for ordinary septic tank.  Lots of nice homes in Ihis attractive  afea $19,900.  HIGHWAY 101: Large lot 82 leet on  Highway 101 and 271 feet on School  Road. This CDA Zone could be  commercial. Prime opportunity to  develop. $45,000.  SCHOOL S WVNQART: Beautilul view  from this duplex zoned lot overlooking  the   Bay.   Close   to   schools   and  good summer moorage In front, House   8h��PPin9- Perfectly suited to side-by  has three bedrooms, large kitchen,  livingroom and full bath. Just pay  $33,000 and assume lease.    $33,000.  TRICKLE BROOK OR. Large new  home on View lot. Quality built, 3 bdrm.  home In quiet residential area, this  home haa large livingroom, fireplace,  double carport, full basement. The  perfect family home. $02,900.  LANGDALE ��� CHADWICK RD. View  View and more View. Keats laland, the  Gap and Georgia Straight. 3 bdrm., full  basement home now under  construction. Large sundeck,  fireplace, designed to complement the  90 x 130 ft. View lot. Covered by the  government new Home Warranty Plan  $01,500.  ELPHINSTONE RD: Gorgeous view of  Keats Island and through the gap.  Nearly 700 square leet. Iwo bedroom  home plus small nursery. Excellent  retirement or starter home with  southern exposure. Has 19 x 6'<v  sundeck and 12 x 6 covered porch  entry. $34,900.  LOTS  LANGDALE: 87 x 163 feet building lot.  On quiet dead end street and ready to  build on. $12,900.  side or up-down duplex construction.  $18,500.  FIRCREST RO: Reasonably priced  lots with nice trees. Dead end street  safe for children. A great area for  families. Priced at $10,500 each  CREEKSIDE PARK ESTATES: In  Gibsons Village on North Road. Lots  for single wides, double wides and  conventional homes. All on sewer,  water, hydro and all within three  blocks of the shopping centre,  schools and medical clinic. Priced  from $11,900.  HWY.101AARGENTRD:6/I0ofan  acre of treed land in Roberts Creek  two blocks from the Masonic Hall  Two dwellings allowed on the  property 100 feet ol tuyhway  frontage that would be .ileal 'hi  domestic industry site with home  behind On hydroand regional water.  $14,900  SKYLINE DR: This 70 x 59 x 131 x 122  foot lot with expansive view of the Bay  area and Gibsons Village is very well  priced. $11,500.  ACREAGE  :-l  MIDDLEPOINT HIGHWAY  101:  acres vacant land located on Highway  GOWER PT. RD. AT 14th: Lovely view 101.  Mlddlepolnt 30 �� miles Irom  corner lot. Two plateaus lor your Gibsons. Logging road, not in uae.  choice ol building sites. Two homes through   property.    Average   sub  could be built on this 1/2acre. Partially division   size    permitted    '/,   acre  cleared.   Could  be  accessed  Irom Southerly exposure and good view.  Grandview Road lor quiet rural setting S3S500  Approximately 85' x 265'.      117.000. MIDDLEPOINT HIGHWAY 101: t 20  BUnNSRD:Goodbuildinglot,65x130 acres   with   insulated  cottage |ust"  on Hat land In Gibsons Village. Four remodelled. Located on Highway 101  blocks Irom Post Office, stores and in   Mlddlepolnt   *   28   miles  Irom  transportation. Lightly treed. Three Gibsons. Aaerage sub-division size  blocks   Irom   ocean.   All   services permitted '/, acre. Cottage has all  available.  111.000.  FAIRMONT RD: Beautilul view lot In  the Village ol Gibsons. Partially  cleared   71   x   115   with   southern  JON MCRAE  885-3670  traction.  holding property.  ANNE GURNEY  886-2164  services, southerly exposure and view  Irom higher elevation at rear.  ���49,900.  ROBERTS CREEK: 10 acres  elTpMure.' Thle Is' ihe only regaining E"88^"1' '��Ml"��,oad N�� hV<"��'  vacant lol In this quiet cul-de-sac In ���"' ���UIM' cr8Bk runs "���S**  area ol new quality homes.   UM00.   oroPerl-'* 130,000.  ARNE PETTERSEN  886-9793  GARY PUCKETT  ���_,_ ,,.���-���_  JAY VISSER������,���. ���������  STEVE SAWYER     0�����m   DAVE ROBERTS  886-9508  885-2691  865-3300  886*8040  [HI  III,  ���  :  ,1  r jrl  9vr,  ���  ' becoming aRoyer  Coast News, October 23,1979  namblings of a Rovei  by Dee Cee  /fs I have mentioned earlier,  I cfon't know if the Chief  Steward, "The Walking Dead",  was! aware of all this skull-  duigery and feats of  legerdemain going on with the  wine bottles at the sideboard,  hut if he didn't it was soon to be  hroight to his attention in a  manner that still gives me the  -hiwrs when I think about it. It  was: brought about by a chain  if circumstances that I suppose  jusl had to happen at some time  ur the other.  Stated at the Captain's table  �� as'a Lord and Lady R. whose  .laughter (I had found out her  name was Maureen) was a  really gorgeous girl of about  eighteen years of age. She was,  io quote the song The Girl From  Ipenema, "tall and tanned, lithe  and lovely", and I could hardly  take my eyes off her although,  like the girl in the song, "she  neveT even looked at me",  which was not surprising seeing  the wide gulf that separated us  socially. Anyway, on this  particular night at dinnertime,  the traffic in and around my  end of the saloon was unusually  heavy with the stewards darting  in and out of the swinging  doors like squirrels taking  evasive action when a cat was  chasing them. One of them,  O'Reilly, a Liverpool Irishman,  who waited on the Chief  Officer's table and whose  movements at all times were  extremely erratic, went past me  with a long necked, half  emptied bottle of Claret  prominently displayed on his  tray and I, with my eyes on the  beautiful Maureen, made a  grab at it and not only missed it  but succ.eded in knocking it  over so that the contents spilled  all down the surprised  O'Reilly's white uniform! In  the ensuing confusion he was  thrown off balance and  droppedthe whole tray of soiled  dishes and glasses and there  was a resounding crash which  caused most of the diners to  stop eating and shift their  glances in our direction. I"  wasn't too concerned about  what they were thinking but I  someone could have taken  ture and portrayed for  rity the look on the Chief  rd's face as he glared at  nfortunate O'Reilly and  yot|fc truly. If looks could have  cotflieyed a message we would  botp* have dropped dead  promptly on the spot, gone  straight to hell and burned  \lK(t for eternity! O'Reilly's  uniform was in such a mess he  hatfip make a hasty dash to the  lo'djle and put on fresh whites  beftoe he could resume service  at His allotted table.  \jrhen the meal was finished  andV'thc last of the passengers  hadSdispersed, "The Walking  De��l" really gave the Steward  an�� me a going over,  particularly me. He called me,  among other choice epithets, a  I unable-fingered, f-���g fool  andsthat it was unfortunate we  weiig not back in the old days  when I would have been lashed  to Ihe mast and given one  hundred lashes with thecat-o'-  ninji-tails. How I wished I  could have given him in return  a well placed kick in the you  knqw where, that is if he had  any?; which I doubted by his  shrivelled up appearance!  a day or two later wc arrived  at Port Said. We moored about  11:00 a.m. and, after a hastily  served luncheon, most of the  passengers went ashore. So  marly left and must have  informed the Chief Steward of  their plans that he passed on  the )Vord to the Head Steward  that dinner that night would be  light and only one sitting would  be required. This was fine with  as we had all asked  permission to go ashore after  work was finished and it had  been granted, albeit grudgingly, by "The W.D.".  I was well aware of where we  were going as I had heard many  references to "The House of All  Nations" from my co-workers  in the fo'c'sle and how, when  we got to Port Said, they were  going to take their Saloon Boy  there and "get him fixed up". I  wisely had not mentioned my  single lapse of virtue that night  in Piccadilly Circus as,  compared with their hair-  raising experiences, it would  have appeared a trifling affair  and  subjected   me  to  their  ridicule.  