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Coast News Nov 12, 1964

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Array GOLDEN CUP AWARD  at DANNY'S  COFFEE HOUSE &  MOTEL  Gibsons ;��� Ph.  886-9815  Provincial Library,  Victoria, B. C.  SERVING  THE  GROWING  SUNSHINE  COAST  Published in Gibsons,  B.C. Volume 18, Number '&, November 12, 1964.  ��� ^ ���/���"���' :  _A       M  7c per copy  *&  Others  Hon. Eric Martin, minister of health and hospital insurance will officially, open the new St. Mary's Hospital  on Sunday, Nov. 29, according to word from Victoria.  In the meantime builders have stated that e*quipment  can be moved in the upper floor on Thursday of this week  and that the lower floor would be ready on Nov. 23.  The nurses' home is expected, to be ready by Nov. 16  with finishing touches now being completed.  SECOND-PRIZE AWARD of $250 in annual journalism awards  by MacMiUan, Bloedel and Powell River Limited is presented to  Les Peterson, at left, for series of articles on The Sechelt Nation in  Coast News, Gibsons, by Peter M. Downes, general manager, corporate communications, MB & PR. Presentation was made Oct. 23 in  Vancouver at annual convention of B.C. Weekly Newspapers Association.  Nominations Nov.26  Municipal   council   nomination ,  day in Sechelt and Gibsons falls  on Nov. 26 with elections where  necessary on-Sat., Dec. 12.  Saturday as a voting day is  a change from the usual Thursday which has been the rule for  many years. This change was  made by the last legislature at  the request of the Union of B.C.  Municipalities which preferred  Saturday.  , In Gibsons there will be two  seats vacated now occupied by  Councillor   Sam - Fladager   and  Councillor Norman McKay.  Councillor Flagader has not yet  . made up his mind what he will  do. Councillor McKay will run  again.  In" Sechelt, Councillors Same  Dawe and Frank Parker will end  their two year terms.. Both have  signified they will not run again.  Gibsons council at its last meeting named Mrs. Jules Mainil as  returning officer. In Secheit Village clerk E. T. Rayner will be  returning officer. The polling  booth will be at Jack Mayne's  office.  . Interest has developed in the,.  Coast News offer or a $25 reward^  for information on who out down  the Coronation oak at Elphinstone.,  Secondary school grounds.  Eric Thomson, lawyer, is prepared to pay half of the reward '���  and Ewart McMynn, real estate,  is ready to add $10 to the $25  reward amount. There are also  other people ready to increase  the amount if it is found necessary.  John Atlee of Franklin road  is prepared to start a' fund with  $5 for a new tree.  School board election?  One elected Sechelt District  School board trustee will complete his two year term and  either retire or seek re-election.   He-is: Leo> Jphnspnyrepresenting;  the village  of  Sechelt.  Mrs. C.  J M.   Volen,   representing  the  village   of  Gibsons  on  the   school  board has another year to run.  At present Mr. Johnson's mind  is not yet made up whether he  will run or retire. There are reports that regardless of whether  Mr." Johnson runs or retires there  will  be  another  name yputf forward  on  nomination dayy"  The remainder of school .trustees are selected at a"; meeting  of school . representatives. -Those  ..-.. whoseytermitentls,; at-^ei^end ^:pf  the year include the chairmain  Mrs. M. Ball and Reg. Spicer.  Pender Harbour who has already  resigned having moved away.  Trustees remaining to fill another year are Mrs. Celia Fisher,  Mrs. R. L. Jackson of Davis Bay  area and Joseph Horvath of Roberts Creek.  *  *  *  Reportcards a problem  The November Gibsons PTA  meeting will be held on Monday,  Nov. 16 at 8 p.m. in the Elementary School. It has been decided  by the principals of Elphinstone  High and Gibsons Elementary  schools that the question of report cards is too complicated  and fraught With emotion to be  dealt with at an open meeting  without prior discussion in committee.  All parents and students having constructive criticisms, practical suggestions for improvement of report cards or questions needing clarification are  asked to bring them in writing  to this meeting. If.there is enough  concern felt by parents a committee of teachers, parents and  school trustees Will meet and  bring their findings to a PTA  meeting early in the new year.  As Nov. 15 to 21 is Young Canada Book Week and as the School  Board has recently received notification from Victoria that Gibsons Elementary school is now '  entitled to a library it was  thought opportune to ask Mr.  Dober to speak about his job as  Librarian for the school district.  Representatives from the Gibsons Library and the high school  librarian will also be present.  Accidents  injure 2  Two persons received injuries  in two accidents during the past  week, one near Langdale and  the other on Gower Point road.  In the Langdale accident Albert Prendergast of Port Mellon  careened into the side of the  highway past the ferry road. He  received numerous . glass . cuts  and bruises. .This mishap occurred shortly after midnight last  Thursday. The car was damaged  ���'heavily. ���:-,;':'.''"' "'������;.  .\;*:TKe;.secqnd;;:acradent,-;pn'.;GQwe_(7  Ppint~R-K;:>?ib^^ 3^30"  p.m. ��� Thursday when two cars,  one pushing the other took ..the  turn past Gospel Rock too close  to the road centre and; an oncoming, car driven by Mrs. A.  M. Gant of Port Mell in ended  partly off the road while the  other two cars experienced more  difficulty in coming to a halt  on their side of the road. Marvin  Garriott of High River, Alta.,  was injured to the point he needed medical attention and Ronald  Cartier, also of High River received minor injuries. A third  man, Harold F. Allan of Gibsons was driving the second car.  Damage to the Garriott car  amounted to about, $500 and to  the Gant car about $250.  : Business licenses in v Sechelt  have been doubled and it likely  the same may occur in Gibsons.  This means Sechelt's' $5 semiannual fee will be $10 making  the yearly tax $20 for the future.  While amounts., may differ for  some types of operations assessed for business license purposes  the general trend is that they  will be doubled. A bylaw to this  effect will be prepared for consideration  at  the  next meeting.  At last Wednesday; night's  council meeting in, Sechelt the  clerk was asked if all this year's  licenses had been paid. He replied that not all of them had  paid up.  The  question,  asked by Coun- ;  cillor   Bernel   Gordon,   resulted  in his commenting that one indi  vidual in Sechelt was; boasting  he had not paid his tax and had  no intention of. paying. As a result action will be taken on delinquents. It was pointed out that  the penalty for non-payment must  not exceed $250. The new bylaw  will be so worded that payment  in advance will be necessary or  the non-payer would be subject  to penalties.  Gibsons council' is also preparing a new set of, schedules and  one of the sticklers for both  councils will be the assessing of  tax against itinerant pedlars. Under the new Municipal Act regulations a municipality shall not  cause or permit any discrimination between non-resident business and resident business either  by classification or by fee imposed.  Chest idea explored  ,'   A type of community chest for  . Sechelt  or  for  the  entire   area  was    mulled    over    Wednesday  night of last week by members  of Sechelt's council.  Council decided to toss the is-  \ ssue to, Jhe\..���Chamber of '.Commerce--'  ^_md^t'6^h^S^ep'ayefs' '���'asliocia-"  tion for further discussion. With  householders   being   plagued   to  death by demands for charitable  purposes council strived to find  a  way' out  and pointed to  the  Port   Mellon   system   where   an  assessment is made and the association in charge of the fund  divides it up amongst the organizations it decides to. help.  (Informaton   from   the   Howe  Sound  Pulp  Employees   Charity  Fund states that this fund is a  wage     deductatole     assessment  which   entails   little   more   work  than bookkeeping.)      ".���-'.--.  Members  of; council  were   of  ��� the opinion that there were too  many demands now being made  yon the public, and that ft would,  be a good idea, if a community  chest plan was in effect, to which  the public could make one annual contribution and not be bothered by door to door canvassers. Canvassers would also be  quite happy to have a communi-  'ty chest take over.  Some thoughts were expressed  that it would be a good idea if  the entire area to Pender Harbour were included in such a  setup.  Parker presses for park area  A new wrinkle  Here is a new wrinkle for you!  A Boy' Scout troop with sufficient leaders but no Scouts. So  lads, if you live in the Wilson  Creek area and want to become  a Scout phone 885-2180 and you  can arrange for a lift to attend  Tuesday night meetings in the  Sechelt Legion Hall.  Game banquet Dec. 5  On Saturday, Oct. 31, the clubhouse of the Sechelt Peninsula  Rod and Gun Club was alive with  sheiks, harem girls, gay-nineties  gals, little old-fashioned ladies,  peasant girls, and many others  in gay and original costumes.  Prizes went to Mrs. Shirley  Fearnley for the best dressed,  to Mrs. Bonnie Paetkau as the  most original and to Chief Caldwell as the most comic. Dancing  was enjoyed to the music of Rod  Lesee's accordion and guitar orchestra.  After midnight a smorgasbord  supper was served by the ladies  of the club. This was a very happy preview of the good time all  will have who attend the annual  Game Banquet in the Roberts  Creek Hall on Sat., Dec. 5,- commencing at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are  now available in Sechelt stores  and at Don Head's Shoe Store in  the Plaza at Gibsons.  PAINTED   CROSSWALKS  Three painted crosswalks* are  scheduled for Sechelt. One will  be in vicinity of the Shop Easy  Store, another at the bus depot  and the third at Inlet Ave. and  Comrie St. Sechelt's council ordered their being painted after  the roads department had given  its O.K.  0iMUinminiflmMminiMnM���MnnaMi-mMu_-_t  Peterson resigns  Les Peterson has resigned as  chairman of the Gibsons area  Recreation Committee - and Eugene Yablonski has been asked  to take over the chairmanship,  Councillor Fladager reported to  Gibsons council at its last meeting.  He also added that sometime in  February it is quite likely this  Port Mellon to Egmont area will  come under the control of a recreation director. Tom Ruben,  consultant of the Community  programs branch of the provincial government informed Centennial committee members, of  which Mr. Fladager is chairman,  this will quite likely take place  as the area is being used as a  model area for a program of this  sort with the idea of extending it  to other areas if it can be worked out here.  COYOTE  VISITS   GOATS  What appears to be a young  coyote has been a frequent visitor at the George Charman farm  on Sunshine Coast Highway just  past the S turn. It shows up now  and again and plays with the  goats and latterly has become  less, afraid of human beings.  Some nights it howls.  Further argument ensued last  Wednesday night when Sechelt  municipal council discussed Porpoise Bay property as ,a likely  park but the issue remains unsettled.  Councillor Frank Parker opened discussion by referring to a  letter from the real estate company handling the area which  stated its terms were half oi  the $28,000 as a down payment  with the rest on terms, or, council could make its offer.  Twice during the discussion  Councillor Parker moved that  the village take a plebiscite to  purchase the land but no seconder supported him. The property on Porpoise Bay shore east  ot the wharf is 3.75 acres ana  extends from the reserve aboui  800 feet. At a price of $28,000 n  was, estimated it would cost $350  Kinsmen visit  On Friday, Nov. 6, Gibsons  Kinsmen played host to North  Vancouver Kinsmen at a lady's  night in the banquet room of the  Peninsula Hotel. After a lovely  dinner a short meeting was held  followed by some good old Hillbilly; entertainment by the Gibsons' Kinettes. Those attending  from rforth Vancouver were  President Bill Anderson, D. R.  Annan, G. A. Freeze, T. D.  Grieve, P. Moffat and J. Hilton.   Sechelt  Kinsmen   attending  after. their executive meeting  were President Glen Phillips,  wife Helen and Morgan Thompson. .  a foot.-Village Clerk E. T. Radnor informed council it could not  buy any property with the  pectancy of selling any part of  it. The Municipal Act was specific that councils cannot go into  the real estate business, he said.  Members of council including  the chairman, Mrs. Christine  Johnston pointed, out that the village would also like to develop  Hacket park and also its waterfront area. These would cost  money. It was also argued that  with lack of tidal movement al  Porpoise Bay there would be  polluted water which would not  be suitable for swimming. With  time getting close to 10:30 p.m.  councillors allowed the discussion to trail away with Councillor Parker deciding to look into  the matter further.  A special meeting to give further consideration on the basis  that the municipality can purchase land and with authority  from Victoria be able to' sell  some of it later, was held Friday morning and was left adjourned until Tuesday night of  this week when it was expected  there would be further information available from the real estate company on the subject of  price and terms.  1   "1 didn't like to ask jor  change fbr the parking meter  without buying something!"  MRS. S. E. LANGDALE  Mrs. Sarah Emeline Langdale,  88, member of a pioneer Vancouver family' died Nov. 1. She  was a member of the family after which the Langdale ferry  terminal was named when Black  Ball interests ran the ferry service.  SHED HAS GONE  The eyesore of a shed which  stood on Gibsons federal wharf  for many years is now a thing of  the past. It was removed during  the latter half of last week with  parts of it being transported intact to other locations for use as  sheds or garages.  ov.29  New rat  killer is  outlined  Raticate, a new rat- exterminator, was explained to the rat  control meeting held Monday  night in Sechelt's Legion hall by  members of the provincial health  unit at Gibsons.  Raticate, a new product, is reported to be in the unusual category because it will kill rats  only within four hours but will  not do harm.to any other animal.  Barrie McDonald, chief sanitarian for the Coast-Malaspina  Health Unit accompanied by Phil  Crampton, area sanitarian with  the Gibsons Health Unit, told the  meeting of this new exterminator  and also showed two short films,  Vandals of the Night and Get  Rid of Rats.  