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Sunshine Coast News May 19, 1986

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 7J  Legislative Library  Parliament Buildings  Victoria, BC  V8V 1X4  86.6 i  sons mulls over  Aqua West project  "It's a community project; If  the community doesn't want it,  then we shouldn't do it," said  Oddvin Vedo about Aqua  West's proposed marine, and  U-Catch-'Em fair for Gibsons  Bay.,: - ���' ���)���: y-:  Gibsons Council will decide  , tomorrow   night   whether  the  fair, which Aqua West would  like to have in place by early  June, is right for Gibsons.  The planning committee  Tuesday recommended the project be turned down for lack of  detailed drawings. Negative  public! response was also a factor and the concept of the fair  had changed, said the planner,  with all the extras for the town  -a permanent pier, a park sloping down to it, shelters and  parking - taken out.  ' "To put it crudely," said Rob  -Buchan, "what's in it for Gibsons? Why should we accept  it?"  Aqua West volunteer Art  McGinnis argued that his group  wasn't gaining anything; either.  "The project was conceived  very unselfishly. We are.trying  to get' some activity on the  Coast going that will draw lots  of visitors. We are working for  the benefit of the entire community."  He said the final plan for the  floating fair was"just a matter  of connecting components, so  we hadn't thought of  drawings."  On Thursday Oddvin Vedo  met with town staff and two  aldermen - Bob Maxwell and  Jack Marshall -to request that  council reconsider before adopting its recommendation.  Vedo said there could be  some improvements on the Gibsons site besides a stairway  down Jack's Lane and an 800  square foot paved tour bus pull-  out at the top. He said most of  the tourists would arrive by  boat, so parking would not be a  problem, or street congestion,  ��� and he reminded town officials  that the previous council had  endorsed his group's efforts in  November 1984.  It was then that he and  McGinnis first proposed a  U-Catch-'Em pen would be  placed at the end of a ramp at  the Gibsons Marina during Ex-  po.  It was finally agreed that  council would review the project before its final decision  tomorrow.  Vedo said in an interview Friday that: consolidating the fair  in Sechelt would in many ways  make the project easier, although bringing the same cruise  boats to Sechelt, he admitted,  would be a problem.  He allowed that he had kept  away from council too long, but  nothing could crystallize, he  said, until government funds  came through in the spring,  after which time became short.  "I admit I failed to get the  full understanding of Gibsons  Council, but we are just trying  to help the merchants in the  town take advantage of Expo-  generated traffic. This is a community project and we need  strong support," he added. "I,  felt we were being treated like a  large-scale developer in there.",  Gibsons and District Chamber of Commerce president  Sheila Kitson said she could not  speak for the chamber's directors jjecau'se "they had never,  discussed it or been approached  about it." ' .  >.  She said she didn't knovy  enough about the fair to saj.  whether it would be good fot  business but she did say she wa$  concerned for the people who  live near the proposed site ana  for people running chartered  boat services in the bay v They  hadn't been approached either*  she pointed out. ��  For herself she said one day ��  year like Sea Cavalcade i$'  enough: the whole summer lik���  that would be intolerable.       \  "The kind of tourists I see,'J  said Kitson, "love the place fo(  its friendliness, cleanliness and  beauty. They don't want to go  fishing out of yucky fishpens]  That's not Gibsons." *  "There's a lack of com*  munication somewhere,''  Alderman Jack Marshall said  from his house Friday.* -  Covenant protects  Egmont fish plant near  All the fun of the fair! Coast residents continue to pour into Vancouver to sample the delights of Expo  186. -'���_.'������"  ���Ten Dawe photo  Sechelt proceeds, Gibsons watches  Restructuring debate  by John Gleeson  ��� Last Wednesday, May 14, a  hew letters patent for the  District Municipality of Sechelt  was granted by Cabinet in Victoria, making the Sechelt  restructure final. Nominations  for a seven-member council will  be on; June 2, the election on  ljune ;21 and the incorporation  bf thb Sechelt district will take  place on June 20.  1 However the prospect of a  Gibsons restructure, while being  entertained as a possible  development by the ministry in  Victoria, seems to be unpopular  ivith Areas E and F taxpayers.  This was strongly indicated at a  'meeting, also last Wednesday,  bf the Elphinstone Electors'  Association and by the number  ' of signatures collected on a petition by Jon McRae, unconfirmed at 30 in total,  it McRae, an Area C resident  and former regional board  director who works in Gibsons  for Pebbles Realty, on Thursday denied any involvement  with an attempt to restructure  Gibsons,  |; But McRae was identified by  pndy   Buis,   of   Showpiece  ��allery, when one night in early  May at the Cedars Pub, just  ���before  closing,   she  said,   he  ���came to her table and gave her  ,. "his spiel" for restructuring. He  "failed to ask and she failed to  mention, until later, that she  was a Roberts Creek resident.  ;    She  said  she   saw   "about  eight" names on the petition he  showed her, which asked that a  study be undertaken on the  restructuring of Gibsons.  Merchants in the town, like  Buis, say many of their Gibsons  area customers are not going to  do anything except wait and see  what happens in Sechelt, especially with taxes.  Area E Director Jim Gurney  said at the Elphinstone meeting  Wednesday to a supportive  agreeing crowd that restructuring would mean "losing half  our revenue and doubling our  costs."  Gurney said currently both  the province and Areas E and F  collect the basic 13 mill industrial tax from the Canfor  mill at Port Mellon. The money  from E and F goes to the province to pay for policing and  highways back on the Coast.  "After we restructure, what  happens? Can you imagine the  provincial government giving  up a tax base like that, with no  liabilities to the province? Can  you see our government doing  that?"  . Gurney said he couldn't. He  sees instead the Port Mellon tax  being kept by the province and  the two costs that the tax basie  paid for - policing and  highways: big budget items  -would become the local taxpayers' burden.  "It's a shell-game," he said.  Please turn to page 17  Arts Foundation gets  Koerner grant aid  The Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation is extremely happy  to announce that it has been awarded a grant of $5000 from  the Leon arid Thea Koerner Foundation to assist with the  Performing Arts Pavilion in lower Gibsons.  The Koerner Foundation was established in 1955 with a  capital gift of $1 million from Dr. Leon Koerner and his wife,  Thea. Additional gifts were subsequently made from their  estate.  The objectives of the Koerner Foundation are to stimulate  and invigorate cultural and educational life, particularly in  British Columbia, by enabling institutions and individuals to  undertake activities which would not be possible without  special assistance.  Although the Foundation does not normally contribute to  capital expenditures, it may, from time to time make, larger  grants to exceptional projects that appear to be of particular  importance.  "The Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation is both pleased  and grateful that the Board of Governors of the Koerner  Foundation have judged the Performing Arts Pavilion to be  such a project and have awarded it this special grant," said  Fran burnside, President of the Arts Foundation.  Story's footnote  Oscar and Helen Johnson, just back from wintering in  Arizona, report that a recent weekend edition of the Phoenix  Sun carried a feature story of Trapper Jack's bequest to his  friends in Gramma's Pub under a Gibsons, B.C. by-line.  The bequest was for 'a drink on the Trapper' every afternoon till the money ran out, which it recently did.  The story of the unusual legacy was first reported by Brad  Benson in the Sunshine Coast News.  *A fish plant for Egmont  se?ms almost certain after  discussions at the regional  board planning meeting held on  May 15, 1986.  The plant is proposed by a  company-'called Egmont Fish  Plant Limited on land owned by  Berndt Rindt. A public hearing  on the matter was held in Egmont on May 6 under the chairmanship of Area A Director  Gordon; Wilson. Also in attendance from the SCRD was  Board ^Chairman Jim Gurney,  Planner Geoff Power and  Recording Secretary S. Cawley.  There were approximately 55  members of the public present.  Some submissions received  did oppose the plant but the  majority present at the public  hearing approved of the idea as  did the members of the Egmont  Community Plan Committee,  N.A. Colby, R.A. Fearn, W.E.  Griffith, J.H. Muller, J.P.  Muncaster, and I.A. Vaughan.  Egmont resident Geoff  Craig, while basically approving  of the proposal, did ask at the  public hearing if a covenant  could be placed on the development  to  ensure  that  the in  dustrial use yvk. screened^ from  adjacent residentiaf^property  and that the use be for cleaning  and icing of fish only.  Representing Egmont Fish  Plant Limited at the May 15  planning meeting in Sechelt was  lawyer Russell Crum. Crum  told the regional directors that  his client had no objection to  the proposed covenant and read  to the planning meeting the  wording of a covenant that he  felt would be acceptable to all  concerned.  The regional directors agreed  "essentiallythat the covenant was >  appropriate but felt it would be  advisable to take it back before  the people of Egmont. It was  not clear at the close of the  meeting whether the changes  made were substantial enough  to require a public hearing or a  public meeting would be ader  quate. The latter would mean  less delay for the project since  the advertising requirements are  not so stringent. A decision will  be made this week.  On the inside  Pender May Day Photos................P. 6  Gibsons Centennial Program ...P. 7  Entertainment.     ....P. 10 & 11  Dining Guide  ......P. 11  Sports.  .P. 12 & sl3  Classifieds  P. 15 & 16  Services Directory   P. 17  Ferry & Bus Schedule.................R 17  A fair of a smaller scale but Saturday's rain did not diminish the delights of Sechelt's Cowrie Street last  Saturday. MP Ray Skelly and MLA Don Lockstead were among the celebrants. ���John Bumside photo  v? 2.  Coast News, May 19,1986  NEWS ITEM: Trade Minister McGeer  proposes US goods boycott over Canadian  Lumber issue...  ���r  >:  I.  I.  ������#.  ...  I  ._#  ��� ��� ���   J*-.  $  %  ���':�����__:  i\C_'  ���'���$!���  ������*>!.  ���u  __*J**  ���?V.  -is  Jt.  I  I  ���$_  ���ft  :__i  .����� �����,  fi* -   �����  -�����  ' . -..  ��������&  �����_���  IS  I.*;.:.  i3V  ���Si  '��'-_���  .5*  What the past  can teach us  jSaturday, May 24, marks the 100th anniversary of the landing of George Gibson in the  beautiful bay that now bears his name.  It is appropriate that we should pay tribute to  the founder of the Coast's oldest municipality  this week and we are delighted to do so.  But in looking backward to the beginnings of  Gibsons we are not only paying tribute to what-  was. In the lives of the pioneers there is much  that we can learn from.  