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Sunshine Coast News Jan 23, 1974

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Array ���J'r-s':.  Fr^^vttttiaX Library,  Printed and Published at Gibsons,' B.C.  3_Dc per copy.  'Volume 27      Number 4,     January .23, 1974.  %  Preliminary Gibsons tax rate up 5.4 mills  Gibsons municipal mill rate  for 1974 was" set provisionally  Tuesday night at 5.40 mills  over last year with, a total mill  rate of 33.96. . >  Aid. Kurt Hoehne, budget  chairman stressed; that this was,  a provisional figure > based on  an undetermined provincial assessment and could result in  a mill fate increase or decrease.  One of the reasons for his  hesitancy in developing a firm  mill rate is due to an indefinite  situation over settling the rate  of   provincial   assessment  for  this year. Aid. Hoehne reported that on the Sunshine Coast  alone there are more than 500  appeals on assessment figures  and this figure he said is far  in excess of normalcy.  A provisional budget reveals  the direction expenditures will  take. The regular or final budget is not produced' until next  May. In the'meantime council  works on a provisional budget.  Taxes- called, for by this budget are not paid until June or .  July.   -  Aid.  Hoehne reported total  revenue 'required    would   be  -ft >  $517,548 and that taxation _rom,f crease. This council must bear  assessments will produce $172,:$ the brunt of the cost of over-  967 via a mill rate of 33.96., He?], hauling it. This is going to cost  added that the-final mill rate^| $200,000. The sewer system  can go either up*or down <t_tuj��3- .which was to cost $S0O,000 ac-  affecting   the . amount,. to   be If   tually cost $1,100,000. ��� . r  paid by taxpayers. He. _ak*l After the presentation Of the  council had revised the-budget^ provisional budget Aid. Hoehne  three times.     >    " -   Y '>; moved a notice of motion that  He also pointed out that the'�� the land parcel tax be increas-  village had been coasting along] ed from $80 to $110; the water  for a long time on constant .tax^;   frontage tax be increased from  Ratepayers to meet  rates but as all costs have gohe|  up, svillage costs are involved;!  and must also rise. The waters,  system is not sufficient for fires?  .. -   _������      -_�� 'k  12 cents to 20 cents per foot;  water rate charges be increased from $30 to $45 per year;  water   connection   charge   be  Are you amazed at the assessment situation and: the am- i  ourit of taxes you have to pay?  Have you.a sewer problem  facing you and you seek advice  as to what .to do?'  It is people like you who are  in need of a ratepayer organization, where you can outline  your situation and obtain help.  Such an organization is planned for Thursday night, 8 pjri.  in the United Church Hall  when plans to get a ratepayer  organization operating will be  laid' down.  With heavy financing facing  taxpayers in Gibsons local'citizens have organized this meeting to get public support.  Tax boost held to 15 percent?  Don Lockstead, constituency  MLA, announces after discussion in caucus with provincial  government cabinet members  on Bill 71 that the government  has agreed on a system of tax  deferral which would- allow  assessed persons to pay only  1���� percent on any tax increase  in a given year.    -1' .'_  This will' apply to people  who hold small parcels of land;  a farm home,< small acreage  and property located ini the  Agricultural > Land -teserye, a  small farrtily-).u_uiiess or commercial property and' to- jgfmor  citizens. and the^handicap_?|d.  - All: assessors iri;thevprovince  _..��    ��_        '*--I__!__l   rit.r__. ��� v    "_.   "  will^ be not��ja��jd qj: ^these pro-  ^posed.^angesr^^^j^^Ib^ in  wrote the premier as follows:     retired    persons,    because, \o#  ".On behalf of the boards of     their  reduced earnings. -yreref  school trustees of this province,     experiencing hardship. At toa^  I would like to congratulate     "'       ~"  ~~        L~* :-:-=����j  your government on its announced intention to introduce  legislation which will allow for  the deferral of property taxes  purposes or the population in-|   rajsed from $100 to $150. The  commercial meter rate has yet  to be established.  - Aid. Hoenhe supported by-  Mayor Labonte said he hoped  council may be able to reduce  the tax rate in the' final, analysis. In the meantime the  problem of assessment rates  is stilf in an extreme state of  Olaussen explanation sought  time we , suggested a -prop^irfgpl, flux  tax deferral ^e^siich��_s tbeS  for senior citizens.  Y "You are aware that the. B.C.  ^SdRool' -' Trustees ' Association  supports the concept of a local  property tax for education: We  believe that such a tax is vital.  . to the? concept of local control  of education through boards of  elected school trustees.  "As early as 1965, .this association  recognized-that, some  one recently anhbuhced. ���-' 'i-%h ,ll!L#A1t_i -' U4-n._��_%. v  "This legislation. MjifMuT UIDSOIlS   SIOlC  two  important' ^rids:  It 4fpl&  provide, relief & persons *$&?*-    LA   ^Jg^Jg^J.  the age of 65 who;are;o_>r|��  |0  j)fi   GXlGlKIGP  A proposal to increase the  size of the Lucky Dollar store  on Marine.Drive, Gibsons, was  placed before Gibsons council  planning- committee Monday  where it ~ was turned over to  planner Rob Buchan. for consideration.;   ' Y "- - , ,  iTftie- planning:, committee  Monday'examined Mr.'Edney's  project arid were pleased, witfh  fixed incomes; and1 it will hi w  tainc the .property tdi? revegucg";  which is lieededltb finance bucj  schools, ahd "other institutions!  at the local level/        ".�����>��  "Our ^association :enOqj$&f  this concept, and-1 am',jilted_-  to take this opportunity to!  vey^our feelingsi tdr yo^:'  i>"  i  Municipal offices are awaiting confirmation oh, this as it  involves a change in mill rates  if the 115 percent is the limit  on payment of any increase. It  will not affect people holding  vacant lands.  ��� .So far something like 500  protests have been filed against  the higher assessment figures  on the Sunshine Coast. This is  by far the heaviest protest ever  .handled over assessments.  The deferral-of property taxes for senior citizens as reported by Premier Barrett has produced congratulations from the  B.C. School Trustees Association. P.   D.  Walsh,  president,  Pantomime to  be repeated  Driftwood Players took their  pantomime -Dick  Whittington  in  the  Sunshine Kingdom  to  Sechelt last weekend and on  ��� Friday night and Sunday after-  ; noon  again  hit  the  standing  ' room only attendance peak at  - both shows in' the old Legion  Hall.  This weekend the Players  will stage, the show in Gibsons  Elementary school gym at 8  p.m. Friday and 2i p.m. Sunday. Those who missed the  early Gibsons performances  ,will be able to see this popular locally created production.  Admission charge is $1.75 for  adults and 75^ cents for children  and pensioners.  Jeremy Young, director of  Driftwood Players' Dick Whittington pantomime will be giving a course on drama and  theatre production Tuesday  evening, Jan.-29 in the Roberts  Creek United Church. Mr.  Young, a graduate of'the UBC  drama department ^rill give  this lecture on behalf of the  Sunshine Coast Arts^and Crafts  Workshop. ���  *#^��^ct^reportedv mis_n-  ' derstandings " concerning, * the  , Sechelt' Recreation Centre ~ as-  sociation and Sechelf s council  a.statement-was issued at last  week's meeting of Sechelt  council.  The statement read to council by Aid. Watson follows:  'A statement of facts in. regard to building and operating  a proposed Ice Arena in Sechelt.  The-Corporation of the Village of .Sechelt .will own and  hold title to the property and  buildings.  No village money (will be  spent either in the construction or operation without approval of the voters.  The village will lease the  facilities to the Sunshine Coast  Recreation .committee on a  mutually   agreed " term   lease  _s>'Ji^__^>^P*_5ft>.fii  for;a nominal-fee.-^  The facility will be,oper_f-d xtf��>n.of ah addition to existing  by-the group within the'standard for public use as laid down  and approved by Victoria.  The group will be "required  to present its yearly operating  budget to the village council  for approval.  It was reported -to council  there has been confusion in  Victoria as to which organization -was which in the recreation field. It appeared that  some government authorities  were confusing the Sechelt association with the Roberts  Creek Recreation committee.  However, Aid Watson said  that has now been straightened'  out.  As matters hCw stand the  Sechelt association has received  assurance provincial government funds have been allocated for their undertaking.  Sechelt. council is awaiting  a visit by Harry Olaussen MP  to find out why Sedhelt I_P  application for a grant was  bypassed.  The main point to be discus-  ed will be .why one of the LIP  committee of three residents  received a grant of $18,720 for  further publication of Raincoast Chronicles. The committee members for this area are  John Burnside and Howard)  White, two of the three. Howard, White is the' publisher of  Raincoast. Chronicles, and has  received three grants to date.  The Sechelt application for a  grant covered -the production  of a water table survey and an  engineering survey-ot Jeo^p-,.  meht which could be used in  the event of a .disaster.  Among other items, discus-  edtYwere -raw sewage \bei__  dumped   into- Porpoise   Bay  ���Uhlra^r^S-ra       -.- - Parking spsice for the second  storey of the Bank of "Montreal" building was discussed  along with a Chamber of Commerce letter asking for more  parking, space. The chamber  argued the village could buy  some land, for this purpose' as  the merchants were the heaviest taxpayers.  The library budget was mentioned by Aid. Watson but -as  the matter was too indefinite  at this point nothing was'completed Aid Ernie Booth discussed the issuance of burning  permits maintaining that as a  result of of new' regulations  the area covered by municipal  issuance of such" permits was  becoming limited  _*>*-'.,'���_;*". *//��  store and warehouse area.  , It would mean expansion of  the existing store by adding 16  feet to its width on one lot and  adding approximately 40 feet  to its total length. This would  double the retail and service  areas, wider aisles, add fixtures ahd increase cooler and  freezer space.  There will be some excavation work' towards the rear of  fhe property and the area of  the former Drummond home  will be excavated There will  be a retaining wall in the rear.  Harry Olaussen MP for  Coast-Chilcotin which includes  the Sunshine Coast, twill be  available to the public from  Monday  Jan,   28  to   Sunday  'iw. 3."  - 'For Pender Harbor.area he  will be available at the Pender  Harbor Realty, office Monday,  Jan. 28 to Thursday,, Jan. 31.  He will be in, Sechelt at  the,   Mvuncipal.JEIall    from  after which he' will meet with  Sechelt's municipal council. On  Friday, Feb. 1 he will be at  Gibsons Municipal hall from  1 to 5 p.m. Sunday he will  leave for Vancouver and Squamish.  Legion zone meeting at P.R.  Quarterly report by mayor  In his first .quarterly report  to the public at a meeting of  jGibsons municipal^ council  Mayor ' Larry , Labonte said  Tuesday night .that "Cooperation with the Regional board  on matters otcommqn interest  has been established and it is  my hope that this working relationship will  gradually im-  Paul committed  Danny Joseph Paul, charged  in connection with the fire  which destroyed Elphinstone  Secondary school last June 30  appeared in Sechelt court Wednesday of last week and decided for trial in a higher court  in Vancouver without jury.  At the Sechelt hearing the  only evidence presented was  his own confession of setting  the fire. Defence counsel Don  Wilson of Vancouver, decided  this was. sufficient for commitment to a higher court.  prove in. the future.  "According to the newspapers there is a possibility .of a  Ratepayers Association for Gib  sons. I endorse this. It would  be a help to council in many  ways and could offer construe-.  tive ideas.  "Our relations with the  school board should reach a  higher level of co-operation in  1974.  *'Our problems with B.C. Insurance Commission is not  quite clear yet.11 -urge Council  to continue the service as it  now stands. In the next 2%  months we should be able to  do a better evaluation of the  problems we are facing at the  present time.  "I would ask the business  people of this community for  their co-operation in making  Gibsons a better place in which  to live. I hope they will offer  suggestions through an organization or on an individual basis."  Shoot success!  ; The Elphinstone Basketball  ��� team ^Shootathon has been an  outstanding success. The players* have earned almost $2,000  in pledges. The pledges are  presently being collected, and  approximately  $700  has  been  - collected' up  to  yesterday   at  noon.  * Wayne"- Smith is the big  money maker in the shootathon. He shot 39 baskets in the  allotted two minutes. Wayne  also collected the greatest number of pledges. His pledges totalled almost $8 per shot.  v The average player had approximately $1.50 per shot in  pledges and scored around 20  baskets.  Bridges change  Traffic problems affecting  bridges over streams between  Langdale and Port Mellon will  be eased as quickly as possible,  Don Lockstead, MLA, reports.  Two Bailey bridges will be  set up immediately over Dakota and McNair streams. The  old bridges were becoming  useless for the heavy traffic  that had to get to the mill. The  new bridges will take heavier  loads than what present bridges can carry.  Top officers and officials of  Legion branches in the Sunshine Coast zone will meet Jan.  26 and 27 at Powell River as  guests of the Malaspina Branch  No. 164. _ Legionnaires and  ladies auxiliary members will  be attending from Gibsons,  Pender Harbor, Roberts Creek,  Sechelt, Texada Island and  Powell River.  The seminar will encompass  administration, service work,  membership and a branch of-  Fine display  in rainbow  Friday afternoon about 4:30  Gibsons and surrounding area  were treated to a rainbow demonstration the like never seen  here before according to old-  timers.  The rainbow created by  moisture in the air shone on by  a sun descending" low for sunset was based offshore at Keats  Island just north of the wharf  and presented a complete arc  across to Elphinstone mountain  slope.  It was a brilliant rainbow  lasting some four minutes reflecting minor rainbows around  the inside of the arc and a little distance on the outside of  the arc- A local resident maintained it was the best rainbow  they had seen for a long, long  time, so much so that store  staffs quit j work anid watched  it briefly.  ficer .training clinic. All of  which it is hoped1, will assist  with respect to the growing  need for competent leadership  now and in the future.  With total Legion membership on the coast now over  59,000 and increasing annually  and with assets in property  running into millions of dollars  there is a constant need to ex-��  change and up-date information among the newly elected  branch officers.  Attending from Pacific Command twill be Ray Harrison,  provincial president from  Burnaby; Herman Keys, provincial first vice-president and  chairman of the provincial ~  leadership committee from  Abbotsford; and Larry Harrison, provincial secretary from  Vancouver headquarters.  Mail robbery  investigated  ROMP report continued investigation into the theft of  6,240 feet of copper wire from  a B.C. telephone line between  the provincial Sechelt Campsite entrance and the James  fish plant on the highway.  