A question and answer period  followed and methods of placing bait for rats was explained.  SOCCER  (By GOALIE)  Sechelt Residential Division  five team outplayed Roberts  Creek boys to score a convincing 6-1 win and thus managed  to keep a secure hold on second  place in the league race.  The team from Sechelt has the  better goal average, as-a look at  a tliel^iandingssit-^ .^but -  somehow or another" the United  team seems to have the ability  to score when they need to score.  ���. They do not run up the scores  that the league champions do,  but then they did not let the  champions run up a big tally  when these two teams last met.  The results of Sundays league  games in division five were:  Roberts Creek 1, Sechelt Res.  School 6.  Gibsons Utd. 5, Port Mellon 0.  Sechelt Legion has expressed  a desire to sponsor a.team in division five again, and has requested that the commission allow them to play in regular  league play for the remainder of  the season. This is a matter for  the next meeting. We will always welcome a sixth team in  the league. If the Legion's request is granted, they shall commence playing as soon as possible.  Games for Sunday Nov. 15 in  division   five   are:  Sechelt Res. School vs. Port  Mellon.  Gibsons Utd. vs. Gibsons Merchants!  In Division three league play  this weekend, the visiting Powell River Legion played against.  the Residential School at Sechelt on Sat., Nov. 7 and lost a  hard fought game by 3 goals to  2.  On Sunday they kicked off  against the Gibsons team and a  very good turnout of spectators  witnessed a game well fought  which ended in a 1-1 tie.  Next weekend yet another Powell River team will be visiting  this area and will play two  league games, one on Saturday  .and one on Sunday, Nov. 14 and  15. Times for these games will  be posted in the village on notices, but anyway Saturday or  Sunday, you can watch soccer at  the Elementary School grounds.  Division 5, League Standings  Gibsons  Utd. 5 5   0 0 22 5 10  Sechelt  Res.   Scb. 5 3   1 1 30 5 7  Port    Mellon 5 12 2 7 10 4  Roberts  Creek 5 1   3 1 9 22 3  Olbsons   Mercs. 4 0   4 0 3 29 0  CHIMNEY FIRE  Monday evening's fire alarm  was a chimney fire at the Jack  Johnston home on Reid Rd. near  Payne Rd. Damage was reported  slight.  CONTAINERS FOR GARBAGE  . Four garbage containers, each  to cost $68.50 were ordered purchased by Gibsons council at its  last meeting to be, set up at Seaview Plaza, Kruse Drug Store,  Co-op Store and Dogwood Cafe.  Council had three samples available ranging from $75 down. PBridge  TTBxuoie constitution  AlfEBSTER CLASSIC  A BF11DG& WMPT-TSeftei^lR; SHOP  (Boast Kjetus  Fred Cruice, Editor and Publisher       Phone Gibsons 886-2622  Published every Thursday by Sechelt Peninsula News Ltd.,  ^*.0. Box 280, Gibsons, B.C. Authorized as second class mail for  layment of postage in cash, Post Office Department, Ottawa.  Member Audit Bureau of Circulation, Canadian Community  Newspapers Representatives, Canadian Weekly Newspaper Association, B.C. Weekly Newspaper Association.  Rates of Subscription, $3 per year, $1.75 lor six months. United  States and foreign, $3.50 per year.  A broader point of view  It may be a mystery to some people why an early start has been  made on opinions for a Centennial project. The completion of such  -a project must be concluded in 1967 and for areas where a project  ���will not be of a costly nature this allows plenty of time to get a clear-  cut decision.  What should have occurred on Monday of last week in Gibsons,  could have been the attendance at a Centennial meeting of a large  .bulk of the public. Tliey would have learned a great deal.  For instance they would have learned that no one area is going  to get very much money and that the money contributed by the fed-,  -eral and provincial governments must be matched by donations from  the public either cash, labor or materials. They would also have  learned that the area from Port Mellon to Pender Harbour is so  split up with as many project ideas as there are segments in the  split area.  Given time, some of these suggestions in the smaller areas  might fall by the wayside and result in there being fewer projects  for a lesser number though Wider area.  Suggestions have been made that the entire region from Port  IMellon to Pender Harbour should get together on one project and  <obtain a tidy sum of money for soine\thing worthwhile.  There is little hope that the Port Mellon to Pender Harbour  rregion will ever get together on 1967 Centnnial project. It is a pity  Ibecause with proper organization something worthwhile could be  -���achieved. If anyone desires to get something started on the widest  ;possible basis there is one way to get.it going arid that would be  Tthrough the half-dozen hospital auxiliaries which have worked so  -valiantly for the new hospital and through the various fraternal and  rservice clubs and church organizations. Chambers of Commerce  .could be included along with the two municipal councils, Sechelt  :and Gibsons. %  Is there a leader in the district who has enough strengtih to  'stand up and start something? If there is and the project is worthwhile he has the support, of the Coast News. ,  Consult your librarian!  Some of the strongest influences in our lives come from the  3>ages of the books that are ;read t-o us, or from which we learn to  jead and to absorb much of our way of life.  Today's children have unlimited fields of learning but not all  <of them are salutary, so fortunate is,the youngster who forms an  attachment to his public library and librarians, so that he may be  helped in finding paths of adventure and knowledge.  For doting aunts and kindly uncles and grandpas, books are an  :answer to the problem of Christmas shopping for the small fry.  'Consultation with the local librarian can help in starting a youngster  ���on his literary road. Books that will help him to read or, if he has  accomplished that skill, reading matter suited to the age, sex and  inclinations of the child can open new worlds to him.  ' The wise donor will remember that good Nature books can start  Ihim on lifetime interests.  A. packet of built-in services  The pattern of Canadian food  'consumption will continue to  shift in the direction of higher  protein foods and foods which  satisfy an increasing demand for  variety and convenience according to the Bank of Montreal Business Review for October, just issued.  The bank reviews the changes  tthat have taken place in food in  the past decade and notes that,  with new methods of processing  and distribution, the housewife  !>uys a packet of built-in services.  Many of the changes in the  ."last decade also reflect the tendency, as living standards rise,  ^to eat less food with a high carbohydrate  content.  With these changes, plus higher spending on restaurant meals,  the bank says that some rise in  flood prices would be expected  .-and this has taken place.  The wonder is, however, not  that food prices have gone up,  3>ut that they have gone up so  little. The B of M points out that,  ron the average since 1951, food  prices have actually risen less  tthan the prices of other consum  er goods and services and substantially less than the rise in incomes per capita.  For the future, the B of M says  that there are two opposing forces at work in the market for  food.  Real incomes in the population  as a whole are rising and the distribution of income is changing  in such a way that there are relatively more families in the higher income brackets, the bank  notes. It adds that these changes  indicate a continuing decline in  the percentage of total consumer spending devoted to food.  On the other hand, the population is increasing and the age  distribution is shifting in such a  way that there will be relatively  larger numbers of heavy eaters  (teenagers and young adults) in  the years ahead than was the  case in the recent past.  Therefore, total expenditures  on food in Canada, which in 1963  reached $6.3 billion, will most  certainly rise but the extent of  the rise will depend on the  strength of the various influences, the B of M review concludes.  By  JACK DAVIS,  M.P.  Coast-Capilano Constituency  It is nearly half a century  since Canadians first began to  think seriously ��� about amending  our Constitution. Many meetings  between Ottawa and the provinces have been held in the  intervening years. Finally, then-  efforts have been crowned with  success. Everyone is agreed. We  can now change the British North  America Act without having to  refer it to the" U.K. Parliament  in Westminster.  The rtew formula is significant!  Formerly Ottawa could get its  own amendments to the B.N.A.  Act passed at Westminister without reference to the provinces".  Now it can no longer do so. The  provinces have to agree in advance. So the federal government's powers in this connection may be said to have been  curtailed.  *     ���*���.*'.���  This is true in theory but not  in fact. Never in our history has  the parliament of Canada asked  Westminister to act without reference to the provinces. So we  never used this power of unilateral action. What we have  never' done in the past, we are  now bound not to do in the future. ;  The amending formula itself  is complex: a few select areas  of provincial jurisdiction ( such  as use of the (French language)  have been identified. In their  ease a single' province can veto  any proposed: change. Other provisions,, i however, ; provide for  amendments which can be passed with the support of'a majority of our Canadian provinces  ��� that or a majority of the  Canadian population.  '���''*���*/   *  Even . greater constitutional  flexibility may be required. This  is why the provinces have been  given certain rights to delegate  their powers to the federal government and/or vice versa. No  one quite knows how this will  work out in practice. But it has  one great advantage. If there is  a widespread demand for general legislation which lies in the  provincial field, a number of  provinces can ask Ottawa to pass  the necessary laws without waiting for the rest, of Canada to  fall into line.    .  Under this arrangement we will  no longer be able to blame other  provinces, like Quebec, for lack  of progress. The majority will  be able to press ahead while the  minority ��� at least in fields of  provincial responsibility ��� will  be able, to go. its own way.  We have been hearing a good  in this country. The effective re-  deal recently about separatism  patriation of our Constitution is  a tangible denial of these statements. It is indeed -comforting,  to learn that, at this so-called  dark moment in our history, all  ten   provinces  and   the   federal  g_rvTerrniiieiiir: uau gci. lugcmc. ciuu.  bury their differences. Tliey have  done more. In one of the greatest acts of Canadian statesmanship for more than a generation,  they have made Canadians masters in their own house. They  have at the same time, preserved that degree of constitutional  flexibility which is so essential  to our survival as a nation.  N. Richard McKibbin  INSURANCE  * _��  PHONE  886-2062 GIBSONS, B.C.  A- PERSONAL INSURANCE SERVICE  *"****���***������������*������*���������������������������������������-������*-������������--*������--������������-*���-������-���������������*-_������_--_.������������������-������������3��*��*kaa*��a*n��aaa(������aaB��_*aataia-��**��*.at  Nature's scrapbook  By  BILL  MYRING  COLD WEATHER STRATEGY  It is generally thought that the  outer surface of the walls of a  beaver lodge always consist of  plastered mud and muck, the  sticks used in construction being  invariably concealed, presenting  a" comparatively smooth surface  to the observer. While this is  correct, without variation on  beaver range where the winter..  Season is not severe, the same  does not apply in terrain suffering from long periods of subzero weather. ���_   .  One never finds a beaver lodge  in the north country that is not  covered with uncemented sticks  and branches, loosely laid, before cold weather sets in. The  reason for this, no doubt, is to  gather and retain as much snow  as possible on the outside to  help keep frost from the interior,  in much the same way as human  residents, of the north pile spruce  and other browse about their  dwellings, for the same purpose.  *     *      *  BEAVER TENEMENTS  Beaver lodges often serve pur- y  poses other than providing shel-'j?f  ter   for  beavers   and  are  quite ;:'  frequently very cosmopolitan  in  their housing.  Often the Canada  Goose   takes   up   rooms   at   the  apex of the lodge, there to lay  1-ov eggs  and  build  the   family  nest.  A  little  further  down  the  muskrat   and   water   shrew   are  known to take up residence beneath  the  eaves,  and little fish  seek refuge in the crevices made  by the inter-lacing of submerged .  sticks.  -is * *  DUGS  AND  DISTANCE  We've heard of the D.E.W.  tne and the Pine Tree line to  protect us from sudden invasion  by air and now we hear that a  Canadian scientist spent his  summer in the northern-most  Arctic to protect the nation's ci-.  ties and towns from attacks by  insects.  Brian Hocking, a University of  Alberta entomologist, is seeking  to find put just how far an insect can travel between meals.  Hocking told the annual convention of the Entomological Societies of Canada in Hotel Vancouver that once this distance is  determined, the use of insecticides will be more effective as  each bug will get a lethal dose.  He studied the sugar content  of nectar in flowers in Elles-  mere Island and the amount of  energy it provides. His findings  will be compared with other studies at Fort Churchill, 500 miles  to the south, and in southern  Canada. o ll'  A LESSON FROM THE OTTER  The sea otter obtains most of  its food by diving to the sea  bottom. Folding its front legs  near its body, it uses its webbed  hind feet to reach the shellfish  far below the surface. Crabs,  oysters, clams and similar creatures are its main diet, although  its favorite food is squid. Sometimes it will bring a stone to the  surface, lie on its back with the  stone on its chest, and beat a  stubborn clam with it until the  shell is broken.  This playful, shy, defenseless  creature was the animal which  Bering's men used as their chief  source of clothing. At that time  it existed from California to the  Arctic Ocean in the thousands, a  source of valuable furs untouched by man. Now it is rarely if  ever seen. It affords a lesson in  why we need conservation measures.  