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Sunshine Coast News Jan 9, 1989

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 gp  ^egisWUve Library  ParHam,^ Buildings  Victoria, SiC. V8V 1X4  Although local fishermen  take their catch elsewhere to be  processed, Sechelt council takes  seriously the threat floating processors pose to the economy of  B.C. and the environment of  coastal waters.  Council received a letter from  the United Fishermen and  Allied Workers' Union January  89.8  jtter asked council to  ohn Savage, provincial  imm&ici    of   agriculture   and  fisheries, protesting his apparent support of floating fish  processing vessels on the B.C.  coast.  Alderman David Wells told  council he had been to Scotland  and saw "...the terrible mess the  processing boats make in the  surrounding waters."  Bob Wilson urged council to  give the fishermen "whatever  support we can give." He  ���pointed out that between 40G0  and 5000 jobs are at risk in B.C  over this issue.  Alderman Joyce Kolibas  questioned the wisdom of such  support. "I feel a little uncomfortable voting on just one side  of it," she said.  She compared the situation to  a previous decision council was  asked to make where a business  asked council not to support  another business' request for a  special permit due to the competition that would ensue between the two operations. In that  case council decided free enterprise must prevail.  However, Alderman Wilson  assured Kolibas the situations  were not comparable.  "The concern has been pro-  The Sunshine  cessing fish in B.C. rather than  shipping them out in the round  and processing them elsewhere.  This is processing them in our  backyard with no benefit to  local workers."  "A  in  David Weils added,  Japanese boat could come  here and process for years,  without ever employing anyone  from the area, or even benefitting from their business apart  Published on the Sunshine Coast        25* per copy on news stands     January 9,1989        Volume 43        Issue 2  from the odd trip into Sechelt  for supplies." x  After much discussion, all  council members appeared 'to  agree with Alderman Wilson  that the floating processors  could affect the economy of Jhe  whole province. They voted  unanimously to send a letter stp  the minister stating their con:  cerns and asking that a full  study and debate on this issue  be conducted. ;  �����i'.  $4.34 million economic plan  Sparkling eyes, sparkling water! This is the season when the nearest thing to a tropical swimming  paradise hereabouts is one of the Sunshine Coast's two public swimming pools. These two youngsters  were obviously enjoying themselves last week. ���Vern Elliott photo  Collins wants one  by. Harold Blaine  A $4.34 million economic  boost for the Sunshine Coast  over the next five years is proposed in the federal government's Sunshine Coast Community Futures Committee (SC-  CFC) initial phase report released Friday.  A proposal for a $2,116,000  business development centre  five-year budget is on the  federal environment and immigration minister's desk for  approval. It would have  $1,550,000 to invest in the Sunshine Coast economy and  $566,000 for operating costs.  "We are waiting with baited  breath for this approval. Then  we can start making loans to  local business," SCCFC  Manager-Coordinator Sharon  Sawchuk told this newspaper.  Also just sent to the minister  is the federal economic commit-  v,tee's. second reRprt smd recommendation.This proposes" a five  year $1,030,000 self-employ-  jnent initiative program to help  20 to 24 jobless persons re-enter  the work force yearly.  The SCCFC has completed  research and planning for these  first two projects. They are the  first of five it proposes.  The other three economic  development projects being pursued for submission to the  minister in 1989 are: a five year  $108,000 relocation and exploratory assistance program; a  five year $700,000 community  initiatives program; a five year  $190,000 training program.  The committee itself plans a  five year $200,000 operating  budget.  The SCCFC was formed in  September 1987. At that time a  number of Sunshine Coast  residents became aware this  area could qualify for a new  federal Community Futures  program because of a local  unemployment rate 20 percent  higher than average.  The founding group included  directors of the Sunshine Coast  Regional District, the Sunshine  Coast Economic Development  Society, etc.  The SCCFC has been responsible for an umbrella study of  the local economic situation and  of development prospects. This  has been done in order to determine whether the Community  Futures program should come  to the Sunshine Coast.  The individual program application details are secret. They  are only released on the approval of the federal government.  The SCCFC chairman is William. McKinnon, a prominent  retired civil servant living in  Ha'fmoon Bay. The members  include Richard Chamberlin,  sawmill owner/operator; Elaine  Futterman, Capilano College  instructor and Sunshine Coast  Arts Council director; Doug  Jardine, Capilano College president; Bonnie Murray, registered  industrial accountant; Lynda  Olsen, past president and director of the Sunshine Coast Community Services Society; Gayle  Preston, social services ministry  employment counsellor; Barrie  Wilbee, resort operator and  chairman of the Sunshine Coast  Economic Development Society; Tom Nishimura (ex-officio),  manager of the Canada Employment   Centre   in   Sechelt;  Diane Fontaine (ex-officio),.  employment and immigration;  Canada community futures:  consultant.  "The Sunshine Coast possesses numerous positive at-,  tributes and economic oppor-  tunities. The area's natural  beauty and rural lifestyle are  treasured and worthy of preser-r  vation," says the SCCFC report  summary.  "The strategy recognizes that  employment and economic  development opportunities  must balance with the very atr  tributes that attract and maintain residents and visitors to the  Sunshine Coast. Available  natural resources, a mild  climate, growing service sector,  an under developed tourism  potential, a large retired popula-:  tion and a dynamic arts community are recognized as the  key ingredients of the strategy;  "The establishment of :a  training coordinating committee  is recommended to help balance  lpcal employer needs with the  skills of local labour. A fifth activity, a Community Initiatives  Fund, is recommended for the  pursuit of unique projects on  the Sunshine Coast." says the  report. ���;���'���;���  "All five options (of the plan),  have the potential to provide:-  secure employment oppor-"  tunities for local residents. The;  Sunshine Coast Community^;  Futures Committee plans t<KF  work with local organizations t<h!  develop and submit proposals;;  for the Community Initiatives';  Fund," says the report. Yf  Possible CIF proposals men-:  tioned include those from the"  Sunshine Coast Arts CouncilY  and Sunshine Coast Golf and ���  Country Club. ;<>  Collins protests meetings  municipality  by Harold Blaine  Recently acclaimed Gibsons  junior Alderman Ken Collins  January 3 tried to get a motion  through town council in favour  of forming a single municipality  for all the Sunshine Coast. But  he failed to get even a single  supporting vote.  Urging the council to go to  the other Sunshine Coast  municipalities with the idea,  Alderman Collins said formation of a single municipality  would deal with the problem of  alienation among the different  parts of the peninsula.  Collins said a single  municipality is the way to get  local taxes levied on the Howe  Sound Pulp and Paper mill.  Local taxation on the mill is the  only way to give local government the economic base it must  have, he said.  The decision is a political  one, rather than a technical one,  Ysaid Collins.  "I recognize we have a  restructuring committee, but  how it came about isn't widely  understood. Independent of  whatever the committee may  find out, I feel we have to  develop an industrial tax base to  support what's needed," said  the Gibsons alderman.  "I feel the Sunshine Coast  Regional District would welcome a political overture that  we go to the public in a 'win-  win' situation to create a larger  community from which all the  people can benefit. People have  the perception now that one  area is trying to gobble up the  others. Fear is the problem.  "I don't feel they have  anything to fear," he said,  arguing that restructuring Gibsons ''with its environs is a matter  of the political approach made.  "I don't feel we should strike  down the work of this (restructuring) committee," said Mayor  Diane Strom.  "I think it would be  premature for us to make a  move toward other political  bodies at this time. I agree that  would be undermining the  technical study," said Alderman John Reynolds.  "What Alderman Collins is  seeking may well be what the  committee will recommend,"  said Alderman Gerry Dixon.  "I feel we wouldn't undermine, but would enhance the  committee," said Collins. "This  is a political decision. It's our  responsibility to say what is the  best solution.  "We have more governments  on this small peninsula than  there are anywhere except  maybe in the undeveloped  world. Probably the municipalities (collectively) are the largest  single body of government  across the country, having  thousands of years of tradition  and wars fought to defend it,"  said Collins, reiterating it isn't a  problem of anybody gobbling  anybody up.  Concerned about being called  to secret meetings of town council or its committees, recently  acclaimed junior Gibsons  Alderman Ken Collins protested  in the official public council  meeting January 3.  Collins said he was disturbed  several times in his first weeks  of office to find himself in  meetings that were 'in camera'.  He said he preferred a procedure described in the  Municipal Act where council  met publicly and only went into  secret   session   by   passing   a  public motion for a specific  reason.  "I personally have no trouble  in calling and having 'in  camera' meetings. I personally  feel there are some things councils have to do that are better  said 'in camera'," said Mayor  Diane Strom.  Alderman John Reynolds  said there were certain gatherings of council members which  were informal. "Like the work  session this afternoon, it  not a meeting," he said.  was  "I don't think any of us, in-Y:  eluding the mayor, has the right:*:  to decide a meeting should be Y  'in camera'," said Alderman >  Collins. >  The discussion concluded >;  without Alderman Collins~k  receiving any apparent support Y  for a change in council practice. ���>>  On the Inside  Non-Smoking Week P.2  Climbs Mt. Kilimanjaro .PA  Mothers March time .. .P.7  / Care aide - homemakers .P. 10  Arts Council thrives  .P.13  70 swimmers compete. P. 14  Sechelt budgeting  Sechelt council voted January 4 to accept the 1989 provisional budget. This motion enables them to begin drawing up  the detailed final draft for 1989.  Mayor Tom Meredith asked the media to cooperate in getting the message out to community organizations that applications for the funds for 1989 should be submitted by the  end of the month. Applications should be in writing and be'  accompanied by the previous year's financial statement.  ���>V��^!Si<Wn:&,  Community  mourns officer  Hundreds of members of the  community joined RCMP officers at St. Mary's Catholic  Church Friday to pay their last  respects to Constable Dennis  Donaldson, who died suddenly  January 2. Forty officers in red  serge were joined by members  of the Roberts Creek and Gibsons volunteer fire departments,  auxiliary RCMP and ambulance attendants, who formed  the honour guard.  "Dennis was a well respected  and loved policeman in our  detachment," Sergeant Ed Hill  told the Coast News. "He provided not only good work but  good spirit, he was part of the  heart and soul of the detachment.  "Since his death we've realized that he was also much loved  in the community as evidenced;,  by the support of the communi- :  ty in the last week. It has really :  helped the men get through this  week, knowing the community;  supports   them,"   said   the  detachment commander.  Donaldson had been with they '  Gibsons detachment for almost  five years and had just received .  a transfer to Coquitlam. He was.  27 years old and had been with:  the RCMP since 1981.  In   commenting   on   the:;  tragedy, Gibsons Mayor Diane  Strom called it a real shock to  the community.  "Dennis was a person that  you just couldn't help but like," ���-;  she said. "He was a person's y  person. He was well liked and.  respected by everyone he touched."  sis��YYSYYY��!liISM $^3_OSffrfX^&%3(ffiig_j  j'i r.  '���: S  '������l: I  _*-  ���'S  ;;,  ������;_:  y  :S:  Y  ���5*  Sv  %'f  Is ;  H'*  -'  r  5-  -.  ._'  i:  '    _.  t    '  *���*  f  jr.  '  Si  s  �����  ,"5  it  s  s  _  I ���!'���'''  IY  Ii  .;�����.'-  Coast News, January 9,1989  In an average group of 15 to 17 year olds, one in four  smokes every day, according to a 1987 Gallup poll on  tobacco use, commissioned by the Canadian federal health  department. Among children aged 12 to 14, one in 10 admitted to smoking daily.  The survey results are alarming, but officials worry the  situation could, in fact, be even worse, as some children interviewed may have been reluctant to confess their smoking to an adult.  While Canadians as a whole are paying more attention  to good health and fitness, teens are largely resistant to  government anti-smoking campaigns, the poll suggests.  The smoking rate among teenagers has remained stable  during the 80's even though more adults are kicking the  tobacco habit.  This year, as B.C. health organizations prepare for National Non-Smoking Week, January 12 to 18, the focus of  their campaign is 'Children and Smoking'. And their goal,  says Shirley Thompson, smoking and health consultant  for the B.C. Lung Association, is to see an entirely smoke-  free generation by the year 2000.  This is a goal the Sunshine Coast and its communities  would do well to adopt.  But for some children, tobacco is a concern long before  they have the option to make their own decisions about  smoking. It can begin before the child is born.  When a pregnant woman smokes, nicotine and carbon  monoxide enter the baby's bloodstream just as they do the  mother's. Because a good supply of oxygen is required for  a baby to develop normally, babies of women who smoke  have lower birth weights and may be under-developed at  birth, leading to a greater risk of complications during the  early weeks of life.  Studies show the chances of having a miscarriage, a  premature delivery or a stillborn child are all greater for  women who smoke while pregnant.  As a child grows, the effects continue and both physical  and mental development suffer. International studies of  several thousand children born to women who smoked  during pregnancy found that up to age 11, these children  are, on the average, one cm shorter and weigh less than  children whose mothers didn't smoke. They are also three  to five months behind in reading, mathematics and general  ability.  But there's more to the problem than convincing pregnant women to stop smoking. If someone in the household  continues to smoke after the new baby comes home, the  infant is more likely to suffer illnesses like pneumonia,  bronchitis and asthma or develop allergies.  Small amounts of nicotine even enter the breast milk of  mothers who smoke and experts say nursing infants could  absorb enough nicotine in a day to cause them to be irritable and sleep poorly.  Just seeing a parent smoke is like giving a child permission to do the same, psychologists say. Mos,t learning is by  imitation and children of smokers tend to smoke  themselves.  The drive to curb teenage smoking must begin in  elementary school, health experts say. The average age  when smokers first light up is 12. And 90 per cent of  smokers say they are hooked on the tobacco habit before  age 19.  Elementary school education programs in B.C., such as  those offered by the Lung Association, teach children how  to resist social pressure to start smoking. The message,  however, must be repeated over and over to be effective.  There are several reasons why teens are susceptible to  cigarettes. Peer pressure is a strong influence and smoking  can make teens feel like they belong to a group.  More teenage girls than boys smoke, studies show.  Girls, concerned about weight gain, often start smoking as  a substitute for food. While 30 per cent of the total Canadian population smokes, for young women in their 20's  the figure jumps to 30 per cent.  5 YEARS AGO  The 1984 New Year's baby was Michael David  Johnson, 7 pounds 4 ounces, born to Dave and Debbie  Johnson of Trout Lake Road, Halfmoon Bay.  The annual bird count netted a record 11,794 birds of  92 species counted. The first owls ever counted were a  Screech Owl and a Great Horned Owl.  NDP leadership candidate Graham Lea visited the  Sunshine Coast.  The Pender Harbour swimming pool was open again  with a new supervisor Barbara Watt.  Ethel McKay was elected president of the Roberts  Creek Legion Ladies Auxiliary.  10 YEARS AGO  Newly elected president of the Royal Canadian  Legion Branch 109 is Al Pajak. First and second vice-  presidents were Bill Chester and Don MacNeill respectively.  Sometime during the past three weeks, a 22 pound  turkey was stolen from a freezer behind a residence in  Davis Bay. Police have no evidence to work on  20 YEARS AGO  Mrs. Sheila Kitson was elected board chairman and  W.P. Malcolm was elected vice-chairman of Gibsons  School Board.  In her annual Christmas message to friends on the  Sunshine Coast, Henrietta Campbell, deaconess at  Wilson Creek's St. John's United Church, wrote that  after five years of work on the Coast it was not easy to  leave comfortable living quarters with the magnificent  view, nor her good friends, but now after 40 years she  was leaving for the hustle and bustle of Toronto  30 YEARS AGO  Sechelt Legion Branch 140 club premises at Selma  Park will open January 10 and will operate under a beer  licence.  Howe Sound Variety Store, Marine Drive in Gibsons,  has changed hands and has been taken over by its  previous owners, Percy and Marion Lee  40 YEARS AGO  In a freak accident, a logging truck plunged into the  ocean. The truck was owned by Nick Wllbee. It had been  left parked and was found in the water with its brakes  still on.  World Religion Day  A time for thinkina  by Harold Blaine  Increasingly the followers of  all religions around the earth are  celebrating World Religion Day  January 15. Many who don't  celebrate that day exactly, including many Canadian local  churches, will be holding a  World Day of Prayer about this  time of year.  This is a time for the  members of all faiths to  celebrate their religions  together, or to pray together.  The goal of world peace  demands harmony among all  the world's segments1,; including  those religious. Thus a World  Religion Day or World Day of  Prayer becomes ever more important with each passing moment.  This, therefore, is a time for  giving consideration to the  question of harmony and  understanding among all faiths  and all sects. That means the  first thing to do is to become informed about other faiths and  about other sects of your own  faith.  A lot of people are interested  in doing that, and are doing just  that, these days.  Houston       Smith,       a  Massachusetts Institute of  Technology philosophy professor, in 1955 gave a course on  the Religions of Man over the  local St. Louis educational  television station. Over 1200  men and women in that one  community enrolled as tuition  paying students. At the same  time, the viewing audience grew  up to 100,000.  This response he rightly attributed to a real hunger on the  part of people to get to know  about the great faiths that have  motivated and continue to  motivate, mankind. The television course also revealed a need  for a different kind of book on  world religions, a book which  would explain the meaning  these religions have in the lives  of their members.  So Professor Smith went to  work and wrote what he hoped  would be such a book. For  those who might, for the cause  of world peace, want to put  some effort into World Religion  Day, this book The Religions of  Man would be a good place to  start (although no doubt there  are many other very good ones).  Although Professor Smith  put in some philosophies as  religions that some would argue  are not such, and although he  left out some that many will  think should be there, it is probable that his viewpoint is the  most important thing and applies to whatever might be included.  In what he calls his final examination, Smith says that  apart from facts accumulated  through such a study, the reader  should have acquired some  sense of what an important part  religions of all kinds have  played in human history. Studying the world religions, he says,  should give the individual an  appreciation for faiths not his  own.  It should become possible to  see other religions as the faiths  of real people, "people who are  asking the same basic questions  as we are, seekers like us of the,  illumined life".  Other questions that should  be answered would, he says, include: "How do these religions  fit together? In what relation do  they stand to one another?"  These are the questions, even  though the answers will depend  on the individual and on points  of view.  Some may think one religion  stands out as absolutely the best  and truest. Others may think  they are all really the same.  Others may think, says the  professor, no one religion is the  best, nor are they all the same.  These people may feel two,  several or more of the world's  religions have important things  to say to mankind.  "Here (in the world's  religions) the people of the  world have a great deal to say to  one another, and they have  drawn close at precisely the time  when man's spiritual life, facing  severe threats from nationalism,  materialism, and conformity,  stands in desperate need of the  stimulus that searching conversation can encourage," writes  Smith. "��� ���   - '  "We must listen first to our  own faith, for every heritage is  inexhaustible...but we must also  listen to the faiths of others.  "The community today can  be no single tradition; it is the  planet. Daily the world grows  smaller, leaving understanding  the only bridge on which peace  can find its home," concludes  the MIT professor.  All this is food for thought,  certainly, be it World Religion  Day, World Communion Sunday, or World Day of Prayer.  Mainstream Canada  Bank - small business  bond needs mending  by Ann M. Smith  P r',;.-:r  yi'v  It's no secret that the current  state of banker/small business  owner relations could be a lot  better.  A recent survey conducted by  the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB)  seems to confirm this. Easily the  most comprehensive study ever  undertaken on small business  bank financing in Canada,  CFIB spent nearly a year  analyzing the results from 3217  member respondents: it concluded that the individual  banker turnover rate may be the  single most important banking factor directly affecting  small business borrowing.  Where banker turnover is  higher, the study concluded,  businesses are being turned  down and cut back more often  in their lending requests than  are their counterparts in regions  with a higher level of bank  manager stability.  This finding, says CFIB's  chief economist and director of  research, Catherine Swift, is important for several reasons.  First, it emphasizes the critical  importance of a healthy relationship between a banker and  the small business customer  -especially in smaller, more urban areas.  "The banks are the first to  say that the ability, integrity and  commitment of the small business owner are major determinants in how much money  the entrepreneur will receive,"  i says Swift.  "In order to properly  evaluate these qualities,  however, a banker must spend a  sufficient amount of time in  that relationship."  By contrast, the importance  that small business owners place  on continuity of their banking  relationship is highlighted by  another finding from this  survey. This showed that two  out of three respondents have  either never changed banks or  haven't changed banks within  the last five years.  And still, says Swift, a small  business owner's loyalty to a  certain bank or branch does not  preclude a revolving door outside his/her bank manager's  door.  "This factor," says Swift,  "will almost certainly impact on  the entrepreneur's access to  financing under any set of  reasonable terms and conditions."  CFIB's study found that  almost 30 per cent of respondents have had to face upwards  of three different account  managers during the past three  years. The study concludes that:  "dealing with a new lender on  an average of once a year does  not provide these businesses  with the depth of relationship  required to demonstrate their  personal ability or commitment  to the business, or to help the  banker understand the unique  success factors of the business in  its local environment."  Finally, this finding is significant because it is one of the  most easily controllable areas  open to those financial institutions serious about improved  service to the small business sector.  The following is a list of the  six major chartered banks with  the percentages of survey  respondents who faced three or  more account managers in the  last three years: Bank of Montreal, 39.2 per cent; Canadian  Imperial Bank of Commerce,  32.8 per cent; Toronto Dominion Bank, 29.5 per cent; Royal  Bank, 26.7 per cent; National  Bank, 21.1 per cent; Bank of  Nova Scotia, 16.7 per cent.  How seriously the banking  community deals with this  critical yet uncomplicated issue  is anybody's guess. If their track  record is anything to go on, the  road to improvement may be a  difficult one indeed.  Editor's note: Ann Smith  prepared this column for this  newspaper on behalf of the  Canadian Federation of Independent Business.  The Sunshine  Published by GLASSFORD PRESS LTD.  Editorial: Harold Blaine   Vern Elliott  Production:  Jan Schuks  Bonnie McHeffey  Bev Cranston  Advertising:  Fran Burnside  John Gilbert  Liz Tarabochla  2 onTJ *' C��*S���EWS ls a ,ooa"y ^ned newspaper, publish-  f?��� Dthe ?"n8h,ne Coast. B.C. every Monday by Glanton! Prats  Ltd., Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0. Gibsons Tel 886-2622 or  88*7817; Sechelt Tel. 885-3930. Second Class S Region Na  The Sunshine COAST NEWS Is protected by copyright and reproduc  Won of any part of It by any means Is prohibited unless perStan In  Srrighi W^..��rom OlM.toid.PMM Ltd., holders of the  SUBSCRIPTION RATES  Canada: 1 year $35; 8 months 120; Foreign; 1 year MO lMiw����py  -,-���>-��.*-*������ vr'v  Y  I'  Coast News, January 9,1989  ^*i '    " " " ' ���"��� -'i ii   ���*>' '������ \ '������  ������'���  ������i^UrtintSivi'i^-rsiX^fi  ���    I  il  i-  Y  i  r  jr.  r  x,  j  ��*  ,-t*.  Editor:  I marvel at how the bureaucrats in the Canada Postal Service can continue to be so successful in scheming up new  ideas to further harrass its victims.  I received notice that my Post  Office mail box was due for  renewal on January 2 at a cost  of $6.74. Consequently I went  there before Christmas to pay  this, only to be told that they  had made a mistake and that  the rent had been increased to  $26.20.  