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The Coast News Nov 21, 1945

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Array mnmuBamuin^tfmxanMm  Home Town  Headlines  * * *  *  PORT ALBERNI���  Len Noble and Jack Moore  were fined $500 each for pit-  lamping.  Foundation work has started  on the new radio station here  and broadcasts may start earlier  than was expected. Planned to  serve the Alberni Valley and  upper Vancouver Island, building foundation work has started  on Third avenue  north.  #  *  *  *'  COMOX���  The Comox Argus asks whether the public wants the 60 cycle  power under discussion at the  moment, and also wants to know  what is holding up the new high  school. The construction controller does not think that the  gym and auditorium is necesteary  for the new school and Alderman -Pirecy pointed out that  with new power coming in the  people should realize from the  start what they want and are  likely to get.  The Comox District Free Press  reports that Cumberland's city  fathers' are attempting to equalize the present discriminatory  property values in the city. V.I.  Coach lines were also reported  to# have inaugurated a new triangle service between CoUrt-  enay, Cumberland and Royston  along with other changes in the.-  new schedule.. Fanny Bay will  also benefit from a new service  and additional runs have been  planned in other places.  #     sH     ajs     *'  PRINCE  GEORGE���  The film council here will sup-  ply an index library of National  Film Board. works. It will also  be the center of circuit of 22  towns radiating, out from Prince  1UK.  ubbakY  PT7B_��_SH_U>   B_"   _*_��_   COAST  NEWS,   Xt-M-TED  Business Office: Half Moon Bay, B. C.      .rational Advertising Office: PoweU Biver, B.  Serving  a  Progressive   &   Growing  Area on  B. C.'s  Southern   Coast  Covers   Sechelt,   Gibson's    ^Landing,  Port   Mellon,  Woodfi'bre,   Squamish  Irvine's  Landing,  Half Moon Bay  Hardy   Island,  Pender   Harbour  Wilson   Creek,    Roberts    Creek  Grantham's    Landing.    Egmont,  Hopkin's    Landing;      Brackendale  Cheekeye.  etc.  Vol. I, No. 19  HALF MOON BAY, B. C.;    Wednesday, November 21,   1945  5c Per Copy. $2.50 Per Year, by Mail  EDITORIAL���  Your Paper  r The editorial staff of YOUR PAPER, The Coast News,  apologize for the undersized nature of the paper during this  formative period. Unfortunately we still have our rationing  worries and only ai certain allotment of paper is available for  the use of new weeklies such as this paper.  This, is your paper���it is bought by the people in your  community, carries the advertisements of your businessmen,  \ and the news is your news and the articles are your articles.  * There is one thing-that is yet missing from our pages; your  direct comment either in the form of letters to the editor or  as commentary columnists.  This paper, although reserving the right to print only  what we think is the interest of the public, will attempt to  show no discrimination to different viewpoints on any article.  All letters to the editor must have the name and address  of the author for our records before we can accept them,  however a psuedonym may be used on the printed article  if the author so desires. '  Until the new year, when we expect to get increased  allotments, and new advertising contracts which will, allow  a bigger and better paper, we shall continue to give the best  service possible with the limited resources available.  We welcome in particular all suggestions as to how this  paper will become even more your paper, bigger and better  because you read and contribute toward it, and how your  community will be even more your community, bigger and  better because you live there.  Because the newsprint ration  of The Coast News is just sufficient to finish out the balance  of the year under restricted publishing dates, The Coast News  will publish every other week  for the next six weeks.  We regret that this action is  necessary, but hope that shortly  we may be entirely free of such  restrictions.  Correspondents are requested  to continue sending their news  items in EACH WEEK to facilitate production of the paper  They will be published un,der  their respective datelines.  ���EDITORS.  ROAD PROTEST MEETING  Taxi men and truck drivers are  holdng a mass meeting to protest  about the roads on Wednesday,  November 21, at Roberts Creek.  CAVE-IN TRAPS  TRUCK DRIVER  Friends had to dig Mr. Alexander, truck driver for Reg  Godfrey, out of gravel when he  was buried under four feet of  material when the gravel pit in  which he was working caved in  on top of him.  A resident of Grantham's  Landing, Mr. Alexander apparently had just pried loose a  boulder which was acting as a  keystone to the pit wall, and his  attention diverted at the critical  moment he did not have time to  notice and dodge the sudden  cave in.  Though no external or obvious  injuries were -experienced, he is  suffering from shock and remained for a.short period under  the doctor's care.  LOCAL MLA HAS LITTLE SUCCESS  KITSILANO BAND TOUR INCURS DEFICIT  Concert Well-Attended  In Spite Of Poor Weather  To Ernie Pearson of The Coast News, must go the credit  of creating musical history for the folks of Pender Harbour,  '^iulie^ylPut'^  residence of Jaimes JEJailey, Toronto street in the Millar addition, when fire started in a  oloiset through a wall from a  stove  pipe.  12 major washouts closed the  CNR main route to Prince Rupert over the armistice weekend.  Two army officers, Douglas  and John Thomas, plan a cold  itorage plants to be erected here  next spring.  *  *  *  *  ROSSLAND���  John Henry Harry, resident of  Rossland for the past 31 years,  died suddenly Saturday morning  at his home.  A good turnout of Canadian  Club members heard Mr. J. J.  Poelhekke, director of the Netherlands government information  bureau, in an address to the  local club.  Electoral  results  of Rossland  High   School    Students    council  rwere:   president,   David   Smith;  vice-president,     David     Keffer;  secretary, Lorraine Swift; trea-  (Continued  on   page   4)  ���-'*"' Commenting on the statement made by Hon. R. L. Maitland, K.C., attorney-general for this province, which appeared last week in the Powell River News, Mr. H. Gargrave,  MLA, who was a visitor to the district also, expressed surprize at the attorney-general's remarks, saying that he would  bend every effort to have roads minister, Honourable Mr.  Anscomb, tour this riding.  conductor.   Though it rained hard during the whole of the  nearly three hour concert, there was a very good attendance.  The boys played a most ambi  GOWER POINT  Mrs. B. A. Chadsey,  Correspondent  HALLOWE'EN  PA#TY  Miss Ruth Chadsey had as  guests at her Hallowe'en party  in her home the Misses Dorene  Armstrong, Eay Coleridge, and  Tola King. Also Messers. Jim  Chaster, ?Eddy Battison and  Murray  King.  Fancy costumes were worn by  all   and   an   enjoyable   evening  was spent.  WINS  FIRST PRIZE  Miss Joy Miller won first prize  for fancy costume at the Hallowe'en sehool party. She was  dressed., to represent a pump-  kin.  (Continued  on  page  5)  SECHELT  ETA ORGANIZED  Twenty-six members joined  the Parent Teachers Association  of Sechelt in their first meeting  held at the Legion Hall follow-  ing an addres by Mrs. Margaret  > McLeod, Provincial Organizer of  the Parent Teachers Association  an B.C.  A good atterdance was at the  meeting in spite of the snow  and freezing weather.  Mrs. , McLeod gave an interesting address, explaining the ���  work of the PTA in this province  and it was decided to organize  in Sechelt, twenty-six joining  (immediately.  Officers elected till the organization takes a permanent basis  were: Honourary Vice President,  Mr. Macintosh (school principal); President, Mrs. Ted Osborne, First Vice President, Mrs.  H. W. Brooker; Second Viee  President, Mr. Ralph McCul-  lough; Secretary, Mrs. Muriiel  Aylward; Treasurer, Mrs. Ru-  bunyna Jay; Health Convener,  Mrs. Margaret Arnold.  Other officers will be appointed at the -next meeting. Positions yetV to $e:' filled include  Membership, Social, Literature,  Library, Study Group, HpspK  taljty and publicity committee  chairman.  Mrs.    MacLeod   stressed    the  "I am very interested in the  remarks made by Mr. Maitland,  last week, particularly in hkn  giving assurance that every ef-  . fort would be made in having  Mr. Anscomb, minister/of roads,  visit this district and inspect the  condition of the local* roads,"  said Gargrave. "That's what I  was trying to da for the past  four years and I haven't succeeded yet in getting Mr. Anscomb out of bis comfortable office to visit this district."  Mr. Gargrave averred that he  had challenged the Minister of  Roads during the last session to  do just that on the grounds that  Mackenzie was the only riding  Mr. Anscomb had not visited.  "If Mr. Maitland," continued  Gargrave, "lis interested in having Mr. Anscomb visit Mackenzie I trust that Mr. Maitland  will co-operate with me to take  action at the next session, and  I will show him the copy of the  Powell River News containing  his statement in an effort to receive co-operation."  tious program, .including Schubert's Unfinished Symphony and  several descriptive numbers  which were very much enjoyed.  Community singing helped to enliven   the  proceedings.  EXTEND APPRECIATION  A   vote   of   thanks   to   Messrs.  Delamont   and  Pearson   and   the  band,   proposed  by   A.   R.  Ding-  man and Ernest Crush, was most  heartily received.   Replying Conductor   Delamont   detailed   some  of  the  band's  successes  in   England,   Wales,   Chicago   and   Toronto fyhere   they   defeated  some  of the world's  best name bands.  It was learned after the concert that due to weather conditions   and  heavy  transportation  costs,   there   would   be   quite   a  heavy   deficit  for the  tour  embracing   Gibson's   Landing,    Sechelt and Pender Harbour.   Any  persons wishing to help in liquidating that deficit,  are  asked to  send their contributions to Ernie  Pearson at Half Moon Bay.  It is hoped here that the band  may be brought back at a future  date.  KLEINDALE  Mrs.  C. Harper,  Correspondent  TEXADA ISLAND VISITORS  Charles   Klein   of   Texeda   Island spent a few days here last  week,  visiting his mother,  Mrs.  Martina Klein.  NEW CLERK AT PIEPER'S  Miss Leona Dubois has begun  her new duties as clerk in Piep-  er's   General   Store,   at  IrviJne's  . Landing.  RETURN  FROM  FISHING  Jim Phillips and Peter Klein,  local  fishermen,  are  back from  the fishing grounds.  