Another investigation involving police of Gibsons and Powell (River- detachments is the  reported1 theft from a mail  truck on one of the ferries.  The report says a hole was cut  into the truck. What was tak-'  en is reported to be a possible  payroll in the form of cheques.  LIGHT BULB SALE SAT. JAN. 23  GIBSONS LIONS CLUB  GIBSONS ATHLETIC CLUB 2     Coast News, Jan. 23, 1974.  Where do we go from here?  Subscription Rates: British Columbia $4.50 per year,  $2.50 for six months; Canada except B.C. $5.00 per year,  United States and Foreign $8.50 per year.  Published Wednesdays at Gibsons. BC.  Fred Cruice, Editor and Publisher  Second Class Mail registration number 0794. Return  postage guaranteed.  Phone 886-2622        P.O. Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.  Roads policy clues!  Hon. Graham Lea, minister of provincial highways  in officially opening the Knight Street bridge recently  in Vancouver revealed some of the current thinking of  the government in highways planning policy.  During his speech the minister said that we have  seen too many cases where developers of commercial  centres have been allowed tt> use highways intended as,  high-speed trunk routes to tap bigger markets. And we  have seen too/many cases where these highways have  been reduced in f inaction to that of a city street straddled  by commercial development.  "The time has come to stop these abuses," he said.  "Highway planning must be integrated with the co-ordinated land use policy and the social objectives of the community. Tj^ture recreational needs of the public must be  considered in this comprehensive approach to road building -7- so must resource development.  ; "This concept contrasts sharply with the practise  of attempting to provide more highway capacity on demand which has previously been the role of the department of highways. To create integrated planning, major  changes are going to have to teke? place. There must be  neater co-ordination of the work of the specialists ���  the transit, transportation and urban planners.  Y "Also, we now7must look to those areas where plan- .  nihg is notbeingexercised as it should bey such as in  sonie municipalities and regional districts, and, if necessary, make le^slatiye changes to ensure Tit will be exercised iri the future.It may be necessary to modify present municipal financial snaring policies to encourage the  development of a regional road system that will provide  maximum mobility in the future.  "Changes such as these are now being considered.  They are a natural extension of this government's commitment to make planning work for the benefit of all  thepeople."  Our own governniehtal representative, Don Lockstead, in remarks made recently intima,!;^ the highways  department has shown strong interest in the grid system  proposed for the Sunshine Coast area. It should be remembered that when the government changed hands the  handling of a new highway proposal was n'��t confined to  departmental officials. It turned over to a very broad  committee a highways exercise new; in governmental  circles,   y  Road problems on the Sunshine Coast and those of  the^ interior of "the province are not quite the same, so  let's hope the minister of highways will come up with  something definite out of "current thinking of The government on highways planning policy."  Romance and mail orders  Dealing with a mail-orderhouse through a computer  was probably inevitable, and Simpsons-Sears Ltd. of Canada and IBM have already offered the service to a limited number of customers. But what about romance?  What about those great evenings around the oil  lamp on the kitchen table tracing feet on cardboard to  send away for new shoes? Marking the yellow order  blank torn from thef center of the catalogue after running  the tape from the sewing basket around necks, waists  and chests, incredulous about how much the kids had  grown since the. last year?  The catalogue was notknown as the wish book for  nothing. People turned reluctantly from, the frilly dresses and dress suits and oxfords to a consideration of more  necessaryitems.        ���  Y Four-buckle galoshes for the barnyard. Rivets to repair the reins. New single-trees for the hay rack. Nose  rings for rooty pigs. Overalls^ Oskosh by Gosh. New bands  for the Ford. A snathe for the scythe. Fence pliers. Sensible sheepskin coats.  And finally, after adding it all up, there would be a  few concessions to sheer abandonment: A pound of hard  candy. A checker board. Two pillow cases with lace edges.  A bottle of oh-de-colog-ny.  Then the measurements and the cardboards and the  order blanks in a big envelope taken out to the RFD box  by an excited procession to await the call on the party  line from the freight depot. \  Three weeks later it came; two longs and two shorts.  Swooh.  You can't punch that into a computer. ��� Detroit  Free Press.  ^JBy SPECUL.US  Energy crisises, inflation, pop  ulation explosion, drug culture  the list is always grow  ing and one wonders where it  will all end. -   ..  Chances are that if we look  at the problem individually  we will end, in a madhouse;.  On the other hand if we look  at the causes of the problems,  they would start to have some  sort of collective meaning.  One of the causes of so much  change has been the improvement in aircraft and communications. Larger aircraft and  higher speeds have resulted  in more people moving around  than ever before. This has  shrunk the world and better  communications have enabled  this smaller world to be seen  and felt emotionally on an instant happenings basis: The  combined effort is instant ex 7  posure to new ideas and products and this can be seen in  almost every shop in Vancouver.  Another cause for a change  in ideas ^has been the collapse '  of Europe and its replacement  by   super-powers' as   present  rulers of the world. This canie  about partly through spiritual  and   financial   exhaustion   in  Europe as  the  result  of two  wars and partly because manufacturing required bigger and  bigger markets to bring prices  , to   acceptable   levels.   Nation  ^states    were    no    longer   big  enough to cope with the situation and "were replaced by  Continental  states.  Europe itself is in the process of -cheating  a   new   continental   state  and   , although    the    growing  pains are severe the end result  will be  another  shift in  . world power control.  War produces separation and-;  5 to 25;  yrs. ago  Five Years Ago  Roberts Creek" Legion auxiliary cancels all January  meetings because of frozen  water pipes.  Gibsons council decides the  mayor should get a raise to  $875 from $750 yearly and  aldermen $625 from $500.  Port    Mellon    received    85  inches of 'snow from just before Christmas to Jan. 20.  10 Tears Ajgo.  Gibsons Chamber of Commerce seeks a motor license  office for the village.  Tenders are sought for a  15 room, nurses home at St.  Mary's Hospital, Sechelt.  Contractors are about ready  to start on the South Pend'er  Harbor waterworks project.  . 15 Years Ago  J.W.R.. Mason was named  president of Gibsons Legion  branch with W.J. Naylor and  J.R. Wilson vice-presidents.  Pork steaks, spare ribs were  selling at 49 cents per pound  with shoulders of lamb at 39  .cents a pound.  A Coast News editorial  headed Where does it stop?  points out that the Consumer '  Price Index stood at 123. (This  was changed to 100 in 1961.  Today it hits ,156.)  20 Years Ago  Twelve tugs round up logs  blown out of Long Bay, Gam  bier Island due to Squamish  winds.  Rough weather forces ferry  trips from Horseshoe Bay to  be cancelled.  Modern two bedroom home  is advertised for rent at $55  monthly.  25 "Tears Ago  St. Aidan's Church, Roberts  Creek holds its 13th annual:  vestry meeting.  \   Dr.   F..   Inglis;,   Elphinstone :  Co-op   charter   member   since  1_17,   decides   to   retire   from  the  executive   due  to   health  reasons.  Pender Harbor residents are  thinking about'-a board of  trade for their area.  fear, with their reactions of  togetherness and love. The  postwar baby boom arising  from this, made the1/world en-  . large its maternity 'wards, pri-  . marv schools, high schools  and universities and now we  are facing the sudden increase  in demand for new homes arid-  all their ec^i-^ent. With demand in excess of supply there  has been a - skyro cketing in  the price of building land and  housing. Predictably this, will  not last fpr long.  The energy crisis' may or  may not be real. The international oil cartels are not  famous for their honesty or  generosity so it is impossible  to accept anything they say  without confirmation from  respectable sources.  In the present circumstances  the need to counter the antipollution groups and' to find  a good excuse for passing on  well-head price increases are  sufficient reasons for oiling  the facts.  Years ago, it was said that  .war was too important to be  left to generals. This can be  updated to energy which is  too important to be left to the  oil companies. Real or not, oil  and other fossil fuels are not  limitless and if we use them  all in the next 20 years there  will be none for the 2,000,000  years to follow. It is that simple as it is equally with world  minerals. Human greed and  fear will be the complications  in the problem.  Together these forces spell  an ever-changing world. The  increasing size of world population means increasing demands on ever diminishing  supplies. In the past this has  meant war and inflation, so  this is our probable fate sooner  or later. Along the way we  will have to accept 'handraul-  ics' or human machines and  a farewell to huge ,autos, snowmobiles and large outboard  engines. Less mechanical mach  inery means that the economy  cannot support. a large percentage of passengers so government staffs will dimiriisih  .ahd handouts in the form of  equalization payments, LIP  and OFY grants will be much  harder to come by.  On the other hand fewer  machines and more 'handraul-  ics' mean exercise," slimmer  waists and better health, physical and mental - - so it is not  all bad.  Two effects of the changes  to come will be a demand for  control of Resources and an increasing demand for control  of self. The first is with us  in the form of Alberta's oil  battle and could appear next  in a demand from B.C., Alberta ��� and Saskatchewan to  move the provincial boundaries to the high Arctic.  There is a precedent in the  form of Quebec Terrratorial  Extension   act   of   1922   when  the people of Canada who had  paid for Rupertsland to the  Hudson Bay Company,, made  a transfer . of the Ungava  (James Bay) to the province  of Quebec. This altered the  real Quebec boundary from  south of the Ungava to the  high Arctic.  Control of self is well along  the road and also the reduction of the individual to a more  complete number. The right of  the individual to make life  about conception, poison or  pollution of the body,, and fo  end life is a matter only the  individual , concerned should  decide, without the moral beliefs of the individual forcing  a conformity, to their own code.  The duty of the state should  be limited to protecting other  individuals from consequences  of self-determination on the  part of* another. Our legal  system is partly equipped for  this and' can be amended to  suit social need as required.  Except in the case of spectacular collapse change is slow  and undramatic in any given  moment so it is unlikely the  enormity of events will be  noticed "until they are history.  A THANK YOU!  To all those VALUED CLIENTS who have entrusted their auto insurance requirements to me these  past 25 years or so ��� Thank You!  I shall continue to provide service for Fire Insurance and related personal lines ��� through those fine  Companies I have represented for up to 42 years,  and whose support is the basis of the service agents  provide.  ,Your inquiries are invited.  N. RICHARD McKIBBIN'  A PERSONAL INSURANCE SERVICE  Personalize Yov/r Stationery  with "MY NAME" PERSONAL PRINTER  Handy too, for identifying your books and other possessions  , imprint your name and address with just a touch  Stamp pad is enclosed in an attractive two-tone jewel-Hke case  with compartment for the printer  An ideal gift for showers, weddings, graduations, birthdays ���  and housewarmings, at $7 each ��� tax included  Order one from the  Coast News  Jim D  rummon  d  _z_  AUTHORIZED AGENT  INSURANCE CORPORATION  OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  IMPORTANT  TO AVOID LINEUPS AND "POSSIBLE NON-CQVERAGE  BY MARCH 1st, PLEASE BRING YOUR FORMS IN FOR  PROCESSING AS SQON AS YOU RECEIVE THEM  '^������'.^.���.���.v���^���T_iA_^YOlJv .'.'��������� v.-.  1545 Gower Point Rd.  Phone 886-Z7751 Church  Services  The food basket  ANGLICAN  St. Bartholomew's  Rev. David H. P. Brown  ��� Sunday School, 11 a.m.  Morning Service. 11:15 a.m.  2nd and 4th Sundays  - 'Holy Communion at 9:00 a.m.  St. Aidan's  Sunday School 10:30 a.m.  Sunday Service 2:30 p.m.  GIBSONS UNITED CHURCH  11:15 a.m., Divine Service  9:30 a.m., Wilson Creek  2:30 p.m., Roberts Creek  ROMAN CATHOLIC SERVICES  St Mary's Church  .    Father E. G. Lehner  11 a.m. Mass, Sundays  Wed., Fri., 7 p.m.  Phone 885-9526  BAPTIST CHURCHES  886-7449 >      886-2611  Pastor - Wilbert N. Erickson  Gibsons '/  9:80; _0:45 am & 7 pm Sundays  3:30 pm Mon.; 7 pm Tues.  7:30 pm Thursday'  Sechelt  10:00; 11:15 am Sundays  3:30 pm Mon.; 7:30 pm Wed.  GIBSONS PENTECOSTAL  Member  P.A.O.CY  Phone 886-7107  Highway and Martin Road _  . Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Morning Worship '11 a.m.  Evening.Service 7:00 p.m.  Wed., Bible Study, 7:30 p.m  Fri., Accent on _outh. 7:30 p.m  Pastor G. W. Foster  GLAD TIDINGS TABERNACLE  Gower Point Road  Phone 886-2680  Sundays, 10 a.m. & 7 p.m.  Bible Study, Tues;,:-7:30 p.m.  Pastor Nancy Dykes  "In His Service ���  At Your Service  _    THE BAHA'I. FAITH  The tabernacle  of  unity  has  been   raised,   regard   ye   not   ,  ..  one another as strangers.  Informal Chats Tues., 886-2078  10}_-20j_  The FASHION WINNER  is  ' this  slimming,  zip-front skim  with   easy   shoulder   shaping  . and a neat, casual collar. Sew  it in a morning in-a carefree  knit.  Printed      Pattern      4 9 0 4:  'Half   Sizes   10%   12%,   14%,  \16% 18%, 20%. Size 14% (bust  737)   takes   i-j_- yards  60-inch.  Y Send one - dollar for each  pattern - cash or cheque or  money order. Add 15 cents for  . each pattern for first class  mailing and special handling-  to Anne Adams.Patterns, c/o  Coast News Pattern Dept. 60  Progress    ave.,    Scarborough;  <Ont. MIT 4P7  GIBSONS  For all your Sewing  and Knitting Needs  Marine Drive 886-7525  Take a delicious break from  chilly "weather by serving a  steaming bowl of savory soup  for lunches or dinners. Soups  that are low in cost, high in  nutrition to help everyone  feel his best during these cold  days.  Make a meal of hearty clam  chowder or pea, soup-. Serve  piping hot -with crusty French  bread or biscuits fresh from  the oven. Double these recipes  for larger families or for freezing for later,use.  Manhattan Clam Chowder  1   can   olams,   drained   (save  liquid)  . % cup chopped salt pork  1 onion, sliced thin  2 Cups raw potatoes, cubed  l%"cup$ boiling water  2 cups canned tomatoes  salt and pepper  Vi tspn. thyme  Chop clams,. fry pork out in  saucepan. Add onion. Cook and  stir for 5 minutes. Add potatoes,- boiling water clam liquid and pinch of salt. Boil  for 10 minutes. Add tomatoes.  Cook until potatoes are tender.  Add  clams,   thyme,   salt   and.  pepper to taste. Simmer 3 minutes. Makes & servings.  