Corporation of Village Municipality of Gibsons Landing  ZONING BYLAW No. 163  1. A public Hearing will be held oh November 17, 1964, at 7  p.m. in the Municipal Hall, to hear all persons- who may  deem their interest in.property to be affected by the proposed bylaw.  2. The property concerned is "Lot 14,- Block 2, D.L. 686, Group  1, N.W.D. Plan 3130."  3. The Bylaw would change the classification of the said lot  from "Residential" to "Business and Residential."  4. Bylaw No. 163 is available for inspection at the Municipal  Hall, Gibsons Landing during' normal office hours from  November 4th, 1964, until the date of the hearing.  C. F. GOODING, Municipal Clerk  Gems of Thought  ART  The true work of art is but  a shadow of the divine perfection. ��� Michelangelo  Form and function are one. ���  Frank Lloyd Wright  A room hung with pictures, is  a room hung with thoughts. ���  Sir Joshua Reynolds  I would no more quarrel with  a man because of his religion  than I would because of his art.  ��� Mary Baker Eddy  Art is either a plagiarist or a  revolutionist. ��� Paul Gauguin  EXERCISE TO  HELP YOUR HEART  When you do no exercise, a portion of your  blood tends to accumulate in the veins of your  legs. Eventually this accumulation causes aches,  pains, swelling and, in severe cases, leads to  varicose veins.  You don't have to be an athlete to improve  your circulatory system. Moderate daily exercise each day helps take a load off your heart.  Your physician will advise how much you .need  Your doctor can phone us when you need a  medicine. We will constantly endeavor to keep  abreast of the expanding activities in the field  of pharmacy ��� in this era of great change. We  pledge at all times to be in the position to offer the finest of pharmaceutical services.  KRU��E DRUG STORES Ltd.  Rae W. Kruse  Gibsons Sunnycrest plaza. Sechelt  886-2023 886-2726 885-2134  Pharmaceutical  Chemists and Druggists  Km j  r2rP  IBliWiiliWIi  A *32�� VALUE FOR m  ���   i        .  this Christmas  give a yearly  subscription of  BEAUTIFUL BRITISH COLUMBIA  /..  USE CHRISTMAS SEALS  FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS  A scenic and floral diary and a  beautiful 6" x 8" Christmas  greeting card - FREE!  With every yearly gift of a  Beautiful British Columbia  magazine subscription you purchase we  will include a scenic travel diary (worth  $1) and a 6"x8" Christmas card (worth  '.Sc) announcing your gift subscription.  Beautiful British Columbia is a wonderful  gift for friends and relatives anywhere in  the world. This spectacular illustrated  ���nagazine deals exclusively with British  Columbia and is published quarterly by  the Department of Recreation and Con  servation. (A regular yearly subscription  is worth $2 alone.)  ORDER YOUR GIFT SUBSCRIPTIONS  FROM THE  COAST NEWS  Phone 886-2622  Your Christmas Gift Package and personal  Christmas Card announcing your year - round  gift of "Beautiful British Columbia" wiir be  mailed out by Department of Recreation and  Conservation.  It contains the winter _ issue . of the magazine,  plus a scenic and floral diary featuring 26 of  the best colour pictures from Beautiful British  Columbia Magazine as well as writing space, for  every day of the year. Hi-Cs see exhibit  of Indian relies  The Hi-C was recently invited  to go and see Mr. Peterson's exhibit on Indian relics and art  work. The party was surprised  at his collection of Indian artifacts and his storehouse of  knowledge. They not only learn-,  ed several new facts about B.C.'s  past, but also something about  the expert craftsmanship of the  Indians. The party thanks Mr.  Peterson again for his kindness  in letting them see his exhibit,  and also 'for his interest in ensuring that this part of our history is not forgotten.  The Hi-C is having a beatnick  party soon. A future announcement concerning this will be  made.  The Winning Post  OLE'S COVE  Open for Dinners, Luncheons  and   small   Receptions  Ph. 885-2046  MMia----a_M_--_��  Hartle's If asoiiry  QUALITY   WORKMANSHIP  Custom built fireplaces, chimneys, block buildings, retaining walls, planters, patios,  slate work, sandstone, cut  granite.  Free Estimates & Design  Phone'886-2586  John Hind-Smith  REFRIGERATION  PORT MELLON  TO PENDER HARBOUR  Phone 886-2231  from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.  Res. 886-9949  9��__j��ffe  TOWING^JSRVItE  PENINSULA MOTORS LTD.  THE  DEPENDABLE CHAIN SAW  Ctt ��� f/-i dtmeostratioB today  CHAIN SAW CENTRE   *  WILSON  CREEK  Phone 885-2228  Gulf  Building  Supplies  SECHELT���Ph.   885-2283  EVERYTHING FOR YOUR  BUILDING NEEDS  mLFMooMBAym  MY FAIR LADY: Audrey Hepburn, in the title role of the spectacular motion picture production, shouts one of the famous lines  from the Alan Jay Lerner ��� Frederick Loewe musical play as she  roots her horse,home at the Ascot races, to the urbane amusement  of Rex. Harrison, standing beside her in the role of Professor Henry  Higgins.  The problem of motels within  the confines of Gibsons municipality received considerable attention at council meeting last  week in Gibsons.  ,S. Gerard of Rit's Motel was  granted a permit for $14,000 to  cover four two room suites as  an addition to present motel  premises on the adjoining corner  lot.  Council argued lengthily on the  subject of whether permanently  rented premises could classify as  a motel. Intention of the argument was to define what was  a motel. On the basis ' of an  earlier letter to Mr. Gerard explaining that transient trade must  be considered, council agreed on  granting the building permit.  Council plans a move to protect  itself against the spread of non-  transient set-ups in the village.  Mr. Gerard's added lot will have  to be  re-zoned  from  residential  to commercial.  Councillor Sam Fladager  while not opposed to Mr.  Gerard's application was of the.  opinion that allowing motels to  be constructed for the use of  permanent occupans was unfair  to residents generally who are  confined to placing one construction only on a lot as a permanent residence. To allow motels  to place four or five small buildings on one lot would be unfair,  Mr. Fladager argued.  After consultation with Walt.  Nygren's Chamber of Commerce  breakwater committee Councillor Sam Fladager reported that  it was decided that council would  continue working on its seawall  in the bay and make its own  presentation to Jack Davis, M.P:,  for Coast-Capilano. It was decided with Mr. Nygren that there  was no clash with the breakwater.  The  several hundred ratepay-    which he sat back and enjoyed  ers  in   the   Roberts  Creek   dis-    the discussion;   '  ��� trict were represented by i>24_.-at  the  ratepayers ^meeting  to  hear .  about school affairs on Monday  evening.   The   chairman,  by  acclamation, was Mr. B. L.  Cope, v  and  the  secretary  was Mrs.  C   .  Beeman.  Main ��� purpose ���'of\ the. meeting  was to elect a representative to  the school board to take the place  of Mrs. Muriel Ball whose term  of office had expired. Mrs. Ball  was   re-elected  by   acclamation.  Mr. J. Horvath, also a member of the board, and Mrs. Ball,  spoke on the impending referendum and pointed out the needs of  the various schools. A new room  for Roberts Creek school appears  to be imminent and possibly laty  era library and an activity room  also.    ���  The subject of school plumbing facilities was discussed at  length. The chairman, usually a  stickler for parliamentary procedure, was heard to say "this  is highly out of order but the  way to learn is to iisten" after  The secretary^ -1 interested in  the discourse/ had doodled the  subject under discussion, flowers  and designs over her notes,. and  while she was straightening them  out so she could read them at  the close of the evening, committed the worst of all sins, a  pun.  All present were still chuckling  when a delicious supper was  served.by the Parents' Auxiliary.  Ph  aynouse, rajjie  A six foot ceiling 8 x 12 ft.  playhouse will be raffled on Dec.  8 by Jcb's Daughters and proceeds from the raffle will go towards their Leukemia fund for  young children, hospital, donations and the education fund.  This playhouse was -built locally by donated materials and  volunteer labor. Tickets for this  raffle can be obtained from any  Jobie or from Peninsula Cleaners.  LAST WEEKS  ANSWER  ACROSS  a. To be dull  5. Light  '9. Christmas  song  10. Wide-  .  awake  12. To nullify  13. Article of  virtu  14. Let it stand:  print.  15. Inelastic  16. Succinct  18. Temples:  poet.  19. Cunning  20. Extinct  bird,  22. Abounding  in ore  23. Not good  24. Victorian  27. Piece  out  28, Plumpness  31. Purple seaweed  33.-?locl-  35. Part of the  eye  36. Amazon  cetacean  37. Smoky  39. Place of  ���worship  40.Harden:  '   var.  41. Shining  42. Observes  43. "Wriggling  DOWN  1, Fireplace  shelf  2. Hard to  manage  3. Looks  sullen  4. Addition to  a building  5. Resinous  substance  6. Part of a  bird's  ���wing  7. Kind  of  sheep  8. Elementary  textbook  9. Throws  11.   turvy  17. Live  coal  18. Lost, as  color  21. Tree  24. Evade  25. Plunders:  var.  26. Thoroughfare  28. Baptismal  29. Bird house  30. Weepy  32. Tidal flood  -.  S|E  A  S  is  MP  LA  G  <������  A  WA  S  H  Al  N  E  G  A  S  P  n- m  R R  O  R  A  S  O  R  V  L  O A  D  Mm  G  O  B  L  uIr  c  s  O  _____s  E  E  R__  o  N  E  __-_���[--__ __________  iriainId_____cIoi__>Ip_________I  H0H   ________!   ____  V  1  ���s  LlAJBB  Ml  D  E  A  G]L  eHeIm  EN  D  s  T  Si  o  D  ���rI  A  t1  E  S  sheie. @na__  Yesterday's Answer  34. Valley of  the moon  38.Afi.irma-  r tive reply  39. To mature  By   MARY   TINKLEY  The Halfmoon Bay auxiliary to  St. Mary's Hospital will hold, a  Christmas bazaar on Sat., Nov.  14 at 2 p.m. at Rutherfords.  Teas will be served and there  will be a sale of home baking.  Among the many novelties on  sale will be Christmas candles  and centrepieces, corsages and  bargains in toys. Raffle tickets  are on sale for a hamper of  groceries, a planter and a table  lamp. ,y  Mr. and Mrs. Bob Wilkinson  have returned from a honeymoon  in California. They drove south  by the coastal route as far as  Morro Bay, where they crossed  ' to Fresno and returned north by  way of Sacramento and Redding.  They crossed into Canada by  Highway 97 and returned home  by the Fraser Canyon. Mr. and  Mrs. Wilkinson were married  quietly in Vancouver on Oct. 5.  Mrs. Wilkinson is the former  Mrs. Vylo Baker of Francis  Peninsula.      y  Visiting in ,the Bay area this  past week have been Ken But-  terfield and his brother-in-law,  Charles Murphy from Sarnia,  Ont. Ken, who was assistant  lighthouse keeper at Merry Island before going east, was delighted to be back by the water.  He borrowed a boat, revisited  all his favorite fishing, spots and  came back with a nice string oi  cod.  Ronnie    Sussbauer    is hunting  for elk in the Golden area, but  so far without success. Meanwhile, Mrs. Sussbauer's guests at  Seacrest are her sister-in-law,  Mrs. Carol Dionne of Abbotsford  with her two children.  Linen shower  for bride-elect  Miss Sharen MacKay: was the  guest of honor at a linen shower  Thursday evening. Mrs. R. L.  Gregory and Mrs. Stan Rowland  entertained at the latter's home  on Crow Road for the bride-to-  ���be.  ��� ���; r-  Fall flower's decorated the living: room, and streamers in blue  and white cascaded over the  chair on which the honored guest  sat to open her numerous. beautiful gifts. The hostesses also  presented her with a dainty cor-,  sage.  The bride's cake, made and  decorated by Mrs. Rowland, was  a tasty work of art; intricately  decorated. ,VA buffet .supper was  served. A door prize was won  by Marilyn Greggain. ''':.:  Other guests included ;Sylvia  and Wendy Gurney, Mrs. Anne  Gurney, mother of the groom-  elect, Mrs. K. Butler, mother of  the bride-elect, Dawn Rowland,  Mrs. Lome Campbell, Lynne En-  nis, Mrs. Do Wortman, Phyl  Greggain and Jan Rowland.  Coast News,  Nov. 12, 1964.        _  Society of Women  @n!y organized  Five persons attended a Selma  Park meeting called by The Society of Women Only for the purpose of assisting deserted families. The meeting called by Mrs.  Dbreen Kaiser, formerly of Sechelt and now of Vancouver  heard the objectives and achievements. Mrs. Kaiser is now planning to call a meeting in Gib-  , sons area, the date of which will  be announced later. Mrs. Kaiser  reports the organization now has  46 members in British Columbia  and is reaching out for more.  Gibson Girl  BEAUTY CENTRE  PERMS,  CUTS & SETS  "BONAT"  PRODUCTS  Professional Care is Best  v^ for Your Hair  Phone 886-2120  Seaside Plaza��� Gibsons Villager  THERE HAS TO BE1REASOI  9 OUT OF 10 M \Wm GO MllML GAS  yond the mains tliere are so many ways  m can  n more wr m-imrnw*  �� MORE ECONOMY ��� Lower initial cost and low operating cost year after year  with a minimum of maintenance.  ..,��    MORE SELECTION ��� Gas gives you more appliances and sizes to choose from  '���'.% ���A furnace tailor-made for every sized home.       '  �� MORE FREE TIME ��� Gas appliances are all completely automatic for cooking,  water heating, clothes drying and heating ��� set the dials and forget it  and get more out of life.    .'���'���''  �� JIORE AND MORE HOT WATER - Size for size ��� nothing can give you as  much hot water as a gas water heater.  ENQUIRE TODAY ABOUT METERED PROPANE HEAT ��� SO  MANY FURNACES TO CHOOSE FROM! NOW PAY ONLY  10% DOWN WITH UP TO 5 YEARS AT ONLY 7% INTEREST.  ROCKGAS PROPANE LTD.  Ph.   886-2185  C & S SALES & SERVICE  Sechelt,  B.C.���Ph. 885-8713  GIBSONS HARDWARE Ltd.  Ph.   886-2442 AK-BSTER CLASSIC  r lexiDie consiiiuooi*needed?  Coast Ketus  Fred Cruice, Editor and Publisher       Phone Gibsons 886-2622  Published every Thursday by Sechelt Peninsula News Ltd.,  9.O. Box 280, Gibsons,  B.C. Authorized as second class mail for  layment of postage in cash, Post Office Department, Ottawa.  Member Audit Bureau of Circulation, Canadian Community  Newspapers Representatives, Canadian Weekly Newspaper Association, B.C. Weekly Newspaper Association.  Rates of Subscription, $3 per year, $1.75 tor six months. United  States and foreign, $3.50 per year.  A broader point of view  It may be a mystery to some people why an early start has been  made on opinions for a Centennial project. The completion of such  -a project must be concluded in 1967 and for areas where a project  vdll not be of a costly nature this allows plenty of time to get a clear-  -cut decision.  What should have occurred on Monday of last week in Gibsons,  ���could have been the attendance at a Centennial meeting of a large  .bulk of the public. Tliey would have learned a great deal.  