Dinner over, we hurriedly  changed into casual clothes and  away we went headed for the  most notorious brothel in Port  Said. As soon as we got  through the gates leading to the  docks we were engulfed in a  seething mass of humanity, the  "fellahin" of Egypt, and it  appeared to me that nine-  tenths of them were beggars as  they all surged around us, like a  swarm of angry bees, with  palms outstretched and the  incessant whine of "backsheesh, backsheesh" assailed  our ears. We literally had to  fight our way through' them  foot by foot to make any  headway. Horse drawn  vehicles, cars and donkey carts  added to the congestion but  after a while, led by the  indomitable Higgins who  obviously knew the way, and  after traversing innumerable  narrow, crooked and winding  streets and alleys, we arrived at  our destination.  A massive door studded with  brass (the only opening in a  high wall) gave entrance to the  bordello and here in a dimly lit  courtyard were the girls! The  name "House of All Nations"  was appropriate as there were  girls not only of all shapes and  sizes but of all colours and  nationalities���English, French  Scandanavian girls with long  hair the colour of ripe wheat  vying for attention with coffee  coloured Arabs and half-cast  Hindus, while here and there  were statuesque coal-black  girls from the Congo or of  Nubian origin'. Presiding over  this dazzling display of  feminine pulchritude were two  elderly ladies festooned with  expensive jewellery who, in  both French and English,  quoted prices and just how long  one could have with any one  girl, for how much, and what  the girl's speciality happened to  be.  All this, was, as you can well  imagine, tremendously exciting  for a healthy, warm-blooded  boy of nearly seventeen years  and I was rapidly getting in the  mood for some hot and heavy  action when some damn fool in  our crowd started . shouting  "Exhibition, Exhibition"!  Although I hadn't a clue as to  what all this was about, the  madams' faces broke into  smiles and, after a hurried  collection was taken, two girls,  one white and the other black,  were selected to put on the  "show". We all repaired to a  large room off the courtyard  where the single article of  furniture proved to be a brass  bed and here the poorcreatures  put on their entertainment, if it  could be called that. To  attempt to describe what went  on in that room would be an  impossibility for a staid paper  like the Coast News to print but  it would be excellent material  for an article for a Penthouse or  Hustler magazine. My  shipmates howled with glee and  egged the girls on with cries of  more but I was, and I am no  prude, completely disgusted  and revolted by it all. 1 had  always placed women and girls  on some kind of pedestal, as  being on a higher plane than  the male of the species, but now  here they were, naked as  jaybirds and indulging in filthy  perversions that I not only had  no desire to witness but  doubted that animals could be  made to perform under any  circumstances.  How my shipmates fared in  this house of ill fame I don't  know but I was nauseated. All I  wanted was to get away from  this scene of nudity and  sweating females and get out  into the fresh air, even though  the night was hot and humid. In  that crowded room I could  hardly breathe so I stumbled  out into the night and to this  day I will never know how I  made it back to the docks and  the Norman Castle, but make it  I did. I had thrown a few  piastres into the collection  plate but apart from that I was  still in the same condition as  when I had left the ship and it  must have done something to  me in a psychological way as it  was a long time before I could  }0ok at any girl in that certain  way, not 'even LortJ R.'s  daughter, the ravishing  Maureen!  Hotel planned  The planning committee on  October IS viewed revised  plans of the Omega development on Marine Drive,  Presented by E, Veistall for  George Giannakos, the plans  showed a hotel of about SO  rooms, retail space, a  restaurant, and lounge  that some re-designing was  necessary to bring one portion  of the building within the  height limits set out in the  building code.  The committee gave its  approval for a foreshore lease  which Giannakos is applying  for but made its approval  subject to Giannakos  constructing a portion of the  sea-walk proposed by Council  for Gibsons- waterfront.  NOTICE        OF      ELECTION  FOR  MAYOR       AND     ALDERMEN  Public notice is hereby given to the electors of the  municipality of the Corporation of the Village of  Sechelt that I require the presence of the said  electors at the Village Office on the 29th day of  October, 1979, at the hour of ten o'clock in the  forenoon, for the purpose of electing persons to  represent them as:  MAYOR       ONE    - 2 YEAR TERM -1980 a 81  ALDERMEN TWO   - 2 YEAR TERM -1980 ft 81  The mode of nomination of candidates shall be as  follows:  Candidates shall be nominated in writing by two  duly qualified electors of the municipality. The  nomination-paper shall be delivered to the  Returning Officer at any time between the date of  this notice and noon of the day of nomination. The  nomination-paper may be in the form prescribed in  the Municipal Act, and shall state the name,  residence, and occupation of the person nominated  in such manner as to sufficiently Identify such  candidate. The nomination-paper shall be  subscribed to by the candidate.  In the event of a aaa\ being necessary, such poll  will be opened at VILLAGE OFFICE on the 17th day  of NOVEMBER, 1979, between the hours of 8:00  a.m. and 8:00 p.m. of which every person is hereby  required to take notice and govern himself  accordingly.  Given under my hand at VILLAGE OFFICE this  15th day of OCTOBER, 1979.  J.M.A. Shanks  Returning Officer  From Skelly in Ottawa  Tory 'privatization' seen bull-headed  15.  '    by Ray Skelly  Member of-Parliament  Tuesday, October 9, 1979  Some people might call it  doctrinaire. Others might call it  simply bullheaded. One way or  another, this attitude of the  Clark government is going to  get it in trouble.  The recent announcement  that   four   Crown  corpora-  ...    * ���  ,v  Guess Where  I  The usual prize of $5.00 will be awarded to the entry  drawn from the barrel which correctly locates the  above. Send your entry to the Coast News, Box 460,  Gibsons. Last week's winner was eight year old  Matthew Kevin Kirk of Seaview Road in Gibsons who  correctly located the pictured propeller on the A.R.  Winegarden property on School Road in Gibsons.  SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 46  (SUNSHINE COAST)  NOTICE OF ELECTION -1979  PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given to the electors  of the herein cited RURAL AREAS of School District  No. 46 (Sunshine Coast), that I require the presence  of the said electors at the School Board Office, 1490  Fletcher Road, Gibsons, on Monday the 29th day of  October, 1979, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock in the  forenoon, for the purpose of electing persons to  represent them as Trustees for each RURAL AREA  of the School District as hereinafter specified:  RURAL AREA  "A"  "B"  TERM OF OFFICE  Two Years - One Trustee  Two Years - Two Trustees  The mode of nomination of candidates shall be as  follows:  Candidates shall be nominated for each RURAL  AREA In writing by two duly qualified electors of the  respective rural areas concerned. The nomination  paper shall be delivered to the Returning Officer at  any time between the date of this notice and noon of  the day of nomination. The nomination paper may  be in the form as prescribed in the Municipal Act,  and shall state the name, residehce and occupation  of the person nominated in such manner as to  sufficiently Identify such candidate. The  nomination paper shall be subscribed to by the  candidate.  