MISS   SUNDQUIST   HOME  Miss    Alma    Sundquist,    who  spent  last  week  in  Vancouver,  as guest. of Mr. and Mrs.  Busier Sundquist, is home again.  Dog Barks Alarm;  Saves Community  fact that fathers are particularly invited to participate in  this type of work. Both parents are included in this organization. '      ���  The meeting opened with the  national anthem. Mrs. F. French  acted as chairman and Mrs. Osborne served as head of a very  efficient convenor committee.  Fire, which might have threatened Grantham's Landing, was  averted by a barking dog and  wet weather about 4 a.m., November 13. Only loss was a  woodshed owned by David  Bates.-"  Of undetermined origin the  citizen's of Grantham's Landing  were awakened by the frantic  barking of a dog owned by Reverend Mr. Snowden, a past resident of Grantham's. Investigating the noise, citizens who  had to get out of bed at 4 a.m.  found the woodshed back of  Dave  Bates'  place  blazing fur  iously and threatening adjacent  dwellings. A fence, jo<ining the  structure to the house, was already on fire.  The blaze was under control  by daylight, but the woodshed  was a total loss.  The recent wet spell was attributed to have kept the flames  from spreading readily and the  dog, which apparently was returning to his old home after  the famdly had moved, was credited with spreading the alarm.  Lack of adequate water supply and fire fighting equipment  hampered operations. PAGE 2  THE COAST NEWS. Halfmoon Bay, B. C.  Wednesday, November 21,  1945  Wat Coast Jfews  3 Lines  (15 Words)  for 35c     3  Insertions  (same ad)  60c  Extra words, above 15-word min., 2c each. Cash with order.  Notices,  Engagements, Marriages, Deaths, etc., 75c insertion  LITTLE ADS - - - BIG RESULTS!  FOR SALE���  One horse for sale. Apply Jack  Rouse, Sechelt. 3  Waterfront lots and acreage adjoining Wakefield Inn, at Sechelt. Harry A Erickson, 942 W.  Pender   Street,   Vancouver,    tf  CIRCULEX   HEALTH UNITS  A Circulex will give you relief  from arthritic, rheumatic or  neurotic pains���asthma, headaches, foot trouble, nervousness, insomnia, sinus, sciatica,  varicose veins, constipation,  hemorrhoids and other circulatory troubles. Models from  $155 up. For descriptive literature, write Doran's Furniture  Co., Westview, B. C.  $100 REWARD!  For recovery of 300-lb. bull  block and rigging taken from  Half Moon Bay wharf. Cook &  Vplen,  Half Moon Bay.  *  KEYS TO ORDER���  All kinds of keys made to order. Send sample you wish duplicated. Muir's Hardware, at  Powell River (Westview) B.C.  FOR  SALE���  One^Jtatelhational   1-ton # dump  tipc^|o*^jpeed$^^ "'  tires? hydraulic hoi_��� Also 1931  pfmel delivery Chevrolet, good  running order, 6 good tires and  wheels.. A. E. Ritchey, Half  Moon Bay. 7 tf  FOR SALE-  36-Foot cod boat. Will make a  west coast troller. Good buy,  excellent condition, $1000 cash.  See or write Oliver Dubois, at  Pender Harbour. 23  WEDDING STATIONERY���  Engraved or standard wedding  invitations, announcements. Also wedding cake boxes, complete with cards, 95c dozen.  The Coast News, Halfmoon Bay  PICTURE   FRAMING���  Send cyour enlargements, pho-  tbs, certificates to us for expert framing at low cost: Prices  before job is done, if you wish.  Cranberry Hardware, Powell  River, B. C.  NOTICE���  Join the theatrical group now  being formed by Brooker Academy of Music and Art. Junior and senior classes. Students  will be presented in revues &  plays, also making and operation of marionette shows. The  Brooker  School,   Sechelt.        tf  WE BUY AND SELL���  Rifles and shotguns bought and  solo>; also all kinds of used  goods, furniture, clothing, tools  etc. Square Deal Store, West-  view, B. C.  ROBERTS CREEK  ROBERTS CREEK, A N Cotton.  ERNIE   COMES   HOME  Ernie Mathews is back home  again. Or maybe we should say  Mr. Ernie Mathews, as he is now  out of the army. Mrs. Mathews  now has both of her sons home.  ARMISTICE   HOLIDAYERS  We notice a few of our Roberts  Creek young ladies home from  their jobs and studies over the  Armistice   Day  weekend,   includ  ing Miss Lorraine Kirkland, Miss  Joan   Evans,   Miss   Jean   Cotton  and Miss Gail Downes.  TREK   TO   GIBSONS  Roberts Cfreek 'Ma largje  number of visitors over the holiday weekend, and there was a  great deal of running about, getting down to Gibsons to catch  Monday night's boat. One taxi  driver reported he carried 26  passengers  to  Gibsons.  COMMUNITY   ACTIVITIES  The badminton club is going  strong; Sechelt is coming down  to play on Thursday, November  SHOP by MAIL  from  Powell Stores Ltd.  Powell River, B. C.  The north coast's Most Modern Department Store  W.  Sutherland,  Correspondent  VISITORS IN AND OUT  Mr. and Mrs. Sheriff of West  Vancouver spent last weekend  at Redrooffs. They were looking over the available homesites  with a view to permanent residence here. Mrs. Thibedeau of  Mission City, has been visiting  her mother, Mrs. Mosier. Mr.  T. H. Beasley and his son Billy,  spent a week in Vancouver and  seem to have managed to enjoy  themselves in spite of the weather. Billy has been getting some  pre-Christmas dental repairs���^a  very sound idea.  IT'S A BOY!  Old friends of Mr. and Mrs.  Albert "Walker,*> one time residents of Half Moon Bay, will  be interested to know that little  Barhara now has a baby brother,  born on November 7th.  BOAT CALLS HERE  Mr.  and Mrs.  Wm.  Cochrane  with  their  daughter   Elise   and  son Bill, arrived on Friday, No^  vember 15th, enroute from Vancouver to their logging camp on  Texada Island.   They were travelling on  their  own  boat,  Miss  Victoria   II,   and   a  very   handsome craft ��it is, rumoured to be  a converted rum runner, which  may account for the sleek swift  lines.    Mr.   Cochrane   formerly  'operated  a   logging  camp   near  Half Moon Bay and the family  is well known hereabouts.   They  remained as guests of Mrs. Beasley until Saturday when they resumed  their  journey.  RESPITE   FROM   REPAIRS  Mr.   George  Fidler,   who  has  been  undergoing repairs at St.  Mary's, Hospital,  was permitted  to return home for a brief visit.  However  hiisr leave  of,-, absence ������  was short and-he has^ returned,  to  hospital  for .:.further   trea|tT '  ��� menti ��� .        .   ;..     '��� ���   '. " ': *  '���'"*  GOING TO CONVENTION  At first it looked as though  our very reliable school teacher  was playing Jiookey, but it turned out that that was one of the  days I forgot to look at the ,  calendar���Armistice Day. Miss  Ek was beaming with pleasure  as the holiday was apparently  not definitely expected. She is  looking forward to a trip to Vancouver for the teachers' convention to be held in* West Vancouver on November 22nd and 23rd.  The location is particularly  gratifying as her sister has recently moved to that district.  KITSILANO BOYS BAND  Wilf Scott transported a  truckload of enthusiasts from  Half Moon Bay to Pender Harbor on November 16th to hear  the K/itsilano Boys' Band. It is  rumored that the band is making  this concert tour as a result of  the public spirited enterprise of  Ernie Pearson. He Is to be con-*  gratulated on an / effort;, which  will bring much pleasure to the  music lovers of the coast communities.  22. The Farmers' Institute is  still meeting once a'month, discussing local affairs. The Gulf  Mainland Co-op are calling a general meeting for Monday, No- .  vember 26, at 8 p.m., in Roberts  Creek Hall.  FERRY NEWS  NOW   IN   OPERATION  yy Two Ifaund Trips Daily  Lv. Gibson's Landing at  7.55  a.m.  and 2.30 p.m.  ^Lv.1 Fisherman's   Cove    !  at 9.10 a.m. and 4.00. p.m.  Objections  to   this   timetable  ��� may be filed with  Public  Utilities' Commission,  Victoria, B.C.  TUGS  BEST  VISITORS  There are few comings and  goiings to report this week���except in the matter of tugs, and  even tttey are just sitting tight.  We are quite proud of the fact  that our Bay offers good shelter,  and during stormy weather we  can generally eount on a temporary increase of population.  Just now we have four tugs in  with "their booms, and as many  as fifteen have been known to  shelter here in the past. The  greatest number I have seen  here at one time was ten, and it  really was a sight, especially at  night when the twinkling lights  looked as though a small village  had unexpectedly grown up  across the Bay-       '  They remind me somehow of  nice elderly hens, with their  broods of ^chicks, anfr'ssemg'  them there always arouses a hope  that something interesting will  happen,.' like the time, one tug  captain suddenly discovered he  had a birthday %o celebrate, and  an impromptu dance was immediately organized, ending with  refreshments on board his tug  ���large and healthy corned beef  sandwiches and coffee. The galley was-a bit crowded arid the  cook, who was unused to haying  his sanctum invaded by a miscellaneous assortment of femininity fled in terror or embarrassment, we : never did find out  which Jt was. . -  Tugs towing barges, derricks,  oil scows qr^what have you, are  fly-by-nights compared to the  dignified dbn't-be - in - a - hurry  tugs with the responsibility of  big log booms. They pop in, an-,  chor perhaps overnight, and  then are off at the first sign  of calmer weather: This is confusing to my ^simple mind as I  depend on. th^ tugs instead of  the baroi^terH. when th^re& are'.-  any' arbuna. It Jas; pleasant 'td  see"'them taking"'��� advantage-~: of ;  our hospitalable shelter, but it's  pleasanter still when we can say  "The   tugs   are  gone.    Thank  goodness the storm has passed."  a   General  Trucking  H WOOD  Service   With   A  Smile!  Gibson's Landing  WALLY    GRAHAM  Gibson's  Landing  Monuments   ��� Flowers^  Funeral Director  Order Your  FUEL   WOOD  NOW!  Whipple & Tyson  WILSON GREEK,  B.  C.  Tsawcome Garage*  & Welding Co; Ltd.  WI-.SO& CtfEEK, B.  CV  ��� . '������. .^    .       ;'���...���������   ..';.,.������ ���  ARE *OUR  STANDARD OIL  Distributors  For   Sechelt   Peninsula   And  the Tbba Inlet Area  We assure all. our customers,  old & new, we will provide  the most efficient and ebuf-:  teous , service of Standard  Products - as'- wartime^ restrict,  tions will allow -  Fuel Oil General Tires  Stove Oil Batteries  Diesel Oil     Auto Accessories  to RALLY  All Masons living between Hopkin's Landing  and Irving's Landing are urged to send their  names, addresses, and the name and address  of mother lodge, to Murray Mackenzie, c/o  Burets and Jackson Logging Company Ltd.,  Wilson Greek.  ���' *   -':'; '-i   ������ ������   ..  ������ ���?��� ':���.;-��� z . --.,���'   ���  *'���-.-.     ���    i ' '' ���''.:.'  ���     ' j .'-  The.intention of the advertisement is to form  a Masonic Lodge on this peninsula.  "Prompt Attention To Mail Orders!"  it RESTMORE FURNITURE:  Beds, Springs, Mattresses "  * General Electric APPLIANCES: Radios, Refrigerators  &  ���   '.'.'   Washing Machines  it FURNITURE: Occasional Tables, Cedar Chests, Lamps etc  WESTVIEW, fi: C - Phone 230  T" t ��ijjt)j����i m��J j^iJJl UM^l^!_JJa.U'JV.l- J  .THf CQAfT $P��& Simeon Say, B. ���.  -FAQ-B'3  *  #  *  *  By ROBERT BURNS,  Gibson'6 Landing,  B.C.  Editor's Note:T,he .epmp^et^n .of  the six miles of road which .will  join Gibson's Landing to Port  Mellon will bring greater^ prosperity to the Gibson's district  as well as allowing greater freedom to the people oJLP.ort Mellon.  Bob Burns, a student of local  history ##4 s^mewj^ of an  authority on local *:o#d conditions, was asked to collect the  following in^|m|it)ion for a report " to the nation through th,��  medium of the C$a$t News. ~As  one can easily notice, this great  historian 'has .given much research to the problem and offers  his own unorthodox solution as  to\iyh.at could and .should he  done. ���'.   ���  *  Gibson's usually has a large  number of visitors during tfye  summer but depends principally  upon pensioners and soldier^  families for its survival. The^e  conditions are /going to change  in- the near future, and are  changing now. If we can get  so;m]e -action J>n <thSs -spad MOW  this newspaper will consider itself a help to this community  as it should be.  This road and the way it has  been treated is ^yery similar %o  the equally notorious "Princeton Highway", whfch has becgn  'under construction* for 14  years.  *  *   * jf  Work on the ahoye road was  ', commenced in the year 191J3  and pursued with such assiduity  that Iby 1915 ,mo��e t^n ^>%e4ialf  mile had j- been completed; ,- No  surveying or engineering: Was  done.  In ,the fipr^n^ of 191j> the  writer .was one of ^a ^pajty of  four men who located and built  a pack-trail f ro$i the end of the  road to P^ort Mellon; the distance was six or seven miles,  the work was done for the Forest Branch, and was completed  in something less than two  weeks.  itVith an electipn tcoming on  in 1916 it was' felt thaPwprk  should be commenced on the  road j |hjs ^was <&n��; .t&e jpoverii-  ment-sponsored candidate was  elected iocaUy, th^ujjh $he government itself waj* Je|eate$.  The local lesson wafe -taken to  heart by both Conservatives and  Liberals and a pattern set for  future elections. Thereafter,  with .very dew exceptions, work  on the road was always started  just Jt*efpa;e ,elec$k>��, usually  finishing up election night,  though on (p^caj4on;v#ie work has  been known to last for a couple  of <$0a Jongey. ;|jxcep|^|ns $o  the established policy have been  as in ��9^3, wh^n #he Tokmfje  government yvipnt ,$Q -thje .country  and 'with their characteristic ineptitude neglected to start the  Port Mellon road. They wer>  soundly trounced. The Liberals  nia,de jtio -such error jn 193?:  survey gangs were jmt to work  more than "a week before election dfcy anp! ,the ineffable Mjel  Bryan liad pockets full of documents guaranteeing the immediate completion of the road.  Bryan and ;the .LSheyals wei?e  elected. However, in the 1941  election $i�� ^go&ernm^nt, wilgh  their minds perhaps diverted by  war tetier4a, /o^go^b $ae Poft  Mellon roa$, .witjhthe unhappy  result that a CCF-er was elected locally, and the Liberals got  back ito Victoria with ,sueh a -slim  representation   that   they   were  forced to share the plums of  . office with the -Conservatives.  The material result of ��� all the  ���above is that the end of the  road is now about a mile farther  along than in 1913, .and has  only about six miles to go.  J>l  feature  of  the  work  has  been   the   many   survey .gan^gs  that haye worked over the Toute  on location; probably an .average of one survey for eaoh election with perhaps an &x��ra survey or two thrown in.  Evidence  of .this is apparent ,at an.d nea,r  the   present   end  pf  the  road,  where   starts   of  roads   can  be  seen l\ea$ng into the ml^njejss  like ,t)ie extended 4ng^s c^pne's  jhand.   Hpiweyer, .in ;spi^e tof 4;]jp  $ia;_y gangs ftf ip^tip^ ^nj^in-  e/ers   who   hf/ye   ^aijed   ^beir  transits  oyer  the ro$te  during  past years, as jot 19.44 $ke ;PJublic  Worjcs  department in ^icjapiMa,  y(ai\co.uyer  and  %ffip  -l^estpiin-  sier reported there is no record  .giving   any  infpron^tiah  gfr- ;t*>  ^putes,    possible   tpbsi^c,les   ,pr  .other jftatf-ers usually ;sujbniii$ted  ,by ��� engineers who have :wp^ed  ' pti (a "job.   Po^blyjgoyernpxent  ' lpcatipn   engh^fiori^g,", like   gpy-  yeiiiinent ro^d b\iildi^g: 4and ^QfV-  ie.i\nment  bo^Jc-^keepih^ is -jsome-  {^ing separate and apai^t ^froan  $}|  methods  us,ed  by .ordinary  yinjrtals.  Actually, there is no engineering problem involved; there are  neither mountains nor muskeg;  i n^J rockrwork, tno difficult bridges.  The terrain is mostly level (or  .as nearly so as is usually found  .on the B.C. .cpast-) and mostly  -gravel f orniation. There -will be  iiwo* bridges of perhaps one  ffcundred ^eet long,: and perhaps  '���twenty feet high; two smaller  bridges and quite & number of  culverts. Of course -the -waiter  is speaking from the view^point  of one who has. done a good  ,deal ..of road'ilocation and construction ,on the xoast of B.C.  .and .always with the objective  of producing the -best road for  the least cost. It is far from  certain that a similar objective  animates government road building ,so it is entirely possible  that a road connecting the two  t points, w^en .and if built by the  goyerixment wjU ;e^e.punter rpck,  muskeg, canyons and cata^cts.  JLt seepms to have been impos-  'sufele to coiTtfince the jgfpyern-  .ment tha,t any- reason exists to  puiild t^e road ���pijheJr than -aia a  ,b3*ibe fpr yotes. To :an vineciu-  ;cated person rsuch .as ^Jbe writer,  ^be i��lipwing .reasons ,pceur:  During the jhun^ry thirties  ^irith ,��iany jaen qut oi wvor]c and  much road jbujidkig jmaehinery  idle such a pie^e of,construction  wprk wpjild <.h#yje been a great  local ^en.pfit, :at least rlpcally.  Assuming the road were com-  pl^d, t^e inarket at J^prt ;^el-  jlpn 5^0^14 be tmpre iaccessi^ip ;to  local produces of farm and  garden producg, ^and ^he wprjc-  ���rs at the Pprt would get the  * * * jt  benefit of the fjpe��b .sjupjpjliles.  The market at the mill would  be more accessible to the thousands of acres o.f seco,nd.-rgrowth  ifir, ^emlock, etc., in this district, Itenefiting the mill as well  g�� %e local ranchers^an^ truck-  Te^s w^o .could be engaged in  cutting and delivering the .tim,-  In ttfee ey^ent ^th^t th^e saw-'  mW> ,# .P^jt jMeUpn ^^e#r^ to  ^i!^c^te Jb ��ttie ^<?c^l jtrade, .jit  would   be   easier   ac^esgihle   rto  *  *  *  jtOgAl MM$K?  fe4  censi^ction  jp^p^le   .repuiping   luiwjfeer,   c^r-  v thinly a l$caLJ^n*$t ..and prfe-  AwmW a mi** -mrtyp .voald  not be 'unacceptable, in ^ao.rmal  jtjn^es,, jtp ti\e null.  ��( >to y^ar^ ji^cal ^pnstruc-  M9�� M ^duajly ^eWn^ away  Jfepm j&fl sta^e^rljhe^gr^und,  boAr^njd-^ba^ejti ,ty^p of ft^e  era of the real estate booster.  Among other things, better construction generally jgoea^s ^np?;e  concrete wprk. T*here is no sat-  is^actory local gravel and sand.  tWith the ro^d ^uilt -^he .Champion & White works' at Hillsfide  would -he acQe3Si'l?le for the re-  quire^l building supplies, certainly (a i?oon to J��c%l bwpders  and again presumably accjept-  able jto that conipany  Ppr,t Afellpn, ,$��asi^e aiiui H;U-  gicle .^s well ,as^,tl>e inijeryening  .districts would Joe aceessnihle to  ,doctors ;and district nurses from  here, or w,hat ^ perhajps mpre  likely ai^d n^pbfi)bly in.pr,e to be  desired., to the^ services of a  n\e��iical (center, Combining hps-  .pitaj, .fdoqtprs^ pharmacists ^nd  nurses that ruay b,e estj^blished  spmewhere in the Qibsion's .area.  Suc^ w.p(ujl^ benefit |jie 'jjwrkers  at jpprt %ey\o\iJ$t#$hy, and #ie  added reyen^ie wopld enable .tl^e  maintenance of much .^tter'  facilities ,at t^e centre, where-  vey.er established.  The Port Mellon area js npt  really desirable as a residential  district; the area centering on  Gibson's is evidently very desirable, judging by the numbers  of people who cpme here wit;h  apparently no other object than  merely to live here. With the  road completed, and a bus operating, the workers could live  wherever they wished along the  road, on small farms or Beach-.  side lots, and go back and forth  1 to work. .  Educational facilities at Gibson's are good, and the ratepay->  ers are regularly voting more  money to make them still better.  With the road built, the Port  'Mellon area included in the  Howe Sound United School district, a school bus operating,  these facilities would be available to children of the workers  at the -Port to their advantage.  The enlargement of the taxation  ar,ea w^pjiild \grejitiy >ejp .J^e  school Jp^d b^ce^ting, and it  is unlikely ^that -any great increase jjB yBy%t ^chjCJpl .pp^tS WOUld  eventuate js ggg$$$B  the   new  area.  With easy communtication between the districts, almost certainly considerable settlement  would develop along the route  of .the road; and again almost  certainly the whole social life  of the whole area from Sechelt  to Seaside -Park would be greatly enlarged, enlivened and improved.  ^weyer, even after two  world wars, allegedly for democracy, we still build roads  for political reasons only, not  for use.  GENERAL MERCHANT  HALFMOON BAY, B. C.  NOTARY PUBLIC  mja  lyillllllMlllffll  SECRET COVE  IsCflfl  *i - _TJ J tL-JTU-V^^* JJ_*X �����-���,_�������_/  i,U    iiUIJIl  XMLLS .LEFT F^R ^C^Y  Mr. and Mrs. George Gill have  4eft for yai^coiuyer. jQ^ their  May down ;t^ey ^yed .over jA  Gibson's Landing, yisiting .wi^b  their daughter, Mrs. Nickelson,  and their children.  RETURN TO VANCOUVER  Mrs. Ruby Franzen and Miss  'Rosalie Franzen have returned  to Vancouver after a few weeks  stay with the Jergenson*s.  SURPRISE jPARTy  A surpris.e party yvjas held  for Mr. and Mrs. Ernie ^illispn  .On Noyember 3. Refreshments  ���were seryed and all enjoyed a  yery 5good time. The guests included Mr. and Mrs. Ivor JB.  Jergen��.on, Mrs. Ruby Franzen,  ,of yancpuyer, Miss Rosalin  Franzen of Vancouver, Miss Ida  Jergensoii, and Edward and Eisner J;ergenspin, and >^iss M^hle  .Qriftltt.   ....  '.;-.   ...  .t..'.,:    . .._  Invest in War Savings Stamps!  SELJMA PARK  HAIRDRESSING  SHOPPE  Dolly Jonas ^  A Complete HaiEdressing  Phone   for  Appc_ia___ents  Thomas  BEASLEY  GENERAL MERCHANT  BUS STOP  AT 1HJS  SPORT-FISHING  GJEOTJER . , ,  ^^.