For instance they would have learned that no one area is going  lo get very much money and that the money contributed by the federal and provincial governments must be matched by donations from  the public either cash, labor or materials. They would also have  learned that the area from Port Mellon to Pender Harbour is so  -split up with as many project ideas as there are segments in the  ..split area.  Given time, some of these suggestions in the smaller areas  might fall by the wayside and result in there being fewer projects  for a lesser number though wider area;  Suggestions have been made that the entire region from Port  IMellon to Pender Harbour should get together on one project and  <obtain a tidy sum of money for sorne\thing worthwhile.  There is little hope that the Port Mellon to Pender Harbour  .region will ever get together on 1967 Centnnial project. It is a pity  ^because with proper organization something worthwhile could be  ������achieved. If anyone desires to get something started on the widest  ipossible basis there is one way to get. it going arid that would be  ithrough the half-dozen hospital auxiliaries which have worked so  -valiantly for the new hospital and through the various fraternal and  rservice clubs and church organizations. Chambers of Commerce  ���could be included along with the two municipal councils, Sechelt  :and Gibsons. ��� *  Is there a leader in the district who has enough sircnglih to  'stand up and start something? If there is and the project is worthwhile he has the support, of the Coast News.  By  JACK DAVIS,  M.P.  Coast-Capilano Constituency  It is nearly half a century  since Canadians first began to  ': think seriously about amending  our Constitution. Many meetings  between Ottawa and the provinces have been held in the  ��� intervening years. Finally, th eh-  efforts have been crowned with  success. Everyone is agreed. We  can now change the British North  America Act without having to  refer it to the U.K. Parliament  in Westminster. * V  The new formula is significant.  Formerly Ottawa could get its  own amendments to the B^N.A-  Act passed at Westminister without reference to the provinces.  Now it can no longer do so. The  provinces have to agree in advance. So the federal government's powers in this connection may be said to have been  curtailed.  *     *    .'*  This is true in theory but not  in fact. Never in our history has  the parliament of Canada asked  ��� Westminister to act without reference to the provinces. So we  never used this power of unilateral action. What we have  never'done in the past,'we are  now bound not to do in the I future.  Consult your librarian!  Some of the strongest influences in our lives come from the  pages of the books that are read to us, or from which we learn to  iread and to absorb much of our way of life.  Today's children have unlimited fields of learning but not all  ���of them are salutary, so fortunate is,the youngster who forms an  ^attachment to his public library and librarians, so that he may be  helped in finding paths of adventure and knowledge.  For doting aunts and kindly uncles and grandpas, books are an  ;answer to the problem of Christmas shopping for the small fry.  'Consultation with the local librarian can help in starting a youngster  '���on his literary road. Books that will help him to read or, if he has  -accomplished that skill, reading matter suited to the age, sex and  inclinations of the child can open new worlds to him.  ' The wise donor will remember that good Nature books can start  Mm on lifetime interests.  A packet of built-in services  The pattern of Canadian food  ^consumption will continue to  shift in the direction of higher  protein foods and foods which  satisfy an increasing demand for  variety and convenience according to the Bank of Montreal Business Review for October, just issued.  The bank reviews the changes  tthat have taken place in food in  the past decade and notes that,  with new methods of processing  and distribution, the housewife  Imys a packet of built-in services.  Many of the changes in the  Tlast decade also reflect the ten-  ���dency, as living standards rise,  to eat less food with a high carbohydrate content.  With these changes, plus high-  '���er spending on restaurant meals,  ^the bank says that some rise in  flood prices would be expected  :and this has taken place.  The wonder is, however, not  that food prices have gone up,  Ibut that they have gone up so  little. The B of M points out that,  ron the average since 1951, food  ���prices have actually risen less  tthan the prices of other consum  er goods and services and substantially less than the rise in incomes per capita.  For the future, the B of M says  that there are two opposing forces at work in the market for  food.  Real incomes in the population  as a whole are rising and the distribution of income is changing  in such a way that there are relatively more families in the higher income brackets, the bank  notes. It adds that these changes  indicate a continuing decline in  the percentage of total consumer spending devoted to food.  On the other hand, the population is increasing and the age  distribution is shifting in such a  way that there will be relatively  larger numbers of heavy eaters  (teenagers and young adults) in  the years ahead than was the  case in the recent past.  Therefore, total expenditures  on food in Canada, which in 1963  reached $6.3 billion, will most  certainly rise but the extent of  the rise will depend on the  strength of the various influences, the B of M review concludes.  The amending formula itself  is complex: a few select areas  of provincial jurisdiction (such  as use of the (French language)  have been identified. In their  case a single province can veto  any proposed change. Other provisions, however, provide for  amendments which can be passed with the support of' a majority of our Canadian provinces  ��� that or a majority of the  Canadian population.  V ��T�� *S*  Even greater constitutional  flexibility may be required. This  is why the provinces have been  given certain rights to delegate  their powers to the federal government and/or vice versa. No  one quite knows how this will  work out in practice. But it has  one great advantage. If there is  a widespread demand for general legislation which lies in the  provincial field, a number of  provinces can ask Ottawa to pass  the necessary laws without waiting for the rest. of Canada to  fall into line.  Under this arrangement we will  no longer be able to blame other  provinces, like Quebec, for lack  of progress. The majority will  be able to press ahead while the  minority ��� at least in fields of  provincial responsibility ��� will  be able to go. its own. way.  We have been hearing a good  in this country. The effective re-  deal recently about separatism  patriation of our Constitution is  a. tangible denial of these statements. It is indeed -comforting,  to learn that, at this so-called  dark moment in our history, all  ten' provinces   and   the   federal  -guyU-iiiuuiiivcan get; wgeui_x.anu-,.  bury their differences. They have  done more. In one of the greatest acts of Canadian statesmanship for more than a generation,  they have made Canadians-masters in their own house. They  have at the same time, preserved -that degree - of constitutional  flexibility which is so essential  to our survival as a nation.  N. Richard McKibbin  INSURANCE  PHONE  886-2062 GIBSONS, B.C.  A- PERSONAL INSURANCE SERVICE  Nature's scrapbook  By  BILL  MYRING  COLD WEATHER STRATEGY  It is generally thought that the  outer surface of the walls of a  beaver lodge always consist of  plastered mud and muck, the  sticks used in construction being  invariably concealed, presenting  a comparatively smooth surface  to the observer. While this is  correct, without variation on  beaver range where the winter^  season is not severe, the same  does not apply in terrain suffering from yiong periods of subzero weather.  One never finds a beaver lodge  in the north country that is not  covered with uncemented sticks  and branches, loosely laid, before cold weather sets in. The  reason for this, no doubt, is to  gather and retain as much snow  as possible on the outside to  help keep frost from the interior,  in much the same way as human  residents, of the north pile spruce  and other browse about their  dwellings, for the same purpose.  *     *      *  BEAVER TENEMENTS  Beaver lodges often serve pur- y  poses other than providing shel-'j$  ter   for  beavers   and   are   quite'  frequently  very cosmopolitan  in  their housing.  Often the Canada  Goose   takes   up   rooms . at   the  apex of the lodge, there to lay  l:r>-.   eggs  and  build the  family  nest.  A little further  down  the  muskrat   and   water  shrew   are  known to take up residence beneath  the  eaves,  and little fish  seek refuge in the crevices made  by the inter-lacing of submerged .  sticks.    '  ���'   *      *      *  BUGS  AND  DISTANCE  We've heard of the D.E.W.  tne and the Pine Tree line to  protect us from sudden invasion  by air and now we hear that a  Canadian scientist spent his  sumimer in the northern-most  Arctic to protect the nation's cities and towns from attacks by  insects. ,  Brian Hocking, a University of  Alberta entomologist, is seeking  to find put just how far an insect  can travel between meals.  Hocking told the annual convention of the Entomological Societies of Canada in Hotel Vancouver that once this distance is  determined, the use of insecticides will be more effective as  each bug will get a lethal dose.  He studded the sugar content  of neotar in flowers in Elles-  mere Island and the amount of  energy it provides. His findings (  will be compared with other studies at Fort Churchill, 500 miles  to the south, and in southern  Canada. f I  A LESSON FROM THE OTTER  The sea otter obtains most of  its food by diving to the sea  bottom. Folding its front legs  near its body, it uses its webbed  hind feet to reach the shellfish  far below the surface. Crabs,  oysters, clams and similar creatures are its main diet, although  its favorite food is squid. Sometimes it will bring a stone to the  surface, lie on its back with the  stone on its chest, and beat a  stubborn clam with it until the  shell is broken.  This playful, "shy, defenseless  creature was the animal which  Bering's men used as their chief  source of clothing. At that time  it existed from California to the  Arctic Ocean in the thousands, a  source of valuable furs untouched by man. Now it is rarely if  ever seen. It affords a iesson in  why we need conservation measures.  Gems of Thought  :������������.��� ART"-.-.  The true work of art is but  a shadow of the divine perfection. ��� Michelangelo  Form and function are one. ���  Frank Lloyd Wright   .  A room hung with pictures, is  a room hung with thoughts. ���  Sir Joshua Reynolds  I would no more quarrel with  a man because of his religion  than I would because of his art.  ��� Mary Baker Eddy  Art is either a plagiarist or a  revolutionist. ��� Paul Gauguin  Corporation of Village Municipality of Gibsons Landing  ZONING BYLAW No. 163  1. A public Hearing will be held on November 17, 1964, at 7  p.m. in the Municipal Hall, to hear all persons-who may  deem their interest in property to be affected by tlie pro-  v ' 'posed bylaw.  2. The property concerned is "Lot 14, Block 2, D.L. 686, Group  1, N.W.D. Plan 3130."  3. The Bylaw would change the classification of the said lot  from "Residential" to "Business and ResidentiaL"        .  4. Bylaw No. 163 is available for inspection at the Municipal  Hall, Gibsons . Landing during" normal office hours from  November 4th, 1964, until the date of the, hearing.  C. F. GOODING, Municipal Clerk  v. a Or  EXERCISE TO  HELP YOUR HEART  When you do no exercise, a portion of your  blood tends to accumulate in the veins of your  legs. Eventually this accumulation causes aches,  pains, swelling and, in severe cases, leads to  varicose veins.  You don't have to be an athlete to improve  your circulatory system. Moderate daily exercise each day helps take a load off your heart.  Your physician will advise how much you need  Your doctor can phone us when you need a  medicine. We will constantly endeavor to keep  abreast of the expanding activities in the field  of pharmacy ��� in this era of great change. We  pledge at all times to be in the position to offer  the finest  of pharmaceutical services.  !   t  KRU��E DRUG STORES Ltd.  Rae W. Kruse  Gibsons Sunnycrest plaza. Sechelt  886-2023 886-2726 885-2134  Pharmaceutical Chemists and Druggists  mmssmm  A *32�� VALUE FOR m  ��� * ��� ���  . .    ���  this Christinas  give a yearly  subscription of  BEAUTIFUL BRITISH COLUMBIA  USE CHRISTMAS SEALS  FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS  A scenic and floral diary and a  beautiful 6" x 8" Christmas  greeting card - FREE!  With every yearly gift of a  Beautiful British Columbia  magazine subscription you purchase we  will include a scenic travel diary (worth  $1) and a 6" x 8" Christmas card (worth  ?5c) announcing your gift subscription.  Beautiful British Columbia is a wonderful  gift for friends and relatives anywhere in  the world. This spectacular illustrated  .magazine deals exclusively with British  Columbia and is published quarterly by  the Department of Recreation and Con  servation. (A regular yearly subscription  is worth $2 alone.)  ORDER YOUR GIFT SUBSCRIPTIONS  FROM THE  COAST NEWS  P  ' Phone 886-2622  Your Christmas Gift Package and personal  Christmas Card announcing your year-round  gift of "Beautiful British Columbia" will be  mailed out by Department of Recreation and  Conservation.  It contains the winter issue of the magazine,,  plus a scenic and floral dtaiy featuring 26 of  the best colour pictures from Beautiful British  Columbia Magazine as well as writing space.for  every day of the year. 9  U  Hi-Cs see exhibit  of Indian relics  The Hi-C was recently invited  to go and see Mr. Peterson's exhibit on Indian relics and art  work. The' party was surprised  at his collection, of Indian artifacts -and his storehouse of  knowledge. They not only learn- -  ed several new facts about B.C.'s  pastj but also .something about  the expert craftsmanship of the  Indians., The party thanks Mr.  Peterson again for; his kindness  in letting them see his exhibit,  and; also'for his interest in ensuring that this part of our history is not forgotten.  The Hi-C is.having a beatnick  party soon. A future announcement concerning this will be  made.  