In event of a poll being necessary, such poll will be  opened at:  RURAL AREA      POLLING STATION  Rural Area "A"       Egmont Community School  (comprising Madeira Park  Regional District      Elementary School  Areas A & B)        Pender Harbour Auto Court,  Garden Bay  Halfmoon Bay  Elementary School  West Sechelt  Elementary School  Rural Area "B" Davis Bay Elementary School  (comprising Roberts Creek  Regional District      Elementary School  Areas C,D,E,F &   Cedar Grove  Bowen Island) Elementary School  Langdale Elementary School  Bowen Island  Community School  on the 17th day of November 1979 between the  hours of 8:00 o'clock in the forenoon and 8:00  o'clock In the afternoon, of which every person is  hereby required to take notice and govern himself  accordingly.  Given under my hand at Gibsons this 19th day of  October 1979.  Mrs. Joan B. Rigby, Returning Officer  School District No. 46  (Sunshine Coast)  Box 220  Gibsons, B.C.  tions���Canadair, de Havil-  land, Eldorado Mining and  Northern Transportation-  will be sold off to private  interests is a good indication of  this.  The first two companies  came into government hands  after their former private  owners found themselves in  financial difficulty. Since then  the two firms have been built  up into strong enterprises and  constitutes a major factor in  Canada's aerospace industry.  This is important because it is  an industry that is much more  labor intensive than most of  Canada's resources industries  and involves technology we  need to develop.  But it is also an industry that  has its ups and downs and when  the hardtimes come again, as  inevitably they will, there is no  doubt the government will be  called in again for help. Would  any government risk more  public money to take over a  company that has already been  saved once by public  intervention? Or would the  company just die, along with  the jobs and the technology?  As for Eldorado, I am  completely against its major  function���the mining and  refining of uranium���whether  it is private or public enterprise.  But it does seem strange that a  government should turn  control over to private  interests, particularly when the  private interest will probably  be some multinational energy  corporation, like one of the oil  companies, which will increase  its hold on energy supply as a  result of the purchase.  In the case of Northern  Transportation, the only  corporation of the four that is  not a money-maker, the Clark  government's decision to sell  out is simply a matter of  reneging on governmental  responsibility.  This corporation performs a  vital service to northern  Canadians. The move is as  sensible and sensitive as the  "privatization" (to use the  Conservatives' own term) of  the Department of Health.  Like the dismantling of  Petro-Canada, the sale of these  four corporations will create  more problems than were ever  imagined. For the Clark  government, one of those  problems will be the confidence  of the public who must  question the mandate of a  group of politicians who will  not be moved in pursuit ofa  political ideology   RESIDENTIAL  REHABILITATION  ASSISTANCE  PROGRAMME  Federal funds are still available to homeowners  and landlords to Improve your housing unit. All  resident homeowners are eligible for a R.R.A.P. loan  of up to $10,000 depending on cost of eligible  repairs.  SAMPLE  Adjusted  Income  $ 6,000 or less  $ 7,000  $ 8,000  $ 9,000  $10,000  $11,000  Maximum  Grant  Term ol  Residence  $ 3,750 After 5 yrs. no repayment  $ 3,000 After 4 yrs. no repayment  $ 2,250 After 3 yrs. no repayment  $ 1,500 After 2 yrs. no repayment  $ 750 After 1 yr. no repayment  $     0    No payment  If you live in the Village of Gibsons and your home  requires major or minor repairs such as;  foundations, wiring, plumbing, insulation, roofing,  inside storm windows, gutters, etc., please call the  Village of Gibsons office at 886-2274 and ask for the  R.R.A.P. Co-ordinator.  ^  I.R. Jones  R.R.A.P. Co-ordinator  VILLAGE OF GIBSONS  SUNSHINE COAST  REGIONAL DISTRICT  NOTICE  EXTENSION OF WATER SYSTEM  Construction on North Road and Reed Road will  start by mid-October, and Tyson Road supply main  will follow around mid-December. Both projects  should be put in service by the spring of 1980. 16.  Coast News, October 23,1979  Lustre-Set Yarn  Mystic Charm  $16.95 so. yd  100% DUPONT nylon  Permanently set Twist  Bright lustre  Individual yarn definition and fidelity  Greater resiliency and appearance retention  ��� Seven colours to choose from  Mystic Charm   Crafted from 100% BURLINGTON approved fibre  this rich, luxurious carpet features both lasting beauty and hard-wearing  ���     durability. The exceptionally resilient pile is non allergenic, moth and  mildew proof, and offers easy maintenance.  Limited time only  Ken DeVries & Son Ltd,  Gibsons   two  886-7112  Locations to Serve You  ^3424  master charge  ___________  t__m__________mt_  mmaa COAST  REALTOR  A Ohasfaf d Pma Pubfcrton  lOfonNawstands  October 23,1979  Volume 1, Number 2  ���    :  'ft>.5��..i,ver*!  [(Ian Corrance: A Coast News Photo)  Sechelt from Trail Bay. Looking towards Sechelt Inlet and Porpoise Bay: Tuwanek, Sandy Hook Narrows Inlet and Skookumchuk.  RECENT HOME PURCHASE ASSISTANCE ACT AMENDMENTS  The Minister of Lands, Parks and Housing, the Honorable James Chabot, recently  announced several changes in the Home Purchase Assistance Act affecting grants  available to first home purchasers. m  We have ordered new information brochures and application forms, but until they  are available, would you please advise your members of the following highlights.  FIRST HOME GRANT OF $1,000.00  - available to applicants who are purchasing their first home and have never  previously owned or purchased a residence of any type, anywhere in the world.  - standard Home Purchase Assistance Act residency requirements apply.  - purchase price or cost must be within the Maximum Price Limits for grants as  published July 1st, 1979.  date of purchase���must be on or after July 18th, 1979���date of purchase is now  defined as the date the applicant's interest is registered at Land Registry Office or  Mobile Home Registry Office.  no equity requirement.  all conventional types of housing will qualify including:  - single family detached  - strata-title townhouse or apartment  - mobile homes on own or rented land,  but the home must be the applicant's ordinary and principal place of residence.  grant is available as a lump sum of $1,000.00 or payments of $21.00 per month for  60 months.  the grant is fully earned and forgiven on the first anniversary of the entitlement  (date of occupation after purchase). ,   - ,     .    _    _  *^ , (Continued on P^e i c  I (Ian Corrance: A Coast News Photo)  Sechelt from Trail Bay. Looking towards Sechelt Inlet and Porpoise Bay: Tuwanek, Sandy Hook Narrows Inlet and Skookumchuk.  RECENT HOME PURCHASE ASSISTANCE ACT AMENDMENTS  The Minister of Lands, Parks and Housing, the Honorable James Chabot, recently  announced several changes in the Home Purchase Assistance Act affecting grants  available to first home purchasers. ��  We have ordered new information brochures and application forms, but until they  are available, would you please advise your members of the following highlights.  FIRST HOME GRANT OF $1,000.00  - available to applicants who are purchasing their first home and have never  previously owned or purchased a residence of any type, anywhere in the world.  - standard Home Purchase Assistance Act residency requirements apply.  - purchase price or cost must be within the Maximum Price Limits for grants as  published July 1st, 1979.  date of purchase���must be on or after July 18th, 1979���date of purchase is now  defined as the date the applicant's interest is registered at Land Registry Office or  Mobile Home Registry Office.  no equity requirement.  