^   MX     ��,.   /��*Vf ��(���**  *j1AK *&** T��**W  f*  J* f   09 �����    ^W*M  Sunset Hardware  HARDWARE   :: FURNITURE  DClfTV    FARM PRODUCTS  .Agents for     DCAIlI     And WASHERS  at GIBSON'S LANDING  I  '.���Hi.  .^ *   V    ��� -y _<  ^^*Ty^*^^^^^L  "A Place I Like To Buy From!"  WlaHaker's  Trading Post  GENERAL MEReMAJ*TS  Davis Bay - ��� WILSON CREEK  "WW  Pt^gS-     jp-*".?.ljf'--��ii       >�����.-���������**<.      ?g����H^>^>*w     Wm*W#*^Wi,  "W^^s^^^WF  t-** w\ *** ����4  ?^s^^^^^^^  Large  WATERFRONT LOT  Comfortable 5-room  )Bungalow, Bathroom, >&  Furnace.  Near stores &  ;Postoff|ce.  HALF <MOON -BAY  P^ice &09P  REAL ESTATE  FlflE - 0UWO - fflBRINE - LIFE  w&mmcE  MsAimom Bay  m " a m m Ji1 ��� w'tagg' ���' *m  ���jiim^iiiiim  y$ri$e pr ^hpne for Information  Ph A-Y    ��Af _)   . ...INSUfiS  ����� iM-wm mvjwww"1 m  ''   ���*-  N-OW  WATERFRONT   and  OTHjE|t LQTJS  $a00.00 and up  *  Porpoise Bay  Sechelt  Half Moon Bay PAGE 4  THE COAST NEWS, Halfmoon Bay, B. C.  Wednesday, November 21,  1945  For    Estimates  Get   In   Touch   With  HALF  MOON   BAY  ometown  DROP  IN AT  THE  SECHELT  TEA ROOM  FOR    LIGHT   SNACKS  . DINNERS and  AFTERNOON TEAS  ���  SECHELT  INN  SECHELT, B. C.  Garden  Bay Cafe  ���.'-:'.;',    ��������������� V  SANDWICHES  SHORT ORDERS  DINNERS  WEEKDAYS:���  11 A.M to 12 midnite  SUNDAYS:���  11 A.M. to 5 P.M.  "Whip  (Continued   from  page   1)  surer,  Orma  Bray,  by acclamation.  *   *  *   *  PENTICTON���  Accommod'ation in Penticton  is taxed to the limit as the result of two big conventions here  at the same time. 250 delegates  are expected at the annual  teachers convention here and  over 75 well-known personalities in the aero world are expected to attend the Air Council Convention being hteld locally to discuss airports and aircraft industries in B.C. and in  particular the smaller places in  B.C.  Renumbering of streets is  badly needed .in the city and the  council is also petitioning the  Postal Department for mail delivery by carrier postmen.  $195,000 for roads and parks  will be voted upon in the elections next month. Also on the  list is a bus franchise, and funds  for sewerage, hospital and  school lands.  *   *  *  *  SALMON ARM���  The Chamber of Comimerce  has appointed a committee to  arrange meetings to discuss the  reopening of the annual fall  fair and exhibition.  Local temperatures dropped  to 24 degrees during the recent  cold spell.        ,  The recently opened York  Cafe on Front street has been  purchased by Messrs. Cameron  Davidson and C. J. Davidson,,  Two members of the Life-  boys team, Albert Daniels and  Randy Thompson, will be rewarded ,by Mrs. Marjorie Mowat for  finding and turning into the police her purse containing $71-  in cash.  S.A.F.E. store has opened a  modern cafeteria in its new, expanded service.  ���*���        ���!*        "J��        v  ARMSTRONG���  Mr. L. Marshall, proprietor  of the Cosy Nook Tea Rooms  disposed of his business to Mr.  E. H. Bennet, of Vernon..  E.   T.   Kiehlbauch,   D.S.,   will  open regular hours in Armstrong  as the result of many requests. ���  The   famous   Swedish   masseur  ���J?  has had an office previously in  Armstrong for appointment visits, but has kept his main office  in Vernon.  Zion  Church,  A.O.T.S.  Men's*  olub, played host recently to 17 ^  returned   servicemen.  UN I ON  LIMITED  sechelt; b. c.  RETAIL STORE  .v-   ���!���    ^ >������������-.  ����    . ���  ���  A LARGE STOCK OF GENERAL MERCHANDISE  ALWAYS AVAILABLE -  ��� 1: ��� FRESH MEATS & VEGETABLES  U    m HARDWARE & DRYGOODS  p ��� WOMEN'S DRESSES  ; Our Prices Are Reasonable!  Armstrong went over the top  in the victory loan on Tuesday,  Nov. .6,' with $165,000 of its-  $160,000 objective.  *      *      *      * ; *  CLOVERDALE���  Nearly 700 children attended  the Cioverdale hall in'the Hallowe'en party sponsored by the  Surrey Junior Chamber of. Commerce. ���-       -       ' '   ���'  \  Surrey Municipal Council has  drafted a by-law to - inaugurate  a Parks Board of three mehibers.  Three readings of the bill passed  unanimously.,, '  Surrey  school" board  trustees  have made   provision   for  habi-y  tual truancy .families to be cut  off from their family allowance  benefits,     j .  "Incorporation of White Rock  as a city, district or village"  was the main topic of'discussion  at a meeting sponsored by the  White Rock Women's League.  *  *   *   *  NORTH SHORE���  Jimmy Sinclair, MP, has assured the North Vancouver City  Council .that North" Vancouver's  new post office is number one  project on the list for postal  improvement in this province.  Miss Evelyn Dohl, 17, was  killed and three others hurt when  a car driven by Frank Collins  got out, of control in the 600  block, West Queensland plunged  over an eight foot embankment,  overturning in the creek bed below. Collins is now charged with  manslaughter. Treated for cuts,  bruises and shock were Pat  Wilkinson, North Vancouver,  Douglas Miller, .RCAF, Vancouver, and the. driver.       "������''  Mrs.  Bertha Rirkenwaier,  65, v  died   as   she   was   boarding   the  North Vancouver fefry in Vancouver, Friday, Nov.  2.   ''������'.''  City Council decided Monday,  Nov. 5, to continue hot to per-,  mit selling of any kind On city .  ferries. "   '  TRAIL���  Lieut. Robert Hampton Gray,  DSC, RCNR, born in Trail,  1918, has been awarded the Victoria . Cross posthumously for his  work in an almost suicidal dive  on a Japanese flotilla. He is,  Canada'te 13th VC in this \yar.      ���  At time of enlistment he was  resident of Nelson, B!.C.  Trail Air Cadets Corps, which  so far has not been functioning  this fall, is expected to resume  shortly under a' civilian committee. . .....  Lieut. H.  B. Dewdney, RCN-   ,  VR,, rehabilitation  officer is visiting Trail this week interviewing, discharged servicemen. .',_  Trail badminton club is 'enjoying the greatest season of  its existence. '������  '  WILSON CREEK  Mrs. Do Erickson,  Correspondent  HUNTERS  LUCK HANDY  Peninsular housewives welcomed hunter's luck* when, ration books miissed last Thursday  for meat coupons. Several fine  deer were tagged during the recent cold '-"���snap.'-  BEARD DISAPPEARED  A 'be&rd: capable of showing  up members of the 'House of  David' team was sported by Paul  Stroshein' when he returned  from Toba Inlet. The beard disappeared, however, with a good  sized trash fire, and the chest  protector isn't.  Alice A. French  Correspondent  SURPRISED  BY GUILDV  A very pleasant surprise was  held   recently   at   the   home   of  Mrs.   E.   S.   Clayton   when   the  ladies   of the  St.  Hilda's  Guild  met   together   to   present   Mrs.  Clayton   with   a   chinchilla   bedspread    in   recognition  . of   her  faithful  services :as  organist  at  St.  Hilda's, Church.   Those pre-  . sent, were. Mrs. W. B. Billingsley,  ^president of the. Guild and Mrs.  Grey, ., secretary,    Mrs.    Arnold,  Mrs.-Uttley, Mrs. Froome, Mrs.  , Jones, Mrs.: McCrea, Mrs. Mowatt, Mrs. '-Gordon, Mrs.  Gibbons  and Mrs; Elliot.  .'..'������   ���    ���      -. ������    ���   .*> .-  REMEMBRANCE  SERVICE  v    The .   annual     Remembrance  * Day service held in Sechelt pavilion by the Canadian Legion,'  was   well   attended    this    year.  The     veterans.   and     Women's  Auxiliary, marched frdm the Legion Hall under the direction of  Comrade Riice.   Genevieve Wood  placed a wreath for the Sechelt  school   children   in* honor   of   a  former school principal Mr. Del  Gilbert who died on active service and Mrs. J. J. Niickson plac-  ed the traditional poppy wreath  in memory of the fallen of two  wars,   also   massed   chrysanthemum's    in    memory    of.   James  Batchelor and Mardon Edwards  who have also made the supreme  sacrifice.    Mrs.   Jean   Lissamen  sang   "There   Is  No   Death',   by  Goeffrey     O'Hara,     and     Mrs.  Wheeler reciited  'Remembering',  a  composition  by  Alice  Amelia  French.   The school  choir  sang  'Land  of Hope  and  Glory', the  congregation,  jointing    in    the  chorus/followed   by   the  risual  hyihhs. > Comrade   Elliottdelivered ; the\ Address  and- Comrade  Lau played 'The!. Last Post'. Mrs.  Muriel Aylwiard was the accompanist.    Ofter   the .service   the  Women's > Auxiliary   served   refreshments to their many, friends.  Mrs.   Charles   Prince   was   con-,  venor.    Other   organizations  invited  were  the   Red   Cross,   St.  Hilda's Guild and St. Vincent's  Mission.  DAVIS   BAY  Mrs. G. Cormack  Correspondent ���  ?a*_____________________���_���__���������___���-  VISITORS TO CITY  Mrs. Thos. Turner, who spent  the last, week in the ciity; Mrs.  G. Reid who visited the city as  a' guest of her daughter, Mrs.  L. Buckley; Mr/ and Mrs. George  .Begg and Mr. and Mrs. Bolton  Were weekend guests of Mr. and  Mrs. H. Begg in Vancouver; Mr.  Os. Geer spent a number'of days  ���in the city with his father, Mr.  - Albert Geer, .who ois |11; "Messers.  Walter and George Mills were  guests at Burnabyy of Mrs. C.  Wooten. .      ,  VISITORS TO DAVIS BAY  'Misses Lorraine and Wilma Ross  who were guests of their mother,  Mrs. G. Ross over the holiday  weekend of November 10.  i  NEWCOMERS HERE  Mr.   and   Mrs.  W.   D.   Scott,  who are at present liviing in the  "Tank''   cottage.    Mr.   Scott   is  employed    by  Jackson    Lumber"  Company. ��� y  BIRTHS  To Mr. and Mrs. A. Aucoine,  a son. ��� ���      , ��� . y ���'        ;   .,-  HOLIDAY WEEKENDS  Davis Bay residents ere rejoicing over the opportunity on  Mondaiy, Thursday and Saturday of each week of a return  day trip to Vancouver via bus,  ferry and bus.  No- more   of  this   "hotel  ac  commodation- worries," and, as  one practical young mother put  *it, ''one can pay a responsible  person to look after the children  for a day,, pay for a dinner in  town, and have the pleasure of  eating a meal cooked and served  'by others, do some shopping, visit relatives or friends, and be at  home <in time to tuck the children in-for the night."  Wilf Scoff  TRANSFER  , "REDROOFS"      .  HALFMOON BAY  General Trucking  Let us help you solve  your transportation  problems!  POSTAGE PAH*  PRESCRIPTIONS  Drugs,   Toiletries  Send your prescriptions foir  quick, accurate service by  mail. We pay postage costs.  All your- drug . store' needs,  can be filled here at lowest  prices. Send your next order  to���-*'     .'-.'.-  KIPP-TAYLOR  DRUG STORE       .  POWELL  RIVER, B. C. L  Pender Harbour  MACHINE  SHOP  Madera Park  IRVINE'S  LANDING  WELDING of all kinds.  MOTOR REBUJLDINfe  .   