Faced with a wilderness to tame, those early  settlers found comfort and strength in the help  and support that they gave each other. The old  truth that the group was stronger than the one  needs no persuasion when there are forests to  clear and farms to make out of mountain  wilderness.  In more comfortable times, the human family  can fall to bickering; can spend more time finding faults with its neighbours than seeking to  find ways to help them.  The times we face today grow tougher; not as  tough as those the first settlers found perhaps,  but tougher than we have known in a couple of  generations.  May we find the strength that comes from  neighbourliness and mutual aid. The path to  prosperity and security which is our constant  goal lies through the thickets of many difficulties. Together we can find it. If we fall to  quarrelling along the way the times will get  tougher still.  As we look back to acknowledge the founding  fathers, may we learn from them how difficulties can be overcome by good neighbours  working together.  5 YEARS AGO  Director Harry Almond reports to the regional board  that the Sechelt Indian Band is prepared to give a lump  sum of $195,000 as a connection fee to the existing  sewer system, despite objections from Director/Alder-  -man-Charles Lee.    / \  y   Sixty people attended the first public meeting to discuss the Area E Settlement Plan last week.  Len George's Indian Dancers proved crowd pleasers  at the Indian Heritage Day held at the Elementary  School in Sechelt last week.  10 YEARS AGO  An estimated 500 people jammed the Langdale ferry  terminal to protest the recent announcement that ferry  rates will increase and resident cards would be discontinued. Both the 1:30 sailing of the Sunshine Coast  Queen and the 3 p.m. sailing of the Langdale Queen left  the docks practically empty as cars, trucks and demonstrators blocked the loading lanes.  20 YEARS AGO  At a meeting on Tuesday in Sechelt a regional committee was formed including 20 members. Eight electoral areas were defined in the district from Port Mellon  to Jems Inlet.  Elphinstone Pioneer Museum Society announces the  official opening of its museum in the Gibsons Municipal  Hall in Gibsons.  30 YEARS AGO  Gibsons tax notices are now in the mail and the mill  rate this year is the same as last year -16 mills.  Glen Wicklun, an Elphinstone High School student,  has been selected one of the three delegates from  Canada to attend the Junior Red Cross international  convention in Maryland this summer.  40 YEARS AGO  Egmont clam diggers are working fast during these  favourable tides and a lot of fine clams are coming in to  the Co-op. The down payment is two cents per pound  but the final payment last year brought the price up four  cents.  Citizens from Roberts Creek to the head of Jervis Inlet are enthused over the prospect of increasing the  facilities of St. Mary's Hospital here to provide for 20  beds in place of the present 10. To illustrate the need,  on a recent evening with the bed capacity full, three patients were on cots in the main hall while four other persons were being treated in bunks on their boats moored  to the nearby wharf.  The Sunshine  ^mmm _����  CO-PUBLISHERS  ;    John Burcu.de M.M. Vaughan  EDITORIAL  Editor, Dianne Evant  ADVERTISING  J. Fred Duncan  Pal Tripp  PRODUCTION  Fran Burnslde  1YP ESETTJNG  Saya Woods'  DISTRIBUTION  Steve Carroll  V.  The Sunshine COAST NEWS is a co-operative locally owned newspaper,  published on the Sunshine Coast, B.C. every Monday by Glassford Press  Ltd., Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0. Gibsons Tel. 886-2622 or 886-7817;  Sechelt Tel. 885-3930. Second Class Mall Registration No. 4702.  The Sunshine COAST NEWS is protected by copyright and reproduction  of any part of it by any means is prohibited unless permission in writing  is first secured from Glassford Press Ltd., holders of the copyright.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES  Canada: 1 year $30; 6 months $18; Foreign: 1 year $35  State of the Nation  "Your views, Jake, on the  current state of the nation?"  I had met the oldtimer by  chance in the parking lot of the  shopping mall and we had gone  across to the adjacent pub and  were comfortably ensconced at  a corner table behind pint mugs  full of ginger ale. The unseasonably cold, wet May weather had made the pub seem an  inviting choice, though Bert had  greeted our choice of libations  with some skepticism.  "Two ginger ales," he had  said. "God, I hope it's not catching."  "The price you charge for  ginger ale you'd get rich anyway," snorted Jake. "And you .  wouldn't have tp fix so many  broken windows." "Va  Bert had gone off behind -tie  bar chuckling and I had posed  my question to my crusty companion. /;->'���  "By the state of the nation do  ^ you mean this carnival of corruption which is playing in Ottawa just now?"  "I do, Jake. "!  "You know," said Jake, after a pull at his ginger ale, "it  comes near to breaking a man's  heart who's lived his whole life  in this country. So much promise, so much hope, so much  opportunity that Canada has  held out and to see it administered like some flea-bag,  two-bit itinerant road show  would make you weep.  "Do you know the T.S. Eliot  poem called The Hollow  Men?" he asked.  "I do."  "I am truly sorry to say that's  what our Prime Minister reminds me of. It doesn't matter  how much cleverness you have  if you are dead inside where  your personal standards should  be."  "'One thing you can't hide, is  when you're crippled inside,"'  "Who wrote that?"  "John Lennon, Jake."  "Well that's what I'm saying  too," said Jake. "Mind you, it  is unfair to blame Mulroney or  his cabinet minister or the poor  sap from Quebec who got charged with fifty counts of influence peddling. I believe it is  true that in a democracy you get  the kind of government that you  deserve and I believe that Canada is getting what it deserves."  "How so, Jake?"  "I've said it before," said  Jake,  "and I'll say it again.  > Corruption and patronage are a  LiI way of life with Canadian governments. The Canadian people  ii-\accept as normal the concept  Jr..that when you get elected the  /'*  fiht thing you will do and the  thing you will continue to do no  matter what else you don't do,  is channel as much of the public  money as you can get your  hands on into the pockets of as  many of your friends as you  can. It is the accepted way.  "Even during the election  campaign, after calling Bryce  Mackasey 'ah old whore' for his  snuffling at the pig's trough of  patronage, Mulroney tempered  his remarks by saying that he  would probably do the same  thing himself. What an admission - and the result was not that  he was thrown out as obviously  having no moral standards to fit  him for the highest office in the  land but that he was elected to  victory in a landslide. Canadians believe that all politicians  are by some mysterious natural  law going to be corrupt and they  accept the fact."  Bert had come off duty from  behind the bar and slid in behind our table to have a half  pint of beer with us.  "You moralist pinkos and  bleeding heart liberals are all  alike," said Bert. "You have a  hard.time dealing with the real  world and wonder why we don't  elect your ilk to government."  "Look, sonny," said Jake.  "Try to understand something.  It is not moral fantasies that we  are talking about here but competence in office. The trouble  with corruption is that it is incompetent. You give money to  your friends because they agree  with you or will vote for you  and you end up with uncritical,  unreflective   yes-men,   incompetents squandering waste-  fully  what   little   money   the  country has left. The tax monies  of the people should be spent  wisely, not on acquiescent fools.  "Take this deal that Sinclair  Stevens masterminded with the  Korean auto company, for example. The management of the  auto industry and  the  trade  unions agree that it will mean  about 25  per cent Canadian  content in cars built in the plant  as opposed to the 75 or 80 per  cent content in North American  cars. Management and the unions agree it could cost us 3000  jobs in the next few years. They  get their plant, Stevens gets his  interest free loan, and the people of Canada get hosed again."  The old timer was under a  full head of steam by this point  and even Bert was listening with  interest.  "Take a look at this province  and how it works, if you will,  millions of dollars in handouts  to a wafer board firm to set up  in the Industry Minister's home  riding - flat treeless prairie for  the most part. Now the same  firm is presenting the case as  evidence that the provincial  government subsidizes the  lumber industry and are calling  for tariffs against Canadian  lumber."  "Not quite," said Bert. "It's  an association that they belong  to that is asking for the tariffs."  "Split hairs, you nincompoop," said Jake. "Right  around here they're throwing  money at their friends like it's-  going out of style though there's  little evidence on the record that  those friends can do much more  than talk and tie their shoelaces,  not necessarily at the same  time."  "Look, 45 per cent of this  province is in opposition and'  probably always will be. It is the  parliamentary  system  we are*  supposed to be proud of. To1  deprive 45 per cent of the province of funds because they  didn't vote for you is to work a  serious injury on the province.  Was it the last budget or the one-  before that saw 60 percent of"  highways money spent in the  Highways   Minister's   h&ipe  riding. It is a stupid way to conduct affairs and a waste of the  public resources. And we put up  with it. I read where that writer  fellow that spends his winters in  Mexico   has   come   home   to  decide that Mexico and Canada  are meeting - Mexico on the way  up and Canada on the way  down - and corruption and inefficiency are the cause."  He felt he had said enough,  finished his ginger ale and asked  "Can you give me a hand  loading my pick-up with the  lumber I just bought?"  I looked at my watch.  "Sorry, Jake, I'm ten  minutes late for my next appointment as it is."  "I'll give you a hand, Jake,"  said Bert. "Us conservatives try  to be a friend to all men, even  pinkos."  "A friend to all, like a public  lavatory," snorted Jake."How  can you call the governments we  have conservative when they're  giving it all away."  The two of them went off still  arguing and I went about my  business.  Maryanne's viewpoint  Peace too may need its martyrs  by Maryanne West  While Mr. Reagan with his  posturing and brinkmanship  grabs the headlines it's easy to  fprget that he doesn't represent  the views of all Americans.  It is of course obvious that  like ourselves many Americans  are shocked by and ashamed of  the self-righteous and bullying  actions their administration indulges in, lbut we don't hear,  much about them.  As we get ready for our annual Peace March, to be held  this year on Sunday, April 27, it  was encouraging to read of an  American Peace March, in effect a grand trek from Los  Angeles to Washington D.C.  