all conventional types of housing will qualify including:  - single family detached  - strata-title townhouse or apartment  - mobile homes on own or rented land,  but the home must be the applicant's ordinary and principal place of residence.  grant is available as a lump sum of $1,000.00 or payments of $21.00 per month for  60 months.  the grant is fully earned and forgiven on the first anniversary of the entitlement  (date of occupation after purchase). ^^ m ^, The Sunshine Coast'Realtor, October 23,1979  Box 1490,  Trail & Cowrie St.  Sechelt, B.C.  VON 3A0  HOMES  THREE FOR ONE WATERFRONT  No. 4066  Over 3 ACRES in one parcel. 3 modern  buildings. HOME No. 1 - has over 1300 sq.  ft. HOME No. 2 ��� 768 sq. ft. HOME No. 3 *  heated, insulated workshop 21 x 27 ft.  Nearly 250 ft. WATERFRONT. Your  terms considered. $115,000. Dial Tiny  Bob Kent, 885*9461.  CABIN ON THE LAKE       No. 4028  Here's just the spot for those quiet weekends and holidays. Right on Garden Bay  Lake, with small panabode cabin, it's even  sun-oriented, facing south. Vendor will  make it easy too, with just a low down  payment and balance at current interest  rate. .Asking $29,500. Bert Walker, 885-  3746 eves.  TRAILER PARK & HOME    No. 243  Over 5 ACRE park with room for 30  trailers. Located on high partial VIEW  property. Residency consists of a large 2  bedioom home - 40 ft. inground pool,  sauna, privacy, asking $240,000, with  assumable 1st mortgage of $118,000 at the  very attractive interest rate of "9 1/2 per  cent" low. Chuck Dowman, 885-9374 or  George Longman, 885-3400.  LOOKING GOOD? No. 247  YOU BFT! This large three bedroom  looks just great! Plenty of space, great  view, finished recreation room with wet  bar, superbly landscaped yard. Vendor is  asking $94,500. Larry or Ruth Moore,  885-9213.  FAMILY HOME  GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD No. 140  Rambling 3 bedroom home with rather  private yard and close to Elementary  school in desirable West Sechelt. A must  to view and priced at just $56*500. Larry  Moore, 885-9213.  CENTURY WEST REAL ESTATE  885-2235  Toll Free  689-5838  Ask About Our Free Catalogue      lots/acreage  A-FRAME CHARMER No. 192  Move right in���pack your troubles away,  this cutie is fully furnished. Sits on a large  lot to make future building easy. Use this  right now and enjoy. $25,000. Larry  Reardon, 885-3924.  SARGEANT BAY AREA No 171  A PRESTIGE home with lovely feature  wall. A huge barn-woodshed extra. Large  rooms, a unique bathroom are features in  this 1 1/2 year, 3 bedroom that can be  finished to suite your tastes. Asking  $82,900. Larry Reardon, 885-3924.  WILSON CREEK No. 187  Beautiful VIEW from this almost new 3  bedroom home, 3/4 basement, carport  sundeck, Asking $49,900. Eva Carsky,  886-7126.  NaiifrJi  iw  SECHELT ��� DOLPHIN STREET  No. 175  Best opportunity to invest in Village  growth. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, family room,  fenced yard. Handy to all shopping and  park. $52,500. Chuck Dowman, 885-9374  SEMIWATERFRONT  GRANTHAMS LANDING  Price reduction to $79,900���3 bedroom  year round home with VIEW. Finished  basement, close to beach. Owner anxious  to sell, bring you offers. Eva Carsky, 886-  7126.  DERBY ROAD No. 227  This double wide features an immaculate  home with 3 bedrooms, large livingroom,  master bedroom ensuite, large 27 by 23 ft.  rec. room. Located in West Sechelt.  Partial view. This represents solid value for  your money at $47,500. Larry Reardon,  885-3924.  AU VALUE-VIEW HOME No. 156  This three and a half year old, 3 bedroom  VIEW home on Cameo Road, has to be  the best buy around. With 2 attractive  fireplaces, full downstairs area for  recreation, carport and a large sundeck  you should see this fine home. More  information or for appointment to view call  Bert Walker, 885-3746 or Rita Percheson  885-5706. OH YES! ��� just -$53,900!  SELMA PARK  .LEASE LAND No. 262  Clean 2 bedroom cottage on leased land in  Selma Park. Excellently landscaped,  carport plus storage shed. Beautiful view  of Trail Islands. Lease presently $600 per  annum. Asking $15,900. George  Longman, 885-3400.  SELMA PARK No. 264  FULL PRICE $13,500. Attractive 2  bedroom bungalow, panelled livingroom,  dining room and kitchen. Full cement  foundation. Forced air elec. heat, sundeck  very clean and livable, on lease land. Ed  Baker, 885-2641.  WALK ON FERRY No. 158  2 bedroom little charmer with good sized  kitchen and livingroom. Side view from  sundeck. Asking $36,900. Try $3,500  down. Eva Carsky, 886-7126.  CONRAD ROAD  ROBERTS CREEK No. 261  3 bedrooms, 1344 sq. ft. double wide  located on' 1.75 acres, features 3 piece  ensuite plumbing off master bedroom.  Family room complete with bar, built in  china cabinet, utility room with washer &  dryer. Landscaping needed to make this  one a beauty. Full price $55,000. George  Longman, 885-3400.  GOWER POINT ROAD        No. 256  Over 1 ACRE with OCEAN VIEW on  prestigious Gower Point Road. Spotless 2  bedroom home has 3rd bedroom in  basement and large spacious rooms on  1300 sq. ft. main floor. Priced to sell  immediately at $69,900. Eva Carsky, 886-  7126 or Rita Percheson, 885-5706.  GOWER POINT ROAD        No. 261  Fantastic VIEW of Ocean and mountains,  from this 3 bedroom family home. Large  living and family room, 2 fireplaces,  sundeck for summer relaxation. Fully  landscaped. Asking $77,900. Eva Carsky,  886-7126.  ROBERTS CREEK No. 230  2 bedroom trailer home is located on a  quiet road. The price of $36,500 includes  fridge, stove, washer, dryer and drapes.  The large lot is exceptionally landscaped  and the home immaculately maintained.  Close to school, beach and store. George  Longman, 885-3400.  DAVIS BAY  LAUREL ROAD No. 217  Near new home with great kitchen and  family room, with sliding glass doors to  patio. 3 bedrooms and 21/2 baths. Closed  garage. Fabulous VIEW location. Asking  $69,500. Chuck Dowman, 885-9374.  LOTS/ACREAGE  9/10 OF ACRE No. 255  Large corner lot is located on Reef Road,  in the Village of Sechelt. Two sides of the  property are on paved roads and is  adjacent to a new subdivision. This very  desirable property is being offered at a  very desirable price. The vendor is asking  $9,500, but will consider offers. Eric  Rudland, 885*9857.  5 ACRE PARCEL No. 241  Invest your money in nicely treed 5 Acre  parcel. Very close lo Ruby Lake with  exce"*-"* "vimming, fishing and boating.  Try $9,200. down and assume existing  agreement for sale at 9 per cent. Full price  $19,800. Eva Carsky, 886*7126 or Eric  Rudland, 885*9857.  LAST OF THE LARGE BLOCKS  No 4133  This targe parcel located in the Village of  Sechelt is almost 40 ACRES, well located  and great potential priced at just  $150,000. Larry Moore, 885*9213.  BUILDING? HERE'S THE SPOT  No. 146  Gently sloping lot close to good Beach  access. This homesite could be just the  place for you. Choice WEST SECHELT  location and only $12,500. Ruth Moore,  885*9213.  DERBY ROAD No. 177  Four large, level lots, some VIEW in the  prestigious area of WEST SECHELT. Lot  20 * $16,500; Lot 23 ��� $11,500; Lot 24 *  $10,700; Lot 26-$11,500. Larry Reardon,  885:3924.  CHASTER ROAD No. 186  Large corner lot on Chaster Road in fast  family growing area. Water and hydro on  road. Asking $12300. Eva Carsky, 886*  7126.  NEW ON MARKET  Large 91 x 305 ft. lot in a very good area of  Cooper Road in Redrooffs Estates. Trees,  blacktop, water and hydro are all here. A  great   price  at  only   $12,000.  Larry'  Reardon, 885*3924.  HEY! ANY LOWER PRICED?  -  ���'���" :'"-'i-^*'-No.410��-  ' $7,250 Ftf! TfWloW.*teBn. Balance  $100 monthly payments. Heart of Madeira  Park on paved Lagoon Road. Hydro! City  water, etc. Near shops, boat launch.  Zoned for trailers. Tiny Bob Kent, 885*  9461.  GET YOURS NOW IN DAVIS BAY  No. 4115  My soil lies bared. I've a couple of fences  part way around me, a tree or two and I'm  a size 52 x 152. I'm priced at $12,000���  near ready to build. More? Tiny Bob Kent,  885*9461.  