Electrical Repairs  PRECISION  LATHE W0&K  Will   Fix   Anything!  Rebuilt   Generators  For  Sale  Wm. S.  Spurrill, Prop. te_taesd!ay, November 21,  1945  THE COAST NEWS, Halfmoon Bay, B. C.  PAGE 5  A new Serial Story  II  by Bubrey Boyd  SYNOPSIS:    Speed M      <e harden-  d gambler, and Ed LjT     /ind, son of  seafaring  New Engla*      family, were  partners in  the Yujr      gold  rush of  &7.    They met on $-    jrip north in a  :-yowd that includ^   /rnchy, the fish-  "'rinan, Lucky Rqf    che beautiful girl  t'ho  took  a fai}/     to Maitland; Fal-  on, leader of t^   miners, who resent-  d Rose's inter   /in Maitland; Brent,  Id-time     pr/ ,ector;     Garnet,    who  ^ave  Maitla/   , and   Speed   his  outfit  ,vhen he q/     the trail, and Pete and  is drunkf  ^partner, Owens, who was  'lrowned/ ^ter a brawl.    Pete turned  >ut to JC /a-'girl in  disguise.    Speed  tilled'/ /man ��� at   Skagway���a   cheat  Kianag ������/    of     a     shell     game���and  jont// after   was   arrested   and   put  u Jul  for his murder.    He got out,  utywhile  he  waited  for Lefty, who  f/Ored  to  help  him  to  get back the  ail   he   had   been   carrying   for   the  /ounties  at  Bennett.    NOW  GO ON  VITH  THE STORY.  I The strangely timed event that  lift, him open to capture, occur-  Id during the forced wait.   With  lany  hours  to  kill;  he had de-  ided to visit Steiner at what was  ow   Skagway's   General    Store.  loney lending  was one   of his  old mines, and speakng of curt-  us   pledges,   he   mentioned   an  ddl^ .shaped   clover-leaf  nugget  a   which  he  had  loaned  some-  ling more than its weight to a  mbling client.    Then the hunt  as on.  The client wore a dicer hat  id stuttered; was known as  <efty" and suspected of being  pickpocket. Speed ran the man  earth in, a gambling tent,  here he cut into the same poker  ime, and dealing Lefty a hand  i which the thief would willing-  hay e bet his shirt, lured the  igget into the game on a raised  t. The shining, foliated piece  gold was weighed on the bar  ales and played for twice its  ild value.  Speed' won it with a straight  ish. When Lefty disconsolate-  quit the table, Speed grilled  m about the nugget. Under  essure, the thief maintained  e extraordinary story that' he  id lifted it in Skagway from  e pocket of a man now dead���-  e shell dealer, in "fact, whom  seed had shot at the door of  be Pack Train saloon.  fin order to learn something  ore about the man with the  cer, Speed had been looking  r Rose when the marshal seiz-  1 him.  That the man he was accused  ! murdering should be the man  io  had  brought the nugget to  tagway, was an apparently per-  srse   loop   of   the   influence   he  illed  luck.    Now  it  lay  in the  arshaPs      safe,   . along      with  need's guns and the mail.  Speed's  breath smoked   in  the.  d cold cell.   They had freed his  ands,   and  had  not  troubled  to  jornove  his gun belt���sighs  that  ointed   to    brief    imprisonment  rid    swift    judgment,    although  jiis  was his  second day in  the  11.  He did not notice the darken-  g of the cell, <5r the wilder  usic; that sounded from the  mp during his long abstraction,  was the opening of the street  oor that made him aware of  oth. There was a different  read in the passage; different,  et somehow familiar.  "Take it in, yourself," the  uard growled testily to ay shadow by the grating. -  The   big   door   was   unlocked,  \        " .-���"���%'.  ind as the figure edged into the  ���omewhat clearer light of the  sell, Speed understood why he  [ad been tryng to place the footfall   in  his   memory.     The   man  who confronted him was French-  ey, carrying a plate and curving  bis chest to bring a deputy's  badge into more formidable  prominence.  Speed bit his cheek as he  glanced over the contents of the  plate  without, accepting  it.  "Well, you're... a nice one,  Frenchy," he comemnted mldly.  "So they gave you a deputy's  star.    Looks good on ye, too."  The ex-fisherman squirmed  back a little, not quite able to  keep a firm front with that; even  voice in his5 ears.        *        "'* "'" /  "You don't forget, neither, do  you, Frenchy?" his prisoner acknowledged, eyeing the fish, and  then the knife in his belt, on  which his free hand had closed.  Are you the' marshall's oflicial  sticker?" >  Narrow black eyes beaded  with a rankling heat which only  blood could quench, as the cool  gray ones of his defenseless prisoner lifted to his .face.  The pause grated on the impatient gnard at the door. "W  that's the best you can do, frog,  back out here with them plates  before he takes your knife and  carves ye."  "Reckon this feller don't know  who he's callin', Frenchy,"  Speed observed, as the. fisherman  packed an involuntary step or  two. "Tell him what you done  to Horse McGinnis of Spokane.  Tell him you could lick'ten half-  baked deputies like him with One  ��� foot:"      > . ��� '���'���-;:��� ���":,/'' ���; i-  r : An oath- from the guard -showed that Frenchy's elevation to  office was not popular with the  marshal's squad. He swung the  door, and hooked the fisherman  .with a boot-toe to speed his  exit? In that finely measured instant, Speed jumped for the door.  Speed reached the corridor in  a bound. A gun barked out of  the dark tangle but he was already   clear   of   the   passageway  and gone.  ******  The canves between the frame  and the rafters was dark. Unfortunately or .otherwise, Steiner  was out. Speed cut a slit in the  canvas, and climbing through  the aparture, dropped inside.  Though the tent had looked  dark from outside, its interior  was vaguely illuminated by a  filtered wavering flow from the  kerosene flare in the street it-  faced on. Rummaging uncovered  , a crowbar of handy size. In a  drawer he found a collection of  six-shooters, which said little for  Steiner's judgment of firearms,  but he quickly picked out a .45,  loaded it from his own belt and  put ft in the holster.:  Still the object of his search  eluded him. He was beginning  to think that the Jew had done  some empty boasting when his  eye fell on a longish box in the  far corner, under a -shelf. He  pulled it out, and delicately prying it open with the bar, put his  fingers inside. With a grunt of  relief, he removed the cover and  tookyout two sticks of dynamite.  As he dropped in the snow and  paused to listen, his kin prickled  wtih a sense of some lurkng presence close by, soundless and un-  een. .He started swiftly back  along his previous trail through  the tents, without tonehing the  gun at his belt.  Speed crouched forward tensely, gripping the bar.as a dark  shape brushed along the tent  wall within a yard of him. In  that instant of its disclosure, his  hand lunged out and clutched a  man by the throat. He raised  the pinch bar.  **'D-d-ddon't hit me," he protested in a hoarse whimper. "I's f-f-  for ye. I seen you prowl itno  th Jew's tt-tent to get the dynamite. D-oSdon't try it! What'd  the  m-marshal  take of y-yourn."  "My guns and jack���they don't-  matter.    The packet of mail'I've  got to  get."  Lefty caught his arm. "L-leave  me case this trick," he whispered  huskily. "You wouldn't have a  chance in a m-m-million with  dynamite. I sen that safe once  when the marshal pinched me,  and with a few minutes, I could  f-feel the combination. It used  to be my racket."  "What's in it for you?"  "I owe you a hand, and the  m-marshal a bad turn. G-giye  me the bar," whispered Lefty.  "^You wait here."  "How���wait here?"  "W-watch for the mob. Whistle  if they get too close. But give  me all  the time you can."  ;Speed yielded the bar. Lying  in the drift, hs gun covered the  only door to the jail, so the  chance of Lefty playing him  double was slight. Long minutes dragged before a distant  trampling began, to pound on his  eardrums. A shore party and  been combing the beach. The  "empty boats at mooring and the  Ship in the gulf would naturally^  suggest that way of escape. As  he sprang erect, his sharp whistle pierced the dusk.  (Continued next week)  WOODFIBRE  Ida E. Preiss,  Correspondent  Sale of Poppies  Brings $106.33  The Woodfibre Branch of the  Canadian Legion held a Remembrance  Day  smoker  on  November  10,  and about 40  members  \were present.   In charge of entertainment were Edwin Mornis,  George   Birnie,   Dave  Anderson,  .:Jftnmy Tough and Charli^- Bellis.  Music  was  rendered  by  Stan  Green,    Mel    Davis    and    Glad  Sharp.    Refreshments,   prepared  by the wives of members, were  ���served during the evening.  The proceeds pf sales of popr  pies for Remembrance Day  ,amounted to $106.33. This sale  was sponsored by the Legion  Branch. The youngsters selling  poppies included Dorothy Eckersley, Jacqueline Monaghan, Florence Johnson, Elaine Anderson,  and Louise Hannah.  WEEKEND  GUESTS  Miss Virginia Lloyd and Mr.  Fred Brooks were weekend  guests of Mr. and Mrs. Sid Lloyd.  HUNTING TRIP  Mr. Harold Golden and Mr.  Otto Nordin were the guests of  the latter's parents in Cliinton.  The boys went up the line for  a week's hunting and fishing.  RETURN FROM EAST  Mr.   and   Mrs.   W.   A.   Bain  have returned home after an extended business trip in Eastern  Canada.  VISITED BRITANNIA^  Mrs."   Carl    Malm    with    her  daughters spent the weekend at  the   home   of   her   parents, .Mr.  and Mrs. St. Lawrence at Britannia Mines.  AT HOSPITAL  Mr. Ken D. Watt is recuperating nicely in the General Hospital after an infection of the  eyes. Mr. Carl Malm is also in  the same /institution for a minor  operation.  OVER  TOP  Woodfibre, with a quota of  $140,000 in the recent Victory  Loan, is very proud to have gone  over the top by another $11,000,  making the grand total of $151,-  000. Well done, Woodfibre!  WEEKEND GUEST  Miss Esther Campbell was the  weekend'guest.of Mr. and Mrs.  Dave Anderson.  WEEK IN CITY  Mr.   and   Mrs.   Frank   Mullin  are spending a week in Vancouver.  TO VANCOUVER  Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Preiss and  their daughter, Janice Barbara,  have travelled to Vancouver.  They will be the guests of Mrs.  Preiss' mother, Mrs. E. V. Wilson.  NEW ARRIVAL  Born to Mr. and Mrs. John  Stetch, on November 14, a son.  SEES OLD FRIENDS  Mrs. Les A. Johnson is at  present visiting Mrs. Ken Nash.  Whole in Woodfibre Mrs. Johnson is renewing old acquaintances, y ���  BIRTHDAY PARTY  Master Ernie Seaton was host  to a number of his little friends  ���on   November    15.    Ernie    was  celebrating his birthday.  SAFETY  PICTURES  A 'picture' show in the  interest of Safety First was held in  the Community Hall on Wednesday.  