The only alternative was a  change of address to a rural  route box. They suggested that I  thought  about  it  until  after  Christmas.  As. a pensioner constantly  practising economy cuts, I  decided I should save $26.20 - in  spite of the inconvenience of  notifying a change of address to  CPP, medical plans, chequing  accounts, Pharmacare,  relatives, car insurance, lawyer,  house   insurance,   cablevision,  Jobless need transport  Editor's Note: The following  letter was received for publication.  Ms Nancy MacLarty, Alderman  District of Sechelt  Box 129, Sechelt, B.C.  Dear Ms MacLary,  Regarding recent news  coverage of your educational  proposal for the employment  disadvantaged: May I make a  couple of suggestions for the  coordinator of the feasibility  study to take into account when  he or she starts the job?  When discussing this news  item with a friend she remarked i "Well, you have to do A  and B before you can do C."  We'd been speculating on who  the 'employment disadvantaged' are and concluded that they  must   be   among   the   most  desperate people in our community to warrant such a label.  If they are single people on  welfare they are probably hard  put to afford shoes for  themselves. How likely is it that  they will own and can maintain  a reliable vehicle? If they are  single parents, childcare can be  a big problem.  Transportation and childcare  are A and B. The proposed  course is C. As the Catch 40  group pointed out (in their excellent letter regarding transportation that appeared in the  Coast News a few months ago),  what good is it to start courses  for the unemployed when people have no way of getting to  them?  All the students could try  moving into Sechelt of course,  but I'm sure that would cause:  an increase in rents throughout  the town.  I'd like to suggest that, if the  transportation system on the  Sunshine Coast has not improved by the time the course is due  to start, your feasibility coordinator should consider supplying a special bus there and back.  On site childcare would be nice  too.  Otherwise the course, even if  it is excellent, will not fill up.  Folks will say, "It just goes to  show that 'those people' don't  want to better themselves."  Another thought, perhaps if  points A and B were already  taken care of, many of the prospective students would already  have jobs and point C would  not be necessary.    A^g Mjies  various accounts, tax offices,  etc.  On January 3 my box was  closed and I requested a rural  route box number. They told  me it would cost me $10 to have  my mail redirected to the new  number for four months or portion. I would need a lock and  key, and each of the redirecting  cards would require a 38 cent  stamp.  Still in pursuit of the now  diminishing economy cuts, I  began to fill in the redirecting  form. But when asking for the  number of the new box, I was  told all boxes in my area were  full and that it would be at least  two to three weeks before new  ones would be placed.  The present one could be  rented for the interim period,  but I would have to pay the full  annual amount of $26.20.  I paid the $26.20 in the hope  of retaining my sanity, but  wonder how our Canadian  Postal 'Service' can continue to  provide such poor sendee at  such high cost to its victims.  Patricia Ritchie  CBC criticized  Suf field activity security secret  Editor:  I have been asked to respond  to a letter from Dr. C.F. Baker  in a recent edition of your  paper. As I have not seen the  letter he was responding to I  cannot comment on its contents.  I was interested to see that  Dr. Baker referred to the scientists who do chemical and  biological warfare (CBW)  research at the Defence  Research Establishment Suf-  field   (DRES)  in   Alberta   as  'elite'. I wondered if he also  considers scientists who refuse  to do military research as also  'elite'.  I was very surprised to  discover that Dr. Baker was apparently not aware that much of  the information related to activities at Suffield, including  scientific papers, is secret  (classified).  Even MPs are unable to find  out what Canada is obligated to  do under the secret CBW  research   agreement   we   have  with the U.S. and the U.K.  Presumably to Dr. Baker this  information was not secret and  he has forgotten that it is to the  rest of us.  Lastly, much of the information derived through the  research which Dr. Baker  describes as being for defensive  purposes only, can also be used  to launch an offensive attack.  This would be known to a person in Dr. Baker's position.  Diana Chown  Edmonton, Alberta  Editor's note: the following was  received for publication.  Early Edition  CBC Radio  Good morning Early Edition:  Somehow it seems the local  CBC Radio station lives in terror of presenting any view that  may be interpreted as having  even a slight left leaning tendency. Don't upset the status quo  and thus extreme right political  and business views hold sway.  The most recent example of  this was last Monday's short  clip of Liberal leader Gordon  Wilson expressing his concern  over the sale of land to foreign  interests in downtown Vancouver and many other areas of  the province.  This is not a racist attitude,  but simply asks: are we to be  paupers in our own land living  under some illusion of 'free  enterprise'.  So how does the CBC play its  part in this? Simply by  choosing to 'interview', an incorrect use of the word in this  case, a right wing professional  business type who also appears  to be American educated, if not  American born.  He proceeds to tell us back  country B.C.'ers how this is not  only good business but also  good for us. The length and  style of this interview when  compared to Mr Wilson's comments only add to my impressions of the matter.  It is interesting that those  who parade under the banner of  land owner/real estate rights are  so quick to sell or essentially  give away our land to foreign  interests.  Teri Dawe  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  at  PENINSULA MARKET  in Davis Bay  until noon Saturday  "A Friendly People Place"  ��� Flush and drain the cooling  system ��� Install up to 4 litres  of Autopar 4 Season antifreeze/  coolant ��� Check radiator cap,  I thermostat, belts and hoses.  0  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  B  I  I  I  I  I  oouPON ^  READY.SET GO  FOR WINTER SNOW  $a  KO  w  CHRYSLER  SERVICE  886-3433  i I  USED BUILDING SUPPLIES  Quality, used lumber, bricks, windows, lights, plumbing, etc.  P A B USED BUIL.OINQ MATERIALS  11947 Tannery Rd., Surrey  MONDAY-SATURDAY 988-1311  We also buy used building materials  Wildlife saviour  LOSE WEIGHT FAST!  ffand fyiehgize your body  \*  ���/f-^w  PROGRAM REGISTRATION FEES  NOW THRU JANUARY 31st  Dict^ffl^  Center   wdiet  Mon ��� Fri, 8 am ��� 4:30 pm  Sat 9 am - noon  634 Farnham Rd. Gibsons  behind Gibsons Medical Clinic  Editor:   ,  By now a lot of us are aware ':  of the good work being done by ��  Joanne Dickson, who treats and  cares for injured wildlife here  on the coast. Thank goodness  we have someone to bring these  unfortunate animals to, someone with the skills and kindness  to put them back in health and  back where they belong.  What a lot of us are not  aware of is the fact that Joanne  does this from the goodness of  her heart. She is not paid to do  this service for us. She relies  upon donations to pay for the  feed, medication and cages  needed to operate this facility.  We are fortunate to live in  such a beautiful area, with such  an abundant amount of wildlife  to enjoy. Let's show our appreciation by supporting  Joanne's efforts to rehabilitate  the ones that fall victim to injury or disease.  Anyone wishing to contribute  to Joanne's much-needed service can send their donations to:  Joanne Dickeson, Box 1384,  Sechelt. A receipt will be mailed  to you.  Cindy 'Rudolph,  Halfmoon Bay  JACK & JILL PLAYSCHOOL  Immediate Openings  Call Betty Topham  886-2251  __^_________��uH_____<__^_i_^ .;:::::  ���<  IPender Harbour Credit Unions  Invites You to Attend Our  OPEN HOUSE  Come in and see our new vault, additions, and'renovations.  We will have coffee, juice, cookies, and goodies along with give-aways,  and a  door prize of a painting by local artist Noreen Marshall  Almost a million British Columbians enjoy  the solid security and peace of mind that  comes from saving at their Credit Union.  With the financial backing of the provincial  government, the Credit Union deposit insurance corporation of British Columbia  protects deposits of all Credit Union  members up to a maximum of $100,000 per  separate deposit account, per Credit Union.  Security, dependability and trust - that's the  unbeatable combination you'll find at  Pender Harbour Credit Union.  Wed., Jan. 18, 1989   from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm  Madeira Park Road, Madeira Park, B.C*  New  Colours!  IN GLOSS AND SATIN  Peach, Jade Green,  Smoke Blue, Dusty Rose  Bright  Beautiful  High-Gloss  Protection  for all around  the house  ��� Protects against chipping,  cracking and peeling.  ��� Levels out to a smooth, even  finish.  Quick drying.  May be intermixed to achieve  custom colours.  ��� Use on wood or metal furniture,  cabinets, toys, boats, kitchens  and bathrooms, interior and  exterior surfaces.  1 I. Reg. $13.69 $  Sale Ends Jan 31  ���^  -____S_J��3fe  9  GIBSONS  BUILDING SUPPLIES  TWO LOCATIONS   sunshine coast highway gibsons   whahfanodolphin  sechelt  0PEH Mon-Sit 8 ��m ��� 5 pm  Sunday (Gibsons only) 10 am - 4 pm  Vancouvar (Toil Fret) 6B8-68T4  b *  if !  \  Coast News, January 9,1989  J:  I  _:  Editor's Note: Ian Thomson, an  Elphinstone Secondary School  science teacher, last year climbed Africa's famous Mount  Kilimanjaro. His account of  that climb is published here.  Teacher Thomson will be giving  slide shows of his expriences in  the local Continuing Education  program, January 25 at Elphinstone Secondary and February 1  ��� at Chatelech Secondary School.  Good grief, what are we do-  ; ing here? I was sitting on the  ground at the mouth of Hans  Meyer cave at the if7,000 foot  level of Mount Kilimanjaro.  Holding a small flashlight for  my friend Jim to focus on to  take a photograph was about as  much as I felt like doing.  Jim had staggered his way  over to the side of the trail in  order to take a flash picture of  myself, our climbing companions and guides. Why was I sitting, stone-cold, at 4 o'clock in  the morning on the side of  Africa's tallest peak?  About a year earlier I had  been sitting on the side of one of  the taller peaks on the Sunshine  Coast. Panther Peak (5700 feet)  behind Port Mellon on Labour  Day was absolutely gorgeous in  the late summer warmth.  I was with a group of 16 led  by our fearless leader who  maintained, even to the novice  hikers present, that various  slopes, pitches and rock  scrambles were 'a piece of  cake'. I distinctly remember  looking at what appeared to be  an almost vertical face and  hearing a voice at the top encouraging us on, much to the  groans of some of the less agile  members of the group.  My thought led to the big  question. What would Kilimanjaro be like? It was over 19,000  feet!  My old hiking and canoeing  buddy Jim, had visited Kenya in  1981 and had heard people talking about a hike that anybody  could do up Kilimanjaro in  Tanzania. In 1986 he talked me  into going with him.  He didn't have to do much  talking, as it took less than five  minutes to realize he had a good  idea. A year ago we made all the  bookings and on July 30, 1988  we found ourselves paying $136  American at the park entrance  registration hut.  Claude Kisaka had been assigned by the Kibo Hotel as our  guide along with four porters to  carry our gear, their gear and all  the food necessary for seven  men during the five day hike. It  was actually not a very nice day  as we set off up the old four  wheel drive road for Mindara  Hut.  The first day was promised as  'easy' with only eight kilometers  to walk. We had heard some  vague references to the fact that  the trail was a bit muddy and  that boots would definitely be a  good idea.  After about four kilometers  the trail degenerated into a slick  muddy trench worn into the  ground by the more than 5000  people per year that attempt the  hike.  We passed a rather sobering  sight at the very end of the four  wheel drive section. The day  before a Yugoslavian man had  been brought out on the one-  wheeled stretcher having succumbed to the altitude and cold  at the top of Kilimanjaro.  The story we heard was that  he and a friend had been looking for a certain point on the  crater rim called Jugoslav Point  and had purposely separated  from their main party and  guides. The man had passed out  and his friend, unable to revive  him, had gone back down to the  top hut to get a rescue party.  He was gone by the time the  rescue party reached him some  hours later. This certainly  underlined the importance of  listening and following the instructions of Claude.  He and his group were making their fourth ascent in four  weeks, so we felt sure they knew  what they were doing.  It is extremely important to  hike 'polepole' so that we never  sweated, could always talk comfortably with our hiking buddy,  and gave us the best chance  possible of making it to the top.  It doesn't matter whether you  are an Olympic runner or a  weekend hiker. One 20-year-old  English chap that we talked to  had run 10 kilometers every  morning for six months to get in  shape for the mountain. He got  sick before he reached the top  and had to turn back.  Yet an Australian lady of 50  or so, comfortably padded  against the cold in a natural way  had not really done anything to  get ready for the mountain. It  rather looked it too.  However, she walked very/,  slowly each day and was an  "hour or -three later than other  people arriving at the huts and  she made it. We came up with a  saying, derived from a Swiss  flag hung in the dining room of  the Kibo Hotel.  "If you walk fast, you don't  last. If you go slow, you'll make  the snow."  We started at 6000 feet and  stayed at 9000, 12,500 and  15,500 feet before doing the last  section to 19,340 feet. At 12,000  feet and above anybody can  suffer from altitude sickness  caused through the inability of  the human body to adjust to a  rapid gain in altitude.  Acute   mountain   sickness  Gibsons science teacher Ian Thomson took this picture of the 19,000 foot summit of Africa's famous Mt.  Kilimanjaro last year. At this point teacher Thomson was only a short climb from his goal at upper left.  The climb starts in a tropical rainforest and ends amid icy glaciers.  mountain.  He did, however, wear leggings on the last cold night section to the top. Every day Iron-  man would pass us on the trail  with a cheery "Onwards,, lads!''  and we were always amazed by  his seemingly boundless energy.  It turned out that he was taking heart pills to give him more  energy. Although he made it  right to the peak, he was pretty  'bagged out' on his return to the  top hut.  A good night's sleep in spite  of a group of Italians singing  and dancing in the eating hut  saw us up early and on the trail  by eight. We were now hiking  with two Americans and a  Japanese fellow, all of whom  had started at the same hotel as  us.  They certainly added to the  experience, as we could  'bounce' our thoughts off  somebody different. By lunch  time we were finally above the  rain forest and the clouds and  could get a look at our objective.  Kilimanjaro's lower peak  ' Mawenzi, Swahili for 'friend'  was actually more easily examined as it was directly above  us. At 16,800 feet it is 2500 feet  lower than Kibo but a difficult  technical climb up eroded  volcanic spines.  Kibo, the main peak of  Kilimanjaro, is a big hike with  no technical challenges other  than a minor bit of rock  scrambling at the approach to  the crater rim.  The second night saw us staying at Horombo Hut with about  60 other climbers. These included the 25 people going up the  same day we were and about 30  or 40 that were returning from  their attempt on the mountain.  Claude told us to take things  The volcanic cone of the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro is shown in  this aerial photograph with Mt. Meru in the distance.  (AMS) commonly involyfd  headaches and nausea and less  commonly pulmonary oedetria  Qr cerebral oedema^Rulmona%  oedema shows itself when yo\i  start coughing up blood, meting that the process of oxygen  going from your lungs into your  blood stream is reversed and the  blood is coming through into  your lungs.  Fortunately, this happens  quite rarely but oddly enough,  young, fit males seem to be the  most badly and often affected.  We hoped it wouldn't happen  to us.  Of the 5000 or more people  that try the mountain each year,  about four out of 10 make it to  the crater rim at 18,600 feet and  two out of 10 make it to the actual peak. Claude informed Jim  and myself that the mountain  claimed one or two hikers a year  r as well as a guide or porter every  few years or so. This was not  terribly 'treassuringyi especially  after seeing the stretcher.  We reached Mindara Hut at  about 4 o'clock to be greeted by  oiuvv porters who had tea and  biscuits ready for us. Mindara  Hut will forever be remembered  for our meeting Ironman  McKiltie.  Ironman was a true Scot  from Edinburgh. We first noticed him when he was trying to  cook his own dinner and had  four foot flames coming from  his portable stove.  He was doing the climb with  a guide and no porters, being a  real man of the Scottish Army.  The second thing we noticed  was that he was wearing a kilt  which he wore to the top of the  really easy in order not to over-  tire. Even walking to the toilet  was done in slow motion, most  of the time. Jim and I did go for  a short walk up the stream  above the huts to investigate the  giant groundsels.  Groundsels are a cousin! of  the dandelion and resemble a  cactus with a tuft of leaves on  top. The most impressive thing  about them is their height of up  to 30 feet.  Groundsels also grow in the  highlands of Scotland but only  to a height of four to six inches.  After taking numerous photographs we returned to the hut  for dinner and bed by 7:15.  Our third day on the mountain dawned clear and cold. As  soon as I got out of bed I realized I had a severe headache and  felt nauseous.  I was quite concerned that I  might be at the 'end of the road'  already. But fortunately, an  Aspirin, a good breakfast and  copious quantities of tea made  me feel better. I never had trouble with headaches during the  rest of the hike but I wasn't so  lucky with the nausea.  After about two hours on the  trail we came to the last water  available on the route up. Appropriately named 'Last Water'  we had a major rest and were  instructed by Claude to drink as  much as possible.  The top 5000 feet of the  mountain including the top hut  has no water, only what is carried up by the porters and  hikers. The normal person requires about six litres a day of  liquids in order not to become  dehydrated at high altitude.  We each drank about one  and a half litres, filled up our  canteens, and proceeded up the  trail.  The scrubby alpine vegetation  was left behind. We spent most  of the remainder of the day  walking across the barren saddle between the two peaks "of  Kilimanjaro. ���  Once again Ironman and tjie  Italians passed us as we were  having a leisurely lunch break in  a pile of rocks beside the -trail.  Claude spotted a herd of eland  about five kilometers to the  east, grazing on grass along the  edge of a saddle.  I could barely make them out  with my 200 mm telephoto so  we were impressed with Claude  until he told us that there are  usually some there anyway.    '\  We plodded on across the  open saddle and ran intd a lady*  from Montreal that was one dayj  ahead of us. She told us that she)  had blacked out about 200 feetj  from Oilman's Point (the cratetf  rim. J  But as she was not sick and*  Please turn to page 19 j  I  I  '.  FRANCIS PENINSULA PLACE  *<2^*?3%<B?<*&  MADEIRA PARK SHOPPING CENTRE  Y ��  SUNSOFT ELECTRONICS  & VIDEO RENTALS  883-2988  Rentals, Sales, & Service  883-9114  PENDER HARBOUR  CHEVRON  Complete Auto Repair  24-HOUR TOWING  883-2392  Pender Harbour Diesel  AUTO. MARINE & INDUSTRIAL  PARTS  883-2616  Peninsula Power &.  Cable Ltd.  High & Low Voltage Power Lines  Outdoor Sub-Sl.itions  883-2218  uenmar "Jjrapeaes  & NEEDLECRAFT SUPPLIES  883-2274  AC Building Supplies  HOME ALL HARDWARE  883-9551  Pender Harbour & District  MEDICAL HEALTH CENTRE  883-2764  PENDER HARBOUR  GOLF COURSE  VISITORS WELCOME  Vi m. north ot Garden Bay Rd.  Hwy. 101 883-9541  Pender Harbour  READING CENTRE  TUES - THURS - SAT  1:30 - 3:30  Royal Canadian Legion  B>anch 112  KITCHEN OPEN   MON-SAT  Bonnie Murray  Accountant  883-2857  Irvine's Landing  883-2392  Marina  TOTAL SHOPPiNG  7 Days <J Week  all Chevron Products.  883-2253  T^sort  Restaurant  883-2269  j��(Ullg'd RESORT  BOAT RENTALS  883-2456  Construction  Backhoe & Dumptruck  Service  883-2747 or 883-2730  Ray Hansen Trucking  & Contracting  883-9222  Competitive Prices  Competitive Services      L  Competitive Selections $  ���y.'-n .^ hi  Pender Harbour  >vhas it all!  V'YV\    \  _n=______  Beaver Island  GROCERY  Pizza. Subs. Video Games  883-2108  Oak Tree Market  Open 7 Days a Week  8 am - 10 pm  CENTRE HARDWARE  & GIFTS  883-9914  IGA  FOODLINER  (Check our Flyer)  lust the spot for a  Delicious Snack  FRANCES*  HAMBURGER  TAKE-OUT  Visit our Sun Salon  883-9389  HARBOUR INSURANCE  AGENCIES LTD.  883-2749  HUGH W. JONES  Lawyer  883-9525  UTHERLAND  Sales & Service  883-1119  Madeira Marina  883-2266  Enkn ;��*:- day of Business, Leisure, and shopping in "V-tNICENOR TH '.'���-  Marina Pharmacy  883-2888  Pender Harbour  Restaurant  Canadian & Chinese Cuisine  883-2413  wiMIx  Miss Sunny's Hair Boutique  883-2715  Pender Harbour  Realty LTD.  883-9525  FAX: 883-9524  PENDER  HARBOUR  CREDIT  UNION  883-9531  HEADWATER MARINA ltd.  Ways, Hi-Pressure Washing,  & Year-Round Moorage  883-2406 '*fe\^^i&��^^*i.^*'^-'~*'<~iv*++*i**:*'~  i  WUMSUKSrWM  man dies  by Jeanie Parker, 885-2163  The Weals' Christmas lights  went   on   for   the   last   time  January 1, but Albert Weal  wasn't there to see them. He  passed away the night before,  J  \  IT'S A  GULL DARN  ���rp     r'  I       SALE  ]' January Clearance of Winter Wear  LEEWARD CLOTHING GROUP  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons 886-8718  Gibsons Landing Heritage Society monthly meeting last Monday of the month, 7:30  pm in Gibsons Pioneer Museum.  Sunshine Coast Peace Committee meeting on Monday, January 9, at 7:30 pm at  Roberts Creek Elementary School Library. 'In Our Own Back Yard', a video on the  Nanoose Conversion Campaign will be shown. Everyone welcome.  Winter/Spring Arts Calendar Pick up your complimentary copy of the Arts Council's  Calendar of Events for Winter/Spring '89 at local galleries, book stores and info centres for the latest on concerts, performances, gallery exhibitions and special events.  The Reverend Brian Kiely will be speaking to the Sunshine Coast Unitarian Group on  Sunday, January 15 at 2 pm at the home of Anne Miles. Anyone interested in learning about Unitarianism or in forming a Unitarian Fellowship here is invited to attend.  Phone Anne at 886-7988.  Sunshine Coast Pro Life Society is having their monthly meeting Monday, January 16  at 7 pm at S.C. Gospel Church, Davis Bay. Newcomers welcome.  Elphinstone Electoral Assn. general meeting at 7:30 pm Wednesday, January 11,  Cedar Grove Elementary School. All Area E residents welcome.  Reverend Brian Kiely will be giving a taik for the Gibsons Unitarian group at 2 pm,  Sunday, January 15. if interested in attending phone Anne at 886-7988.  Sunshine Coast Liberal Assn. general meeting will be held Monday, January 9 at  7:30 pm at the Liberal office, Cowrie Street, Sechelt. Call 885-2239 or 885-9491.  The Sunshine Coast Cancer Society monthly meeting January 16 at 1 pm in the  regional board offices. Everyone welcome.  Suncoast Writers' Forge meeting Wednesday, January 11 at Rockwood Lodge, 7:30  pm. Judy Gill will speak on 'sending your query letter'. Everyone welcome,  refreshments served.  Alpha Omega Foundation Workshop on brainstorming for community formation  January 14 at 5933 Skookumchuck Road, Sandy Hook. Phone 883-2251 or  885-4433.  Shornciiffe Auxiliary membership meeting Tuesday, January 17 at Shorncliffe board  room, starting at 1:30 pm. New members welcome.  THE UNITED CHURCH  OF CANADA  Sunday Worship Services  GIBSONS  Glassford Road 11:15am  Sunday School 11:15am  ST. JOHN'S  Davis Bay 9:30 am  Sunday School 9:30 am  Rev. Stan Sears     Rev. Alex G. Reid  Church Telephone 886-2333   ; **I4��   GRACE REFORMED  PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  Morning Worship 11:15 am,  St. Hilda's Anglican Church  Evening Worship     7 pm in homes  Wednesday Bible  Study 7:30 pm in homes  J. Cameron Fraser, Pastor  885-7488  ALL WELCOME    jt^ Mi  I*   ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S  &ST.AIDAN'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  Parish Family Eucharist  11:00 am  Phone: 886-7322 or 886-3723  St. Aidan's, R.C. Road 2:30 pm  First Sunday in month  -JK* J_% J^>  THE SECHELT PARISH OF'  THE ANGLICAN CHURCH  invites you to worship with us .St. Hilda's, Sechelt  'Prayer Book' said Communion 8 am  Either Morning Prayer or  Communion with music 9:30 am  St. Andrew's, Pender Harbour  Either Morning Prayer or  Communion with music 11:30 am  Both Churches Wheelchair Accessible  Sunday School, St. Hilda's 9:30 - St. Andrew's 11:30  The Reverend )une Maffin, Rector - 885-5019  'We extend a warm welcome to all'  -& sfr 3fc-  ANGLICAN CATHOLIC  CHURCH OF CANADA  St. Columba of lona Parish  8835 Redrooffs Rd., Halfmoon Bay  The Rev'd E.S. Gale: 1-525-6760  information: 885-7088  "Prayer Book Anglican"  CALVARY  BAPTIST CHURCH  711 Park Road  Telephone: 886-2611  Sunday School    - 9:30 am  Worship Service - 11:00 am  Hour of Inspiration 7 pm  Cal Mclver - Pastor  Arlys Peters - Music Minister  "The Bible as it is...  for People as they are."   : ��s��afk   GIBSONS COMMUNITY  FELLOWSHIP  Welcomes you to join us  in SUNDAY  Worship  Children's Progress 9:45 am  Prayer 10:00 am  Morning Worship Service  10:45 am  Wednesday 7:00 PM  599 Cower Point Road  Pastor Monty McLean  886-7049   *V tV Qe   PENDER HARBOUR  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  Lagoon Road. Madeira Park  Sunday School 9:45 am  Morning Worship 11:00 am  Prayer & Bible Study  Wednesday, 7:30 pm  883-2374 & 883-9441  Pastor Mike Klassen  Affiliated with the Pentecostal  Assemblies of Canada   *.*��.*   GIBSONS  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  New Church building on  School Road - opp. RCMP  Pastor Ted Boodle  Sunday School 9:45 am  Morning Worship 11:00 am  Evening Fellowship 7:00 pm  Bible Study  Weds, at 7:30 pm  Phone  886-9482 or 886-7107  Affiliated with the  Pentecostal Assemblies  of Canada  _ ____���__!  on the eve of the year that  would have marked his 90th  birthday.  I'd only known Albert a couple of years, but he was a longtime resident of Roberts Creek.  He'd been involved in community affairs for many years  and told me about his work  / with the youth of the area.  Albert always had lots of  ideas and projects, as evidenced  by the intricacies of the  Christmas display he and Mary  erected and accumulated over  the years.  