ACREAGE CLOSE TO GIBSONS  No. 4111  Approximately 5 ACRES located in the  Boyle Road area. Zoned R2L, could be  good for future sub-division, power  available, but would require well for water  supply. Vendor anxious to sell. Will  consider offers. Asking $28,000. Jim  Wood, 885*2571.  INTERESTED IN  WATERFRONTAGE? No. 149  This lot 99 x 186 ft. includes an interest in a  waterfront bt. $10,800 F P. Ask Tiny Bob  Kent, 885-9461.  WATERFRONT LOT No. 210  SCARCE-but just look at this lovely  gently sloping WATERFRONT LOT.  Good access, choice of building sites and  only $29,500. Ruth Moore, 8859213.  COMMERCIAL  MMM  MM  COMMERCIAL BUILDING  No. 258  It's   not   often   you   can   purchase  Commercial   property   in   downtown  Sechelt. Come & see the potential on this  NMMMMMMMMMMMMMIM.  building. Bring your new idea to turn this  valuable property into a real money  maker. Larry and Ruth Moore, 8859213.  WE'RE THE NEIGHBORHOOD PROFESSIONALS FOR YOU  ED BAKER  885-2641  CHUCK DOWMAN ��� SALES MANAGER  885-9374  EVA CARSKY  886-7126  BOB KENT  885-9461  GEORGE LONGMAN  885-3400  LARRY MOORE  885-9213  LARRY REARDON  885-3924  RUTH MOORE    RITA PERCHESON  885-9213 885-5706  PETER SMITH 885-9463       ERIC RUDLAND 885-9857        BERT WALKER 885-3746        JIM WOOD 885-2571 The Sunshine Coast Realtor, October 23, 1979  SOLAR REALTY  MARINE DRIVE, GIBSONS: Up and down duplex. $13,000 spent in 1979 on R.R.A.P.  programme. Good view. Within walking distance of all amenities. $47,900.  owned and operated by  AELBERS REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS LTD.  When considering selling your property, we will execute an independent written, documented  appraisal (or $150.00. If you decide to list your property with Solar Realty and a sale is completed  we will reimburse the appraisal fee.  Telephone 886-9238 Toll free  922-2017  Older three bedroom home on 101 near North Road* Full bathroom with shower, wall-to-wall  carpet in livingroom. Entire house newly insulated and extremely well cared for. Oil furnace. Lot  has 50 ft. highway frontage and is 268 ft. deep. Gardens have had lola of TLC, include several  fruit trees and berry bushes, vegetable garden, flower beds. Garage with workshop and storage  shed attached. F.P. $45,000.  ^���^'mi.mtmmm.mJ^-m~^.mmlm**. Jijt\.  Maintenance Free  Attractive Ihree bedroom home on Veteran's Road. Full bathroom phis two piece ensuite.  House, less than a year old, is located on nicely-landscaped comer lot in quiet area only ft mile  from schools and shopping. Wood heater supplements electric heat. Well insulated with  maintenance free aluminum siding. Fully serviced, cablevision available. $48500.  Dal Grauer   885-3808  Be Your Own Boss  Furniture business located at Sea-View Place on Hwy. 101.1100 sq. ft. with possibility of leasing  larger area. $6.50 per sq.ft. triple net. 5year lease with option for another five years upon expiry.  $22,000 plus stock.  jflKfc     JREAL ESTATE  * INSURANCE  FLORON  AGENCIES LTD  w  OFFICE 886-2248  1589 Marin* Drive, Gibsons  Ron McSavaney John Black  885-3339 886-7316  George Cooper  886-9344  HOMES  SECHELT: 2 bedroom mobile home with large  livingroom. Large rec room, sundeck and storage  has been added. In first class condition with w/w  throughout. Priced at $24,000. J. Black  GIBSONS: 3 bedroom post and beam with  carport; 2 baths, master bedroom ensuite.  Fireplace, open area living and dining rooms; new  w/w in living area; beautiful well planned kitchen,  also two rec rooms downstairs. Large level lot 127 x  25 with good garden soil. Asking $69,000.  GIBSONS: Bay area, close to beach, stores and  P.O. Attractive 3 bedroom home on extra large lot  with good vegetable garden. Home is conveniently  designed with large rec room, utility, workshop and  spare room in basement.  ROBERTS CREEK: Ultra modern luxurious  waterfront home with 3,000 sq. ft. of living space;  designed for modern executive or anyone wishing to  entertain etc. Main rooms open onto patio sundeck  with complete view of Georgia Strait. Large  attractive garden gives complete privacy; low  approach to beach; guest cottage and many other  extras. Ask for further details of this choice  property.  GIBSONS: Small cottage in lower Gibsons on  sewer, close to shopping; older type house, ideal as  starter or recreation cottage. Priced at only  $28,500.  John Black  886-7316  George Cooper  886-9344  Ron McSavaney  885-3339  *ft  FLORON  AGENCIES LTD  w  GIBSONS: Small 2 bedroom house in Bay area;  needs paint and renovating. Asking $20,000.  GIBSONS: Nice 2 bedroom house, terrific view,  nicely landscaped, carport, workshop, toolshed.  Electric heat. Asking $47,500.  ROBERTS CREEK: 3 b*droom home on Lower  Road; full basement wjtk^yieat; large lot 110 x 145  has some fruit trMgQare for garden. House has  F.P. in livingroom Wrasundeck for summer leisure.  Priced at $42,000.  LOTS  GOWER POINT: 1/2 acre of cleared property,  lovely home with dream kitchen, lots of cupboards,  laundry and workshop area; playroom and carport.  This has everything including fantastic view and is  priced at only $65,000.  SUNSHINE HEIGHTS: Sechelt, 7 1/2 acres  approx. Serviced view property, approved in  : principle for a 26 lot subdivision; plans and details  with listing service. This is a very good view property  and has access to marina in Porpoise Bay. F.P.  $66,000.  GRANTHAMS: Lot on Reed Road, 48 x 168 ft;  good investment, potential view; asking $8,750.  ROSAMUND ROAD: Three lots cleared, ready to  build; suitable for trailer or mobile; only $10,500  each.  GIBSONS: Level cleared lot in Gibsons Village on  sewer and water. 62 x 183 ft. Inquire for details.  WHARF ROAD: Langdale, good retirement area;  lot 65 x 193 ft. Try your offer.  Other lots in Village and also in rural areas , , ** . ,-���  M���MnMtffcfttftfMMMM^MI  The Sunshine Coast Realtor, October 23,1979  Mitten Realty Ltd.  Where Real Estate Is Serious Business���But A Pleasure  THINKING OF RELOCATING?       Next t0 th*Gu,< s,a,,on   ���  Box 979 Sechelt,  Don't delay. Use our Trade Plan. Call for more details.       bc. von 3ao  WATERFRONT  ACREAGE  HOMES  WILSON CREEK $32,000.  Two bedroom A frame with loft on 120 It. of the |  best waterfront near Mission Creek. Private  road, off highway. Fifteen yean left on|  Dominion Lease on the land. For more details,  call Rene Sutherland at 885-9362.  WATERFRONT - GOWER POINT  priced reduced to $79,950.  Lovely two bedroom quality home located on  Gower Point Road, cloee to shopping and near  Pebbles Beach. Panoramic view of North Shore  mountains, Salmon Rock and Vancouver  Island. For an appointment to view call Rene  Sutherland at 885-9362.  SANDY HOOK $27,500.  Nice low bank waterfront with almost 100 feet  frontage. Would be an ideal hideaway. Deep  moorage. This property is over one and a  quarter acres. Call Terry Brackett, 885*9865.  TUWANEK WATERFRONT LOTS  Side by side beauties. 110 ft. of waterfrontage  priced at $28,500 and 95 ft. of waterfrontage  priced at $28,000. Gentle slope to water and  southerly exposure enhance these properties.  Phone Rene Sutherland for more details, 885-  9362.  ROBERTSCREEK $89,500.  5 acres of beautiful bottom land with a southern  exposure. Large organic vegetable garden, fruit  Irees, and pasture areas. PLUS, a custom built  1700 sq. ft. three storey 4 bedroom home.  Quality and craftsmanship have created an  inspiring living space. Leaded glass windows-  cedar finishing inside���parquet floors. A sauna  outside that will seat 10 people. An outbuilding  which could be converted into a guest cottage.  This property must be seen if you are looking for  acreage with comfort. Call Suzanne Dunkerton  for viewing, 8853971.  TYSON ROAD $99,500.  