The organization has been an  enormous undertaking, planning for a moveable tent city to  house the 5000 marchers chosen  from 25,000 volunteers, and including support of 125 trailers,  six mobile field kitchens, two  tank trucks for water, portable  toilet and shower facilities, a  laundry, a day care centre,  waste and recycling facilities,  etc-  At least a third of the participants are family groups including small children. This is  understandable, those who have  children just starting life's  adventure are likely to be more  acutely motivated to save their  children, and to understand  that, all propaganda notwithstanding, parents the world over  have the same hopes and aspirations.  "We want to feel safe and see  aggressive attitudes ended so we  can grow old and watch our  children grow up and have  children of their own" - "I can  complain all I want in front of a  television but it is hypocritical  not to do something" are some  of the reasons given for making  the commitment of nine months,  of their lives to this project.  For some it's an adventure,  for others a way to come to an  understanding   of  themselves  -"I'm here to change me," said  a Vietnam veteran.  The ambitious project, perhaps too big, seems to have had  a difficult start. The logistics of  looking after so many people  over 3369 miles boggles the  mind. The last report I read was  that the project was having to  be scaled down, the costs were  just too great, but many marchers were determined to carry  on.  Our  good  wishes go  with  them. It becomes more and  more obvious that the survival  of the world is too important a  matter to be left in the hands of  politicians, and that if we want  to have a future for our children  we may have to take to the  streets more often than once a  year, and perhaps think up  some more effective non-violent  demonstrations.  too.  Peace may need its martyrs  ^______^*___^i._.��-_-<-��_^i_ _-._-��� _.!___._. ______ ..._��_ uutmu  Good and Bad  Good and bad and right and wrong,  Wave the silly words away:  This is wisdom to be strong,  This is virtue to be gay:  Let us sing and dance until  We shall know the final art.  How to banish good and ill  With the laughter of the heart.  James Stephens  aaAru_AiS-S_yxx^^  __ m Coast News, May 29,1986  3.  Area F Planning  Committee Meeting  Editor:  I like your editorials, but in  the last one you said the peace  movement should attack the  problem of radioactive pollution.  There is. nothing to stop a  person who supports the peace  movement from working like  mad against pollution. Many of  us do.  But I see the universal so-  called 'peace' movement as a  force against nuclear war and  That's All. Lots of peace  workers would disagree:. but it  has to be that way.  Anyone who will take a step  against nuclear armament  belongs in the peace movement;  is, in fact, already part of it.  It heeds a majority-of the  world's people. It needs the  many who agree with having  weapons handy, as long as  they're not nuclear.  It needs people who think  Mr. Reagan is doing just fine in  Libya and Nicaragua, because  that is the majority of the US  population. It needs the ones  who think Russia is quite correct to take over Afghanistan,  because that's the majority ih  the USSR. It needs the workers  in atomic plants, polluting oV  not, who'll commit themselves  against nuclear war. It needs  non-violent people, violent people, and people who won't eat  their wheat germ.  Sitting in Peace Committee  meetings (second Monday,  7:30, Roberts Creek School),;!  struggle to rid myself of tte  ideas that freedom, democracy,  and the elements of Christianity  are necessary to the peace movement. They're not. I'll work on  other nights for some of those.  But the peace (or disarmament) movement, as such, is not  for that. It is an instrument to  gain time, so that all these  valuable things can grow.  Or, should we say the movement is like our B.C. Ferry? If  we don't all pay our fare and get  aboard, it won't run. We all  have different reasons but we  have to get across. Ponderous,  unsatisfactory as the peace  movement may be, we're all in  the same boat.  Iris Griffith  MONDAY, MAY 26  7:00 p.m.  at Langdale Elementary  k\  1  iimi.yjM_iijii.ii  Nurses explain their needs to public  i  55  Editor:  Your readers have a right to  know why nearly 16,000 nurses  are taking a strike vote on May  21 at 135 hospitals and long  term care facilities across British  Columbia.  The reason is painfully simple. It's all about fair treatment  - of nurses and of the people we  care for.      .."'_'. '."';  Except for our responsibilities, nurses are no different  from other wage earners.   ,  But our take home pay is  worth less today than in April-  1984, when we received our last  general wage increase of 2.1 per  cent. Now, two years later, our  employers insist we fall farther  behind. Their demands for  1985-86 would mean another  7.8 per cent loss in our purchasing power,.based on the provincial government's own cost of  living projections.  Y There is nothing fair about  that, or about the way our  employers deal with other issues  with patient care implications.  For instance, one of our proposals is for formaf recognition  of the right of nurses to use the  grievance procedure to correct  patient care problems. This is  something that has been denied  us. Another proposal deals with  the effects of poor scheduling  on us and our patients. Right  now, nurses can be required to  work eight days, or nights, in a  row. We want six to be the maximum, so nurses can give the  best possible care without the  extra burden of unnecessary  fatigue. _,*.-.���.���  Although these and other  proposals would not create new,  costs, our employers refuse to  consider them unless wegive.up  existing nurses'benefits. I  Music lack is serious matter  -n  iri  ?/.  IB  3f  _'i  b;  o"  Editor: . .  Re:     "Lack     of     Music  Disturbing", March 24, 1986.  We are vitally interested in  Josephine Hammond's concerns about the lack of music  programmes in your local  schools. The B.C. Arts in  Education Council has as its  main role the advocacy for the  effective teaching of the arts in  our schools. If is through programmes taught at all levels of  schooling by teachers trained in  the arts, that talented children  are identified and encouraged.  Almost more importantly all  children should be receiving a  good grounding in the arts. The  ^arts help to,develop their self-  esteem, their valuing process,  and their appreciation of our  cultural heritage. The arts  education will help to make  them good and discerning audiences and consumers of the  arts.     -���������'.' ���'���   ' ���  It is important that other  community groups support  those involved in the education  of our youth. The local Community Arts Council, as wellas  other art and music groups can  be co-operating with the school  board to assist them in their efforts to see that the prescribed  curriculum is made available to  'all students.  Our organization has information that would be helpful in  this regard if readers are wishing  to pursue this vital concern.  Arthur Vallis  B.C. Arts  in Education Council  201-3737 Oak Street,  Vancouver, BC  V6H2M4  Fire Chief throws gauntlet  _.    Editor:  .t> v. ��� Harbour Larceny; or .Forget-  .;;:fullness?.v. .> -; <���-���.-.. .,;' .��� ���������> v.  v !:; Siry time has obviously not  3j healed the despair and ruin that  ^s the Pender Harbour Firemen  -i dished out to the Ladies' Scow  e Team in last year's Great Scow  race. The ladies have confirmed  ���the above state of affairs by an  article they placed in last week's  Pender People n' Places.  As outstanding citizens and  dedicated members of the community as the firemen are, I felt  it my righteous responsibility to  uphold and defend our public  image against such a dastardly,  nefarious (to use their own  words), and unsubstantiable insinuation, with regards to the  mysterious disappearance of  their floating menace.  Ladies, I hereby state that we  are not culpable of the above insinuate act and further I would  suggest that your Scow, like  your car keys and your purses  and your sewing needles, has  been misplaced due your mental  state after your ignominious  defeat by none other than the  firemen.  ' To substantiate my accusations I would be pleased to confront you with negatives clearly  demonstrating the above, i.e.,  the despicable act by one of  your members leading to the  disappearance of our hard won  trophy over the. side, of. the  governrnent dock into 20 feet of  water.- Need I say; mor;e?- *  ;��� Ladies,: accept the defeat, life  , goes on* and should you find  your Scow, please accept this as  - an open invitation from .your  ... fire, department to try again Ju-  ; l^ly_l.. 1986,..' ) -if?"'(*  - uirvfrim..  ���������..v........  ������;.:.    !��� ������'. Cheers!  Steve Boyd  Fire. Chief  Thanks to all  Editor:  Now that our Tea and  Fashion Show is over, we would  like to thank those who helped  to make it a success.  Prizes were generously  donated by Oak Tree Market,  Harbour Video, Hayestack,  Miss Sunny's, Four Seasons  Upholstery, France's Take-Out,  Roosendal Farm, Drizzle Enterprises, Pender Harbour Chevron and IGA. There were also  donations from many, individuals.  We are grateful to Mac Mac  Farlane, Jack Crabb and Sam  Walker for consenting to model  the men's fashions for us.  ��� Many thanks also to Joan  Wilson and her Girl Guides who  did an excellent job of serving,  and to the many other people  who helped us.  And sincere thanks to the  firms who supplied the lovely  clothes for our models, Blackberries, Cactus Flower and  Goddard's.  Elspeth Logan  Pender Harbour Auxiliary  to St. Mary's Hospital  Superb showing at  Arts Council  Editor:  The Sunshine Coast Arts  Council would like to thank the  many contributors to this year's  Young People's Art Exhibition,  running from May 14 to 25.  We have work from most of  the elementary and secondary  schools on the coast as well as  from Teddy Bear Day Care,  Crystal Cottage School and  many individual submissions.  It's a superb showing.  Joan Marshall  .     Curator, SCAC  A do-it-yourself move  could be the most expensive  move you ever make.  ALLIED  The Careful Movers  If you think it is  cheaper to move by yourself,  check with Allied before you  make the wrong move. You  may find that we can plan  and professionally handle  your move for about the  same price as a do-it-yourself move.  Call today, you may find we are a pleasant  alternative to the do-it-yourself move.  LEN WRA Y TRANSFER  LTD.  886-2664 Box 186, Gibsons  That hardline approach at the  bargaining table is leading to a  major shortage of nurses. This  province has always relied on  nurses educated elsewhere, but  our wages and working conditions don't attract them  anymore. Last year, the number  of new B.C. registrations issued  to out of province nurses was  the lowest in 20 years, continuing a downward trend that  began in 1981.  It's not hard to see why  nurses are staying away from  B.C. A general duty RN with 10  years' experience here earns  $14.85-an hour. But the same  nurse would earn $16.27 in  Alberta, or $16.32 in Ontario.  Just as important, she would  probably find better working  conditions, which have a direct  bearing on patient care.  We do not want a province  wide nurses' strike, but the  employers are making one a  distinct possibility with their  confrontational tactics. They  refuse to negotiate with us on  the basis of the real needs of  nurses and the health care  system.  Nurses  are  taking  a strike  vote on May. 21  because the  employers must be convinced to  act fairly - for everyone's sake.  