French Canadian Pea Soup  1 lb. (2% cups) dried yellow  peas "   ���/  ' ���  ' 6 cUps cold water  1 lb.'salt pork, sliced  2 medium onions, chopped  1 tbsp. chopped parsley  1 tspn.. savory      '   -  1 tspn. salt  pepper to taste  iWash and' drain peas. Place  in soup kettle and cover with  cold water. Let soak overnight.  Add remaining ingredients and  bring to a boil. Lower heat,  cover and simmer gently for  3-4 hours. This soup is very  thick. If thinner soup is dej  sired add a little boiling water.  (Use bacon (bits in both recipes  if more economical.) ,  A COMMON LANGUAGE  The Eskimo language is common to Eskimos from Siberia  to Greenland. Eskimo groups  who have had no contact with  each other for -centuries have  been found to know the same  stories, told in almost exactly  the same way.  Coast News, Jan. 23, 1974.     3  Books in Library  GIBSONS  Adult Travel':  From   Island   to   Island   by  Sven Gillsater  Wave after Wave by  Sven  Gillsater  The   Shores   of   the   Black  Ships by John Marriner  Fiction.  Tht Curse of the Kings by  Victoria Holt  From the Nets of a Salmon  Fisherman by Eric. Forrer  The   Honorary   Consul   by  Graham Greene  The   Occupying   Power   by  Evelyn Anthony  The   Pegnitz    Junction   by  Mavis Gallant  A Privilege and a Pleasure  by Max Braithwaite  The Revenge of Annie Charlie by Alan Fry      . .  Time  Enough for  Love' by  Robert A. Heinlein  COAST NEWS WANT ADS  DEADLINE. TUESDAY NOON  Phone 886-2622  SEE  KEN DeVRIES  FLOOR COVERING LTD.  CARPETS ��� TILES ��� LINOLEUMS >  1659 Sunshine Coast Hiway, Gibsons_ ��� -886-7112  -     *- ~ * t    u  Get your printing at Coast News  There is only toddy between you and tomorrow  Which is why Canada Pension Plan benefits  .   will be increased today and will be kept in line  with the cost increases of tomorrow  ,.-c  What this means to you as a beneficiary  From January 1st 1974, Canada Pension Plan benefit payments  wiil be adjusted fo reach ... then m_ihtain a level in line with  the actual cost of living. _  If you are receiving monthly benefits that began during the  period 1967 to 1973, your benefits have been recalcufeted so  that the amount you receive in 1974 is related to the actual  increase in the cost of living over the years your benefits have  been paid/When you receive your January 1974 benefit cheque,  you will see that it has been increased. The increase in your  payment will vary from 8% to 20% and will depend on the year  se, you can expect  further increases in your benefits, based on current cost of  living data.  What this means to, you as a contributor  As "a cbntributdr to .he Canada Pension Plan, you are, building  a basic, and portable retirement plan for the future and at the  same time providing current-protection.for yourself and your  dependents against the possibility of severe disability or early  death.  In order to protect the value of your eventual benefits, the  Canadian Parliament has passed legislation whicfrensures that  the contributions you make today will give benefits that  maintain the purchasing power of today's wages twenty, thirty  or even fifty years from now:. .when you need it!  To achieve this, the Government plans to have the earnings  ceiling ��� the maximum amount on which contributions are'paid  and on which benefits are calculated ��� increased each year  so that it will reach,.and then keep etfen with the average  earnings of Canadian industrial workers. This ceiling will be .  raised from $5,600.00 in 1973, to $6,600.00 in 1974 and  $7,400.00 in 1975. ';    ,  This new earnings ceiling means that the year's basic exemption ��� the initial amount on which you do not pay contributions  ��� is changed from $600.00 in 1973 to $700.00 for 1974. '  These changes also mean that the maximum employee contributions will increase from $90.00 a year in 1973 to $106.20  in 1974. Your contribution is matched by your employer.  In the case of self-employed persons, the maximum annual  contribution is increased to $212.40 for 1974 as against $180.00  last year. For earnings of less than $5,700.00, there will be no  increase in contributions.  The change in the earnings ceiling means that the maximum  retirement pension will rise from $90.71 for pensions effective  in December 1973 to $134.97 for those whose pensions will  begin inADecember 19751As the maximum earnings levels for  the years after 1975 continue to rise, so will the maximum  retirement pensions in those years. There will aisobe increases  in the maximum values each year for disability and survivors'  benefits.  // you have any questions or would like further information, please write:  Canada Pension Plan,  Department of National Health and Welfare,  Place Vanier, Tower "A",  Ottawa, Ontario,  K1A0L1. -V.V.  Your contributions today ensure your protection  tomorrow.  I*  torNational  Hotth and Wttftn   ,  AA^t^A^^_   ^fl���   f ���I     A_M���_X   _  inlT ���!-_  MraHnMH SanlB IMOOTN-V  ���tduBan-Str* social  Marc Latonde, Minister.  ' , , .     . > [M'. 4     Coast News, Jan. 23, 1974.     WORK WANTED  COAST NEWS CLASSIFIED ADS  Phone 886-2622  Deadline ��� Tuesday noon  5c a word, minimum 75c  for up to- 15 words  Subsequent Insertions % price  25c added for bookkeeping on  ads not  paid one  week  after  insertion.     /  Legal ads 25c per count line.  Subscription Rates:  B.C. 1 year $4.50, 6 mo. $2.50  Canada ex. B.C. 1 yr. $5.00  V.S. & foreign 1 year $8.50  coming Evans  TWILIGHT THEATRE  - Gibsons, 886-2827  SEE THEATRE AD  ON PAGE 10  Every Monday night at 8 p.m.  Bingo, New Legion Hall, Gibsons.  Every Thursday night at 8 p.m.  Bingo, Legion Hall, Roberts  Creek.  Jan. 26, 8 p.m., Masonic Hall,  Roberts Creek. Installation of  Honoured Queen Valerie Roberts and 'Bethel: officers, IOJD.  Everybody welcome. ;  Feb. 9: Guides, Brownies Valentine Tea, United Church Hall  2 - 4 p.m.  Feb. 16: St. Bartholomew's Valr  entine Tea and Bake Sale, Parish Hall, 2 p.m.  DEATHS  ANDERSON ��� Andrew R., of  Gibsons, B.C- Passed away Jan.  15, 1974, aged 61 years. Survived by his loving wife Isabel; 2  sons Harry Andrew and Donald Brian; 3 grandchildren; 1  brother Lindsey of Edmonton,  Alta.^ 1 sister Pearl Weiss of  Calgary, Alta. Flowers gratefully declined, donations to the  B.C. Heart Fund would be appreciated. Private arrangements through the Memorial  Society of B.C. and First Memorial Services Ltd.  BURLS ��� On- January 20, 1974 ���  Mabel A. Burls of Gibsons,  dear wife of Alf red C. Burls.  Survived by 1 daughter Mrs.  Joan D. Ramsden of Hitchin,  England, a granddaughter  Cheryl; Glasgow, Scotland and  1 great-granddaughter Nicola.  2 brothers and 2 sisters. Rev.  David Brown will conduct .a-".  private memorial service in the  Harvey Funeral Home on Wednesday, January 23 at 1 p.m.  Cremation. .  CRITCHELL <��� On Jan. 20,  1974 Hazel I. Critchell (McAr-  thur), of Vancouver, formerly  of Davis Bay. Survived! by a  nephew Arthur F., McArthur  of London, Ont., a niece Mrs.  D. (Margaret) Hauka of Gibsons and a dear friend Mrs.  Betty Garner, Vancouver. Relatives in Canada and 'U.S.A.  Mrs. Critchell was a member  of Sunshine Rebekah Lodge 82.  Rev. David Brown will conduct  the service in the Harvey Funeral Home on Sat., Jan. 26 at  12 noon. Interment Seaview  Cemetery.  CAW OF THANKS  Mr. and Mrs. Ed Dignard thank  the merchants of Gibsons and  Sechelt for the gifts received  on the occasion of the birth of  their baby as the first baby of  1974. The gifts have been very  much appreciated.  My sincere thanks to all my  relatives, neighbors and friends  for the lovely -.��� flowers, gifts,  and cards which I received  while in Hospital. To Royal  Canadian Legion Branch 109,  for the fruit, and -the L.A. Br.  109 for the gift, and a special  thank you to Dr. Hobson and  the nursing staff of St. Mary's  Hospital.  ���Mrs. Eva Pilling.  HELPWAMTO  DEPEND ABLE MAN WHO  CAN WORK WITHOUT SUPERVISION. Earn $14,000 in  a year plus bonus. Contact customers in Gibsons area. Limited auto travel. We train. Air  Mail S. R. Dick, Pres, Southwestern Petroleum, P.O. Box  789, Ft. Worth, Texas.  Teacher supervisor for 3 and  4 year old children. Apply in  writing stating qualifications tp  Jack and Jill Child Minding  Co-op, Box 801, Gibsons, or  phone 886-2184- V  Relief   cook   needed   for   St.  Mary's Hospital. Please apply,  to the dietitian 885-2224.  Personable ladies wanted immediately. Excellent remuneration in personal satisfaction.  Help the __ansmen Mothers  - March. For details phone 886-  7148 or 886-2996.  Rubbish removal, Gibsons Rob-  ' erts   Creek   area.   Phone   886-  9632. ,7, K  NEED A PAINTER? Interior,  exterior (when applicable).  Call Ken Corbin, 885-2734 or  write P.O. Box 943, Sechelt.  Free estimates, good references  Reliable couple seeking care-  takdng job in "wilderness or  rural area. Write T. Fenner,  General Delivery, Squamish.  For all your carpentry needs  Call A. SHEPPARD  CONTRACTING  886-7005  Backhoe available on request.  Phone 886-7638.        Reliable mother of 2 wishes to  babysit children in her own  home. Phone 886-21149.  TYPEWRITER  & ADDING MACHINE  SALES & SERVICE   Phone 886-7111  DIGGING SEWER LINES  Tree Service Cat Work  Gardens Insured  Marvin Volen - 886-9597  Secretarial work, letters, manuscripts, etc. done in my home.  Phone 886-7111.   Backhoe available for drainage, ditches, water lines, etc.  Phone 886-9579.   Y   Jalica Constr. & Gen Contrac.  New Construction; remodelling  Sewer installation  Commercial & Residential  Shaw Road, Gibsons    886-7668  886-9815  Will do any kind of work  around house and garden,.also  moving and hauling of any  kind. Phone 886-9503.   We provide a complete tree service for the Sunshine Coast.  AH work insured and guaran*  teed to your satisfaction.  PEERLESS TREE SERVICES  -85-2108  CHIMNEY  SWEEPING  Oil Stoves  Phone Roir TCrbOk,  886-2834  ���v.   77:.}.[, aftejr;7g7jP.in.  FURNACE INSTALLATIONS  OIL BURNER SERVICE  Financing Available  Call Thomas.Heating, 886-7111  MBC.RH.-_:  Older type bedroom suite. Ph.  886:9372 after 5.          Leonard fridge, $75, good con-  dition. Phone-886-2582.     ,  2 loveseats, orange tweed, suitable for rumpus room. 886-2590  200 amp Lincoln welding machine driven toy AV4 aircooled  mounted on trailer. Phone 886-  5872 after 5 p.m.     '  1 Gendron baby stroller, like  new, $35; Tasco telescope, 300  power, with extra lenses; and  a set of Gretsh drums with  cases; Zildjiah, cymbals. Of-  fers? Phone 886-7736.   Old phonography records for  sale or trade/ Edisons, Zono-  phonis etc. Will buy also. Ph.  886^2513. ^  ELECTROLUX  Sales & Service  iPickup and Deliveries  Doris Sugden 886-9864  Bed   chesterfield,   $35.   Phone  886-9376. ,   Cedar  fence  posts,   75c  each.  Phone 886-9594.        '  ��� Snow tires and extra wheels.  Call 886-7660 after 5 pm.  QUESTIONS?  Regarding 1974 Vehicle  .  Licences and Insurance . . .  PHONE MARY  at 885-2235  Sechelt Agencies Ltd.  Zig-zag   sewing  machine  and  cabinet. Phone 886-7479 after  5.    [ ���;. . .������'" - :-.   Used electric and gas ranges,  also oil ranges. C & S Sales, Pb  885-9713. Sechelt.   METRIN  Roberta E. Johnson, 886-2546  BARGAIN CENTRE  Used furniture and household  goods  Bought ~ Sold ��� Traded  Sechelt, 885-9848  AMWAY  Roberta E. Johnson, 886-2546  TUPPERWARE  Roberta E. Johnson, 886-2546.  NOTICt  N.D.P. NOTICE  Final reminder. Meeting Sunday, Jan. 27, 10:30 a.m., Provincial office, Vancouver.  For Latter Day Saints in this  area, contact 886-2546.  If you are concerned about  someone with a drinking problem call Al-Anon at 886-7128.  885-9409. Meetings St. Aidan's  Hall, Wed., 8 p.m.  WAHP  Good used pool table. Phone  886-2644. .  Information leading to the arrest and conviction of the persons responsible for the theft  of a 4 x 4 ft. leaded colored  cut glass widow with a wooden circular sphere. This win-,  dow was removed from a* house  oh Hwy. 101 last June. Contact  R.C.M.P. or Box 3013 Coast  News Strictly confidential, $ilu0  reward   CARS, TRUCKS FOR SALE  I960 VW window van Insulated, 11,400 org. miles. 1967 Chev  2 door, 6 std., good condition.  See Sid at Seaview Mkt., Rob-  erts Creek. Phone 886-2467.  1971 Volkswagen, needs some  body work. Phone 886-2177.  1962 Chevy II compact, 6 cyl.,  auto,- custom radio, snowtires,  winterized. $265. Phone 886-  2334.  ���  '63 Pontiac Parisienne. Hardtop  V8, auto. Phone 886-9657.  QUESTIONS?  Regarding 1974 Vehicle  (Licences and Insurance . . .  PHONE MARY  at 885-2235  Sechelt Agencies Ltd.  FOUND  Man's jacket on highway.  Claim at Miss Bee's, Sechelt.  885-9066. -  Man's Timex calendar watch  found' Mon., Abbs Rd. and  School Hill: Ph< 886-2169.  German, shepherd, around P.O.  area, one week ago. Phone 886-  7872.   Key found on crosswalk at  School Road and Sunshine  Coast Highway. Now at Coast  News.  Nylon playsuit for toddler  found in front of United  Church last week, now at Coast  News..,      ''  BOATS FOR SALE  'l4' fibreglass," 35 Chrysler '67.  New   condition,   trailer,   $700.  . Phone 886-9584. v _    Sell or swap, water taxi or  crew boat. Rebuilt hull, new  cabin and wheel house, reinforced bow. No engine. $1500  Call Walt Nygren, 886-2350.  MARINE INSURANCE  PROBLEMS?  New insurance advice  Re-insurance, advice  Claims settled  Capt. W. Y. Higgs,  Marine Surveyor  * Box 339, Gibsons  Phones 886-9546 or 885-9425  Small furnished house, 2 bedrooms, suitable for couple. Ph.  886-7735.  Bachelor suite, furnished, $125  per month. Lady preferred.  Phone 886-7216 evenings.  Point Road, Hopkins Landing.  Furnished newly decorated 2  bedrodfn house on Sargent Rd.  Gibsons/ Phone 886-7005, or  876-1975 or 434-6326.  . 17% ft. Donzi hull with 155 hp.  OMC leg. 213 gal. built in fibre-  glass tanks. Upholstered seats  Phone 886-9604.   PERSONAL  QUESTIONS?  Regarding 1974 Vehicle  Licences and Insurance . . -  PHONE MARY  at  885-2235  Sechelt Agencies Ltd.  ro_TRif        r    ~~  Modern 1 bedroom apartment.  Available immediately. Wall to  wall carpets colored appliances,  3 piece bath and garburator,  $165. Bachelor apartment, $150.  Call 886-2415 or 886-7629.    ,  Modern 2 bedroom home, fireplace, on Vz acre. Trees, shrubs,  lawn, etc. Near Gower Point.  Apply M. Volen, 1751 Glen Rd.,  Gibsons. ,  * 2 bedroom furnished trailer at  Bonniebrook. Available Feb. 1.  No dogs. Phone 886-2887,  2 view cottages, Gower Point  road. One bedroom, $115; 1 2  bedrooms, $280. responsible  adults. Phone 886-9147 or Van.  876-6507 between 6 and 9 p.m.  Year round rental, furnished,  cottage winterized. Prefer older couple. Phone 886-2935 evenings, j  BONNIEBROOK CAMP  AND TRAILER PARK  1 site for small trailer, up  to 50 ft.' Couples preferred.  No dogs. Phone 886-2887 or  886-9319..  RITZ MOTEL  Reasonable weekly and daily  rates'. 886-2041.  Store for rent in Gibsons centre. Rhone 886-7564 or 886-  9303. ������_  Suites at Seaside Plaza, heat,  electricity, / garbage removal  included in rent .Phone , 886-  7564 or 886-9303.  WANTED TO RBn  , Young reliable couple need 1  or 2 bedroom . unfurnished  house between Roberts Creek  and Langdale. References. Ph.  886-2622: -  PROPfRTY FOR SALE  Beautiful treed acre lot on all  services. Driveway in, close to  ocean, $13,500, terms. Phone  112-826-9208.'      Questions?  Regarding 1974 Vehicle  Licences and Insurance.. ...  PHONE MARY  at  885-2235  Sechelt Agencies Ltd.    .  Private sale. Ix>t on Chaster  Road. 80 x 104, zoned for mobile homes. $6600? All services  Phone 886-9984. i  Good size lot, Leek Road, Roberts Creek. Enquiries please  phone 886-2152.  PROPERTY FOR SALE Cont'd  ROBERTS s CREEK  , Water side, Lower Road, between Joe" and" Bayview roads,  9 lots. Service with, city water  and* paved roads with beach  access. Ideal summer cottage  or quiet residential sites. ���  . Sign on. 'Call owner 886-7316.  or write Box 3010, Coast News.  