The Winning Post  OLE'S COVE  Open for Dinners,  Luncheons  and   small   Receptions  Ph. 885-2046  QUALITY   WORKMANSHIP  Custom built fireplaces, chimneys, block buildings, retaining walls, planters, ,, patios,  slate work, sandstone, cut  granite. ,  Free Estimates & Design  Phone '886-2586  John Hind-Smith  REFRIGERATION  PORT MELLON  TO  PENDER HARBOUR  Phone 886-2231  from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.  Res. 886-9949  TOWlNG^ilRVltE  PENINSULA MOTORS LTD.  Phone  DAYS  ~. 885-2111  NITES ��� S85-2155  THE  DEPENDABLE CHAIN SAW  fill ��� free d.msastratio- today  CHAIN SAW CENTRE   "  WILSON  CREEK  Phone 885-2228  Gulf  Supplies  SECHELT���Ph.   885-2283  EVERYTHING FOR YOUR  BUILDING NEEDS  HALFMOON BAY NOTES  MY FAIR LADY: Audrey Hepburn, in the title role of the spectacular motion picture production, shouts one of the famous lines  from the Alan Jay Lerner ��� Frederick Loewe musical play as she  roots her horse.home at the Ascot races, to the urbane amusement  of Rex. Harrison, standing beside her in the role of Professor Henry  Higgins.  The problem of motels within  the confines of Gibsons municipality received considerable attention at council meeting last  week in Gibsons.  .S. Gerard of Rit's Motel was  granted a permit for $14,000 to  cover four two room suites as  ah     addition    to present motel  premises on the adjoining corner  lot. ���  Council argued lengthily on the  subject of whether permanently  rented premises could classify as  a motel. Intention of the argument was to define what was  a motel. On the basis ' of an  earlier letter to Mr. Gerard explaining that transient trade must  be considered, council agreed on  granting the building permit.  Council plans a move to protect  itself against the spread of non-  transient set-ups in the village.  Mr. Gerard's added lot will have  to be  re-zoned  from  residential  to commercial.  Councillor       Sam       Fladager  while     not     opposed     to     Mr.  Gerard's  application was of the:  opinion  that  allowing  motels  to  be   constructed   for   the   use   Of  permanent  occupans was  unfair,  to   residents  generally   who  are  confined to placing one construction only on a lot as a permanent residence. To allow motels  to place four or five small buildings on one lot would be unfair,  Mr. Fladager argued.  After consultation with Walt,  Nygren's Chamber of Commerce  breakwater committee Councillor Sam Fladager reported that  it was decided that council would  continue working on its seawall  in the bay and make its own  presentation to Jack Davis, M.P.,  for Coast-Capilano. It was decided with Mr. Nygren that there  was no clash with the breakwater.  The several hundred ratepayers in the Roberts Creek district were represented by,24���at  the ratepayers meeting to hear .  about school affairs on Monday  evening. The chairman, by acclamation, was Mr. B. L. Cope, >  and the secretary was Mrs. C.  Beeman. .-...'���'.'  Main purpose of- the meeting  was to elect a representative to  the school board to take the place  of Mrs. Muriel Ball whose term  of office had expired. Mrs. Ball  was   re-elected   by   acclamation.  Mr. J. Horvath, also a member of the board-, and Mrs. Ball,  spoke on the impending referendum and pointed out the needs of  the various schools. A new room  for Roberts Creek school appears  to be imminent and possibly latr  era library and an activity room  also. . -  The subject of school plumbing facilities was discussed at  length. The chairman, usually a  stickler for parliamentary procedure, was heard to say "this  is highly. out of order but the  way> to learn is to listen" after  which he sat back and enjoyed  the discussion.-  The secretary* ^interested in  the discourse, had doodled the  subject under discussion, flowers  and designs over her notes,. and  while she was straightening them  out so she could read them at  the close of the evening, committed the worst of all sins, a.  pun.  All present were still chuckling  when a delicious supper was  served.by the Parents' Auxiliary-  Ph  aynouse. r-iijjie  A six foot ceiling 8 x 12 ft.  playhouse will be raffled Gn Dec.  8 by Job's Daughters and proceeds from the raffle will go towards their Leukemia fund for  young children, hospital. donations and the education fund.  This playhouse was -built locally by donated materials and  volunteer labor. Tickets for this  raffle can be obtained from any  Jobie or from Peninsula Cleaners.  LAST WEEKS  ANSWER  ACROSS  1. To be dull  5. Light  9. Christmas  song  lO.Wide-  .  awake  12. To nullify  13; Article of  virtu  14. Let it stand:  print.  15. Inelastic  16. Succinct  18. Temples:  poet.  19. Cunning  20. Extinct  bird,  22. Abounding  in ore  23. Not good  24. Victorian.  2. Hard to  manage  3. Looks  sullen  4. Addition to  a building  5. Resinous  substance  6. Part of a  bird's  wing  7. Kind of  sheep  8. Elementary  textbook  9. Throws  11.   turvy  17. Live  coal  18. Lost, as  color  21. Tree  24. Evade  25. Plunders:  ��s  E  A  sffl  S  L  A  G  1  A  w  A  S  HI  P  A  1  N  E  G  A  S  P  e1  E  A  R  R  O  R  O  R  L  O  D  M  A  G  D  __  B  L  u  R��  S  O  S  S  E  E  R  c  O  N  E  BIR  A  Nl  D  G  R  A  s  S  R  A  N  O  ���c  O  O  p  HEH   BISHE.   SQ  S T OO D  R A T E S  var.  26. Thoroughfare  28. Baptismal  29. Bird house  30. Weepy  32. Tidal flood  HHUH   __D____  Yesterday's Answer  34. Valley of  the moon  38. Affirma-  . tive reply  39. To mature  27. Piece   out  28. Plumpness  31. Purple seaweed  33.Flock  35. Part of the  eye  36. Amazon  cetacean  37. Smoky  39. Place of  worship  40. Harden:  ''"  Var.  41. Shining  42. Observes  43. Wriggling  DOWN  1, Fireplace  Shelf  By   MARY  TINKLEY  The Halfmoon Bay auxiliary to  St. Mary's Hospital will hold a  Christmas bazaar on : Sat., Nov.  14 at 2 p.m. tat Rutherfords.  Teas will be served and there  will be a sale of home baking.  Among the many novelties on  sale will be Christmas candles  and centrepieces, corsages and  bargains in toys. Raffle tickets  are on sale for a hamper of  groceries, a planter and a table  lamp.  Mr. and Mrs. Bob Wilkinson  have returned from a honeymoon  in California. They drove south  by the coastal route as far as  Morro Bay, where they crossed  ' to Fresno and returned north by  way of Sacramento and Redding.  They crossed into Canada by  Highway 97 and returned home  by the Fraser Canyon. Mr. and  Mrs. Wilkinson were married  quietly in Vancouver on Oct. 5.  Mrs. Wilkinson is the former  Mrs. Vylo Baker of Francis  Peninsula.  Visiting in the Bay area this  past week, have been Ken But-  terfield and his brother-in-law,  Charles Murphy from Sarnia,  Ont. Ken, who was assistant  lighthouse keeper at Merry Island before going east, was delighted to be back by the water.  He borrowed a boat, revisited  all his favorite fishing, spots and  came back with a nice string of  cod.  Ronnie    Sussbauer    is hunting  for elk in the Golden area, but  so far without success. Meanwhile, Mrs. Sussbauer's guests at  Seacrest are her sister-in-law,  Mrs. Carol Dionne of Abbotsford  with her two children. -   ,  Linen shower  for bride-elect  Miss Sharen MacKay was the  guest of honor at a linen shower  Thursday evening. Mrs. R. L.  Gregory and Mrs. Stan Rowland  entertained at the latter's home  on Crow Road for the bride-to-  be.  Fall flowers decorated the living'room, and streamers in blue  and white cascaded over the  chair on which the honored guest  sat to open her numerous, beautiful gifts. The hostesses also  presented her with a dainty corsage.  The bride's cake, made and  decorated by Mrs. Rowland, was  a tasty work of art intricately  decorated. vA buffet .supper was  served. A door prize was won  by Marilyn Greggain.  Other guests included Sylvia  and Wendy Gurney, Mrs. Anne  Gurney, mother of the groom-  elect, Mrs. K. Butler, mother of  the bride-elect, Dawn Rowland,  Mrs. Lome Campbell, Lyrine En-  nis, Mrs. Do Wortman, Phyl  Greggain and Jan Rowland.  Coast News,  Nov. 12, 1964.        3  Society of Momen  dniy organized  Five persons attended a Selma  Park meeting called by The Society of Women Only for the purpose of assisting deserted families. The meeting called by Mrs.  Doreen Kaiser, formerly of Sechelt and now of Vancouver  heard the objectives and achievements. Mrs. Kaiser is now planning to call a meeting in Gibsons area, the date of which will  be announced later. Mrs. Kaiser  reports the organization now has  46 members in British Columbia  and is reaching out for more.  Gibson Girl  BEAUTY CENTRE  PERMS,  CUTS & SETS  "BONAT"  PRODUCTS  Professional Care is  Best  for Your Hair  . .,       Phone 886-2120  Seaside Plaza ��� Gibsons Village-  THERE HAS TO BE 1 REASOI  9 OCT OF 10 m HOMES SO MURAL GAS  the miiis tliere are so many ways  �� MORE  �� MORE  ���'" yV:  �� 'MORE  �� MORE  �� MORE  ,�� MORE  ECONOMY��� Lower initial cost and low operating-.cost year after year  with a minimum of maintenance.  SELECTION ��� Gas gives you more appliances and sizes to choose from  ��� A furnace tailor-made for every sized home.  FREE TIME ��� Gas appliances are all completely automatic for cooking,  water heating, clothes drying and heating ��� set the dials and forget, it  and get more out of life.       '  AND MORE HOT WATER .��� Size for size  much hot water as a gas water heater.  nothing can   give  you   as  USE FROM LESS CLOTHES ��� Nothing dx?es clothes as fast as   a   gas  clothes dryer ��� And so economical too. '  FLEXIBILITY ��� Compact, attractive gas heating units can be built into  walls and closets ��� no chimney needed and so quiet and clean too.  Ei  ENQUIRE TODAY ABOUT METERED PROPANE HEAT -  SO  MANY FURNACES TO CHOOSE FROM! NOW PAY ONLY  10% DOWN WITH UP TO 5 YEARS AT ONLY 7%  IN-  TEREST.  ROCKGAS PROPANE LTD.  Ph.   886-2185  C & S SALES & SERVICE  Sechelt,  B.C.���Ph.  885-8713  GIBSONS HARDWARE Ltd.  Ph.   886-2442  IB Phone 886-9345  OPENING  Thursday, Nov. 12  In Gibsons Opposite Kruse Drug Store  <z/f-    <zfs?0����.    to    ^LfoU  Jean and Bill Lissiman  W$U *'-' >*   --+"-'      - * J    -,*!>'*���'>' .���> �� " *VS .��* I     I' 5"^-���    ' ' ^ st -    'v" ** I^A s -  the  easy  way to  order  an old  #  favorite..  Yes sir! That's CARLING PILSENER for you  ... a B.C. favorite for almost four decades.  There are reasons. Fine quality for one, and  a fresh natural flavor made possible only by  skilled, natural brewing. Natural Brewing  for a fresh natural flavor won a World Award  for Carling Pilsener. Try some, you'll see why.  CARLING  u  ^jj___!��'l_U^^"  W  ^5f*'xj-<>  The B.C. Beer with the Fresh Natural Flavor  This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor  Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.  Church Servic-S  ANGHCAN  St. Bartholomew's,  Gibsons  11:15 a.m., Matins  11:15 a.m.. Church School  St. Aidan's, Roberts Creek  '        3   p.m.,  Evensong  11 a.m., Church School  St.  Hilda's,   Sechelt  11 a.m.,���Matins  Egmont  3 p.m., Evensong  Madeira Park  7:30 p.m., Evensong  UNITED  Gibsons y  11 a.m., Sunday School  11 a.m., Nursery  11 a.m., Divine Service  Roberts  Creek  2 p.m., Divine Service  Worship led by Miss H.  Campbell,   deaconess,   every   second  Sunday of each month.  .   Wilson Creek  11:15 a.m., Divine Worship   .-,  Sunday School, 9:45 . a.m. .  Worship  led  by  Rev.   W.   M.  Cameron at 3:30 p.m. every second Sunday of each month.  BAPTIST  Bethel Baptist,  Sechelt  11:15 a.m., Worship Service  7:30 p!m., Wed., Prayer  Calvary  Baptist,  Gibsons  7:30 p.m., Evening Service  Prayer Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Thurs  ST. VINCENT'S  Holy Family, Sechelt, 9 a.m.  Most Pure Heart of Mary,  Gibsons. 11 a.m.  CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS  Church Services  and Sunday School  each Sunday at 11 a.m.  Roberts  Creek United Church  Radio Program: The Bible  Speaks to You, over CJOR, 600,  9:00 p.m. every Sunday  PENTECOSTAL  Gibsons  9:45 a.m.,  Sunday School  11 a.m., Devotional  7:30   p.m.,   Evangelistic   Service  Tues.,  3:30  p.m.,   Children's  Groups  Tues., 7:30 p.m., Bible Study  Fri.,  7:30 p.m., Young People  GLAD TIDINGS TABERNACLE  11 a.m., Morning Worship  7:30  p.m.,   Evangelistic   Service  10 a.m., Sunday School  Tuesday, 7 p.m.     Bible School  Friday, 7:30 p.m.. Rally  JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES  Bible Studies, Tues., 8 p.m.  Ministry School,  Fri.,  7:30 p.m.  Service Meeting, Fri.,; 8:30 p.m.  Public Talk, Sun., 3 p.m.  Watchtower Study,  Sun., 4 p.m.  Kingdom Hall at  Selma  Park  Lucky 13  tea planned  The Women's Institute in Gibsons plans a Lucky 13 tea for  Fri., Nov. 13 starting at 2 p.m.  in the W.I. cottage. There will  be gifts, novelties, furniture,  home cooking, sewing and. a  white elephant table. There will  also be a lucky prize to be won  -during the afternoon.  Cartons of soap and used clothing are being sent to the United  Services for shipment to Greece  and Korea and a birthday gift  was sent to the W.I. adoptee at  the Queen Alexandra Solarium.  It was announced at the last  meeting that there would be a  radio program .every Wednesday  at 11:30 a.m. on CFFC giving  news of the 14 Fraser district institutes of which Howe Sound institute is one.  At the end of the meeting Mrs.  Wes Hodgson gave an interesting  talk on her recent trip to England and Scotland. It is expected  she will continue her talk with  slides at a later meeting.  Christmas bazaar  At Roberts Creek Legion Auxiliary meeting Nov. 2 it was decided the Christmas bazaar would  be held Wed., Dec. 9. The auxiliary will also send its usual contribution to the blind institute  and gifts will be sent to male  patents at Essondale. It was also  decided not to hold a Christmas  tree event for youngsters if the  Community association plans one  and if so the auxiliary will make  its donation towards it.  ZONING HEARING  A hearing on the' bylaw to rezone property owned by Frank  Wyngaert in rear of the chicken  farm will be held at 7 p.m. on  Nov. 17 preceding council meeting in the Municipal hall. Mr.  Wyngaert seeks to have the property zoned from commercial to  residential and commercial.  Editor: In June this year, an  open meeting was held in the  Community Hall at Roberts Creek  to form a Centennial committee.  Due to the small attendance a  committee of seven persons was  appointed to look into the matter of selecting a project. We  are now calling for suggestions  from any residents of Roberts  Creek and all will be carefully  considered.  In three weeks time a public  meeting will be called to discuss  these ideas and attempt to decide on a project. Date of meeting . will be announced later.  Please watch for it.  Address suggestions to the  Centennial Committee, Roberts  Creek. Thank you.  Ron  McSavaney,   chairman.  