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The Coast News Aug 30, 1951

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Array yy r  a  Autho'      iGLori.?     ^ --��>  V^j-  Class Mail, Post  Department,   Ottawa"  a_i>  Published by The Coast News, Gibsons, B.C.     Vol. 4-84*        Thursday August 30 1951    5c per copy, $2.00 per year by mail  ylaw  Complete renovation of major portion of Gibsons water  supply and installation of a new system in the Headlands area  will cost $45,664, according to figures released by Village Com-  mission, Tuesday.  Here's what happened after a swifl-rurmmg  Missouri Pacific streamliner collided witft an  automobile at Malvern, Ark. Police said the  motorist drove his car down- the  tracks  after  mistaking them for a roadway. Seven cais... of  the 15-car train, bound for San Antonio, were  derailed but only the engine overturned, i'he  motorist scampered from his car before the :mp'|ict.  �� and J. Sawmill Will  Be Dismantled Soon  / WILSON  CREEK. ��� One   of  this  area's  landmarks and  eans of employment for 14 men, the B. and J. Sawmill, will be  ismantl.ed" and machinery moved to various units in the Har-  !nac holdings, .    :  Announcement of the rn'ove was made by Sawmill Manager  jfaptain Andrew Johnston; v  ' The ���sawmill, starts ���    ���' ~ ~~���. .... ���'������.��� '  airs: ,=.; agp; :by; L^v^'Ja^c'ksbii  d^ his -'partners,;;on property  rated-. fey: Roger: Mxre ehS v efe';.^���^|?:, ���  Ir^v^araige; .i^#��e)��ii^  Jfreek:, 'had " been ^sold  d few  | eeks ago to H. R. MacMillan  ^xport    Company  along  with  nber holdings of the B. and  /[Main. reason behind the dis-  ahtling move was "shortage  logs suited for this parti-  :lar type pf operation."  jtylt would hardly pay a huge  ^m, such as this,' to pick and  loose a few logs with which  I teed this-mill when much  ;/ [tter use could probably, be  wade of them in some of the  jyher Harmac holdings,'' Mr.  Authority  '���mnston said.  employee   has been  the     opportunity    of  (Ir'Each  tofven  Village Commission will attempt to amend bylaw 90 (rezoning) in order to give itself  power to authorize parking  lots anywhere within the village without being made to  neighbouring V residents as is  now necessary under the act.  The move, suggested by  Victoria, will do away with  public hearings following requests for. re-zoning for park-  C.A. Lett Resigns  From Gambler 1.0.  GAMBIER    HARBOUR. ���  C. A'. Lett, for 14 year* post  master of this area., will retire  on September 30.  Mr. Lett, well known..for his  community work, and his. justice of the ��� peace activities, has  nominated his successor, former.- Assistant-Post Ma.s^<3r#Mrs.:-  Eva Julian P'rag6��-V^.^"i^l:suii3-'  '"���" ������ A" petition   - signed'  by v ''a  great, majority of Gambier  postal participants;" has gone  forwarded to postal authorities.  Mrs. Drage had filled the  post she now relinquishes since  the inception of the service in  1937.  Approval of the new move  will have to be passed by  Ottawa. It is belived Vancouver officials have consented  to the resignation of Mr. Lett  and     appointment     of    Mrs.  of    cora-  mobilized  be  among  The Farmer's Institute Fair,  Friday and Saturday, will be  opened hy B. M. Maclntyre,  MLA, and is .slated to be the  "best  ever.  A    complete    list  petitors   'has    been  -while  exhibits  will  the topi in quality.  Keen rivalry has developed  among various groups and  farmers who will make up the  impressive list of entrains  while the Kinsmen Club is  -slated to add its part in the  fun and. festivities with 'chuck  a luck' wheels and Bingo  games and a regular, miniature fair.  Art.    exhibits - and    hobby  fibpws  wi 11   add   color to  the  while-   the.;, now   famous  fair  Commissioners will further  study the figures and plans  for a water bylaw at a special  meeting, Tueday, 7.30 p.m.  It is expected a portioning'  of cos,ts to the various localities in the village will be  made  at this  meeting.  The estimate, forwarded by  mail from A. Conway, civil  engineer, who has been making a study of the water here,  also includes cost of pipe and  labor.  Hopes are held, and tentative plans are now afoot to>  hold a public meeting in order  to clarify the contentious-  question  of the water bylaw.  Said Commission Chairman*  Mrs. E. Nestman, "There are-  quite a number of people who  think this bylaw is just to give-.  Headlands water. Nothing:"  could be further from the  truth. The older portions of.'  this village are just as mueli^  in need of a large expenditure'  as the new parts.  "This  water  bylaw" affects  us all. Any thought that it is,  being  planned merely.;for the  benefit of-a few in   685  and'..  hij^y^^i^yyym^y y^yp^W:mM^im'.years:Have  show the birds which to^k sd:: 'av^^fa-^ker)iji^   CQm^n���  fo  many of the  top PNE prizes     them  if they  B.C. bylaw."  against the best in  fail  coming  to pass the.  M  Will  Drage.  oving of Poles  Increase Car Parking  Detour and directional signs for traffic coming the Sechelt  Highway and destined for the ferry will be placed at the junction of the Fletcher Road and the highway, at the junction of  the Fletcher and Rocky Road and at 'the junction of tiie Met-  calf and Gower Point roads in order to line up vehicles along*  Gower Road.  mg.  ���Ubrking in some of the other  Idings    of    this-   company.  there, have beenoiq arbitrary  dismissals.    This sawmill  and  [i lumber supply was a great  |f[set to this community^* the '���  janager said. "But,the wheels  - J progress must continue and  turning,    must   necessarily  }flict changes on the future!"  hurch Parking is  gain to The Fore  j Parkin g   opposite   block E,  ' e      Presbyterian'      Church,  arne up for an airing  again  council meeting.  The     contentious     question  laised by Church Board Secretary,  George  Marsden,   will  e handed   over   to  R.G.M.P.  to decide. ���  I Mr. Marsden claimed the  public were using the adjoin-  fing street portion to park  /vehicles "for, as mucn as six  and seven days. It is so*bad we'  often cannot find room for our  fcongregational ears on Sun-  fday."  'j Mr. Marsden also asked for  fa general clean-up along the  1 street adjoining the church  (lawn. Commissioner Skellett  /volunteered to have -his men  ^pick up the debris.  "This   is  a  very  section, we   are   asking  ���powerful  for,"  said   Commissioner   Macnicol.  ��� ���'It puts a lot of authority into  'the hands' of the commission."  First and second reading of  " the    amendment    was    made,  .Tuesday.    A   public    hearing,  when  ' objectors   to   granting  ���this blanket'authority to corn--  vmiss.ioners: may be heard, will  be held at 2.30 p.m., September' ii.   '  '���'��� Present applications for rezoning' from Gordon Bryant  and Mrs. W. B. McNab, will  be held over until following  the amendment.  ���...Little hope has been held  out by Mr, Marnicol for future  chances in the zoning bylaw,  " at least until another seven  or' eigiht months;. When the  bylaw will have had a chance  to settle "down."  This ruling will be good unless "in  case of emergency."  Brus  Shore  h Ob  North  ) < r  a net:  pro-  scures i^on  to Newcomers  read  The  x>ur-  FIRE  GAMBIER ISLAND. ���The  sudden, freak thunderstorm  which Monday ende'd one. of  the longest dry spell in the  .^history of B.C., was the means  of lighting a busMire on this  island. v  The lightning struck : between West Bay and Gambier  Harbour.  The.first European to see the :site of Vancouver, Narvaez,  in 1791 missed finding the First Narrows; it was so concealed  by forest on both shores it was hard to find.  Capt. Vancouver was the first European, to see that north  "shore, in June 1792; he came in about noon, slept o}i the beach  in loco, and went, out again about 6 a.m. next morning. The  first public reception on Burrard Inlet on record is when a  flotilla of Indian canoes met him aJid escorted him up the inlet;  they were very friendly and gave him Jots of food, raw and  cooked.  The report that there were  .several creeks; on the north  shore, but he did not see any  houses, so he concluded they  must  be in  the forest.  