PROPERTY WANTED  Wanted to buy before July 1.  ^Acreage with or without house.  Cash available. Write Box 593,  Gibsons, B.C.    ANNOUNCEMENTS  , For membership or explosive  requirements contact. R. Nimmo, Cemetery Road. Ph. 886-  7778. Howe Sound Farmers'  Institute. Stumping or ditching powder, dynamite, electric  or   regular   caps,   prima-cord,  Alcoholics Anonymous. Phone  885-9534, 886-9904 or 885-9327.  Gibsons meeting Monday, 8:30  p.m. in Gibsons Athletic hall.  COMPRESS�� AIR  RECHARGED  FIRE EXTINGUISHERS  Skindivers available  for salvage work   N  .   Marine Hardware  Fibreglass, paint, rope, canvas  (1971) LTD.  Gibsons. 886*9303  WALT NYGREN SALES  GET YOUR MAP  of the  SUNSHINE COAST  at the  COAST NEWS  GIBSONS  63^ each  ASK FOR FREE CATALOGUE OF REAL ESTATE  PHONE (24 hrs.)  Sechelt 885-2235  Vancouver 689-5838  AGENCIES ?'    BOX 128, SECHELT, B.C.       Multiple Listing Service       Authorized Autopian Agent Open 6  Days a Week and Providing 24 Hour Service  AUTHORIZED AGENT  INSURANCE CORPORATION  OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  QUESTIONS?  Regarding your 1974 Vehicle Licences  and Insurance  PHONE MARY AT  885-2235  M m THE AHSWHtS! Movie News       Who will use curling rink?  Thrift Shop elects officers  A movie classed general and  named Godspell will (be at Gibsons Twilight Theatre Thursday, Friday and Saturday.  Joyous is the best .way to  describe everything about God-  spell, the film version of the  _ hit Broadway musical. 'Based  on the Gospel according to St.  Matthew, the concept was begun as a Master's, thesis by  student John-Michael Tebelak.  Stephen Schwartz provided the  rock score, -which includes Day  by Day, now considered a standard. Tebelak and David  Greene, who directed the film,  adapted the material to the  screen.  Victor Garlber is a perfect  Christ figure, while co-star David Haskell doubles as both"  John the Baptist and Judas.  There is a great deal of comedy throughout, although the  climax, representing the Last  Supper, tends to create a down  'beat     atmosphere.     Godspell  . should be around for a long  time.  WANT SOMETHING DONE?  You'll find the help yon need  in the Directory  imcoast  .ESTATE? LTD.  .   Free MAP of Sechelt  Peninsula and Catalogue  of Listings  ACROSS FROM  SECHELT BUS DEPOT .  Gower Point Esplanade  Waterfront lot, % acre, level  land, nicely treed, southern  exposure. Building site clear  ed and foundation in. Vendor selling as is. Don't miss  seeing this desirable property ��� FP. $22,000. Call Dave  Roberts.  Treed- Lot  Irregular shaped large lot  with- creek. Fully serviced.  F.P. $5250. Call Stan or  Jack Anderson  GIBSONS  5 acres, (King Road. 180' x  1220'. Road at side. Heavily  treed. F.P. $21,500 Call Jack  or Stan Anderson  Vancouver Direct  Line  MU 5-5544  EWART McMYNN REALTY  Phone 886-3248 .  Box 238 Gibsons, B.C.  Notary Public  Gibsons  Ron McSavaney. 886-9656  MORTGAGES  __  MORTGAGES  Buying Homes  Building Homes  ���    Building or Buying. Rental  Property  - Recreational Property or  Cabins  Up to 95% Mortgages  For further information  Phone or Call in at:  B of M, Gibsons, 886-2216  B of Mi Sechelt, 885-2221  B of M, Madeira Park, 883-2423  1st & 2nd Mortgages  RESIDENTIAL  COMMERCIAL  RECREATIONAL  We handle all types of real estate . financing ire-tiding  builders loans. Fast appraisal service  ACADIAN MORTGAGE  CORP. LTD.:  2438 MARINE DRIVE  WEST VANCOUVER  Phone 926-3256  MOBILE HOMES  _  SUNSHINE COAST  MOBILE HOME PARK  AND" SALES  RR. 2, Gibsons      Ph. 886-9826  NOW ON DISPLAY  Ambassador * Diplomat  Statesman * Embassy  2 and 3 bedroom models  *  Double wides  Featuring:  Shag and hard twist carpeting  Deluxe colored appliances  Custom made futniture  Open for viewing at the Sunshine Coast Trailer Park R.R.  2, Gibsons, Phone 886-9826.  Dealer No. 65573.  Questions have been asked!  about who is to use the proposed curling rink  Basically, the Winter Cluib is  a nonprofit society operating  the curling rink which will be  open to everyone. Leagues will  be organized and people who  have assisted in the financing  of the rink would have first  chance at playing in the prime  time periods, usually weekday  evenings.  Hopefully, leagues will be  organized to fully utilize the  facilities. For example, those  who have leisure time during  the daytime like those on shift,  some housewives and mothers,  senior citizens and students  could use the rink in other than  prime times. Some times will  also be available for practice  and pickup games.  The club is also planning on  having the rink open for skating for a one week period prior to the curling season, also  for the two week Christmas  break and at the end' of the  curling season for as long as  interest is shown and ice maintained.  The club is still very much  in need of people to help by  purchasing share certificates  for'_ $50   with  the   application  and the balance of $150 due by  June 30. Applications are available by contacting the Coast  News, the Royal Bank, Gibsons; Dick Blakeman, Ray  Chamberlin, Ron Lacey, Terry  Connor, Dave Richardson or  any director.  Valentine Tea  Gibsons Guides, Brownies  and Rangers, together with  their local association, will be  holding a Valentines Tea and  Bake Sale at the United Church  Hall, Sat., Feb. 9 from 2 to 4  p.ni.  Tea (will be prepared and  served by the girls and there  will be a craft table as well as  the bake sale. Admission will  be 50c. It is hoped all families  and friends will attend to help  support the Guiding, movement  in this area. There is a wide  range in ages of these girls,  seven to 16, and .they need to  know that we as adults are interested' in what they are doing.  Anyone wishing information  on used Brownie or Guide uniforms may phone Mrs. Inga  Harrison at  886-2967.  The bi-monthly meeting of  St. Mary's Hospital Thrift Shop  committee was held Jan, 15  with Mrs. Rosa Swan in the  chair. Election of officers re-  . suited in Mrs, Bessie Row-  berry fining the post of chairman, Mrs. Clara Nixon vice  phairman. Mrs. Martha Reid  and Mrs. Mildred Forbes remain as secretary and treasurer, respectively, Mrs. Jean  Laird is responsible for publicity.  Roberts Creek  auxiliary meets  Charles English Ltd,  REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE  GIBSONS, B.C.      Ph. 886-2481  SUNNYCREST SHOPPING CENTRE  1    TOLL FREE 687-6445  NOTARY PUBLIC ��� APPRAISALS  REVENUE HOME: Centre of Gibsons on large view lot.  Well laid out spacious rooming house. 1 one-bedroom suite,  4 sleeping rooms, 2- housekeeping rooms, centralized kitchen facilities, TV room and guest living room, Very modern and neat, extra washroom and shower rooms.. Sale  includes furniture, dishwasher, grill, 2 stoves, fridges as  set up. Make an appointment to see this fine investment  at F.P. $65,000.  2 two unit duplexes. Excellent revenue or retire,in one"  side and let other unit to make your/ payments.! $128,000.  each- " ���    " ���' ������. . ���>*:._*.  2% acres level. Selectively cleared. Serviced1 -^ with  modern trailer home, buiuYon. sundeck and ejctra^liying  area. Very appealing. $35,000.  CHASTER ROAD: Good trailer or house lot, size 80 x 100,  has all services, cleared. FP. $6,600  SOUTH FLETCHER ROAD: 134 ft. of road frontage near  Village Hall, has small older home on. Good view property.  FP. $20,000.  A VIEW PROPERTY IN GRANTHAMS: An immaculate  2 bedroom home with unparalleled view from large picture windows and front balcony The kitchen has to be seen  to be appreciated. $22,500.  Thirty-one members of the  Roberts Creek Hospital Auxiliary were present at its annual meeting Jan. 14 in the Golf  Course clubhouse and enjoyed  a delicious lunch served by the  staff.  President Mrs. Gladys Ironside expressed appreciation for  the co-operation she had received during the past year,  thanking her executive and all  members for contributing  many hours oi volunteer work  in connection with the catering  . events, Christmas bazaar,  Thrift Shop, Gift Shop and Ex-  , tended Care. This expression of  gratitude was reiterated by  Mrs. Charlotte Raines, repre-.  senting the Hospital Society.  Following the annual reports  Past President Mrs. Neva Newman installed the incoming executive with many words of  encouragement.  The;7; following    committees  were formed: Membership, Mrs  Bessie Baba; Catering convenor, Mrs. Wilma Rodgers; Gift  Shop representative, Mrs. Louise Dorey; Thrift Shop representatives,  Mrs.  Clara Nixon  and Mrs. W. Rodgers with Mrs.  Lil Flumerfelt .alternate; pub-  : licity, Mrs M.,,Forbes, histor-  ,,-ian, Mrs G. Ironside; teahos-  "i 'tesses, -Mrs. Neva Newman and  ;| iMrs; Flo McSavaney.  ^fe-JNfext1 meeting is  called for  ^^pfday^ -'Ob. II' in St. Aidan's  YHall  Road,  Roberts  Creek  at  "1:30 p.m. .,  Don Sutherland ��� 885-9362  Ken Crosby ��� 886-2098  Jay Visser 886-2531  Mike Blaney ��� 886-7436  AUTHORIZED AGENT  CONSULT US FOR ALL   '  YOUR INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS  Phone 886-2000 ��� Gibsons, B.C.  MEMBER ��� MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE  ^Q&cc3w2  Gibsons: Upper and lower duplex in excellent location. 2  and 3 bedroom units, steady  tenants. Some terms on $35,000  Gibsons Rural: Over 10 acres  with'a viewl Southern exposure. Attractive terms on $28,000  Heroes a real cutie at a reasonable price. Cozy 4 rooms  and f ui-nished too. All electric.  W-w.,carpet. Easy terms on  $21,500.  Lge. view lot; frontage on 2  streets. Terms on $7,900.  Top rating! Local business in  prime location. Ideal man &  wife operation, . includes all  equipment, shop, 3 bdrm home  with revenue suite. 2 lots, ample off street parking. .Showing  excellent returns on investment.  Approx. Vz ac. with unobstructed view at Langdale.  Only $16,000.  LISTINGS WANTED!  Norm Peterson 886-2607  Freda DuMont 886-7105  ��_  An  afghan's   a   great   gift!  Choose 3 colors for this one.  STRIPS OF SQUARES  create diagonal interest. Crochet in afghan stitch, add contrast zig-zag borders. Use knitting . ^Worsted. Pattern 7401:  directions for afghan.  $1 each pattern ��� cash,  cheque or money order. Add  15 cents each pattern for first-  class mail and special handling'  to Alice Brooks, Coast News,  Needlecraft (Dept., 60 Progress  ave, Scarborough, Ont. M_T_P7  For All Your  Knitting Needs  The Yarn Barn  Cowrie St., Sechelt, 5-9305  Donations of clean clothing  and household articles will be  appreciated. These can be left,  at the Thrift Shop which is  open every Thursday from  10 a.m. to li pjn. and every  Saturday from 10 a.m. until  3 p.m.  Area representatives are  Port Mellon, Mrs. Gladys  Booth. Gibsons, Mrs.,Oney de  Camp and Mrs. Alameda Whiting; Roberts Creek, Mrs. Clara  Nixon and Mrs. Wilma Rodgers  Sechelt, 'Mrs. Rae Fitz-iGerald  and Mrs. Ruby Creese; Halfmoon Bay, Mrs. Jean Laird;  Pender Haiflbour, -Mrs. Jean  Whittaker and Mirs. Jean Pat-  erson.  The next meeting will be  held March 19 at the Thrift  Shop.  Coast News, Jan. 23, 1974.     5  Church meetings  The annual. meeting of, St.  John's United Church congregation will be held in: the  church at 1'0:30 a.m. Sunday  morning.  The annual congregational  meeting, of Gibsons United  Church will be held Wednesday night of next week starting  at 7 p.m. in the churdh hall.  The first meeting of the  new AOTS cluib for men will  be held in the Gibsons church  hall starting at 6:30 p.ni. Monday night, Jan. 218.  There are many new  items on the "White Elephant" shelves at Miss  Bee's. Look in when next  in Sechelt.  THERI&  4GOODT1IT1E  cominci  Choose your favourite Festival of Sports events  and plan to attend during the  IfDWEEK  January 24-30  WeekendiJanuary 25, 26, 27  PRINCE GEORGE WINTER CARNIVAL Jan.  25 - Feb. 3. BADMINTON Kelowna Jan. 27;  KitimatJan. 26, 27; Masset Jan. 26, 27; West  Vancouver Jan. 25. BASKETBALL Burnaby  Jan. 24, 30; Dawson Creek Jan. 25, 26;  ^Kelowna Jan. 28-Feb. 4;Prince George  ? Jan. 25, 26. BOWLING Burnaby.Jan: 27;���-_     .  Dawson Creek Jan. 25, 28, 29; North Delta  Jan. 27. BOXING Richmond Jan. 25, 26.  CURLING Cranbrook Jan. 25, 27; North  Vancouver Jan. 25-27; Qualicum Jan. 24-26;  Vancouver Jan. 24-26; Vernon Jan. 25, 26, 27;  Victoria Jan. 25-27, 28, 29. HOCKEY Vancouver  Jan. 25, 26, 27. JUDO Campbell River Jan. 26;  Penticton Jan. 26. MARKSMANSHIP Coquitlam  Jan. 27, SKIING Kelowna-BIg White Mountain  Jan. 26,27; Nanaimo-Green Mountain Jan. 26,  27; Revelstoke-Mt. Revelstoke Jan. 26.  SNOWMOBILE RACING Golden Jan. 26,27;  Quesnel Jan. 27. SPEED SKATING Fort St.  John Jan. 26, 27. SQUASH Victoria Jan. 25,  26, 27. STOCK CAR RACING Prince George  Jan\ 26, 27. SWIMMING Burnaby Jan. 26;  Prince George Jan. 27; Vernon Jan. 30:  VOLLEYBALL Burnaby Jan. 25,26; Vancouver  Jan. 25, 26. WRESTLING Vancouver  Jan. 25, 26.  BRITISH COUimBLd  FESfllMLOF  UlllHER  JANUARY 17 to  FEBRUARY 4,1974  Pick up a  "Schedule of Events'  at any ���       .-;  Bank of Commerce  branch or  BCAA office in  .British Columbia  Sponsored by the  Government of British Columbia  Department of Travel Industry  Hon. Ernest Hall, Minister  and the B.C. Sports Federation  -\ 6     Coast News, Jan.: 23. 1974.  *  Horoscope for the next week  "  .     By TRENT VARRO  ARIES - March 21 - April 20  Some quite unexpected and  pleasant surprises are due  shortly. This, of .course won't  apply to all Aries persons, but  the-general chart looks most  promising.  TAURUS - April 31 - May 21  There's a strong probability  that some sort of added income  is 'just around the corner'  waiting for you. Be cautious,  but keep- your cherished goal  in- sight and don't get sidetracked.  GEMINI - May 22 - June 21  This is a general 'growing up'  period for most Gemini persons  For many, it will mean that  you have accepted the res-  ponsibility770f. 7 maturity;;; For  the very young, it brings great  benefit and iwisdom.  CANCER - June 22 - July 22  Some new and interesting experiences should1 come to persons born under thi^ sign short  ly. Legal matters don't seem  too auspicious.  LEO - July 23 - August 23  Leo individuals are born actors. They , play^their part in  life just  as  diligently  as the  SHABBY  ���8in��v_f  O   ?r.  '���'   or ������'��� ^-'���:'  BATHROOM?  Replace worn Agborite  or tile with bright new  ���^^y^^..fNOWX,  y'  O^^liow ;';_.bci^t*'^'���new:������.  cabin-ts?  Evenings 886r7495  greatest Hollywood or Broadway stars; TFtight now, the astrological spotlight is shining  brightly.  VIRGO - August 24 - Sept. 22  No ihatter what your age, you  should be experiencing some  great'highlight in your career.  Younger persons may probably  end up as leaders in their chosen career. Older folks will see  the rewards of their past life  start to bear fruit.  LIBRA-4 Sept. 23 - October 23  .It's still 'work, work, work' for  Libra, but you can be sure  that work done well now, will  pay off handsomely in the future. One of the most beneficial aspects in the zodiac. is  slowly moving into position.  SCORPIO - Oct. 24 - Nov. 22  A number of 'changes' in your  business career ^mayTbe.offered  to you at any time now. These  should work out well if you  consider all aspects carefully,  arid don't rush into something  with your eyes shut.  SAGITTARIUS Nov 23, Dec 21  Signs of harmony are evident  everywhere. Again, this week,  read the Libra chart, and be  guided by it. Your rewards are  coming!  . CAPRICORN Dec. 22 - Jan. 20  Much easing of tension is  s hown in the astrological chart  for Capricorn. Things that may  ,   have  seemed  like  mountains  ���Y;_J<;tfbu_le-..Vw^  ��0 but to be only ;mmofeirritatibns  AQUARIUS - Jan. 21 - Feb. 18  The general chart for Aqiiar-  iuslbokSi better -han it has  for months. New opportunities  Y -should Ibe: opening up in all  7 aspects of your iifeY7 Y  PISCES ���:.