He evidently had an .affinity  for concrete, which his son-in-  law teased him about. Roberts  Creek firemen learned a lot  about wiring from him.  Albert lived a long and full  life. He will be greatly missed by  family and friends. But he has  left a legacy of which he could  be proud.  His Christmas lights have  delighted many many people.  They are a tradition which the  firemen of Roberts Creek hope  to help continue.  BURNS NIGHT  Saturday, January 14, the  Roberts Creek Legion celebrates Robbie Burns' birthday  with food, verse, and music.  The evening will be highlighted by several guests including Barb Johnson. She will  perform Scottish dance to the  accompaniment of the pipers.  Doors open at 6 pm, followed by dinner at 7. Starting at 9  o'clock you can dance to the  steel guitars of the Stillwater  band featuring Brian Nicol.  A member of the well-known  Kilt Band will be joining them  on the button accordion.  Tickets are $15. There's just  this week left to buy them at  Seaview Market, Gibsons  PetroCan or by phoning  886-9813 or 885-5556.  Russ Clarke will be providing  live entertainment Friday at the  Legion.  Branch 219 would like to  thank all those who helped  make the New Year's Eve dance  such a hit, including Klaus'  Restaurant for catering the  evening.  A reminder to < the new executive of the meeting Wednesday, January 11 at 7:30 pm.  Sechelt  Scenario  by Margaret Watt, 885-3364  West Sechelt Elementary  School certainly believes in  making a joyful noise. Their  Christmas concert was a  tremendous success.  Kids, parents and teachers  alike enjoyed a carol-filled evening. All went home filled with  the spirit of Christmas. That's  what it's all about, after all.  There will be a Parents Committee meeting at the school on  Wednesday, January 11 at 7  pm. It will be a work session  blitz with the theme 'we love to  read*.  BRIDGE GROUP  St. Hilda's bridge group  resumes play on Monday January 9 at 1 pm at the church  hall. New players are most  welcome.  SPCA  Five dollars doesn't buy you  very much nowadays. But that  small amount will buy you a  whole year's membership with  the SPCA.  If you would like to help the  animals, you may send your  cheque to Box 2094, Sechelt. It  will be very much appreciated.  WRITERS' FORGE  The next meeting of the forge  will be held January 11 at 7:30  pm at Rockwood Lodge. Local  writer Judy Gill will be the guest  speaker.  Writers please note that the  deadline for entries for the  writing contest has been extended to January 16.  Sechelt  Celebration  Days job  The Sechelt and District  Chamber of Commerce has appointed Doug Roy to the  Celebration Days Committee.  Roy will be one of many people  representing community groups  on the committee.  The the letter informing the  Sechelt Municipal District of the  appointment, chamber president Bonnie Paetkau urged that  a meeting be called of the committee as soon as possible in the  new year.  Coast News, Januarys, 1989  wmmmmammmm  lilPIIIlillii  ADCM       9:30 am - 6:00 pm  W r~ E_. i ^       Frsdays 'till 9:00 pm  Sundays 11:00 am - 5:00 pm  No Name ��� Sliced Side  BACON sOOgm  Grade 'A' Beef - Blade  CHUCK  ROASTS ,0 2 so ,���  Grade 'A9 Beef ��� Standing  Bone In  RIB  ROASTS .7 69  lb.  Fresh - Weather Permitting  SNAPPER  FILLETS   ,.6.37  Ib.  B.C. Grown ��� Mac  kg  .86  California Grown - Navel  ORANGES     ...64  California Grown - 5 Ib. Bag  CARROTS  2.2 kg ea.  Limit 2 With A $25 Purchase  Foremost - Grade 'A9 - Large  EGGS  2.89  /_ ��iSSi  lb.   ��� ���" *^  .59  .99  i. M  Additional Purchases $1.49  Pronto  PAPER  TOWELS  Pack of 95 gm Bars  Ivory - Bar  SOAP  4's  Oven Fresh - White or  Whole Wheat - Dinner  BUNS  Oven Fresh - White or  Chocolate - Layer  CAKES  999  2's ��� 319  1.19  ��� TV  %3 * 99  ^  ^  Oven Fresh - French  BREAD  rfHUU____M  ____*�� i  i  .V  f  ���  I  If  Y- V  6.  Coast News, January 9,1989  WSUIS^m^XSttj^SSM  by Jean Robinson, 885-2954  GENERAL MEETING  The Davis Bay/Wilson Creek  Community Association  (DBWCCA) has a general  meeting tonight at 7:30 pm in  the hall, 5123 Davis Bay Road.  There will be a short meeting  after which coffee will be served.  The entertainment is still a  mystery. Come and meet your  neighbour.  The New Year Dance at the  hall was a great success again,  although not as many people  came as last year. Evelyn  Bushell played the piano as it  has never been played before  and she got everyone up dancing. Evelyn is just excellent and  very much appreciated.  George Newsham played his  guitar and sang during a break.  He was given hearty applause  for his easy style and pleasing  songs.  Not too many of us had been  privileged to hear George until  recently and we hope to hear  him more often now. Thanks to  Authorized  Geri's  ELECTROLUX  Distributor  up to  Vacuums  668 Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons  (former VIDEO ETC location)  s200 OFF  WE ALASO CARRY  CENTRALUX BUILT-IN CLEANING SYSTEMS  EI ELECTROLUX    a name you can trusti  Supplies ��� Service ��� FREE Delivery  OPEN MON. ��� SAT.  10am - 5:30pm  FREE Home Demonstrations  886-4776  Evelyn, George, and Sue and  Bill LeNeve who hosted this  year's event.  PARENTS GROUPS  The Parents Group of Davis  Bay Elementary School meets at  7:30 pm in the library January  10. Come and be a part of this  growing school.  KIRKI.AND CENTRE  Drivers are still needed to  take adult day care clients to  and from the centre on Simpkins Road in Davis Bay.  Drivers are needed for Meals on  Wheels as well.  If you can help on a regular  basis, or even temporarily in an  emergency, please call the  Home Support Society at  885-5144.  Volunteers are needed to  teach or help with crafts. If you  have an ability for that sort of  thing, or even if you just like  people, give the society a call.  POLAR BEAR SWIM  Genee Murray was the winner of a youngest swimmer prize  in the Shetxwin Polar Bear  Swim at Davis Bay January 1.  The wrong name was reported  in this newspaper due to a mix-  up on the event prize list.  Name Baker  Action Centre  coordinator  The Volunteer Action Centre  is pleased to announce the appointment of Nancy Baker to  the position of Referral Coordinator/Interviewer. Nancyt  replaces Rita Petrescu who has  recently begun work to establish  a new Victim/Witness Assistance program on the Sunshine  Coast.  Nancy, who has lived on the  Coast for 13 years, is well  known in the community for  her extensive volunteer work,  which includes service at the  Sechelt Pre-School and the  Parent-Tot Drop-In. For the  past three years Nancy has coordinated the Arts Centre  Christmas Craft Show as well as  organizing fundraising events  such as the Charlotte Diamond  concerts for Parent-Tot.  Free Seminar!  You're invited to join us at the  Davis Bay Elementary School  Wednesday, January 11, 1989  7:30 pm to 9:30 pm  Guest Speaker - Bob Thompson  the Royal's RSP Consultant for B.C.  Hosted by the Gibsons and Sechelt Branches of the  ROYAL BANK  Please Pre-register at  886-2201 or 885-2201  :���,*�����'-' '���"������<������"��  '**&  'dm  NUARY  r�� ~>  .vN.V  :d/  !>*  fcY  :��;;���������**'  SS  1  '.t ���.  ���*>���.  ���fi  st  w/y  ^  \  40% OFF  All Sports Shirts  Reg./Tall/Oversizes  Casual Jackets  Bathrobes  Judo Style  yy  OFF  Sports Jackets  Dress Shirts  Leather Jackets  Jeans  P^c-.  TV  :T  \i  OFF  Sweaters  Rugby Pants  \  h  $  Jogging  Suits  Top & Bottoms  ��**?��  {��  jffi&paab  ALL SALES FINAL ON SALES MERCHANDISE  Visa & Mastercard Accepted  $#**fi*lf    Trail Bay Centre   885-$330  i_��-JJ_^-��,^*iit<��5<A5:V';t: j >2zrLl  -^.,,^M^<..��^^^^  ���^^MtfT  '- '' " ���rli-.___��g��>.m_BMBMSlr~---  flMa'^aali  ,..'~'M'*?iy��M"**.,f��fy%��*.,.>*fi. ,���  _^  _--i.i)ii'i-_ii  JJiifiifiiiT'-rr .'.7.-",'"������i''5*��*'r.��'Ji: \ZZ^^^:���>:^<��Z*������'���'^>���-  k;  Coast News, January 9,1989  7.  j  From, this snow-sprinkled Sechelt beach one can imagine the  warmth and comfort of seaside apartments. ���Vem Elliott photo  __________________i__^_^_^^B_H^^BlHBMBBBBI^BBMBl_____^____________--__^_-_-  Denied parole  '.. Last week Robert Noyes appeared before the National  \ Parole Board in Vancouver. His application for parole was  denied.  ' In 1986 former teacher Noyes was convicted of sexually  I assaulting 19 children, several of them during his teaching  I years on the Sunshine Coast. He was designated a 'dangerous  I offender' which carries with it an indeterminate jail sentence.  KINSMEN MOTHERS' MARCH  Jan. 15-31  Marchers needed  in all areas  886-7838  885-7236  886-3419  ���H  m  Once again its Mothers  March time on the Sunshine  Coast and across B.C.  This year an expected 30,000  volunteers will take to the  streets, going door to door to  raise funds for the annual  Kinsmen Mothers March, says  Barry Stein, secretary of Gibsons and District Kinsmen  Club. The club's Mothers  March chairman is Dennis  McRae of Roberts Creek.  Mothers March is the  primary source of funds for the  Kinsmen Rehabilitation Foundation of B.C. (KRF). The  money raised through the  Mothers March enables the  KRF to help people with  physical disabilities improve  their lives and gain more independence.  This year's theme for the  campaign is, 'We're in the  Futures Business'. Creating independent futures for people  with physical disabilities is what  the KRF if all about, said local  club secretary Stein.  The 'Mission' of the Kinsmen  Rehabilitation Foundation is to  assist people with physical  disabilities to attain independence and equal opportunity generally available in the  community. '  The KRF's disabled living  resource centre, located in the  KRF offices (in Vancouver), is a  comprehensive information and  referral service, including an up-  to-date research and lending  library, films and videos, and  an   'Aids   to   Daily   Living'  ��_&f  e��:  f/y  ���-W  display containing items from  more than 55 medical suppliers.  The public education program includes 'Kids on the  Block' an educational puppetry  program, Image (the KRF journal), and educational displays  and workshops.  Through these programs, the  KRF provided over 7000 services to 5000 people (including  residents of the Sunshine Coast)  with physical disabilities last  year, says Stein.  Anyone can volunteer for the  march���men, women and  youth. Most volunteers go  door-to-door canvassing directly for funds. Other volunteers  serve as area and district captains.  People join the march for a  variety of reasons. Some  volunteer because they, a  friend, or someone in their  family, has been personally  assisted through the KRF. For  others, the march has become a  family tradition, with grandparents, mothers and  daughters, (husbands, etc)  volunteering, says Stein.  Whatever the reason  rewards are great! When you  see firsthand the dreams of independence come true, when  you see futures getting brighter  before your eyes, and you know  that you had a part in it...that's  what makes being involved in  the Kinsmen Mothers March so  special, he says.  "So when a marcher calls on  you, please be generous. If you  can volunteer (even a few hours)  please contact: Dennis McRae  at 886-3419."  the  m  o  *** 4c  4//<  Canadian Radio-television and  Telecommunications Commission  Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des  telecommunications canadiennes  Decision 88-845. Mountain FM Radio Ltd. Gibsons and Squamish,  B.C. APPROVED - Amendment to CISC-FM Gibsons and CISQ-FM  Squamish by changing the frequencies from 107.1 MHz to 107.5  MHz and 104.7 MHz to 107.1 MHz respectively.  Where may I read CRTC documents? CRTC documents may be  read in the 'Canada Gazette', Part 1; at CRTC offices; and at  reference libraries. CRTC decisions concerning a licensee may be  read at the licensee's offices during normal business hours. You  also may obtain copies of CRTC public documents by contacting  the CRTC at: Ottawa/Hull (819) 997-0313; Halifax (902) 426-7997;  Montreal (514) 283-6607; Winnipeg (204) 983-6306; Vancouver (604)  666-2111.  Canada  Keep part of the dollars you spend...  SHOP LOCALLY  WsthNrtftei  80's. Pc^ts onntwett Iik!u-��, ^^  :^$mm^^^^0^f^^ sy:; ;Hi*y*t%&i%^wm.     ���' ^'  In.tructor At H��,1o��has b��n ��rmmNn of th�� pop��t-r mortc w^��  in both E^l��nd and Can.d., w���� �� n^^ of t^^u ,..��>��� gg-  ��*^^^��^t^-^rUii��i' w!U> which h* is ��tiilactiv��,��fNfkMpWt  $  IWS  x" *���>���$.:  r��  ;���J  J  K  Y  /M  0  ^  Ht  "%'  X-fe  TRAIL Bfl-l CEflTRE PHALL  x-  V  Open Mon, Ye Sat; 9;30 - 5:30  OPeN FRIDAYS ' TILVPH  B.C. Government Liquor Store  Bobbie's Family Shoes  Books 'n Stuff  Cactus Flower Fashions  Coddard's Fashion Centre  Headquarters Hairstyling  INTRA Vagabond Travel  janelle's Chocolates & Fudge  Medical Office  Mitten Realty    ;  Morgan's Mens' Wear  Nova Jewellery Y  Peninsula insurance  Pharmasave Drugstore  Photo Works  Radio Shack  Royal Bank  Sew-Easy Fabrics & Yarns  Shop-Easy  Snack Bar  Trail Bay Hardware  The Upstairs & Downstairs Shoppe  Zippers Children's Wear  Sho p E asv and Ph a rm asaye  open   til 6 rvn  aPENSUNBAVS 70-5  A -���"�����  .'-���j  8.  Coast News, January 9,1989  by Larry Grafton  Since 1989 is upon us, one of  the first things that members  and potential members should  start thinking about is the fact  that membership cards now in  possession are outdated. New  cards are available for 1989  from Kay Mackenzie at $5 per  member.  My understanding is we are  already off to a good start so  let's keep up the good work.  Kay may be reached at  885-3184.  While on the matter of  memberships, in past columns I  have stressed the importance of  membership in our federal affiliate, the National Pensioners  and Senior Citizens' Federation  based in Toronto.  They deserve individual  membership from seniors  Canada-wide. You may obtain  yours by phoning Adele  deLange at 885-2545.  FUND RAISING  Slowly and by degrees our  local drive for funds for the new  activity centre is creeping up-  eniors  ward. We have now surpassed  the $28,000 mark since early  summer in donations from  members and local businesses.  NEW YEAR'S EVE  One of the biggest and most  acclaimed events of our branch  is our New Year's Eve party and  dance.  Co-ordination and planning  for   this   popular   event   was  started months ago by Patty  and John Miller.  The following account was  produced by Patty for publication.  "Well, New Year's Eve 1988  has come and gone, but the  memory of that night will linger  long in many hearts. Seniors are  not as slow as many think: dinner at 7:30 and they were there  well before 7 for roast beef,  vegetables, dessert and wine for  those who chose it.  "We were all transported  back a few years with the  wonderful music of Jack  Bourne and Associates. John  (Miller) says they should be called   'time   travellers',   for   we  8,000 mark  danced and sang all evening to  our   favourite, numbers ������off?  yesteryear. :   i;  "On the stroke of midnight,  of course noise, balloons, lots  of hugs and Auld Lang Syne;  then tea, coffee and goodies  brought by the ladies, followed  by more dancing till 1 am.  "We had spot dances and  games (such as golf putting).  Door prizes of Shop Easy gift  certificates were won by Esther  Becker and Jim Derby.  /^DEPENDABLE  AUTO SERVICE  DID YOU KZTOW...  We're known for successful  TROUBLE  SHOOTING  "For all those who offered  help we do thank you.  THANKS  Thanks are in order to Neil  Campbell of Janitor's  Warehouse in Sechelt for the  use of a floor polisher, and considerations on purchases made  to make the old hall floor shine  again.  NEW RENTALSMAN  Mel Neelands (885-2490) will  be looking after rental of our  hall as of now. Ted Farewell has  been our rentalsman for the last  couple of years.  The South Coast's Only ���  BCAA APPROVED Shop  (Special consideration to BCAA members)  ^0Htt���d(Mt   AUTOMOTIVE  V07.8 HaY .101 .6 6'  rom Pialt Rf  886-7919  We Are Always There  When You Need Assistance  For further information v  contact:  579 Seaview Road  Gibsons, B.C.  886-9551  APPLIANCE SERVICES ���  ��� CONCRETE SERVICES ���  GEN. CONTRACTORS  GEN. CONTRACTORS ���  JY'  SERVICE & REPAIR   To All Major AppH.neats   Quality Reconditioned Major Appliances For Sale  GUARANTEED & DELIVERED  Will Buy Nice. Non-Working Major Appliances  BJORN  /;  885-7897 J  ��Muc Hwvmm  Refrigeration &  Appliance Service   PRATT RD. 886-9959  (T. and M. APPLIANCE}  SERVICE,,    ������M  omall & Major  Appliance Repairs  ^Chaster Rd.,    Ph. 886-7861  BUILDING CONTRACTORS*  R  N  Ready Mix Concrete  Sand & Gravel  CONCRETE  SECHELT PLANT  __     885-7180  o  LTD.  SCKVING THC SUNSHINE COAST  GIBSONS PLANT  886-8174  J  r\  POMFRET A  CONSTRUCTION  For all aspects of  residential & commercial construction  885-9692   P.O. Box 623. Gibsons. B.C.  ALWEST  issSS  ��� ys  100% Guarantee  ������*      vOURB��?rt*E0   ��n Workmen-hip  crnvrrvc VINYL SIDING-SOFFIT fascia  Sl-HYlwtiS    Door and Window Conversions  Box 864. Roofing  \   Sechelt. B.C. von 3AoCall for FREE ESTIMATE885*4572 >  ROOFING  Specializing in all types of  FREE      commercial & residential roofing  ^ESTIMATES  8862087 eves    JXtZlSL  COQUITLAM TRUSS LTD.  Residential and Commercial Roof Trusses  agent 886-9452  Brad Robinson    (604> 522-8970  (604) 464-0291  2990 CHRISTMAS WAY, COQUITLAM, B.C. V3C 2M2  Coast Concrete Pumping  s. Foundations  FREE ESTIMATES  John Parton     885-5537  (Turenne  Concrete Pumping Ltd.  ��� Pumping   ��� Foundations ��� Patios  ��� Placing     ���Sidewalks     ��� Floor  ��� Finishing  ���Driveways,.  ^     RR*4 Gibsons 886-7022  ELECTRICAL CONTR  Electric Plus  Authorized  B.C. Hydro  Contractor  ea&ide C^lectric Xtd  Residential - Commercial - Industrial  Box 467, Gibsons, B.C.  VON 1V0  886-3308  .3-2  ^  EXCAVATING  BLACKBIRD INDUSTRIES  ��� DITCHING  ��� EXCAVATING  ��� WATER & SEWER  886-7386 GIBSONS  CLEANING SERVICES  PENINSULA SEPTIC  TANK SERVICE  Box 673, Sechelt, B.C.  VON 3A0  RAY WILKINSON  885-7710  f Fastrac BACKHOE  SERVICE  I  ��� SEPTIC FIELDS  e DRAINAGE DITCHES  ��� EXCAVATIONS  ��� WATER UNES  CLEARING  Steve Jones  (CASE 590)  886-8269  r  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon to Ole's Cove  Commercial Containers Available  886-2938  "CONCRETE" SER VIC ES  I  Ready-Mix Ltd.  ACCOUNTS -  fCMST BOBCAT SERVIC  Small In Size - Big In Production,  - Yard Clean-Up     - Post Holes  - TopsoiS/Gravel/Mulch Spreading T5_*5?**-*-��*  - Light Trenching :������<����cST*'*'*  1885-7051   SECHELT swwww&L...^  Need this space?  Y  Call   th<>  COAST .'NEWS  Y.  .it   886 ?6?2 or 88b 3930  *Wg'<t    WELL DRILLING LTD.  ������ J����0UBCEWIH��L015f��ICH-| | ACCOUNTS    885-9666    885-5333  3 Batch Plants on the Sunihina Coast  Gibsons ��� Sechelt ��� Pendor Harbour  I-:?;..',-   r;  J  Now serving the Sunshine Coast  ��� Submersible Pump installation  u ft-   - Air Transportation Available (only 15 minutes  752-9358/  ^iS^ R-H- 2, Quallcum Beach, B.C.  '��������    VOR2T0  Am  RENOVATIONS WITH  A TOUCH OF CLASS  COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL  IMPROVER  LTD  885-5029  BOX 7  HALFMOON BAY  REmODEL, RENOVATE, REPAIRS,  ROOFING, WATERPROOFING  m  Coast Construction  Quality Guaranteed  L. FERRIS 885-5436, 885-4190^/  ROLAND'S  HOME IMPROVEMENTS LTD.  ��� 5" Continuous aluminum gutters  ��� Aluminum soffits & fascias  ��� Built-in vacuum systems  ��� Vinyl siding  885-3562  'Bonniebrook Industries Ltd/  , 886-7004  * Septic Tank Pumping*  ��� �� . *    - *Concmtt Septic Tank Sales * y    - ��� j  .,,��!:.        -. *CrtneTruck Rental*  '   " ��Portable Toilet Rentals*   '   "      ",  ���^WiesftnCoasTDrywall  RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION  Board ��� Spray ��� Demountable Partitions ��� Int. - Ext. Painting  Tape   ��� Steel Studs      ��� Suspended Drywall       - Insulation  - T-Bar Ceilings CeHlngs  For Guaranteed Quality & Service Call  .    BRENT ROTTLUFF or RON HOVDEN   .  M3UUMM PAINTS 4k DECORATES  FREE ESTIMATES SEVEN DAYS A WEEK  RESIDENTIAL ��� INDUSTRIAL - COMMERCIAL  INTERIOR EXTERIOR PAINTING  Mark A. Maclnnes 886-2728  ICG LIQUID GAS  ��� Auto Propane  ��� Appliances  ��� Quality B.B. Q's  885-2360      '  Hwy 101. across St.-  from Big Mac's, Sechelt  Need this space?  C.tll   tin?  COAST   NEWS  .it   886 2622 or 885 3930  ���m bc FGRRies Schedule  VANCOUVER-SECHELT PENINSULA  HORSESHOE BAY-LANGDALE  JERVISJNLET  EARLS COVE-SALTERY BAY  Lv. Horseshoe Bay  7:30 am 3:30 pm M  9:30 M 5:30  11:30 am 7:25 M  1:15 pm 9:15  Lv.  6:20 am      2:30 pm  8:30 M1       4:30  10:30 am     6:30  12:25 pm M 8:20 M  Lv. Earls Cove  6:40 am       4:30 pm  8:20 6:30  10:30 8:30  12:25 pm M 10:20 M  Lv. Saltery Bay  5:45 M 3:30 pm  7:35 5:30 M  9:25 M 7:30  11:30 9:30  M denotes Maverick Bus  M' denotes no Maverick Bus on Sundays  Additional sailings March 23 through March 27,1989 and  May 19 through May 22,1989 only.  Lv. Saltery Bay Lv. Earls Cove  1:30 pm 2:30 pm  Gibsons  BUS  'Note there will be no  "First Ferry" run on  Saturdays, Sundays & Holidays  OMEGA  Terminal  Qibsone-  Marina  Sunnycrest  Mall  Lower  Bus  Shelter  ���6:03  8:03  10:03  12:03  1:53  4:03  6:03  Ferry  Terminal  ���6:10  8:10  10:10  12:10  2:05  4:10  6:10  IMINI-BUS SCHEDULE!  MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY EXCEPT HOLIDAYS     Effective Sept. 12  SECHELT TO WEST SECHELT:  LEAVE Sechelt:  (Trail Bay Mall/Trail Ave.)  8:25 a.m.  ��� 1:05 p.m.  4:25 p.m.  ARRIVE Mason/Norwest Bay Rd.  8:32 a.m.  ��� 1:12 p.m.  4:32 p.m.  WEST SECHELT TO SECHELT:  LEAVE Mason/Norwest Bay Rd.:  8:32 a.m.  ��� 1:12 p.m.  4:32 p.m.  ARRIVE Sechelt:  (Trail Bay Mall/Trail Ave.)  8:40 a.m.  ��� 1:20 p.m.  4:40 p.m.  SECHELT TO GIBSONS:  LEAVE Sechelt:  (Trail Bay Mall/Trail Ave.)  8:40 a.m.  10:30 a.m.  ��� 1:20 p.m.  3:00 p.m.  ARRIVE Lower Gibsons:  (Lower Rd.)  (Lower Rd.)  (Municipal Parking Lot)  9:15 a.m.  11:15 a.m.  * 1:50 p.m.  3:45 p.m.  LOWER GIBSONS CIRCLE:  LEAVE Lower Gibsons:  (Municipal Parking Lot)  9:15 a.m.  * 1:50 p.m.  3:45 p.m.  ARRIVE Lower Gibsons:  (Municipal Parking Lot)  9:25 a.m.  ��� 2:00 p.m.  3:55 p.m.  GIBSONS TO SECHELT:  LEAVE Lower Gibsons:  (Municipal Parking Lot)  9:25 a.m.  11:15 a.m.  ��� 2:00 p.m.  3:55 p.m.  ARRIVE Sechelt:  (Lower Rd.)  (Lower Rd.)  (Trail Bay Mall/Trail Ave.)  10:15 a.m.  12 noon  ��� 2:45 p.m.  4:25 p.m.  FARES:  One zone: 75 cents  Each additional zone: 25 cents  Zone #1: Lower Gibsons to  Flume Rd.  Zone #2: Flume Rd. to  West Sechelt  The bus will stop on request  it any safe spot along its  route.  REGULAR STOPS AT: SECHELT AND GIBSONS MEDICAL CLINICS  Suncoast Transportation Schfed^^  ���'No Servico on Fridays at  These Times*'  Please note: There is no service  on Saturdays, Sundays, or Holidays I  a member of  Independent Travel  Professionals  ==��� 886-9255  Swmul  Insurance, ��ktf��pt��fi   Notary  886-2000 =  Red Carpet Service From Friendly Professionals In Sunnycrest Mall, Cibsons  r^iiry^^  rniTifiifafin -���atf-j-v  y _.; ~^j,*fyz^^'��f^&l>^r i-"'-^ ~*T~v*~ *~*i.*.~?K  Coast News, January 9,1989  9.  WS&n&Km  by Myrtle Winchester, 883-9302  Registration for the Capilano  College 1.5 credit course, A  History of Popular Music, takes  place this evening, at the first  class, in the Pender Harbour  School of Music, at 7:30 pm.  This course has no prerequisite and requires no  knowledge of music, practical  or theory. High school students  with the approval of their principal may take the course.  SURPRISE!  A couple of weeks ago Al  Christy unsuspectingly walked  nto Joyce Garbers' house in  Garden Bay and found himself  in the middle of a surprise birthday party, surrounded by  friends and neighbours.  A fine time was had by all,  especially Al. He'd like to extend a special thank you to  Joyce for organizing the whole  @ FINANCIAL SERVICES  MISC SERVICES  thing, and to all the people who  were there to help him celebrate  his 65th.  LEGION NEWS  With the holiday over,  Branch 112 of the Royal Canadian Legion is back to all its  regular activities, including a  couple of changes for 1989.  Shelly Kattler is running the  meat draw again, same time,  same place, Saturdays at 4 pm  and 3 pm for the early bird  draws.  Due to requests by those who  have Wednesday commitments,  Crib Nite has been changed to  Tuesday. No registration is required to play, and prizes are  given to the winners of the top  score and the 'hidden score'.  Members are reminded that a  general meeting will be held at 8  pm on January 16. The agenda  includes installation of new officers elected on January 9.  Correction: Music at the  February 4 Robbie Burns Night  will be supplied by Jack  Bourne's Orchestra, and tickets  will be available soon, maybe  later this week.  The New Year's Eve dance  was a great success. So were the  Spin Offs, a satellite band of the  Harbour Lights.  As an alternative to impaired  driving, free transportation was  offered after the dance by  David Murphy. Although no  one took advantage of the service   (sober   spouses   and  I  ACCOUNTING SERVICES  ��� COMPLETE ACCOUNTING SERVICES ���  H. Bruce Cranston, C.G.A.  Marine Drive, Gibsons  (Across from Armours Beach)  886-3302  ^Sunshine ^Lodge  I���MEETING ROOM  COMPLIMENTARY T.V.  1 TELEPHONE & FIREPLACE -  On North Road at Highway 101 RESERVATIONS:  V P.O. Box 1768. Cibsons, B.C. Cirudj VON 1V0        (604)886-3322^  Gibsons, B.C.  Egmont  News  V  GREAT PACIFIC  ��� Financial Planning Service  ��� Investment Fund  �� RRSP's  ��� Retirement Income Funds  ��� Tax Shelters  MANAGEMENT    N  CO. LTD. (EST. 1965)  Alasdair W. Irvine  Representative  (604)886-6600  Box 127, Cibsons, B.C. VON 1V0 ,  JON JAREMA ^  DESIGN CONSULTANT  PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS  CUSTOM HOME DESIGN  RENOVATIONS OR ADDITIONS ��� REVISION OF EXISTING PLANS  DRAWINGS AND RENDERINGS  CALL 886-8930 TO DISCUSS YOUR HOME ENVIRONMENT.  f\  HEATING  V  k  CONSULTATION/INSTALLATION  Metal Fireplaces  Wood Furnaces     _ __���.,  ~" ii  ~\  Wood Stoves  Chimneys  Inserts  Liners  Certified  Wood Stove  Technician  STEVE  CHRISTIAN  883-9551  AC Building Supplies  S &G TREE SERVICE^  g&, TOPPING - TRIMMING - PRUNING  ��s#*     ���'������  DANGER TREE REMOVAL  <fifefi^       Bonded & Insured ��� 20 Years Experience  ,.hn Thoco "SERVING THE SUNSHINE COAST"  .     i^J!^ WILSON CREEK  V 885-3897 r.r. #1, sechelt, b.c von 3ao  YiJ  MARINE SERVICES ���  Hf  9<  Headwater Marina (i986)��td.  WINTER SPECIAL HA TE ON WA YS:  Pay for 1 Day _ GET 2 DAYS FREE  Nov. 1,1988 - Jan. 31. 1989  YEAR ROUND MOORAGE: HI-PRESSURE CLEANING  Box 71. Madeira Park, B.C. VON 2H0    (604)883-2406  Cottrell's Marine Service  SERVICE TO ALL MAKES  Specializing In MercOutboard  & stern drive rebuilding  y    Located at  Smitty's Marina, Gibsons  SHOP 686-7711     RES. 885-5840 J  PENINSULA INDUSTRIAL  & LOGGING SUPPLIES  General Industrial Supplies  ��� Hydraulic Hose & Fittings ��� Welding Supplies  ��� Wire Rope ��� Truck Parts  ��� Detroit Diesel Parts  *\  DELIVERY  SERVICE  24 HOUR  SERVICE  DIVER  BOAT  HAULING  Phone M6-2480  Van. Direct 689-7387   Mobile * 290-4806  1042 Hwy. 101. Gibsons   (across from Kenmac Parts)  GIBSONS MOBILE SAW SERVICE  Custom Cutting - Planing  Bevel Siding - Posts & Beams  Chris Napper 886-3468  R.R.#4, S6, C78,  ^Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0  by Egmont Etta, 883-9302  A couple of weeks ago waterfront Egmonsters were treated  to an enchanting view: a boat  slid out of the darkness about  8:30 with Christmas lights  strung up and down the mast  and sides. It passed near the  shoreline, reminding all who  saw it that Christmas is more of  an attitude than a date, and  leaving them feeling a little  privileged for taking in the unannounced light show.  ' We thtnk it might have been  the Pacific Paragon. If it was,  thanks to Peter for the treat.  BIRTHDAY WISHES  Gunner Jardine will be  celebrating his 75th birthday  January 21 in Egmont. It looks  like he'll have lots of help  celebrating it.  Other happy January birthday wishes go out to:  Colleen and David Jensen,  Sherrie Higgins, Crystal White,  Britt Grydeland, Ron Kushner,  Lisa O'Neil, Kenny Sharp, Rob  Eutenier, Stewart and Kristi  Hately, Fred Larson, Bob  Rivard, Sheelagh Vaughan and  Kelly and Rob Kniepkamp.  'designated drivers' took care of  getting everyone home safely),  the Legion should be commended for arranging it and  organizers of other alcohol-  related activities should follow  their example.  ELECTION RESULTS  Following are the results of  the Pender Harbour branch of  St. Mary's Hospital Auxiliary  election:  President, Vivi Alexander;  vice-president, Lou Farrell;  secretary, Kay Hatcher;  treasurer, Jean Prest; publicity  officer, Alice Haddock.  Members are reminded that  the next meeting will be held on  January 11 at 1:30 pm in St.  Andrew's Church hall, and  anyone interested in the auxiliary is welcome to attend.  MEMBERSHIPS DUE  Pender Harbour and District  Reading Centre memberships  are now due, and all those  books you took out before  Christmas are overdue, so  please stop by at the library  Tuesday, Thursday or Saturday  between 1:30 and 3:30.  r  Reference: Point AtkinSOn    For Skookumchuk Narrows add 1 hr. 45 min ,  n~���:*:��� c*__j i t-:  plus 5 min. for each ft. ol rise,  PaClflC Standard Time and 7 min. for each ft. of fan.  Time To  WINTERIZE  Your Boat & R.V.  winter storage  on fenced premises  power & water on site  BOAT HAULING  1 ' HARBOUR VIEW MARINE  ^-v i v   v    vv    ^   ^   ^    xvvxvv  I ID        Hwy   101    Oib*On  .   886-2233  M  Gibsons  Swimming Pool  MONDAY &  WEDNESDAY  Early Bird  Aqua Fit  Ease Me In  Noon Swim  Lessons  Swim Fit  6:30 a.m.  9:00 a.m.  10:00a.m.  11:30a.m.  3:30 p.m.  7:30 p.m.  TUESDAY  Fit & 50+ 9:30 a.m.  Senior Swim 10:30 a.m.  Adapted Aquatics 2:30 p.m.  Lessons 3:30p.m.  Public Swim 6:00 p.m.  Co-ed Fitness 7:30 p.m.  THURSDAY  Adapted Aquatics 2:30 p.m.  Lessons 3:30 p.m.  Public Swim 6:00 p.m.  Co-ed Fitness 7:30 p.m.  8:30 a.m.  10:00 a.m.  11:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  7:30 p.m.  8:30 p.m.  ���10:30 a.m.  ���11:30 a.m.  3:30 p.m.  6:00 p.m.  7:30 p.m.  8:30 p.m.  ��� 3:30 p.m.  ���6:00p.m.  ���7:30 p.m.  ��� 8:30 p.m.  FRIDAY  Early Bird  Aqua Fit  Fit & 50 +  SeniorSwim  Noon Swim  Public Swim  Teen Swim  6:30 a.m.-  8:30 a.m.  9:00 a.m.- 10:00 a.m.  10:00a.m. - 10:30a.m.  10:30a.m. -11:30a.m.  11:30 a.m.-  l:06p.m.  5:30 p.m.-  7:00 p.m.  7:30 p.m.-  9:00 p.m.  SATURDAY  Public Swim        2:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.  Public Swim        7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.  SUNDAY  Family Swim  Public Swim  1:00 p.m.- 3:30 p.m.  3:30 p.m.- 5:00 p.m.  Lessons Commence  Sept. 19th  REGISTER NOW  Gibsons Swimming Pool 886-9415  Publication of this schedule  sponsored by  Super Valu  K  >v  juccaneer  Marina 6? Resort Ltd.  Located in Secret Cove 885-7888  MARINE SPECIALISTS 21 YEARS  PARTS - SALES - SERVICE -REPAIRS  Johnson  OMC  \70I_VO  l    evmmjoei  I  AHsMUik'-  OUTBOARDS  W^Mft  (stern drives/inboardsI  f COMPLETE LANDSCAPE SERVICE  Designing, Turf, etc.  Free Estimates  6.7' & 8' GOLDEN  HEDGING EVERGREENS  s3����/ft.  BARK MULCH ���__  15 vds.de..vered in Sechelt $270 COAST'S LARGEST NURSERY  MURRAY'S NURSERY '*""��FP"NTS  \^   Located 1 mile north of Hwy 101 on Mason Rd.  261-2151  8852974  Hydraulic ��� Truck ��� Industrial    "\  FAST 24 hr. Service:  Pager 885-5111  SUPPLY?  686-4990  Hwy. tQI n��ar Prait Htf., Gibftons  Ucron from L��r> Wr*y Tr��nif��r>  To find out about  an educational or  training course, you  could spend hours  with these  Or just minutes  with this.  ��^^H��vt  ��� Salt Water Licences  ��� Motel & Campsites   ��� Water Taxi  * Marine Repairs        * Ice and Tackle       883-2266  HARBOUR VIEW MARINE LTD  ��� IUPPUE8 ��� SALES ��� SERVICE ��� RETAINS ���  : STERN DRIVES *_flwUM^_i    E^_H   yr&ra    ���i'.'.uf.i.��  AINMMD EH8WES by...   "HW"~"    ESSB3   "��*   **smp  Fuiiv licensed FULL LINE OF MARINE HARDWARE A ACCESSORIES  & insured     BOAT HAULING & FULL SHOP REPAIRS -  Van. Direct    DOCKSIDE SERVICE  ----- .     VHFChil0:  684-0933    7MHEviPi.ett.Kn   ____�� 886-2233 J  Custom Carpet Sales a  & Installations  ���������*'.. y  {gg&jr&&2$lW%g  "vy  WIDE SELECTION OF:  ��� Brand Name Carpets  ��� Saxony Plush, Cut & Loop,  Berber Wool, Level Loop  ��� Resilient Flooring (Lino)  ��� Exclusive European  Flooring Designs  ��� Custom Installation  Marine Diesel Repair  DAVE COLES  >  'QUALITY IS SATISFACTION",  *pftfe& For Appointment Call  IN HOME SHOPPING   I  886-8888  Mobile Service ��� Repairs ��� Overhauls  WINTERIZING SPECIALS ON SAIL BOATS  886-2875  rCHAINSAWS  SALES & SERVICE  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER &  _________ CHAINSAW LTD.  MISC SERVICES ���  Kj/ ' 886-7359 K&  \~2nnuersinn   Windows.   Glass,   - I  731 NORTH ROAD   886-2912  " Conversion   Windows,   Glass,  Auto  &  Marine Glass, Aluminum Windows]  & Screens  Hwy 101 & Pratt Rd.  aWawmtammmaVamaammammamammamemmMmam  Mirrors  SUNSHINE KITCHENS  - CABINETS  886-9411  \ Showroom Kern's Plaza, Hwy 101  Open Tuesday to Saturday 10-4 pm  Over 175,000 courses, workshops  and seminars right at your fingertips.  Now you can find all the information  you need to select an educational or  training opportunity simply by using  the Discovery Training Networks computerized catalogue.To tap into this  information source, visit your local  TAP (Terminal Access Point).  TAPs may be found in your  community at participating  colleges, government offices,  libraries and many other locations in  the Greater Vancouver, Vancouver  Island,Thompson-Nicola, Howe Sound  and Sunshine Coast regions. Province-  wide TAPs are coming soon.  Specify the subject area you're  interested in and our computer will  search out what's available.  It s as simple as that,  lb find the TAP nearest  you, call us toll-free at  1-800-663-1383.  N<  Open learning  agency  DiscoveryTraining Network  300-475 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 4M9 W!  10.  Coast News, January 9,1989  Japanese students  need local homes  jf  by Gail Sangster  A unique culture exchange  opportunity is available for  several Sechelt area families this  winter.  Homes are needed to host  Japanese students visiting the  area from February 7 to March  1. A second group will be arriving on March 2 to depart on  March 24.  Some  34  students   will   be  coming to the Sunshine Coast  from all over Japan to learn  more about the Canadian way  of life. The host families will  receive a profile on the student  prior to their arrival to better  acquaint them with their new  family member.  The students are between the  ages of 18 to 21 and are now attending college. They have  taken from three to five years of  English in school but some find  speaking the language still very  difficult.  These visitors will learn about  our area through daytime tours  and classes, and experience  typical Canadian family life  through evenings and weekends  spent with their billet families.  To participate in this cultural  experience, please phone Gail at  885-3100 (days) or 886-3783  (evenings).  ��*fpi  .%<&  -3*  S8SC*t  iPwl  &$��&  ���l��  STOP SMOKING IN 1 SESSION  LASER THERAPY AS SEEN ON T.V.  ��� Laser is the most modern therapy  ��� Soft laser is painless, harmless, no negative  side effects  ��� Soft laser stimulates points, you lose desire  to smoke  ��� Diet and withdrawal points included  ��� 85% success rate  $100  January 17 only  1-800-663-4000  BY APPOINTMENT ONLY  DELCO LASER INTERNATIONAL INC.  Suspects  in jail  Two Gibsons men arrested  on charges in connection with  the alleged murder of Claude  Joseph Dupuis of Montreal and  burial of his body at Port  Mellon, are being held in  custody in North Vancouver.  Marcel Joseph Gerard, 51,  and Denis Joseph Guerard, 31,  appeared in North Vancouver  provincial court Tuesday. They  were remanded in custody until  January 10 when they are to be  back in the court for consideration of a preliminary hearing  date.  si  S jr<-  ��Y  r&  These participants in the program for re-entry into the work force are all set to continue their studies  after the holiday break (see story). -pwii Murray phoio  Course attracts 20  by George Cooper  One program in the  Elphinstone Secondary School  only sees the participants come  TOURIST AND RECREATION GUIDE |  *--Vn  SUNSHINE COAST  Golf & Country Club  Year 'round 9 hole course  Coffee Shop & Lounge Area  VISITORS WELCOME  Hwy. 101, Roberts Creek 885-9212  oiUv  fine Art -Art Supplies ��� Gifts  >?-GALLERYlsl  280 Gower Point Rd., Gibsons Landing   'min^iiiimU'Mil'in'UU, ,,,  'ii  it  8  ���*  <;  5��  I;  yiry%iyyygy^iygYs^  ""? <.T\  ��� HELLY HANSEN & MUSTANG  OUTDOOR WEAR  ��� MARINE BATTERIES  ���CHARTS & BOOKS  888-8686  Waterfront, Gibsons  *��**$rf  GIBSONS marina  T^f  ^  :��:  886-9213  ill  WAKEFIELD TENNIS CLUB  Next to the Wakefield Inn - on the beach  Pay As You Play  visitors welcome - indoor courts  885-7666      y  "?���? ���^ft'U^- V%ft  ^ivS**>iv  ~iJK-  Tmnmmayaw  [fticientllectric Phis Heating  Enjoy modern electric heat  and save up to 50% on fuel costs  ;.f*.,' * y  Electric Plus is clean, quiet,  versatile and 100% efficient.  Electric Plus gives you all the advantages of modern,  energy-efficient electric heat at a saving of  up to 50% on fuel costs if you now use  oil or propane. \bur Electric Plus heating  system is clean and convenient, quiet  and 100% efficient. You can choose from  a variety of ways to heat electrically  with Electric Plus, while having oil,  propane, butane, wood or coal as a  back-up heating system.  Supply is limited, so get  popular Electric Plus now.  Electric Plus is offered at the special low  rate of 2.50 per kilowatt-hour (about  half the regular cost of electricity) because  it is secondary interruptible energy,  available only when we have more  water than we need for basic  commitments. The supply of this  secondary energy is limited to 500 tm_tm ir\ r^rrrM TT.  gigawatt-hours, and once this limit is ^KOUL/ Ur UUk  reached - expected to be within the next      A     v"*- - - - -*-�� ���   x v  12 months ~ no new Electric Plus  customers will be signed up.  If you sign up for Electric Plus now you'll enjoy the  benefits of electric heating whenever secondary energy  is available. When Electric Plus is interrupted you  switch to your back-up system. We expect interruptions  to be infrequent but when one does occur it will likely  last an entire heating season.  ��RCHjdro  Convenient Hydro financing and big  dollar savings,   r  For most homes, the entire cost of converting  to dual-fuel Electric Plus can be covered  .by B.C. Hydro financing. It's available on  approved credit at only 8#% interest.  Contractors can arrange financing, which can  be conveniently repaid on Hydro bills over  |>eriods up to four years.  : Your home is probably eligible for Electric  3Plus, unless it already has natural gas service.  If you now heat with oil or propane, Electric  Plus could save you $200 to $450 a year  on space heating, and another $110 to  $130 on water heating if you add it  there too. Heating equipment costs vary  with individual homes and wiring  systems, so see a contractor for specific  recommendations and prices. Or ask  your local Hydro office for our Electric  Plus pamphlet, i      -  to the classroom for half of the  time.  The other half of the time is  spent in on-the-job training in  facilities and with agencies that  provide long-term care.  This program provides training for re-entry into the  workforce after an absence, in  some cases of years, in other  cases of months. The 20 women  participating in the 26 week program that began last October  take a course than combines  Provincial Long Term Care  Aide training and the Provincial  Homemaker program.  The objective is to reach a  level of competence in the field  of long term care. Each participant that does so will be awarded a certificate recognized  throughout the province.  Qualifying means showing  competence in practical work as  well as written. For example,  participants recently had to  qualify in CPR.  The components of the program are taught by experts in  their fields. A qualified nurse  instructs in that field of care, a  physiotherapist*   in*? Jt>od,y  mechanics,   a   nutritionist i in*  foods and diet.    ^     *irr~. ^ ';;  Academic upgrading is done"  by instructor Vern Giesbrecht  of the school district's Continuing Education branch. Capilano  College provided  a week of  computer training.  The managing-coordinator of  the whole re-entry program,  Thelma Eckland, instructs in  life skills such as listening,  research, and time management.  The re-entry program is part  of the school district's Continuing Education offerings. It is  funded by the federal government through its Canadian  Employment and Immigration  Commission with some support  from the province of B.C. The  funding for the re-entry program here is close to $200,000.  "I have been in health administration for a non-profit  Home Support group in Mission for 15 years," Eckland told  us, "and also managed and  coordinated five reentry/entry  programs there since 1985.  "So, when I called Mary Pinniger, the director of Continuing Education here, I could give  her a sound background of reentry training programs."  The upshot of that call is the  present program, the participants coming from all parts  of the Sunshine Coast. There is  also enthusiastic support from  the community.  "My part in this is all done  under contract to School  District 46," said Thelma. "My  co-worker is Kathy Morem, the  office support person.  "I did another program for  the school district this past summer," Thelma added, "called  WOW, a work orientation  workshop for teenagers to show  them the value of education in  making careers for themselves.  Their work experience took  place in tourist service facilities,  the marina, and the golf course.  "We wish to gratefully  acknowledge the warm support  of the school district in arranging this program and in providing a classroom and office in  the Elphinstone cafeteria. Mar-  tyn Wilson, Elphinstone principal, and staff have opened  their library to us.  "Thanks also to the West  Howe Sound Fire Department  which generously gave time in  instruction. And to these  facilities and agencies which  provide the on-the-job training:  the Sunshine Achievement Centre, the Fairview Residence, the  Home Support Society and its  Adult Day Care, Kiwanis  Village, Shorncliffe, St. Mary's  Hospital, and the Teddjj Bear  V     *A  CT< r;  ii  MARY'S  VARIETY  open 7 days a week  Vi PRICE SALE  til Jan. 20  Soft & hard Cover  USED BOOKS  Dry Cleaning Drop Off  Next to Shell Station ���_,   Cower PI. Rd. 886-8077  WEBBER PHOTO!  TREASURE PRINTS  We'll mount your favourite photo  on a china plate  ��� photoflnlshlng       ��� batteries, etc.  ��� photocopying        * keys cut  ��� films, flashes & frames  ��� passport photos    ��� Konlca cameras  ��� agent for Looml* Courier  886-2947  275 Gower Pt. Rd.  Gibsons Landing  EUROPEAN STYLE  YOGURT  Variety KM FOODS  Gibsons Landing  886-2936  TERMINAL  Forest Products Ltd.  LOG  BUYING  STATION  Competitive Prices  Camp Run  * CEDAR ��� FIR ��� HEMLOCK ���  886-7033  u zpy-^-'i.--* ~j~-~*~-^*<  u  ��s  %  V  \i  V  V.  Coast News, January 9,1989  11.  I �� �� i�� �� ii ii min hi ii in irn ii hi m �� Tntii m ip ��nn, Mjn hipmhih^hii mi i�� ��� i j m unu iim  fr ��� ��� -��� ��� -���- ~-��� ^ ���- ~ ������ ���-��� --������ ~. ~. -. ~ .��� ^.^-^^^ ^p-^-^ ^|T~ ^ui^i mnirfiiTi _i Tin mi-��ii iifjijniCJIjf  ;, ���. ��� - ' . ^  by Ruth Forrester, 885-2418  Oncewe had the Halfmoon  Hams. Now we have the Halfmoon Bay Halfwits! Sorry I  can't name them individually,  but apparently this group held  their second annual New Year's  Day Swim.  Eight hardy souls, entered the  water for a quick dip, then rushed into a hot tub to warm up.  One of the usual participants  had to go to work, but his obliging friends gave him a bucket  dip just to keep with tradition.  NEW YEAR REVELRY  Had good reports of the New  Year being celebrated  throughout the area. The group  who attended the party at the  Welcome Beach Hall report a  very pleasant evening of dancing to music provided by our  own local DJ, Bill Vorley.  Several people from Halfmoon Bay also joined in the fun  of the party at the Sechelt  Seniors Hall and had nothing  but good to say about the evening. Likewise, the Forrester  residence was the scene of great  revelry where a highlight was  the traditional piper playing the  New Year.  Special mention must be  made of this year's 'First Foot'  who turned out to be a very  handsome tall dark young man.  Many thanks to Nick for  playing the role so well, to Ken  for his bagpipes, to Nikki and  musical friends for a happy  night of music, and to all our  friends and relative who made it  a memorable night.  SHUFFLEBOARD  Some spare players are needed for this session of shuf-  fleboard at Welcome Beach  Hall. If you would like to take  part in the fun please give Vivian Hain a call at 885-9207.  HELP!  Elsewhere in this paper you  may read about Joanne Dickeson of Welcome Woods who  takes care of wild creatures who  are injured.  It seems that Joanne does not  get paid for this and I know she  could use some financial support to keep up the good work.  Do try to donate a little bit  towards this marvellous cause.  FAREWELL TO TED  Must end this column on a  sad note this week regarding the  passing just before New Year of  a fine gentleman, Ted Gough.  We all knew Ted as a delight  fully cheerful man who had a  kind and pleasant greeting for  all.  Ted was responsible for keeping the gardens at St. Mary's  Hospital beautiful for many  years. He kept a lovely and productive garden at home in  Welcome Woods and was  known and appreciated for  sharing the produce with friends  and neighbours.  We know that his wife Barbara and family will miss Ted  and want them to know that we  will miss him too.  .    BUI  tiiMii     WE ST,LL HAVE A FEW LEFT  THRIFTY'S  tues-Sat10-4  GIBSONS   ���  886-2488 or Box 598  "Quiet charm in the heart of the city'  Make the Sylvia part  of your Vancouver adventure.  SINGLE from *37       QOVBVt from *48*  ' i ' >    <���'   " f y    " >  free Covered Parking wh'erffou hrin&m ik$ad.  i  j  Featuring "Sylvia's Restaurant & Bistro''  .Overlooking Vancouver's English Bay  On the Beach at 1154 Gilford  ���JJJJJJJ  <<  'l  681-9321   '  E-S-Z-ZEE-  Ken's Lucky Dollar Foods  886-2257  GOWER POINT ROAD, GIBSONS LANDING  FREE DELIVERY TO THE WHARF  reserve the right to limit quantities  fully guarantee everything we sell    fully satisfactory or money fully refunded  |aw��iiipiipppMiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii u ���--  5*r.: i*'-'-. f^^/mWTi-'SiSSt^^7'  FOOD  VALUES  Prices effective:  Jan.-10 - Jan. 15  ^^^g^^YY' l:l '..-.-r  ���.vs.-    ��vA  -^��C/___k'  ���_____MB____M_i__M_i__i___________^^  :;.Y"f   ,{'.*..  Vow LOTTERY Centr�� m  G5B  Minute Maid - Pulp^Pulp Free/  & Low Acid - Assorted Sizes  Green Giant - In Butter Sauce  Niblets/White Corn/Peas/Mixed Veggies  :;yegeiableL,.Y_*::.,^iY^~ .  ���;������".-;'.��������� :250gm .   1> 1 %J  Pepperidge Farm - Chocolate -  layer cake       359 3m 1.59  Purina - Tuna/Beef/Gourmet  Liver & Beef - Tender Vittles  cat food  .500gm     I .OO  284mi 2/.yy  Campbell's - Tomato  soup  Sunlight - Powder  laundry  detergent.'...'.. 6//2 kg  No Name  popping corn      ikg  Better Buy  refuse bags        ws  Boston - loaf  corned beef     nogm  Javex ��� Liquid  bleach 3.6.1  Bumble Bee - Solid White  tUna. ... 198 gm  Golden Harvest - Australian  sultanas... 375 9m  Maxwell House -Instant  decaffeinated  coffee: :  . .....1509m 4.79  Maxwell House - instant .  COffee ....200gm    5.39  Bee Cee ��� Liquid  honey............500 3m 1.88  v-s  vegetable  cocktail 1/  Clover Leaf - Whole Baby  ClamS....... 142 gm  Presidents Choice  firelogs..... 5/bs./2.27 kg  Better Buy  margarine..  Palm  sour cream  454 gm     ��  500 ml  1.49  Cortina - Random Cut  Mild/Medium/Old  Cheddar cheese 20% Off  Fresh - In Family Pack  chicken legs   y 1.39  Fresh - Medium  ground beef   y 1.69  New Zealand ��� Frozen  lamb loin  chops ib. 3.89  1��A1U��KY  McGavins -100%  homestead  bread  595 gm  1.59  Venice 100%  stone ground  bread  Burns  cottage roll 1/_'s    /_. 2.29  Burns  head cheese  CUPS 375gm    1.75  Pioneer Brand - Side  bacon 500 3m .99  Burns  garlic coil ��,  1.39  fT neftU,.�� 0ur 0wn FreMv Baked  ff -Bobfift ^ banana loaf  1.99  454 gm  1.09  PRODUCE  Chilean Grown  peaches     ��,  California Choice  Large Size - Navel  oranges      /_  Mexican Grown - Beefsteak  tomatoes    ��. 68  California Grown  Green Leaf    ea.  FIRST  /k  OF       "^  tHL-Int c ���  Start with the basics.  CRAB SALAD  1 crab  First of all, catch the basic ingredient, cook it, extract its meat,  and chill.  Dressing:  2 cloves garlic  Vi teaspoon salt  freshly ground black pepper  2Vz tablespoons herb vinegar (I used rosemary)  Vi teaspoon dried mint  Vs teaspoon dried basil  Vi teaspoon dried oregano   .  '/��teaspoon dried rosemary  V* teaspoon Mongolian fire oil  or  V* teaspoon crushed red pepper  6 tablespoons olive oil  Chop the garlic finely. Place all ingredients in a bowl. Add oil  gradually, continously beating. Place the crabmeat in the dressing and marinade in the refrigerator for half an hour.  i Salad:  1 small head lettuce  2 tomatoes  1 small cucumber  2 stalks celery  1 smail zucchini  Prepare vegetables according to kind. Add crabmeat and dress-  > ing. Toss well. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon chopped parsley.  Serve immediately.  It helps greatly if you have a number one son who will venture out  onto the briny and catch the crab, but I'm sure the purchased or  canned or mock variety would do quite well.  Thanks number one!  NEST LEWIS  i    k\  T8�� 12.  Coast News, January 9,1989  h; Y  ��  s  Branch #109  Members   _       _. Guests Welcome |  & We have the Live Music of course ;  <��_ *���    ��� ���  i. 13&14  P  ]�����  k  I  t'..  %  W  I  It has become a bit of a tradition in recent years for the Sunshine Coast Arts Centre to kick  off its exhibition season with the  local group show, Friends of the  Gallery. To uphold this tradition in 1989, the Arts Centre is  inviting all those artists who  consider themselves 'friends of  the gallery' to bring up three  works to the Arts Centre on  Saturday, January 21 between  11 and 4.  The Arts Centre staff  guarantees to hang at leas: one  in the show. Running this year  from January 25 until February  21, this show" is always interesting and always a surprise!  Absolutely everyone is  welcome to participate!  CLASSICAL MUSIC  Last year the Arts Council  brought Brian Tate, now a  regular CBC music commentator, to the Coast for a classical  music weekend. Popular demand is bringing Mr. Tate back  January 28 and 29 for a repeat  of this mini-course in music appreciation.  Brian Tate combines extensive musical knowledge (he is a  composer as well as a teacher)  with a lively sense of humour.  He covers music from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and  Contemporary periods on tapes  and   CDs,    with   ongoing  demonstrations from the piano.  The   program   takes   participants   through   the   basic  elements  of music  (rhythym,  melody, harmony, tone colour),  the texture of music, musical  form (rondo, sonata, etc.) and  musical   styles.   The   goal   is  greater appreciation for and enjoyment of music.  The course will be held at  Rockwood Lodge January 28  and 29 and costs $65.  Preregistration is required by  January 23.  Call   the   Arts   Centre   at  885-5412 or write to Box 1565.  Sechelt.  ARTS CALENDAR  Want to know what's happening on the arts scene? The  Arts Council's Calendar of  Events for Winter/Spring '89 is  now available free of charge at  local bookstores, galleries, in-  focentres, and libraries. It gives  you the latest information on  concerts, performances,  children's programs, gallery exhibitions, and special events.  The Calendar also provides  information on artists who are  interested in studio visits, local  library hours, and contact  numbers for Arts Council  member groups. Pick up your  copy today!  ART RENTAL DATE  If your house or office has a  case of the post-Christmas  blahs, spruce it up with a  beautiful work of art for pennies a day! The Arts Council's  art rental and sales is open on  January 16, 10 am to 4 pm at  the Arts Centre, Sechelt.  Come in and make a selection  from the juried works by some  of the Coast's best-known artists. There are paintings,  photographs and prints to  choose from, all ready to hang  on your walls.  Rental is a great way to introduce yourself to a new  artist's work, and very inexpensive! The monthly charge is a  fraction of the purchase price.  If you decide that you simply  must own the work, a three-  month rental period can be applied against the purchase price  (the charge is tax deductible for  businesses).  We're only open every six  weeks, so mark the date on your  calendar now! And if you have  any questions about the program, please contact Carole at  885-7935 or Sandie at 885-3981.  Special arrangements may be  made for viewing at alternate  times, when possible.  by Peter Trower  No one argues with him. In a  flurry of frantic movement the  gang struggle back into their  bakery uniforms, stuff money  into every available pocket.  Dashing madly down the corridor they burst into the locker  room, compose themselves for a  second, then slip furtively  through another door into the  huge room that houses the main  part of the factory. Amazingly,  the plant workers have not yet  been notified that there are  thieves in the building.  They toil industriously at  their various jobs and fail to  notice the late arrivals. Herb  and the others scatter through  the enormous hall of the factory  and resume their customary  tasks.  They are not a moment too  soon. A minute later several  dozen armed police burst into  the high-roofed cavern of the  bakery and order the machines  shut off. The heavy thrum of  activity dies into silence.  "All you people stay put,"  orders one of the police.  "We've got some safecrackers  holed up in the office."  Guns drawn, the officers  move purposefully towards the  corridor entrance. As the factory workers grasp what is happening they begin to panic.  "Let's get the hell but of  here!" someone shouts.  "There's liable to be bullets flying around!"  His cry proves infectious and  the frightened workers begin  shoving and jostling towards  the exits. Adding their voices to  the others, Herb and the rest  join the general exodus.  After a few token attempts at  restoring order the police let  them go. Once outside the  building the safecrackers work  their way towards the fringes of  the crowd and make their  escape.  It is another stroke of luck  for the Wilson gang.  To be continued...  r  John is hack with his middle of the road music.  jEnjoy a night out in the warmth and fun atmosphere  at your legion and bring a guest couple.  