The .Indians always lived at  the mouth of a creek for fresh  water; had lived for countless  ages;  housed    in   nice   warm  houses   of  cedar  slabs,   built  with stone hammers and stone  chiseTs:-by the greatest, natural  carpenters in North   America.  Canoes!  There were hundreds  of them. Large for war,, smaller  for  work,   and  little* ones  for   swift   hunting   of   ducks,  etc.    The    Indians  were  well  clothed   and fat;  lived,  loved  and laughed even as Ave; had  their ceremonies at the proper  time ��� their  Christmas, Easter and so  on,  but could not  or write,  first  industry   on  rard Inlet was started at Lynn  Creek; a water wheel sawmill.  The Cariboo miners had come  down     rive r     disappointed ;  something to   do  was important,    they   wanted    houses  to  live  in   and    needed    lumber,  and the easiest place to get it  was at Moodyville where there  was plenty of forest, and deep  water  in  front  of it.   To the  east and to the west was shoal  and  ships could not get near.  The first, big public picnic in  North    Vancouver   was   when  the   people   of New  Westminster    were    invited    to    come  down   the Fraser River to be  present at the opening of the  first  tiny  sawmill,   driven  by  water power.  Faced .with a pendii  ever increasing traffic  blem, Commissioners planning:  to widen the road from the-  Post Office to the .Metcalfe  corner, will request the B.C.  Power Commissioner to move  present power .poles in order  to  allow  parking.  ������"These poles will have to  be moved," said Commissioner  Skellett. "They deny us- die  means of filling in ji-'Ho-r/g' tiie  side "'of the 'road and this ii.*  turn forces traffic to park all  over the'area."  The Power' Cimmission had'  been previously requested to  move some of the poles but had*,  taken the stand, the poles wers?-  in their ritxht position owing"  to tlie- right of way,- only 4Q  feet wide.  This error will' also lie point-  out to the Power Commission.  Q&mmm beer  GAMBIER. 1SLAND���AdS'-  ing weight to Gambier Island's  plea for a forest reserve in the  West Bay, New Bright.ou and  Gambier Harbour area,, is;  news that another male dhear  -has been wantonly shot.        !  Found on ihe beach en Monday,  the  buck  deer had been *  mortally wounded on the previous Sunday.  Game    Department    authorities  are investigatins?.  ed The Coast News    Thursday August 30 1951  Sp Blocking The Way  Published every Thursday by The Coast News, Gibsons, B.C.  Publishers, William Sutherland and Samuel Nutter.  A. aalean family newspaper dedicated to furthering the truth and all  sssmmunity efforts.  Advertising rates may be had upon application to The Coast News,  ^Gibsons B.C.  &-y, ������&:������':* ~&/-1 -  rime  is  N.  Often have members of our staff been asked, "why does  your paper report all the harmful little stories that pour out from  police and civil court?  The answer i's very simple, we are newspaper.  A newspaper's first duty is to truth. It's second to principle.  The first needs no help, the second must revolve around the  paper's editor.  This paper reports stories emanating in police court. It is  news when a man steals a car or gets drunk and assults. another  on the main street. Can a paper be still a newspaper and report  jm\y what its staff sees fit to report?  Will every reporter make of himself a* judge of a story/s  -aseatnlity. Will he be able to "kill," a story because he knows  the murderer's wife who attends the 'same church as he himself,  and she is a "lovely," person who would be hurt by the story  appearing in print?  As this is a logging area, peopled by and revolving around  loggers, our news is relative and often "different than that of  sOshtosh or Nimamboo.  In Nimamboo, where fishermen daily arrive with mermaids  Ibeeause he was full of pep and had found another logger equally  ;as exuberent would probably make the front page of the Nimamboo Herald. In this paper, so, commonplace is it, that it would  siot rate a mention.  In Nimamboo, where fishermen daily arrive with mermaids  "m their nets, the Herald, after a few years of mermaids, ignores  them. But not where we circulate. A mermaid would be news,  and therefore would be reported in full detail.  Crime reporting in a small paper is supposed to hurt' relatives, friends and neighbors of the culprit.  Without setting ourselves up as part of our judiciary or  penal systems, it may be well that such is so. Thought of our  courts, in many cases, seem to have little deterring effect. Perhaps dread of having his or her name in print may help someone  over a weak moment of criminal urge.  f Grime reporting is never nice. It is a duty borne by every  reporter who enters the halls of justice and listens while a fellow  "iiuman is sentenced to punishment for a crime against society.  The newspaper story is often a means of warning "that same  society of impending danger.  Yes. We report court proceedings, fully and with names.  It is a part  of our  obligation to society.   It  is,   and must  txemain a principle of every newspaper: that is worthy of the  laiame. 'If it's news; report it:'Without;.fe'arfbr'favor.'.:  There never can be a bargaining with truth. When we can,  change fact at ^ilj, wheh we can shade H^vw^n we can with-  3iold it, then are:w'eusing 'th.e,power which n^a^yisomedajr result  Sn the toppling:of our society. "''���'"      v. I      ���  :     ��� ^  Any man, organ, or newspaper which can tamper with  $roth can, and will tamper with liberty.  There can be no half measure. We, on this paper, want  ?iaoiie. We print the truth as long as it is news. We print thef,  siiews as long as it's true.  -'-������':/..���!-.,  i V.:'.v;;;��t;..-  ���*%3i~t-t*;.  "��^8fc#*-~..  IReader's Right  Editor,  The  Coast News.  Sir:  In recent months, complaints  ifaave ..come to Us about: dogs  * chasing cattle and being a  : nuisance at the. school. This  ���was  before  school  closed   for  ^vacation. ���  , We took up these complaints  -with the R.C.M.P. and in reply they quote the law, giving  the power to the | aggrieved  person to shoot the dogs, un-  vder certain conditions.  We are against such drastic  ^measures because they nearly  -always result in ill will  in a  .-country  distriet'.  The   R.C.M.P.   constable   in  his last letter, suggest cooperation, particularly with the  parents and we also favour  this more sensible and kindly  method.  We would now like to know  if you wouid be willing to tell  the public through; your paper,  of our receiving [complaints  aiid of taking same up with  the R.C.M.P. It is necessary  that the public know the need  for cooperation in keeping  their dogs at home. This latter  help is most essential as owners are really the most responsible.  Margaret LeFeuvre  Sec'y.  Howe  Sound  Parmer's  Institute. . ,..-  Dangerous Plants  on Range  ��� Before..vthe (introduction of  extensive domestic grazing the  herbaceous vegetation on. most  of the western grazing lands  was composed principally of  perennial grasses. The introduction of increasingly large  numbers of domestic animals  tendedj to deplete |the more  palatable plants and start a  regression or deterioration of  the vegetation.  Noxious plants, bringing  with them today's problems,  have come in several .ways,  but mainly by the increase of  ever - present sub - dominant  species as a result of the thinning out of desirable plants  from continued grazing. Some  noxious plants were introduced and have spread, while  others���undesirable and often  poisonous ��� have become serious only as they come within  the scope of domestic grazing.  There are four general  classes of undesirable plants,  points out S. Smoliak, of the  Manyberries Exp erii mental  Station:  ,  (1) Those highly poisonous,  but usually limited in distribution or abundance, such as  water hemlock.  (2) Those moderately poisonous during certain seasons,  but loeally abundant and  widely distributed ��� the larkspur and lupines.   .  (3) Plants that are slightly  poisonous, but very abundant  and   widely   distributed.    Ex  amples are:, loco weeds and  death camus. Some plants in  this group are more serious  because animals develop a  habit or taste for. them.  (4) Plants that are non-  poisonous, or slightly poisonous under certain conditions,  and of low forage value, but'  that are so abundant and  widely distributed that large  areas occupied by them have  low or submarginal grazing  capacity.  Many noxious plants are  highly aggressive and well  equipped to maintain their  heavy stands for a long time  despite  exclusion   of  grazing.  Exclusion of, or greatly restricted grazing, would effectively control noxious plants,  but this is not always feasible.  In most cases adequate range  management must be supplemented by cultural, mechanical or biological treatment of  the range in order to. get  effective controll.  CJOR TO AIR  TOMORROW'S STARS  VANCOlHrER;'; ���;  SepfenK  ber 4th arid 5th John Adaskin  will be. in Vancouver to audition   candidates   for.   C.LL/Js -  1951-52 radio series "Singing  Stars    of    Tomorrow''    aired  over    CJOR.    All    candidates  oav^. Sms o% pa.red8.id aq "\snvn  musical selections��� one aria  from opera and one ballad,, or  standard ,song.    Audition will  be    held    in    CJOR's    Radio  Theatre.     Application    forms'  may be obtained from: Wallie  Peters,      Muoical       Director,  CJOR, 846 Howe St. Vancou-  ������   f.  ver.  ��� m  k       .. . ;v -~i'*-\niiii uri ftiiii-nifTrni"irjhi��ii,i,r . i^j  r - '-      ' , .j  SINCERE   THANKS  to the following merchants]  ,who Jbave made your > Conoid  munity Bulletin po33ible;n  y   '���������; ;;:-- # ���:#'���.��� % :< yy--:'-  SUNSET HARDWARE  MENS SHO  *��������  DORIS' BEAUTYSALON  GEB��QNS BIHLDING!"  '���?.'���  ���*��������  INGLIS TRANSFER  gibsons.mi^aiFm  ANDERSON S SHOE  ���: ^.��^Q^t:Vr;.v^^.':..'  iM  PENINSULA CLEANERS 1  S & S" SHELL GARAGB  CONSOLIDATED  BROKERgY  I  For Sale  $2750 to $5000  J. A. 3VEAINIL  Gibsons, BC.  MOVING JOBS  LOGGING EQUIPMENT  HEAVY FREIGHT  Leaves Gibsons Every Tuesday Evening  Arrives Excelsior Paper Dock 95 East 1st Ave. Wednesday Morning  Leaves Vancouver, Wednesday Evening  Arrives at Gibsons Thursday Morning  Phone Gibsons 50  Phone Gibsons 53  GRAYSON S GROCERS  IRENE^S P&p!SS SHOP  HOWE  SOUND  5-10-15C  STORE  JOHN COLERIDGE  AGENCIES  MARSS^LL  PLUMBING  MIDWAY GROCERY ^  STORE  ANNE'S  COFFEE  BARS  ���l*      .    n�� 5^  Your  friendly,  ^Community   Sales  m  in.  s^���^I;^���?T?;sr���i3?s?'ftS!,:  Z.-:<~*:t?ir..f*.i..1V&,Tnrr,.t-if *~  ^jK?tS^��.C?GtnS��,iR^rt ,-?-..���  .J^n^.-^^j.nrf.-.rai-i^SiV..' ~f*^5T��*p��Wiw^M, Wm. McFadden  Optometrist  GIBSONS  Phone Gibsons 91  Office    Hours  9:00   a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  Evenings by Appointment  Every day except Thurs.  Why go to Vancouver for  Optical Service?  The Coast News  Thursday August 30 1951  mpsme  fw&m  CHEVRON  GAS STATION  Gower   Gleanings  BY GYPSY TOWERS  Mrs. A. B. B. Hill, hostess  to the Scottish Dancing elan,  held at Stronlochie to take  advantage of Mrs. Bow's  superb recordings. A most  energetic time was enjoyed  by* all.  Miss Mary Dykes and friend,  Miss Becky Walker, weekending with the Jim Dykes.  Regret to report Mr. Dykes  not so well ��� Doctor's orders  to take things easy for a  while. Miss Dorothy Marston  of Vancouver, visiting the J.  D. Smith's. Mr. and Mrs. E. J.  Sager of Vancouver enraptured with their visit with the  ;Pete Nicholson's. Mrs. Jack  Bow, wife Kay and young  sons, visiting at Stronlochie  ��� trying to tempt the wily  fish and doing a* bit of surf  board riding, or should it be  log rolling? Miss Wilks of  Vancouver spending a few  days with Mrs. P. J. Town-  send, nursing a sprained ankle  and catching up with her  hostess knitting. Nothing like"  ].)i1tting them to work!  The Welcome Mat freshly  vacuumed at the H. Chaster's-.  for a former resident, Mrs. B.  Chadsey and son Dale, who  spent a week renewing old  acquaintances and a. further  week with: Mr. and Mrs.  Mitchell King, original neighbors up Honeymoon Lane.  Many changes to be seen and  much to talk about. Miss Viola  King, a bright young, member of the North Vancouver  Hospital staff, and daughter  of Mr. and Mrs. King, en  route to Hamilton and way  points, visiting with Mrs.  Robert Thicke, who is expecting the stork to pop in one  day soon and then won't Mr,s.  Harry Chaster take to the air!  Any variety will be most welcome, say the proud grandparents to be.  The fish are biting, but  please,  don't rush them.  FASTER  GROWING  It is well known thaft trees  grow faster under cover of  darkness. It is said that two-  thirds of their growth occurs  between sunset and sunrise.  For' the same reason, too,  trees that grow in ' shaded  areas attain 'their maximum  height in less time than similar  species growing in  the open.  very Nigntisv  Radio Night  For the duration of the  Pacific National Exihibition,  CKWX will be bringing  listeners the highlights of each'  days activities in a quarter  hour nightly broadcast at 7.45  p.m. Announcers Jack Kyle  and E. Gee will be at the Exhibition each day with their  portable tape recorder, gathering material for the program  that is titled PNE Periscope.  Jack Kyle will also be picking  up farm material that will be  used each morning on.CKWX  The Pacific Northwest's  foremost garden authority,  Cecil Sollyy> will also broadcast each night from the PNE,  with Latirie Irving as announcer. This is aired at its  regular time  of 8.15 p.m.  Dick Diespecker will be  featured nightly at 10 with,  his Province newscast appearing on the stage of the outdoor theatre.  Ballot Will Decide  iWA Work Dispute  Meetings petween the Negotiating Committee of the International Woodworkers of  America, B.C. District Council  and the Northern' Interior  Lumbermen's Ass.'n., under  the chairmanship of Conciliation Officer, Reg. Clements,  have feen held in Prince  George and Vancouver during  the past week. The parties met  in Prince George, August 17,  and adjourned the meetings  to Vancouver where ihey were  resumed ; on August 21, and  carried through until August  22. Tentative proposals for a  settlement of the dispute were  discussed and the present ,time  both parties are submitting  these proposals to their principals  for   consideration.  It is anticipated that some  definite decision in respect to  acceptance or rejection of  these tentative proposals will  be-reached within the next ten  days. Final acceptance will be  contingent upon a referendum  ballot of the. membership of  IWA in all interior Local  Unions.  Cash Payment  (Mill at Gibsons,   B.C.)  Phone, or see Max Propp, Gibsons, B.C,  J  Sechelt-Jervis Towing Company  Your Local Complete Marine TOWING SERVICE  AGENTS:���  Pender  Harbour:  Bill  Donley���Phone:   Sechelt   11S2  Gibsons.  Reg.   Godfrey���Phone:   Granthams  56  Nanaimo: Phone 555���Night: 1497 or 305  Vancouver:   Phone  PAcific   4558;   Night:  KEfrr.   6352  Phone Us Collect for Quotations  "Tractor Transport No. 1" ��� especially equipped for  hauling cats, trucks and logging equipment by sea  Log Towing . Scow Towing Pile Driving  Dredging Wharf and Float Construction  Breakwater  Construction Marine   Salvage  Salvage Pumps  v  .(  SPECIAL NOTICE  The Regular sailing frcm Vancouver on Sunday,  September 2, at 1 p.m. to Gibsons and West Howe  Sound ports from Gibsons at 4.30 pm. IS CANCELLED.  Sunday service will operate instead on Monday,  LABOUR DAY, September 3, leaving Union Pier at  1 p.m.1'' for Keats Island and Gibsons. Leaving Gibsons  at 4.30'p.m. for Vancouver.  *Labour Day sailing at 1 p.m. replaces regular  9.30 a.m. Monday sailing.  FREIGHT Service between Vancouver,  Gibsons and Wesi Howe Sound parts  will be continued after Labour Day for  the winter season and until further  notice.  Union-Waterhoiise freight service will be continued  between Vancouver, Gibsons and West Howe Sound  ports as shown under the route 12 schedule.  Phone PAcific 3411  of I Canada  Lid,  Gibsons Agent:  Harry Smith  ^ YOU REALLY ENJOY BEER WHEN YOU SERVE  ^^^^^tW.-^'^?0?*^*!?^  p-3-sr  sement  Is.    not    published    or    displayed    by    the    Liquor    Control    Board    or    by    the    Government    oi    British   -Columbi Distributed by  1905 Main Street ��� FAirmont 2508  Vancouver, B. C.  J  fa  m  BUTT AND BOWES  BUTCHEH SUPPLIES ��� STOKE EQUIPMENT  Cookhouse Utensils ��� Mining ��� Logging  MEAT CHOPPEES ��� SCALES ��� PEELEKS  CHIPPEES  I  |  I  I  I  Thursday August 30 1951  4 The Coast News  This and That  BY MRS NESTMAN  Mrs.    