WILSON CREEK  Hobby Farm  6.53 acres���5 acres cleared and cross-fenced,  an orchard and wonderful garden area. Wilson  Creek runds through the property and one can  watch the salmon run, large pond for ducks,  geese, swans. Bam and out-buildings, plus two  dwellings. The main 3 bdrm. house is multi-level  and spacious. Teak parquet floors, fireplace,  311 sq. ft. of sundeck at the front and 115 sq. ft.  of covered sundeck at the back. 2 bdrm. guest  house is 940 sq. fl. A property to be seen. Call  Suzannne Dunkerton, 885*3971 for more  information.  ROBERTS CREEK $27,900. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMW  Nice level 3 acres in this desirable area. Ideal for  Hobby Farm. Property is well treed with over  315 feet frontage on highway and over 500 feet  depth. Try your offer on this hard to find  commodity. Contact Terry Bracket!, 885-9865  LANGDALE  19 acres of treed property with a year round  creek. Phone Suzanne Dunkerton for more  details, 885*3971.  GIBSONS $53,500.  Revenue duplex in the heart of Gibsons. One  side has two bedrooms, large living and dining  room, and the other side has one bedroom. This  property has the potential of being zoned  commercial. Phone Suzanne for more  information on this well priced investment, 885*  3971.  SELMA PARK $44,000.  Two homes on a large view lot in this popular  area. Larger home has a nice southerly  exposure and includes a fridge, stove, washer  and dryer. Small guest cottage would be ideal  for an in-law or rental and also includes a fridge  and some furniture. For more Information  contact Terry Brackett, 885-9865  GRANTHAMS VIEW HOME       $39,500.  What more could you want���a newly decorated  2 bedroom home with excellent view of Shoal  Channel and Keats Island. Abo a 1 bedroom inlaw suite���aee this fine starter or retirement  home with Don Lock, 885*3730.  SEAMOUNT INDUSTRIAL PARK  Light Industrial Service Commercial property  located on Hwy. 101 in Ihe Village of Gibsons,  Seamount Industrial Park provides a mixed  package of lots and acreage sites. Reasonably  priced, fully serviced with sewer, 347*600 volt  three phase power, water and paved roads,  these lots are selling fast. Only a few small tots  and acreage sites left. For more details, call  Rene Sutherland at 885*9362.  KLEINDALE  $49,500.  HOMES  SELMA PARK  $10,900.  60 ft. of pebble beach ji  I^n/iew, two room  cottage Lease pv-fen,  MBre info, with Ray  Bern*,. 885Sam**���m  Se Henderson, 885*  5383.  WEST SECHELT $39,700.  Cute one bedroom house, chicken house, large  truss roof outbuilding situated on 2* acres of  good cleared level land. Fruit trees, well. To  view, call Rene Sutherland at 885*9362.  ARCHITECT DESIGNED HOME  $77,000.  Words cannot do justice to this house���built by  the owner/contractor who gave it his tender  loving care. A most unusual home whh an  excellent view over Paq Lake and Pender  Harbour. Just minutes from schools, shops,  marinas and boat launching, yet this 4 bedroom  home is nestled amongst the dogwoods and  arbutus with complete privacy. This 1800 plus  sq.ft. house is only 5 years old and is looking fot  a discerning buyer. Call Don Lock, 885*3730.  Three bedrooms, family room and dervin this  home designed for a large l��y*:'AirM6&rit.ii;  bathroom and kitchen. Also eating nook in  kitchen. Please see this and make your offer to  Don Lock, 885-3730.  ROBERTSCREEK $56,900.  Like new, this house was finished by master  craftsman and it in immaculate condition. 2  bedroom suite down at present rented.  Imaginative lands in a choice location. Call Don  Lock, 885-3730 br further detds, 8853730.  Appointments to view only.  RETIREMENT HOME $59,000.  You can possibly subdivide two lots off Ihe  parcel for tale and keep the remaining lot plus  the 60 x 24 mobile, carport, landscaping and  heated greenhouse for your own enjoyment  Don Lock 885-3730 hat all details and will be  pleased to arrange to show you this offering.  ROBERTSCREEK $19,000.  Over one half acre in this prime location. Lot  haa over 130 feet frontage on Beach Avenue,  and 280 feet on Marlene Road. Water, hydro  and cable available. Get your offer in fast on this  one. Contact Terry Brackett, 885.9865.  WAKEFIELD ROAD $16,750 ea.  Two beautiful tide by side view lots bordering  on Wakefield Creek. Good building sites, dose  to village. For more information call Rene  Sutherland at 885-9362.  SECHELT VILLAGE $10*500.  Located at the comer of Reef and Shoal Roads,  dote to the arena, this nicely treed subdivision  features eleven well planned lots. Walking  distance to waterfront. For more information  call Rene Sutherland at 885*9362.  -mi<m��i^i&lmm%mV^Jmm>m\immm&.: -* -*���   ...J*,^-.. .  WEST SECHELT  Two side by side lots all ready to build on. Waler  is already in with Hydro and cable on road Each  lot has a cleared level bulding site wilh possible  future view. Build on one lot and hold the other  for privacy or future development. Priced al  $12-500 and $9,000, or try offers as a unit.  Terry Brackett, 885-9865.  TUWANEK  View lot overlooking Lamb's Bay. Close lo easy  beach access. Vendor wfl carry at C.I.R. Phone  Rent lor more information, 8854962.  PENDERHARBOUR $14,000.  View lot on Malcolm Road. Building site is  already cleared, has regional water and power.  Lovely sloping lot. Close to excellent fishing and  beach access. Terry Brackett, 885*9865.  LOTS  CALETA ESTATES  WEST SECHELT  13 fully serviced lots situated approx. 2 miles  northwest of Sechelt, comer of Mason &  Norwest Bay Road. Level lots to facilitate both  single and double wide trailers. Call Emilie  Henderson, 885*5383 or Ray Bernier, 885-5225.  HALFMOON BAY $12,900.  Good view bldg. lot on Truman Rd. Close to  boat launch. More info, with Ray Bernier, 885-  5225 or Emilie Henderson, 885*5383.  FRANCIS PENINSULA $10,000.  Excellent bldg. lot in new subdivision, water &  hydro, septic approval. Near Gerrons Bay-  good fishing! Emilie Henderson, 885*5383 or  Ray Bernier, 885.5225.  WEST PORPOISE BAY $9,900.  Nice level lot located in the Village. This lot is  selectively cleared and ready to build on. Water  and hydro. Contact Terry Brackett, 885*9865.  LOWER GIBSONS $13,500.  Located in Lower Gibsons, adjacent to public  park. Close to shops and water. For more  details call Rene, 885*9362.  PENDER LAKES PROPERTIES  Excellent building lots in new subdivision, close  to Garden Bay. Many with ocean views and  southern exposure. Paved roads, water, power  and telephone. Ideal for building or investment.  Priced from $10,000 to $23,500. Call Ray  Bernier, 8855225 or Emilie Henderson, 885  5383.  WEST SECHELT  Nice level lot with potential view. AD services.  Priced for quick sale at just $11,900. Terry  Brackett, 885*9865.  SECHELT $53,000.  New large 3 bedroom home. Open kitchen and  dining room plan, lots of cupboard and counter  area. Ensuite off the master bedroom. Full  unfinished basement view of the mountains  from the front sundeck. Call Suzanne for more  information.  WEST SECHELT  2 bedroom 12 x 60 mobile home set up in local  trailer park. Fully skirted with a view of the Trail  Islands. Fridge and stove included, asking  $10,000. Contact Terry Bracket, 885*9865.  PENDERHARBOUR $24,500.  Commercial tot zoned R3L on Lagoon Road, 65  ft. frontage. Call Ray Bernier, 885 5225 or Emilie  Henderson, 885-5383.  KEATS ISLAND  The summer retreat you've been looking for? A  corner tot wit h a view at only $7,500. Hydro and  water available. Contact Terry Brackett, 885*  9865.  SAKINAW LAKE $124,900.  2500 ft. of lake frontage, two dwellings, two  floats, boathouse, completely sheltered private  bay. 15 acres wilh subdivision possibilities.  Southern exposure and view. Call Ray Bernier,  885*5225.  POWELL RIVER  WEST VANCOUVER  NORTH VANCOUVER  Other offices to serve you KINGSWAY  Member of "Relocation Services Canada" Referral System SURREY  PHONE FOR FREE CATALOGUE LANGLEY  Ray Barniar  Corry Rou  Rant Sutherland  Tarry Brackatt  Don Lock  Emilia Handaraon  885-5225       885-9280 885-9382 888-9865       885-3730 885-5383  Suianna Dunkarton   TarrlHanaon  885-3971 886-8295 The Sunshine Coast Realtor, October 23,1 979  PENDER HARBOUR  REALTY LTD.  