Sheila Tammivaara, RN  Chairman, BCNU Provincial  Nurses' Bargaining  . Committee  SPECIAL NOTICE  CHILD ABUSE INQUIRY  School District No. 46 (Sunshine Coast)  are *  ��� 9  ��  *  Dr. Arthur Kratzmann is conducting an inquiry in the J  School District respecting policies and procedures J  related to child abuse. His terms of reference  available at the School District offices.  During the second and third weeks of June (9th to#  20th), he will be available to meet with persons in the5  District who wish to share information with him. .'$  If you would like to meet with Dr. Kratzmann, please ��  call Mrs. Ann Robertson at the School District '������Offices;?.  (phone' 886-8811). An interview time and place suitable #  to you will be arranged. J  ��� ���  .'   . ���'"�����.'  . i  *  Drive home today OAQ  1st & last months payment required In advancj  ' *  Call immediately and ask about  our personal RED QARPET LEASE PLAN*  ,      :���    ���������������-��� -���������������:���;, .,  WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD      Wharf Rd:> Sect.fi.t  vTB*M281  MDL5936 |  SOUTH COAST FORD  ���|.^^^#i_.^l^..f._.^l.l._i.ifl^.#;f' ���        " ^~^ ���'.  U/eeftCtj S|>ect<i_>  ���_  Marin* Drive, Qibsona    @8��~8158 .  ���IMHIa  Mnta  r 4.  Coast News, May 19,1986  You take the cake, and...  We're dishing it out!  ������.  YOU'RE INVITED...  to join us SATURDAY, MAY 24th  as we celebrate  Gibsons' Centennial Birthday at  MALL  SUPER VALU will be providing a Birthday Cake  in honour of this occasion, and the  Miss Sea Cavalcade Contestants will be serving.  Come in and have a slice!  nnnooo pop 6 O Q oo g__pOQO OOP ^iSL9&9&?S&  \\.  ���X '��� \  *.  t$_U  _���"'���" ^_____L- ^ _^^Tn     ^y^  sS^*''  Af***Zm  _______________________  *          '  To celebrate Gibsons' 100th Birthday...  Specially Prepared  Gift     $ 4 a   A A  Baskets 1 ObOQ  . H       ���     I while they last  featuring the locally made  "Coast Comfort" line of  herbs ��� teas ��� pot pourri ��� sachets  ��� scented pillows ��� and more..,.'  i  to  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons     886-3861  i.1  'V:  You can depend on PIPPY'S  for up to the minute fashions,  whatever the era.  In honour of Gibsons' 100th Birthday... we're having a  Running Shoe Special!  ?)  ASSORTED CHILDREN'S  LADIES'and MEN'S  RUNNERS  For Only  m  *mW^:#ML:  VISA  f  SUNNYCREST MALL  CANADIAN IMPERIAL  BANK OF COMMERCE  COSY CORNER CRAFTS  DEE'S FINE CLEANING  DON'S SHOES  GIBSONS TRAVEL  GODDARD'S FASHION CENTRE  GREEN SCENE  INNER SPACE  ���KITCHENS & CLOSETS  J'S UNISEX HAIR  JEANNIE'S GIFTS & GEMS  KITS CAMERAS  LIQUOR STORE  ORANGE-0  PARTY STOP  PIPPY'S  RADIO SHACK  -ADVENTURE ELECTRONICS  ROYAL BANK OF CANADA  SEW MUCH MORE  SUNCOAST AGENCIES  HENRY'S BAKERY  HOME HARDWARE  PHARMASAVE  'a little bit city, a little bit country...the best of both, right here in Gibsons/  ���on  SUNNYCREST LAUNDROMAT  SUNNYCREST RESTAURANT  SUPERVALU  THE CANDY SHOPPE  THE FEATHERED NEST  TODD'S CHILDREN'S WEAR  TOYS & HOBBIES FOR ALL AGES  YOU-DEL'S DELICATESSEN  ���u Coast News, May 19,1986  The Gibsons Garden Club are planning something special in Pioneer Park for Gibsons' Centennial Year.  Details as they grow. ���Fran Burnside photo  Now its Dr. Terry Amie  Terry   Amiel,   formerly   of  Gibsons, recently received his  MD degree after having attended the University of Calgary for  Lthe past three years.  I   Dr. Amiel has been visiting  | the Sunshine Coast since 1953  .and resided here permanently  from 1976 to 1982. During that  time he owned and operated  Peninsula Cleaners and was the  cartoonist for the Coast News.  ' He was also a member of both  the Gibsons and Sechelt Chambers of Commerce, helped in  several Sea Cavalcades, and sat  on the Marina Planning Com-  'mittee.  ��� From 1980 to 1982 Terry  ; commuted daily to Capilano  | Community College in North  ��� Vancouver which he credits  [with the best teaching and most  supportive staff in his six years  I of training. While there he  received the T. (Buck) Suzuki  'award for top science student  and was named to the Dean's  Ust.  In 1982-83 he attended UBC,  majoring in microbiology, and  won a summer scholarship in  cancer research. On application  to medical school he was accepted at UBC, Queen's University, and the U of C where he  received a full scholarship for  the entire medical training.  While attending the U of C  Terry has been the co-editor of  the med.-school newspaper  Parallax, spent a month elective  with the Gibsons Medical Clinic  working with Dr. R. Lehman,  and travelled to Papua, New  Guinea, to study tropical  medicine. He has now accepted  a residency position in New  Zealand in General Medicine  for two years.  Eventually Terry and his  family hope to return to practise  in northern B.C. or the Yukon.  Terry would like to thank all  the people of Gibsons for their  support and encouragement.  Special thanks go to Commodore LB. B. Morrow and  Mrs. Sheila Kitson. As well, and  most importantly, Terry thanks  his wife Jenny and two sons,  Oliver and Jamie, for their support, understanding, and patience over the past six years.  Attending the graduation  ceremonies were Ron and Lil  Amiel from Vancouver, Frank  and Marg Williams from Toronto, and Moira Clement and  Lily Flockhart, his grandmother, both from Gibsons.  Roberts Creek  needs help  by Jeanie Parker, 886-3973  The Roberts Creek Library  has served the community well.  It was always a nice surprise for  newcomers to discover and in  recent years the selection of  books has been greatly enhanced by government grants.  But, like all organizations, it  needs new people to get. involved in its operation to keep it  alive. The library is presently  undergoing a 'personnel crisis'.  If you are interested in maintaining   or   improving   the  library's service, please attend  the meeting this Wednesday,  May 21, at 8 p.m. in the Community Use Room at Roberts  Creek Elementary. A little of  your time can help keep this  valuable asset in our community.  FACILITY USERS  The Facility Committee for  Kraus Hall is meeting this  Wednesday. Users of the Joint  Use Facility should phone  Marlene at 886-8548 or Jeanie  at 886-3973 before then if they  Log dump granted  The log dump requested by Sunfor Logging Co. Ltd. at  Tuwanek has been approved by the Ministry of Lands, Parks  and Housing.  The dump has provoked an outcry from Tuwanek residents and been opposed by the SCRT.  Land Administration Manager H.K. Boas told the SCRD  of the decision in a letter received last month. The log dump  will be confined to a specified area and will be in use during  winter months only.  Perm Sale  $1A OO Until  * JV May 31  REDKEN &  LA MAUR  Cut, Blow, Dry or Set, and  Condition included.  (Long hair perm extra)  -^ Call now for appointment Tuesday - Sat.:   886-7224  THE HOUSE of GRACE  _>  FINANCING  O.A.C  ^  FORD ESCORT  MERCURYLYNX  L-��  Warranty  GREAT SELECTION ��� CALL TODAY  I  I  I  1  I  I  I  I  I  I  1  I  I  I  I  I  1  have any problems or suggestions they would like the committee to consider.  NO VOLLEYBALL  Thursday night volleyball is  cancelled until September.  STUDENT ARTISTS  Roberts Creek Elementary  students are among the artists  whose work is featured in the  seventh Annual Young People's  Art Exhibition at the Arts Centre in Sechelt. The show runs  until May 25 and the Arts Centre is open Wednesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and  Sundays 1 to 4 p.m. Drop in  and get a preview of the artists  of the future.  DAZE FUN  Roberts Creek Daze, incidentally, has been set for the  weekend of July 19. Start thinking about what you can do to  help make the Daze fun.  GIRLS' SOFTBALL  The girls' softball team from  Roberts Creek is doing well this  year. They've.won just about  every game they've played, including the one at the Creek last  Wednesday.  PRIZE LIST  If you're curious about who  won the prize you wanted in the  school's service raffle, you can  check the list at . Seaview  Market. Last I heard Karmen  Braun was trying to sell the load  of firewood donated by her Dad  and Bongo Knowles.  Legion  tribute  The Roberts Creek Legion  held a reception to celebrate  Peter and Peggy Grabenhoff's  retirement.  Sixty people enjoyed the  refreshments made by the  Ladies' Auxiliary. The Branch  presented a badometer to Peter  and a photo album to Peggy.  Bill Evans, acting fdr the,  Branch, declared May 15 as1  Peter and Peggy Day.  We all wish them the best for  the years to come and lots of  good fishing.  \.  WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD     Wharf Rd., Sechelt    885-3281  WANTED  DONATIONS to  KIWANIS CLUB  of new or used articles (no  clothes please), for their  tables at the Flea market,  June 8th.  Phone 886-2490  or 886-7735  for pick-up or information  _^PJ  '</���_���  G'thoml  Grade A Beef -Boneless  inside round  rda_M.,...^.���....:....:!:..���::.:��5_i93__'2i6_l  Boneless  top sirloin steak*,8.58,_ 3.89  Fresh Turkey  drumsticks ....'.........*. 2.62,_ 1.19  Fresh  snapper fillets  *95.71 ,.,.2.59  Mapleleaf Sliced  side  bacon  500 gm  With 1 Complete ,'  Super Saver  Card  Without  4 .,     .   .. Super Saver  3 Varieties card  :yyy;:yym:m\  _S_K.  __$_&__  Fresh California  v_  1.30  ���_*rr_t .;���..  Granny Smith  apples  B.C. Grown (per bunch)  radishes or  green  onions  kg  1.30   .59  With 1 Complete  Super Saver  Card  Without  Super Saver  Card  3/. 09  3/. 89  I OBQCBRY VALUi  Sunlight  liquid  detergent t m,e  Fortune 284 ml  whole  mushrooms  With 1 Complete  Super Saver  Card  1.99  Without  Super Saver  Card  2.69  With 1 Complete  Super Saver  Card  Without  Super Saver  Card  Parkay With 1 Complete 4        ft ft Without  ft      f* ft  margarine7 36_g:: _. 1.33supe^ Z.B9  Miracle Whip **i��XZ 1%    TO     "���*-.��    1 A  salad dressing..,../...L. 7aSupe"szo. 19  i  Foremost Grade A __ _ -     ^ ^  _ With 1 Complete      ft fill Without m       *1Q  large eggs ._._?:_��. 99 Supersc_?_ I .a9  Niagara ��� Frozen �����#*  orange juice .....355m,. 79  Campbell's t% I    AA  mushroom soup _..,...2/.$9  I**  !+���  i .  I*.  M.  _. 6.  Coast News, May 19,1986  WMMxMM^^wWMS^mS^WS  A week of o  by Joan Wilson, 883-9606  Lots of odds n' ends this  r0kek, it seems. Next week, a  Complete rundown on May Day  'events. It's too bad the weather  didn't co-operate, but no  of rain can dampen  Harbour   enthusiasm,  amount  Pender  _��nit?  ���WILDLIFE NEWS  :)Dr. Brian McKeown, professor of marine biology at  Simon Fraser, is the guest  j/pieaker at the May 20 meeting  df the Pender Harbour Wildlife  Society. Everyone is welcome,  7:30 at the elementary school  Ijbrary.  ' ^ Wildlife members will be selling tickets on a great looking  jeep Cherokee at the Trail Bay  Mall on Saturday, May 24.  Contact any member for tickets  here.  COMMUNITY BAZAAR  Muriel Cameron and the  other members of the club  would like to thank all those  who worked and enjoyed the  Bazaar. A few corrections to the  list of prize winners (errors were  mine, not Muriel's),:  Main raffle, Mary Buntain,  $50; grocery hampers, Davena  NJorton and Mrs. Hamblin;  $oven cushion, Vi Berntzen; tea  frizes, ceramic garden ornament to Myrtle Page and a swan  planter to D. Eelsworth.  �� Thanks to all who knitted  gnd sewed, and to three super  jtchen helpers from PHSS. It  jas a real community effort!  |T. ANDREW'S  All services at St. Andrew's  will now be at 11:30, with alternating pastors from the Luth-  _^an and Anglican congregations. One exception is June 1,  which will be the first Sunday  service in the new St. Hilda's  Church in Sechelt, 10:30 a.m.  ffo service at St. Andrew's that  day, but come down and see the  new building.  