W.    Yates    (formally,  Cochrane),  sold  her  home  on  the hill to A. E. Ritchey. Ernie  Drew has left for Vanderhoof.  Mrs. Anne Prewar is recovering very nicely,  in  hospital  in Vancouver.- Guest of honor  at  a  shower   in  the  home   of  Mrs.  Jim Sehutz,  was Doreen  Blumgren,     whose     marriage  takes,     place    < Septmber     3.  Among the  guests   were  Mrs.  Letty   Dawson,    Mrs.    Vivian    !f|  Klein, Mrs. Mary Solnik, Mrs.-   Js  **B**9**m*a���**M**���aM��mumm***m  ��SCB*UBM  I  i'/a  every |pisi*p��se  lane Initastnal immm  Write or Phone for further Information,  2557 East Hasting^ Street HAstings 8030  Vancouver, B.C.  |  I  228 Abbott Street ���  Vancouver, B.C.  TAtlow 3231  ��� |  I  ALLIED METALCRAFT Ltd.  ��� Manufacturers  Allied Fishing Tackle  Phone or write for further information.  341 Powell Street ��� TAtlow 2739  Vancouver, B.C.  Canadian Compression Joints  Securex Tube Fittings  Copper Tubing - Copper Cosis  739 Beatty Street ��� PAcific 8734  Vancouver, B. C.  The Coast News  CiAJJIFIED  ADVERTIZING  3  Lines  (15   words) for 85c 3  Insertions   (same  ad)   75c  Extra   words,  above   15-word   min.   2c   each   -   Cash  with  order  Notices,   Engagements,    Marriages,    Deaths,   etc.,    75c   insertion  LITTLE ADS . . . BIG RESULTS  iFOE SALE  LISTINGS WANTED.  WE HAVE a wide range of  foatiery radios from $10 .to $50.  i3ee  them   on   display   at   our  istose.  We accept trade ins.  Cf-ibsons  Electrdc   phone   45  Three complete bomber wheels  size 56 with some spare tires  and tubes. O.. Sladey, Pender  Harbour. 85  Residential lots  in Village  of  ��Sbsons  50  X 132 ft.  adjoin-  .<ng    the    Sedhelt    Peninsula  Highway. Close to schools and  Churches.  Elecjtrie   lights  and  xw&ter, low taxes. $275.00 and  3350.00.    Apply    Granthams���  Phone  88.                                 84  > ��� . ...    iJnforseen circumstances requires our client to move to  ��e&ty, so we offer their waterfront lot with modern 5-room  ^bungalow, fire place, oil furn-  a.e,e jand range, inboard motor  boat'. Price reasonable, terms  arranged. For further particulars apply, A. E. Mullett,  ���ffranthams Landing.  -l'I 11, ���  Furnished   modern   bungalow,  Hopkins   Landing,   three   bedrooms.     Moderate     rent, ,   to  Careful  tenant.   MacLaren.  JOHN COLERIDGE Agencies  real estate licenced and bonded agents (Connection with  H.A. Roberts Ltd.) Listings  required, attractive to retired  couples. Contact our office or  Coast News Office,.  Gibsons' to Pender Harbour.  H.B. Gordon Real!Estate. Box  11 Sechelt, Phone 53 J  FOR RENT  House for Rent. Four-roomed,  electric  lights  year  round   in  Village,  25   per   month,    oil  rangte optional. For . further  particulars write R. S. Barr,  Blubber Bay, B. C, or enquire  at Black &-White Store.  84  WANTED  ���i r������ ,  Cattle, hogs, and live poultry.'  Apply  Harry Kennett,  opposite Canadian Legion.  FOR SALE  XTSE COAST NEWS FOR  .CLASSIFIED ADS!  One Jersey milk cow. Fresh  three months, 5 years old,  good milker. O. Brumbraugh,  Reid Road.  Essex Sedan, five tires. What  offers ? Apply J. Burrows,  Halfmoon Bay.   _��� ��� 84  NOT   LET   US  LOOK AFTER YOUR  PROPERTY?  We are fully bonded and  specialize in rentals and property ���r banish worry ��� we  really protect your investment  CONSULT   US FIRST  We assure action  and  satisfaction.  1  A complete Real Estate  Service  Sales Rentals  Consolidated Brokers  Limited  Gibsons ������ Opposite the P. O.  O. Blumgren, Mrs. J. Rusk and  Miss Doreen Shaw.  They tell me Kim Elliott  was winner of th^�� lions share  of trophic?, at the Pender Regatta. Mr. auid Mrs. Glenn  Elliott are enjoying the company of their new daughter,  and all doing fine. Mr. Elliott  *is recovering frcm a serious  operation.  Mr. and Mrs. Kip Hewat  and family, leaving for Kaslo,  Monday, where they will  spend the next year. Mr. and  Mrs. Stutchberry will occupy  their home while they are  . away. Visiting Gibsons, Mr.  and Mrs. George Walsh and  f amily.  Want to thank the folks for  all the nice things they said  about my Ferry Day speech.  I was so cold standing down  at the foot of that wharf, it.  was about the chilliest clay we  had all summer I think ��� my  teeth chattered, and I was sure  I was going to swallow some  of the words, but they must  have come out OK, according  to all you folks, for I sure had  stage fright ������ than��ks again.  The boys got a wonderful  break when. Port Mellon hired'  about 30 men for a two week  rush job. It was wonderful for  the boys who went d<own.  Boys were all feeling mighty  low, with no prospect of work,  due to the fire closure, and  school looming en the horizon.  It was going to be a serious  problem, getting the much  needed paraphernalia for their  next term.  We  have  been very  fortunate, in being able to  keep an  adequate   supply   of   water  in     3,  our  domestic   set-up.    With   a    |/  very    serious     leak     in     the     " ~  Marine Drive water main, and  the excessive draw off, due to  hot weather,  we have had at  all times a generous supply at  (continued on page 5)  (See This and That)  RENTALS  i����ro��WM������������"������nQ������������.������a������a����"��..����"����a""*"��"""����"'*""^  W��� C. LEDiNGHAM  AGENTS \m  MONROE  Adding-Calculating Machines  Write, phone or. wire for further information.  509 Richard Street ��� PAcific 6648  Vancouver, B.C.  I  In Stock Now  for ���  Immediate Delivery  2 X 4s     Shiplap  A Variety of Lumber  ROOFING INSULATION ��� WALLBOARDS  SEE  THE   NEW SIMPSON ECONOMY BOARD  per sheet $2.10  SECHELT BUILDING SUPPLIES  ��� Phone Sechelt 60 ���  BLAvK  BALL  CAR  FERRY  HORSESHOE BAY  .���������'< -_ , /  ���-*' ���-..���"  M.V. "Quillayute"��� 5 round trips daily  SCHEDULE Al^D RATES  Leave Gibsons:  7:00 a.m.  10:04) a.m.  1:00 p.m.  4:00 p.m.  7:00 p.m.  Leave Horseshoe Bay:  8:30 a.m.  11:30 a.m.  2:30 p.m.  5:30 p.m.  8:30 p.m.  Fares: Adult...��� $1.00 each way��� $1.80 return  Children  ���  .50���each���way __ .90  return  AUTOMOBILES $3.00 EACH WAY  (Exclusive of Driver)  ��� CONTINUOUS   LUNCH   COUNTER  SERVICE  BLACK BALL FERRIES LTD  ��� Whytecliffe 3581 ���  B-  I  m  hi  'ii  ^^���^^^I'^SV^1^^  *. wwr&TITtTC ��tn.'3,V-��V flf^jr/PS?*W��*��������  -��flitVl/T��MW��-i tn WT�� .���" B^W-V '/��� Use Coast News Classified Ads  EXPERIENCED ROOFERS  GENERAL ROOFING  Phone Gibsons 76-W  SCREEN DOORS  MEAT SAFES  Specials from.  Specials from  $3.50  S3.75  Coleman NNo. soo stove Reg. $13.75  CoSdpack Canners.   Reg.    4.25 Special $^4.95  Total $18.00  SCHOOL OPENING SPECIAL  20% offf  BASEBALL EQUIPMENT  CAMP   COOK '> Special  (Cast Liner) Below replacement cost.  $25.00  Terms with'n government regulations.  PHONE ORDERS WELCOMED  -a . . ,  Knowles Service Hardware  Phone 33 ��� Gibsons, B.C.  FALL TIME is  ROOFING" SIDING TIME  MINERAL  SURFACE  SUMMER ENDING CLEARANCE  ASPHALT*  ^  COATING-���  -"sagg  ASPHALT SATURANT.  INSULATION  ���-BOARD  Be Prepared For Cold  CALL AND INSPECT OUR WIDE RANGE  of siding and roofing ��� each gnranteed to give  .   /satisfaction when the winds howl.  ONS BU  Phone Gibsons 53 ��� Tlie Lumber Number  Thursday August 30 1951  The- Coast News 5  Halfmoon Bay  BY Mrs K. RAVEN  Halfmoon Bay VON meeting will be held in the home  of Mrs. Curran,'"Hideaway"  with Mrs. Nutio as co-hostess,  this is the first, meeting of  the   group  since  June.  Mrs. Axam, sewing convenor  for the "VON Auxiliary has  gone to California and will  undoubtedly be greatly missed. VON is.working hard now  on a bazaar to be held in  October.  The P.-T.A. will return to  regular meetings starting September 12 at the School. Hostess for the evening will be  Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Scott.  President, Mrs. Burrows, extends a warm ^velcome to all  with particular note paid to  newcomers.  Tuesday, September 11, in  the Mariann Hall has been set  as time and place of the first  fall meeting of the popular  badminton club under President. Alf Ness.  