ENTERTAIN AT PARTY  Miss Betty Simpson and Miss  E>ileen   Howe  were   co-hostesses  for a mixed party at their apart-  iment  on  Wednesday.  BOND WINNERS  Lucky winners in the recent  Victory Loan draw were L.  Plourde ($100) Ronny Dean  ($50), and Bob MacKenzie  ($25). Tims sum of money has  been donated in every Victory  Loan drive by the British Columbia Pulp and Paper Company  Limited.  GOWER POINT  (Continued from page 1)  CUSHIONED  SEATS  Berson A. Chadsey, traveller  to Vancouver viia the ferry last  week, reported a quick and comfortable trip and expressed considerable pleasure to see that  the 'Communter' has cushioned  seats, no less!  VARIETY IN WEATHER  The weather of the past week  has set an all time high for  variety. Monday it snowed in  the morning and showed thunder  and lightning at night. Approximately seven inches of snow fell  during the week, and Thursday  morniing was said to be coldest  November morning in ten years.  At least the children enjoyed  the snow.  MANY VISITORS  Miss Tola King returned after  Viisiting relatives and friends in  Vancouver a few days. i  Miss Evelyn Harris, R.N., visited her aunt, Mrs. Esther King,  for a week before* resuming her  Gordon Ballentipe  Studio:   Gibson's   Landing  PORTRAITS  -   CHILDREN  Weddings,   Commercial,   etc.  Call or write for information  and  appointment  duties in the Vancouver General  Hospital.  Eddy Battison and Jim Chas-  ton spent Saturday and Sunday  in Vancouver last week, and  were accompanied home by Mrs.  E.  Battison.  Wally Mailer,' recently discharged from the armed services  and taking treatment at Shaughnessy,  is  home for thirty  days.  Miss Margaret Thorn, who is  employed in Vancouver, visited  over the weekend with her sister,  Mrs. Olga Watson.  Miiss Dorothy Chaster and  Mister John Craig were visitors  at the home of Mr. and Mrs.  Harvey Chaster.  Mr. and Mrs. Kelly of Vancouver are spending the weekend at their summer home here.  Maurice Cook of Nipawin,  Saskatchewan, is visiting his  grandmother, Mrs. Emily Cooke  and aunt, Mrs. Mae Chadsey.  Wm. McFADDEN  Optometrist  510   West   Hastings  Street  VANCOUVER  ���  at Gibson's  Landing  EACH  Friday and Saturday  Examinations   -  Fittings     |  WAKEFIELD     INN  Until  further notice the  Inn will be open from  2 P.M. To 6 P.M.  7 P. M. To 11 P.M.  COFFEE SHOP  Across the road from Inn  ^ FOR BETTER  SERVICE . . . SEE  R. D. BREWS  REAL ESTATE  OPERATOR  For Sale . . .  CHOICE  WATERFRONT  LOTS  At  Porpoise   Bay  50 Feet wide, 300 feet long  $300.  A. CRUCIL  SECHELT, B. C.  MURDOCH  FRESH   MEATS  '��� HARDWARE  ��� SHELL OIL  ���FISH CAMP  Pender Harbour PAGE 4  For    Estimates  Get  In   Touch   With  Jim   Morgan  HALF MOON BAY  (Continued   from   page   1)  surer,  Orma  Bray,  by acclamation.  A      ik      sk      A  THE COAST NEWS! Halfmoon Bay, B.' ������.  iiies  Armstrong went over the top  in the victory loan on Tuesday,  Nov. 6,: with $165,000 of its-  $160,000 objective.'  Alice A. French  Correspondent  DROP  IN  AT  THE  SECHELT  TEA ROOM  FOR    LIGHT   SNACKS  ��� DINNERS and  AFTERNOON TEAS  ���  SECHELT  INN  SECHELT, B. C.  Garden  Bay Cafe  ������"  SANDWICHES  SHORT ORDERS  DINNERS  WEEKDAYS:���  11 A.M to 12 midnite  SUNDAYS:���  11 A.M. to 5 P.M.  BUS STOP HERE  PENTICTON���  Accommodation   in   Penticton  is taxed to the limit as the result of two big conventions here  at the same time.   250 delegates  are    expected    at    the    annual  teachers   convention    here    and  over   75   well-known   personalities  in  the  aero world are  expected to attend the Air Council Convention being beld locally  to   discuss   airports  and  aircraft industries  in  B.C.  and in  particular the smaller places in  B.C.  Renumbering of streets is  badly needed in the city and the  council is also petitioning the  Postal Department for mail delivery by carrier postmen.  $195,000 for roads and parks  will be voted upon in the elections next month. Also on the  list is a bus franchise, and funds  for sewerage, hospital and  school lands.  *   *   *   *  SALMON ARM���  The Chamber of Commerce  has appointed a committee to  arrange meetings to discuss the  reopening of the annual fall  fair and exhibition.  Local temperatures dropped  to 24 degrees during the recent  cold spell.  The recently opened York  Cafe on Front street has been'  purchased by Messrs. Cameron  Davidson and C. J. Davidson.  Two members of the Life-  boys team, Albert Daniels and  Randy Thompson, will be reward- ,  ed ,by Mrs. Marjorie Mowat for  finding and turning .into- the police her purse containing $71;  in cash. '  S.A.F.E. store has opened a  modern cafeteria in its new, expanded service.  *J*      *i*      *?��      *j��  ARMSTRONG���  Mr. L. Marshall, proprietor  of" the1 Cosy Nook Tea Rooms  disposed of his business to Mr.  E. H. Bennet, of ��� Vernon..'  E. T. Kiehlbauch, D.S., will  open regular hours in Armstrong  as the result of many requests. ���  The famous Swedish masseur  has had an office previously in  Armstrong for appointment visits, but has kept his main office  in Vernon.  Zion   Church,  A.O.T.S.  Men's*  club, played host recently to 17  returned  servicemen.  *     *     $:     ij: '��� '  CLOVERDALE���  Nearly 700 children attended  the Cloverdale hall in ��� the ��� Hallowe'en party sponsored by the  Surrey Junior Chamber of. Commerce. .���'-..' '���>������'  . Surrey Municipal Council has  drafted a by-law to������ inaugurate  a Parks Board of three members.  Three readings of the bill passed  unanimously... ���'���  Surrey  school' board  trustees  have made   provision   for  habitual  truancy families to be:: cut7  off from their family- allowance  benefits. ������   ? .  "Incorporation of White Rock  as a city, district or village"  was the main topic of'discussion  at a meeting sponsored by the  White Rock Women's League.  . i  UNION  LIMITED  SECHELT,   B. C.  RETAIL STORE  *   *   *   *  i  NORTH SHORE���  Jimmy Sinclair, MP, has assured the North Vancouver City  Council .that North" Vancouver's  new post office is number one  project on the list for "postal  improvement in this .province.'  Misis Evelyn Dohl, 17, was  killed and three others hurt when  a' ear driven by Frank Collins  got out, of control in the 600  block, West Queensland plunged  over an eight foot embankment,  overturning in the creek bed below. Collins is now charged with  manslaughter. Treated for cuts,  bruises and shock were Pat  Wilkinson, North Vancouver,  , Douglas Miller, .RCAF, Vancouver, and the driver. -������'" *  Mrs. Bertha Birkenwfcier, 65,  died as she was boarding the  North Vancouver ferry in Vancouver, Friday, Nov.  2.     ~ '  City Council decided Monday,  Nov.  5, to continue not to per-,  mit selling of any kind on city  ferries. ���     ������ \ ���   '  *   *   *  * '  TRAIL���  Lieut. Robert Hampton Gray,  DSC, RCNR, born in Trail,  1918, has been awarded the Victoria . Cross posthumously for .his  work in an almost suicidal dive  on a Japanese flotilla. He is.  Canada'ls 13th VC in this war.  At time of enlistment he was  resident of Nelson, B^C.  Trail Air Cadets Corps, which  so far has not been functioning  this fall,- is expected to resume  shortly under a' civilian committee. .  Lieut. H.  B. Dewdney, RCN-.   ,  VR., rehabilitation officer is visiting Trail this week interviewing  discharged servicemen, .,  Trail badminton : club is 'enjoying the greatest season of  its existence.  SURPRISED BY GUILD'  A very pleasant surprise was  held recently at the home of  Mrs. E. S. Clayton when the  ladies of the St. Hilda's Guild  met together to present Mrs.  Clayton with a chinchilla bedspread in recognition of her  faithful services :as organist at  St.  Hilda's. Church.    Those pre-  . sent, were. Mrs. W. B. Billingsley,  ..president of the. Guild and Mrs.  Grey, .secretary, Mrs. Arnold,  Mrs..Uttley, Mrs. Frdome, Mrs.  y Jones, Mrs.. McCrea, Mrs, Mowatt, Mrs.  Gordon, Mrs. Gibbons  , and MrSi Elliot.  REMEMBRANCE  SERVICE  "The . ' annual:    Remembrance  " Day service held in Sechelt pavilion by  the  Canadian  Legion;  was   well   attended    this    year.  The     veterans,   and     Women's  Auxiliary, marched frdm the Legion Hall under the direction of  Comrade Riice.   Genevieve Wood  placed a wreath for the Sechelt  school   children   in, honor   of   a  former school principal Mr. Del  Gilbert who died on active service and Mrs. J. J. Niickson placed the traditional poppy wreath  in memory of the fallen of two  wars,   also   massed   chrysanthemum's    in    memory    of    James  Batchelor and Mardon Edwards  who have also made the supreme  sacrifice.     Mrs.   Jean   Lissamen  sang   'There   Is  No   Death',   by  Goeffrey     O'Hara,     and     Mrs.  Wheeler reciited 'Remembering',  a  composition  by Alice  Amelia  French.   The  school  choir  sang  'Land  of  Hope and  Glory', the  congregation;  jointing    in     the  chorus/followed   by: :the   usual  hyrtins.; Comrade   Elliott   delivered the kddress  andv CJomrade  Lau played ;The; Last Post'. "Mrs.:  Muriel Aylward was the accompanist.    Ofter   the .service   the  Women's -Auxiliary   served    refreshments to their many, friends.  Mrs.   Charles   Prince   was   con-y  venor.    Other   organizations   invited  were the  Red   Cross,   St.  Hilda's Guild and St. Vincent's <  Mission.  Wednesday, November 21,  1945  commodation worries," and, as  one practical young mother put  -at, "one can pay a responsible  person to look after the children  for a day,, pay for a dinner in  town and have the pleasure of'  eating a meal cooked and served  by ojthers, do some shopping, visit relatives or friends, and be at  home (in time to tuck the children in-for the'night."  /"REPROOFS"   ���;  HALFMOON BAY  .���������������#4>-  ��� i. .  General Trucking  Let us help you solve:  your transportation  problems!  ��*  DAVIS   BAY  Mrs. G. Cormack  Correspondent  it.-  ���  A LARGE STOCK OF GENERAL MERCHANDISE  )��� ALWAYS AVAILABLE ;  ��� }\ m FRESH MEATS & VEGETABLES  ��� ���>,    ���  HARDWARE & DRYGOODS  i ";i ��� # WOMEN'S DRESSES "  \ Our Prices Are Reasonable!  II���  WILSON CREEK  Mrs. D. Erickson,  Correspondent  HUNTERS LUCK HANDY  Peninsular housewives welcomed hunter's iuck,, when ration books massed last Thursday  for meat coupons. Several fine  deer were tagged during the recent cold Snap.  BEARD DISAPPEARED  A ;beiar_; capable of showing  up members of the 'House of  David' team was sported by Paul  Stroshein" when he returned:  from Toba Inlet. The.beard disappeared, however, with a good  sized trash fire, and the chest  protector isn't.