GIANT SALE  ���jj Pender Harbour Church  Yeomen are holding their annual Giant Sale on Saturday,  Kjay 31, 10 a.m. at St.  Andrew's. Plants, furniture, a  children's table, books,,  household items - just what you  heed!'-- ���-.- ���.' *~.<-y  GOLF CLUB DANCE  The Pender Harbour Golf  Club will hold a spring dance  for members and guests, Saturday, May 31 at the clubhouse.  Happy hour at 6:30, dinner at  7:30. Tickes are $12.50 each.  IT'S A GIRL!  Yes, a daughter (as yet unnamed), arrived May 7 for  Beata and John Spraggs. Many  Harbour residents will be pleased to hear their good news.  Mother, father and baby doing  well.  WRITE ON  Judy  Gill  of the  Writers'  Forge reminds all students that  there is still time to enter the  Student Writers contest. Check  with your English teacher for  details. You can enter any  suitable submission written during the past year.  Let's see some entries.from  the talented young writers out  there.  NEWS BRIEFS  A warm Pender Harbour  welcome to new residents Sandi  and John Murdie, and Syd and  Anne Lowings.  Best wishes to Morris and  Pauline Green, who have left Ir  vine's Landing to enjoy life on  Redrooffs Road.  Stop in at the Pender Harbour Hotel Cafe, and ipeet  Ruth Campbell, new manager.  We wish you every success,  Ruth!  Save those empty bottles for  Pender Harbour Beavers, Cubs  and Scouts, who will be around  collecting them June 14. If you  can't wait, call Diane Fielding,  883-2602. '  DON'T FORGET  Spring Luncheon for Pender  Harbour Ladies' Golf Club,  May 25 at the clubhouse.  Portable Toilet lentals  Camp grounds ��� Outdoor picnics  Fairs ��� Reunions ��� Gatherings  Construction sites.  SEPTIC TANK PUMPING  Bonniebrook Industries  886-7064  Serving the entire Sunshine Coast  South Pender Harbour Waterworks Dist.  Egmont Alews  All types visit Egmont  ANNUAL  GENERAL MEETING  Sunday, May 25, 2:30 p.m  Madeira Park Community Hall  by Ann Cook, 883-9167  VISITORS THIS WEEK  A big family of whales paid  Egmont a visit. Maybe it wasn't  a family but a travelling entertainment show, as there were-  more than 20 jumping, twirling  and spouting. Really doing their  stuff.  They hung around a couple  of days, the salmon ran for  cover and the sports fishermen  said damn.  A family of Canada geese are  nesting on little Home Island  (that's out front of Bathgate's  store), and visited the little bays  for daily grub and teachings  from mother goose.  Have you seen the wild rabbits at the sharp turn at Waugh  Lake or the straight stretch between Ruby Lake and Egmont  Road? They are a very dark  brown this year and unless they  move they are hard to spot.  Not so with the almost tame  deer at the golf course. I saw  tourists get out of their car  before it bounded away.  MISCELLANEOUS  , , Local artists; Marilyn  Bathgate and Noreen Marshall  travelled to Prince-George for  the Arts Festival. Noreen had  her camera along and maybe  got a good picture of Princess  ���Di.   ���        .^;-?::::V <���      -��� "V.  Nan White is in hospital in  Vancouver   recovering** from  lung surgery. We are all thinking of you Nan and pleased to  hear you are recovering as well  as expected and will be home in  your garden soon.�� (Soon as  winter's over!)  Winners at the Tea were  Gwen Colby, Randy Young and  Richard Baker for door prizes.  Ame Young the drawing contest. Shirley Hall for poetry.  Goodie box, Kay Birch. Plant  raffle, Muriel Cameron.  Happy Birthday Ben Angus,  Brenda Martin (now 18), Timi  Newcomb and remember the  boy with the smile,. Kevin  Graham.  AGENDA ITEMS INCLUDE:  -1985 Financial Statements  - request for borrowing to enlarge intake  on Haslam Creek  - Election of trustees  PLEASE PLAN TO ATTEND  -< ."^. ���  Teachers asking  public input on wages  A press release from the Sunshine Coast Teachers' Association (SCTA) indicates that the  association has reaffirmed the  current "Back to Basics" job  action.  The current salary dispute  between the SCTA and the  school board will be heard by a  three party arbitration board on  Monday, May 26. The conclusion reached by this board was  once binding on both parties  but now there is an additional  step of the Compensation  Stabilization Board.  According to the release; the  teachers are continuing to meet  with the trustees in an ieffort to  avoid this process, called draco-  nion by Davey Fulton last year.  .While there are other outstanding issues, salary adjustment has become the main difficulty between teachers, arid  trustees.,;   ... '-,...   ...,_.' .. ..v. '  The teachers believe that they  have subsidized the system sufficiently over the last three zero  contracts, the release states.  Class sizes in this district have  been kept steady and the board  can, in the opinion of the  SCTA, afford a cost of living  adjustment equivalent to that of  other teachers in the province  The-SCTA believes that it is  not out of line asking to be  treated equally with other  teachers in the province, but  that the board is out of line in  demanding that the teachers  agree to settle significantly  below the provincial average for  the fourth consecutive contract.  The SCTA appreciates that  not all members of the community will agree with- its actions, and they are urged to  communicate their concerns to  both parties in the disagreement:.--; '-y-~~-. *yry-  "'X   ________________________________ ..^- ,\^WWWj^WBBWP^ _. s   tK(F*^(^W^HI^.J-.-P^_P|PF_p^   ^_.   ^_^^%"- ^   .'���*.,  . S_. '��� ���..��.'"^S^t*!a#ii^iii___^_iilS.  See next week's paper for Timber Days Photos  ��  > Coast News, May 19,1986  The tradition of the May Queen is alive and well in Sechelt, and this year's Queen, Tanya Wishlove, second from the right in the back row, was joined by her Princesses, Flower-girls and last year's Royalty for  dinner at the Parthenon Restaurant in Sechelt last Friday evening. ���Dianne Evans photo  The people on the hill are watching the Better Beater Race in Sechelt's Timber Days last weekend. Complete photo coverage next week. ���Chris Staples photo  Sechelt  Scenario  A service to remember  by Peggy Connor, 885-9347  St. Bartholomew's Anglican  Church was filled to capacity on  Tuesday, May 13 as friendsv and  relatives gathiered to pay \last  respects to Walter Nichols, who  lost his fight with cancer on  Saturday, May 10.  A fine service was conducted  by Reverend J. Paetkau and  Reverend Godkin, ending with  Piper   John   Webb   on   the .  *|^ijagpipes with a moving rendi-  . Vtion of Amazing Grace.  ft      Walter was. a banker who  u retired to West Sechelt and pro-  <i. ceeded to be of great help to the  **' community. As a member of  the Sunshine Coast Golf and  Country Club he,served on the  board of directors. His financial  expertise was greatly appreciated by the. Sechelt Intermediate Care Society where  right up until the last couple of  weeks he was still advising.  Daughter; Susan Lazarand  and husband Henry were here  from Vancouver, with Teresa,  Gregory and Peter; Susan said  Jshe couldn't see the many people behind her in the church but  felt a great warmth coming  from the back. Not surprisingly  as this was the type of man he  was. He took a keen interest  in people arid they responded to  him.  Son Ian Nichols, well known  here as he taught at Chatelech  but is now in Burns Lake, was  also here with daughters Lisa,  Stephanie and Jennifer.  Walter's wife Mercia also  stepped right in to help in the  community and it is to be hoped  she will feel the sympathy from  their many friends with her on  her great loss.  MAY QUEEN TANYA  This year the May Queen,  Tanya Wishlove, was picked  from Grade 7 and the six  ; runner-ups were: First Princess,  \Kristy Beecham; Second  Princess, Nicki Acton; and  Tammy Francis, Beverly Peters  and Andrea Clayards. The  other five competing were  Krista Bricknell, Karen Protocky, Josie Veldhoen, Alonia  Brand and Jackie Sager.  The flower girls came from  the Grade 1 's in the area and are  Ashley Nanson, Sandra Goodwin, Leslie Erickson and  Allison Wright.  The girls raised money for  their events and on Friday, May  16 they all attended a dinner at  the Parthenon. Joining them  were last year's May Queen,  Joyce Joe . and her two  princesses Leah Hemstreet and  Diana Hockneil.  JUMPING FOR THE HEART  The   Sechelt   Elementary  School children who jumped  rope for the Heart Foundation^  raised $2,125.11 which surely  must have made the Foundation  jump for joy. It was well done  and for a good cause.  RUBY OSBORNE  Ruby Osborne was a long  time resident of this area who  was a delightful little lady. Ruby ]  passed away in Chilliwack  Hospital on May 13 and her  funeral was on Saturday, May  17 at St. Hilda's Anglican  Church.  Predeceased by her husband1  Vic, whose logging activities  look them all around the Sunshine Coast area, they came up  here many years ago from Mission.  The last few years Ruby called Greenecourt home and was  friend and companion to Jack  Mayne. She was also a willing  worker for the St. Mary's  Hospital Auxiliary's Thrift  Shop and a very dear soul  whose friendly smile will be  missed.  She leaves her daughter  Shirley and son-in-law Bob  Kirkby, granchildren and great  grandchildren plus her sister  Sylvia Reeves and brother  Milton Conley of Mission.  ���_v  I  VISA  Sechelt  SUNDAYS  Enjoy leisurely shopping  on Cowrie Street  every Sunday this Summer  Sh,  m  Chi  ac/o  w,  z***2s*��  Stedi  cta  man  nSh  Bo  okst  ore  f ALL THESE STORES WILL BE OPEN  FROM 11 a.m. TILL 4 p.m.  ^eod^^d  Os  SECHELT  j STREET MERCHANTS  I ASSOCIATION  .iisi^^^ipsi^^s^iii^^?  mai  by Ruth Forrester, .885-2418  Parents would be well advised to warn their kids that interference or damage to mail  boxes is an offence with fines of  up to $2000 or a maximum five  year jail sentence. .  .. Residents are also reminded  that there must be a locked  padlock on your box, otherwise  your mail will be held at the  post office for pick up*. .  WEDDING ON REDROOFFS  The little Church of His  Presence on Redrooffs has been  closed and unused for some  years now, therefore it was such  a pleasure to see it filled with  happy young people for a wedding last Saturday.  The Reverend E.S; Gale conducted   the   lovely   ceremony  . which joined Geoffrey Spahr  and Maureen Wartberg in holy  matrimony. .. .  Geoffrey is a son of Mrs.  Norma Spahr of Sandy Hook.  His brother Allan was best man  and bridesmaid was Kathy  Chilies, while little Brandon was  ring bearer.   .  The beautiful bride was charming in a full length silver-white  gown while the bridesmaid was  in deep pink. Reception followed at the Spahr residence.  SOFTBALL  Two softball teams have now  been set up in the Halfmoon  Bay area and the organizers  would like to make special  thanks to some folks who made  it all possible by their help in  sponsoring.  The Welcome Beach Community Association, B & J Store  and the Halfmoon Bay Recreation Association's help is much  appreciated.  Games are played at Connor  Park and you are welcome to  show up on May 20, 23, 28,  June 2, 6 and 9.  NOVA SCOTIA VISITORS  Hugh and Irene Duff recently  played host to their nephew and  his wife who were visiting from  Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.  Frank and Mary Hall were  participating in a chefs' convention which took place at the new  Pacific Hotel in Vancouver.  