This will be the first chance  many loggers have had to get  on the "bird." It is expected  the club will meet on two evenings per week, Tuesday and  Friday. Tickets will sell ai  $5  (Continued on page 8)  (See Halfmoon Bay)  THIS AND THAT  (Continued  from page 4)  the source. The sprinkling ban  was a definite necessity to  conserve this, supply in the  event of a fire or breakdown.,  Our water main situation is a  bottleneck, and replacement  of some of these inadequate .  mains is something to think  about very  carefully.  Just a tip, if you are going  ..to town on - the ferry,. travel  as light as you can, for there  is a wonderful hike, from the  ferry up to the bus. It's not  bad during the sunshine, but  I hate to think of that trip  when it's blowing and raining.  Maybe by that time Mr. Lawrence will have his bus business  straightened   out.  They tell me, Les Peterson  will be teaching at Sechelt  school this year. Good- to see  Les back in harness again, and  wish him lits of luck.  Our. patients : George Pye  and Bill Skellet, Jr., are still  on their backs in hospital, will  be for a while, bnt coming  along.  Miss W. New will have her  kindergarten going full swing  again this year, in the Wagner  home, I hear.  They tell me,^when a man  discovers his wife sewing tiny  garments, his reaction is, "My  gosh; you are not going to  wear that on the beach?  LEGAL  NOTICE  "PUBLIC  HEARING,  ZONING   BYLAW"  A Public Hearing will be held in  1 the Municipal Hall, Gibsons, B. C,  at 2.30 in the afternoon of Tuesday, September 11th, 1951, to hear  any persons who deem themselves  to be affected by a proposed  amendment to Zoning Bylaw No.  90, 1951. The said proposed amendment   to   provide   as   follows:  "Bylaw No. 90, Zoning Bylaw  1951, as amended by Bylaw No. 91,  is further amended by adding  thereto as Clause "f" of Section 9,  the following words:  'Automobite Parking Stations,  provided the Iay.out plans and  location are satisfactory to the  Board  of  Commissioners'."  The proposed by?.aw will be avail.  a,ble for inspection by interested  persons at the Municipal Hall, on  September 1st, 4th, 5th, 8th, and  llt'h, from 1-00 oclock to 4.30  o'clock in  the afternoon.  ROBERT   BURNS  Clerk.  VI  Manufacturers of  Write or Phone for further Information.  500  Campbell Avenue      ���      HAstings  1822  Vancouver, B.C.  !*' _ '        ~  ii     For Style and Value in Ladles' Clothing  Is  is!  12!  SWEET SIXTEEN Ltd.  Stores in  Vancouver, New Westminster, Victoria,  Port Alberni,  Prince Rupert, Chilliwaek,  Penticton,  Kelowna, Kamloops.  Phone Or Write for Farther  Information.  g AtWaWMwp������i������ra"M��"��"'a����"*B"*a"M*M*"��"^  GIBSONS KIMMILTEN  Parents or children, or both, come to the United  Church Hall Tuesday, September 4, between 9.30 and  10.00 in the morning, or 2.30 and 3.00 afternoon. You  will be taken to the house in the village where the Kindergarten will be held. Regular classes start Wednesday, September 5. Further information from Miss W.  New, or Coast News office.  B  usiness an  dProf  essiona  DIRECTORY  Please Clip This Directory Out and Hang By Your Phone  For Reference  BEER BOTTLES  Will  call and   buy for cash   1  beef bottles, scrap metal, etc.  Calls made at intervals from  Hopkins   to   Irvines   Landing  R. H. Stroshen  Wilson  Creek  PLUMBING  ELECTRICAL  WORK  Plumbing- and Electrical  Supplies,   Fixtures,  Service  Sechelt Building  Suppies  Phone  60  PLUMBING and HEATING  /  Reliable Electrical Repairs  Appliances,   Fixtures,   Radios  WashingMachines  Everything   Electrica]  Gibsons Electric  Phone   45  FLORIST  Sunset  Hardware  ....GIBSONS  Registered     Plumbers  PLUMBING  Sal^s   and   Contractig  Flowers   for   all   occasions  We   are   agents   for   large  Vancouver florists  Fast   service   for   weddings  and   funerals  Jack Mayne  Phone   Sechelt   24     or   write  P.O.   Box   28  [  Plumbing,   Heating   and  Supplies.  Jack Marshall  Gibsons B.C.  Phone Gibsons 104 or 33 |  REAL ESTATE  GIFT STORE  John  Coleridge  Agencies  Gibsons   and   District's   Only  -Full Time Real Estate  Agent  Phone Gibsons 37  Headquarters   for  Wool,  Notions.   Cards,   Toys,  Miscellaneous Gifts  Gibsons  5-10-15' Store  Left of Post Office  Gibsons, B.C.  HARDWARE  TAXI  KNOWLES   SERVICE  HARDWARE  Phone 33 _._. Gibsons B.C.  Builder's Hardware  Paint.   Plumbing  Appliances  Complete   Installation  Maintenance  Service  DELIVERIES  TO ALL  POINTS  Peninsula     Cabs  24-Hour  Service  2   Phones   --   2   Cabs  WILSON   CREEK   and  SELMA   PARK  Phone Sechelt 66  Taxi Sir  ?  call  BILL HUNTER  Sechelt  48  MACHINISTS  Hills Machine Shop  Mobilized Welding  I   Welding   anywhere   --anytime  Expert Tradesmen  Precision   Machinists  Phone 54 Res.  5*  TRANSFERS-TRUCKS  Hansen Transfer  GENERAL  CARTAGE  Phone   Seen pit   28 6  The Coast News    Thursday August 30 1951  " Your B. C.  Livestock  Branch"  This is the subject  of an  important address  to'' be broadcast by  HON.  H.R.BOWMAN  MINISTER   OF   AGRICULTURE'  B.   C.   GOVERNMENT  CBR  3  :��5 p.m.  Sept.  HASSANS  Pender  Harbour,   B.C.  The  Old-Established  General Store  SUPPLYING FAMILIES,  FISHERMEN AND  CAMPS  Latest in Novelties and  Toys  FISH   BUYERS  HOME GAS STATION  Mechanical  Refrigeration  Fresh Deliveries on Hand  Always  Steer For   ?  * HASSAN'S  LANDING  Midway South Shore  distinguished  product of the  BRITISH  COLUMBIA  DISTILLERY  Co. Ltd.  EXPORT  CANADIAN WHISKY  0ISTILLIO   M.TUMO  AMD BOTUtD i>.eo��o  liKCI. t*l SU.IPviSiO. 0��  ArJM f^S-mtui 3.</My1*  Ofmaari  ri&  '*&���  THE BRITISH  COLUMBIA  DISTIllERV CO. LTD  NIW   WHIM1N5TIJ,   B.C.  BCD-1-0+  This advertisement  is not published or displayed by.  the Liquor Control Board or by the  Government of British Columbia  Much Ado  BY  CHERRY  WHITAKER  Pender  Harbours   fifth   Regatta ...  Yes, dear, today is regatta  day. When are we going? My  pet, it is only 8 o'clock and  the parade doesn't start till  11 . . . How do 1 know? Well,  it has started at 11 for the  last four years so I see no  earthly reason why they might  change the time this year.  Just relax and run along and  play while I get the work  done! What work? You may  not believe it, but the fairies  don't make beds, wash dishes  or sweep floors. Will you  please scat- I haven't time to  explain why they  don't.  No, dear,.it isn't time to go.  and Ave won't" miss the parade.  It's only 9.30. It's going to be  a long day so we don't want  to get there too early. Run  along while I gather up the  things we might need.  Ye'i dear, I know it's 10.30,  but it doesn't start till 11. We  have lots of time and besides  Josie has to   finish  her work  before she can go. Why? The  fairies at her house aren't any  better   trained  than   they   are  here.  I   don't know  why not.  You can ask Josie,  but don't  do  it till next week . . , Because   by   the   time   today is  over,  she   won't have  enough  energy to explain for at least  four days. Yes clear, you may  go down to the float and wait,  but  don't get in the boat til]  get  there.   Don't   ask  me  we  why not!     f)  Yes clear, it looks as if we  are too late for the parade. It  is a shame, but we will probably see all the decorated boats  anyway,   so   stop  un  making  hello. I  pleasant noises.    Oh,  haven't   seen  you   for  years.  How  are    the   children?  You  mean   those   large   things   arc*  3'ours ?  Oh,  no !I   've  got two  more. There. The one wearing  the bathing trunks on  top  of  his head, and the one ��� well  he was here a minute ago. See  you later.  No dear, we can't go down  on, the floats. Yes, I know we  could gee everything, but that  is   for  people   who  are  going  to  do  things.   I  don't   know.  Just things. Swimming, diving  and log-rolling. No  dear, you  can't have a hot clog . . . Be-^  cause we just.got here and if  you v start  eating now ... . .Hi  there. How  are  you?   Isn't, it  a  lovely   day.   See  you  later:  Yes dear, you may get an ice  cream cone. No, I don't know  who won    the  12. and   under'..  No, you may not have a bottle  of pop. There, the man is announcing  the next  race.   The  man in %he green shirt, down  on��� the f 1 oat. No :clear, he isn ?t  going to race, he's, just telling  us about it. I don't know why  he isn't. Yes, I'll go with yoii. ''  No.  I missed  that  race.  You  mean to  say,   that our  eldest  went  off  the high  dive!  