- Feb. 19 - March 20  Much gain is indicated 7 for  Pisces involving;/partnerships.  7 Tread ;ckrefully however, as un  scrupulous persons may try to  *oash in' oh your good fortune.  Copyright 1974 by Trent Varro  All rights reserved.  -TC-  .o>_-_  .;.:". v  .<_��_ .f  t >..> v 11  SX;  scmiyy  ���V";  . ,v  \o��  _���  .A.V��  ._S7.ria\.-t\o".ovuv_'  ,_�� .ns\  .��_s_>_ -X ,fcs*# -.HOiC,i-.v  ���Vs>    &'>���  c>>-*1    '��-'..  i -w \.*i     '.'<v>' _���  Pizia will be available  -t$ft-  ���\.i> i-vr 4  3l.[, ���-.  FOR RESERVATIONS  .n?*  r��,6  iiiu  v .:'���>_ �����---i- s.   t i ._   ..irji; JylVv'J  - V  "PS^TtTS^TUx^  Larid values and speculation  Speaking on Saturday night's  . CBC-TV - provincial political  broadcast time, Don Lockstead.  discussing the land situation in  British Columbia, said an -alternative must be found to  counter the "outrageous prices  we-are now paying for land.'*  His remarks ��� in the broadcast  follow:  'In this large, diverse area,  as with most other parts of  B.C., a common concern, of  basic importance to people I  meet -is the-problem of land,  its availability or its scarcity,  and its rapidly increasing cost.  'Land . speculation' in   this  province has resulted in prices  rising in a spectacular manner  ���oVer* the past few years/ It1 is  not at all unusual to find that  land' which   sold   for   a   few\  dollars an aere, 10 or 15 years  ago-,  costs  hundreds   or   even  thousands of dollars per acre  today.  And  this trend is not  decreasing."' Investors in many  foreign  countries  are turning  with   increasing   interest   to  our province as a prime area  for land speculation.'  '    This  situation,  whilec'it-is  a   happy orie  for- those. few  holding  large tracts r of "land;  poses an ever increasing- problem to many' citizens,' ahdlmost  particularly  to young' people,  whose  hopes   and   aspirations  are so often dependant on procuring a parcel of land,- for- a  Home; a farm, or for a business venture. Y^ ..neijias-jH lasl  'It is for this reasoris-'that-'_  believe we must take steps to  make leases of Crown land  'available, and at the same  time, see to it that no'further  Crown lands are .sold-to,private persons or companies. -3  " 'If our land resources are so  obviously valuable that-wealthy syndicates abroad are com  ���petirig to buy them, then it is  dearly our responsibility to  ensure that -the birthright- of  our children, and our-child-,  ren's children, the very land  into which they were > born, is  'not .sold away from them.       ���v  'Our' government- under;r;  Premier Dave Barrett'has already taken firm steps to preserve our farm land and many  of the areas with magnificent  recreational potential'' We  have''also taken steps to preserve wilderness areas which  are so important to the many  wildlife species of which B.C.  is so justly proud,  'These steps, while essential  to future happiness and prosperity, do in the short run  tend to increase the scarcity  of land for many legitimate���*  purposes and to push "prices  even higher. This \is why I  believe that we must move  quickly to make much more  land available.  'There   is   a   tendency,   for,  some to feel a long tenm lease,  is inferior to a deed of ownerV  ship.  This  is  not  necessarily '  true.  Lease arrangements can  toe made with clauses to protect the" lease holder so that  the lease is every bit as eJEfec-  tive  in  meeting  the  holder's  needs as a deed of ownerships  " 'No   one   ever  really   owns  land in the sense of forever  anyway. Ownership is merely  the right to the unrestricted  use' of something, and this  right i9 quite adequately conferred by means of a lease.  'Now, itris obvious that private land will still toe available for sale, regardless of  whatever measures are taken  by your government to make  leases more available.  'But the important thing is  that   an   alternative  must   be  found, to the paying of'mor,e  and   more   outrageous   prices  for land, to the detriment * of .  most of us," and to the benefit  of a few speculators, many of  whom have riot even seen the  land they  -so* profitably  buy  and sell.  'I ahr not arguing for the  abolition of private property.  I am only asking for the pro-  ��� vision of an alternative, one  which, by its very existence,  will tend" to hold down land  prices.  'In    the   words   of   Henry  George,' Land is -a commodity  Kike no" other; it is in fact a  resource and not' a commodity  at all . .- .- The land of every  country   belongs  of   right   to  , all "the people of'thaf country,  iand   cannot   be   alienated   by  |one  generation.  Private ownership  of land has no more  [foundation in morality or reason than private ownership of  Lair or water.  ANOTHER ��100 WINNER"  The Lions Club 400 draw  for last week was won by Jim  Lbokhart and the draw was  made by Dorothy Cresiwell.  This draw comes from the  fund established by the club  for a driver-training car which  would be used within the  school system on the Sunshine  Coast.  HEW MANAGEMENT  HOWE SOUND WATER TAXI  New Brighton, Gambier Is.  IS NOW UNDER THE  MANAGEMENT  OF  Nr. JOHN KNIGHT  Phones: 886-9343, 886-9651  Radio-controlled  For Real Estate on the  Sunshine Coast  K. CROSBY  CHARLES ENGLISH LTD.  Sunnycrest Shopping Centre  Gibsons ��� 886-2481  VOLVO  CARS  /^Z# �� STATION WAGONS  t���wi_Af<tt) International Trucks &  Recreational Vehicles  PHONE: 278-6291  E. E. (MICKEY) COE  Ben Jacobsen Motors Lfd.  369 No. 3 Road ��� Richmond, B.C.  l>*  I "Eve the attt mte.  ���-, fence?  BE ELECTRIC hd.  )  SERVING YOU ELECTRICALLY  ��� NEWIMSTAIIATIOMS  ��� REWIRING  ���ELECTRIC HEAT  ��� DESIGN  ��� MAINTENANCE  ' PHONE  /AFTER HRS  (BOB)  AFTER HRS  (ED)  886-7605  886-7658  886-7406  (:���'�����  .._..*  1^  i. ci"._'r_,-v-/  O _.i  K.  f-j  _538lC__^cr^Powit Road  ��.-:'(��� ��� f-v? r.?^/..'. '^-Y-  LTD.  Phone 886-2000  te  AUTHORIZEI_A__tSii  "!''.!  Hi  EiOiVU-ic'J-nii.'iib.  INSURANCE CORPORATION  ���jr."* --  bos  Si'.  YOU D BE AMAZED AT WHAT $3  A MONTH CAN DO FOR YOU!  Become a ROYAL CERTIFIED SERVICE  CUSTOMER TODAY!  Think of it...  Unlimited cheque writing on your own fully  personalized cheques; overdraft protection t .  up to $300; reduced Terrnplan personal loan '  rates; all the travellers cheques and money  - ~ordersyouwant;asafetydepo8ltboxfor~~'~  the valuables you cannot afford to lose and -.<  nO more problems cashing your personal  cheques in more than 1,300 Royal Bank  branches throughout Canada's ten provinces.  Oh yes ���and lots more! Get in the savings  habit withour HPay��yourselF* cheques or ^  pay your bills (where applicable) through  our branches ��� all this plus a Chargex  card for your buying convenience and  vacation travel, benefits for  your enjoyment.  A package worth considering! Apply now  and from the moment your application is  accep_iQd, .there will be no service charges;  on your P.CA until January 16,1974.  Why not drop In and fill out an  application today. ^  COMMUNITY CORNER  Jan. 26: Job's Daughters Queen  Installation,   Masonic   Hall,   8  p.m.  Feb. 9: Guides, Brownies Valentine Tea, United Church hall,  r 2 to 4 p.m.  Gary McDevitt, Manager  ROYAL BANK  serving British Columbia  Gibsons  .-Telephone: 886-2201 Legal Notices  Im  Province of British Columbia  Department of. Lands, Forests  and11 Water Resources  Forest Service  Reforestation Division  , NOTICE TO CONO-tACTORS  Tree Planting Project (Number) 920Hl-2ll (Name) Sechelt  Creek. ���  The  British  Columbia For-  - est  Service  intends; to   let   a  planting contract in the Spring  of   1974   for   the  planting  of  57,000 trees on 113 acres, more  or less, situated on T.L. 978,  Seohelt Creek, 'between Howe  ,   Sound and Sechelt Inlet.  (1) Eligibility to Bid  Bids twill be considered only  from    persons     qualified    as  )        follows:^ ���  (a) Planting Experience  (i)   persons who have prer  viously held a Forest Service  contract for planting trees and  i have completed the contract; or  V (ii)  persons who can show  proof that they have held and  have completed a tree planting  contract with a private company; or  (iii) persons who can show  a proof of completion of a tree  planting contractor's course; or  (iv) persons who have been  employed as tree planters and .  can produce references as to  their satisfactory performance.  (ib) Citizenship  (i) persons who are Canadian citizens; or  (ii) persons who are Landed  Immigrants; or  (iii), persons  who  hold an  Employment  Visa,   issued  by  Canada   Manpower   or   Cana- -  dian Immigration,  (c)    Viewing    Planting , Site  Prior to Bidding  As indicated' below this may.  1    not  be required for bidder's  eligibility  Prior Viewing.     Optional  (2) Viewing Planting Site  1   In   order   that   prospective  bidders may have, an oppor- .  tunity   to  view  the  planting  site and acquaint  themselves.,  with conditions on the ground,  the Forest Ranger at n/a will  conduct  interested parties , to  the area.  Transportation, if provided by .  the Forest Service, will be at  the prospective bidder's risk.  Where a conducted! trip is  not indicated above or prospective bidders are not able  to be present for the conducted  trip, the Forest Ranger at  Sechelt will supply directions  to enable prospective bidders  to visit the area.  Where viewing the planting  site is optional to establish  bidding eligibility ,1 (c) above,  prospective bidders are nevertheless strongly, advised to examine the contract area before  submitting a bid.  (3) Tendering  Sealed tenders for ihis contract will be received by the  Chief Forester up to 4 p.m.  February 20, 1974 except that  the Chief Forester may extend  such time in his discretion..  Tenders must be 'submitted  in the envelope marked 'Tendr  er for Tree Planting'.  Tenders will not be considered, unless made out on the  ��� tender form supplied, properly  signed and witnessed, and accompanied by a bid deposit in  the form of a certified cheque  or money order in the sum of  fifty ($50.00) dollars, payable  to. the Minister of Finance. The  deposit.will be returned to unsuccessful tenderers.    ,  Failure of the successful tenderer to- execute the contract  and' to submit, the required security "deposit as specified in  (4) (Awarding Contract) below, may render the contract  void and the fifty ($50.00) dollars deposit subject to forfeiture to the.Crown.  (4) Awarding Contract  The   lowest   or' any   tender  will not necessarily be accepted, and the Forest Service re-  " serves ' the right to limit the  ��� number of contracts held by  any party at any one time.  Prospective bidders are advised that this contract will be  awarded'only on proof that the  successful bidder has arranged  with the Workmen's Compensation Board for the necessary  coverage of all employees and/  or partners who will be work-  '' ing on the contract. Current  Workmen's Compen sation  Board assessment" rate is 8%  of the monthly Ypayroll and  there is a minimum -'coverage.  period of three months.  The successful 'bidder, upon  notification of the contract award by the Chief Forester, will  be required to submit a security deposit to the Chief Forester within five (5) days of notification, and at the same time  execute   a   contract   for   the  - planting in the form submitted  by the Chief Forester. The security deposit will be in the  total amotmt of. five (5) percent of the total bid price. The  bid deposit ($50.00) will be  considered part of the security  deposit, and the balance up to  the five percent of total bid  price must be remitted as noted above by Money Order or  Certified   Cheque   payable   to  . the Minister of Finance. In the  event the successful bidder  fails to remit the security deposit and fails to execute the  contract within the time limit  specified in the award letter,  the Chief Forester may cancel  the contract, and the fifty  ($50^.00) dollar bid deposit may  be forfeited-to the Crown.  (5) Planting Steele and Equipment  Planting stock requirea for  the contract will be supplied  free of charge by the Forest  Service f .o.b. at a place designated by the Forest Service^  The contractor shall provide  and maintain all equipment,  and personnel, necessary to  complete the - contract in the  time specified', except as specified below.  (6) Period of Contract  The contractor shall have 12  days to complete the planting  contract, after date of commencement.  (7) Payments  Payments    for    completed  work will <be made as outlined  on Schedule "A" (clause 6).  Note that there is a ten (10)  percent holdback provision on  all payments.  -  Particulars may be obtained  after February 1, 1974, from,  the following:  -  Forest Ranger, Sechelt, B.C.  or  District  Forester,  355  Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.  or  Forester i/c Reforestation  Division, BC. Forest Service,  Parliament Buildings, Victoria,  British Columbia.  Province of British Columbia  Department of Lands, Forests  and, Water Resources  Forest Service  N   Reforestation Division  NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS  Tree Planting Project (Numr  :ber) 92G12-22 (Name) Thorn-  hill Creek.     \ ,  The British Columbia Forest Service iitfends to let a  planting contract in the Spring  of 1974 for the planting of  -86,000-trees on 153 acres, more  or less,-situated on TXr.'s 55 &  56, Thornhill Creek, approx.  13 miles North East of Sechelt.  (1) Eligibility to Bid  Bids will be considered only  from persons qualified, as  follows:.  (a) Planting Experience  * (i) persons who have previously held a Forest Service  contract for planting trees and  have completed the contract or  (ii)' persons who can show  proof, that they have held and  have completed the contract; or  contract with a private company; Or  (iii) persons who can show  proof of completion of a tree  planting contractor's course; or  (iv) persons who have been  employed as tree planters and  can produce references as to  their, satisfactory performance,  (lb) Citizenship  (i)  persons who are. Canadian citizens; or  (ii) persons who are Landed  Immiglrants; or  (iii) persons who hold an  -Employment Visa, issued by  Canada Manpower or Canadian Immigration,  (c) Viewing Planting Site  Prior to Bidding  As indicated below this may  not be required for bidder's  eligibility  Prior Viewing.     Optional  (2) Viewing Planting Site  In order that prospective  bidders may have an opportunity to7 view the planting  site and acquaint themselves  with conditions on the ground,  the1 Forest Ranger at n/a will  conduct interested parties to  the area.  Transportation, if provided by  the Forest Service,.will be at  the prospective  bidder's risk.  'Where.a conducted! trip is  not indicated above or prospective bidders are not able  to be present for the conducted  trip, the Forest Ranger at  Sechelt will" supply directiops  to enable prospective bidders  to visit the area. 7  WBiere viewing the planting  site is optional to establish  bidding eligibility _ (c) above,  prospective bidders are nevertheless strongly advised to examine the contract area before  submitting a bid.  (3) Tendering .  Sealed tenders for this contract will .tee received by the  .Chief  Forester  up   to  4  p.m.  "February 20, '1974 except that  uthe Chief Forester may extend  such time in his discretion.  Tenders must.be submitted  in the envelope marked 'Tender for Tree Planting^  Tenders will not be considered unless made out on the  tender form supplied, properly  signed and witnessed, and! accompanied by a bid deposit in  the form of a certified cheque  or money order in the sum,of  fifty ($5000) dollars, payable  to the Minister of Finance. The  deposit will be returned to unsuccessful tenderers.  