Frank was one of 120'chefs  chosen from all over Canada to ,  You're All  attend this event.  The Halfmoon Bay Fire Hall  is a far cry from the Pacific  Hotel"where Chas and Diana  stayed, but the Halls thoroughly -  enjoyed a first class Mothers'  Day breakfast there, cooked by  our volunteer firemen.  The visiting couple enjoyed..  their stay and werei of course  most impressed by the beautiful  scenery. A tour of Shorncliffe '  also impressed them. May they  come back soon.  FOR YOUNG WRITERS  A reminder to all high school  students in the area that the  ��� Suncoast Writers' Forge competition for high school writers  is still accepting entries.Details  are available at all the high  schools. .: ,  KIDS HELPING KIDS *  On Friday, June 13, you c^i  be treated to a delightful ev^ii,-  ihg bf song by two groups fg  young people knowj[Vi;as t}ie  Mini Mob and-; the Semitohgsj.  These.are two of Nikld'Webej_��  groups ;and they will ht giving  of theil. time andtalents to hefc  raise V funds for the Cystic  Fibrosis Foundation.'- y ^  * .. The ;shpw will be at; l$e  Sechelt Sehiors' Hall- and .a^  mission - will be by donatio^  Please try to support this^ yer^  worthy cause. ^r  Tickets are still available fo^a .  musical "Night to Remember"  on May 24. Pick them: up frofjf  Strings 'n Things of the Boo|c  'Store.'.'.-:. '..'���_������.:;- ~'������'������:'y*j{:  courses  Philosophy and English courses will be taught this summer  at Simon Fraser University in a special program for outstanding high school students, y   : V  The five week immersion in university life begins Fridajr,.  June 27, with an orientation day, classes run from July 2  through August 1. Further information from Simon Fraser  University^ Jeff Berg, 291-4563 or 291-4414.  '������*���?���  _��':  BENEFIT DANCE  Linda & Adam Davidson  FRIDAY MAY 30, 8 P.M.  Roberts Creek Community Hall  Band -"Fun with Numbers"  TICKETS - $5.00 BAR SERVICE  Ayailableat: ��� Seaview Market. ;.  Richard's Men's Wear,       Strings & Things  t  ;���_*.  Celebrations!  "It's a once in a lifetime affair!"  See George Gibson land here.  ��� Watch the dedication of the  new Gibsons flag.  ��� Enjoy refreshments at the  Barge Birthday Party.  ��� Dance the night away!  Saturday, May 24th, 1986  W  M,  *W:l  ^PROGRAMME OF CELEBRATIONS=  (Sponsored by the Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation)  2 p.m. -SEAWALK  -"George Gibson"* and sons land at Omega  .   Dock, escorted by S.C. Navy Cadets and piped  ashore by Sechelt Legion Pipe Band.  ��� ���" ������   - Unveiling of Commemorative Plaque: Mayor  Diane Strom & Mr. Ted Winegarden Sr.,  George Gibson's only living grandson.  ���George Gibson & sons represented by his  great grandson, Cecil Charnberlin, & great  grandsons Ted & Nelson Winegarden.  2:15 p.m. - OLD FIRE HALL  - "George Gibson" nails sign, on old fire hall  proclaiming it "Future Home of Gibsons  Performing Arts Pavilion".  2:30 p.m. - PIONEER PARK  - Mistress of Ceremonies: Dodi Marshall, SC  Toastmasters.  - Flag Dedication: Rev. Alex Reid  - Flag Raising: "George Gibson" and SC Army  Cadet Honour Guard.  - Remarks by: Mayor Diane Strom, Mr. Cecil  Charnberlin, former mayor Larry Labonte.  3 - 5 p.m. - BARGES AT OMEGA DOCK  -"Pavilion Punch" and cookies served to one  and all in honour of the occasion! (no charge).  - Continuous musical entertainment.  - Punch servers: Elphinstone District Girl  Guides, Rangers & Pathfinders.  PRESIDING AT HEAD TABLE  3 - 3:30 p.m. - Mrs. Nonie Hill, Honourary  Patron, Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation; Mrs.  Pearl Trethewey, George Gibson's great-  -       granddaughter.  3:30 - 4 p.m. - Mrs. Glady Sluis, President  Royal Canadian Legion Branch 109; Mrs. Pat  Shindell, Branch 109 Auxiliary President.  4 - 4:30 - Mrs. Kay Wood, Mrs. Peggy Campbell, Gibsons Garden'Club.  4:30 p.m. - Mrs. Margaret Smith, Mrs. Peggy  Volen, long-time Gibsons families.  3-9 p.m. -  CONTINUOUS ENTERTAINMENT  By: Nikki Webber's "Semi-Tones", Stephen  Hubert, Judith Scott, lack Inglis & friends,  Centennial Singers, Donnie Wright, "Otto  Pilot", Signi Murgatroyd, Bob Carpenter and  .   Ken Dalgleish.  5 - 9 p.m. - BARGES AT OMEGA DOCK  Barges become Licensed Premises. NO  MINORS ALLOWED. $2 admission towards  Performing Arts Pavilion.  8:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. - DANCE  - Dance at Gibsons Winter Club to the Big  Band Sounds of "Harbour Lights Orchestra".  Proceeds to Gibsons Swimming Pool. Tickets  available on barges. NO TICKETS AT DOOR.  Sponsored by Gibsons and District Chamber of  Commerce.  t^r  ELPHINSTONE PIONEER MUSEUM OPEN DAILY, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. 8.  Coast News, May 19,1986  Hanging at the Gibsons Animal Clinic is this water colour by Heidi  Lambert entitled Mikie. Regular readers of the Coast News will  remember "Mikie" as the wounded eagle found on Gower Point  Road last November who died despite an extraordinary attempt by  Dr. Joel Bornstein to save him. Lambert used "Mikie" as the  model for her realistic painting. ���Brad Benson photo  George    in    Gibsons  Generosity  i .  by George Cooper, 886-8520  Over $31,000 was disbursed  by Elphinstone Recreation  Tuesday Night's Bingo to 30  community activities or projects  in their past fiscal year which  ended March 15.  Generous donations were  made to St. Mary's Hospital  and to the Kiwanis Care Home  and a further donation to the  Cafe Home Mini-bus.  There's the generous bursary  to an Elphie grad "A bursary  that honours the memory of a  devoted community worker and  a member of our association,  Ron McSavaney," said Ernie  Fossett.  There were grants to the  Alternate School, and ,to  Roberts Creek and West Sechelt  Elementary Schools. Grants to  sports groups of all kinds, to the  Elves Club, the Roberts Creek  Fire ; Department, the Music  Festival, Crime Stoppers, Big  Brothers, and Rainbow Preschool. oX. ,  ij The, Roberts Creek Community Asscra^^ in  their refurbishing of their post  office and library building.  FLAG SEQUEL ?  .v- A sequel to an anecdote in  this corner (April 7), about a  gift of a flag of Canada by a  Gibsons resident, Doug  Dickson, to a returned veterans'  club in Alice Springs is reported  by Agnes Labonte of Elite  Travel.  Agnes and Edna Husby,  holidaying recently in Australia,  visited Alice Springs a few days  after the Canadian flag had  been formally presented to the  veterans club and been placed  among their other memorabilia  in the club museum.  "We met the club executive,"  said Agnes, "and heard that  one club member recollected the  incident of the felled flagpole  during his air training days in  Canada in WWII.'  "I have their club pennant as  a   souvenir,"   said   Agnes,  "which I'll give to our Gibsons  Legion."  GUIDES CELEBRATE  The Elphinstone District, Girl  Guides of Canada, held its annual banquet May 1.  "About 200 attended the pot-  luck supper," said a spokesman, "and were entertained  afterward by a slide display of  recent Guiding events in the  area."  The Lions area includes West  Vancouver, Squamish, Sunshine Coast and Powell River.  Among the guests were  Alderman Bob Maxwell, Walter  Dennis, District Scout Commissioner, and Mrs. Bridget  Gleave, the area public relations  director.       ^.  "We wish, to say thanks to  the  Gibsons  Legion  for  donating the use of their hall for  this occasion," said the spokes-  ' man. " ,' '���''������''..  NEW EXECUTIVE   .:  Elise Rudlahdj of Halfmoon  Bay, has b^pme a member of  the executive of the Sunshine  y. Association: J6p the Handicap-  "We are delighted to have  her join us," said Peter Bandi,  president of the association.  "We know that in the six years  she has resided on the Sunshine  Coast she has been most concerned about children's special  needs and; has devoted a great  deal of time and thought to that  area." ���'���',. v;_-,-;.\ :y.  Elise Rudland is a pediatric  physiotherapist, and while in  private practice here, she has  seen the heed for organized  children's services.  She is the co-ordinator of the  .' Stroke Club which meets at  Greenecourt, Sechelt, and is-in  the process.of co-ordinating an  association to further children's  services..  "We are just starting to  ascertain children's special  needs here on the Sunshine  Coast," said Mrs. Rudland.  Area C Soundings  t:  news  by Jean Robinson, 885-2954  The general meeting of the  Davis Bay/Wilson.Creek Community Association drew a few  interested people on a foul  night.  After the meeting we listened  to Al Jenkins from the Parks  Branch talk on the Marine  Parks in our area. With the aid  of excellent slides showing this  beautiful area we live in, we  soon caught Mr. Jenkins enthusiasm.  . This should boost boat sales  at least, so we can get to these  places. Of course our own Porpoise Bay Campsite and Park  has to be one of the best.  One of the Community Association Directors resigned for  personal reasons so we are. looking for a volunteer for this position. If you would like to join  this lively group, please phone  me. ;  CORRECTION  Thankfully the Sandy Hook  Ratepayers President, John  Johnson, caught the printing error in last week's column. Their  general meeting is on May 24, 2  p.m. at St. Hilda's. Gremlins  again.  MISCELLANEOUS  Anyone wishing further in  formation on the Western  Weight Controllers, which  meets Thursday, 7 p.m. at the  Scout Hall, phone Joan New-  sham, 885-2098, after 5 p.m.  The Sunshine Coast Dressing  Society meets on Thursday,  May 22, 10 a.m. Bring scissors,  a sandwich and a friend. A lot  of dressings ahead means a  summer holiday.  Jack Marsden passes on. his  grateful thanks for the support  given him in Area C while he  has been in office.     .  Good neighbour, Connie  McDonald, passed away suddenly on May 12. Her happy  face and jaunty walk will be  missed by all who knew her.  START THINKING!  So we will be a municipality.  It is a fact now or will be shortly. Those of us who cared  enough to vote must now realize  that dwelling on "what might  have been", for the  "no"voters, is behind us. Now  we must pull together arid start  thinking of elections. Because  nearly half the eligible voters  would not or could not vote, it  leaves half the people of the  area to get some worthy people  council. Get busy on it.  Open   9 a.m. till 6 p.m^ Fridays till T p.m.  New Zealand  GRANNY SMITH  APPLES  Imported  GREEN SEEDLESS  ���  ���  ���  ���  (kg 3.06) lb.  Florida Indian River-Pink & White  i    .    ���   ���  size 56  3/ .79  California  STRAWBERRIES  B.C. Grown  MUSHROOMS  Washington Russet  BAKING P0TAT0E  (kg 2.18) lb. ���  (kg 4.15) lb.  20 lb. bag ea.  99  1.88  2.59  Christie's Premium Pius ^  f-y      yg  Drink Mixes - ^^*  Kool-Aid...,,5/1_00  crackers  Nalley's  l...450gm  2.49  ....,....:.... .200 gm  Na//ey>  *  niP 7   ... .225 gm  Kraft-Assorted Varieties  .99  .89  Powdered Detergent  ABC  Kraft  mini  .250 ml  lkg  1.19  2.29  .95  250 gm  Cloverleaf Solid Light _  '���'������%  til n a      . ���^. 198 sm 1.29  Kraft  44 gm  Red Rose  163  Da9S.. paper 60's  Reynold's  alumina  fOll          ...   ...18''x25' ^mHI^  Christie's '.-/      ^^  cones 20s 1-29  Fabric Softner  Bounce  Christie's  snack .  crackers 250 gm 1 ���  Regular Thins, Wheat Thins,  French Onion  Mr. Clean  Golden Harvest  40's  3.95  .. .1 litre  3.19  dates  1 litre  2.99  Whip  "Arte & Flowers"  SL_..,1.29    .500 gm  I fO,5f  sunflower oil   vi^S  Squirel  peanut g  butter       500 3_, 1.89  Day by Day I tern by I tern VV e do more for y ou  (. Vavtfktp  Deli and Health  We now carry  MO-NA  Dried Mushrooms  'shii-tu-ke, meadow,  yellow cups arid more!  ___    886-2936  across from Ken's Lucky Dollar  886-3251  LOCAL CRAFTS  Supplies & Classes  PAPE__HOLE CLASSES  every Man. & fri.  A GIFT FOR EVERY OCCASION  Bell shaped  GLASS WINDCHIMES  anriJSeaguJIsJjalpr e!.  Girl  SGu^s  Hair Salon  For carefree  SUMMER STYLES and  Precision Trimming...  we are the one's to see.  Call 886-2120, for  an appointment, today.'  jh the Lower.-Village.'  [  Show Piece  Gallery  J  Next to  Gibsons  Fish  Market  NOW RELOCATED  .    Come in and see our  NEW SELECTION  Custom Framing  '  LIFETIME CAIARANTEL  Gower Pt. Rd. Gibsons  886-9213 Palm Big Dipper  ice  cream  Armstrong  soft cream  cheese  4 litre pail  250 gm  4.99  1.59  Cool Whip  Eggo  waffles  .1 litre  .312 gm  1.69  1.39  Sunbeam -100% Whole Wheat       ^ *>  Dread .16oz. boSI  Sunbeam  cracked  wheat  .16 oz ���  89  ililiiiiilllllB.  ELMER'S GLUE-ALL  Dries clear/fast/strong  Safe - no harmful fumes r*~~"'     "'"'"^  250 ml { |  Regular price $3.15  SPECIAL  PURCHASE  PRICE  emm.  1.89  STAINLESS STEEL  VACUUM BOTTLE  ��� Stainless steel unbreakable  liner  ��� Retains hot or cold liquid  temperature for many hours  ��� Handy collapsible carrying  handle  . ��� Plastic lined cup  ���' Leak.proof stopper  20 ounce .  Regular price $49.95  SPECIAL  PURCHASE  PRICE  *���<���<__  -, !.,  ;_____//^<*���* '  'J*  ___J_v��--___#  22.99  Fresh Whole Cut-Up  FRYING  s  no  CHICKEN .9O  /b.  Thrifty Pack  kg.2.16  Fresh Whole  CHICKEN  BREASTS  In Family Pack  T_-  '>���  '-ft.'  -. *,.;  kg 5.03  Fresh  CHICKEN  THIGHS  In Family Pack  Fresh  LEGS  In Family Pack  Fresh  CHICKEN  WINGS  In Family Pack  kg2.82  Fletcher's Deli Thin  SLICED      S4  MEATS I  4 Varieties  48  ea.  Canada Grade A Beef  kin Family Pack���  ���&%m  <.  **,',������   %yy  (Canada Grade A Beef- Thin Cut  SHORT  RIBS  ���;���..,.-   ..rf.  >n   -v.  .jr-- r    -  .-  ���'    ���    ���:  In Family Pack  11  THIS LETTUCE  is superb. Whoever cooked this has a knack-.with lettuce. It's' a  triumph,"  And if you too want a knack with lettuce try:  SALAD WITH A DIFFERENCE  2 small lettuce, cleaned and quartered  SPRINGTIME PEAS  2 cups peas (fresh or frozen) _  2-3 large lettuce leaves  V- cup finely chopped Spanish onion  2 tablespoons parmesan  2 tablespoons mozzarella  salt and pepper  2 tablespoons cream  Get a steamer ready. Line with lettuce leaves. Mix other ingredients  and place inside-. Cover with lettuce. Steam ten minutes. Remove from  steamer, remove top lettuce leaf and broil for a couple of minutes.  Serve immediately.  Of course, if you don't want to cook your lettuce you can make:  DRESSING  6 tablespoons olive oil  2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  1.2 teaspoon paprika  v. cup whipping cream  salt & pepper  Combine all ingredients and whisk until thick and creamy. Pour over  lettuce quarters and serve immediately garnished with chopped  parsley.  And where does that quotation come from? Ever heard of a playwrite  called Alan Ayckbourn who writes hilarious comedy? Come on along to  Gibsons United Church Hall this weekend or next and find out who says  this and why!  We'll make you happy!  NEST LEWIS  ���niB-ifi  tickets  now at Ken's  in providing Variety, Quality, ��f Friendly Service  886-7744,  Corner of School  & Gower Pt. Roads  UPSTAIRS  Town & Country  BED &  BREAKFAST  in B.C., Canada  $9.95  Is your  HOT WATER TANK  too small - or not  working at all?  CALL US  SERVING THE SUNSHINE COAST  Seaside Plumbing Ltd.  886-7017  /  _CZ  The   DoU'$  House  Children's  Consignment Boutique  Quality used clothing  toys, equip. & maternity  also RENTALS  HOURS: Tues. - Sat. 10:30 - 5  Next to Variety Foods  past Ken's Lucky C_.l...r 886-8229  WEIGHT  CONTROL  PROGRAM  Our program is simple, fun and hw^k ,i!  Everybody needs nutrition. 100%  satisfaction guaranteed in losing, gaining and maintaining w?ight. Also in  business opportunity, too!  886-3908 Lee!  Happy  100th  Birthday  Gibsons! Coast News, May 19,1986  r*i" '    ,--.v'*���^.    ��� -/J  jaiM/  .rtifcihi-   .___*>_*___-��a^��>^d___r__~ '���<'��������������"    '':<���  : .     ^ttlfc-*-   ��� '������ ��� ���*���           - ��� -_..-j.        ���    -    r....f ,.___F  ^Jennifer Copping has been very successful throughout the years  fjiere on the Coast and this year her performance at the Festival of  jjhe Arts in Prince George netted her the first place in the Intermediate Theatre Dance competition. (See story below)  ;�� :    ���Diiuine Evans photo  Public Notice  COAST CABLE VISION LTD,  RADIO ACT  Coast Cable Vision Ltd. hereby gives notice that it has  made application to the Department of Communications' Vancouver Regional Office for private microwave  radio stations at Bowen Island and Sechelt.  The proposed microwave system is to provide carriage  for KCTS (PBS) (Channel 9), KOMO (ABC) (Channel 4),  KING (NBC) (Channel 5), KIRO (CBS) (Channel 7): Seattle, Washington; KSTW (IND) (Channel 11), KCPQ (IND)  (Channel 13): Tacoma, Washington, and various FM  Broadcast Stations licensed for distribution in the Applicant's CATV System.  The proposed system consists of an eight (8) channel,  ,12 GHz AML Microwave .Repeater .located on"Bowen  Island and a 12 GHz Receive Facility located at Sechelt.  "this system will repeat the above signals received at  Bowen Island from an existing multi-channel AML  Transmit Facility owned and operated by Rogers Cable  TV-British Columbia Limited in Burnaby, B.C.  The proposed system is designed to satisfy the requirements of CRTC Decision 85-90 regarding the impact of CKVU on the reception of Channels 9 and 11 at  the Applicant's headend.  EXAMINATION OF APPLICATION  Copies of the application are available for examination  during normal office hours at:  Coast Cable Vision Ltd.  Wharf Road  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  Delta Cable Television Ltd.  5381 - 48th Avenue  Delta, B.C. V4K1W7  Department of Communications  1700 - 800 Burrard Street  Vancouver, B.C. V6J 2J7  INTERVENTION  Any interested person who is not a party to the application may submit a written intervention to support, oppose or modify the application. An Intervener shall mail,  telegraph or deliver his written intervention to the  Regional Director, Department of Communications,  1700 - 800 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 2J7 and  to the Applicant on or before June 16,1986.  The intervention should contain a clear and concise  statement describing the interests and concerns of the  Intervenor respecting the application, together with any  document that may be useful in explaining or supporting the intervention. In general, interventions to be considered relevant to the application should address matters relating to the efficient and orderly development of  radio communications to meet the program signal  delivery requirements of the Applicant arid other Broadcasters in the area. Furthermore, the Applicant may  make written reply to the Department and to the Intervenor on any intervention on or before 20 days from  the expiry date of the intervention period.  Interventions and replies received in response to this  Notice will be put in a Public File for examination at the  above address of the Department of Communications  until such time as considered reasonable or until a decision has been rendered on the application.  Dated this 17th day of May, 1986.  .    COAST  A CABLEVISION  Wharf Road  Sechelt, B.C.  VON 3A0  by Peter Trower  Cu-Ching was a great fisherman. Most cats content themselves with catching birds and  mice but he was forever dabbling in the sea. We would often  wake in the morning to find  small, fishy offerings on the  floor or the porch. One night,  he came leaping through the  window with a pulsing* translucent object that looked like an  unborn squid. I quickly  flushed the weird creature down  the toilet. "Cu-Ching's just  paying his board, "I told my  alarmed mother.  Sadly enough, Cu-Chin'g's  penchant for angling was to  prove his ultimate undoing. He  'developed a kidney ailment  from spending so much time  around the salt water. Eventually, Cu-Ching's kidneys ceased  to function altogether and he  began to dehydrate. The vet advised us that the only humane  thing to do was have the cat put  down.  I was surprised by my own  reaction to the news of Cu-  Ching's impending execution.  The terse pronouncement jolted  me to the quick. The loyal little  cat had a definite personality  and had become a true friend.  Perhaps it was a neurotic over  reaction but I, was devastated.  My mother was equally distraught. Neither one of us  wanted the responsibility of taking Cu-Ching to face the needle.  As it turned out, we were spared  this enormous duty by longtime friend, Jack Williams, who  was then my mother's tenant.^  He offered to take Cu-Ching to  he vet and we gratefully ac-  .epted.  Jack returned shortly with  Tu-Ching's remains in a brown  mper bag. I buried that sad  package in the garden outside  my shack and wrote an eulogy  to the cat that had something to  do with Cu-Ching's spirit growing up through the flowers. The  poem is far too maudlin to  quote here but the fact remains  that the cat's death moved me.  deeply. I had never gotten that  close to any animal before.  The house and garden seemed very empty with Cu-Ching  gone. I kept expecting to hear  him scratching at the door or to  see his small, piebald face peering down from the roof at. me.  We remained cat-less for several  months. Then one of my  mother's friends who was leaving the area, presented us with a  six month old orange torn.  Simba, as we almost immediately dubbed him, was a  different sort of cat from the  jaunty and well balanced Cu-  Ching. He was rather more prone to paranoia, particularly in  the matter of dogs. Simba had  been almost fatally mauled by  one as a small kitten. He hated  and feared the entire canine  species, irrespective of breed or  temperament.  Apart from his extreme  distrust of dogs, Simba proved  to be a gentle and affable cat.  He soon filled the vacuum that  had been left by Cu-Ching.  Simba's terror of dogs did  not extend to other male cats.  He was a tenacious alley-fighter  during mating season and was  always coming home with torn  ears and other minor badges of  combat. Finally, Simba had a  savage battle with a much larger  cat and was badly bitten. The  wound abcessed and nearly killed him. The vet bills were getting ridiculous and it was  mutually decided that Simba  had sowed enough wild oats.  The inevitable, operation was  duly performed.  Neuterhood effectively put an  end to Simba's self-destructive  brawling. He became a docile  and affectionate house cat who  seldom strayed outside the yard.  We grew as fond of him as we  had been of Cu-Ching.  To be continued  Festival success  Jennifer Copping, "almost 15", pf Sechelt has won the Intermediate Musical Theatre.Dance competition at the recent  Fesitval of the Arts in .Prince George.  ^Jennifer has beenvery.successful here on the Cbast in past  years, but now her famifyls planning to relocate in Burnaby  so that Jennifer may be "closer to more opportunities in Vancouver. ykyV-  "I want to go on with this," Jennifer told the Coast News,  "I definitely want to do this as a career."  The Coast News extends its congratulations to Jennifer for  her recent win and wishes her every success in her future endeavours.  