I've  been trying to get those trunks  off  the  top ���, of  his  head   all  He   wouldn't   go   in  morning.  the  swimming  races,  so  don't.  ask me what possessed him to  enter the  high  dive.  I didn't  he could. Dear, will you please  put your hat on and stop dripping  ice  cream   all   over  me.  Hello there! No, I haven't seen  Mary or Jack  or Sue   or Bill  or Jane or Tom. They must be  around     somewhere.       Thank  yon very much, I'd- love a cup  of coffee.  No dear, you can't  have    another   bottle   of "'pop.  Would you mind  sitting  anywhere bu�� in ray lap. Try that  nice soft rnek over there. Oh.  look! The losr-rolling is  goinc  to start. Yes dear, I know thev  are going to fall off, but that's  why   they   are   on   ihe   log.-   I  mean, they are supposed to try  to stay on, but they usually  don't. Why don't they take  their clothes.off? because they  are supposed to stay on the  log. NcTdear, you can't go for  a. swim with your clothes on.  Would you like an'ice cream  bar? Good. We'll walk over  to the other side. No, I really  don't know who won any of  the races. We can find out  next week from the paper.  Yes dear, the boat races are,  ail   over   on    the   other   side  where we left   our boat   this  morning.  We'll   go  over   and  see   them.   Hurry   up,   so we  * BEN BACKSTAY  %  don't  don't:  have  think  ate it  You  miss them. No dear, I  know, why ^hey don't  any more ice  cream.   I  perhaps you children  all . . .  can't  see    the    boats?  Never mind, neither can I.  My legs are tired too. Yes, my  head aches. Yes, I'm hungry.  Yes, we are going home now.  No, I am most certainly not  going to the dance tonight.  Yes dear, I guess we'll come  to the regatta next vear, but  DON'T ASK ME WHY!  Action-packed, red-blooded  adventure returns to the air  August 30 when the Cisco Kid '  and his side kick, Paneho, .  resume their series of stories  on CKWX. Every program  each Thursday at 7.30 p.m. is  a complete story.  The Cisco Kid is drawn from  the. original story by one of  America's greatest story-tellers, the unforgettable O. Henry. This great writer's idea of  a Eobin Hood of the range, a  gay caballero of the Old West,  who fights for law and order  in his own way. who helps all  those who deserve help, has  been faitfully adapted for '  radio.  ttTfe  JyAIMtiwc Tt4Vi  USE COAST NEWS FOE  CLASSIFIED ADS!  Ben Backstay was a boatswain,  A very jolly boy,  ���No lad than he more merrily  Could pipe all hands ahoy.  For over a century Lamb's Navy has  been the call of those who know  good rum. Smooth and mellow, it is  matured, blended and bottled in  Britain of the finest Demerara Rums.  Lamb's Navy Rui  This  advertisement  is  not  published  redisplayed by the Liquor Control Board or '  bv the Government of British Columbia.  An old sea shanty  WOOD USES  You know that wood makes  paper, lumber, posts and fuel,  it has many other uses, too.  It makes textiles, explosives,  plastics and chemicals. It can  even make the feed to fatten  cattle. Today we ��� know how  to make many things of wood  that used  to  be  waited.  GRAVEL SAND CEMENT  GENERAL C  SECHELT CARTAGE  iratfWHI  ��� Km  Phone Sechelt 60 Daytime ��� 97-H in Evenings '  ii SECHELT  BY ARIES  Mrs. Thelma Brooker was a  weekend visitor,  staying with  Mrs. Dora Doyle. She is very  happy, in her new job in Vancouver, /but does miss us a bit.  Charlie   and  Auntie Jordan  are living at Deep Cove. Auntie,  it was generally believed,  would  never get  about again'  after her broken hip. She has  a   special   walking   chair   and  gets around the suit very Avell.  We were grieved to hear of  the sudden death of Mrs. Dolphin  of  Sechelt   Inlet.     Very  well    known ��� here    and   well  liked. Also the passing of Mrs.  N.   J.  Thompson  in  Burnaby,  wife    of.  the    Reverend N. J.  Thompson,    and    one.   of   the  Whitaker girls whose brother,  Herbert,  once   owned   Sechelt  Townsite.     The     Thompson's  had   planned    on   retiring   tp  Davis Bay where"Mr.  Roland  Whitaker    operates    the    Sea  Beach  Motel.   Our  sympathies  go  out to Mr. Thompson and  daughter Marjorie.  Had a call from Father  Cooper of St. James Church  in Vancouver. He finds a great  change in Sechelt. It is many  years,since he stayed here.  Mrs. Margaret Bristow was  the guest of Mrs. F. French  recently. When Mrs. Bristow  was guest of Mrs. B. Parker  during her visit here, a party  was arranged which included  Mrs. J. Parker, Mr. and Mrs.  Stuart Killick,, Mrs. French  and Stanley Parker.  Mrs. Bristow^ a member of  D.V.A. in Vancouver, had recently returned from a trip to'  Europe, when she visited Holland, Belgium, Germany and  England, on��behalf of the War  Graves  commission.  In the Garden of Remembrance in Stanley Park--now  rests a plaque which Avas  brought home by Mrs. Bristow  from Holland, where it > was  donated to commemorate the  airmen who gave their lives  to free the country.  Visiting Mr. and Mrs. Cecil  Lawrence is W. A. Lawrence  of Vancouver.  We would like to welcome  another   new  family   to   this  area,   Mr.    and   Mrs. A. W^-  liams and  children. Albert is  brother to Mrs; D. Doyle and  is  at present driving bus.  v Noticed Mrs. Hazel Critchell  In Sechelt. Recently back from   s  University      of      Washiiigton   ;  where she has been taking  a  refresher  course   in  Dramatic   t  Art. She says it was very hot   .  down there.  Mr. and Mrs.^W. B, Billingsley are in Vancouver having a  few days at the exhibition.  Tliey<are>the^guests oFMr.'and  Mrs. E. E. Redman.   .  Wooden Nicked To  Be Payoff Money  This -dry summer has further emphasized the importance of wood, especially to  British Columbia. This fact-  will be graphically illustrated  at the coming CCL Convention  in Vancouver by a special  issue of "Wooden Nickels.''  This forest coinage will be  issued to the thousand odd  delegate"* when the convention  meets September 17 to 21.  These nickels are to be madp  of plywood. Their thr.ee inch  diameter will put them in the  "Big Nickel" class. Suitably  engraved as special purpose  .eoitis, they ^are designed to  upset that old and misleading  warning not to take wooden  nickels. (If one comes your  way, take it. It may be worth  more than the real thing.)  Road or destination signs  are now. appearing in the village of Gibsons in answer to  compliants from tourists finding themselves at a loss when  they arrive in the area.  The [Board of Trade also  have signs on order for the  village.  Roberts Creek has signs at  either end of the short cut,  while the same is planned for  Halfmoon Bay and Pender  Harbour.  BEPLACES COTTON  The cotton in your clothes  is cellulose-fiber. Cotton comes  from the cotton plant.'Almost  two-thirds of wood is also  cellulose:fiber. Taken from  trees, it can be made into  cloth which is called rayon.  An acre of trees can produce  much more cellulose each year  than an acre of cotton.  AROUND  MURDOCHS  BY   MYRNER  Mr. and Mrs." Don Dilla-  bough returned home on Friday. Don has nearly two  months time saved up for holiday:;, so we hope, he enjoys  them.  Visiters here for a second  time this year are, Donnie  Thorp at the Murdoch's and  Shirley Thomas, who is again  visiting the little Phillip's  girls, Alice and Esther.  It was nice to see George  and Jean Daniels again. They  came up by car and were ptir-  suaded to stay overnight at  the Murdoch's.  Mr. and Mrs. Jack Thorp  came up for the Regatta and  are spending a week as guests  of  the Murdoch's.  Thursday August 30 1951    The Coast News  More than 21 different materials are used in the manufacture of a quality fountain  pen, the W. A. Shaeffer Pen  Company of Canada reports  1��� including all the precious  metals (gold, silver, platinum), three kinds of plastics,  and four different types of  rubber.  H  Flowers for All Occasions  PHONE: GIBSONS 76W  Mrs E. Nestman  IMMEDIATE SERVICE  FOR THE VERY  FINEST  HARDWARE  CHINA and DEYGQODS  GROCERIES ��� DRUGS  FISHING  SUPPIES  HOME ESSENTIALS  MURDOCK'S  MARIN<=^SUPPLY  Pender Harbour, B.C.  ROYAL NAVY  DEMERARA    RUM  This advertisement is not published or displayed  by the Liquor Control Board or by the Govern*  ment of British Columbia. K  Last in a series to bring you the facts about your Hospital Insurance plan  What are the Benefits of Mil's.?  