REMEMBER Dinner Available Too  Extension Credit Programs  Space is still available in the following programs.  For further information, call 885-9310 or drop into  Capilano College Sechelt between 12:30 and 7 p.m.  Monday to Friday.  NEW DATE  Rhythms of Life  Think good, it happens  by Penny Fuller  Drop ofl your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  at  Seaview Market  Roberts Creek  "A Friendly People Place"  What is 'good luck' and  where can I buy a dozen?  I think it's a combination of  timing and positive expectancy.  Sometimes you can reach for  the stars with a lot of success, at  other times reaching for a glass  of water is pushing it.  If you have a good sense of  the flow of things, you can time  your reaching for when things  are most conducive to success.  Armed with expectations of success you are probably considered a 'lucky person'.  On the other hand there are  people who seem to misfire all  their lives, being in the wrong  place at the wrong time, etc. If  this is you, understand that,  you've gotten into a pattern of  negativity sometime, probably  when you were quite young.  It is your own expectations of  bad luck that are being confirmed by the universe. You're  creating that reality.  Maybe it's time for a change.  I can offer some suggestions of  timing, but you have to begin  affirming that good things are  going to happen to you, and  they will.  Next week is going to see  some interesting planetary action and it's worth preparing  for it. Mercury goes retrograde  (appears to move backward) on  January 17. This indicates the  beginning of a three week  period of some chaos and confusion in thinking, transportation and contracts of any sort.  Until February 6 it's a good  idea to be flexible and not get  into a flap when things get fouled up^  You can prepare for that time  by getting your car checked out  this week. Re-check reservations  lilliiipi����Slijf  ___K>^H^h ���k^^^P'kBL���*-*^�� '���..l^B ^-"f &-21 ^. ���*-. 7  sHM fi*y ���{��� >-'.x.��> i-3 '>-s'i- >'>-:-��")-<ii- <��������'���$2$-*i'-'i^*&  Re-ooens  ' >V" nV ***^_B _tf__rV__F*__T'*^''j',iV$?^*__F-o^^__ __F-__F__(V#w  w,,h �����*�� yito^i^  mi  fr  Ptus  Mm mm m ir-fTk I  Made fresh on our premises  ')v  ^o-  FREE DELIVERY   ~~��  after 6 pm on orders  $15 and over within 4 miles  ?*.  ~&ffif*d.  P.  OPEN Sun. - Thurs. 10 am - 12 midnight  FRI. & SAT. 10 am - 2:30 am   '  Minimum iiimliim   \  made. If you're a student, study  now and review during that  time, things will work with you  that way.  There is one twist to this Mercury retrograde that isn't normally there. Between January  19 and 22, Jupiter appears to be  stationary in the sky. This is a  time of expansion and bounty.  It could mean things like  missing a ferry, only to be  discovered by Hollywood as  you wait for the next.  This time is > especially good  for people born between May  17 and 21. The next two months  are for you, enjoy it. Make-  yourself   available   for '\S/o0;i  things.  Another group coming up to  good times for a few months are  those born: May to June, 1929;  May to June, 1941; April to  May, 1953; March to April,  1965; August to October, 1964;  July to August, 1976; and  November 1976 to March 1977.  That's a lot of people who  can have positive expectations  during the next couple of months. Pretty well everyone should  look for good things when  Jupiter stands still, between the  17th and 22nd.  There's no doubt that we get  what we expect out of life, so  expect the best and you'll get it.  Advanced Child Development  (for under 3's and Special Needs)  Prerequisite: Basic Early Childhood Education  Certificate or permission of instructor. 2 credits  Instructor: Lois Rennie  14 Wednesdays, 5-7:30 p.m. starting January 11  An examination of the prenatal development and  genetic environmental factors which influence  development arid behaviour.  Electronic Bookkeeping  Prerequisite: Basic Bookkeeping (keyboarding skills are  desirable but not essential. 3 credits  14 Wednesdays, 6-10 p.m. starting January 11  This course consists of a review of basic accounting  procedures plus the use of the Bedford Integrated  Accounting program for entering, storing, and  retrieving records and for producing financial  statements.  CAPILANO     COLLEGE  5627  Inlet  Avenue,   Sechelt, B.C.  Sechelt Legion Pipe Band  Burns Night  Sechelt Legion Hall   Sat., Jan. 28  6 pm - 1 am  JC79        Dance to Big Band Sound of the  our Lights  O  'Tn  TICKETS $15.00 each  ,, Available at TRAIL BAY HARDWARE  or 886-7084, 886-7378  The Free Trade Agreement will gradually eliminate customs duty  between Canada and the United States.  Somethings   Somethings  dont:  change:  __. The duty on some Free Trade  goods will be eliminated  immediately while the duty on  other goods will be phased out  in stages.  __. Only goods which are of  U.S. or Canadian origin will be  eligible for lower Free Trade  Agreement duty rates.  __i The goods must have been  acquired in the U.S. and must  have no mark or label indicating the goods were produced  in any country other than the  U.S. or Canada.  ��3Ffp3'*��_  teMl&&&  :'&���>  v.ut  m  v?ss  _��  >_o  m  ���.ttj?  fcSgi  __i Current personal exemption  levels do not change.  A Restrictions on the duty and  tax free amounts of alcohol and  tobacco remain in effect.  _i Free Trade goods exceeding  personal exemption levels  remain subject to federal sales  and excise taxes as applicable.  ft Before your next trip, we'll be  glad to tell you the duty payable  on the goods you intend to  bring home. We're here to help,  that's something that will never  ^change!  Call your local Canada Customs office or  your regional Canada Customs office (604) 666-0545  during regular business hours  or our National Hotline at  1-800-267-  ���II  1*1  Revenue Canada Revenu Canada  Customs and Excise     Douanes et Accise.  [���mii-iiiTi-ii^  :M5tjfcSai&S��yj^;<sii��<��t^.<^ftffi  ^'flJ^^M^^i^^^Mai^iS^'^^^^M^^^^V''' by Penny Fuller  Last year was a busy and productive year for the Sunshine  Coast Arts Council, and 1989  may be even busier.  At the January 4 meeting of  Sechelt council, an application  was received from the Arts  Council for its annual grant of  $500. Included in the application was a complete financial  and activity report for 1987-88.  The achievements were impressive.  The Arts Council is an umbrella organization for the arts  and crafts groups in the lower  Sunshine Coast. The council attempts to encourage, coordinate and develop arts activities in this area.  In this capacity, the council  administers the grants for many  groups. Last year, these included: the Centennial Singers, Sunshine Choristers, Pender Harbour Music Society, the Music  Festival Society, Writers' Forge,  Rockwood Lodge Society, the  Festival of the Written Arts,  Spinners and Weavers Guild,  Suncoast Players, Driftwood  Players and Potters Guild.  Through the work of council  volunteers and staff, the  Canada Council Readership  program sponsored five literary  events at the Arts Centre during  the 1987-88 season. Prestigious  Canadian authors were brought  to the coast and gave readings  from their works.  Another popular event last  year was the 'ethnic nights'  which were held at the Arts  Centre. Potluck dinners of international cuisine were followed by slide shows or dancing  and music from the specified  country of the evening.  Countryside concerts completed their fourth season. All  concerts were well attended,  with 70 per cent of the ticket  sales being season subscriptions.  Such international performers as the Paris Boys  Choir, the Tvasz Singers of  Budapest, and the Nyonza  Singers of Uganda were brought  to the area for the entertainment of Sunshine Coast residents.  Both the Hunter Gallery in  lower Gibsons and the Sunshine  Coast Arts Centre provide a  showplace for local artists, with  Child, adult arts  events at Sechelt  i��  Start off 1989 right. Come  enter.the Puppet Trunk and enjoy an afternoon with Guignal  and Grafron. These two have  delighted European audiences  for over -200 years. Travelling  with them will be many puppet  friends, with some special insights for solving a problem.  This story is especially suited  to younger children, however  the warmth it portrays crosses  all age barriers.  Colourful puppet booths provide the backdrop for these  presentations, which recall the  tradition of the travelling performer. All the colour and excitement of a mini festival.  A delight for the whole family!   Saturday,  January  14,  2  ||p.m.   at   Sechelt   Elementary  pSchooljGym.  -      Mter'^  [*-joye&the colo^  ^Jcot^ fwill imovehover to the  j^^^Centre for an evening of  j ^ adultperformance.  TUESDAY, JANUARY 10  -       7:00 PM  Talk to Your Local  Government  Al Price takes the host's chair  in our monthly program that  allows the viewers to talk to  members of their local government. Invited guests include  Gibsons Mayor Diane Strom,  Sechelt Mayor Tom Meredith  and Regional Board Chairman  Peggy Connor. Topics of local  concern will be discussed.  8:00 PM  Gordon Wilson,  B.C. liberal Leader  Stan Dixon hosts a monthly  ! talk show with interesting people from the Sunshine Coast.  Stan's guest this month is B.C.  Liberal'Leader Gordon Wilson.  Topics of local concern will be  discussed.  THURSDAY, JANUARY 12  7:00 PM  .Recycling on the  Sunshine Coast  Live Phone-In  Join Rob Buchan and his  guests Anne Miles and Gemma  Vandermeer for a discussion  about recycling. Included in the  program is a half hour show  from our friends at the Powell  River Cablenet. The program  titled 'The Recycling Scene in  Powell River' is hosted by Jim  and Dawn Stewart and looks at  recycling from their point of  view.  j 8:00 PM  ; Kinsmen Mother's March '89  �� Live Phone-In  y  Barry   Stein   and   Dennis  [cRae join us to talk about this  year's Mother's March.  8:30 PM  | Project Parent  I Live Phone-In  | 'Angela Kronihg talks with  ml Little about Project Parent.  this. Community  Television Schedule ;  \    ,  ���Courtesy of; ���* ���*- ---' ^r*  SOUTH COAST FORD  885-3281 ���^^���:  In this program we will see  two classics performed by  Clayton Jevre with direction by  Katie Kern.  The strong European flavour  of their work is no accident, as  both actor and director have extensive training and work experience throughout Europe.  The two pieces they will present  also stand as a tribute of two  European Literary giants.  In the first we find ourselves  being lectured to by Ivan  Nyukhin, a man who has discovered too late that his life has  been lived for others. What  does he intend to do about it?  You'll have to come to the Arts  Centre in Sechelt to find out.  This piece is called 'On the  Harmfulness of Tobacco' and  was written by Chekhov., You'11  be delighted by his humour.  Y"Ne^t^e;'virift^  ���IQieamof���& ltidiC^us^a_r'b^  ; Dostoevsky. A taile that takes  the listener on an intense voyage  that covers the boundries between reality and fantasy.  A showcase of the arts and  discipline of the actor as well as  the appreciation of the riches to  be found in classical literature.  A very fine double bill!  Saturday, January 14, Sunshine  Coast Arts Centre, Sechelt,  A��l  ever-changing exhibits and a  wide variety of styles and  mediums. Last season the  Hunter Gallery held 14 exhibitions, representing over 130 artists and artisans from the area.  The Arts Centre hosted 15  presentations of high quality  programs both in the visual and  performing arts.  A new position was created in  1987 to help co-ordinate and  promote arts events on a more  consistent basis. Carole Rubin  was hired as the arts community  co-ordinator.  Her major organizational  success last summer was the  First Annual  Sunshine Coast  The Arts Council made a  profit of approximately $2000  from the event. Craftspeople,  according to Rubin, are already  expressing an interest in attending this year.  In her covering letter to  Sechelt council, President  Therese Egan pointed out,  "Our contribution to the  cultural life of the community  would not be possible without  the work of over 150 volunteers  and the support of thousands of  people who take part in our  BOBERTS CREEK LEGION  Branch 219  Delay writer deadline  Those writers who planned to  submit manuscripts to the Suncoast Writers' Forge Writing  Contest but found that the  December 31 deadline had come  and gone will be pleased to learn  that you now have until January  16.  Your entry could win cash  prizes as there is a total of $350  in prize money.  Entry forms are still available  at the Coast News office in  Sechelt. Get that piece completed and in the mail right  away.  Fri., Jan. 13  ftll$$ CLARKE  ********* Sat., Jan. 14 **��***���**  ROBBIE MM$   ��  ANNIU-ftSARV  The famous Brian Nicols  and the  STILL WATER BAND  Banjo, Button Accordian & Steel Guitars  DOORS OPEN: - 6 pm  DINNER: - 7 pm TICKETS: - * 1500 per person  OPEN DAILY - 4 pm on  SATURDAYS- 1 pm on  Regular Saturday evening dinners $5.00  \ MEMBERS & GUESTS WELCOME I  Music Fest deadline  is Feb. 1  The deadline for the Sunshine  Coast 1989 Music Festival entries is February 1.  Your completed entry forms  (available from your music  teacher, or Rhona Weir,  886-7361 after 6 p.m.) should be  returned to Rhona Weir, Box  498, Gibsons, with the appropriate fee, postmarked no  later than Wednesday, February  1.  Don't forget to use the new  style entry forms only. The  festival is open to all residents  on the Coast.  @k  FOR THAT SPECIAL  OCCASION  Rent a  VIDEO CAMERA  at  Tri ��� Photo  Teredo Square, Sechelt  885-2882  30% OFF  Selected  Accessories  Scarves  - Jewelry  - Belts  Ask to see our  Cruise Wear  2nd Lock 3mtiqm  Hwy 101, Sechelt 885-3132  rm  ���pw  yjrgf*.  ���"�������.'  J?  m\nt ln~_Hii  Your guide to  the finest in  area dining  A listing of  restaurants  and pubs  loml of  the Cowl  What is there to do on a Saturday in January? It was decided  a drive down the coast to take in the winter scenery would fill the  gap nicely.  Glorious! Sunlight breaking through the haze, lit the snow  covered hill tops and reflected from the trees, newly dusted with  snow, like they had been hung with diamonds.  Cresting a hill we gazed down over a beautiful lake with  quaint looking structures lining its shores. This was the Ruby  Lake Resort and Restaurant. A pair of swans graced the lawn  and the restaurant looked so warm and welcoming we decided to  stop for lunch before heading back. The hostess' greeting from  behind the counter and the wood heater made real the warm  promise of the exterior.  The lunch menu contained clam chowder, homemade soups  and pies, hot and cold sandwiches of every kind, burgers including a mushroom burger that looked mightly tempting, fish  or chicken and chips, a chicken and zucchini basket, and a Chef  Salad.  We ordered the hot roast beef sandwich and the chicken and  chips. The chips were homemade, skin on and delicious. The  roast beef was a mound of tender roast beef swimming in rich,  dark gravy over toast. The chicken was juicy.and golden brown,  and we wondered where they got their chicken because unlike  the supermarket variety^ this tasted like chicken (if memory  serves).  Finally, warm through and through, and satisfied by a hearty  meal in pleasant surroundings, we headed back home.  Average meal prices quoted do not include liquor.  Creek House - Intimate dining and  European cuisine in a sophisticated yet  casual atmosphere. We serve rack of  lamb, duck, crab, clams, scallops, steaks,  also daily specials. Reservations recommended. Roberts Creek Road and Beach  Avenue - 885-9321. Open 6 pm. Closed  Mondays & Tuesdays. V. MC. 40 seats.  The Omega Pizza, Steak And  Lobster House - With a perfect view  of Gibsons marina, and a good time atmosphere,   the   Omega  is   a   people-  : watcher's paradise. Cast members of The  Beachcombers can usually be found dining here. Menu includes pizza, pasta,  steaks and seafood. Steaks and seafood  are their specialties.  Banquet  facilities  available. Very special children's menu.  Average dinner for two: $20. Reservations recommended. Located in Gibsons  Landing   at   1538  Gower   Point   Rd.  886-2268. Open Sun-Thurs, 11:30 am -10  pm, Fri and Sat 11:30 am - 10:30 pm.  Seats 145.  ViCHT ON THE rolVV  Pronto's Restaurants Two locations  to serve you. Both serve an extensive  variety of pizza, steak, pasta, lasagne,  ribs, souvlaki in a delightful family atmosphere. Children's menu available. All  dinner entrees include garlic bread and a  choice of soup or salad. Average family  meal for four about S15-S20. Located at  Wharf Rd., Sechelt, 885-1919; and on  Highway 101, across from Gibsons  Medical Clinic, Gibsons, 886-8138.  FAKittY DINING  Cornerstone Tea House -  Featuring traditional cream tea, by  reservation only, Saturdays 1-4  886-9261.  pm.  Ruby Lake Resort - Lovely view of  lake from Ruby Lake's post and beam  dining room and good highway access for  vehicles of all sizes. Breakfast served all  day. Lunch prices begin at $2.50, dinners  from $5.50 including salad bar. Smorgasbord Sunday nights includes 12 salads,  three hot meat dishes and two desserts,  $10.95 for adults, $5.50 for children  under 12. Tiny tots free. A great family  outing destination. Absolutely superb  prime rib every Friday night. Average  family dinner for four $20-25. Sunshine  Coast Hwy, Pender Harbour -883-2269.  Open 7 days a week, 7 am - 9 pm. 54  seats. V., MC. Breakfast, hinch and dinner.  pl as  Cedar's Inn - Appetizers all day till 11  pm. Darts every Sun. Everyone welcome.  Cedar Plaza, Gibsons -886-8171. Open 11  am - midnight, Sun-Thurs; 11 am -1 am,  Fri-Sat. 100 seats. V., MC. Regular menu  11 am to 8:30 pm.  EAT l\ - JAKE OUT  Chicken Shack - Deep fried chicken,  pizza, hamburgers, salads. All to go.  Cowrie St., Sechelt -885-7414. Video Rentals. Open 11 am - 9 pm, Mon-Thur; 11  am - 10 pm, Fri-Sat; noon - 9 pm, Sun.  Home delivery within 5 miles of store  after 4 p.m.  PAID ADVERTISEMENTS 14.  Coast News, January 9,1989  u  by Penny Fuller  Several years ago the  Chinook Swim Club went into  hibernation. But last fall, head  coach Dan Cross revived the  group.  Next weekend they head out  to Tsawwassen to the Winskill  Dolphins invitational swim  meet.  The club has 70 swimmers  between the ages of six and 17.  Of those, 16 will be participating in this first meet in  four years.  This will establish sanctioned  times for the competitors enabling them to get into higher level  meets.  Cross is enthusiastic about  the level of accomplishment in  the club.  "We can compete right  across Canada, right across  North America," he told the  Coast News in an interview last  week.  DAN CROSS  SWIM CLUB COACH  He also maintains the swim  club is a healthy activity for kids  on all levels. Swim club  members, he said, have their  academic standings go up, their  physical activities benefit and  their self-esteem improves, thus  enhancing their social skills.  6i06i6i6i6i6i<6itd{<i^icifcitJ68Bftit<M6iiB3fci  i^F(^^~i^Ps^^^^^(^^Q^C4  1/2 PRICE SALE  or mores  Reg.  Now  !       PI ace mats  $3.50  $-|75  Oven Mitts  8.99  $450  Terry Teatowels  3.99  $2oo  Wine Glasses  4.99  $-|99  PVC Apron  7.99  $350  Norman Rockwell collectors  Tankards & Plates  $10.39  $520  Mixing Bowls  $15.99  $599  m sPfcCl*1-   Grand Marnier Gourmet Coffee }  irUS  Reg. $9.75 Ib. NOW $6" lb.  Baskets, Ornaments, Candles and  MUCH, MUCH MORE!  1   5714 Cowrie St.  Sechelt  KITCHEN  QnRnlVnL       Sechelt 885-3611  THANKS AGAIN  The Sechelt and District Chamber of Commerce  would like to thank the following for their continued  support of the Schetxen Polar Bear Swim  Mayor Tom Meredith  Peggy Connor  Mr. Peterson  Steve Sleep  Louise Peebles  Vicki Hanson  Louise Caron  Sechelt RCMP  Sechelt Ambulance  Service  Swansons Ready Mix  Mountain FM Radio  Coast News  Ahi Voulgaris  Don Siemens  Eve Siemens  Doug Roy  Rudy Riepe  Dean Butler  Bob Tween  Pacifica Pharmacy  Nova Jewellers  Tyee Air  Photo Works  Home Hardware  Gilligan's Pub  Lighthouse Pub  Marlee Fashions  Cactus Flower  Morgan's Men's Wear  Trail Bay Sports  The Dream Shoppe  J.L. Outfitters  Strings 'n Things  Tri.Photo  Seecoast Living  Upstairs Downstairs  Shoppe  MacLeods  Chief Tom Paul  John Webb  Mr. Hench  Sunday Haslem  Ed Traff  Dawn Cuthbustson  Gerhard Felgenhauer  Coast Guard Auxiliary  Sechelt Elementary  School  The Press  Lauralee Solli  Cliff Garrett  Vic Walters  Helene De Leeuw  John Williams  Talewind Books  Stedmans  Tony's Locks  Orca Brewery  Appa Sea Food  Davis Bay NQw & Used  Wilson Creek Campsite  Store  Scantech Resources  Casa Martinez  Bella Beach Motel  Homestead  Colleen Heigh  Peninsula Market  Protech  Bobbi's Shoes  Mall Association  Pharmasave  Gibsons Building  Supplies  (Sechelt & Gibsons)  Coast Cable Vision  "Swimming looks like one of  the most awesome sports there  is," he said. "No one else can  do it for you. You have to do it  yourself."  On a purely physical basis,  the swimming strengthens the  heart and the vascular system,  improves upper body develop:-  ment and builds stamina. As  well, it increases the oxygen  flow to the brain.  The coach also pointed out  that a great deal of mental  preparation goes into competitive swimming.  The club appears to be a great  success, but Cross, who  volunteers his time to coach the  club, says he can't take the  credit for the success. The club  executive, he said, has been extremely supportive.  There's Jergen Kowalewski,  Brad Hunt, Anne Miller, Katherine McGuinness, Caroline  Cross and Linda Hodge.  "It's due to those people and  the hard work of the children  that makes me^look good," he  said.  He was also full of praise for  the staff at the swimming pool.  "Wendy Gilbertson and the  staff here have been great. It's  all their co-operation that has  made it possible for us to get to  this level so fast."  Men's  League  by Mark Benson  Third place Roberts Creek  defeated fourth place B&D  Kings 4-1 in Men's Hockey  League play. The win was.  thanks to superb goal-tending  by Creek's Mike Marleau.  Pairs of goals were scored byt  Creek's Bernie Ber^s and Steve  Marsh. A late powerplay goal  by Kings' Pete Hautala spoiled  the shut-out bid.  The Sunshine Coast Men's  Hockey League was saddened  by the passing last week of Dennis   Donaldson.   Derihy,  who^  played   centre   for   Roberts-*  Creek, will be dearly missed.  Second place, Hawks defeated  ���i fifth.,.jplacey. Buccaneers (. ��2.  Hawks'  scorer's  were  Adrian  Dixon, Darren Dixon, Ian Dixon  and  Wade  Fisher. Chris ���  Strong notched a pair of goals   ���  for the Buccaneers.  Undefeated Wakefield  knocked over the Creek 6-1.  Dave Crosby. (2), Jim Brackett,  Bill Stockwell, Darren Kohuch  and Ted Brackett scored for  Wakefield. Rick Sach got the y  Creeks only goal.  LAST WEEK'S SCORES  Wednesday - Creek 4, Kings  1; Thursday - Hawks 4, Buccaneers 2; Friday - Wakefield  19, Gilligans 1; Saturday  -Wakefield 6, Creek 1; Hawks .,-���  10, Kings 3.  NEXT WEEK'S GAMES  Wednesday, 8:30, Buccaneers  vs Kings; Thursday, 8:30,  Gilligans vs Creek; Friday, 6:45,  Hawks vs Wakefield.  LEAGUE STANDINGS  WLT P  Wakefield 16 0 1 33  Hawks 10 2 2 20  Creek 6 9 2 14  Kings 5 8 111  Buccaneers 4 8 19  Gilligans 1 13 13  ~A NEW YEARTH   A NEW LOCATION!  After over one year of serving the financial planning and investment needs of the residents of the Sechelt  peninsula, 1 am pleased to announce the opening of a centrally located office in downtown Sechelt.  "A PERMANENT OFFICE  ON THE SECHELT PENINSULA"  Why? We believe that important financial planning decisions can only be made on a one-to-one basis,  after careful consideration of ones' current financial situation and future goals.  We also believe people need time to become comfortable with net^ information without pressure.  Finally, we believe, you slxould expect continued service of the highest quality, and get to know the  people who advise you on money matters.  "THINKING ABOUT SAVINGS AND IN VESTMENTS?"  ...consider the following...  Great Pacific Management is an established firm in the financial planning industry. Throughout the  past 23 years we have helped thousands of British Columbians, like yourself, attain their financial  objectives.  Our firm provides you with access to all financial planning areas including:  RETIREMENT PLANNING (RRSP's, RRIF's, etc.), TAX PLANNING, EDUCATION SAVINGS (RESP's etc.) and LIFE and HEALTH INSURANCE.  In addition, for CORPORATIONS and SMALL BUSINESSES we provide many  types of GROUP BENEFIT PLANS and INSURANCE services.  1 invite you to call our office and find out more about our many services. There is no fee or obligation on  your part for a preliminary consultation.  Yours sincerely,  P.S. - Upcoming Seminar  "Options for Self-Directed  RRSP's"'-call for details  (6Q4)B85-2272  Alasddir W. Irvine  GREAT PACIFIC MANAGEMENT Co. Ltd.  Midcoast Professional Building  5674 Teredo St., P.O. Box 2629  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  '87 HONDA  PRELUDE  Auto., Air., Roof,  Cassette Etc.  SAU*15,995  '88 SPRINT  4 Dr., 5 Speed  Cassette, 11 Km  SALE  s8495  '87 SPECTRUM  4 Dr., 5 Speed  Cassette, Clean  SALE  $8495  '87 TRACER  4 Dr., 5 Speed  Cassette, 20 km  m  m  P  &  SALE  $8495  '88 CHEV Vs  6 Cyl., 5 Speed,  Cassette   y    ^      *��  8 Ft. Box, Visor  sale*! 2,495  m  i  '86 CHEV 4X4  3A Ton Diesel  Loaded, 80 km  cu'13,496  '86 VANTASY  Astro,  Loaded, 7 Pass.  Only 20 km  S4iY19,995  '86 ASTRO  8 Passenger, Vj|:  Auto., Stereo  s���lY1 6,495  1985 SKODA -4 DOOR  1983 FIREBIRD -T ROOFS  1982 PONTIAC SUNBIRD  1981 LYNX STATION WAGON  1981CHEVETTE-4 DOor  1980 EAGLE 4X4 - s/w  ?-%T- ^���^'-'������'^���^J-'^-J  *^ rfjV./.v^W^^:XiT>T:?> H^^ Wi'i;;-'.--^*.'^:  ;^y  -^.*��n��&j-*',r'*"'> V^'-"^ ���-tn**.-****"'-*  .-'^"^���t-' V r ���*.,'  Coast News, January 9,1989  15.  Into the icy waters of Georgia Strait plunged 29  at the 1989 annual Schetxwen Polar Bear Swim  j(  intrepid Sunshine Coasters     piped the participants to the beach, but sensibly stayed on shore with the  on January 1. John Webb     other amazed observers. coHagebyVemEiiiott     ���penny Fuller photos  '.. ,���-', : A.������������������ ,-s     i(       '   y.y Y-.������:'' Y.._ .,-. ',...,;<-.        i '-���tf-iwrt-c::: ������;��� "V in->:���.'<-.j Y, ;>��� ��� ��� yy Jsyyy:. Y": i  -       ^ .  With Toyo  All Season  Raaials***  Winter  kY��  ' -T.'j  S>\   >���*��. ��^    J-VWY  ^  VIKING RAINGEAR  Reg. $34.99 /   / ���'"���.;  ^li��^'^^^-  it might as well  be Spring  The inconvenience of winter tire  changeover is gone forever with Toyo  800 Premium All Season Steel Belted  Radials.  Toyo's quiet, road-gripping  performance makes the 800 All Season  Radial a real winner in every kind of  weather, all year'round.  In fact, rigid industry testing has given  the Toyo 800 the best performance rating  in snow, in long tread life, and in low  noise levels.  Now that's a premium performance tire!  And with the Toyo 800 All Season, you get both performance and  protection. The protection of Toyo's 100,000 km Wear Out Warranty  (W.O.W.), exclusive to the 800, PLUS Toyo's standard comprehensive  3-year Road Hazard Warranty. You get protection, PLUS!  You'll find that rare combination of unbeatable performance and  protection in a Premium All Season Radial at your Toyo dealer. Install  a set of Toyo 800s today, and enjoy spring all year long. >-���-.,  Tovotmes  driven to Perform  DIC^'H'rSTdR.ES  Corner of Wharf & Dolphin Sfs. 885-3155  ' -oa-  Vilon Pants & Jacket?  