and you would have something  worthwhile to show for Centennial Year,   .y:  I live in the village but I do  think people should be thinking  of the future and the exparision  of the village.        ~ Thinking.  Editor: Re Gibsons project  vote landslide ��� was there an  actual ballot with the six mentioned subjects printed on the  same where a person could mark  an X or some similar symbol?  To me that is voting. Where you  have a choice shown to you and  you mark the one you prefer, I  think fair.  It seems to me that there were  canvassers going' around and not  going to every home, asking if  you thought it would toe a good  idea to clean up the old church  grounds as a Centennial project.  Naturally it needs fixing up as  a lawn but the village can surely afford those funds themselves  and use the grant for a larger  project.  A park where the young people  can benefit from it for baseball,  tennis or other sports for outdoors. The church grounds are  so small you can hardly play  horseshoes.  Brothers Memorial Park is in  the area now but someday it will  be part of the village of Gibsons  Editor: Have just received the  very informative circular issued  by the Sechelt School District No.  46 and as I note it suggests that  we ask questions I would like to  ask the following.  Under the heading Annual  Ratepayers Meetings they speak  of the trustees making their any  nual reports to the people of the  area. There was no trustee made  any report to the Roberts Creek .,  School meeting but there were  two representatives there.  Just what is the difference between a trustee and a representative and what -are the duties  of each? I telephoned the lady  who was re-elected a representative and she said she would  take it up with the Board of  School Trustees and have it explained in their next bulletin.  Maybe you could enlighten the  ratepayers in your publication.  B. L. Cope.  4       Coast News, Nov. 12, 1964.  Rehearsal turns  into sing-song  Mr. and Mrs. Denis (John)  Connor entertained members of  the Tidewater Players' Club Friday evening at their home on  Lower Road.; Those present had  to do with certain scenes in the  coming production, Calendar  Countdown, and although part  of the evening was given over to  rehearsal, much of it was spent  in, spontaneous singing and dancing. Ray Johnson and Bill Garrison were, as usual, equal to any  demands made upon them and  their guitars. ,  Those present were Mr. and  Mrs. H. Mylroie, Mr. and Mrs.  Bud Blatchford, Mr. and Mrs.  Bud Laird, Mr. and Mrs. Bill  Garrison, Mr. and Mrs* Rod  MacKenzie, Mr. and Mrs. Ray  Johnson, Mrs. L. Farr, Mrs. M.  W. MacKenzie, Mrs. J. T. Newman, Mrs. B 'Campbell, Mrs D.  Schoenewolf and Mr; Rex Davis.  Much of the sunflower seed  crop grown in Canada is for bird  feed  or  confectionery use.  YOUR BLACK CAT  An all-black cat, apparently  struck, by an automobile and  brought to the home of Dr. H. R.  Hylton is now fully re covered  and its owner can claim it by  phoning 886-7713^ This male cat  would be under two years old.  CHIROPRACTIC OFFICE  MON.,   THURS.,   SAT.  1678 Marine Drive ��� Gibsons  Phone 886-9843  YOUR GLASSES?  Grey-colored plastic framed  giasses picked up in the Langdale area have been turned over  to the Coast News. If you have  lost them come and pick them  up.  SEPTIC TANK  SERVICE  PUMP TANK TRUCK  Tanks Built or Repaired  Drainage Fields Installed  Gibsons Plumbing  Ph. 886-2460 for information  What's your stand on registering life  insurance policies to claim certain  income tax deductions?  Mr. Campbell  If it's possible, I'm all for it!  Interviewer   You'll be pleased to know you  may register any Mutual Life  policy, except Term, under the  Income Tax Act. Subject to  certain limitations, the savings  portion of your premium can  then be deducted from your taxable income each year.  Mr. Campbell  It seems to me that everybody  should know about this!  Interviewer    You're right! Particularly people  who are building a pension for  themselves. Even people now  contributing to a company  pension plan may qualify for  further tax relief.  Mr. Campbell  Look, I'd like to check into  this before I file my 1964 return; Where can I get complete  information?  Interviewer  Just call your nearest Mutual  Life representative.  The Mutual Life  ASSURANCE COMPANY OP CANADA  ML6S-1C HEAD OFFICE: WATERLOO. ONTARIO/ESTABLISHED lie.  Nick D. Thiessen,  6921 Jasper Ave.,  Powell River, B.C.  Ph: 485-6330  Paul Neufeld,  300-475 Howe Street,  Vancouver, B.C.  Ph: Bus. MU 3-6905  Ph: Res. CR 8-8337 Coast News, Nov. 12, 1964.  b     ANNOUNCEMENTS (Cont'd)  COMING   EVENTS  Nov. 13, Friday- W.I. Lucky 13  tea and sale. W.L Cottage. Home  cooking, sewing, novelties, white  elephant. .; p;  Nov. 19, St. Hilda's W.A. Tea,  homecookirig, holiday gifts. Parish Hall, Sechelt, Thursday, 2  p.m. Visitors welcome.  Dec. 2. Selma Park Community  Hall, 2-4 p.m., Tea and home  cooking.: Selma Sewing Circle.  Proceeds to new hospital.  Dec. 11, L.A. to Guides and  Brownies Xmas Bake Sale at  Super-Valu. ���   V  births ������:������;������:������'.���:-.;���.'' - .  SULLIVAN ��������� To Mr. and Mrs.  George Sullivan, Sunshine Coast  Trailer Court, a baiby girl, 8 lbs.  3 oz., Nov. 8, in Vancouver General Hospital. ' y    y  FLORISTS  Wreaths and sprays. Lissi-Land  Florists. Phone 886-9345, Hopkins  Landing.       ".- ���-���"._. -. ''". y.'   -...  Flowers for all occasions  Eldred's   Flower   Shop,   Sechelt.  Phone 885-4455  HELP WANTED  Experienced .-male bookkeeper  required as assistant to accountant. Phone 885-2228 for appointment.  CASH IN ~~      ~~"'  On the big Fall and Christmas  selling season. Represent Avon  in your neighborhood. Write Mrs.  A. Legg, Box 79, Wellington, B.C.  Choir   leader   and   organist   for  Gibsons United Church. Reply to  , Box 271,   Gibsons post office.  WORK WANTED ~  ROY'S LAND SERVICE  ROTO-TILLING, 4 sizes of machines to match your job.  Plowing and Breaking  Rocky Ground Breaking  Grading and Levelling  Cultivating and Hilling  Complete  Lawn   Service  from  planting to maintenance  Mowing and Sweeping  POWER RAKING  Edging and Fertilising  Seeding and Rolling, etc.  Arrange  for regular  complete  lawn care  ROY BOLDERSON Box 435  Sechelt 885-9530  Phone evenings only Please  Redrooffs Water Service  Plumbing, building septic tanks.  James Alex Stewart  Phone 885-9545  Sewing. Plain, fine or coarse.  Phone 886-2280. Ask ipr .Davie.  Portraits Free! Pay only if satisfied. Also paintings of your  home and property. Contact A.  Lisch, General Delivery, Roberts  Creek. i -  Dressmaking   and   alterations.  Phone 886-2295  ANNOUNCEMENTS  Will holder of .ticket .No. 12650,  Anglican Bazaar, Nov. 7, phone  886-9555 to  claim  door prize.  REINCARNATION  explains life and death  Send for free booklet  .  YOU WILL COME BACK  UNITED  LODGE   OF  THEOSOFHTSTS  531 Bay St.,  Ottawa,  Ont.  MAKE IT ELECTROLUX  FOR THE BEST FLOORS  AND CARPETS  886-9833 days  886-2774 eve.  For membership or explosive re-  quiremenlte contact F. J. Wyngaert, 886-9340, HOWE SOUND  FARMERS' INSTITUTE.  Tree falling, topping or removing  lower limbs for view. Insured  work from Port Mellon to Pender Harbour. Phone 886-9946.  Marven Volen.  BRICKLAYER  Custom built fireplaces and ohim'  neys. Brick and block building.  Slate,    sandstone.    Bill    Hartle,  886-2586.  CUNNINGHAM'S  AMBULANCE SERVICE  Emergency  and nonemergency calls  Special rates for O.A.P.  Qualified Personnel  24 HOUR SERVICE  Phone 885-9927  WATKINS PRODUCTS  W.  H. KENT,  Gibsons,   886-9976  ~ PEDICURIST ;  Mrs. F.E. Campbell  Selma Park, -on bus stop  885-9778 '  Evenings by appointment  PETER CHRISTMAS  Bricklayer and Stonemason  All kinds of brick and stone work  Alterations and repairs  Phone 886-7734  SUNSHINE COAST  FOR RENT (Confd)  FUELS  NELSON'S  LAUNDRY  &  DRY  CLEANING  FUR STORAGE  Phone Sechelt 885-9627  or in Roberts Creek,  Gibsons  and Port Mellon Zenith 7020  WATER SURVEY SERVICES  HYDROPURE water sterilizer,  water filtering systems, diamond  drilling, jack hammer work, rock  and stump blasting; R.R. 1, Sechelt.  Phone 885-9510. '  WATCH REPAIRS & JEWELRY  MARINE MEN'S WEAR  Ph. 886-2116, Gibsons  VICTOR D'AOUST  Painter ��� Decorator  Interior ��� Exterior  Paper Hanging  First Class Work Guaranteed  Phone 886-9652, North Road  FIREPLACES  PLANTERS  FOUNDATIONS  WALLS  A. Simpkins 885-2132  WATER SURVEY SERVICES  Full insurance) coverage on all  blasting operations. We have had  wide experience iri this area. Try  us��� we provide estimates. Ph.  885-9510, Mason Rd:, Sechelt.  CREST ELECTRIC  Domestic wiring, rewiring and  alterations from Port Mellon to  Pender Harbour. Free estimates.  Phone 886-9320 evenings.  Alcoholics Anonymous, Post office Box 294, Sechelt. Information, phone 886-9372.  MISC. FOR SALE  Large Warden King hot water  furnace boiler, $100; refrigerator $45; oil stove $25; 4 chests  of. drawers $5 each; dining room  table and sideboard. Box 731  Coast News.  Oil stove $30; Singer treadle  sewing machine $25. All in good  condition. Phone 886-7766.  Gifts galore at Earl's Store. Only  36 shopping days left till Christmas. A small deposit will hold  any purchase.  Earl's, 886-9600  Lambs, live weight, 18c lb. Ph.  886-9363.  MUSHROOM   MANURE  NON-ACID TOPSOIL  Weedless. odorless, easy to handle, general purpose humus fertilizer, ideal for lawn dressing or  base, large and small fruits,  vegetables and flowers. Also  mushrooms for sale. Pick yourself. Phone 886-2855.  Combination white enamel wood  and coal kitchen range with 2  gas burners. Full size blue enamel oven. Very good condition.  Phone 885-2792 evenings.  3 oil space heaters with barrels,  $30 each. Phone 886-9615.  Good qualitv turnips at the farm,  6c lb. G. Charman, 886-9862.  PLASTIC PIPE  % inch     3%c per ft.  % inch ������-    5%c per ft.  1 inch '.. 8%c per ft.  VA inch  .........  12V_c per ft.  1%  inch    .........   16   c per ft.  GIBSONS BLDG. SUPPLIES Ltd.  Phone 886-2642  Pot burning auto, oil furnace,  suitable for smaller home. Small  oil heater. Ph. 886-9814 after 6  p.m.  POULTRY MANURE available.  Sacked for convenient handling.  Order in advance. Wygnaert  Poultry Farm.  886-9340.  2 hives of bees and equipment,  cheap.   Phone   885-4470. .  Used automatic washer $39.95  Used Annex Heater $20.00  Used McLary Refrigerator $69.95  Used Norge Elec. Range $89.00  1 Steel full sized bedstead $10.00  New 54" Box Spring &  mattress $98.97  See the new "Trendline" Tappan  Ranges now on display  PARKER'S HARDWARE LTD.  Marshall^Wells Store  Sechelt, B.C.  HUNTING SUPPLIES  Everything for the hunter, guns,  ammo,    cases,    sleeping    bags,  ground sheets, tarps, etc.  Walt Nygren Sales Ltd.  Phone 886-9303  52 ft. x 10 ft. Rollohome trailer  located in Gibsons. Some terms.  Phone 886-9817.  Used electric and gas ranges,  also oil ranges. C & S Sales, Ph.  885-9713, S_fehe_t.  Canning fowl 30c each. Swabey,  Henry Rd., Gibsons. 886-9657.  For guaranteed watch. and: jewelry repairs, see Chris's Jewelers,  Sechelt.. Work done on the premises, i  Used furniture, or what have  you? Al'�� Used Furniture, Gibsons. Phone 886-9950.  CARS, TRUCKS  FOR SALE  1958 Dodge power wagon, good  condition, complete with winch.  Phone 886-2882.  1955 Belevdere Plymouth sedan.  One owner. H. Chaster, 886-9566.  '53 Ford sedan, automatic^ $250.  Phone 886-2632.  51 Pontiac sedan, real good shape  R. & H., A.T. $175. Ph. 883-2418  1960 Chev, low mileage. Phone  886-9686.   PETS   feKlnese puppies. Phone 886-9890  WEST SECHELT        y  2 bedroom house on good view  lot. $6,000 terms.  3 acres good land and 3 room  cottage with bath.  $4500.  Good view lot and building site  $1850.  ���-.-���'. v .-        .    . /  SECHELT  Homes and lots in village. ���  SELMA PARK  Several good homes and lots  on both sides of highway at very  attractive prices and terms.  2 bedroom house on 3 acres,  Wilson Creek. $9560 terms.  We have exclusive listings and  shall be pleased to show you any  of the above.  For all kinds "of insurance including Life, see E. SURTEES at  AGGETT AGENCIES LW.  Sechelt, B.C.  Phone 885-2065,  885-9303.  C. King, 885-2066.  Fully serviced V.L.A. LOTS on  Evergreen Acres, conveniently  located, level. Only $500 down,  excellent terms.  Easy terms on this Gibsons duplex. Excellent revenue property. Suite 1: 2 bedrms, living rm.  and kitchen, shower etc. fenced  yard, car port. Suite 2: View  living rm. bar kitchen, dining  area, 3 bedrms, bath. Separate  entrance, open porch, grassed  yard. Full price $9,850.  Village water serves this Pratt  Rd. house on 2Vk acres, mostly  cleared. Exterior comipleted, interior not partitioned. Large  enough for three rooms. Modern  electric range and fridge. $1,500  down,   low  pay's.  FOR THE CHOICE  PROPERTIES CONTACT  K. BUTLER REALTY & Insurance  Box 23, Gibsons B.C.  Phone 886-2000  GRANTHAMS  View Lot ��� Fully serviced,  magnificent southerly view. Ideal  summer or year round homesite.  Close to wharf and store. Full  price $1,450.  GIBSONS  View Lots ��� Your choice of  two fully serviced view lots in  new home area. Full price $2,250  each with easy terms.  . 2 Bedroom ��� Modern home on  large lot close to schools etc.  Modern family kitchen, large liv.  ing room, Pem/broke baithroom.  Utility room. Full price $7,900  terms.  3 Bedroom ��� Basement home  in bay area. This modern 4 year  old home /has large living room  with fireplace, auto-oil furnace,  Pembroke bath. Full price $12,750  easy terms. V  SECRET COVE AREA  Waterfront ��� 2 acres with superb view and 350 ft. frontage.  Easy access from highway,  springs on property. Full price  $4,500.  PENDER & BARGAIN  HARBOUR  Waterfront Lots ��� Close to  Madeira Park. Large lots with  perfect year round sheltered  moorage. Priced from $2,800,  easy terms.  Call Frank Lewis or Morton  Mackay at Gibsons office, 886-  9900 (24 hrs.)  FINLAY REALIY LTD.  GIBSONS     and     BURQUITLAM  OPEN FOR INSPECTION  MERMAID STREET,   SECHELT  Fri., & Sat., Nov. 6 & 7, 2-4 p.m.  SECHELT  AGENCIES  OFFERS  3 bedroom modern 6 rm. full  bsmt.  Auto oil heat.  Handy lo-.c  cation,   landscaped   lot;   $14,000 ;  terms. ��� A  ?      LOOK EOR PRE SIGNS  TRY OUR COFFEE  For this' and other well priced,  properties with terms from $500  down, jttj,j  Call J.  Anderson,  885-9565  B.  Kent,   885-4461.  SECHELT AGENCIES LTD.  Phone 885-2161  Box 155,  Sechelt, B.C.  Rockwood Lodge, Sechelt, B.C.  Acr. View, furniture. E.T. Rayner, Box 142, Sechelt, B.C. Ph.  885-9598.  SILVER SANDS  PENDER HARBOUR AREA  On Sunshine Coast Highway Private or good commercial property. Sandy beach with 140' pier.  Sheltered anchorage. 