The benefits covered by B.C.H.I.S. are extensive and provide coverage for almost  every requirement for acute hospitalization. They include:  Public ward accommodation.  Use of operating room facilities and equipment.  Use ofcase room facilities andr equipment.  Surgical dressings and casts.  Anaesthetic supplies and equipment.  Drugs listed in the B.C. formulary.  Emergency treatment ($2 standard charge per visit).  Out of province coverage (up to $6.50 per day for 30 days).  Care of the acute stage of chronic illness.  All other  in-patient  services  rendered  by  employees^ of the  hospital which may include X-ray services, clinical, laboratory  and other procedures, including the services of,,,a.pathologist if ,  employed by the hospital; and physiotherapy services provided  by'the, hospital.      ���  To sum up these services, it may be said that your Hospital Insurance plan gives you  coverage for the services which are provided by the hospital you enter, and you are eligible  for the services of aU the employees or persons paid by that hospital.  These services are yours when you or your dependents require hospitalization for  acute care. They are designed to give you maximum protection at a minimum cost*  ��� Tliese advertisem.eiif;s have been presented to give you the facts about your British  Coluin^i^ Hospital Insurance Servic,^.,;The Service is still in its forVnative period and this  serie^ of "advert^e in the interests of the people of B.C., so  that they will understand the present circumstances and therefore be in a better position  to assist in furthering improvements where necessary.  If this series has not covered some specific point which you may want answered,  please write to the Minister of Health and Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria,  or the Commissioner of the B.C. Hospital Insurance Service, 544 Michigan Street,  Victoria, B.C.  The B.C. Hospital Insurance Service has already paid over 500,000 hospital bills for  the people of this province. Some of these bills have been more than $6,000. Each and  every month, over 14,000 people receive benefits under the plan. B.C.H.I.S. was designed  to be-of value to the people of B.C. and the hospitals. In this it has succeeded.  B.C. HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE���  YOUR PROTECTION AGAINST LARGE HOSPITAL BILLS,  DMRTMENT OF  HON. DOUGLAS TURNBULL, Minister  BCH-51-14 The Coast News    Thursday-August 30 1951  APPRECIATION  I wish to thank my friend and neighbours for Kindness shown, and syjmpathy in the loss of my beloved  wife, CaroQinje. Special thanks to Rev. Father O'Bwyer,  Rev. Father Bissette, OMI, Mx. Ben Turner and Mrs.  Martinson.  ��� Joseph Dolphin  i  ���  Phone Sechelt 96 ���  Post Cards  Toys  Jewellery  Pictures  Electric Fixtures  Wools  Cosmetics  Candy  Mirrctas  Plastic  Dolls  Laces  Novelties  Lamps  Cutlery  Films  Hardware  Towels  Threads  Lingerie  Gaines  Ladies Hosiery  Toys  Tabledloths  f^ffe^s  sir  UNION SPECIALS  COTTAGE ROLL -per .lb.  Swifts  Premium  Visking     ������'><>������:���.������������      ���  STRAWBERRY JAM 4 lb  Aylmer Pure  SPECIAL TEA i.ib." .".'  Our Own. Very Good.  20 oz. tin  4 'lb., tin  Ashton 's  PURE MONEY  89c  97c  89c  25c  83c  "SPECIAL PRICE   ON LARGE  GIANT TIDE  lc and 2c off regular price.'  This week may be your last cjhance on No. 1  preserving peaches.  Boy's and Girl's  School' Supplies' at right prices.  99c  $3.49  Boy's Shirts 6 to 14 years.  Closed 12 30 every Thursday.  YOUR RED AND WHITE STORE  Union Genera! Store  Phone Sechelt 18  SECHELT BAKERY  PENINSULA OWNED  PENINSULA OPERATED  The following1, progressive merchants are prepared to  give you service and a wide range of quality goods  including SECHELT BAKERY BREAD  ��� Ask for it by Name ���  Roberts Creek  M & W GENERAL STORE  BLOTT'S STORE  Davis Bay  ;~ VIC'S TRADING POST  St  Selma Park  THE COFFEE SHOP  SELMA STORE  Sechelt  UNION  GENERAL STORE  SECHELT SERVICE STORE  CLAYTON'S GROCERY  Halfmoon Bay  THE TRADING POST  West Sechelt  BY MARGARET ALLAN  Detective Dave Rdchardson  and his wife have an important reason for interupting  their holiday. Their parents,  ex-police chief Richardson and  bis wife of Chilliwack celebrated their diamond wedding  anniversary on August 14.  Met    Mrs.    G. Boying    and  Mrs. II. Urquart, they used to  come  up   every   summer  with  J     their children, now it is grand-  -'     children. How time flies.  Sorry to report that Mrs.  W. Wilson is again sick and  has to stay in bed for a spell.  We nearly had a fire on the  Rose Martin property, a man  passinga in. a boat saAy it and  with the alertness of the fire  brigade put it out.  All is not lost in the garden.  Mrs. C. Lawrence had an aster  measuring eight inches across.  We also have a- cactus plant  with more then 70 blooms.  Each bloom is ��� as big as a  human hand.  Roy Taylor had a' birthday  party recently with the family  .and families within the realm.  Roy is the .carpenter now  working-on the new school.  The Phi Beta Gamma<sorority girls |are certainly haro  workers. Nothing too menial  for them to do, including floor  scrubbing and vegetable peeling. There are many girls in  this world, with less money,  who feel too good for this type  of work.  I see Mrs. Alex Gray's  mother here from the prairie.  With her is her-son, Albert  Johnson.  ,   Sorry to report the passing  of Mrs. Muriel Thompson, wife    ���  of  the  Rev.  Norman  Thompson. She was a well known and  well liked personality  here.  The first car to come up the  thill from the states via the  feery carried the Jenkins  family, they left here in 1922. ���  Had a trip to Gower Point  to visit Mrs. Gladys Kean, who  used to'live here,, and has a  summer cottage at the Point.  While there I visited Mr. and  Mrs. G. Montieth and was  thrilled when discussing my'  pet subject ��� industry ��� to  find that Montieth Street in  Glasgow was named after his  ancestors,, one of. the fathers  of Industry,, they started the -  first factory there.  Came up ��� in . the . buss with  Mr. and  |Mrs.   Bill   Andeson,  who are just back from a trip-  to . Trail.   They  brought   back-  some boats with them for the  toutist trade at Porpoise Bay.  Andy "' Carew    landed 'a 27  '"��� pound salmon  ^vith   the  first  cast of his line., Andy is the  grandson   of   Mr.    and    Mrs.  Cairns,   who  is  enjoying   the  :" summer-here.;:  . ������''���' ���'������������  ���  J. Me-Crea   is    getting    his ���  tools ready to log on.,his place...  ���  once the weather, allows- it.-    =  - Congratulations ���    to'.������   Mrs-  Florence Taylor on her birthday ��� what  a  lot   of   girls.:  We will be. missing Roy  and .  Gretha. when they go back to .  their home in Horseshoe Bay.  In the meantime they will be  going to Harrison Hot Springs  where Roy is going to build  the    new    forestry    buildings  there along with Mr. Neff, of  course,    the    contractor    who  built our school.  VANCOUVER VISITORS  Lieutenant >. and Mrs. C.  Jfferrott were visiting Mrs.  Margaret Cooper, Upper Road,  during the weekend.  Mr. and Mrs. Herron are  from  Vancouver.  NEW BUDGET     .  Asked  the  meaning   of   the  word   budget,    one   little  boy  replied soberly, "It's a family,  quarrel." ��� Reader's Digest.  HALFMOON BAY  (Continued from page 5)  per season or 50 cents for occasional. The Badminton Club  is the place for relaxation and  fun.  Mrs. Hanney, our popular  school teacher, has1 returned  from a post graduate course  at Victoria, and will be host  to her father for a short time.  A: new date will be set for  the usual meeting of the Halfmoon Bay Liberal Association.  The usual date turns out to  be Labor Day this time.  Mr. and Mrs. Boyd of liog-  ��� co  have returned from a trip'  to  Revelstokeand  Wenatchee.  Miss Irene Lonsdale of  Chase River has been visiting  Mrs. It.  Kangas.  IDEAL IE(I WORK  GIBSONS ELECT HIC  Machine Shop  to  Fishing Industry  Write or phone for  information  369 Alexander St ��� TA 1364  Vancouver, B.C.  COMPLIMENTS  Herbert E. Hunt  (Halfmoon Bay)  representing  Great West life  ASSURANCE COMPANY  Royal  Bank Building  Vancouver, B.C.  �����**'*"  There is a  !'freshup"in  every sip  vouuK$iT-iTuia;syou  CISCO KID  Champion of law and order, the CISCO  KID returns to the air in stories of action  ond romance. Cisco and his pal Pancho  ride the Western plains each week in  search of adventure.  Dial 980 every Thursday at  7:30 p.m. fo . . .  Instant  i  Hot Water  FOR AS LOW AS  $99.75  Thermo Control  Automatic  Insulated  Economical  *  f  WashiDg Machines  witn  ,3 Washing Zones  Safety Wringer  ^m $179.50  Gibsons  wi5ra��iRa��E WNS  jr Phone Gibsons 45. ��� I  SECHELT  BY ARIES  Mrs. Thelma Brooker was a  weekend visitor,  staying with  Mrs. Dora Doyle. She is very  naPPy, in her new job in Vancouver, /but does miss us a bit.  Charlie   and  Auntie Jordan  are living at Deep Gove. Auntie,  it was generally believed,  would  never get  about  again'  after her broken hip. She has  a   special   walking   chair   and  gets around the suit very well.  We were grieved to hear of  the sudden death of Mrs. Dolphin  of  Sechelt   Inlet.     Very  well    known ��� here    and    well  liked. Also the passing of Mrs.  N.   J.  Thompson  in  Burnaby,  wife    of   the    Reverend N. J.  Thompson,'   and    one.   of   the  Whitaker girls whose brother,  Herbert,  once   owned   Sechelt  Townsite.     The     Thompson's  had   planned    on   retiring   to  Davis Bay wherev Mr. Roland  Whitaker    operates    the    Sea  Beach  Motel.   Our  sympathies  go  out to Mr. Thompson and  daughter Marjorie.  Had a call from Father  Cooper of St. James Church  in Vancouver. He finds a great  change in Sechelt. It is many  years.since he stayed here.  Mrs. Margaret Bristow was  the guest of Mrs. F. French  recently. When Mrs. Bristow  was guest of Mrs. B. Parker  during her visit here, a party  was arranged which -included  ��� ������"' Mrs. J. Parker, Mr. and Mrs.  Stuart Killick,, Mrs. French  and Stanley Parker.  Mrs. Bristow, a member of  D.V.A. in Vancouver, had recently returned from a trip to'  Europe, when she visited Holland, Belgium, Germany and  England, on��behalf of the War  Graves  commission.  In the Garden of Remembrance in Stanley ' Park-v now  rests a plaque which was  brought home by Mrs. Bristow  from Holland, where it > was  donated to commemorate the  airmen who gave their lives  to free the country.  Visiting Mr. and Mrs. Cecil  Lawrence is W. A. Lawrence  of Vancouver.  We would like to welcome  another new family to this  area, Mr. and Mrs. A. Williams and children. Albert is  brother to Mrs. D. Doyle and  is at present driving bus.  Noticed Mrs. Hazel Critchell  in Sechelt. Recently back from  University of Washington  where she _has been taking a  refresher course in Dramatic  Art. She says it was very hot  down there.  Mr. and Mrs..W. B. Billingsley are in Vancouver having a  f ew days . at the exhibition.  Tliey ��� are* thev;guests of "Mr." and  Mrs. E. E. Redman.  ... ���*  Wooden Nickels To  Be Payoff Money  This .dry summer has further emphasized the ' importance of wood, especially to  British Columbia. This fact  will be graphically illustrated  at the coming CCL Convention  in Vancouver by a special  issue of "Wooden Nickels.''  This forest coinage will be  issued to the thousand odd  delegates when the convention  meets September 17 to 21.  These nickels are to be made  of plywood. Their thr.ee inch  diameter will put them in the  "Big Nickel" class. Suitably  engraved as special purposv  coiiis, they^are designed to  upset that old and misleading  warning not to take wooden  nickels. (If one comes your  way, take it. It may be worth  more than the real thing.)  Road or destination signs  are now. appearing in the village of Gibsons in answer to  compliants from tourists finding themselves at a loss when  they arrive in the area.  The |Board of Trade also  have signs on order for the  village.  Roberts Creek has signs at  either end of the short cut,  while the same is planned for  Halfmoon Bay and Pender  Harbour.  REPLACES COTTON  The cotton in your clothes  is cellulose-fiber. Cotton comes  from the cotton plant. Almost  two-thirds of wood is also  cellulose:fiber. Taken from,  trees, it can be made into  cloth which is called rayon.  An acre of trees can produce  much more cellulose each year  than an acre of cotton.  AROUND  MURDOCHS  Thursday August 30 1951    The Coast News  Mr.  BY   MYRNER  and   Mrs." Don   Dilla-  bough returned home on Friday. Don has nearly two  months time saved up for holiday:?, so we hope, he enjoys  them.  Visiters here for a second  time this year are, Donnie  Thorp at the Murdoch's and  Shirley Thomas, who is again  visiting the little Phillip's  girls, Alice and Esther.  It was nice to see George  and Jean Daniels again. They  came up by car and were pur-  suaded to stay overnight at  the  Murdoch's.  Mr. and Mrs. Jack Thorp  came up for the Regatta and  are spending a week as guests  of  the Murdoch's.  More than 21 different materials are used in the manufacture of a quality fountain  pen, the W. A. Shaeffer Pen  Company of Canada reports  1��� including all the precious  metals (gold, silver, platinum), three kinds of plastics,  and four different types of  rubber.  <$$i&&^  &  Flowers for All Occasions  PHONE: GIBSONS 76W  Mrs E. Nestman  IMMEDIATE SERVICE  FOR THE VERY  FINEST  HARDWARE  CHINA and DRYGOODS  GROCERIES ��� DRUGS  FISHING SUPPIES  HOME ESSENTIALS  MURDOCK'S  MARiN^JSUPPLY  Pender Harbour, B.C.  ROYAL NAVY  DEMERARA    RUM  This advertisement is not published or displayed  by the Liquor Control Board or by the Govern*  ment of British Columbia. '���  ��-.-..��  Last in a series to bring you the facts about your Hospital Insurance plan  What are the Benefits of R.C.M.I.S.?  The benefits covered by B.C.H.I.S. are extensive and provide coverage for almost  every requirement for acute hospitalization. They include:  Public ward accommodation.  Use of operating room facilities and equipment.  Use of case room facilities and equipment.  Surgical dressings and casts.  Anaesthetic supplies and equipment.  Drugs listed in the B.C. formulary.  Emergency treatment ($2 standard charge per visit).  Out of province coverage (up to $6.50 per day for 30 days).  Care of the acute stage of chronic illness.  All other  in-patient  services  rendered  by employees^ of the  hospital which niay include X-ray services, clinical, laboratory  and- other, procedures, including the services of a pathologist if r  employed, by the hospital; and physiotherapy.services provided  by'the hospital.  To sum up these services, it may be said that your Hospital Insurance plan gives you  ��overage for the services which are provided by the hospital you enter, and you are eligible  for- the services dfaUthe e^ that hospital.  These services are yours when you or your dependents require hospitalization for  acute care;. They are designed to give you maximum protection at a minimum cost.  ���   '        ������'���.  '   "'���.'"'���       v-.-.v     /. ,,. ,.-.      ���    ,.       -������'��� .���  .   ;������-, ;. '...'��� .���'������'' ���;���������"'���  ��� Tliese advertisen^ejits have been presented to give you the facts about your British  ColuArftiai. Hospital Insurance Service,..;The Service is still in its for^native period and this  '^rl^'^ofj'adyer^i^em^nts have beenv published in the interests of the people of B.C., so  that they will understand the present circumstances and therefore be in a better position  to assist in furthering improvements where necessary.  If this series has not covered some specific point which you may want answered,  please write to the Minister of Health and Welfare, Parliament Buildings, Victoria,  or the Commissioner of the B.C. Hospital Insurance Service, 544 Michigan Street,  Victoria, B.C.  The B.C. Hospital Insurance Service has already paid over 500,000 hospital bills for  the people of this province. Some of these bills have been more than $6,000. Each and  every month, over 14,000 people receive benefits under the plan. B.C.H.I.S. was designed  to be-of value to the people of B.C. and the hospitals. In this it has succeeded.  B.C. HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE���  YOUR PROTECTION AGAINST LARGE HOSPITAL BILLS.  in; 11, tii  HON. DOUGLAS TURNBULL, Minister  BCH-5M4

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