Neoprene ^O*  PVC  v v  _��� >  '* _R_____Mfc __M_l____k__F_U_L __hH_l__^___n>  * $?" ���- * +��*_ y'   * ' ?    **_    ,,��*,'      -  *  OFF        "��"  All Steel Toe WORK BOOTS    AK  $50.00 and up /U\  V.-.3*  __il  Men's & Ladies'  SWEATERS  Reg. $19.99  NOW  $1299  ��*""���  i hi i ii    mi       'i   lyi'1"*:  J,  iiijiiui  uijiiii  -* ^\\'vT v~* x\ \      v v \^.   *****   H ^  ���*-��*  v-Y    *> ,  {.. y^.Yx *j  Yy  &\  re   .v.*.* *xtt  Jewellry  30%off  Men's  COTTON PANTS  Reg. S29.99 NOW  $1999  LADIES'VeStS    ; .  Reg. $54.99 Y  $3999  CALVIN KLEIN    $ -| Q99  y   Jeans       ��� ~7  NOW  LADIES  Cords  $-|999  Duray  INSULATED SOCKS  Reg. $4.99 JNfOW  SECONDS  JEANS  ���e-WDRKWEN?  SU% WORLD =��  w %' lq��ally owned a operated  El  (c  IB  t *  j  1  it  I  GIBSONSSTQRE  ���.\.i,aort,::'i">ryynHi.v.4.o,Jb .:������'  ���QP-'E-IS Mon-Saiyy^rlO-^iO  ���suNOA'vsi;.v:i-.-'4-..-:  SECHELT STORE  OPEN Moh-Sat,5:i0->:30  m^mmmmmmSi Li   i f  > 16.  AY  Coast News, January 9,1989  !  V.  !y  �����������  if. ��� ��� *  I  f   �����  Introducing B.C!s  comprehensive $137  million alcohol and drug program.  Alcohol and drug abuse is a serious problem in British Columbia.  And it's getting worse.  Ignoring the problem won't make  it go away Thats why it's up to all  of us to do what we can to help.  For our own part, the government  is already accelerating its efforts to  deal with the abuse problem at every  level. With our enhanced three year  program, we're providing new and  expanded treatment facilities, money  for funding, province-wide awareness and prevention programs, as  wellas community action grants to  deal with the problem at a local level.  $29 million to help stop  problems before they start.  Over the next three years you'll  see a major Health Care Curriculum  Support initiative, a special educational effort in all our primary  schools and a carefully-targeted  awareness campaign with a toll-free  Information and Help Line.  $5.4 million for community  action.  To help communities deal with  the abuse problem on a local  level, our new B.C. Community  Action Program provides funding for qualified non-profit community groups  wanting to take action.  $96 million for treatment  and care.  To help individuals with alcohol  and drug problems get effective treatment and care, a comprehensive  network of treatment services and  facilities is now in place throughout  the province.  Expanded residential treatment  centres, improved outpatient service,  detoxification facilities and supportive recovery homes are now more  accessible than ever.  $6.4 million to find new  solutions to age-old problems.  A better understanding of substance abuse can also lead to better  solutions. So we're setting aside  funds to examine the effectiveness of  specific prevention and treatment  techniques, monitor trends in the  province and evaluate how our programs are working.  Obviously, we can't solve the  problems of alcohol and drug abuse  overnight. And we realize these  efforts are just a start. But certainly  ^J  we can make the difference,  ^   all of us, if we're willing to try  Alcohol and Drug Programs  Ministry of Labour and Consumer Services  The Honourable Lyail Hanson, Minister  ;_SSIS23>!r��it  .*. J, ; 11 i��V *,/*, .HT��l >���_,.�������..���  _^_i_._*. ����.l>X,.tt<*ii*fc;  Ls_i\-_i._:x_*  ZZSlXCijtiXSLtfSti^^ -*- ^rAW'i^-***  Coast News, January 9,1989  17.  " *v  '2.  S.;  . *.  ���'������*.  '���-.:�����-  ��f*  .-*��.  ���'���4.'  ���*'$."  'feMccMurtaat   "'  fhmk.HtM     -  frnvotuA _  'knmvamtimmu-:  W��Mfc*��V '  tog*/'  y_-Mn_iril  G*r*g�� $*)*r.' -  17.  : tfi,  t*.  22.  *i:  "'H..  ���if*  'Afc.  QuttfMfe'  ����*_�� �� Y  4tottte��toMtr   ,  ****** ', Y<-~:  Mta__'vir��_A-_ ���"  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  Classifieds  at any of our convenient  Friendly People  Places  I���IN PENDER HARBOUR-  I       Marina Pharmacy 883-2888  I     AC Building Supplies 883-9551  I���IN HALFMOON BAY���  I B & J Store 885-9435  L- -IN SECHELT   The Coast News  (Cowrie Street) 885-3930  ��� IN DAVIS BAY���  Peninsula Market 885-9721  IN WILSON CREEK-  Wilson Creek Campground 885-5937  ���IN ROBERTS CREEK���  Seaview Market 885-3400   IN GIBSONS   B&D Sports  (SunnycresrMall) 886-4635     ; _,  The Coast News  (behind Dockside Pharmacy) 886-2622  DEADLINE IS NOON SATURDAY  FOR MONDAY PUBLICATION  60x250' West Sechelt waterfront  lot, 2 cleared building sites with  driveway. New steps and trails  down park-like hillside to rock  bull-dozed beach. Have septic  permit, house plans, spectacular  view, outstanding beach areas.  885-7629. #4s  Waterfront lot Gower Pt. Rd.,  asking $64,900. 886-9485 or  526-4061. #5s  Approx. 800 sq. ft. home,  workshop, woodshed, nearly V2  acre lot, Mason & Norwest Bay  Rd., Sechelt, $49,500.  885-3982. #2s  OPEN HOUSE  Sat. 2 to 4  1321 Judith Road  Well maintained  3 bdrm. rancher  s79,000  Lindsay Beynon  886-2277  LOG HOME  Approx. 1700 sq.ft. fir structure,  28x40 with 28x16 loft. Ready to  be moved and assembled on your  lot, top quality log work, great  price, absolutely no viewing'  without appointment. 885-2839.  *2s  1 bdrm. newer cabin, approx.. %  acre, 1 block to Rbts. Ck. School,  $57,900. 885-5280, 885-3127  courtesy to agents. #3s  Newer log, 1800 sq. ft. 4 bdrm.  and guest house, view,  Redrooffs, $77,500. 885-7143.  #2s  OPEN^  SUN. 15, 1-4  #2-815 North Road  Brand new one level  townhouse, designed  for seniors.  .2 bdrm., 1060 sq. ft., carport,  &_ RV parking,, private.yard,  patio.  Jordan Duncan, is happy to announce the arrival of his brother  Corey, born December 4, 1988.  Parents Brian and Darlene would  like to thank Dr. Petzold and first  floor staff for his safe arrival.  Special thank you to 'coach  Michelle and Jo-Anne. Congratulations to grandparents Jim  and Joan; Uncle Rick and Aunti  Ann. #2  Tim and Jill Diebel are proud to  announce the birth of their  beautiful daughter, Ayla Grace  born at Burnaby Hospital on  December 30,1988 at 12:54 am  weighing 8 lbs., 7 ozs. Happy  grandparents, are Alex and Ann  Diebel of Burnaby and Dave and  Janet Flumerfelt of Roberts  Creek.  WEAL: Passed away December  31,1988, Albert Henry Weal, late  of Roberts Creek, in his 90th  year. Predeceased by a son  George. Survived by his loving  wife, Mary; Albert and Bea;  Donald; Margaret and Lome;  Doris; Mary-Lou and Norm; Ann  and Jim; 11 grandchildren and  two great-granddaughters. Service was held Friday, January 6  in the chapel of Devlin Funeral  Home, Gibsons, Reverend N.J.  Godkin officiated. Cremation.  Remembrance donations may be  made to the Cancer Clinic.  #2  LISA KELLER  MONTREAL  TRUST  946-0887  278-8181  Fred and Cheryl Bott are  delighted to announce the birth of  their daughter, Kathlynn Tianna  Marie, at Grace Hospital on  December 3, 1988 weighing 7  lbs., 4 ozs. Katie is a little sister  for Daniel and Sarah. Heartfelt  thanks to Dr. Pendelton for his  support and caring and to Daddy  who was a super coach. Proud  grandparents are Peter and Joan  Wright of Tsawassen and Art and  Myrtle. Bott of Rocky Mountain  House. Alberta. #2  Thank You  3  Black wool sweater, Sechelt,  Jan. 5. 885-3244. #2  Gold rim glasses in shopping  mall, Dec. 17 can be left at Coast  News office, Gibsons. #2  Entertainment Agency  Music to your tastes.  885-5556  Thank you to relatives and friends  on Quadra Island, Mayne Island,  Victoria, Alnwick, Ashington;  England, Seattle, Burnaby, Sunshine Coast for gifts and cards  etc. Thanks again, B.W..Brum-  mell. #2  Many thanks to all the people  who walked through and enjoyed  the lights. Thank you also for the  contributions of $1404. Thanks  to the firemen for all the work  they did to make it possible.  Alberts Mary Weal #2  "J111 1    'It, '���'��"��,�����  c  10,  found  #3  Chow   small  885-3948.  male,  brown.  #2  Young tabby cat, white collar,  found on Leek Rd. 886-3403.  #2  C  II-  fets  &. livestock  Bill & Karen Phillips are the friendly faces at Wilson  Creek Compground, a Friendly People Place where  they'll help you fill out your classifieds.  House and 10 acres, workshop  and outbuildings, fish pond,  80x40 stocked, year round  creek, $65,000. Write R. Cam-  posano. Box 1278, Gibsons.  #3  View plus executive style 1600 ft.  rancher and full daylight basement, dbl. gar., Lot 81 Wood-,  creek.   K.W.   Contracting  886-4994. #4s  ANDERSON REALTY  The Sunshine Coast  Specialists for  ��� Recreation  ��� Retirement  ��� Relocation  FREE CATALOGUE  Teredo Square, Sechelt  885-3211  Van. Toll Free 664-6016  ot^  n&s>.  The LOWEST  lassified Ad Rates!  $400  lhe **5ld������  MAJt  <��To���\\*'-  (minimum) for 10 words  25     *or eac^ additional word  w  Pay for 2 weeks, Cet the 3rd week FREE  When paid by CASH, CHEQUE  or MONEY ORDER  Sute Se����"c_AssiFiEDs  They run until your item is sold!  I J       for up to 10 words     I        per additional  word  Your ad, featuring one item only, will run for four consecutive  weeks and will then be cancelled unless you instruct us to renew it  for  another  four,   by  Saturday,   3   pm.  NO CHARGE FOR RENEWAL for as long as you want!  (No! available (o commercial advertisers)  ALL CLASSIFIED ADS must be PRE-PAID before insertion.  For your convenience, use your MASTERCARD or VISA!  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE  At "Friendly People Places" Saturday NOON  At COAST NEWS Offices,  Sechelt & Gibsons      SATURDAY, 3 pm  COAST NEWS Classifieds  Jaeck: Ralph, January 11, 1987  We who loved you  Sadly miss you  As it dawns another year.  In our lonely hours  Of thinking  Thoughts of you are  Ever near.  ) Love Kay & Brock  #2  Florence (Flo) Robertson     >  Passed away January 10, 1988  When we are sad and lonely  And everything goes wrong  We seem to hear you whisper  "Cheer up and carry on"  A heart of gold stopped beating  Hard working hands at rest  God broke our hearts to prove  To us he only takes the best.  The leaves and flowers may  whither  The golden sun may set  But the hearts that loved so  dearly  Are the ones who won't forget  So each time we see your photo  You seem to smile and say  "Don't cry, I'm only sleeping.  We'll meet again some day."  Sadly missed by husband Alex,  family and friends. #2  For Dennis  There are things a storm cannot  bring down  1 Memories we keep for our own  love to keep us holding on,  until we meet again.  Memory smiles and will not let go  It follows you safely home  and like friendship, it grows,  the further it has to go.  We remember you the way you  were,,  good natured, witty, cheerful,  these truths wipe away our tears  overcome our winter fears.  And we'll smile again each time  we meet,  like old friends,  on yesterdays' street.  Are you in an unhappy relationship? Call the Transition House  for free confidential counselling.  885-2944. TFN  INDIVIDUAL THERAPY  COUPLES COUNSELLING  Call Eleanor Mae 885-9018  #4  li  AftfM|tillCf��ll��ftt$  MAGUS KENNELS  ��� Bright clean dog  & cat boarding  ��� Dog grooming  Lowest Prices On  "SCIENCE DIET'  OPEN 8 am ��� 6:30  everyday. 886-8568  Wanted  Guitar  player/singer,   male  or  female for small 50's/60's R&R  band. Only serious persons need  apply. 886-3199 aft. 6pm.     #4  Wanted - male singers of all ages  (min. 15) and young female  singers (min. 15) to expand  coastal choir for Broadway  musical productions and classical  concerts under leadership of Lyn  Vernon. 886-8026. #3  CB radio, $50; 100' radio phrine,  $50; receiver & speakers, $275;  TV stand, $100. 886-7819.   jP2s  Kenmore electric automatic  range, $250.885-2820.       |#2  Eskimo Eastern Arctic soapstpne  carvings & prints, various sizes &  prices, IVz' Polar bear rug, full  head. $2900. 885-2820.       f#2  Humidifier, typewriter, m$tal  desk, three lawn mowejrs,  torotiller, 20" F.G. sailbdat,  motor & trailer, rowing machijie,  oak easel, 78 Bonaire H T.  trailer; darkroom equipment, njir-  sing rocker, mens Apollo bicyc le,  folding bike, birdcage.  886-8504. fl  O pm  568|  SCIENCE DIET & IAMS  Pet Food  Quality Farm & Garden  Supply Ltd.  Pratt Rd. 886-7527  X-country skis & poles for 5 year  old. 886-3288. TFNs  HELP! Urgently Needed! Daily  ride from Roberts . Creek to  Sechelt. Will pay expenses.  Kasandra 885-7866 eves.  885-5881 days. #2  waffle iron.  #2  Teflon toastmaster  886-7505.  THE WOODMAN  Fir & hemlock mix, full coVd  guaranteed, cut to lengyi,  $75/cord. 886-3779.   '       ��� JE4  3 pc. Q-Anne LR suite, play peK  jolly jumper, crib toys, 18" Ii  Graco stroller,  car seat,  mi  trampoline. 886-4711.  'Northern' steel fireplace linejr,  $250 OBO. 885-2182.      "     #3  TFN  NOTICE  Gibsons  Marina  During Jan. & Feb. '89  Service in the store will  be restricted to specific  needs in marine & fishing & supplies; electronics; Mustang floater  coats & suits, etc.  PROPANE HOURS  Auto & bottle propane hours  will be reduced.  caii 886-8686  for information  15.3 H.H. T.B. mare, English-  Western, jumps, needs experienced rider, some tack included, $850 OBO. 883-9383.  #4s'  SPCA SPAYING PROGRAM  886-7837, 886-8044, 885-9582.  TFN  Sharon's Grooming  Now at Sunshine Feeds  ���    886-4812  TFN  Student would like ride to Cap  College (or nearby 2nd Narrows  bridge) Mon. and Wed. from 8:30  ferry (back on 5:30 ferry). Will  pay 886-9130 or 886-2426.  -    #2  18-21' motorboat, good cond.,  fresh water cooled engine.  885-5363. #4  Weight set and bench w/leg extension, call Lily 886-4965.  #4  Fresh goats milk and bean bag  chair. Judith 885-3692. #4  CA$n_ftOCK  B     KENNELS  Highway 101,  Roberts Creek  885-9840  ^^^^^^^m  Boarding & Grooming  No anini.ils will be accepted without  current vaccination records.  Cowrie St., Sechelt  885-3930  The LOWEST Price!  The HIGHEST Circulation!  The FIRST on the street!  Cruice Lane. Gibsons  886-2622  DONALDSON: Passed away suddenly on January 2, 1989, Constable Dennis Brian Donaldson,  late of Gibsons, age 27 years.  Survived by his fiance, Tracey  Hanson; parents, Melvin and  Claire of Edmonton; two sisters,  Annette Dawson, of Fort McMurray, Theresa Balding, of  Camrose, Alberta; five neices and  nephews; numerous aunts,  uncles and cousins. Funeral service was held Friday, January 6,  1989 at St. Mary's Seaview  Cemetery. Devlin Funeral Home,  directors. Remembrance donations may be made to the Bruce  Denniston Bone Marrow Society,  7095A Duncan St., Poweli River,  B.C.V8A1W1. #2  HUTTON: Passed away January  6, 1989. Roy Hutton. late of  Sechelt, age 84 years. Survived  by his son Ken, of Courtenay.  Funeral service Monday, January  9 at 1 pm in the chapel of Devlin  Funeral Home, Gibsons, Reverend Stan Sears officiating.  Cremation to follow. #2  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS  885-2896, 886-7272, 886-2954.  TFN  If someone in your family has a  drinking problem you can see  what it's doing to them. Can you  see what it's doing to you? Al-  Anon can help. Phone 886-9903  or 886-8656.  Attention Teens  Al-Ateen   Can   Help.   Phone  886-2565. TFN  WHALE  PRINTS  POSTERS  Sunshine Coast  Scenic Photos ��� Cards  1989 CALENDARS  $795  Eagles & Whales  GALLERY      886-8341  Beside Dockside Pharmacy. Gibson:  Phone us today about our beautiful selection of personalized wedding invitations, napkins, matches, stationery, and more.  Jeannie's Gifts & Gems  886-2023  TFN  Are you interested in joining an  informal group for meditation,  healing, channelling, lectures,  etc. at Rockwood Lodge on Sunday evenings at 7:30 pm. First  meeting January 8, donation.  885-2103,885-3535. #2  SUNSHINE FEEDS  670 INDUSTRIAL WAY  CO-OP FEEDS  PET FOODS  & ACCESSORIES  9:30 to 5:30  886-4812  Free - 1 armchair. 886-2676.  #2  Registered Tenn. Walker to good  home only. 883-2367 or  883-2855. #4  TFN  Free to loving home, Peter, 2 yr.  old Terrier Elkhound X, loves  people. 885-7326. ' #2  P.B. Black Lab, 11 mos. old free  to good home. 886-8962 aft.  6pm. #2  Young parrot complete with cage  & food. $375. 883-2321.        #2  MOLDOWAN FEEDS open in  Rbts. Ck. only, closed in Gibsons. 885-5697. #7  SPCA ADOPTION  Gentle 9 mo. old spayed female  Doberman X; Maltipoo X Lab male  pup, 9 wks. old; variety cats and  kittens. 885-5734. #2  For sale, 2 female goats, $60  pair. 886-3123 or 886-3748  mess. #2  l  t  McClary Easy white stove, 30'{.  recond., $249 OBO; Viking 24}'  h. gold stove, auto, nearly like  new,   $279;   Westinghouse  n.  gold 30" stove, self clean overj,  $387; Kenmore heavy duty hi  gold 4 cycle 2 sp. washer, r_-  cond., $349; Westinghouse auto  dry white dryer, recond., very  nice, $247 OBO; Westinghousi  washer,   2   dryer   stacke  recond.,  very nice,  set $66  OBO;   Coldspot   white  recond  fridge, 15 cu. ft. frost free, $38!  OBO. Appliances guaranteed fror  90 days to 2 yrs. parts an  labour.   Corner   Cupboa  885-4434  or Bjorn  885-7897  Will buy non-working or used ap  pliances. 885-7897. #J  ana  w\  I  Plexiglas  Fibreglas Supplies  = F0AM =  s  �� Camping Pads  S"   ��� Mattresses, etc.  I W.W. UPHOLSTERY &  2      BOAT TOPS LTD  5  637 Wyngaert Rd.  Gibsons      - 886-7310  Two  OBO.  bucket van  886-3124.  seats,  $100  #2  '80 GM, no rust or dents, 350  auto., PS/PB, TW, DT, buckets,  PW, D. EX4. 885-4593.        #5s  Stihl metal or concrete cutting  saw, model T5350., 885-4593.  #5s  25' Reinell 188 Merc, 1 owner,  private dock, outer waters, Dec.  89 F.W.C. 885-4593. #5s  RCA Cobrtrak  new,   trade  886-2942.  20"  for  TV, brand  firewood.  #5s  ANNOUNCEMENT  Available for residential plumbing,   15   years   experience.  885-4796. #2  _     __     __  10-20% off listed prices  Then and Now Furniture  699 Highway 101  886-4716. #3  Gil Musgroye's retirement party,  $S; Fri. 13th at the legion.  #2  I  PIANO  TUNING  repairs ik appraisals  Ken Dalgleish  886.2843  IS,  for Sale  Lg. orange/red acorn fireplace,  asking $200.886-9017.        #4  Love seat and 2 easy chairs, good  cond. 886-8602. #3  HAY FOR SALE  $3.50 can deliver. 885-9357  TFN  Serger, 4 thread, 1 yr. old, $575  OBO. Kathryn 886-4547.       #2s  15 gal. aquarium, fully equipped,  fish, growlight. plants.  886-7819. #2s  To earn extra money, professional, portable, steam carpet  machine, $400. 886-7895.   #4s  Antique marble  stand, excellent  886-7696.  topped  shape,  wash  $450.  #5s  PASSIVE EXERCISER  For Firming and Toning  ��� Siend8rtone  ��� Body Designer  ��� Japansse Body Sauna  ��� Nail Extensions  atSuparshaps  Phone lor your appt. today  885-2818  Fostex 260 tape deck; Roland  drum machine; Yamaha  SPX-90-11 effects processor,  $2500 OBO. 886-8356. #4  Wanted - All persons interested in  forming an executive for a  musical association whose objective is to establish a permanent  choir and orchestra on the Sunshine Coast. Please mset with  Lyn Vernon on Jan. 23 at 8 pm at  St. Aidans Anglican Church Hall,  North Rd. and Hwy. 101, Gibsons. As well as musically  oriented people we would  welcome' those who have administrative or organizational  skills, but do not want to be on  stage. For information phone Glyn  Hethey at 886-7992 or Marilyn  Ranniger at 886-2323. #3  Thomas 2 keyboard electric  organ, excellent cond., $550.  Save and fly coupons 886-7943  aft. 3pm. #4  Dining room suite, antique, oak,  bow front buffet with mirror and  48" round oak claw foot table!  22" leaf, 4 spindle-back chairs,  $1700.886-7696.   _ #5s  Speed Queen auto, washer,  $295. Guaranteed & delivered.  883-2648. TFN  T & S SOIL  Mushroom Manure  Topsoil Mixed  Bark Mulch  By the yard or 14 yard diesel  dumptruck-full. Top quality products at reasonable prices. You  pickup  or we deliver.  Phone  anytime 885-5669. TFN  Billiard table. Briarwood IV by  Brunswick Sears, complete,  $500,886-9115. #2s  Wood stove, CSA approved,  heats large house, $650 OBO.  885-5461. #4s.  Almost new 20" RCA color trace  fV, great picture, $325.  886-7819. #2s  Stereo, receiver, rec player,  cassette & Altec speakers (cas. &  recs inc.), stand. $975.  886-7819. #2s  40" Moffat stove, $30; swivel TV  stand, $10; table saw, $30.  886-2676. #2  Horse Manure  $20 per pickup load, Rbts! Ck.  885-9969 #4  Sale sports equip, downhill ski  boots, exc. cond., Nifty Thriftys.  #2  Coppertone fridge & stove,  $100/pr.; 24 cu. ft. chest  freezer, $150,886-4624.    ,  #2  'Free  range'  885-9357.  chickens,  $1.50  TFN  DESPERATION  SALE  Take advantage of us!.  (we're slow in Jan.)  & hall' $39.95  (limited number of  jobs only)  SUNSHINE CARPET CARE  885-2373  V I >ry TiTWgTWSyawri<w^>  ;i   ' ;  16.  U -  i  I  v:  i  Coast News, January 9,1989  Introducing B.C!s  comprehensive $137  million alcohol and drug program.  Alcohol and drug abuse is a serious problem in British Columbia.  And it's getting worse.  Ignoring the problem won't make  it go away That's why it's up to all  of us to do what we can to help.  For our own part, the government  is already accelerating its efforts to  deal with the abuse problem at every  level. With our enhanced three year  program, we're providing hew and  expanded treatment facilities, money  for funding, province-wide awareness and prevention programs, as  wellas community action grants to  deal with the problem at a local level.  $29 million to help stop  problems before they start.  Over the next three years you'll  see a major Health Care Curriculum  Support initiative, a special educational effort in all our primary  schools and a carefully-targeted  awareness campaign with a toll-free  Information and Help Line.  $5.4 million for community  action.  To help communities deal with  the abuse problem on a local  level, our new B.C. Community  abuse.  Action Program provides funding for qualified non-profit community groups  wanting to take action.  $96 million for treatment  and care.  To help individuals with alcohol  and drug problems get effective treatment and care, a comprehensive  network of treatment services and  facilities is now in place throughout  the province.  Expanded residential treatment  centres, improved outpatient service,  detoxification facilities and supportive recovery homes are now more  accessible than ever.  $6.4 million to find new  solutions to age-old problems.  A better understanding of substance abuse can also lead to better  solutions. So we're setting aside  funds to examine the effectiveness of  specific prevention and treatment  techniques, monitor trends in the  province and evaluate how our programs are working.  Obviously we can't solve the  problems of alcohol and drug abuse  overnight. And we realize these  efforts are just a start. But certainly  ^  we can make the difference,  ^   all of us, if we're willing to try  Alcohol and Drug Programs  Ministry of Labour and Consumer Services  The Honourable Lyall Hanson, Minister  ^vg&'tiM^x'i i.i/i  ��S^^^2^f!*^*^^��^^^J^?fe_^_��^  !*_&*r_fe?^!5***:&ff  ^fe4yjjf''trj_^^^  *&ur^^&***^ Drop off your  COAST NEWS  Classifieds  at any of our convenient  Friendly People  Places  -IN PENDER HARBOUR-  Marina Pharmacy 883-2888  AC Building Supplies 883-9551  ���IN HALFMOON BAY���  B & J Store 885-9435   -IN SECHELT ���  The Coast News  (Cowrie Street) 885-3930   IN DAVIS BAY���  Peninsula Market 885-9721  ��� IN WILSON CREEK���  Wilson Creek Campground 885-5937  ���IN ROBERTS CREEK���  Seaview Market 885-3400   -IN GIBSONS���   B&D Sports  (Sunnycresilvjall) ,886;4635 ���'.;_,  The Coast News  (behind Dockside Pharmacy) 886-2622  DEADLINE IS NOON SATURDAY  FOR MONDAY PUBLICATION  Waterfront lot Gower Pt. Rd.,  asking $64,900. 886-9485 or  526-4061. #5s  Approx. 800 sq. ft. home,  workshop, woodshed, nearly Vz  acre lot, Mason & Norwest Bay  Rd., Sechelt, $49,500.  885-3982. #2s  OPEN HOUSE  Sat. 2 to 4  1321 Judith Road  Well maintained  3 bdrm. rancher  s79,000  Lindsay Beynon  A 886-2277 ,  LOG HOME  Approx. 1700 sq.ft. fir structure,  28x40 with 28x16 loft. Ready to  be moved and assembled on your  lot, top quality log work, great  price, absolutely no viewing"  without appointment. 885-2839.  #2s  1 bdrm. newer cabin, approx.. %  acre, 1 block to Rbts. Ck. School,  $57,900. 885-5280, 885-3127  courtesy to agents. #3s  Newer log, 1800 sq. ft. 4 bdrm.  and guest house, view,  Redrooffs, $77,500. 885-7143.  #2s  OPEN^  SUN. 15, 1-4  #2-815 North Road  Brand new one level  townhouse, designed  for seniors.  .2 bdrm., 1060 sq.ft., carport  & RV parking,, private.yard,  patio.  LISA KELLER  MONTREAL  TRUST  946-0887  278-8181  Jordan Duncan, is happy to announce the arrival of his brother  Corey, born December 4, 1988.  Parents Brian and Darlene would  like to thank Dr. Petzold and first  floor staff for his safe arrival.  Special thank you to 'coach  Michelle and Jo-Anne. Congratulations to grandparents Jim  and. Joan; Uncle Rick and Aunti  Ann. #2  Tim and Jill Diebel are proud to  announce the birth of their  beautiful daughter, Ayla Grace  born at Burnaby Hospital on  December 30, 1988 at 12:54 am  weighing 8 lbs., 7 ozs. Happy  grandparents, are Alex and Ann  Diebel of Burnaby and Dave and  Janet Flumerfelt of Roberts,  Creek.  WEAL: Passed away December  31,1988, Albert Henry Weal, late  of Roberts Creek, in his 90th  year. Predeceased by a son  George. Survived by his loving  wife, Mary; Albert and Bea;  Donald; Margaret and Lome;  Doris; Mary-Lou and Norm; Ann  and Jim; 11 grandchildren and  two great-granddaughters. Service was held Friday, January 6  in the chapel of Devlin Funeral  Home, Gibsons, Reverend N.J.  Godkin officiated. Cremation.  Remembrance donations may be  made to the Cancer Clinic.  #2  t  Thank You  Fred and Cheryl Bott are  delighted to announce the birth of  their daughter, Kathlynn Tianna  Marie, at Grace Hospital on  December 3, 1988 weighing 7  lbs., 4 ozs. Katie is a little sister  for Daniel and Sarah. Heartfelt  thanks to Dr. Pendelton for his  support and caring and to Daddy  who was a super coach. Proud  grandparents are Peter and Joan  Wright of Tsawassen and Art and  Myrtle.Bott of Rocky Mountain  House, Alberta. #2  Bill & Karen Phillips are the friendly faces at Wilson  Creek Compground, a Friendly People Place where  they'll help you fill out your classifieds.  House and 10 acres, workshop  and outbuildings, fish pond,  80x40 stocked, year round  creek, $65,000. Write R. Cam-  posano, Box 1278, Gibsons.  #3  View plus executive style 1600 ft.  rancher and full daylight basement, dbl. gar., Lot 81 Wood-,  creek. K.W. Contracting  886-4994. #4s  ANDERSON REALTY  The Sunshine Coast  Specialists for  ��� Recreation  ��� Retirement  �� Relocation  FREE CATALOGUE  Teredo Square, Sechelt  885-3211  Van. Toll Free 684-8016  ot*-  n*os>  The LOWEST  lassifled Ad Rate:  $400  Bt*t  iM**  C\&  (minimum) for 10 words  2 ^L$ to* eacri additional word  Pay for 2 weeks, Get the 3rd week FREE  When paid by CASH, CHEQUE  or MONEY ORDER  "SttftG SgK!"cLASSIFIEPS  They run until your item is sold!  $| 5       for up to 10 words *1        per additional  word  Your ad, featuring one item only, will run for four consecutive  weeks and will then be cancelled unless you instruct us to renew it  for  another  four,   by  Saturday,   3   pm.  NO CHARGE FOR RENEWAL for as long as you want!  (Not available to commercial advertisers)  ALL CLASSIFIED ADS must be PRE-PAID before insertion.  For your convenience, use your MASTERCARD or VISA!  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE  At "Friendly People Places" Saturday NOON  Jaeck: Ralph, January 11, 1987  We who loved you  Sadly miss you  As it dawns another year.  In our lonely hours  Of thinking  Thoughts of you are  Ever near.  i    '      .      ' Love Kay & Brock  #2  Florence (Flo) Robertson  Passed away January 10, 1988  When we are sad and lonely  And everything goes wrong  We seem to hear you whisper  "Cheer up and carry on"  A heart of gold stopped beating  Hard working hands at rest  God broke our hearts to prove  To us he only takes the best.  The leaves and flowers may  whither  The golden sun may set  But the hearts that loved so  dearly  Are the ones who won't forget  So each time we see your photo  You seem to smile and say  "Don't cry, I'm only sleeping,  We'll meet again some day."  Sadly missed by husband Alex,  family and friends. #2  For Dennis  There are things a storm cannot  bring down  Memories we keep for our own  love to keep us holding on,  until we meet again.  Memory smiles and will not let go  It follows you safely home  and like friendship, it grows,  the further it has to go.  We remember you the way you  were,,  good natured, witty, cheerful,  these truths wipe away our tears  overcome our winter fears.  And we'll smile again each time  we meet,  like old friends,  on yesterdays' street.  #2  Thank you to relatives and friends  on Quadra Island, Mayne Island,  Victoria, Alnwick, Ashington;  England, Seattle, Burnaby, Sunshine Coast for gifts and cards  etc. Thanks again, B.W.Brum-  mell. #2  Many thanks to all the people  who walked through and enjoyed  the lights. Thank you also for the  contributions of $1404. Thanks  to the firemen for all the work  they did to make it possible.  Alberts Mary Weal #2  Gold rim glasses in shopping  mall, Dec. 17 can be left at Coast  News office, Gibsons. #2  c  round  Chow   small  885-3948.  male,  brown.  #2  Young tabby cat, white collar,  found on Leek Rd. 886-3403.  #2  Cu;  Mill   II   I  8. livestock  Are you in an unhappy relationship? Call the Transition House  for free confidential counselling.  885-2944. TFN  INDIVIDUAL THERAPY  COUPLES COUNSELLING  Call Eleanor Mae 885-9018  #4  G  )  At COAST NEWS Offices,  Sechelt & Cibsons  SATURDAY, 3 pm  COAST NEWS Classifieds  Cowrie St., Sechelt  885-3930  The LOWEST Price!  The HIGHEST Circulation!  The FIRST on the street!  Cruice Lane, Gibsons  886-2622  DONALDSON: Passed away suddenly on January 2, 1989, Constable Dennis Brian Donaldson,  late of Gibsons, age 27 years.  Survived by his fiance, Tracey  Hanson; parents, Melvin and  Claire of Edmonton; two sisters,  Annette Dawson, of Fort McMurray, Theresa Balding, of  Camrose, Alberta; five neices and  nephews; numerous aunts,  uncles and cousins. Funeral service was held Friday, January 6,  1989 at St. Mary's Seaview  Cemetery. Devlin Funeral Home,  directors. Remembrance donations may be made to the Bruce  Denniston Bone Marrow Society,  7095A Duncan St., Powell River,  B.C.V8A1W1. #2  HUTTON: Passed away January  6, .1989. Roy Hutton, late of  Sechelt, age 84 years. Survived  by his son Ken, of Courtenay.  Funeral service Monday, January  9 at 1 pm in the chapel of Devlin  Funeral Home, Gibsons, Reverend Stan Sears officiating.  Cremation to follow. #2  NOTICE  Gibsons  Marina  During Jan. & Feb, '89  Service in the store will  be restricted to specific  needs in marine & fishing & supplies; electronics; Mustang floater  coats & suits, etc.  PROPANE HOURS  Auto & bottle propane hours  will be reduced.  caii 886-8686  for information  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS  885-2896, 886-7272, 886-2954.  TFN  If someone in your family has a  drinking problem you can see  what it's doing to them. Can you  see what it's doing to you? Al-  Anon can help. Phone 886-9903  or 886-8656.  Attention Teens  Al-Ateen   Can   Help.   Phone  886-2565. TFN  WHALE  PRINTS  POSTERS  Sunshine Coast  Scenic Photos ��� Cards  1989 CALENDARS  Eagles & Whales  GALLERY      886-8341  Beside Dockside Pharmacy. Gibson:  Phone us today about our beautiful selection of personalized wedding invitations, napkins, matches, stationery, and more.  Jeannie's Gifts & Gems  886-2023  TFN  Are you interested in joining an  informal group for meditation,  healing, channelling, lectures,  etc. at Rockwood Lodge on Sunday evenings at 7:30 pm. First  meeting January 8, donation.  885-2103,885-3535. #2  MAGUS KENNELS  ��� Bright clean dog  & cat boarding  ��� Dog grooming  Lowest Prices On  "SCIENCE DIET"  OPEN 8 am ��� 6:30 pm  everyday. 886-8568  Wanted  Guitar  player/singer,   male  or  female for small 50's/60's R&R  band. Only serious persons need  apply. 886-3199 aft. 6pm.      #4  Wanted - male singers of all ages  (min. 15) and young female  singers (min. 15) to expand  coastal choir for Broadway  musical productions and classical  concerts under leadership of Lyn  Vernon. 886-8026. #3  SCIENCE DIET & IAMS  Pet Food  Quality Farm & Garden  Supply Ltd.  Pratt Rd. 886-7527  TFN  15.3 H.H. T.B. mare, English-  Western, jumps, needs experienced rider, some tack included, $850 OBO. 883-9383.  #4s"  SPCA    SPAYING    PROGRAM  886-7837, 886-8044, 885-9582.  TFN  Sharon's Grooming  Now at Sunshine Feeds  ���    886-4812  TFN  X-country skis & poles for 5 year  old. 886-3288. TFNs  HELP! Urgently Needed! Daily  ride from Roberts Creek to  Sechelt. Will pay expenses.  Kasandra 885-7866 eves.  885-5881 days. #2  waffle iron.  #2  Teflon toastmaster  886-7505.  Student would like ride to Cap  College (or nearby 2nd Narrows  bridge) Mon. and Wed. from 8:30  ferry (back on 5:30 ferry). Will  pay 886-9130 or 886-2426.  ���     #2  18-21' motorboat, good cond.,  fresh water cooled engine.  885-5363. #4  Weight set and bench w/leg extension, call Lily 886-4965.  #4  Fresh goats milk and bean bag  chair. Judith 885-3692. #4  CB radio, $50; 100" radio pfulne,  $50; receiver & speakers, $275;  TV stand, $100. 886-7819:   f2s  Kenmore electric automatic  range, $250. 885-2820.       j#2  Eskimo Eastern Arctic soapstone  carvings & prints, various size? &  prices, 7V2' Polar bear rug, jfull  head, $2900.885-2820.        !#2  Humidifier, typewriter, mistal  desk, three lawn mowejrs,  torotiller, 20" F.G. sailboat,  motor & trailer, rowing machine,  oak easel, 78 Bonaire H}T.  trailer; darkroom equipment, nursing rocker, mens Apollo bicyqle,  folding bike, birdcage.  886-8504.  fl  THE WOODMAN        ��  Fir & hemlock mix, full ctjrd  guaranteed, cut to length,  $75/cord. 886-3779. |W   _!_'���  3 pc. Q-Anne LR suite, play pefrt,  jolly jumper, crib toys, 18" looiji,  Graco stroller, car seat, mjni  trampoline. 886-4711. if3  CASH EftOCK  0     MHN��L$  Highway 101.  Roberts Creek  885-9840  mm  .x^k  Boarding & Grooming  No animah. will be accepted without  current vaccination records.  Free -1 armchair. 886-2676.  #2  SUNSHINE FEEDS  670 INDUSTRIAL WAY  CO-OP FEEDS  PET FOODS  & ACCESSORIES  9:30 to 5:30  886-4812  Registered Tenn. Walker to good  home only. 883-2367 or  883-2855. #4  [y j^^^fe^^l  'Northern' steel fireplace liner,  $250 OBO. 885-2182. Y3   . : L  i  McClary Easy white stove, 30'{,  recond., $249 OBO; Viking 24|'  h. gold stove, auto, nearly like  new,  $279;  Westinghouse  rj.  gold 30" stove, self clean overj,  $387; Kenmore heavy duty h.  gold 4 cycle 2 sp. washer, rej-  cond., $349; Westinghouse auto  dry white dryer, recond., ven/  nice, $247 OBO; Westinghousfe  washer,   2   dryer   stacker!  recond.,  very nice,  set $66f  OBO;   Coldspot  white   recondj  fridge, 15 cu. ft. frost free, $389  OBO. Appliances guaranteed from  90 days to 2 yrs. parts an<  labour!.   Corner   Cupboarc  885-4434  or  Bjorn  885-7897  Will buy non-working or used ap  Dliances. 885-7897. #c  Plexiglas  Fibreglas Supplies  = F0AM =  _l_��M___tl  TFN  Free to loving home, Peter, 2 yr.  old Terrier Elkhound X, loves  people. 885-7326. ' #2  P.B. Black Lab,  to good home;  6pm.  11 mos. old free  886-8962 aft.  #2  Young parrot complete with cage  Stood, $375.883-2321.        #2  MOLDOWAN FEEDS open in  Rbts. Ck. only, closed in Gibsons. 885-5697. #7  SPCA ADOPTION  Gentle 9 mo. old spayed female  Doberman X; Maltipoo X Lab male  pup, 9 wks. old; variety cats and  kittens. 885-5734. #2  For sale, 2 female goats, $60  pair. 886-3123 or 886-3748  mess. #2  &��  _u�����������������*���t���  '80 GM, no rust or dents, 350  auto., PS/PB, TW, DT, buckets,  PW, D. EX4. 885-4593.        #5s  Stihl metal or concrete cutting  saw, model T5350. 885-4593.  #5s  25' Reinell 188 Merc, 1 owner,  private dock, outer waters, Dec.  89 F.W.C. 885-4593. #5s  RCA Cobrtrak  new,   trade  886-2942.  20"  for  TV, brand  firewood.  #5s  S^    ��� Camping Pads  ��� Mattresses, etc.  _ W.W. UPHOLSTERY &  8     BOAT TOPS LTD.  S637 Wyngaert Rd. :  _   Gibsons       .886-7310  %_P5_K-K-K_Kig-K-K_K  Two bucket van seats, $100  OBO. 886-3124. #2  Lg. orange/red acorn fireplace,  asking $200. 886-9017.        #4  Love seat and 2 easy chairs, good  cond. 886-8602. #3  HAY FOR SALE  $3.50 can deliver; 885-9357  TFN  Serger. 4 thread, 1 yr. old, $575  OBO. Kathryn 886-4547.       #2s  15 gal. aquarium, fully equipped,  fish, growlight, plants?  886-7819. #2s  To earn extra money, professional, portable, steam carpet  machine, $400. 886-7895.   #4s  N    ��� ^ffv       ^%ff^^��^^fc  PIANO  TUNING  repairs & appraisals  Ken Dalgleish  886-2843  ANNOUNCEMENT  Available for residential plumbing,   15   years   experience.  885-4796. ,       #2  ___       __  10-20% off listed prices  Then and Now Furniture  699 Highway 101  886-4716. #3  Gil Musgroye's retirement party,  $5; Fri. 13th at the legion.  #2  PASSIVE EXERCISER  For Firming and Toning  ��� Siendertone  ��� Body Dsslgner  ��� Japanese Body Sauna  ��� Nail Extensions  at Supsrshape  Phone for your appt. today    885-2818  Fostex 260 tape deck; Roland  drum machine; Yamaha  SPX-90-11 effects processor,  $2500 OBO. 886-8356. #4  Wanted - All persons interested in  forming an executive for a  musical association whose objective is to establish a permanent  choir and orchestra on the Sunshine Coast. Please meet with  Lyn Vernon on Jan. 23 at 8 pm at  St. Aidans Anglican Church Hall,  North Rd. and Hwy. 101, Gibsons. As well as musically  oriented people we would  welcome' those who have administrative or organizational  skills, but do not want to be on  stage. For information phone Glyn  Hethey at 886-7992 or Marilyn  Ranniger at 886-2323. #3  Thomas 2 keyboard electric  organ, excellent cond., $550.  Save and fly coupons 886-7943  aft. 3pm. #4  Antique marble  stand, excellent  886-7696.  topped  shape,  wash  $450.  #5s  Dining room suite, antique, oak,  bow front buffet with mirror and  48" round oak claw foot table",  22" leaf, 4 spindle-back chairs,  $1700.886-7696. #5s  Speed Queen auto, washer,  $295. Guaranteed & delivered.  883-2648. ,  TFN  T & S SOIL  Mushroom Manure  Topsoil Mixed  Bark Mulch  By the yard or 14 yard diesel  dumptruck-full. Top quality products at reasonable prices. You  pickup or we  deliver.   Phone  anytime 885-5669. TFN  Billiard table, Briarwood IV by  Brunswick Sears, complete,  $500,886-9115. ��� .   #2s  Wood stove, CSA approved,  heats large house, $650 OBO.  885-5461. #4s.  Almost new 20" RCA color trace  TV, great picture, $325.  886-7819. #2s  Stereo, receiver, rec player,  cassette & Altec speakers (cas. &  recs inc.), stand. $975.  886-7819. #2s  40" Moffat stove, $30; swivel TV  stand, $10; table saw, $30.  886-2676. #2  Horse Manure  $20 per pickup load, Rbts. Ck.  885-9969 #4  Sale sports equip, downhill ski  boots, exc. cond., Nifty Thriftys.  #2  Coppertone fridge & stove,-.,  $100/pr.;- 24 cu. ft. chest:  freezer, $150.886-4624.      #2;  'Free  range'  885-9357.  chickens.  $1.50  TFN  DESPERATION  SALE  Take advantage of us!,  (we're slow in Jan.)<  2 rms.  & hafl  $39.95  I     (limited number of  jobs only)  JSUNSHINE CARPET CARE  I 885-2373  8MMHMHaanMDH_MM___M  �����_ ���:*18.  Coast News, January 9,1989  ft  <"'������  ��  i  Twin bunks, mattresses, $110  geologist drafting table, 3 drawer  -steel frame, $120; heart-shaped  corner table, $25; Sears washer,  $150; 1 mile %" plastic pipe, fittings. 885-3630. #2  Viking F/F white fridge, 16 cu.  ft.,   recond.,   $385;   Coldspot  white   F/F   15   cu   ft.   $379;  Westinghouse harvest gold, 30",  self-cleaning stove, $389. Ap-  ; pliances guaranteed from 90 days  ' to 2 yrs., parts and labour. Corner Cupboard 885-4434 or Bjorn  '885-7897. Will buy non-working  ��� or used appliances. 885-7897.  #2  :$_**&  cftnfos;  CASH PAID  For Some Cars and Trucks  Dead Car -Removal  886-2020  TFN  1971 Chev window van. Very  good running cond. Partly  camperized, lots of extras, $1850  or trade small car. 886-9729.  ���   #2s  74 Olds, 2 dr.,  cassette, $800  eves.  PS, PB, AM/FM  OBO. 885-9425  #2s  Apple HE, 128 k, single disk  drive, monitor, $1450.  885-7006. #2  And interiors  |l\nu,u\ ( ^  'ryz price ^  �����������..,' Sale      *  YBe,f Pricev    ,  K of the Year'    :  Cowrie St.  Sechei  ., Ou'1"'1  Tues-Sat 10-5J  Ladies' female mink coat,  ��� beautiful Christmas gift, size 10,  : appraisd at $3,500, asking  .$1,500,886-8660. #2  1985 Ford Escort, exc. cond.,  $5500 OBO. 886-3789. #4s  1982 Volvo S/W, air cond.,  stereo, very gd. cond,, $9750.  886-3030. #4s  '82 Plymouth Horizon, exc.  cond., low kms, hatchback,  $3500.886-3940. #2s  '80 GMC short wheelbase van,  extras, exc. cond., $4500.  885-5564. #4s  '84 Pontiac Parisienne S/W,  loaded, exc. cond., $8500.  883-2572. #2s  77 Century Buick 4 dr., 45,000  mis. auto., mech. sound, rust,  new tires, $700. 886-7819.  #4s  1986 heavy duty F250 4X4 XLT  Lariet Explorer, fully loaded,  $16,900 OBO, towing pkg. consider trade. 886-8104. #4s  1970 Corvette 350 tunnel ram,  new paint, tires & mags, $10,500  OBO. 886-4870. #2s  '81 Subaru wagon, 118,000  kms., gd. cond., new paint,  tires, clutch, $3700. 886-2908.  #2  '84 Camaro Z8 HO/SL/PW/PS.  air cond., p. mirrors, AM/FM  cass., P. doorlocks, new paint,  tires, mufflers, T.tops, $12,000.  886-8964. #2  75000 kms.,  885-2820.  #2  1979 Plymouth Horizon 4 dr.  AM/FM cassette, gd. cond.,  $1500 OBO. 883-9551 days,  885-7171 eves. #3  '69 Plymouth 30,000 miles,  rebuilt motor N/B runs great,  $650,886-8290. #4  78 Honda Civic, $1200, good  running cond., brand new tires,  good body, plus lots of extra  parts included. 886-2459.      #2  '83 Citation, 6 cyl.  exc. cond., $3900  1987 Dodge Omni, auto., 5 dr.  hatchback, asking $6500.  886-9670. #2  1972 raised roof Ford, 6 c>  auto, radio & cassette, 2 burner  propane hot plate underbody propane   tank.   883-1106  asking  $650. #2s  1980 Ford Fairmont S.W.; 1969  Mercedes diesel. 883-9303 eves.  #2  '68 COUGAR  New paint, tires, good shape, no  rust,  V8 auto, asking $2000  886-2215 aft. 6 pm. TFNs  SEASONED FIREWOOD  886-2084 or 886-4812  #2  .Port, gas welder, 300 amp,  ;Canox, good cond., $1500.  ;886-7831 aft. 4pm. #4  ;Side by side frost free  freezer/fridge, harvest gold, exc.  :cond.. S600 firm. 885-3875.  #4  Green Onion  Earth Station  SATELLITE  Sales & Service  885-5644  Kenmore washer & dryer, top  line, 3 yrs., $600. 885-5280 or  885-3127. #5s  Double bed c/w headboard, $30;  2 table lamps, $15 ea.; 30"x80"  .^glass/wood doors, 4 for $100.  886-9856 weekends only.       #2  AUTO  SUPERMARKET  We Dare You to Compare!  CHEVY SALE  I As  new 10" B&W Sanyo TV,  reasonable. 886-7062. #2  Large Variety of   ^\  FRUIT TREES  up to 4 years  $1495andup  BEAUTIFUL CAMELIAS  all colours  4' to 5' tall Reg. $24.95  NOW! $Q95  1WKONLY 5J  Sunshine Coast  NURSERY  Hwy 101, Gibsons  886-2796  =1986 CAVALIER^  CONVERTIBLE  V6 Auto., PS/PB, Air., Tilt, Cruise,  Cassette, PW, PDL,  An exceptional car.  ��14,995  otUVW  QUM-lTV  6    C  DRY FIREWOOD  FOR SALE  886-4566  -Hot Point F/F fridge & self-clean  bnge. harvest gold, like new,  $750.886-8206. #2  SHAKES  20 sq. 24" tapersawn  16 sq. 24" ta'persplit  Ridge Capping  883-2250  H0'x6" O.H. garage door, c/w  hardware, slightly damaged, $50  OBO, reg. $400; single SS sink  for wall mount taps, $10; 2 -15  Ford van rims, like new, $20  pair; 20" color TV, works, $50.  886-2512. #2  1986  OBV^TE  S32.S00  SUNOCO  CLOURS*  Sfeg*  $9950  A980  LEMP^'  $W95  CUTLASS  ���* 4 do��T  Cotop***   pB  ^8 aUl��5000 tn\-  Ikea   single  storage bins  S240   value,  885-7108.  bed   with   rolling  and good foam,  $125   delivered.  #2  2 hitches, 1 Chev, 1 Ford, 2 jump  seats for club cupe; IBM elec.  typewriter; 2 - 225x15 tires on  GM wheels, all half price.  883-9278. #4  EVERYTHING  frum the Slightly Bizarre to the  Almost Divine  KITCHEN TABLES  & CHAIRS  For Olde  Times Sake  Sacond Hand  ' Hwy. 101 at Pratt Rd., Gibsons  886-8261  -iKi^  best pa***1  # 40 Co*s  TRADES WELCOME  FINANCING AVAILABLE  SAVE THOUSANDS NOW!  POWERTRAIN  WARRANTY  VEHICLES  DRY FIREWOOD  FOR SALE  886-4566  White Fridge,  needs handle,  886-8558.  gd.   cond.,  $75   OBO.  #2  Akai amp, $250; dual turntable,  $50; beer making equip., $50;  bunk beds, no mats, $75.  886-7159 aft. 6pm. #4  BUY THE  BEST  FOR LESS!  SOlJIHCdSTFORi  FORD���:'���LINCOLN ��� MERCURY  1975 T-Bird loaded, $750; 1979  Chev Nova, auto., 6 cyl., oinly  $500; 1953 Vintage Hillman 4  dr., stnd., 20,000 original miles  'rare', asking $6500 OBO.  885-9509 886-3690. #2  '81 Chev 150 4X4 auto., exc.  cond., many extras, $6950.  885-2730. #3  STEWART ROAD  AUTO WRECKING  FREE car removal, used parts and  mechanical  work.   Guaranteed.  886-2617. #4  '84 Camaro,  886-7942.  5 spd., V6,  $6100.  #2  72 GM 6 cyl., Van, well maintained, runs great, body fair,  $1000.885-3881. #4  1980 Renault LeCar, sunroof,  cass., 4 spd., man., low miles,  $1000 OBO. 886-9461. #2  1988 Ford Aerostar, exc. cond.,  $17,000,886-9883. TFNs  1977 T-Bird, PS/PB/PW, $2000;  1984 Granada, air., PS/PB,  $1800.886-7511. #2  Wanted - good home for 1966  Chevrolet Belaire 283, V8, auto.,  PS, radio, runs well. 886-7339. ������>���  #4  '79 Chev Monza Sport Coupe,  good condition, V6, 4 sp., stereo,  sunroof, $2900.885-3736.   #4s  1977 Honda Civic, 5 speed,  sunroof, runs great, good  mileage. 886-7482. #4s  '65 International V2 Jon flat deck,  running condition, needs minor  work, $500. 885-3374.        TFN  SECHELT MARINE"  SURVEYS LTD.  Captain Bill Murray  M.CM.M.C    M.N.A.M.S.  M.A.B.Y.C. �� Marine  Surveyors and Consultants I  885-3643  OUTBOARDS FOR SALE  9.9-20-30-40-50-70 HP  1987-1988 Evinrudes. Excellent  condition. Lowes Resort,  883-2456. TFN  Samson 37' FC sailboat, world  cruiser, live aboard, equipped,  42 g. 886-7400 messages.    #2s  '68 H.P. Osco Ford marine diesel  and hy. gear, as new cond.  883-9401. #2s  1975 - I8V2' Sangstercraft 130,  4 cyl., Volvo, 270 Volvo leg.  comes with trailer, $2500.  886-3882 eves. TFN  Cal25, fully equipped, moorage  included, $11,500. 886-8706.  #4s  17' Boston Whaler, trailer, mere,  power, mint. 883-9110.        #2s  14' fibreglass boat, 50 HP Merc,  new leg, new trailer, new suntop  with side windows, very clean,  comes with 2 fuel tanks, $2800  OBO. 886-3882 aft. 6pm.  TFN  Classic 1986 50 HP Mercury  motor; electric, $1595.  883-9110. #4s  16'  K&C Thermoglass 85 HP  Merc, exc. shape. 883-2270.  $3200. #4s  Wanted-ife/iteiit  NEW DIESELS  41 HPOnan diesel, $5000, 20 HP  Yanmar, $4000. both complete  electrical panel, atomic 4 gas  completely rebuilt 2300.  886-2875. #3  21' fibreform hardtop, plus canvas, new leg, bilge pump, timing  chain, gears, $6000 OBO or trade  W.H.Y. 886-4916. #5s  23' Penson fibreglass inboard  340 Chrysler 2 to 1 reduction  hydraulic steering, oil stove, CB,  sounder, $13,500 OBO.  883-2433. #5s  300 cu. in. Ford, 3 to 1 BW, 2  alt., ins. panels, good cond.  886-2631 aft. 6pm. #4  22 ft.  'C  883-2548.  licence,  best offer.  #4  Imoi  Mobile Homes  !  Ife;  -\ *.-,  ���_N_H_a  Hb3s3^3v39���fc���Mv3&3t393Vwfe3ft^93N  BROOKS & MILLER  FLOOR COVERINGS ltd.  Benjamin Moore & International  Paints  Marine ^,  Finishes   /��� Y  Commercial.'//  Pricing  Bill Wood  SECHELT  ���   bus. 885-2923  _____> Res. 885-5058  IMMWramUWMMHHHHBI  Sunshine Coast  MOBILE HOME  PARK  1 Ml. W. GIBSONS HWY. 101  PH. 886-9826  Lot No. 60  14x60 2 B.R.  Fr., Stv. - W & D. A very clean  home on a nice large lot.  This home has just been  reduced to SELL  A SUPER BUY AT JUST  s 20,9 00  Lot No. 25  12x60 2 B.R.  Fr. Stv. & New Carpet, Lino  and Drapes, Front & Rear Porches, Skirted. This home is  vacant and ready for new  owners at a  Reduced Price of  s12,900  1969 Empress class 'A' 21'  motorhome, very clean, $10,500.  886-2432 or 886-7923. #4s  1971 VW Westfalia van, gd.  cond., some rust, $1750.  886-3030. #4s  Hunter's Special - 8' camperette  stove, furnace, cupboards.  886-3821 aft. 6pm. #4s  34' Aleta, C licence live  cod/charter boat, diesel, fully  equipped & ready to fish,  $21,500 without license  $10,500. 885-9802 eves.      #2s  OMC new manifold & riser, $450;  4 cyl. OMC motor with rebuilt  head, $300. 886-3191. 4s  23 Penson, twin 165 Merc  cruiser, FWC, VHF & sounder,  rebuilt engine & stern drives, fully warranty,, gd. crew boat or  fishing charter, $25,0.00. Tideline  Marine 885-4141. TFN  30' Disp. Cruiser, recently  rebuilt. 340 Chrys. dual hyd.  steering, many extras, $11,500.  885-2814. #2s  17%' older boat with 270 Volvo  leg, with or without motorboat.  $1500, motor $1000. 886-7677.  #2s  Mobile home space available,  Sunshine Coast Mobile Home  Park. 886-9826. TFN  NEW HOMES  14'x70'  From $23,900 FOB  USED HOMES  Starting as low as $12,900.  Call collect 580-4321.  TFN  1 large bdrm. 12x52 bay window,  dishwasher, fridge & stove, lots  of cupboards, $9,500.  883-2244. #3  1974 Safeway Mobile Home for  sale, 3 bdrm., fridge, stove,  washer, dryer. 886-8039 aft.  2pm. #4  Working couple (newlyweds) require house to rent (approx.  $400) Gibsons/Roberts Creek  area. 886-2728. #3  3 bdrm. house on or near the  beach by Mar. 1, Davis Bay to  Langdale. 886-9883. TFN  Young working couple wants  small home or suite Gibsons area  for Feb. 1.886-4820. #4  4 bdrm. house prefer Gibsons  area. 886-2664 days, 886-7406  eves. #2  Powell River gent working in Port  Mellon seeking sleeping room or  bach, suite at reas. rate. Phone  collect 485-7253. #2  Professional   couple   urgently  seeking 2-3 bdrm. home, Gibsons area, exc. refs. 886-2097.   ���      #4  ft** J  [ For Rent J  Roberts   Creek   Hall   avail.,  dances,   parties,   weddings,  equipment rental. Yvonne,  885-4610, 7-9 pm. TFN  Davis Bay/Wilson Creek Hall  available. Wheelchair facilities.  Phone 885-2752 or 885-9863.  TFN  1 bdrm. duplex unit on % acre lot  West Sechelt area, refs. $365  plus heat. 926-8124 (Van.)     #2  Storage, 200 sq. ft. downtown  Sechelt available Feb. 1,  $60/mo. 885-4535. #3  Small trailer, one adult, $250 including hydro. 885-3313.       #3  1 bdrm. W/F cottage, Granthams, $350/mo. phone Century  West Realty at 885-2235.       #2  1 bdrm. cottage, Sandy Hook,  $290/mo., plus utils. avail. Jan..  15.885-3982. #4  Rbts. Ck., W/F house to share,  N/S male preferred, avail, immed. 885-4743 or 885-4651.    #2  PRIME RETAIL  OFFICE SPACE  For Lease - 627 sq. ft.  Gibsons Quay,  Next to Dentist & Real Estate  Great Harbour view  886-9110 day_  16 ft. AVAILABLE  NOW  17 ft. & up  ORDER NOW lor  SPRING DELIVERY  Camperized   school   bus,  Ford, best offer. 886-4596.  '62  #1s  Exceptional Boat,  Exceptional Value  '83 Kawasaki GPZ 550, exc.  cond. 13,000 kms. $2000 OBO.  886-7198. #2s  '82 250 Kawasaki, w/rack,  25,000 kms. 885-9553.        #5s  1979 Yamaha 750  dressed. 886-3841.  DOHC  fully  #2s  '81  Suzuki GSL  OBO. 885-3374.  1000,  $2500  TFN  Hopkins Landing home, fantastic  view, spacious living room F/P, 2  sundecks, 2 bdrm., 2 baths, fully  furn., $675/mo. avail. Mar. 1  886-9017. #4  Person to share view house Davis  Bay, $250/mo. plus utils.  885-7233. #4  2 bdrm. self-contained suite,  private beach access, garden,  Rbts. Ck., washer, dryer, require  evening child care occasionally  for 2 school age children in exchange for, reduced rent, N/S  female applicants only. 886-4584  or 886-3695 mess. #2  2 bdrm. trailer, adults, Sechelt  area, $370/mo. plus utils.  885-3313. #2  Furn. bachelor suite, utiis. incl.,  $250,886-2512. #2  3 bdrm. with bsmt., central Gibsons, $550/mo., Feb. 1.  Kathryn/Dean 886-4547.       #2  Suite for rent, self-contained,  view, stove, fridge, no pets.  886-9186 eves. #4  BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  f$eif> Wanted  INCREASE YOUR CHANCES! LET  OUR FINGERS DO YOUR TALKING! Call Arbutus Office Services'  for fast and confidential preparation of your resume - 885-5212  TFN  Russell' F. Crum Law Office requires an experienced legal  secretary, familiar with word processing and use of computers.  Experience in corporate/commercial work is required, and experience in wills and estates, and  litigation would be an asset.  Salary and benefits negotiable  depending upon experience. Reply to Box 649, Gibsons, B.C.  886-2207. #2  Painters helper  preferred, call  886-3276.  wanted,  aft.   5  exp.  pm.  #3  TOWN OF  GIBSONS  HELP WANTED  LABOURER I  The Town of Gibsons is accepting applications for the position of Labourer I. The successful applicant will be  responsible to his/her immediate supervisor for a variety of tasks and duties requiring a minimum of skills, and  will assist other personnel  such as labourers, utilitymen,  equipment operators, sewer  and water technicians to carry  out their assigned duties.  Ability to operate a variety of  equipment such as jack hammers, chain saws, hand tools,  garden tractors, and light  trucks will berequired.  Applications will be received  by the Superintendent of  Public Works at 474 South  Fletcher Road, until 4:30 pm  on Monday, January 16,  1989.  E.H. Reeves  Superintendent of  Public Works  TOWN OF  GIBSONS  HELP WANTED  UTILITYMAN  The Town of Gibsons is accepting applications for the position of Utilityman.  The successful applicant will  be expected to perform duties  related to the operation,  maintenance, repair and connection to the sewage, water,  and storm drainage systems.  A knowledge of pumps and.  standard construction equipment is essential.  Certification in Water Distribution Systems and Waste Water  Collection Systems is required, as is previous experience in a similar position.  Applications will be received  by the Superintendent of  Public Works, at 474 South  Fletcher Road, until 4:30 pm  on Monday, January 16,  1989.  E.H. Reeves  Superintendent of  Public Works  These Ads appear in the more than 75 Newspapers of the B.C. and Yukon Community  Newspapers Association and reach more than 1,000,000 homes and a potential two million readers.  $159. for 25 words  ($3. per each additional word) Call the Coast News at 885-3930 to place one.  AUTOMOTIVE  FOR SALE MISC.  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  mssmm  835-3281  Buy/ lease any gas, diesel  car or truck, new or used.  Direct from volume factory  dealer. Call for pre-approved credit. Call collect 464-  0271. D5231.   $1 Down leases a new car or  truck. Seven year warranty.  Payments from $139./Mo.  O.A.C. Call lease manager  at (604)465-8931. DL5584.  Take over payments 1988  Bronco II $399. per month.  All makes, cars and trucks  available. Cash allowances  for trade-in. Call 1-800-663-  6933, Dick Miller, DL.8196.  Lease/Buy any new/used  truck or van with no money  down O.A.C. Deal direct  with Truck-Finders. Call  Keith collect for pre-approv-  ed credit. 290-3659.   BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES   A new company is looking  for independent distributors  for health care products that  include a purifying system  we feel Is the best method  available for filtering municipally treated water. This  could be a primary or secondary income opportunity.  For free Information write:  . P.O. Box 91601, West Van-  couver, B.C. V7V 3P3. _  Thriving Hitachi television  stereo retail store. Also  video rentals, music and  tapes. Excellent mall location in prosperous Houston  B.C. Call Les at Radio  Shack. 