-''  VISITORS  TO CITY  Mrs. Thos. Turner, who spent  the last week in the city; Mrs.  G. Reid who visited the city as  a' guest of her daughter, Mrs.  L. Buckley; Mr. and Mrs. George  Begg and Mr. and Mrs. Bolton  were weekend guests of Mr. and  Mrs. H. Begg in Vancouver; Mr.  . Cv. Geer spent a number1 of days  ��in the city with his father, Mr.  ��� Albert Geer, who 'is jll ;~~Messers.  Walter and George Mills were  guests at Burnaby: of Mrs. C.  Wooten.  VISITORS TO DAVIS BAY  'Misses Lorraine and Wilma Ross  who were guests of their mother,  Mrs.   C.   Ross  over  the  holiday  weekend of November 10. .��  NEWCOMERS HERE  Mr.   and   Mrs.   W.. D.   Scott,  who are at present living in the  "Tank"'   cottage.    Mr.   Scott   is  employed   by  Jackson    Lumber"'  Company. ���  BIRTHS  To Mr. and Mrs. A. Aucoine,  a son.       ���  , - ..      '.   y .: ,'',  HOLIDAY WEEKENDS  Davis Bay residents are rejoicing over the opportunity on  Monday, Thursday and Saturday of each week of a return  day trip to Vancouver via bus,  ferry and bus.  No. more   of  this   "hotel  ac-  POSTAGE PAID  ���::y;^���.>--oh:|_ir^t ���M'";'-f  PRESCRIPTIONS  Drugs.   Toiletries  Send your prescriptions for  quick, accurate service by  mail. We pay postage costs.  All your drug' store needs  can be fil|ed here at lowest  prices. Send your next order  to���'���', .       .;..���  KIPP-TAYLOR  DRUG STORE  POWELL  RIVER, B. C.  ���|  Pender Harbour  MOT  MACHINE SHOP  Madera Park  IRVINE'S  LANDING  WELDING of all kinds.  MOTOR REBUILDING  Electrical ��� Repairs  ��� ���*  PRECISION  LATHE WQ&K  Will   Fix   Anything!  Rebuilt   Generators  For  Sale  Wm. S.  Spurrill, Prop. Wednesday, November 21, 1945 _.  THE COAST NEWS, Halfmoon Bay, B. C.  PAGE 5  A new Serial Story  II  by Bubrey Boyd  ic   SYNOPSIS:    Speed Malone hardened gambler, and Ed Maitland, son of  'seafaring New England family, were  partners  in  the  Yukon gold  rush  of  t)7.    They met on the trip north in a  rowd that included Frnchy, the fish-  i-man, Lucky Rose, the beautiful girl  ,'ho took a fancy  to Maitland;  Pal-  on, leader of the miners, who resent-  d Rose's interest in Maitland; Brent,  Id-time     prospector;     Garnet,    who  ave  Maitland   and   Speed   his   outfit  when he quit the trail, and Pete and  lis drunken partner, Owens, who was  tlrowned  after a brawl.    Pete turned  put to   be a-"girl  in  disguise.    Speed  dlled   a   man   at   Skagway���a   cheat  Panager of a shell game���and  onths after was arrested and put  ti jail for his murder. He got out,  ut while he waited for Lefty, who  ffered to help him to get back the  aail he had been carrying for the  iounties at Bennett. NOW GO ON  VI TH  THE STORY.  The strangely timed event that  2ft him open to capture, occur-  d during the forced wait. With  lany hours to kill; he had de-  ided to visit Steiner at what was  ow Skagway's General Store,  foney lending was one of Ms  bid mines, and speakng of curi-  us pledges, he mentioned an  ddl^r shaped clover-leaf nugget  n which he had loaned some-  ling more than its weight to a  imbling client. Then the hunt  as on.  The   client   wore   a  dicer  hat  id    stuttered;    was   known  as  ^efty"  and  suspected  Of being  pickpocket. Speed ran the man  earth    in, a  gambling    tent,  here he cut into the same poker  ime, and dealing Lefty a hand  i which the thief would willing-  have bet his  shirt, lured the  igget into the game on a raised  ^t.    The shining, foliated piece  gold was weighed on the bar  ales  and played- for twice  its  ild value.  Speed' won it with a straight  ish. When Lefty disconsolate-  quit the table, Speed grilled  m about the nugget. Under  ���essure, the thief maintained  e extraordinary story that' he  id lifted it in Skagway from  ie pocket of a man now dead���  e shell dealer, in." fact, whom  ieed had shot at the door of  he Pack Train saloon.  fin order to learn something  ore about the man with the  ��cer, Speed had been looking  >r Rose when the marshal seiz-  I him.  That the man he was accused  murdering should be the man  fib  had  brought  the nugget  to  (tagway, was an apparently per-  erse   loop   of   the   influence   he  illed luck.    Now  it lay in the  Larshal's      safe,   .  along      with  .peed's guns and  the mail.  Speed's  breath smoked  in  the.  Id cold cell.   They had freed his  ands,  and  had  not troubled to  jmove his  gun belt���signs  that  ointed   to    brief    imprisonment  fnd    swift    judgment,    although  tils  was his  second  day in  the  Ml.  He did not notice the darken-  ig of the cell, <fr the wilder  msic: that sounded from the  amp during his long abstraction.  t was the opening of the street  foor that made him aware of  pth. There was a different  read in the passage; different,  . et somehow familiar.  "Take it in, yourself," the  ;uard growled testily to a y sha-  low by the grating.  -  The big door was unlocked*  ind as the figure edged into the  omewhat clearer light of the  :ell, Speed understood why he  ad been tryng to place the foot-  all   in   his   memory.     The   man  who confronted him was French-  ey, carrying a plate and curving  bis chest to bring a deputy's  badge into more formidable  prominence.  Speed bit his cheek as he  glanced over the contents of the  plate  without- accepting  it.  "Well, you're a nice one,  Frenchy," he comemnted mldly.  "So they gave you a deputy'3  star.    Looks good on ye, too."  The ex-fisherinan squirmed  back a little, not quite able to  keep a firm front with that'even  voice in his'ears.      '"        ������������<-,  "You don't forget, neither, do  you, Frenchy?" his prisoner acknowledged, eyeing the fish, and  then the kiiife in his belt, on  which his free hand had closed.  Are you the* marshall's official  sticker?" ;  '   '��� ���  Narrow black eyes beaded  with a rankling heat which, only  blood could: quench, as the cool  gray ones of his defenseless prisoner lifted to his face.  The pause grated on the impatient g\iard. at the door. "Df  that's the best you can do, frog,  back out here with them plates  before he takes your knife and  carves ye."  "Reckon this feller don't know  who he's calling Frenchy,"  Speed observed, as the fisherman  packed an involuntary step or  two. "Tell him what you done  to Horse McGinnis of Spokane.  Tell him you could lick "ten half-  baked deputies like him with one  fool"      ���   ���>-..    yy  '" '  ,"';'  ~:;.'::    ���   :.' v  - ��� An oath from the guard show--  ed that Frenchy's elevation to  office was not popular with the  marshal's squad. He swung the  door,   and  hooked  the  fisherman  .with a boot-toe to speed his  exitr In that finely measured instant, Speed jumped for the door.  Speed reached the corridor in  a bound. A gun barked out of  the dark tangle but he was al-  ready clear of the passageway  and gone.  *J& h? ���!��� *���*    ���       f* "F  i  The canves between the frame  and the rafters was dark. Unfortunately or ..otherwise, Steiner  was out. Speed cut a slit in the  canvas, and climbing through  the aparture, dropped inside.  Though the tent had looked  dark from outside, its interior  was vaguely illuminated by a  filtered wavering flow from the  kerosene flare in the street it  faced on. Rummaging uncovered  , a crowbar of handy size. In a  drawer he found a collection of  six-shooters, which said little.for  Steiner*... Judgment of firearms,  but he quickly picked out a .45,  loaded it from his own belt and  put ft in the holster."  Still  the object  of  his  search  eluded   him.    He  was   beginning  to  think that the Jew had done  some   empty   boasting   when   his  eye fell on a longish box in the  far   corner,  under   a .shelf.     Ha  pulled it out, and delicately prying it open with the bar, put his  fingers  inside.    With  a grunt of  relief, he removed the cover and  took out two sticks of dynamite.  As he dropped in the snow and  paused to listen, his kin prickled;  wtih a sense of some lurkng presence Close by, soundless and un-  een.    .He   started   swiftly  back  along his  previous  trail  through  the   tents,  without  tonching   the  gun at his belt.  Speed crouched forward tensely, gripping the bar,as a dark  shape brushed along the tent  wall within a yard of him. In  that instant of its disclosure, his  hand lunged out and clutched a  man by the throat. He raised  the pinch bar.  ��'D-d-ddon't hit me," he protested in a hoarse whimper. "I's f-f-  for ye. T seen you prowl itno  th Jew's tt-tent to get the dynamite. D-d-don't try it! What'd  the  m-marshal  take of y-yourn."  "My guns arid jack���they don't  matter. The packet of mail" I've  got to get."  Lefty caught his arm. "L-leave  me case this trick," he whispered  huskily. "You wouldn't have a  chance in a m-m-million with  dynamite. I sen that safe once  when the marshal pinched me,  and with a few minutes, I could  f-feel the combination. It used  to be my racket."  "What's in it for you?"  "I owe you a hand, and the  m-marshal a bad turn. G-glve  me the bar," whispered Lefty.  "jYou wait here."  "How���wait here?"  "W-watch for the mob. Whistle  if they let too close. But give  me all  the time you can."  ,Speed yielded the bar. Lying  in the drift, hs gun covered the  only door to the jail, so the  chance of Lefty playing him  double was slight. Long minutes dragged before a distant  trampling began, to pound on his  eardrums. A shore party and  been combing the beach. The  empty boats at mooring and the  ship in the gulf would naturally^  suggest that way of escape. As  he sprang erect, his sharp whistle pierced the dusk.  (Continued next week)  WOODFIBRE  Ida E. Preiss, Correspondent  Sale of Poppies  Brings $106.33  The Woodfibre Branch of the  Canadian Legion held a Remembrance  Day smoker  on  November  10,  and about  40  members  ���were present.   In charge of entertainment were Edwin Morriis,  George   Birnie,  Dave  Anderson,  Jimmy Tough and Charlie Bellis.-  Music  was rendered  by  Stan  ..Green,    Mel    Davis    and    Glad  Sharp.    Refreshments,   prepared  by the wives of members, were  served during the evening.  The proceeds of sales of poppies for Remembrance Day  .amounted-'to $106.33. This sale  was sponsored by the Legion  Branch. The youngsters selling  poppies included Dorothy Eckersley, Jacqueline Monaghan, Florence Johnson, Elaine Anderson,  and Louise Hannah.  WEEKEND  GUESTS  Miss Virginia Lloyd and Mr.  Fred Brooks were weekend  guests of Mr. and Mrs. Sid Lloyd.  HUNTING TRIP  Mr: Harold Golden and Mr.  Otto Nordin were the guests of  the latter's parents in Cliinton.  