34x40 workshop with suite upstairs. Cement  floor and industrial wiring. Electric hot water and pressure system. Inside colored plumbing.  Rockgas. 900 sq. ft. aluminum  roof carport. Boat launching  ramp, good well. 1964 taxes  $120.63. Approx. 2 acres. $18,500.  Telephone owner, W. Copping,  521-6069.  New waterfront home, West Sechelt. Lovely beach. S. Patrick,  885-4467.,  *3'Bedroom'house,"Gibsons, automatic heat, full basement. Phone  886-2762.  PROPERTY   WANTED  WATERFRONT LISTINGS  WANTED  We have many clients wanting lots and waterfront homes  in the Roberts Creek, Davis  Bay,�� West Sechelt and Halfmoon Bay areas.  We specialize in waterfront  properties.  For action on your property  oall or write N. Paterson,  CAPILANO HIGHLANDS Ltd.  803 Davie St., Vancouver  Ph.   682,3764,   Eves   988-0512  FOR  RENT  H. B. GORDON & KENNETT Ltd.  Real Estate & Insurance  Gibsons Sechelt  886-2191 885-2013  (R. F. Kennett ��� Notary Public)  2 years old post and beam. A  real bargain at $8,900.  2V_ acres for only $1,800 down.  Full basement. 2 br. home.  ' 3 bedrooms, new, superlb view.  Close to beach. A low down payment  can handle.  EWART McMYNN  Real Estate & Insurance  Phones 886-2166  Evenings 886-2590 or 886-2496  CHARLES ENGLISH Ltd.  Real Estate���Insurance  Sunnvcrest Shopping Centre  GIBSONS.   B.C. PH.  886-24R1  Eves. - C. R. Gathercole, 886-2785  PENDER HARBOUR ��� DISCOUNT 10% on all lots Sunislope  Sub. Nov. 1st Dec. 31, 1964. Prices $1000 to $1750. Terms. Sechelt  Agencies Ltd., 885-2161. Evenings  885-4461 Collect   1 acre, Selma Park, onjiHighway.  Full' price $1700. Phoiie 885-9339  or 885-2160.' ^p   Pender Harbour, 6 acres ��� with  garage. Northwest corner of  Highway 101 and Garden Bay  Road. Spring water. $4500. Ph.  885-9714.  3 room cottage furnished or unfurnished. Phone 886-9661.  27*ft. trailer, also 2 room cabana  available  Nov.  23.   Ph,   886-2762.  2 bedroom furnished suite at  Granthams, heating supplied.  Phone 886-2163.  3 room and bathroom, furnished  suite.  886-2863.  ; 2 bedroom house trailer, vicinity  Hopkins Landing. Available Nov.  .23.  Pihone 886-2762.  Bachelor cottage, furnished, elec.  stove, oil heater, near beach.  Phone after 6 p.m., 886-2559.  Single housekeeping . room for  man. Cottage on Port Mellon  Highway. Phone 886-9525 after,  5 ip.m. s  BUILDING MATERIALS  JOHN DEKLEER  BUILDING ��� CONTRACTING  Wilson Creek, B.C.  Phone 885-2050  COAL & WOOD  ���. Aide*$10  ' Maple $12  WANTED  WILL BUY STANDING FIR,  HEMLOCK AND CEDAR.  PHONE 886-2459.  WANTED TO RENT  Wanted to rent with option to  buy, 2 or 3 bedroom house, Gibsons, Granthams, Hopkins area.  Steady tenants, 3 adults, no pets.  Phone 886-2434.  Wanted to rent or option to purchase, 3 ��� bedroom home with  acreage in Gibsons vicinity. Ph.  886-9304. .  Fir $12 delivered  Bone dry old growth fir $14  DRUMHELLER HARD COAL  $32 ton, $17 y2 ton, $2 per bag  TOTEM LOGS ��� $1 per box  R. N. HASTINGS���North Rd.  Gibsons  We deliver anywhere on the  Peninsula.  For prices phone  886-9902  WOOD   FOR   SALE  Alder $10, Fir $12. Terms Cash.  Phone C. Wyton, 886-2441.  REST HOME  Ideal home care and good food  for aged or convalescent. T.V.  Phone 886-2096.  "Give me one  good reason  why I should  build my home  this winter"  Here are five hundred!  You Get a $500 Cash Incentive  To help keep Canada's building trades busy and productive  during the winter season, the Federal Government is again  offering to pay a $500 cash incentiveto those who build or  buy a winter-built home.  What is a Winter-Built Home?  A winter built home under this program is one that has not  proceeded beyond the first floor joist stage by November  15th and is substantially completed by March 31st, 1965.  How Do You Proceed?  It's easy. Pick up an Application for Certification form at  your National Employment Office or Central Mortgage and  Housing-Corporation officer-fill it out and mail to your  nearest CMHC office. If you wish, your builder can do this  for you. Complete information on the program is included  on the application form.  AttNbw V  See your builder and arrange to have your home winter-  built. Help yourself to that $500 cash incentive and help  Canadian industry stay busy throughout the winter.  Last Winter more than 28,000 homes were built under  this program.  ~~ ���   DO IT NOW!  Have Your Home  Winter-Built!  Issued by authority of Hon. Allan J.MacEachen, Minister of Labour,Canada.,  WB-2-65A  I WINTER BU1LI  ANEW DEAL!    BUY NOW!  $25 DOWI and $25 a M0ITH  FOR LARGE VIEW LOTS  AT MADEIRA PARK OR EARL COVE  Phone 0LLI SLADEY at 883-2233 ��� Madeira Park, B.C. 6       Coast News, Nov. 12,  1964..  Christ!sia.c3!3@@H  Tentative plans for the school  Children's Christmas closing were  made at the Parents' Auxiliary  meeting at Roberts Creek School  Monday night. It was decided to  depart from the Christmas concert custom and have instead  something less exhausting to  teachers and parents.  Mr. A. Merling, the principal,  announced that the children had  collected in excess of the required amount for their little Korean  adoptee on their Hallowe'en  rounds.  British Columbia's virile cattle industry supplies some 65,-  000,000 pounds of meat annually  to the B.C. market.  Hassans Store  Complete stock of  FISHING TACKLE  Commercial & Sports  HARDWARE ��� DRY GOODS  BAPCO PAINT  Interior & Marine  Ph. 8832415  Wori-wiiie Bi&Ie  The Canadian Bible society is  seeking a special $200,000 fund  this Fall as the second phase of  Canada's contribution towards a  world-wide drive to triple availability of Bibles, Testaments : and  Bible portions to the growing  millions of literates around the  world. B.C.s part this Fall is an  extra $20,000. added to. the anticipated $110,000 1964 budget.  The God's Word for a New  Age program was inaugurated in  the summer of 1963 all over the  world.' Canada's goal of an extra  $60,000 was over-subscribed. As  a result of Canada's gift along  with those from other countries,  campaign  the society was able to increase  scripture distribution, along with  the other Bible societies^ 29% in  the first quarter of 1964.  In a July report by the British  and Foreign Bible society, demand in languages alone, for  translation and^ for printing, was  being held up because the Society lacked the $344;000 - needed  to pay the costs. The present  campaign is. destined to help relieve that situation and others.  Stones     used     to  beat  other  stones  into   shape are  assumed  to have been the first tools used  by primitive, man.   ,  "Now I have to step on thej  " ' scales to reach it!"  ��<uou. \Vl___GUTD.  READY  MIX  CONCRETE  850���DISPLAY YOUR HANDIWORK proudly with this trio of easy,  oval doilies. Easy crochet, pineapple design. Directions 21x32-inches  doily, 17x23 and 9x14 in No. 30 cotton.  911���LOOKS LIKE CUTWORK ��� it's actually only satin, outline,  lazy-daisy stitches. Decorate towels, cases, scarfs with these rich  motifs. Transfer 6 motifs 4x1254 inches.  841���DO IT YOURSELF! Slip cover a chair or sofa. Follow our step-  by-step method; turn out .professional covers. Instructions for basic  cover;  6 other types.  THIRTY-FIVE CENTS in coins (no stamps, please) for each  pattern to Laura Wheeler, care of Coast News, Needlecraft Dept.,  60 Front St. West, Toronto, Ont. Ontario residents add 1c sales tax.  Print plainly PATTERN NUMBER, your NAME and ADDRESS.  GIBSONS PLUMBING  HEATING  ���   PLUMBING  Complete installation  . Quick  efficient service  Phone 886-2460 or 886-2191  SCOWS ���  LOGS  P & W DEVELOPMENT CO.  Ph.   886-9857 ���   Gibsons  Christmas Seals available  The Christmas Seal campaign  which opens Nov. 9 in British  Columbia will try to raise $325,-  000 this year.  Highlights of the Society's 1964  activities included the completion of the Vancouver Operation  Doorstep community TB skin  test and chest X-ray survey program. This program, the largest  of its type ever attempted in  North -America has been declared an outstanding success. Over  .220,000 Vancouver residents were  tested in a 12 week period, with  over 125 new cases of tuberculosis, 25 cases  of lung cancer,  90  heart conditions and a long list  of other chest 'conditions being  discovered.  The Operation Doorstep program, which is considered a model in North America and has  been copied by the States of Wisconsin, Washington, Ohio and  others, was recently accorded  an unprecedented five page review in the United States Tuberculosis Association Bulletin.  As in past years the Christmas  Seal campaign. ;will be. conducted ���  exclusively  by. mail.   The   campaign   which   opens   on   Nov.   9  will be completed by. Christmas..  SECHELT TOWING & SALVAGE  LTD.  Heav.y Equipment Moving  & Log Towing  Phone   885-4425  CHAIN SAW CENTRE  WILSON CREEK. B.C.  Dealers for PM  Canadien,  McCulloch and Homelite Chain Saws  A Complete  Stock of Machines  and Parts for Maintenance,  and Repairs.  Telephone   885-2228  C. E. S1C0TTE  BULLDOZING  SERVICE  Land Clearing ��� Excavating  and  Road Building  H       Clearing Blade  Phone   886-2357  \  When you need more  living space, the fastest way  ,to find REAL ESTATE  is in the  YELLOW PAGES,  where YOUR  FINGERS DO  WALKING  The public school meeting at  the Halfmoon Bay school on Nov.  4 was a lively affair with an unusually good attendance of parents. Mrs. Peggy Volen, school  trustee, was kept busy, -answering  questions.  The question was again raised  of extending the school bus run  as far as Cooper's store during  the winter months.,-.This same  ���question had Tjeerf brtiught to the  attention  of" the" board  the  pre-  ^i^w'-'S^^Tr-w!^.^^  :^___��_______;  _______2____v  Gibsons  ESSO OIL FURNACES  NO DOWN PAYMENT - BANK INTEREST  TEN YEARS TO PAY  COMPLETE LODE OF APPLIANCES  FOR FREE ESTIMATE ��� Call 886-2728  vious year but no action had  been taken.   ....'.,  The School Board was asked to  include a financial statement in  the annual report and it was also considered desirable that a  copy of the annual report be posted in the post office where it  could be seen by everyone interested before the date of the annual meeting.  Questions were asked about the  policy of giving school children  periodic medical check - ups.  Strong criticism was expressed  of th.p access *o *hft school bv  way of a stretch of busy logging  road and through a too narrow  gate. The meeting felt strongly  that the gate should be widened  and that the alternative road on  the south side of the school  should be repaired and made usable. Mrs. Queenie Burrows was  re-elected as school representative. -  :  For all your Heating needs call  TINGLEY'S HI-HEAT  SALES & SERVICE  Expert service on all repairs to  oil stoves, heaters and furnaces  New  installations   of  warm  air  or hot water heating,  tailored  to   your  needs  Your   choice  of  financing  plans  Phone 885-9636 or 885-9332  P.O.  Box 417 ��� Sechelt, B.C.  GIBSONS WELDING  & MACHINE WORKS  Precision  Machinery  100  ton  Hydraulic  Press  Shaft Straightening  Caterpillar Roller Rebuilding  North   Road,   R.R.I.   Gibsons  Ph.  886-9682  CHAMPIONSHIP   GOLF  ��� Pleasant Valley- Country Club  in Sutton, Massachusetts, will be  the site of the 1965 Carling World  Golf championship, Harold W.  Blakley, president of the Carling. Breweries Limited, announces. ''     '���  '    ������*������- 0 -..:,      ������      ���    '��� .'?  With a $200,000 purse, the richest in golfing history, the 1965  Carling World will attract over  150 of the world's best professional and amateur golfers. Contestants are selected for the tournament in 10 world-wide; qualifying  events. First prize money is  $35,000  I & S TRANSPORT LTD.  Phone 886-2172  Daily Freight Service to  Vancouver  Local & long distance moving  Local pickup and delivery  service  Lowbed hauling  Wilson Creek, B. C.  DEALERS    FOR:  PM CANADIEN, McCULLOCH, HOMELITE, STIHL & PIONEER CHAIN SAWS  A COMPLETE STOCK OF MACHINES AND PARTS  FOR MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS  Telephone 885-2228  TELEVISION  SALES & SERVICE  Dependable Service  RICHTER'S RADIO ��� TV  Fine Home Furnishings  Major Appliances  Record Bar  "Phone   885-9777  OPTOMETRIST  FRANK E.  DECKER  BAL BLOCK, GIBSONS  EVERY WEDNESDAY  FOR APPOINTMENTS - 886-2166  HALL ���METAL  GENERAL SHEET METAL  Domestic  ���  Commercial  Industrial  ���   Marine  HEATING  Phone 885-9606  SUNSHINE COAST TRAILER PARK  1 mile west of Gibsons on Hlway.  Roomy Parking, Plenty of Water  Large recreation area  Bus passes park site  Phone 886-9826  MASONS GARAGE  Dunlop tires & accessories  Electric welding,  Wheel balancing  Truck and car repairs  NORTH ROAD ��� GIBSONS  Ph. 886-2562  NORM BURTON  Your Odd Job Man  Carpentry Work, House Repairs,  Drainage Tilesdaid, etc.  Res., Pratt Rd.,   Gibsons  Phone 886-2048  HILL'S MACHINE SHOP  Cold  Weld Process  Engine Block Repairs  Arc, Acy Welding  Precision Machinists  Ph. 886-7721 Res.  886-9956  APPLIANCES  Radio, Appliance & TV Service  LIVE BETTER ELECTRICALLY  Gibsons Electric  Authorized  Dealer  Phone  886-9325  SWANSON BROS.  Cement  Gravel, , Backhoe &  Road Gravel, Loader Work,  Sand & Fill  Septic Tanks and Drain Fields  Phone 885-9666  C. ROY GREGGS  Sand, Gravel, Fill,  Septic Tanks, Drain Fields  Backhoe   and   Loader  Bulldozing  Sechelt ��� Ph. 885-9712  GENERAL REPAIRS  ��� CHIMNEY   SWEEPING  OIL STOVE MAINTENANCE  E. LUCAS  Free  Estimates ���  Ph.  884-5387  We use  Ultra Sonic Sound Waves  to clean your watch  and jewelry  CHRIS' JEWELERS  Mail Orders  Given Prompt Attention  Ph. Sechelt 885-2151  SIM ELECTRIC LTD.  ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS  SECHELT  Phone 885-2062  0CEANSIDE FURNITURE  & CABINET SHOP  Makers of fine custom furnishings and cabinets in hardwoods and softwoods  Kitchen remodelling is our  specialty  R.   BIRKIN  White Rd., Roberts. Creek  Phone  886-2551  THRIFTEE DRESS SHOP  "Personalized Service"  Agents .  Brown Bros; Flpr��sts       :   Phone 886-9543  BEN DUBOIS  FLOAT, SCOW, LOG TOWING  Gunboat Bay, Pender Harbour  Phone 883-2324  ALCAN KEMAN0 SURPLUS  Staff Prefab Houses complete  1 Bedroom $1200  2 Bedroom $1400  Phone 885-4464  885-2104  886-2827  No 8% ��� Can be bank financed  C & S SA1ES  For all your heating;  requirements  Agents for ROCKGAS  PROPANE  Also Oil Installation  "     Free estimates  Furniture  Phone  885-9713  AIR COMPRESSOR,  BACKHOE   and   LOADER  and ROCK DRILL  DUMP TRUCKS  Contract or hourly, rates  Also  SAND, CEMENT GRAVEL  ROAD FILL and TOPSOIL  W.   KARATEEW.   Ph-   886-9826  SMITH'S HEATING  CHIMNEY & OIL  STOVES  CLEANED  Phone 886-2422  D. J. R0Yf P. Eng. B.C.L.S.  LAND SURVEYING  SURVEYS  P.O. Box 37,  Gibsons  1334 West Pender St.  