Failure of the successful tenderer to execute the contract  and to submit the required security deposit as specified in  (4) (Awarding Contract), below,* may render the contract  void and the fifty ($50.00) dollars deposit subject to forfeiture to the Croiwn.  (4) Awarding Contract  The lowest or any tender  will not^ necessarily be accepted, and the Forest Service reserves the right to limit the  number of contracts held by  any party at any one time.  Prospective bidders are advised that this contract will be  awarded only on proof that the  successful bidder has arranged  with the Workmen's Compensation Board for the necessary  coverage of all employees and/  or partners who will be working on the contract. Current  Workmen's Compen sation  Board assessment rate is 8%  of the monthly payroll and  there is a minimum coverage  period of three months. .  The successful bidder, upon  notification of the contract award by the Chief Forester, will^  be required to submit a ajecur- ���-  ity deposit to the Chief Forester within five (5) days of no- .  tification, and at the same time  execute   a   contract   for   the  planting in the form (Submitted  by the Chief Forester. The security deposit will be in the  total amount of five (5) percent of the total bid price. The'  bid  deposit   ($50.00)   will   be  considered part of the security  deposit, and the balance up to ���  the five .percent of total bid! ;  price must be remitted as not- (?  ed above by Money Order ��recertified  Cheque   payable   to  the Minister of Finance. In the  event    the   successful   .bidder  fails to remit the security deposit and fails to execute the  contract within the time limit  specified in the award letter,  the" Chief Forester may cancel <  the   contract,   and   the   fifty  ($50.00) dollar bid deposit may ���  be. forfeited to the Crown.  (5) Planting Stock and Equipment  Planting 'stock required for  the contract will be supplied'  free of ,charge by the Forest  Service f.o.b. at a place designated by the Forest Service.  The, contractor" shall provide  and maintain all equipment,  and personnel necessary to  complete the contract in the  time specified, except as specified below.  (6) Period of Contract *  ��� The contractor shall have 31  vdays to complete the planting  contract, after date of commencement.  (7) Payments  Payments    for    completed  work will be made as outlined  on Schedule "A" (clause 6).  Note that there is a ten (10)  percent holdback provision on  all payments.  Particulars may be obtained  after February ly 1974, from  the following:  Forest Ranger, Lund  or  ��� District  Forester,   355  Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.  or  Forester i/c Reforestation  Division, BJC. Forest Service,  Parliament Buildings, Victoria,  British Columbia.  Province of British Columbia  Department of Lands, Forests  and' Water Resources  Forest Service  Reforestation Division  NOTICE TO CONjTRACTORS  Tree Planting Project (Number) 92K7-7 (Name) Johnson  Bay.  The British Columbia Forest Service intends to let a  planting contract in the Spring  of 1974 for the planting of  136,000 trees on 295 acres, more  or less, situated on T.L.'s 4991,  4992, 5612 West side of the "entrance to Toba Inlet.  (1) Eligibility to Bid  Bids will  be considered only  from    persons     qualified    as  follows:  (a) Planting Experience  (i) persons who have previously held a Forest Service  contract for planting trees and  have completed the contract; or  (ii) persons who can show  proof that they have held and  have completed a tree planting  contract with a private company; or  (iii) persons who can show  proof of completion of a tree  planting contractor's course: or  (iv) persons who have been  employed as tree planters and  can produce references as to  their satisfactory performance.  Ob) Citizenship  (i) persons who are Canadian citizens; or  (ii) persons who are Landed  Immigrants; or  (iii)   persons  who  hold  an  Employment. Visa,  issued  by  Canada   Manpower   or   Canadian Immigration,  (c)    Viewing    Planting    Site  Prior to Bidding  As indicated below this may  not  be  required  for  bidder's  eligibility  Prior Viewing.     Optional  (2) Viewing Planting Site  In order that prospective  bidders may have an opportunity to view the planting  site and acquaint themselves  with conditions on the ground,  the Forest Ranger at n/a will  conduct interested parties to  the area.  Transportation, if provided by  the Forest Service, will be at  the prospective bidder's risk.  Where a conducted! trip is  not  indicated above  or  prospective bidders are not able  _ to Ibe present for the conducted  *' trip,   the   Forest   Ranger   at  ���"' Lund   will   supply   directions  to enable prospective bidders  to visit the area.  Wlhere viewing the planting  site is optional to establish  bidding eligibility 1 (c) above,  prospective bidders are nevertheless strongly advised to ex-  , amine the contract area before  submitting a bid.  (3) Tendering  Sealed tenders for this contract will be received,by the  ' Chief  Forester  up   to  4 p.m.  r February 20. 1974 except that  the Chief Forester may extend  such time in his discretion.  Tenders must be submitted  in the envelope marked 'Tender for Tree Planting'.  Tenders will not be considered unless made out on the  tender form supplied, properly  signed and witnessed, and accompanied by a bid deposit in  the form of a certified cheque  or money order in, the sum of  fifty ($50.00) dollars, payable  to the Minister of Finance. The  deposit will be returned to unsuccessful tenderers.  Failure of the "successful tenderer to execute the contract  and to submit the required security deposit as specified in  (4) (Awarding Contract) below, may render the contract  void and the fifty ($50.00) dollars deposit subject to forfeiture to the Crown.  (4) Awarding Contract  The lowest or any tender  will not necessarily be accepted, and the Forest Service reserves the right to limit the  number of contracts held by  any party at any one time.  Prospective bidders are advised' that this contract will be  awarded only on proof that the  successful bidder has arranged  with the Workmen's Compensation Board for the necessary  coverage Of all employees iand/  or partners who will be working on the contract. Current  Workmen's Compen sation  Board assessment rate is 8%  of the monthly payroll and  there is a minimum coverage  period of three months.  The successful bidder, upon  notification of the contract award by the Chief Forester, will  be required to submit a secur  ity deposit to the Chief Forester within five (5) days of notification, and at the same time  execute a contract for the  planting in the form submitted  by the Chief Forester. The security . deposit will be in the  total-amount of five (5) percent of the total bid price. The  bid deposit ($50.00) will be  considered part of the security  deposit, and the balance up to  the five percent' of total bid!  price must be remitted as noted above by Money Order or  Certified Cheque payable to  the Minister of Finance. In the  event the successful bidder  fails to remit the security deposit and- fails to execute the  contract within the time limit  . specified in the award letter,  the Chief Forester may cancel  the contract, and the fifty  ($50.00) dollar bid deposit may  be forfeited to the Crown.  (5) Planting Stock and Equipment  Planting stock required for  the contract will be supplied  free of charge by the Forest  Service f.o.b. at a place designated by the Forest Service.  The contractor shall provide  and maintain all equipment,  and personnel necessary to  complete the contract in the  time specified, except as specified below.' ^  (6) Period of Contract  The contractor shall have 18  days to complete the planting  contract, after date of commencement.  (7) Payments  Payments for completed  work will be made as outlined!  on Schedule "A" (clause 6).  Note that there is a ten (10)  percent holdback provision on  all nayments. \  Particulars may be obtained  after February 1, 1974^ from  the following:  Forest Ranger, Sechelt, B.C.  or  District  Forester,  355  Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.  or  Forester i/c Reforestation  Division, B.C. Forest Service,  Parliament Buildings,. Victoria,  British Columbia.  Coast News, Jan. 23, 1974.  Province of British Columbia  Department of Lands, Forests  and Water Resources  Forest Service  Reforestation Division  NOTICE TO CONTTRACTORS  .Tree Planting Project (Number) 92J4-2 (Name) Skwawka  River.  The  British  Columbia  Forest Service  intends  to  let  a  planting contract in the Spring.  . of  1974  for   the planting  of  152,000 trees on 254 acres, more  or less, situated on T.L.'s 1-00  & 10216, Hunaechin Creek; &  T.L.   1417Q,   Skwawka   River,  head of Jervis Inlet.  (1) Eligibility to Bid   ,  Bids will  be considered only  from    persons     qualified    as  follows:  (a) Planting Experience  (i) persons who have previously held a Forest Service  contract for planting trees and  have completed the contract; or  (ii) persons who can show  proof that they have held and  have completed a tree planting  contract with a private company; or  (iii) persons who can show  proof of completion of a tree  planting contractor's course; or  (iv) persons who have been  employed as tree planters and  can produce references as to  their satisfactory performance.  Ob) Citizenship  (i)  persons who are Canadian citizens; or  (ii) persons who are Landed  Immigrants; or  (iii) persons who hold an  Employment Visa, issued by  Canada Manpower or Canadian Immigration,  (c) Viewing Planting Site  Prior to Bidding  As indicated below this may  not be required for bidder's  eligibility  Prior Viewing.     Optional  (2) Viewing Planting Site  In order that prospective  bidders may have an opppir-  tunity   to   view   the   planting  not indicated above or prospective bidders are not able  to be present for the conducted  trip, the Forest Ranger at  Madeira Park will supply directions to enable prospective  bidders to visit the area."  Where viewing the planting  site is : optional to establish  bidding eligibility .1 (c) above,  prospective bidders are nevertheless strongly advised to examine the contract area before  submitting a bid.   ,  <3) Tendering  Sealed tenders for this contract will be received by the  Chief Forester up to 4 p.m.  February 20, 1974 except that  the Chief Forester may extend  such time in his discretion.  Tenders /must be submitted  in the envelope marked 'Tender for Tree Planting'.  Tenders will not be considered unless' made out on the  tender form.supplied, properly  signed and witnessed, and! accompanied by a bid deposit in  the form of a certified cheque.  or money order in the sum .of  fifty ($50.00) dollars, payable  ^0 the Minister of Finance. The  . deposit will be returned tp unsuccessful tenderers.  Failure of. the successful ten-  . derer to execute the contract  and to submit the required security deposit as specified' in  (_) (Awarding Contract) below, may render the contract  void and the fifty ($50.00) dollars deposit subject to forfeiture to the Crown.  (4) Awarding Contract  The lowest or any tender  will not necessarily be accepted, and the Forest Service reserves the right to limit the  number of contracts held by  any party at any one time.  I^ospective bidders are advised that, this contract will be  awarded only on proof that tjie  successful bidder has arranged  with the Workmen's Compensation. Board for the necessary  coverage of all employees and/  or partners who will bo working on the contract. Current  Workmen's Compen sation. '  Board assessment rate is 8%  of the monthly payroll, and  there is a minixaum coverage  period of three nionths.'  The successful bidder, upon  notification of the contract award by the Chief Forester, will  be required to submit a security deposit to the Chief Forester within five (5) days of notification, and at the same time  execute   a   contract   for   the  planting in the form submitted1  by the Chief Forester. The security deposit will be in the  total amount of five (5). percent of the total bid price. The  bid  deposit   ($50.00)   will  be  considered part of the security. '  deposit, and the balance up to  the five percent of total bid  price must be remitted as noted above by Money Order; or  Certified  Cheque   payable  to  the Minister of Finance. In the  event   the   successful   bidder  fails to remit the security deposit and fails to execute the  contract within the time limit  specified in the award letter,  the Chief Forester may cancel  the   contract,   and   the   fifty  ($50.00) dollar bid deposit may  be forfeited to the Crown.  (5) Planting Stock and Equipment  Planting stock required for  the codtract will be supplied  free, of charge ^by the Forest -*  Service f.o.b. at'a place designated by the Forest Service.  The contractor shall provide  and maintain all equipment,  and personnel necessary to  complete the. contract 'in the  time specified, except as specified below.  site and acquaint themselves  with conditions on the ground,  the Forest Ranger at n/a will  conduct interested parties to  the area.  Transportation, if provided by  the Forest Service, will be at  the prospective bidder's risk.  Where a conducted trip  is British Columbia  (6) Period of Contract  The contractor shall have 25  days to complete the planting  contract, after date of commencement.  (7) Payments  Payments for completed  work will 'be made as outlined!  on,Schedule "A" (clause 6).  Note that there is a ten (10)  percent hold/back provision on  all payments.  Particulars may be obtained  after February 1, 1974, from  the following:  Forest Ranger, Madeira Park  or  District   Forester,   355   Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.  or  Forester i/c Reforestation  Division, B.C. Forest Service,  Parliament Buildings, Victoria, L E GAL  8     Coast News, Jan. 23, 1974.        of   the   monthly   payroll   and  ~ there is a minimum coverage  period of three months.  The successful bidder, upon  notification of the'contract award by the Chief Forester, will  be required to submit a security deposit to the Chief Forester within five (5) days of notification, and at the same time  execute a contract for the  planting in the form submitted  by the Chief Forester. The security deposit will be in the  total amount of five (5) percent of the total bid. price. The  bid deposit ($50.00) will be  considered part of the security  deposit, and the balance up to  the five percent of total bi_  price must be remitted as noted above by Money Order or  Certified Cheque payable to  the Minister of Finance. In the  event the successful bidder  fails to remit the security deposit and fails to execute the  contract within the time limit  specified! in the award letter,  the Chief Forester *nay cancel  the contract, and the fifty'  ($50.00) dollar bid deposit may  be forfeited to the Crown.  (5) Planting Stock and Equipment  Planting stock required for  the contract will be supplied  free of charge by the Forest  Service f.o.b. at a place designated by the . Forest Service.  The contractor shall provide  and maintain all equipment,  and personnel. necessary to  complete the contract in the  time specified, except as specified below. '���...  (6) Period of Contract  The contractor .fliall have 50  days to complete the planting  contract/after date of commencement. 4  (7) Payments  i Payments    for    completed  work will be made as outlined  on Schedule "A" (clause 6).  Note that there is a ten (10)  percent holdback provision on  all payments.  Particulars may be obtained  after February 1, 1974, from  the following:  Forest Ranger, P.O. Box 69,  Sechelt, B.CY  . or ...,.