845-2663.   BUSINESS PERSONALS  Body?   Mind?  Spirit?  Who  are you? Dlanetics Hot Line,  toll     free    1-800-F.Q.R.-  TJ3.U.T.H. 1-800-367-8788.  EQUIPMENT  AND MACHINERY   1985 Frelghtliner COE - 400  Cat - RT015 - SSHD - RTE  440 - New Recaps, Certified  $47,500. 1985 Mack COE -  440 Mack - 12 Speed - 38  Axles - Spring Suspension -  Alcoa Wheels - Certified  $39,500. B.C. 1-800-663-  7766. Others 1-604-635-  4938. .   Increase power up to 50%.  Increase mileage by 10%.  Cars, trucks, tractors. Gas,  diesel, propane. One time  modification to the fuel  -tank. Send $6.00 for complete instructions. Economical household materials  needed. Western Fuelsaver,  315 - 2040 Gordon Drive,  Kelowna, B.C. V1Y 3H9.  A Free Hunting, Fishing,  Camping Catalog ($6.00  value). Send your expired  hunting and fishing license  (photocopy acceptable) and  S.I.R. will mail a free 388  page (over 6,500 items) Annual Sportsman Catalog.  S.I.R.    Mail    Order,    Dept.  .247, 1385 Ellice Avenue,  Winnipeg,   Manitoba,   R3G  <5N1. Offer expires March  31, 1989.   Lighting Fixtures. Western  Canada s largest display.  Wholesale and retail. Free  Catalogues available. Nor-  burn Lighting Centre., 4600  Ea3t Hastings Street, Burnaby, B.C. V5C 2K5. Phone  1-299-0666.   Light fixtures, electrical motors, generators, phase convenors, transformers, fans,  welders, wiring materials.  Friesen Electric, Abbots-  ford. 859-7101 or 1-800-663-  6976.   GARDENING   Interested in Greenhouse or  Hydroponic Gardening?  Greenhouses $195., Hydroponic Gardens $39., Halides  from $140. Over 2000 products in stock, super prices.  Free Catalogue call Toll  Free 1-800-663-5619. Water  Farms, 1244 Seymour St.,  Vancouver, B.C. V6B 3N9.  HEALTH & BEAUTY  Hope Cancer Health Centre.  Information, education, support, counselling and seminars for cancer patients and  families, 732-3412 Toll Free  1-800-663-5137 courtesy of  Fraternal Order of Eagles.  HELP WANTED  Castlegar News requires reporter/photographer. Published Wednesday afternoons and Sunday mornings. Have CP wire. Remuneration per collective  agreement. Rush resume  and samples to: Simon  Birch, Editor, Castlegar  News, Box 3007, Castlegar,  B.C. V1N 3H4.  School District No. 85 (Vancouver Island North) invites  applications for the vacant  position of Tradesman  Plumber. This is a regular  full time position within the  district's Maintenance Department. Applicants must  possess a valid B.C.T.Q. or  Interprovincial Trade Certificate. Ideally the successful  candidate will hold a B.C.  gas ticket and be proficient  in the servicing or oil and  gas fired heating systems  including boilers, heat  pumps and HVAC equipment. The rate,of pay for  this position is in accordance with the current  C.U.P.E. Collective Agreement. School District No. 85  serves 10 communities at  the northern end of Vancouver Island. Residents enjoy  excellent indoor and outdoor  recreational opportunities.  Resumes including a detailed work history and references are to be submitted  by the closing date of  Tuesday. January 31. 1989  to the attention of Mr. J.R.-  Martin, Secretary-Treasurer, School District No. 85  (Vancouver Island North),  P.O. Box 90, Port Hardy,  B.C. VON 2PO. For further  information contact Mr.  Cam Allan at 949-6618.  Students: If working from  April to August in Europe  appeals to you and you're  between 19-28 and have  practical farming experience  apply to: IAEA, 206, 1501 -  17 Ave. S.W., Calgary,  Alta, T2T 0E2.   HELP WANTED  PERSONALS  Camera Operator. Peerless  Printers, an established  printing business in the  B.C. Interior, has an opening for a camera operator.  Duties to include camera,  stripping and plate making.  Design and art experience  would be an asset. Apply to  Tom Fair, Peerless Printers,  1172 Battle Street, Kamioops, B.C. V2C 2N5. (604)  372-3373. Fax: (604)828-  6848.  Bodyman required for modern shop. Mu3t be conversant with chart frame  machine. Location Northern  Vancouver Island. Phone  (604)949-6042.   Automotive painter required  at iE.J. Klassen G.M. in  Port Hardy, B.C. Phone:  (604)949-7442.   Senior Accounting Clerk/  Business Manager required  by automotive dealership,  Quesnel, B.C. Applicant  must have full accounting  knowledge including payroll. Previous automotive  dealership experience an asset, but not essential. Submit resumes to Box "I",  Cariboo Observer, #4 - 462  Reid, Quesnel, B.C. V2J  2M6.  Estimator Production Coordinator. Peerless Printers,  an established printing business in the B.C. Interior,  has an opening for a key  person on their management team. Duties to include computerized estimating, scheduling and all  phases of production coordination. This position will  require good management  and interpersonal skills. Apply to Tom Fair, Peerless  Printers, 1172 Battle Street,  Kamioops, B.C. V2C 2N5.  (604)372-3373. Fax: (604)  828-6848.  Meditation by Mail! A correspondence course to control stress, improve health  and add dynamic energy to  your life, all In the comfort  of your own homel For  details of this and other  instructional tapes: Box 404  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0.  SERVICES  ���  ICBC Injury Claims? Call  Dale Carr-HarrJs - 20 years  a trial lawyer with five years  medical school before law.  0-669-4922 (Vancouver). Experienced In head injury  and other major claims. Per-  centage fees available.  TRAVEL   Skiers: Lake Louise, Canada's Favorite, has 6  nights/5 day ski holidays  from $182. per person quad  occupancy. Other varieties  of packages available. Call  1 -800-661-1158.       Driving to Vancouver?  $39.95 Drive and Stay Special at the Blue Boy Motor  Hotel with this ad. 725 S.E.  Marine Drive. 1-800-663-  6715. Expires March 30,  1989.  blanket  classifieds  -CYCKA.  25 WORDS  $159 ���Si*"****^-****.-*;^.-* ,".^_.<i>��'"*"*i" ****-jp-'~tF.  .���.: ,... ...     ....'.- t-irst*^ ^"  Coast ttewsr J dirraary 9?1989��  19?  For all your  Satellite Heeds!  LCali MOOEJSfcAKER.  ELECTRONICS!  883-8103  DtoP  CLASSIFIEDS  your at  The Coast News  Sechelt  Continued from page 4  did not have a headache, she  continued on, supported by her  guide, and eventually made it to  the peak. Four out of 10 in their  group had in fact made it to the  peak. Our 12 kilometer day  ended after seven hours at 3:30  pm.  We had made it to Kibo Hut  NOTICE  Works crew will be installing culvert pipes on  Ebbtide Street at works yard entrance during  night time low tides January 9 to 12 inclusive.  Doug Fraser  Works Superintendent  District of Sechelt  :3MV'**S /y  Help Wanted  A christian social service agency  is looking for a part time case  worker. Must have some experience in social work and dealing with people, please call  886-9759 or 886-3761 for an appointment. #2  Town of Gibsons  We are now accepting employment applications for part time  lifeguard/instructors. Contact  Wendy Giibertson at 886-9415 or  886-2274. #2  Receptionist/secretary for new  community service agency. Position involves direct and phone  contact with public. Apply Action,  .Box 2647, Sechelt. 885-5680.  #2  I     Kelp Wanted  Service Advisor  Required  For NewtCar  Dealership  Automotive background  and    communication  skills a necessity.  Position Available  Feb.1,1989  Please apply in writing  only   to   the   Service  Manager,   Box   1759,  Sechelt, B.C. VON SAO.  SELL IT FASTE  ���  With A Classified Ad!  just pick up the      rtrtr   OQOf|  phone and call.    OOJ'jyjU  <_(_-   ,Yx"~u��-..^  Work Wanted  Econo Hoe, custom backhoe service, Langdale to Davis Bay.  886-8290. #4  Remodel, renovate, repairs, roofing & waterproofing, quality  guaranteed. L. Ferris 885-4190.  #4  Reliable carpenter available for  remodelling, finishing and  repairs. Reasonable Rates. John  Jensen 885-4796. #2  TREE TOPPING  Limbing, falling, danger tree  removal, free est., fully insured.  Jeff Collins 886-8225. #3  Work Wanted  PEERLESS TREE  SERVICE LTD.  Topping - Limbing - Danger Tree  Removal, Insured, Guaranteed  Work. Free estimates. 885-2109.  TFN  Province of  British Columbia  Ministry of  Transportation  and Highways  HIGHWAYS-TENDERS  Electoral District: Mackenzie  Highway   District:   Sunshine  Coast  Project or Job Number:  C-4989-002  Project or Job Description:  Wharf Road - Reconstruction  Sechelt, B.C.  Drainage Installation  Tender Opening Date/Time:  January 24, 1989 at 2:00 pm  File: 05-88-058  Surety Bid Bond or Certified  Deposit Cheque is required in  the amount of 10 percent of  tendered sum. Tender documents with envelope, plans,  specifications and conditions  of tender are available free of  charge ONLY from Sunshine  Coast Highways District Office,  Box   740   (1016   Seamount  Way), Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0  between the hours of 8:30 and  4:00 pm Monday to Friday, except Holidays.  Phone number of originating  office: 886-2294.  Tenders will be opened at: As  Above.  G.W. Warrington  District Highways Manager  Province ol  British Columbia  Ministry of  Transportation & Highways  HIGHWAYS - TENDERS  Electoral District: Mackenzie  Highway District:  Sunshine Coast  Project or Job Number:  C-4981  Project or Job Description:  Highway 101 and Field Road  Supply and Place AC Pavement  (approximate quantity 1450 ton  nes)  Tender Opening Date/Time:  Thursday, January 26, 1989 at  2:00 p.m.  File: 05-88-048  Surety Bid  Bond or Certified  Deposit. Cheque is required in  the amount of 10 percent.  Tender documents with enve  lope, plans, specifications and  conditions of tender are available  free of charge ONLY from Sunshine Coast Highways District  Office, Box 740,1016 Seamount  Way, Gibsons, B.C: VON 1V0  between the hours of 8:30 and  4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday, ex-|  cept Holidays.  Phone number of originating of  fice: 886-2294. .  Tenders will be opened at Sunshine Coast Highways District  Office, 1016 Seamount Way,  Gibsons, B.C.  G.A. Warrington  District Highways Manager  NOTICE OF SALE  PURSUANT TO THE WAREHOUSEMEN'S LIEN ACT  Notice is hereby given that the storage lot held by Len Wray's  Transfer Ltd., Box 186, Highway 101, Gibsons, B.C. in the name of  Michelle Mathews will be sold at a public sale for debts outstanding  and cost of sale within 30 days of the second appearance of this  notice at a location designated by Len Wray's Transfer Ltd.  (15,520 feet), the final resting  place before the last big push.  We didn't do very much at  Kibo Hut. We rested, had dinner about 5 and drank lots of  tea. We were to start our climb  to the peak at 1 the next morning, so we got organized and into our sleeping bags by 6:30.  Our Japanese companion  was ill to his stomach right after  dinner and did not look well.  The rest of us looked fine if not  somewhat sunburned. Up to  this point no apparent altitude  sickness.  I didn't sleep past 8:30 and I  tossed and turned and felt terrible until Claude and the porters  came and woke us up a at 12:30.  As soon as I got up I had to  rush outside to be sick and I was  sick again on the way to the  toilet.  I was pretty sure nobody had  ������%lii  Y ,   - ," -<-V  , }***^S? Y ��' Y -V^&H  <\5o-'"'   '* \'V> < ,^&'  n___l_M_*i���_i__���fai_tt���l__  HOME IMPROVEMENTS  & RENOVATIONS  Reasonable & Reliable  886-2215  TFNs  Housecleaning services available  $6.50/hour, evening and  weekends, references available.  886-3314. TFNs  i$K;  ;(MM��w^  Fun, games and crafts, will do  babysitting in my home close to  Gibsons Elem. School, refs  available. Yvonne 886-8910.  #4  Occasional nanny needed for  christian family in Rbts. Ck.  885-9620. #4  Handyman Services V^,  Need some jobs done? Glass  work or yard cleanup, have Vz ton  will haul, reasonable rates, discount for seniors. 886-9701.  #4  If you're too tired or just plain  beat, Cinderella's here, so rest  your feet. 886-2273 aft. 10am.  #4  Handyman, renovations, additions, decks, fences and all home  repairs, free estimates. 886-2835  anytime. #4  Handyman - give me a call about  your problems, minor plumbing a  specialty. 883-9278. #4  Experienced housecleaners &  yard maintenance. Call 886-3985  and 886-2593. #2  *<*���    IMtslraess  Additional income to your  business, Gibsons Telephone  Answering Service, $1500.  885-9509 or 886-3690. #2  *.,\ %  "!"*  Ya ; yi&ys  Y-*��%% YCx YvfYY-^i  \ \YV: ^-*_^\iS$f1  Cllikf -OMr4JK;y-^  Quality licensed after school child '  care available.  For information  call 886-9261. #3  A 1ST TIME  OFFERING  Direct from manufacturer,  highly successful in U.S. &  Europe. Absolutely no competition. Fully patented. Now  available in Canada.  ALL CASH BUSINESS  Part/full-time or absentee  HUGE PROFITS!  NO SELLING!  Premium established loca-J  tions are waiting vEach $ spent  oh this product can return $20  to you, $11,600 opens your"  chain of accounts. To receive  information and literature, call  our 24-hr. toll free line and  leave your name, address and  phone number.  1-800-663-4171  INVITATION TO TENDER  Sealed tenders marked Project  T88-806-04, Interior Renovations to Gibsons Ambulance  Station, 1490 S. Fletcher Rd.,  Gibsons, B.C. will be received  up to 3:00 pm local time, the  25 of January, 1989 at the  Coast Garibaldi Health Unit,  1538 S. Fletcher, Gibsons,  B.C.  NOTE: Manditory site visit  January 16, 1989 at 9:30 am.  Drawings, specifications and  other tendering documents  may be obtained at B.C.  Buildings Corp., 301-1385  West 8th Ave., Vancouver,  after 9:00 am, Wednesday,  January 11,1989. Documents  must be returned in good condition within 30 days of close  of invitations.  Drawings and Specifications  may be examined at  Amalgamated Construction  Association of B.C., 2675 Oak  Street, Vancouver, B.C.  101-3255 South Fraser Way,  Clearbrook, B.C., and at Construction Plan Services, 4250  Dawson Street, Burnaby. B.C.  after 9:00 am, January 11,  1989.  Enquiries for general information during the tender period,  should be made to: Betty Murphy, 736-9658. ETM Consultants, 2040 W. 12th Ave..  Vancouver, or Pat Kinrade,  660-1676, British Columbia  Buildings Corporation,  301-1385 West 8th Ave., Vancouver, B.C.  Tenders must be filed on the  forms provided in sealed,  clearly marked envelopes.  The lowest or any tender not  necessarily accepted.  All bidders must attend the  following site visit: Monday,  January 16,1989 at 9:30 a.m.  B.C. Buildings Corporation  Notice to Creditors and Others  RE: The Estate of Ernest Philip  Joe, also known as Ernest  Phillip Joe, Deceased formerly  of P.O. Box 837, Sechelt,  British Columbia, VON 3A0.  NOTICE is hereby given that  creditors and others having  claims against the Estate of the  noted deceased individual are  hereby required to send particulars thereof to the Executrix named hereunder care  of 948 Howe Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6Z  1N9 on or before March 5,  1989, after which date the Executrix will distribute the said  Estate among the parties entitled thereto having regard only to the claims of which the  Executrix then has notice.  Lenora Joe, Executrix  Per her solicitors  Snarch & Allen  #2  CLASSIFIEDS  885-3930  Province of  British Columbia  Ministry of  Transportation  and Highways  HIGHWAYS-TENDERS  Electoral District: Mackenzie  Highway District: Sunshine  Coast  Project or Job Number:  C-4989-001  Project or Job Description:  Wharf Road - Reconstruction  Sechelt, B.C. Gravel - Supply  and Place.  Tender Opening Date/Time:  January 24. 1989 at 2:00 pm  File: 05-88-057  Surety Bid Bond or Certified  Deposit Cheque is required in  the amount of 10 percent of  tendered sum.  Tender documents with enve-1  lope, plans, specifications and  conditions of tender are  available free of charge ONLY  from Sunshine Coast Highways District Office, Box 740  (1016 Seamount Way), Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0 between  the hours of 8:30 and 4:00  p.m. Monday to Friday, except  Holidays.  Phone number of originating  office: 886-2294.  Tenders will be opened at:  As Above.  G.A. Warrington  District Highways Manager  seen me so the only person I  told was Jim. Not terribly  reassuring for him to be told at  1 am that I wasn't sure if I could  make it or not.  However, I thought that seeing as I'd come this far, and I  wasn't planning on coming  back to do it again, that I'd better give it a try.  The official reason for starting so early in the morning is  that the climb can be done while  the loose rocks and gravel are  frozen. Although it was very  cold, this didn't help us.  Looking back on it I figured  the reasons were you had to  start early in order to get to the  top and get back to Horombo  Huts by nightfall because of the  water shortage. Also, the hikers  would be really demoralized if  they could actually see what  they were trying to climb.  A half moon shone onto the  mountain slope as our group of  five left with two guides and  two assistant guides. We had on  all our winter clothes and carried a walking stick.  I have never used a walking  stick before, but zig-zagging up  the loose skree slope of  Kilimanjaro demands that you  have one. If it wasn't for the  stick and the fact that Jim was  right behind me, I know I  would have fallen over several  times.  We proceeded extremely  slowly, and because of the  moon, the guides had left their  lanterns back in the hut. I  realized after a while that my'  stomach was going to cooperate  and although I felt empty and a  bit dizzy, I might be able to  make it.  We had a rest stop after  about 1 Vz hours and then carried on. Predictably, the Italians  and Ironman passed us during  this stretch.  The peak seemed so far up  that I found it really depressing  to look up. So I concentrated on  the boots in front of me and trying to stay on the trail.  Four in the morning found us  sitting exhausted in front of  Hans Meyer Cave vyondering if  we really could make it all the  way to the top. y       -���.��-���  Please turn to page 20  - YYin Y <?" ���  Diesel Engine Rebuilding  Industrial Parts  Hwy 101,  Madoira Park  g.!gY"'TUg?V  ���____,  IIIHIJIIWHI.IIJ    '.Ml  Member of  ALLIED...  The Careful Movers  STORAGE  ��� 10,000 sq. ft. of heated, gov't approved storage.  ��� Dust-free storage in closed wooden pallets.  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER LTD.  Custom Packing, Storage, Local & Long Distance Moving  HWY.IOI.eilSONS  Pender Harbour customers      oa_ n��e_  please CALL COLLECT BdO"_BM  #300 -1212 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. Canada V6H 3V1  TR1CKLEBROOK WAY - GIBSONS  Lovely well kept 3-4 bedroom home situated in central location. Home has  lots of extras including large kitchen with oak cupboards, built-in organizers,  huge wrap-around deck, landscaping, some fencing, fruit trees and much  more all on a good-sized corner lot. The home is ready to move into and is  a real pleasure to show! $88 800  -Call Lynn Crosby at  sutton group-broadview realty ltd.  Bus.: 738-1000 Pager 24 hrs.: 686-5858 Res.: 886-2155  Any way you Slice it  the Classifieds bring results  %     %  Our premises at Cowrie & Inlet ���  have been extended in size to comfortably  accommodate the following services:  HAIR CARE: Perms, Colouring, Styling  SKIN CARE: Facials, Facial Rejuvenation, Make-Up  Eyebrow Arching, Pedicures, Manicures,  Body Waxing, Herbal Body Wrap,  Herbal Hair Wrap, Nail Extensions  HEALTH CARE: Sauna, Jacuzzi, Showers, Flotation Tank,  Body Composition & Fitness Analysis,  Slenderizing, Muscle Toning, Passive Exercising,  Deep Tissue Relaxation Therapy, Tanning  PACKAGE #1  6 slendertoning sessions  6 plexis (body designer) sessions  1 sudacho sauna  PACKAGE #2  12 slendertone sessions  2 sudacho saunas  PACKAGE #3  12 piexis (body designer) sessions  2 sudacho saunas  1 herbal wrap  Above packages include fitness analysing with our Futrex 5000 computer. Weighing, measuring and consultation  Try our Sybar|t|c Experience  Full day of personalized Service for both men and women  ��� Paraffin, manicure and pedicure  ��� Deep cleansing facial & eyebrow arching  ��� Sauna with herbal hair and body wraps  ��� Deep tissue relaxation therapy  ��� Shower, hair styling, comb-out  ��� For Ladies - a complete make-up session  for day or evening wear  ��� For Men - a relaxing Jacuzzi  ��� Complimentary lunch  ALL FOR ONLY  Unisex Stair, Skin  & Health Centre  OPEN LATE THURS. & FRI. SUNDAYS 10-4 Cowrie & Inlet. Sechelt  885-2818  i  ;>Y  \: r7^rr'nn|ni^'i^"rnrri'"l'"rir?'irytll'<'^' ^ n^nwrirfj- wrwrir-mii n~nr-r���i-ia-i���rnym r-inpnfiwitiijriniririliW-r_  20.  Coast News, January 9,1989  ! !  Teacher  climbs  Kilimanjaro\  Continued from page 19  We discovered during our  rest that the water in our water  bottles was freezing. However  the view of Mawenzi in the  moonlight with the lights of the  town of Moshi far below us in  Tanzania to the west and some  unidentified lights to the east  plus the occasional streaking  meteorite made up for our  discomfort.  Jim managed to get his  photograph and we proceeded  on. The climb got steeper and  we started taking frequent short  rests. Jim reported seeing  meteorites when there weren't  any and realized he was seeing  spots in front of his eyes.  I was in much the same condition. About Vi hour later an  Italian and a guide passed us going back down and about Vz  hour after than another person  and a guide were heading down.  Unfortunately, the last part  of the trail to Gilman's Point is  over a lot of boulders and small  cliffs. This is not exactly a piece  of cake when you've used up  almost all your energy and are  having trouble just staying on  the trail.  We all felt as if we should rest  more frequently. Looking back  at it, we feel the guides pushed  us a little bit more than they  might have, in order to get us to  the crater rim by sunrise. And  that is what they did.  We had enough time to collect our wits and get our  cameras out to take a picture of  the sun coming up over the  horizon at 7:05. We were also  treated to Ironman singing  'Rule Britannia'.  Strangely enough, nobody  else joined in. What a view! The  sun really lifted our spirits  although didn't help much in  the energy department.  The view across the crater  revealed some of the glaciers on  the northern rim and Uhuru,  the highest peak, to our west  and almost 1000 feet higher. We  took pictures of ourselves and  remembered to have the Canadian flag out.  Jim and Claude then set off  for the peak. Lemeck and I  followed a minute behind. My  body didn't really feel like going  but my mind did.  The V/z kilometers around  the crater rim took 1 Vz hours. It  was crystal clear, the snow was  bright and we had a definite  sense of euphoria from being so  high.  Actually, my euphoria turned  out to be altitude sickness, as  my stomach made itself known  about half way around the rim.  However, still no headache, so I  carried on to arrive at the peak a  few minutes behind Jim.  The peak is quite flat,  although the crater drops away  about 700 feet to the north. The  ground slopes away to the  glaciers in all other directions.  Jim and I were rather spaced  out. We forgot to take the flag  out of my pocket, forgot to get  a picture of the two of us  together, and I forgot to leave  my Canadian penny under a  rock.  We did get pictures of each  other and also sign the register  at the top. Of the 25 people attempting the mountain on our  day, 12 actually made it to the  peak.  Of the 12 Italians included in  that 25, only two (one male and  one female) made it right to  Uhuru. 'Go slow and you'll  make the snow' definitely seems  to apply.  All five of our group made it  to Gilman's and four of us  made it to Uhuru. One of the  Americans developed a severe  headache as he started along the  crater rim and wisely turned  back.  What a relief to actually  make it. Our next concern was  how were we going to make it  down if we were this dead at the  peak?  After 15 minutes on the roof  of Africa we started back. Fortunately, going down turned out  to be completely different.  What took us over seven  hours to climb up took only an  V/z hours to come down. We  practically ran down the scree  slope and arrived back at the  top hut a little after 10:30.  Following a well-earned  sleep, our last day was spent  walking the remaining 20  kilometers that had taken us  two days to come up. We arrived back at the park entrance,  signed out, received a certificate  for making it to the top and  headed back to the Kibo Hotel  for a beer or two and a bath.  **j. \  ���w  V-fcXl*,  ���V -'J  **.  Remember: "   ' ��� -^  About 25,000 people read this newspaper; but we A  have only a limited supply of carpet to choose from j*  at 1988 prices  SO HURRYls==_ _ i  Wm  Y'a5"'  ��� *Ma  DAR SPRIN  .���^ir'Ti ts   i t_   ���Y*& _-��. ***? *w  Don't miss these January Savings  Come in soon while selection is still excellent  A small deposit will hold your selection at  the sale price. ,  Ve>\  * ca��3 its* fca       rjjccy Se aA  ?_,\   VJ  4 Choices        Install it your  self  January Clearance Prices From:   m   r  sq. yd.  PECIAL  mFAWtwrs "  5TAm$mfpm  Ivory. 4&>_^      ; |   *  SWS!K__{_S&  mw*dfffi$  V*  >0 V,  *�� *��� ��� T f.  -�����'-���/'�����'  I ft  ^^^Mmmrnmimmmi  CONTRACTOR PRICING  OPEN TO THE PUBLIC  ALL THIS MONTH  VALUES WILL NEVER BE BETTER.  1989 FIBRE PRICES ARE UP  10-15 PERCENT  Check out these  extraordinary.pr^es  (up to 8x12')  VTNVT C_. - Great Selection/  W AH ft All9    Low Prices  This Week Only:  sq. ft.  ABMSTRONO  CASTILIAN PLUS  4 choiOM, fog $16 85 aCj. yd  . -   t  >*t *  PROMO SOLAHUUI  Tough urctiwA* itnlA  Product  Chadwick (Chestnut)  Avbndale (Snow Peach)  (Frost Grey)  Quality Mood (Grey)  100% Wool Berber  Mm  Bog. Price  80 sq. yd.  60 sq. yd.  120 sq. yd.  17 1/3 sq. yd.  15 1/3 sq. yd.  $2,040.00  $1,974.00  $3,948.00  $442.00  $728  ���1,036����  877700  ���1,554����  ���224����  ���122����  PLUS    76 more similar choices  all sizes, all colours  ^   - -  *.-  -��* t ���*���' �����*   - j  -iSf NO  DOMCO REGAL 44  Reg. $10.95 sq. yd.  January Clearance Price:  sq. yd.  Just Ask Art-ad  OVER 30 YEARS  EXPERIENCE  In The Carpet Industry  STEAM CLEAN  Carpets & Upholstery  CZ3  ' Our reputation tor dependability ana  thorough results is well known! -  Jfia moat powarful unit on tha  Sunahlna Coast -  THBafHam most carpet manulactutais  racomtnand  VINYL, CARPET,  [ HARDWOOD FLOORS  NEED SPECIAL CARE  Manufacturer's guarantees  ., (not to mention your own  maximum satisfaction) require the use of correctly formulated floor care products.  Be safe. Choose the right  product from our display of  manufacturers' specially formulated floor care products.  Up To wit /��  ALL  BLouver  ISDrape  MINI BLINDS  PLEATED SHADES  VERTICAL DRAPES  '���jeYp:^  LOUVER DRAPE &  DeVRIES  announce  A New Breakthrough  in  Window Coverings  Fashion &  Efficiency  ,#t��Y  6"X6"  Ceramic  ^allTii?  ,;^/f.jVVrhite, Beige, G|rey  Insulating Honeycomb Construction  No holes or visible cords  Great colour & design choices  (Even Georgian fan lites)  No sag, fray, or fade  /6  over-60  gM- in-stock.  oi  DeVries offers the largest selection, on the Sunshine Coast  of special order patterns' '���& colours (over 100 books to  choose from) plus all the accessories you'll need to create  beautiful walls.  :// you'r&sefipusly considering new window  coverings you must see new Duette at DeVRIES  Mon-Sat, 9-5  709 Hwy 101, Gibsons 886-7112  fc*  ROLLING OUT MOBE  FOR Y001 MONEY  ssafltt  3^Mri&_t__-_:&k.___J^LiiM_; -i  **4t**?y^��t.,*.e,.j. ��:gtiy^^*~^,m  b-.^..-,..^.-;.

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