Highway 101 at Francis Peninsula Rd.  883-279*  WATERFRONT; Amagnificenl and unusual 15 acres with some 700 ft. of waterfront in the  lee of Harness Island. Haslam Creek runs through the middle of this fine property and Ihere  is a driveway in from Highway 101. A big plus on this one is a 4 acre oyster lease. Make an  offer to the $165,000 asking price (29% down), it's a good buy at any price.  PENDER LAKES PROPERTIES: A new and prestigious subdivision overlooking Pender  Harbour. See with ut and choose your ocean view now...it's a wise investment.  WATERFRONT: Pender Harbour area...2adjacen!4acre parcels each with approximately  150 ft. of deep protected moorage. Fairly high bank but quite workable and well worth the  asking price of $50,000 each.  IRVINES LANDING: Contemporary 3 bedroom home with hot water heating and a  magnificent view over Lee Bay. The grounds are unusual and immaculate. The price is right  at $75,000.  GARDEN BAY-2 large view lots $14,000 each  GARDEN BAY-Fairly new 2 bedroom home $35,000.  EXCELLENT BUY-1000 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, full basement. Near public wharf, good  garden, nice view. Just $50,000 F.P.  WATERFRONT: Two side by side waterfront lots. Each slightly over 1 acre. Both have safe  moorage, power and water. Priced at $50,000 and $36,000 respectively.  BARGAIN BAY: Deluxe waterfront condominiums���2 beautiful units. Unit 1 has  approximately 1,468 sq. ft. of living area; other approximately l,200sq. ft. (presently rented).  These two gorgeous view units offered at $135,000 for both. Must be seen.  GARDEN BAY WATERFRONT: Older 2 bedroom home on beautiful level lot. 250 ft. of  beach, excellent dock, deep and safe moorage. F.P. $110,000.  John Breen Mike Rosse        Jock Hermon  883-9978 883-9378 883-2745  Mitten Realty Ltd.|  Where Real Estate Is Serious Business  -But A Pleasure!  Van. Direct 681-7031      885*3295  Box 079 Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0 Next to ths Gull Ststion  THINKING OF RELOCATING?  Don't delay. Use our Trade Plan. Call for more details.  Gibsons $53,500.00  Revenue duplex in the heart of Gibsons. One side has 2  bedrooms, large bright living and dining room, the other  side has one bedroom. Both include a fridge and stove.  Financing is attractive with an assumable mortgage of  $31,500.00 at 11%% - $326.00 per month. Monthly rental is  $425.00. Lot size is 81 x 100 and a potential for re-zoning to  Commercial.  Call Suzanne Dunkerton to view this investment  property, 885-3971.  PHONE FOR FREE CATALOGUE  Cony Rots  Ron* I  MS-0250 ���  MS-522S  id Terry Srtckelt  Don Look  EmWeHe*  M5-M05        MS-3730 M5-I  Suann* Dunkerton  TerrlHtnton  U5-39T1 SM-4206  POWELL RIVER KINGSWAY  WEST VANCOUVER 8URREY  NORTH VANCOUVER other offices to servo you   LANGLEY j  Member of "Relocation Services Canada" Referral System  North Shore Realty Ltd.  The Little Professional Firm  134 E 14th St. North Vancouver collect 985-7185  Tage Elgaard 922-7968 collect  Doug Black 988-6239 collect  In Sechelt:  Sam Calli 885-2762  WEST SECHELT  Sargaant  Bay  Builders terms available  One of the finest subdivisions in West  Sechelt. 19 lots, sewer, water, power,  blacktop roads, most lots treed. Should  qualify for C.M.H.C. loans. Priced from  $14,500 to 116,500. t>. The Sunshine Coast Realtor, October 23,  1979  H.B. 80RD0N AGENCIES LTD.  30 Years At Cowrie St., Sechelt  SECHELT BOULEVARD  Waterfront style, architect designed and meticulous  craftsmanship in this spacious two bedroom home. The  four main rooms are orientated to the south facing view  over the Gulf. Everything you wanted in a home is here,  from the electric hoist for the livingroom fireplace wood, to  a wine cellar in the fully developed lower level. Priced at one  hundred and thirty five. For your private showing call John  Wilson.  MARINE DRIVE, SECHELT  SECLUDED WATERFRONT ESTATE.  * West Coast contemporary design.      * Cedar exterior with skylights.  * Four bedrooms. It Priced at one seventy.  * Three fireplaces. * Under construction.  For all your      * Real Estate  * Property Management  requirements in: + Insurance        (including house rentals)  John Wilson 885-2013        Eves., Wknds., 885-9365  K.BUTLER  REALTY  LTD.  GIBSONS ��� O'SHEA RD. ��� Very well maintained home.  Two bedroom, electric sauna, garage, situated on a quiet  road for comfort in living. Ideal for a small family or? Listed  for $39,000 HOMES  JUST A LITTLE BIT COUNTRY Looking for that home  with a little extra land to roam on? We have not 1, but 2. One  home is located on Pratt Rd., Gibsons. 1.25 acres of country  living with a 3 bdrm. split level home completing this  package. Priced at $64,500.  This second home is situated in Roberts Creek on Joe Rd.  1.3 acres with a 3 bdrm. full basement home set amongst the  trees with a southern exposure to the sundeck for country  enjoyment. Listed for $59,600.  Both homes are for that extra room a family appreciates.  GIBSONS ��� HiQcrest & Crucil, a large home with a large  view. Enjoy a panoramic view of Keats Is. and the Gull from  1564 sq. ft. of comfort. Built for spacious living with entry  from both master bedroom and living room to the sundeck  where you can do your cooking on a built-in barbeque. If  your family needs 5 bedrooms then this is the home to view.  $68,500.  TRUMAN ROAD ��� Lovely 2 bdrm. home approx. 1050 sq.  ft. in size. Many features including open beam ceiling  throughout. Sandstone fireplace, built-in K.T. range,  custom cabinets etc. The large fenced corner lot is a show  place full of shrubs, flowering plants and bushes, It has a  targe cbsed garden with lane access and a covered potting  area. This one should be seen. Must sell, $49,500.  VETERANS RD. AREA  Large 3 bedroom full basement  home on large double lot (127 ft. x 225 ft.). New W/W  carpets, fireplace, open beam ceilings, plus many other  . extras. Should be seen at $69,000.  Serving the Lower Sunshine Coast  Phone 886-2000 or 886-9121  Located in the Seaside Plaza, Gower Point Road, Gibson.;.  EVENINGS & WEEKENDS  CALL NORM PETERSON OR DENNIS SUVEGES  886-2607 886-7264  GIBSONS * Commercial building in the heart ol the Village.  This 14 year old store sits on 4 lots wilh a total area of 17,886  sq. ft. The building is 1 !*. stories with 4471 sq. ft. on the main  floor and 1562 sq. ft. on the upper. The overall condition is  good and the building could be used for a wide variety of  retail outlets. The store fixtures are NOT included in the sale  price of $200,000  NORTH ROAD, GIBSONS * Near new 3 bedroom, no  basement home on large 1/2 acre wooded lot. Twin-seal  windows, wood burning heater in livingroom. Custom  shower-tub in bathroom plus a 500 sq. ft. finished garage-  workshop. (This could be used as a large family room).  Priced to sell at $59,900.  MAPLE WOOD LANE * Brand new 3 bdrm. home with  part basement, large lot. Listed to sell at $57,900.  WATERFRONT  DAVIS BAY * Looking for a good home wilh a different flare  lo it? Or a perfect bachelor home wilh a beach of your own,  then view this one. Listed $79,500.  GOWER POINT 150' of waterfront. If you are looking for  property in the $140,000 range you should see this large 2200  ���q. ft, 4 bdrm. home plus basement. A good pathway leads  to a nice beach. Features include large open ceiling  livingroom with hand-hewn beams, a floor to ceiling stone  fireplace, double plate windows. Stone and ce lar bark  exterior, shake roof plus much more. Some terms available.  WATERFRONT & SECLUSION - SECHELT INLET  Not 1 lot but 2 lots, crown lease land. Cabin on each lot,  water access only. Great summer and winter homes.  REAL ESTATE  GENERAL INSURANCE  AUTOPLAN  GRANTHAMS LANDING ��� Looking for a starter home,  Central Ave. A full glassed sundeck to enjoy a view of  boating in Howe Sound. 