���..  District   Forester,   355  Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.  .- . or        /������. ��������������� ���  Forester i/c Reforestation  Division, B.C. Forest Service,  Parliament Buildings, Victoria,  British Columbia.  Province of British Columbia  Department of Lands, Forests  and Water Resources  Forest Service  Reforestation Division  NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS  Tree Planting Project (Number)    92G13-9   (Name)   Earle  The British Columbia Forest Service intends to let a  . planting contract in the Spring  of 1974 for the planting of  371,000 trees on 729 acres, more  or less, situated on TJL.'s 11933,  11934, headwaters of Earle  Creekv 5 miles East of Skook-  umchuck Narrows, Sechelt Inlet.  (1) Eligibility to Bid  Bids 'Will be considered only  from    persons     qualified    as  follows:  (a) Planting Experience  (i)  persons who have previously held a Forest Service  contract for planting trees and  have completed the contract; or  (ii) persons who can show  proof that they have held and  have completed a tree planting  contract with a private company; or  (iii) persons who can show  proof of completion of a tree  planting contractor's course; or  (iv) persons who have been  employed as tree planters and  can. produce references as to  their satisfactory performarfce.  (b) Citizenship  (i)  persons who are Canadian citizens; or  (ii) persons who are Landed  Immigrants; or  (iii) persons who hold an  Employment Visa, issued by  ' Canada Manpower or Canadian Immigration.  (c) Viewing    Planting    Site  Prior to Bidding  As ind_c_ted below this may  hot be required for bidder's  eligibility     . ^.      ,  Prior Viewing.     Optional  (2) viewing PlantingSite   .  In order that prospective  bidders may have an opportunity to view the planting  site and acquaint themselves  with conditions on the ground,  the Forest Ranger at n/a wdl  conduct interested parb.es to  the area. . ���      _.- .-   w.  Transportation, if provided by  the Forest Service, will be at  the prospective bidder's risk.  Where a conducted! trip is  not indicated above or prospective bidders are not able  to be present for the conducted  trip, the Forest Ranger at  Sechelt will supply directions  to enable prospective bidders  to visit the area.  Where viewing the planting  site is optional to establish  bidding eligibility ,1 (c) above,  prospective bidders are nevertheless strongly advised to exT  amine the contract area before  submitting a bid.  (3) Tendering  Sealed tenders for this contract will be received by the  Chief Forester up to 4 p.m.  February 20, 1974 except that  the Chief Forester may extend  such time in his discretion.  7 Tenders must be submitted  in the envelope marked Tender for Tree Planting'.  Tenders will not be consid;-  ered unless made out on th_  tender form supplied, properly  signed and witnessed, and! accompanied by a bid deposit in  the form of a certified cheque  or money order in the sum of  fifty ,($50.00) dollars, payable  'to the Mimster of Finance. The  deposit will fee returned to unsuccessful tenderers.  Failure of the successful tenderer to execute the contract  and to submit the required security deposit as specified- in  (4) (Awarding Contract) below, may render the contract  void and the fifty ($60.00) dollars deposit sulbject to. forfeiture to the Crown.  (4) Awarding Contract  The lowest or any tender  will not necessarily be accepted, and the Forest Service reserves the right to limit the  number of contracts held by  any party at any one time.  Prospective bidders are advised that this contract will be  awarded only on proof that the  successful bidder has arranged  with the Workmen's Compensation Board for the necessary  coverage of all employees and/  or partners who will be working on the contract. Current  Workmen's Compen sation  Board assessment rate is 8%  fish in the more northern parts  of the range have gone outside and these still in the Gulf  of Georgia during the winter  are resident fish.  The Qualicum fish are not  quite so ��� far north, they are  also predominantly on the  eastern side of the Gulf near  Powell River. It will be very  interesting, in future months,  to see if these remain where  they are, disappear, or head  south on the, mainland side.  American chinook still show  in good numbers in the south  gulf with Canadian hatcheries  contributing to the middle and1  north gulf.  Unlike chinook, coho salmon  spread both north and south  Qualicum cohos were recovered as far south as Saanich  Inlet.   Cohos   from   Rosewall  Creek, now showing in significant numbers were all found  close to Rosewall Creek. These  fish ai*e generally smaller  ithan Qualicum coho and this  may account for their less extensive movement. The Cap-  ; llano coho were predominantly in the southern gulf,  filling in where the Qualicum  coho began to drop off. The  American coho recovered -were  caught in Saanich Inlet with  two caught in Juan de Fuca  Straits near Beechey Head.  During October and November the Saanich Inlet, and Victoria areas enjoyed a fruitful  harvest of salmon as did Stuart  Channel and the Qualicum  areas. Winter fishermen should  continue to check for missing  adipose fins during this winter fishery.  N  "It says yon are gentle, charming and sweet  natnred. It has your weight wrong, too."  Tags reveal fish movements  Northern Timber  There are approximately  77,000 square miles of produc?  tive forest in the Yukon and  Northwest Territories which  could provide ari estimated 23  billion cubic feet of commercial timber. About 25 million  board feet was logged in the  two. Territories last year.  The federal Fisheries department Georgia Strait Head  Recovery program reports the  Octotoer-Novemiber winners of  the Salmon $100 bonus draw  were Mrs. Pearl Pellow and  Mr. Henry White, both of  Victoria. Mrs. Pellow caught  a 2 year old coho salmon released by the. Fisheries Research Board in Rosewall  Creek. This fish was caught  near Bowser on Vancouver  Island.  Mr. White caught a 2-year  old chinook salmon released  at the Green River Hatchery  in Washington State. This fish  was caught at Sheppards Point  in Saanich Inlet on Vancouver  Island.  During winter months the  total numbers of heads turned  in to depots has decreased, but  it is gratifying to see interest,  effort and numbers of fish still  great enough to return 177  salmon heads. The returns  brought in 59 coho, 117 chinook  andi 1 masu salmon. The masu  salmon is a western Pacific  species, also called cherry salmon, which doesn't occur naturally on the North American  side. Washington State trans  planted some of these fish  and reared them at their Min-  ter Creek Hatchery.  Of the  59 coho,  52   (88%)  had tags and of the 117 chinook, 95  (81%) had tags. The  . one,masu salmon also has a  tag. Of the 95 chinook caught,  25   were   of   Canadian   origin  (26%)   and   of   the   52   coho  caught, 43 were of Canadian  origin (83%). The overall recovery rate of 84%  is better  than last month  (80%). This  is most likely due to the grow-  - ing awareness of. the  public  to   the   program  and  careful  checking for  missing adipose  fins.  Since  the  program  began in May, we have received  1036  heads,   737   (71%)   with  . wire tags.  The northward movement of  . chinook   salmon   from . their  } stream of origin still seems to  I be the prevalent' pattern but,  'it is less obvious than before,  and in the/case of the Punt-  ledge super-smolts the pattern  is reversed, with the fish now  caught  south  of  the  release  site.   This   general   reduction  of numbers of fish in the extreme northern parts of their  previous range may be a phenomenon   of   residency;   those  SENIOR CITIZENS  KIWANIS VILLAGE  HAS TWO DOUBLE APARTMENTS  AVAILABLE FOR RENT  Call BILL WRIGHT, 886-7735, Abbs Road  CROSSWORD PUZZli  :      ACROSS  ! 1. Zodiacal  symbol  I 6. "Portnoy's .  Complaint"  author  20. Transferable  picture  21. Great Lake  22. With 37  Across,   , -,  Moore's  Christmas  classic  (3 wds.)  24. Fencing foil  25. Cried, as  cats do  29. Vestige  23. "Twelfth  Night"  countess "  25. Sine qua  3. Here (Fir.)  4. Placed  gradually  (2 wds.)  5. Lingerie  item .  6. Allude  7. Boston  Bruins'  Bobby  8. Senor-  "uncle"  9. Do a  sewing job  13. Vietnamese  holiday  15. A Charlton  Heston        .  portrayal  16 Choice  17. Enticed  18. Dec.  24, for one  20.Point Today's Answer  off  view  21. Comedian  Myron  BEEBS   BEHB  EH-BEDC.   BE3HEB  EEHEffiEDGSSIE-  [HEEE  aG-BEll   SBEEE  BDE  22.Vesti-  - bule  24. Belgian  commune  27. Out  calling  (2  wds.)  28.���  de    ,.���:.  France  .32. Slur over  33. Fabled bird  .36. Burn  37. Pronoun  BEHEI!   HEfZZBC-l  BBHB  nESEnD_._i__H ������)  BUSH   HEIESH  ���DUES  EBnsn  38. Weight  for  wool  39.Yuiet.de  , drink  (colloq.)  40. Carry  41. Biblical  -   king  42. Salt    .-  (Fr.)  26. Christmas  cafol  (2 wds.)  29. French,  season  30. Shout  .31. Passover  feast  34. Quite small  (colloq.)  35.���  Lomond  37. See 12  Across  (2 wds.)  43. Engine  covering  44. Entertain  45.Brink  46. Splendid  DOWN  l.Cityin  Oklahoma  2. Religious  title (abbr.)  fire Alarm Procedure  ALSO INHAUTOR  To place a Call at Gibsons OR Area covered by Hie  GflKons Fire Protection District:  1. Immediately dial phone number 886-2345  2. Wait for someone to answer  3. Give them (A) Location of Fire & Address  (B) Name of Resident Involved  (0 Extent of Involvement  (D) Your Name  4. Ensure everyone is out of the building no  matter how small the fire is.  5. Dispatch someone or yourself to nearest  roadway to direct Firemen or R.C.M.P.  Thousands of copies have been produced for lawyers  real estate companies and others on this Coast News XEROX  Yours can also be copied at rates varying  according to the quantity required  Phone 886-2622 for further information SUNSHINE   COAST   DIRECTORY  ACCOUNTANTS  W. PHILIP GORDON  , CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT  Room 208, Harris Block  Gibsons  Ph. Bus. 886-2714; Res. 886-7567  AUTOMOTIVE  SERVICES  NEED TIRES?  Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  at the S-BENDS on  Highway 101 >  Phone 886-270O  BANKS  ROYAL BANK OF CANADA  GIBSONS Branch-Ph. 886-2201  SECHELT Branch-Ph. 885-2201  Gibsons: Mon. - Thurs.  10 a.m. - 3 p.m.  Fri, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.  Alternate Tue3. 10 - 3; 4 - 5.30  Sechelt: Tues. - Thurs.  10 a.m. - 3 p.m.  Fri, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.  Sat., 10 ajn. - 3 p.m  BUILDING SUPPLIES  GIBSONS BUILDING SUPPUES  (1971) LTD.  LUMBER PLYWOOD  CONCRETE PRODUCTS  READY MIX CONCRETE  Phone 886-2642  "A complete building service"  TWIN CJSEK LUMBER  & BUILDING SUMS lid.  Everything for your building  need-  Free Estimates  Gibsons Sechelt  886-2291-2 885-2288-9  I A H SWAMS0N LTD.  READY-MIX CONCRETE  Sand and Gravel  BACKHOES  , Ditching - Excavations    ~  Porpoise Bay Road  385-9666, Box 172, Sechelt, B.C.  BULLDOZING, BACKHOE  CUSTOM BACKHOE WORK  SEPTIC TANKS INSTALLED  Government Approved  Free Estimates  Excavations ��� Drainage  .   Waterlines, etc.  Ph. 886-9579, Roberts Creek  SICOTTE BULLDOZING LTD.  *', LAND CLEARING  * ROAD BUILDING  IPhone 886-2357  BOUTIN BULLDOZING  Clearing ��� Landscaping  Backhoe Work  Phone 886-9824  R.R. 2 .Gibsons  CABINET MAKING  OCEANSIDE FUHKnURE  & CANff. SHOP  Hardwood Specialists  Custom .Designed Furniture  Kitchen and Qathroom  Cabinetry  Remodelling  ,  R. BERKIN  Beach Ave., Roberts Creek  Phone 886-2551  CLEANERS  We Clean Carpets,  Chesterfields, etc.  No Soap Buildup .  .Stay Clean Longer  FREE ESO-MATES  TOM SINCLAIR*  Box. 294, Sechelt  7 _>hone: 885^9327  12 - 1 or after 5 p.m.  CONSTRUCTION  CEMENT DRIVEWAYS      ;  Free estimates  Bank financing available  GIBSONS BUILDING SUPPLIES  (1971) LTD.  8: a.m. to 5: p.m. Mon to Sat  Phone 886-2642.  STUCCO  NEW OR OLD HOUSES  y MASONRY  GAMBIER CONSTRUCTION  FRANK FRITSCH  886-9505, Box 522, Gibsons  CONSTRUCTION (Cont'd)  SOUND CONST.  Coastal and Island  Contracting for  Seawalls, Boathouses, etc.  G. WaUinder      . 886 9307  MORRIE'S CONCRETE  Driveways - Walks  Placing & Finishing  Fjoors - Patios - Stairs  Box 884, Sechelt, Ph, 885-9413  FREE ESTIMATES  TURBINE; BROS.  CEMENT   CONTRACTOR  Foundations  Floors,  Driveways,  Sidewalks,   Patios.  R.R1 1, Gibsons'  Phone 886-9977 or 886-7022  STAN HILSTAD ROOFING  DUROID,  SHAKES  OR REROOFING  R.R.   1, Port Mellon Highway  Gibsons   , Phone 886-2923  ROBERTS CRJH DRY WALL  Taping.and Filling by hand  _���'   and Machine  Spraytex Sparkle Ceilings   .  Free Estimates at any time  GOOD SERVICE  Phone'88���P71��3  CHAIN  SAWS  SECHET CHAIN SAW CENTRE  LTD.  SALES & SERVICE    '  Chain Saws '��� Outboards  Boats ��� Marine Supplies  Sechelt 885-9626  DRY CLEANERS  MOVING & STORAGE  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER Lfd.  Household Moving & Storage  Complete Packing  Packing Materials for Sale  Member Allied Van Lines  Phone 886-2664 - RR. 1, Gibsons  NURSERY '  1  HR.  COIN-OP DRYCUANERS  SAVES TIME & MONEY  Sunnycrest Plaza  next to Royal Bank  886-2231  MACKS NURSRY  Sunshine Coast Highway  Shrubs,   Fruit   Trees,   Plants  Landscaping,    Pruning   Trees  Peat Moss & Fertilizer  licensed for Pesticide Spraying  Phone 886-2684  DISPOSAL SERVICES  OPTOMETRIST  REFRIGERATION (Cont'd)  ..  JOHN HARRISON  REFRIGERATION  and Appliance Servicing  also used appliances for sale  PRATT ROAD, GIBSONS   Phone 886-9959   RETAIL STQRES  C       &       S  HARDWARE  A.  APPLIANCES  Sechelt ��� 885-9713  EATONS BUY-LHE  CALL 886-7515  Gibsons B.C.  T.V. & RADIO  NEVENS'TV  Service Depot for  PHILIPS ��� ZENITH  R.C.A. - ADMIRAL  FLEETWOOD  DEALER  Phone 886-2280  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES LTD.  SP-fUSS^"1 t�� 6ie _ Cove  886-2938 ,   885-9973  . Call usj for your disposal needs  Vfhen renovating  . or spring cleaningr  Containers available  ELECTRIANS  BLAHt ELECTRICAL  Contracting & Engineering  Residential - Commercial  Wiring  Phone 886-7816  OPTOMETRIST  FRANK E. DECKER  BAL BLOCK ��� GIBSONS  _ _     WEDNESDAY .     J  FOR APPOINTMENTS  886-2248  SECHELT MONDAYS  Phone 885-9712  ������'-*  SUNSHINE COAST TV  SALES & SERVICE LTD  ADMIRAL - ELECTROHOME  and ZENITH DEALERS  Gordon (Oliver - E<_. Nicholson  "IN THE HEART OF  DOWNTOWN SECHELT."  Box 799,  Sechelt  Phone  885-9816  CLOSED ON MONDAYS  MISS BEE'S  CARD AND GIFT SHOP  Wharf Road, Sechelt   ^  P.O. Box  213 Ph.  885-9066  HCoutts-Hallmark Cards' & -  wrappings; Gifts, Picture  Puzzles; English bone china  cups, saucers, etc.  Boutique   Items  Local Artists' Paintings  TOWING  SECHELT TOWING & SALYA6E  JL_D.  {JSCOWS   ���  LOGS  Heavy Equipment Moving  & Log Towing  Phone 885-9425  TRAILER  PARK  PLUMBING  /  SIM ELECTRIC WL  ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR  Y Sechelt ��� Phone 885-2062  FUELS & HEATING  REZANSOFF HEATING  B.ox 497, Gibsons  OIL & GAS  HEATING SYSTEMS  Financing Available   Phone 886-7254  JANITOR SERVICE  RAY NEWMAN PLUMBING  SALES  &  SERVICE  Hot Water Heating  Building & Alterations  Davis Bay Rd., R.R. 1,  Sechelt ��� Ph. 885-2116  Welcome to  the  Floorshine Coast  HOWE SOUND  JANITOR SERVICE  Specialists  in Cleaning  Floor Waxing, Spray  Buffing, Window Cleaning  RUG SHAMPOOING  Phone   886-7131,   Gibsons  MACHINE SHOP  At the Sign of the Chevron  HILL'S MACHINE SHOP  & MARINE SERVICE Lfd.  Arc & Acty; Weleiirig  Machine Shop  Steel Fabricating  Automotive - Marine Repair  Marine Ways  Standard Marine Station  Phone 886-7721  Res. 886-9956  MARINE SERVICES  PAZCO FIBREGLASSW0  Complete Marine & Industrial  Repairs  14 & 16 ft. Canoes  6!