Vancouver, 5 Ph. MU 4-361J  A. E. RITCHEY  TRACTOR WORK  Clearing, Grading. Excavating  Bulldozing,  Clearing Teeth  FOR RENTAL  Arches, Jacks, Pumps  Air  Compressor,  Rock  Drill  Concrete Vibrator  Phone 886-2040  PENINSULA PLUMBING  HEATING & SUPPLIES  Formerly Rogers Plumbing  cor. Sechelt Highway & Pratt Rd.  SALES AND SERVICE  Port Mellon ��� Pender Harbour  Free Estimates  Phone  886-9533  TWIN CREEK LUMBER  & BID. SUPPLIES LTD.  Phone  886-2808  Everything   for 'your  building  needs ,  Free Estimates  Morgage Money  for New Construction  or Older Homes  CHARLES ENGLISH LTD.  Sunnycrest Shopping Centre  GIBSONS 886-2481  R. H. (Bob) CARRUTHERS  Oil  stoves  and  heaters cleaned  and serviced  Port Mellon to Earls Cove  Phone 886-2155  NEVENS RADIO & TV  Franchised Philips Dealer  SALES AND SERVICE  (to all makes)  also appliances  Ph.  886-2280  Peninsula Cleaners  Cleaners for the Sechelt  Peninsula  Phone 886-2206  GULF BUILDING SUPPLIES  Everything   for your   building  needs  Sechelt ��� Ph. 885-2283 KNOW  Prepared by the Research Staff of  IN CYC LOP EDI A   CAN AD I ANA  What was described as  Canada's chief town?   ,  In 1608 a pamphlet was published in Lyons, France, describing Brest, a Labrador harbor,  as the principal town of Canada  "peopled by about 50,000 men."  Despite the fact that there was '  probably never anything more  on the site than a blockhouse  and some huts, this story of the  former greatness of Brest persisted in one form or Another for  nearly 300 years. The harbor is  on the Labrador coast, about 30  miles southwest of the southern  end of the Strait of Belle Isle.  It had already been frequented .  by Breton fishermen when Car-  tier visited it in 1534.  How did Franklin help  Arctic exploration?  In addition to the great series  of explorations he carried out  himself. Sir John Franklin in  death was, the cause of great  advances in knowledge concerning the Arctic. In 1847 Franklin  and all his men lost their lives  when hemmed in by the-ice near  King William Island, although '  their fate was not known for a  number of years.-  In 1848 and subsequent years  numerous expeditions were sent  out to search for Franklin .and  his men, and, in the course of  this grim search, the whole of  the Arctic coast of Canada was ;  charted. Shins sailing west from  thte Atlantic met ships sailing  east from the Pacific, and thus  the existence of a Northwest  Passage was at last demonstrated. The actual navigation of the  Northwest Passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific was first  achieved by the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen in 1906.  Who baptized more than  10,000 Indians?  Claude Jean Allouez, Jesuit  missionary of the 17th century, j  is said to have baptized more  than 10,��00 Indians during his'  years in the West. Born in  France in 1622, he took his vows  as a Jesuit in 1657 and came to  Canada the following year. For  seven years he worked at Trois  Rivieres and other settlements  on the St. Lawrence.  Then in August 1665 he set out  from Quebec for the missions in  the West and spent the. rest of  his life there, except for the occasional visit to Quebec. He  worked first among the Ottawa  of Lake Superior and in 1668  founded the St. Francis Xavier  Mission near Green Bay, at what  is now De Pere, in Wisconsin.  In 1676 he was appointed to the  Illinois missions and there he  remained until his death in 1689..  'sl-lgl-tiiiare  Step over number one.  Bend under number two.  Twist between numbers three  and four. The count could extend up to eight ��� not as" part  of a daily exercise or a dance  step but as part of a lineman's  manipulations in dodging clotheslines and" pulleys as he works  on telephone poles.  A campaign is underway within the B.C.' Telephone ��� Company  to improve: safety conditions on  poles. ..-:.',  "Hazards such as clotheslines  and pulleys have caused some  accidents among our men, al--  though. none has been serious  yet," an official said.  He noted .that every time a  lineman climlbs among pulleys,  he has to unfasten, his safety belt  to change position. The official  said that up to eight clotheslines  were counted on a pole in a Vancouver (Point Grey) lane, although other areas. produce equal  hazards.  "When we learn that a particular pole is hazardous to climb  because of obstructions, a supervisor will contact the householder concerned and request remov-  -al of the hazard," the official  said.  The Workmen's Compensation  Board is in accord and has regulations requiring removal of hazards within a-two-week period.  hear  The foxest industry of British  Columbia will be in the spotlight  When the 55th Pacific .Logging  Cc;:gress convenes at the Vancouver Hotel, Vancouver, Nov.  18, 19 and 20, according to President Don McColl, director and  timber manager of ��� the .Tahsis  Company, ��� Limited, Vancouver.  The Congress, oldest and largest organization of its... kind,  meets in B.C. about every fourth  year. Its members come from  the twelve western states, Alas:  ka and B.C.  The   Congress 'theme   will   be  Smiling and vivacious Peggy  Neville. is featured guest singer  each Wednesday night on. Red  River Jamboree. Host Stu Phillips, the Altones and other members of the cast start their fifth  season of lively country: music  and dance on the CBC television  network.  RECIPES  I.?.y V ��?-ndwich. Filling  */_ c-y T!.ne\-  "hopped cooked  lean lamb  3 tablespoons  celery  Va teaspoon salt  few grains pepper  Vz teaspoon prepared mustard  2 tablesnoons   mavennais**  Thoroughly    combine    all    ingredients. Use between slices of  buttered bread or for variety in  the lunch box use to fill buttered  hamburg or hot' dog buns. Makes  enough  filling  for 4  sandwiches  or buns.  GIBSONS PUBLIC LIBRARY  Winn Road  ���   OPEN  Tuesdays 2 to 4 p.m.  Fridays 7 to 9 p.m.  Saturdays 2 to 4 p.m.  ROBERTS  CREEK  CREDIT UNION  Sechelt, B.C.  OPEN TUES. to  FRI.  11 a.m. to 5 p.m.  SCHOOL SAVINGS CLUBS  at  Gibsons,  Roberts  Creek,  Davis Bay, Sechelt, Egmont  Perpetuating Our Timber Heritage, and the program will be  broken down into three basic  topics ��� Protection, Management and Utilization, and Reforestation.  On the afternoon of Nov. 18,  John Liersch, Canadian Forest  Products Ltd., Vancouver, will  present a paper on Forest Management and Harvesting.  Officers of the Congress are:  President, Don McColl, Tahsis  Company, Ltd., Vancouver; vice-  president, R. B. Kennedy, Bly  Logging Co., Klamath Falls,  Oregon; treasurer, R. F. Dwyer,  Clackamas Logging Co., Estaca-  da, Oregon and executive vice-  president, Carwin A. Woolley,  Portland, Oregon.  Mercury Outboard  New  1964-65 HP ELECTRIC  reg. $1,137���TO CLEAR Cg��3  1964���3.9 HP  reg. $250 ��� TO CLEAR $f 9g  Used  1961���6 HP ��� $139  1963���6HP ���  $219  1964--8HP   $269  1961���45 HP ��� $318  1961���45 HP ��� $348  EASY TERMS  HADDOCKS CABANA MARINA  :MERCURY   SALES  & SERVICE DEALER  Madeira  Park���Ph.   883-2248  <_oasryivews, ivov. i_r,~_w_:  A 5,000-year-old hearse in a  tomb excavated in Mesopotamia  is the earliest actual wheeled  vehicle known.  AUTOMATIC DRYER  with  Electronic Control  No  guessing on time to  set ���  Just push one button.  Continually   measures   moisture  and; will never over dry.  Dries correctly every time.  Porcelain drum.  Peninsula Plumbing  & Healing  GIBSONS ��� Ph. 886-9533  CLOSED MONDAYS  One-stop  banking  y -  In a few minutes they'll be out again, with  all their banking done. Right now they want  to cash a cheque, get something out of their  safety deposit box, have their savings account  book made up. Next time? He may be in  about a loan; she to buy a money order for  her aunt's birthday. An able, obliging staff  looks after them; and should they need help  on some financial problem, the manager is  there ��� a good man to talk things over with.  Complete service. Trained people. Convenient, one-stop banking at your chartered bank.  THE CHARTERED BANKS  SERVING YOUR  COMMUNITY  Through 5,650 branches, all across Canada,  the chartered banks bring full-range banking  within the reach of everyone.  W^M-#^^^M-  *,**<BS '2i��g$��Kil.  These Merchants offer a 10%  discount off regular prices on  all purchases with Family AUowance Cheques  HELENS FASHION SHOP       HOWE SOUND 5-10-15 STORE        WALT NYGREN SALES  THRIFTEE DRESS STORES NEVENS RADIO & TV  GIBSONS FAMILY SHOES  GIBSONS SHELL SERVICE  (Except Gasoline) Shopping  Days  Until  Christmas  for  Your  Christmas  SUIT  It's  mms  Every Time  SECHELT  885-9330  BOWLING  SECHELT BOWLING ALLEY  (By EVE MOSCRIP)  Kerry Eldred, in the High  School League had an outstanding night coming up with 296.  This combined with a 201 gave  him a total of 497.  League Scores:  Buckskin:   Stan   Joe   706,  Yvonne  Joe 443,   Pi.oss  Joe   295.  Ladies: Rose Rodway 750 (314)  Lil McCourt 304.  Ladies Matinee: Hazel Skytte  675 (264),' Jean Eldred 254.  Pender: Bert Gooldrup 714,  Dave McDonnell 646 (298), Ron  Pockrant 616, Bill Cameron 651,  Isabel Gooldrup 617, Eric Antil-  la 602, Muriel Cameron 588 (251),  Dennis Gamble 309.  Sechelt Commercial: Norma  Gaines 681, Norma Branca 325,  Frank Nevens 745 (286), Mabel  McDermid 250.  Sports Club: Hazel Skytte 661,  (259), Dorothy Smith 659 (262),  Gloria Barker 264, Lawrence Crucil 666.  Ball & Chain: Mary Flay 658,  (252). Red Robinson 750 (279).  School Leagues:  Seniors: Kerry Eldred 497 (201,  296). Danny Gibbons 321 (205),  Leslie Cobleigh  278   (160).  Juniors:   Earl John  352  a84),  Alan Hemstreet 335 (192), Wendy  Bvstpdt  339   (182).  Ten Pins:  Men's: Dick Clayton 531. Roger Hocknell 553 (215). Mickey  Bab* 517. Don Caldwell 206, Harry Batchelor 516.  E & M BOWLADROME   >  (By ED CONNOR)  Gibsons B: Termites 2754 (1028)  G. DeMarco 683 (246), A. Holden  607 (252), S. Malyea 237, J. Lowden 241, F. Reynolds 623 (272),  F. Nevens 685 (265, 271).  Gibsons A: Midway 3259 (1186)  Gwen Edmonds 670 (231), G. Edmonds 638 (259), F. Nevens 656  (262), E. Connor 768 (269, 253,  246), D. Skerry 637 (249), J. Low- '  den 630 (267), J. Clement 642  (263), W. Robinson 635, I. Plourde  239, E. Shadweil 738 (271, 236,  231), D. Crosby 705 (300).  Ladies: Go Getters 2498 (868).  V. Peterson 507, J. Christianson  609, R. Wolansky 569 (230), P..  Hylton 537, H. Dee 508, M. Carmichael 520, M. Lee 240, M. Holland 519, N. Douglas 529, D. Crosby 621 (234), D. Kelly 508.  Teachers Hi: Hopefuls 2756  (974). J. Lowden 614, A. Merling 296, B. Lasser 674 (261), M.  Crosby 240. S. Rise 710 (295), D.  Reeves   667   (259).  8,      Coast News, Nov. 12, 1964.  c --Tiv -?cials: Pawn Brokers  . 2790 (1105). F. Nevens 695 (256),  i_ .'���-���ndwell 239, J. LeGreeley-  286, H. Jorgenson 632 (244), J.  Jorgenson 238, J. Larkman 668  (283), L. Blain 278, J. Lowden 634  M. Chaban 253, N. Kcnney 639  (254), J. Lind 607, P. Headgbro-  do 277.  Port Mellon: Drifters 2616  (1022). D. Dunham 674 (286), T.  Kennedy 255, A. Godfrey 655.  - Ball & Chain: Untouchables  2656 (920). H. Ashby 269, G. De-  Marco 248.  Men's: Invaders 3003 (1101).  F. Reynolds 600, F. Hicks 638,  (241, 259). J. Larkman 241,' R.  Godfrey 637 (268), L. Gregory  254, A. Plourde 240, J. Lowden  650, H. Jorgenson 648, S. Rise  641 (255), D. Robinson 606, C.  Johnson  668.  Juniors: Patty Clement ' 255  (157), Maline Fitzsimmons 251,  Carol Forshner 235, Jim Westell  334 (158, 176), Denise Murdoch  224, Patsy Feeney 205, Wayne  Wright 241. /  Wright   241,   Robert   Solnik. 239,  (175).  Sechelt  Beauty Salon  Ph.   885-9525  HAIRSTYLING  designed just for you  Coldwaving ~ Coloring  Tuesday to Saturday  ;  Big order of  powerful trucks  What is believed to be the  largest single order ever placed  in this area for logging trucks  has been awarded by MacMillan,  Bloedel and Powell River Limited to two Vancouyer manufacturing firms.  The order for 23 powerful 18  wheel, 29 ton trucks ��� each  capable" of carrying almost as  much timber in a single load as  is contained in two average-size  Canadian homes will cost $1,400,-  000.  The. order, placed with Hayes  Manufacturing Co. Ltd. and  Canadian Kenworth Ltd., both of  Vancouver, was announced'by H.  R. Chisholm, general manager  vof MB & PR's logging group.  SECHELT THEATRE  FRIDAY. SATURDAY/MONDAY  NOV. 13, 14 & 16  Maurice Chevalier, Hayley Mills  IN SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS  Technicolor  Adults $1, Students 75c,  Children  75c  Starts at 8 p.m., Out at 10 p.m.  TWILIGHT THEATRE  GIBSONS ��� Phone 886-2827  All evening Shows 8 p.m.���Children's Matinee, Sat. 2:30 p.m.  Sat. night show also for Sat. Matinee unless otherwise noted  WED.,,THURS., FRI. ��� NOV. 11, 12 & 13  Richard Chamberlain in TWILIGHT OF HONOR  Cinemascope  .  SAT., MON., TUES. ��� NOV. 14, 16 & 17  Jackie Reason in GIG01  Technicolor,  Cinemascope  >  TIRE SALE  ALL SIZES * TYPES  AND ALL SELLING AT  TREMENDOUS SAVINGS  WHITEWAILS  AND  BLACK WALLS  yot"-s/*e  PICK-A-PAIR for as low as  SIZE  TYPE  1st  TIRE  2nd  TIRE  8.15/7.10-15  ��� Tubeless Blackwall  ��� 24.30  12.15  7.75/6.70-15  ��� Tube-Type Blackwall  ��� 18.95  9.47  7.75/6.70-15  ��� Tubeless Blackwall  ��� 21.95  10.97  7.75/6.70-15  ��� Tubeless Whitewall  ��� 23.95  11.97  8.15/7.10-15  ��� Tubeless Blackwall  ��� 24.30  12.15  8.15/7.10-15  ��� Tubeless Whitewall  ��� 26.50  13.25  7.75/7.50-14  ��� Tubeless Blackwall.  ��� 21.95  10.97  7.75/7.50-14  ��� Tubeless Whitewall  ��� 23.95  11.97  8.25/8.00-14  ��� Tubeless Blackwall.  ��� '24.30  12.15  8.25/8.00-14  ��� Tubeless Whitewall  ��� 26.50  13.25  6.00/6.50-13  ��� Tubeless  Blackwall  ��� 19.45  9.72  6.00/6.50-13 ��� Tubeless  Whitewall  21.20      10.60  GIBSONS  7.75/6.70-15  Tube-Type   Blackwall  Exchange  NO MONEY DOWN  MONTHS TO PAY WITH  CONVENIENT FIRESTONE  UNI-CHARGE  SERVICE  Phone 886-2572  SECHELT  885-2025  STEAK SALE  CANADA CHOICE OR GOOD CANADIAN BEEF  irloin T-Bone, Rib  or Round  ALL AT  ONE  LOW PRICE  BONELESS TOP ROUND  STEAK  or ROAST  C  lb  1st & 2nd CUT  RUMP ROASTS  c  lb  MAPLE LEAF THICK SLICED  SIDE BACON  69c  lb  CRYOVAC  GARLIC RINGS.*..  OWNERS  SIDES of BEEF  CANADA GOOD GRADE  c  lb  {IMPORTED No.   1 ___________* P  TOMATOES J jib  FLAyORFUL  C  DIPLOMAT - FROZEN       M   f f\g%  MEAT PIES   4 89  3 $1  VALE - Frozen  FANCY PEAS it  LIBBYS *__. __f\  CREAM CORN g - 10  15 oz.  TIN  C  CORNED BEEF  49  CARNATION  MILK  TALL  TINS  6 85  MALKJ-N'S CHOICE - 20 0Z.  TOMATOES  4>1  $  PUREX -2 ROLL PACKS VI �� A AC  Bathroom Tissue 4|49  SEE OUR REGULAR AD IN THE VANCOUVER SUN  FOR ADDITIONAL SPECIALS  Prices in effect Thurs. Fri., Sal.���Nov. 12, 13 & 14 Only  WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES

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