The boys went up the line for  a week's hunting and fishing.  RETURN FROM EAST  Mr.   and   Mrs.   W.   A.   Bain  have returned home after an extended business trip in Eastern  Canada.  VISITED BRITANNIA�����  Mrs.'   Carl    Malm    with    her  daughters spent the weekend at  the   home   of   her   parents, .Mr.  and Mrs. St.  Lawrence at Britannia Mines.  AT HOSPITAL  Mr. Ken D. Watt is recuperating nicely in the General Hospital after an infection of the  eyes. Mr. Carl Malm is also in  the same (institution for a minor  operation.  OVER  TOP  Woodfibre, with a quota of  $140,000 in the recent Victory  Loan, is very proud to have gone  over the top by another $11,000,  making the grand total of $151,-  000. Well done, Woodfibre^  WEEKEND GUEST  M'iss Esther Campbell was the  weekend'guest .of Mr. and Mrs.  Dave Anderson.  WEEK IN CITY  Mr.   and   Mrs.   Frank   Mullin  are spending a week in Vancouver.  TO VANCOUVER  Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Preiss and  their daughter, Janice Barbara,  have travelled to Vancouver.  They wall be the guests of Mrs.  Preiss' mother, Mrs. E. V. Wilson.  NEW ARRIVAL  Born to Mr. and Mrs. John  Stetch, on November 14, a son.  SEES OLD FRIENDS  Mrs. Les A. Johnson is at  present visiting Mrs. Ken Nash.  Whale in Woodfibre Mrs. Johnson is renewing old acquaintances. .  BIRTHDAY PARTY  Master Ernie Seaton was host  to a number of his little friiends  on   November    15.    Ernie    was  celebrating his birthday.  SAFETY  PICTURES  A picture' show in  the  interest of Safety First was held in  the Community Hall on Wednesday.  ENTERTAIN AT PARTY  Miss Betty Simpson and Miss  Eiileen   Howe  were   co-hostesses  5  for a mixed party at their apart-  ��ment  on  Wednesday.  BOND WINNERS  Lucky winners in the recent  Victory Loan draw were L.  Plourde ($100) Ronny Dean  ($50), and Bob MacKenzie  ($25). Thiis sum of money has  been donated in every Victory  Loan drive by the British Columbia Pulp and Paper Company  Limited.  GOWER POINT  (Continued from page 1)  CUSHIONED  SEATS  Berson A. Chadsey, traveller  to Vancouver via the ferry last  week, reported a quick and comfortable trip and expressed considerable pleasure to see that  the 'Communter' has cushioned  seats, no less!  VARIETY IN WEATHER  The weather of the past week  has set an all time high for  variiety. Monday it snowed in  the morning and showed thunder  and lightning at night. Approximately seven inches of snow fell  during the week, and Thursday  morniing was said to be coldest  November morning in ten years.  At least the children enjoyed  the snow.  MANY VISITORS  Miss Iola King returned after  visiting relatives and friends in  Vancouver a few days.  Miss Evelyn Harris, R.N., visited her aunt, Mrs. Esther King,  for a week before* resuming her  Gordon Ballentine  Studio:   Gibson's   Landing  PORTRAITS   -   CHILDREN  Weddings,   Commercial,   etc.  Call or write for information  and   appointment  duties in the Vancouver General  Plospital.  Eddy Battison and Jim Chas-  ton spent Saturday and Sunday  in Vancouver last week, and  were accompanied home by Mrs.  E.   Battison.  Wally Miiller,' recently discharged from the armed services  and taking treatment at Shaughnessy,   is  home for thirty  days.  Miss Margaret Thorn, who is  employed in Vancouver, visited  over the weekend with her sister,  Mrs. Olga Watson.  Miiss Dorothy Chaster and  Mister John Craig were visitors  at the home of Mr. and Mrs.  Harvey Chaster.  Mr. and Mrs. Kelly of Vancouver are spending the weekend at their summer home here.  Maurice Cook of Nipawin,  Saskatchewan, is visiting his  grandmother, Mrs. Emily Cooke  and aunt, Mrs. Mae Chadsey.  Wm. McFADDEN  Optometrist  j   510   West   Hastings  Street  VANCOUVER  ���  at Gibson's  Landing  EACH  Friday and Saturday  Examinations   -  Fittings  WAKEFIELD     INN  Until  further  notice the  Inn  will be open from  2 P.M. To 6 P.M.  7 P. M. To 11 P.M.  COFFEE SHOP  Across the road from Inn  J  <4r FOR BETTER  SERVICE . . . SEE  R. D. BREWS  REAL ESTATE  OPERATOR  ^  For Sale . . .  CHOICE  WATERFRONT  LOTS  At  Porpoise   Bay  50 Feet wide, 300 feet long  $300.  A. CRUCIL  SECHELT, B. C.  MURDOCH  FRESH   MEATS  ��� HARDWARE  ��� SHELL OIL  ��;FISH CAMP  Pender Harbour PAGE 6  THE COAST NEWS, Halfmoon Bay, B. C.  Wednesday, November 21,  194!  Garage Ltd  ���  Vulcanizing; synthetic  tubes a speciality!  Automobile Accessories  and Repairs  LIBRARY BOOKS  (Discards)  FOR  SALE  Westerns   &  Mysteries  25c EACH  Tuesdays, 2 to 4 p.m.  Thursdays, 2 to 4  SECHELT  LENDING   LIBRARY  and GIFT SHOP  T R. GODFREY  AND COMPANY LTD.  ^GIBSON'S LANDING^  General Trucking  and Fuel  BBS-  Mrs. D. Erickson,  Correspondent  RACK FROM HOSPITAL  Mr. George Keynock has returned home to recuperate  after being in hospital at Vancouver. During his absence the  familiar station wagon was cap-  I ably handled by Miss Margaret  Matheson.  FROM TOBA INLET  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Paul  Stroshein  and family have returned to the  district after living at Toba Inlet for the past year.  WELCOME  HOME  PARTY  Mr. and Mrs. Roy Nygren returned here after an extended  trip by, automobile to the prairie  where they were marnied at Mrs.  Nygren's former home. They  were feted at a "welcome home"  party on November 9 with Mr.  and Mrs. Harry Dutz as host  and hostess. Several friends and  relatives were present. Mr. and  Mrs. Nygren intend to reside at  Wiilson Creek.  SHOOT DEER  Hal Hammond, Mike and Ted  Jackson bagged a nice three  point deer during their hunting  expedition recently. The cold  snap seemed to favour the nim-  rods this time.  IN NEW HOME  Mr. and Mrs.  George Wright  formerly    of    Vancouver,    have  moved into the Stewart Henderson home.  MOVE POST OFFICE  The post office has been moved  across the road  to the  new  location.    Thiis  location   will   be  more convenient.  HAVE DAUGHTER  Mr.   and   Mrs.   Reuben   Stro-   =>  shein  are  receiving  congratulations  on the  arrival  of; a baby  daughter, Mypna Dee.   The birth  was on September 29. ��?  CITY VISITOR  Mrs.    D'arcy    Nickerson,    of  Vancouver, was a recent visitor,  at the home of Mrs. L. S. Jackson.  TO DAVIS BAY  Mr.  and Mrs.  W.  Scott have   ,  moved to Davis Bay where they  ���intend to settle.  LEAVE WILSON CREEK  The Art Langleys have left  for Elk River, Vancouver Island, recently.  Serving  THE COASTAL COMMUNITIES  OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  FOR OVER 50 YEARS  *.'  Regular year-round   passenger and freight  service from Vancouver to Howe Sound  and Gulf Coast points.  ASK FOR CURRENT SAILING SCHEDULE  Operating  BOWEN ISLAND  VANCOUVER  Foot of Carrall Street  Violet Streeter, Correspondent  SERVICE CLUB SOCIAL  Mrs. E. Healy held a Service  Clijb social evening at the home  of Mrs. Victor Christeson, on  November 7.  VISITORS  THIS WEEK  Miss  Zella  Hankins,   Vancouver, is the guest of Mr. and Mrs.  Frank   Howes.    Mr.   and   Mrs.  Frank   Home   and    Sheila    are  holidaying  in   Vancouver.    Mrs.  V.   Christeson   was   visiting - in  Vancouver for a couple of days.  Mr.  and Mrs.   Chris Wood  and  family   have   returned   from   a  week   in   Vancouver.    Mr.   Giill  D'Oust   and  his "wife   and   two  children   up   for    the    weekend  looking over their future home. .  Trooper   Pat    Choquette,   -B.C.  Dragons,   and   Ray   Wiick,   Sea-  forths, with two years overseas,  were   weekend   visitors   of   Mr.  . and  Mrs.  Harry  Chpquette  and  family.     Misses    L.    Choquette  and   Lillian "McGhie  have  journeyed  to  Vancouver to see the  Remembrance   Day   parade   November 12.  NEW  BOAT  SCHEDULE  A new Union S.S. schedule is  in the offing for Port Mellpn.  The schedule will be announced  later.  NEW FAMILY-ARRIVES  Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Brown-  hill and children arrived November 6. Mr. Brownhill is employed in the Engineering department,  Sorg Pulp Co.  VARSITY   VISITOR  ���    Gordon McGill, UBC student,  is spending the holiday weekend  with his parents,  Mr.  an dx Mrs.   >  Bill McGill.     : : >  READY NEXT YEAR? '  Plasterers and plumbers are  busy on the new modern duplex  dwellings, and it looks as though  they may be ready by the first  of the year.  POPPY DRIVE SUCCESS  A total of $28.00 was taken  on the sale  of 200 poppiies by  Eleanor Arrowsmith, Marion  Groner, Lottie Hostland ^ and  Violet  Streeter.  OIL TANK STARTED  Work has been started on the  new fuel oil tank for the Sorg  steam plant, this tank as being  assembled by Vern Seidleman  and his gang of iron workers.  The tank will be 60 feet in diameter and 30 feet high and will  sit on the old land mark���the  Bentham dwelling, that was  torn down to make room for  the new project.*  REV. MOORE OFFICIATES  The Reverend T. Moore held  Remembrance Day servfice here  in* the Community Hall, Nov. 11.  MRS. RHODES ENTERTAINS  ���Mrs.   D.   Rhodes   entertained  at"a bridge party?: Thursday.  HARDY ISLAND  by Margery Thomas  MISS PETTIGREW In'cITY  During   the   past   two   weeks  Miss ��� Jacquilihe   Pettigrew   has  been   visiting   her   grandparents  in West Vancouver.  HARRY THOMAS HOME  Harry   B.    Thomas    returned  last week from a week's stay an  Vancouver. '��'.���'���  RECOVERING  Following an operation, Mrs.  Paul Harding is at present confined to St. Vincent's Hospital,  Vancouver. Her many friends  wish her a speedy recovery and  home-comiing.  Masonic Lodge  Sechelt Peninsula will have *  branch lodge of the Masonic Of  der if present plans of! some \:  the more progressive brother  materialize. z  Those interested in the Masof.  ic Order are advised to notice tjf  advertisement elsewhere in tj  issue. j  PICTURE  SHOW  GIBSON'S HALL    1  Every Week. Watch for th|l  Posters!   Shorts,  News,   an<|  Feature Photoplay       fc  m  ESSO GASOLINE j  MARVELUBE    Oil  Get the best out of your |  high-speed motors!9  Fill up here with  Premiu  Ethyl  Gasoline.  Hose  deli$,  ery from  float to  boat!|l  W. P. PIEPER  Irvine's Landing  Pender  Harbour    J  A  I  acific Mobile Moviei  /  <N  ���z:'::- z--vy^--:\--:z ]:P   presents    .^-^y:..z ���'������/::-:.-. y'"Y<-'r y  NOVEMBER 19 - 23  "A STAR IS BORN"  Technicolor, with Janet Gayn or,  Frederick  March J  NOVEMBER 26 - 30 j  "ROAIT TO ZANZIBAR"  with Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour  \i.  ��  UNION ESTATES, Sechelt  A. H. BRINE, Roberts Creek  TSAWCOME GARAGE, Wilson Creek  THOMAS BEASLEY, Half Moon Bay  !��^^l"  i>i  Ml  hi

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