_, 8, 10 and 171_ Runabouts  Used Boat Sales  FREE ESTIMATES  Ph. 886-9604 or 886-9111  G & E PLUMBING  & HEATING LTD.  Certified  Plumber,  Box 165 Gibsons, B.C.  FREE ESTIMATES  Phone 886-7638  New" installations,r renovations,  repairs, hot water heating,  blocked drains,  sewer clearance pump repairs  & installations. Duct work.  24 HOUR SERVICE  Domestic' Commercial  -    Industrial  SEASIDE PLUMBING LTD.  PLUMBING -^- PIPEFITTING  STEAMFITTING  HOT WATER HEATING  , 886:7017  All work Guaranteed  PENINSULA PLUMBING  HEATING i SUPPLIES  Sechelt Highway & Pratt Rd.  SALES & SERVICE  Port Mellon ��� Pender Harbour  Free Estimates  Phone 886-9533  Ray Coates ��� 886-7872  REFRIGERATION  JOHN HIND-SMITH  REFRIGERATION &  MAJOR APPLIANCE  SERVICE  Port Mellon to Pender Harbour  Used   Refrigerators   for   Sale  Phone 886-2231  From 9 ajn. to 5:30 p.m.  Res. 886-9949  BERNINA  SEWING MACHINES  NOTIONS, etc.  REPAIRS AND SERVICE  .   TO ALL MAKES  FABRIC HQUSE  Marine Drive  Gibsons 886-7525  SUNSHINE COAST TRAILER MR!  1 Mile West of Gibsons, Hiway  Laundromat  Extra Iiarge Lots  and Recreation Area  " Parklike Setting  Phone 886-9826  TRANSPORT  RENTALS  Conprete      Form"    Rentals  for all types of basements  Complete instuctions  provided  Please' Contact  FISHER FORM RENTALS  (Rental Shop, Davis Bay)  Phone 885-2612  885-2848  Eves.   885-2359  DOUBLE R  TRUCKING LTD.  EXCAVATING ��� SAND  GRAVEL ��� FILL  Phone 886-7109  P. V. SERVICES LTD  LOG HAULING  CONTRACTORS  Direct all enquiries to  Dispatcher - 883-2733  days & evenings  SHEET METAL  SEA COAST  SHEET METAL LTD.  HEATING - VENTILATION  AIR CONDITIONING  Domestic Furnace Installations  Propane - Oil - Electric  Forced Air  Commercial and Industrial  Installations  24 Hour Service in Oil and  Propane  885-2712  Porpoise Bay Rd., Box 920,  Sechelt  SURVEYORS ���  ROBERT W. ALLEN  BC. LAND SURVEYOR  Sechelt Lumber Building  Wharf St. Box 607  Sechelt B. C.  Office  885-2625  Res.  885-9581  LAND SURVEYING  ROY & WAGENAAR  ,   SURVEYS  1525 Robson St.  Vancouver 5 Ph. 681-9142  Zenith 6430  Sechelt 885-2332  Can I have a raise now I've  got this certificate from my  doctor saying I suffer from  malnutrition, sir?  WANTED  Used furniture or what  have yon  AL'S USED FURNITURE  WE BUY BEER  BOTTLES  Gibsons ��� 886-2812  Coast News, Jan. 23, 1974.     9  Point ot Law  (By a Practicing Lawyer  Copyright)  Many questions have been  received concerning the guardianship rights' of husband and  wife over infants, when there  has been a separation.  'The questions of custody  and access, visiting privileges,  may and should be arranged  by written agreement between  the parents when they separate. Usually the wife will have  custody and the husband' will  have reasonable visiting privileges.  Each parent has equal  rights of guardianship. Guardianship may be surrendered to  the other party to the marriage  or may be given to a third  party. Where the parents are  living apart voluntarily, the  parent who has actual physical  custody and control of the infants is entitled to that and to  guardianship.  The fact that one parent has  been, deserted, however, does  not mean that the parents arc  living apart voluntarily. In  such a case, there is a most  unsatisfactory state of affairs  and the unfortunate children  may be jerked back and forth  endlessly.  Where there is a desertion  and no written agreement, one  party may apply to the coyrts  for a decision as to who shall  have custody and control.  When this has been done,-and  pending the hearing, the par-  eftt who has physical control  has guardianship.  The courts will decide all  such questions on' the basis  of what is best for the childT  ren's welfare. The fact' that  a wife is, a guilty party in a  divorce action does not ordinarily .mean she loses  guardianship. It would have to  be proved that she was an unfit'mother. The fact that a  husband is a guilty party in a  divorce action does not mean  that he loses the rights of visits  with his children or to take  them with him for visits.  Your income fax!  For information, cajl the  District Taxation Office. If  you live in a toll area, ask  your long-distance operator  for Zenith 0-4000 and your call  will be placed without charge.  Q.  What happens if I sell  my home  at  a  price  greater.  than it cost me? Am. I going  to be taxed on any profit or  gain that I make?  A. No. If a taxpayer uses  his home only as his principal .  residence, that home together  with up to an acre of surround  ing land, if the land contributes to the use and enjoyment of the home, wiil be  exempt from capital gains tax.  Q. What if I own a summer  cottage? Could the cottage be  considered my principal res*  idence since I spend a considerable period of time there  each year?  A. yes, provided you have  lived in the cottage at some  time^ during the year. Where  a taxpayer has more than  one home,, he must declare  which of them is his principal  residence.  Q. Along with k home, nearly everyone owns personal and  household effects, an automobile, a boat, or many other  similar items. Where would  I stand if I sold or disposed  of this type of property?  Would I be subject to the  capital gains tax?  A. The term used to describe  the items you refer to is Personal-use Property. Where a  personal-use item does increase  in value over time and is worth  more than $1,000, such as a  summer cottage for example,  a capital gain from the sale of  that item would be subject to  tax.  Q. I live in a trailer. Can  this" be classed as a principal  residence?  A. Yes. Any type of Structure that you own and ordinarily inhabit may qualify as  a principal residence. IP  Coast News, Jan. 23,1974.  BOW LING  Tues. Coffee: 7 Joan Fraser  254;.Isabel Hart 238; Jean Dew  235; Jan Rowland? 223.  - Golden Age: Belva Hauka  199; Jean Wyngaert 186; Nancy'  Scheideger 167; Florence Chaster-158; Art Teasdale ;i_4.  Gibsons A: Sal Olseh 255;  Paddy Richardson 251 (679);  Nancy Carby 229; Jean Wyngaert 229. Larry Braun 300;  Art Holden 29�� (711).  Wed. Coffee: Juid|y7 Day 304  (753), Sherry Husby 303 (645) ;  Penny McClymont 257; Louise  Carroll 2Sly Barbara Quaddy  24K; June Frandsen 224.  Teachers: Jean Gawne 215;  Kathy Whiting 206; Barbara  Soumang201; John Mgyer 260;  Les Wells 258.  Ball & Chain: Virginia Reynolds 292 (747), Bonnie Mc-  Connell 272 (671); Dick Blakeman 295 (695), Don MacKay  271 (702), Freeman Reynolds  253 (719), Hal Anderson 244.  Thurs. Mixed: Maureen Sleep  239 (645), Doreen Crosby 220  (621); Vic Marteddu 324 (819);  Frank Nevens 293 (730); Hugh  Inglis 263; Freeman Reynolds  258 (681).  YOUTH BOWLING COUNCIL  Pee WeeS: Michele Whiting  92;! Yvonne Valancius 89; Lori  Hinz 42; Billy Youdell 125;  Mike McKenzie 1)16; Gerald  Bailey 105.  Bantams: Nola Fromager 174  Jackie Gaines 148; Colleen  Bennett 1_7; Darlene Duncan  146; Louise Youdell 129; David  Olsen 203; Mike Partridge 181;  Jimmy Reynolds 171; David  Atlee 168; Donny MafeKay 162;  Geoffrey Spence Ifll; Grant  Gill 161; Kevin Partridge 157.  Juniors: Susan Vedoy 253;  Mava Schneider 194; Leslie  Ivers'on 178; Dianne Pelletier  167; Stephen Hoops 226; Patrick McConnell 226; Gerald Mc  Connell 210; Mike Kampman  210; Scott Verrechia 208; Brent  Lineker 196.  Seniors: Lisa Kampman* 180;  Kim Crosby 178; Dawn Blakeman 152; Kim Bracewell 216;  Randy Kampman 213; Scott  Forsyth 185.  LETTERS  - /  The following is Kinsmen  Club of Gibson's letter to the  Kiwanis  Cluib,   Gibsons,   B.C.  Mr.'President and Members;  On behalf of the Gibsons  Kinsnieh Cluib we at this time  would like to extend to you  and your members, our most  whole hearted congratulations,  on the completion of the Senior Citizens Housing Project.  Wte as a service club, with  aims and objects, very similar  to your service organization,  appreciate only too "well, this  almost insurmountable task.   ���  This accomplishment, the unselfish and dedicated effort  given by all, indicates that'the  impossible does not exist, when  it comes to the Kiwanis Club  of Gibsons. To succeed in your  project iwhich has taken a  number of years, and not lose  sight of your goal, can and is  understood by our membership, 'what a great momentous  task you have undertaken and  accomplished.  You as Kiwanis members can  take a great deal Of pride in  fulfilling one of the most desperate needs of our community  the facilities of housing for  our Senior Citizens, who we  all respect. Regards from us  all. - R.D. Machon, secretary,-  Gibsons Kinsmen Club  Editor: Your January 16 issue contains a couple of editorials which are right on but  which, when combined philosophically, are somewhat superficial  Walter Cronkite _ summary  of moral results of Watergate  is, in general to be generous,  only a hope ��� a case where  the wish is- father to the  thought. We: have , heard or  read Gordon Sinclair's essay  on the TLS.A., about whom  Cronkite speaks. It is true but  superficial.  The world, nevertheless, is  in the grip of ruthless, men,  men loaded with, gr^^powbr,  who.will not relinq^Sw;then-  methods of control./*-because  they control governments they  control   the    destiny   of   the  world.  Recently, William Bradford  Huie, an American author and  journalist, speaking over CBC,  said in effect, "America is on  the decline the same as Carthage, Rome, England, were in  the past."  To the person that reads contemporary philosophy against  history, this has to be true.  Many Americans agree with  Huie's contention for there are  clear thinking, hand nosed people there as elsewhere in the  world. Lets! face it, much as  we love England she's still slipping. It is not now and may  never be again, the world leader she was prior to World War  One when her dreadful losses,  helped to put America into thie  driver's seat which has already  worn thin and in which she ho  longer feels comfortable.  Possibly the greatest cause  of inflation, and bank presidents like McLaughlin will  never tell you, is' ther philosophy that "you have to get all  the market will bear." Why  are interest rates ballooning?  Why do people switch their investment portfolios? They,. the  bankers and their customers,  think superficially and subjectively.  Union leaders read financial  statements, get what they want  out of them, and scream to  their members about exorbitant prof its, / omitting percentages. They think superficially  and subjectively because thef'  want all the market will bear  for themselves as well as their  members. - $  The religious leader will talk  about changing; the heart of;  man and' having faith, as he  has for centuries. He wants all  the market will bear so that he  can promote his^narrow philosophy. \  Even those politicians who  are proud of speaking out 'with|  candor' want all the market  will bear and likely get M  without the, problems of $_.*,  business, union or religious  leader. - ��   . i  Getting all the market will  bear whether it is interest, in-  I never thought I'd have to  teach you how to hold out  your hand!  Blake C. Alderson, D.C.  CHIROPRACTOR  Post Office Building, Sechelt  Wednesday 10 am - 5:15 pm  Saturday 10 am - 2:30 pm  Phone Office 885-2333  Boys and Girls  PART TIME WORK  Earn Money, Trips & Prizes  DUE TO SCHOOL SHIFTS  A number of Vancouver Sun paper routes may be  available in an area where you live.  If interested, fill in and mail the attached coupon  R. Lemvre, ^  Vancouver Sun,  2250 Granville St.,  Vancouver, B.C:  ���' ��� .';7*; Y' -;  '     '  Name ���_______-_   Addreis/3    Phone Age   ���������tf  A Nbw Book  ��� ���       ...        -&���-���,-      ���,  ���  ByLes 1^  His second volume of poems and sonnets,  with hand drawn illustrations  ' ���'''���'"���'''������"���������''.���'���.���.'     ���'.-...  This new book will be on sale shortly at the Coast News  and the Bookshop on Gower Point Road next to Kruse Drug Store  Also at other distribution points to be announced  Illustrations were hand drawn by Lloyd and Robert Barnes,  Joka Zuidema and Pam Sommerfield  It was printed by the Coast News  come, wages, profits, pensions,  ' what have you, is, like keeping up with the Joneses, a subjective anid superficial philosophy. It keeps people poof. It  makes others rich. It puts some  in jail and others in ,a grave.  It breaks up homes and nations. It causes revolt in homes,  wars between nations. It,,  tempts men to seek office with  intent to gain by influencing  and enticing others. We even  help these men to gain office.  We do nothing about it because  we're afraid we'll lose out on  something the market will bear  for us.  Well, it's my guess that the  sand in the top part of , the  timer has practically filled the  bottom section. I see no one  reaching to turn the timer over  We fear the loss of freedom  which too frequently we interpret as license to plunder.  We believe in incentives so  words like "controls" and "discipline" become anathema-be-  our right to seek alT the mar-  cause they would take away  ket will bear. Are we letting  time run put? A number of intellectuals think this is true.  They think objectively and in  depth./'/- ', ' _. Y^i'  "���.H. F. HARRIS.  CORRECTION MADE   r  Attributing the name, of  Frank Havies to a comment in  a recent article that the RCMP  were understaffed and! that he  received little attention from  the police was incorrect. He  did not make that statement.  ttJMAJ&cJsrEr*  ~ For the men of the house. -  who travel a great deal we  have a very compact carryall-for their toiletries. No  need to unpack, just-open  it up and hang it,on p. door  bracket. Great for quick  grooming between planes  or trains or before those .  special after- hours meetings.  Miss  Bee's,  Sechelt.  RED CROSS  means  People  Helping People  REPEAT PERFORMANCE  of     -  DICK WHITTINGTON in the SUNSHINE KINGDOM  FRIDAY, JAN. 25 at 8 p.m.  SUNDAY, JAN. 27 at 2:30 p.m.  GIBSONS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  Admission $1.75 Children & OAP 75c  Family $3.50  TWILIGHT THEATRE  Gibsons , 886-2827  Thurs., Fri., Sat.  Jan. 24, 25, 26  GODSPELL  GENERAL  Sun., Mon., Tues.  George Segal  Jan. 27, 28, 29  Kris Kristofferson  BLUME IN LOVE  RESTRICTED  ICE ARENA  : i,j  J I  ��� GOVERNMENT FUNDS APPROVED  ��� LAND APPROVED FOR CLEARING  ��� CLEARING & GRADING STARTED JANUARY 21,1974  ��� CONSTRUCTION TENDERS CALLED  ��� CONSTRUCTION TO START APPROXIMATELY FEBRUARY 15,  1974.  ��� APPROXIMATELY 100 DEBENTURES SOLD  ��� FIRST 200 DEBENTURE HOLDERS RECEIVE FREE  MEMBERSHIP  ��� DEBENTURE DRIVE UNDERWAY JANUARY 21,1974  ��� IN ORDER TO QUALIFY FOR 1st DEBENTURE ISSUE,  PURCHASE EARLY - ONLY 100 LEFT.  ��� BANK FINANCING AVAILABLE FOR DEBENTURE PURCHASE  ��� WE CANNOT RESERVE DEBENTURES - A 1st SERVED  BASIS ONLY.  Members Please Note  THE FIRST ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF S.C.R.A. (SUNSHINE  COAST RECREATION ASSOCIATION) TO BE HELD AT 1:00 p.m.  SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3rd, 1974, AT OLD LEGION HALL, SECHELT,  B.C. " !       .   ���      '    :    -���"���,  PLEASE ATTEND TO ELECT DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS AND  VOICE OPINION TO THE MANY IMPORTANT MATTERS ON TH&  AGENDA.  TO BUY DEBENTURES CONTACT ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COMMITTEE MEMBERS:.  Mayor Harold Nelson 885-2577  Shop Easy (Dick Clayton)  885-2025  Suncoast Estates (Suzanne or Len  Van Egmond) 885-2241  Gordon Dixon 885-9669,  Jack Whittaker 885-2438  Mr. & Mrs. G. T. London 885-9472  J; Mercer 885-9563  W. Place 885-2674  Mrs. Mary Gordon  885-2130  Mrs. Mary Krepps  885-2748  Gen Phillips  885-2183  Mel Housley  John Clayton  885^2629    .  J. Hencke  885-9865  G. Kuerpig.  885-9834  Brian Lowen  885-2383  H. A. Hall (Vancouver)  873-1851

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