15' x 19' livingroom with fireplace, 1  bdrm., % basement. $29,900.  LOTS  SOUTH FLETCHER * Great view lot. Easy to build on and  close to shopping area. Asking $15,000.  GIBSONS, WYNGART RD * Fairly level lot with view of  Keats Island and Shoal Channel, lot on sewer, is also duplex  zoned. $17,500.  COCHRAN ROAD * 4 * 56' x 125' level lots lo pick from. All  backing on Village park. Priced to sell at $12,000.  JOHNSON ROAD LANGDALE Urge partly cleared  view lot in area of all new homes. This is one of the last  unbuilt lots in the area. Now only $13*500.  CHASTER ROAD > Bring all offers on 80' level cleared lot,  close to school. OK for trailers.  ACREAGE  GIBSONS ��� 20 acres at $3,506 per acre. Ideal for hobby  farm. Has gentle southern slope. Also a creek for  landscaping or ??? Located approximately 2 miles west of  Gibsons on Hwy. 101. Total price $72,500. Terms available.  Adjoining acreage also available.  GAMBIER ISLAND ��� 9 acres of vacant land. Rare  opportunity to acquire one of the nicest parcels on Ihe  Island. Good road frontage (574 ft.). Close to ferry and  moorage. Would make good holding property or use il as a  hide-away. Asking $49,000.  AGENTS FOR EVERGREEN PARKLAND  Over 60 large wooded lots in parklike setting, located 1200'  from highway on Veterans Road. Drive in and look around  as these lots are priced to sell from only $8,500. lo $15,200. The Sunshine Coast Realtor, October 23, 1979  Trev 886-2658  Sechelt  WATERFRONT L-153  Waterfront, 1400 sq. ft. home is now on the market.  173 waterfront x 469 depth. It's approximately 1.82  acre. Own private water system. The 3 bedroom  home also offers a spacious rumpus room, and a 3 car  garage. Presently rented is the 600 sq. ft. 1 bdrm.  guest cottage. F.P. $115,000.  SECHELT L-182  Ideal location close to shopping, schools and across  the road from Hackett Park where the children can  play. 4 bedroom, 3 year old family home (2 beds up &  2 down). Cathedral entrance, 2320 sq. ft. of finished  living area. Downstairs is completely self-contained  making it Ideal for an in-law suite, large master  bedroom with ensuite. Level lot, carport. Try your  offer to F.P. $69,500. Must have appointment to  view. Call Pat, 885*5171.  Lots  Bus. 885-5171  Box 1188, Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  W -Waterfront  H-Homes  A - Acreage  R - Recreational  F - Farms  "Your Real Estate hosts  on the Sunshine Coast"  Deirdre 885-9487  Special Feature  ~ ,1     X.      *      r.. 1: J*'* Sm&Vf " tv  ��� -        \  GIBSONS BLUFF L-161  Seven waterfront lots ranging from $32,000 to  ���46,000-all with view of Harbour, Gambler and  Keats. A rare opportunity. Call Trev, 8862658.  Pat 885-5171  Pender Harbour  MIDDLEPOINT L-175  2.78 acres with two bedroom home on Sunshine  Coast Highway at Middlepoini, A nice place for  summer vacations or year round living. F.P. $39,900.  Call Pat, 885*5171.  Gibsons  LOWER GIBSONS  WITH KEATS ISLAND VIEW L-178  Totally rebuilt 3 bedroom home close to stores,  transport etc. Later development potential. Call  Trev, 886-2658. F.P. $44,000.  GRANTHAMS REVENUE  WATERFRONT L-154  5 suite older block, solidly built. Good revenue  investment now with later development potential.  Owner may finance. F.P. $86,500. Call Trev, 885*  5171 or 8862658.  REVENUE PROPERTY L-109  Modern duplex on Marlene Road. 2 bdrm. homes  wilh separate laundry and heating facilities. Rents  almost $500 per month. Small subdivision of bt  corner will slightly reduce present asking price of  $55,000. Call Trev, 8862658.  MARLENE ROAD  Two half-acre lots on Marlene Road.  SANDY HOOK  /PORPOISE BAY  WATERFRONT  & VIEW LOTS  EAGLEVIEW PARK  WEST SECHELT L-144  Eagleview Park, 4 miles west of Sechelt; 7 lots left,  some waterfront; some view. All with excellent beach  access. Priced between $16,900 and $18,900.  EAGLEVIEW PARK  ��� ������S-��, <      LI'      ���   /<,to}\'ti'  fa*^*  ,'    "j*. j, *w] ^e*  kss-1?**f  WATCH THIS SPACT.  ROBERTS CREEK L-1C6  9.7 acres with two homes, level land, fronting on  Highway 101 and Conrad Road. Good future  potential for this property. Let me show you and then  you make your decision. Call Pat, 8855171. F.P.  $98,000.  V Al   ( ANADIAN I I OKA  HrdiK li  I 10. Sec hell  October 2h, 27  I HI   MUSK   MAN'  NORVAN ROAD.  Level lot 77 x 150,  road, quality homes  $13,000. Call Pat. 885517?  ���s in TWai*  amX-t.iTr.mf  L-174  for building. Quiet  l Sign on lot. F.P.  REDUCED FROM $33,500. Look at what only  $31,000 buys...nice landscape/2 acre: 2 bdrm.  Mobile Home on concaiVnndation... Franklin  fireplace, all apnlianetMCaBort. workshop, gazebo,  tool shed. Close to sBKclt. Some furniture. Call Pat,  8855171. 8. The Sunshine Coast Realtor, October 23, 1979  (Continued (roan Page 1)  RECENT HOME PURCHASE ASSISTANCE ACT AMENDMENTS  FAMILY FIRST HOME GRANT  (has been substantially altered)  II the applicant meets the above eligibility requirements and is the parent or  guardian of a dependent child under the age of 19 who will be residing in the residence  on a full time basis, the amount of the grant is increased to $2,500.00.  - option available of lump sum of $2,500.00 or payment of $52.50 for 60 months.  - equity requirement is removed.  - grant is fully earned after one year of occupation following date of entitlement.  For either of the above grants, until the new application forms are printed, we will  accept applications using the existing Family First Home Application form.  For homes purchased prior to July 18th, 1979 the benefits that were then available  remain available on the terms and conditions that were in effect at the date of  purchase.  The alternative, B.C. Second Mortgage is still available, current interest rate is 11  3/4%.  Applications for the new Home Building Grant of $1,000 will be accepted only until  December 31st, 1979.  Applications for Family First Home Grant where the dwelling was purchased prior  to July 18th, 1979 will be accepted only until July 18th, 1980.  EXISTING GRANTS  The earning period on grants previously received from this Ministry have been  substantially changed. Federal rules CM. & H.C have not changed and their  requirements in equity have not changed.  Provincial Home Acquisition Act  $    500.00 Tenant Home Acquisition Grant  $1,000.00 New Home Building Grant  OR  Home Purchase Assistance Act  $1,000.00 New Home Building Grant  $2,500.00 Family First Home Grant  Effective September 26th, 1979 the Registrar of Land Registry Office or Mobile  Home Registry can automatically allow the conveyance of a property out of a  grantee's name if the first anniversary of the date of entitlement has passed.  Yours truly  H.C. Rounds, C.G.A., Administrator  Manager ,  Home Purchase Assistance  Reprinted from M.L.S.  This article was reprinted with permission from the M.L.S. NEWS of October  3,1979 published by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver. Its Publicity  Director, Anne Broadfoot asked the Sunshine Coast Realtor to stress to its  readers the fact that the Federal rules of the Central Mortgage and Housing  Corporation have not changed, and that their requirements in the matter of  equity remain as they were.  WE DONT JUST SHOW YOUR HOUSE]  WE SHOW ITOFE  ���tsEZjtTZI. century west real estate  WETttTHEWKMIOBHOOOPROfESSIONAlSe  A house is as personal as the  people who live in it. That's why we  take extra care to show off those  things that can make your house  special to potential buyers.  Maybe it's extra closets. A  spacious backyard. Or room in the  garage for a big model train. We'll  work together to make sure your  buyers see these advantages.  Call your Neighborhood  Professional before you're ready to  sell. We'd like to get to know your  home. So we can help make your  buyer feel at home in it as you do.  885-2235  Toll Free    689-5838  Box 1490, Trail & Cowrie St.  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xcoastnews.1-0175856/manifest

Comment

Related Items