Other successful entrants from the Sunshine Coast were  Rachel Poirier who was first runner up in the Senior Musical  Theatre Dancer Erin K. White, first runner up in the Junior  Musical Theatre Dance, and Tandrea Der, first runner up in  the Junior Ballet.  Hunter Gallery Show  The Seasons on Gambier by Ursula Fritsch is the theme of  the show to run from May 20 to June 9 at the Hunter Gallery  in lower Gibsons.  This innovative artist works in acrylic and her work was  selected for the Festival of the Arts which was opened recently by Diana, Princess of Wales, in Prince George.  Table  Manners  Driftwood Players' current  production Table Manners written by English humourist Alan  Ayckbourn and directed by Betty Keller can be seen at the Gibsons United Church Hall on  Thursday, May 22, Friday, May  23 and Saturday, May 24 at  8:00 p.m.  Tickets are available at the  usual ticket outlets or at the  door.  This hilarious comedy is part  of Ayckbourn's trilogy The  Norman Conquests and deals  with the trials and tribulations  of a family as seen during one  weekend.  GIBSONS  LEGION  Branch #109  WEEKEND ENTERTAINMENT  Friday. May 23rd  Catfish Willie  Saturday, May 24th  The Wave Trio  ���   GENERAL  MEETING  Tues., May 20, 8 p.m.  DRIFTWOOPH presents  A comedy by Alan Ayckbourn    . Directed by Betty Keller  THURS., FRI. & SAT. A  May 22, 23 & 24  Gibsons United Church Hall  8 p.m.  TICKETS: Adults $5  Students & Seniors $3.50  Available at usual outlets  & at the door  The  SUNSHINE COAST  POTTERY GUILD  . is having a  SALE and POTATHON  Sunday, May 25  11 a.m. ��� 2 p.m.  at the Craft Studio  (corner Hwy 101 & North Rd.)  EVERYONE WELCOME  Keep Our  Swimmers Afloat!  Dance to the BIG BAND SOUNDS of the  HARBOUR LIGHTS ORCHESTRA  on Saturday, May 24th  8:30 p.m. - 1:30 a.m.  at Gibsons Curling Club  All proceeds to support the on-going  operation of our community swimming pool.  TICKETS: Available at several locations  in Gibsons, Roberts Creek and Sechelt  _      . v   *���   _,       _ s ___. _ _ v__ _ 4_       ��      *    "* * *      ^   X      V     s ��      i  -**>   . - ss   - ;       _*-.-���>_-_" <��nW. s \ r?" *  J. _>  ,^_. _       --_      fr_-  .  IONA CAMPAGNOLA  & DOVEHENDREN  (Pres. Nat. Liberal PartyKPres. BC Liberal Party)  To Visit The Coast  Meet and talk with these two  dynamic Canadian women, at the  Parthenon Restaurant  WEDNESDAY, MAY 28th  sit 7:00 p.m.; >  Tickets $20.00 ea. Available at:  Chinese restaurant in Pender Harbour,  The Bookstore, Strings;* Things the  Parthenon Restaurant in Sechelt, and  Truffles the Candy Store in Gibsons or  Phone 885-7029  ENTERTAINMENT BY SECHELT 49'ers.  Pepsi-WHson Minor Tennis League, in Gibsons and Sechelt, June 30 to July 10  and in Pender Harbour July-14 to 31. Register now: Don's Shoes, Trail Bay  Sports, Centre Hardware, 883-2854.  Sunshine Coast Employment Development Society Annual General Meeting,  May 26, 7:30 p.m. at the SCRD office. New members welcome.  Driftwood Players present "Tibte Manners" by Alan Ayckbourn, Thurs, Fri and  Sat, May 22, 23, and 24 at 8 p.m.. Gibsons United Church Hall. Tickets: Adults  $5, Students & Seniors, $3.50, available at usual outlets and at the door.  Gibsons Minor Ball, Girls' Softball Bottle Drive, Sunday. May 25, Langdale to  Roberts Creek Campground, 10-2:30 p.m. '  Shorncliffe Auxiliary Monthly Meeting Tuesday, May 20 at 1:30 in the activity  room at Shorncliffe. Speaker: Barbara Estey. Meeting to be followed by an appreciation tea sponsored by Shorncliffe. Please note change of meeting location for  this month only.  1st Gibsons Beavers, Cubs & Scouts Bottle Drive 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Langdale to  Seaview Cemetery, Saturday, June 7.  "Your Christ is too Small" video presentation & discussion. Roberts Creek  Elem. School. To run each Wednesday from April 23 to May 21 at 7:30 p.m.  Sponsored by'Grace Reformed Pres. Church. Coast News, May 19,1986  11.  i  )  ; sppogmitsm.  i  Teresa Kobayashi,left and Takeo Yamashiro will be performing at the Arts Centre next Saturday, May  24. These two fine musicians return by popular demand and the concert promises to be an exciting one.  Tickets are $5 and tea and sushi will be served.  Ceramics students excel  Students of Halfmoon  Ceramics under the direction of  Joan Clarkson won 135 awards  at the Vancouver Island  Ceramic competitions held in  Victoria, May 9, 10 and 11.  Eleven trophies, 119 ribbons  and seven certificates of merit  were won.  The show was judged by  .three judges under the International Ceramic Association  point system and although Vancouver Island has many excellent judges of their own, the  ICA rules state the judges must  be from outside the area of  competition.'  These pieces must be of top  quality and must be near  perfect. Second, third and  fourth ribbons are awarded in  the ��ame manner by the number  of points.  Ribbons are npt given to look  pretty, some entries do not  receive any ribbons because  they have not received sufficient  points to qualify. Ribbons are  earned and the participant  deserves credit for having earnr  ed a ribbon, no matter what colour.  Below are some of the local  winners* in alphabetical order,  although space does not permit  listing of all names.      ,���  ; Carell Carmichael, Gibsons;  t$6-.firsts; two Best of Division. .:r  ���_Jpan Clarkson, Halfmoon  Bay; three firsts; five seconds;  one third; three Best of Division; two Best of Category; Best  of;;Show trophy for Greenware  Adaptation.  >;Ed Davies, Gibsons; two  firsts; one second; Best of Division; Best of Category.  ; Jamie Dixon, Sechelt; one  first; Best of Division; Best of  Category; Best of Show trophy  for riiehJ   v  Del Elliott, Halfmoon Bay;  two firsts; one second; two Best  of Division; one Best of  Category; Best of Show trophy  for Handmodelling.  Mary Gkrnett, Shorncliffe;  one second; Oldest Entrant  trophy, (age 95).  Jessie Harpnick, Halfmoon  Bay; two firsts; two Best of  Division.  .Fred Hunsche, Madeira  Park; first; Best of Division;  Best of Category; certificate;  Best of Show trophy for teens,  (age 16).  Beth Knight, Halfmoon Bay;  two firsts; Best of Division; Best  of Category, Best of Show  trophy for amateurs.  jlaurane Norstrom, Gibsons;  three firsts; three seconds; two  Best of Division; two Best of  Category; Best of Show trophy  for novices.  Pauline Provan, Shorncliffe;  first; Best of Division; Best of  Category.  Candace Olney, Campbell  River; first; Best of Division;  Best of Category; Best of Show  trophy for Children under 12;  Best pf Show trophy for  Amateur^nioris.  Helen   Rennie,   Halfmoon  file Cedars  PUB  Cedar Plaza  Hwy 101, Gibsons  Menu  from  6-9:30  Bay; first; two seconds; two  thirds; Best of Division; Best of  Category; Best of Show trophy  for Miniatures. *  Gail Sarigster, Gibsons; first;  Best of Division; Honourable  Mention; Certificate.  Verda Schneider, Gibsons;  first; Best of Division.  Jesi West, Sechelt; second;  certificate, (age 9).  . Nellie   Woodward,   Shorncliffe; first; Best of Division.  Visiting grandchildren of  Audrey Browning (Candace  and Shaun Olney, Ages 11 and  6 respectively, from Campbell  River), and Laurane Norstrpm  (Philip LaCoursiere from  Squamish, Age 11) sat in on  classes and came out winners.  Joan Clarkson, who donates  her time to. teach Shorncliffe  residents and has only just  started teaching them last  month has proven that you're  never too young, old or handicapped to do ceramics and  come out winners.  . Halfmoon Ceramics Studio  \also won the "Studio Trophy".  The Elphinstone Pioneer  Museum Society will be presenting a special Open House on  the weekend of May 25 to coincide with the return of many of  our local pioneer families for  the centennial celebrations.  We are very proud to be  housing many fine artifacts and  photos; a great deal of them  having been donated from our  pioneer families. The lower  floor of the museum houses a  large collection of Indian artifacts, the excellent Charles  Bedford shell collection as well  as the superb B.C. rock and  mineral collection of Jim Laird.  The museum is especially proud  to be introducing our new Inuit  display which uses the many  fine artifacts and clothing collected by Ross Gibson while sta-V  tioned in northern Canada with  the RCMP.  The upper floor of the  museum is like a walk through  time, from the rustic tool shed  to the recreated family kitchen,  artifacts are displayed largely as  they would have been used at  the turn of the century.  Elphinstone Pioneer Museum  is the regional museum for this  area. Operating largely on a  volunteer basis it relies mainly  on the donations pf a generous  public and membership dues.  Be a part of our.centennial  celebration; join us across from  the Gibsons Post Office on  Winn Road. We are wheelchair  accessible. Support your local  museum and become a member  for the small sum of $6 per year  for family or $4 per year for individuals. Your membership  would entitle you to have input  into museum decisions as well  as access to all the museum  facilities.  There is ho compulsory admission fee, but donations are  gratefully appreciated.  BUS BUSINESS  ��� Need a working  partner  ��� Investment required  Call 886-2268  f  J      ASK FOR TARRY        ��  r  In lower Gibsons, hear Keri's Lucky Dollar.  Now also open weekend nights  Hamburgers, sandwiches, entrees  & daily homecooked specials  will be served FRIDAY & SATURDAY  evenings from 5 - 8 p.m.  NEW HOURS:  Mon - Thur 7-4  Fri & Sat 7-8  Sun & Holiday 8-4  [OMEGA]  [OMEGA]  Sunday  BRUNCH BUFFET  11 a.m. - 3 p.m.  overlooking Gibsons Harbour  OMEGA  RESTAURANT  Reservations ��� 886-2268  On Channel Ten  TUESDAY, MAY 20  7:00 P.M.  Expo Update: This week's  exciting news from the Expo '86  site.  Peninsula Review: The final  showing pf the third episode of  Peninsula Review. This biweekly news program was produced, crewed, written and  directed by senior broadcasting  students from Elphinstone.  The Real Kitchen: The third  cookipg show for the Real Kitchen crew.- This week, Pat  Taylor and Bernie Mahoney  make Chicken Cordon Bleu;:  Next time it's Marinated Rabbit.!  prepared in the Real Kitchen,   i  Look Back to the Hill: This  play, performed by members of  the Gibsons Baptist Church was  taped in the studio. A good performance, well worth watching.  ��      THURSDAY, MAY 22  5:00 P.M.  Expo Update: Repeated from  Tuesday.  7:00 I*.M.  Coastal Update: The Coastal  Update crew wraps up their  season with the final news program by the broadcasting  students from Elphie.  Gordon   Wilson   Area   A  Director   for   the   Regional ���  Board, visits the studio to talk  with  Dianne Evans on local  topics.. . '������ -,.    .-,���..;,  Pool Fundraising Dance: Joe^Q  Bornstein   and   Sheila   Kitson^ c  on NATO's involvements in today's world.  Timber Days Parade: Coast  Ten plans coverage of this  year's Timber Days. Parade.  Weather permitting we will be  put with multiple cameras this  year hoping for the best  coverage ever. An equipment  failure caused the loss of our  .footage of the Better Beater  Race held Saturday. Our ap-  pologies to interested vie\vers.  r.;tf you   are   interested   in  Igonntetiroofe  DINING ROOM  ., FULLY LICENSED  NOW!  Fine Dining  THURS-SAT  Each week a limited and unique selection of taste pleasures.  THISWEEK CHOICES INCLUDE:  Spinach Salad Nimosa, Bisque of Prawn  ���     Asparagus Tips with Hot or Cold Sauces',   .  Poached Snapper, The Bonniebrook Steak '���..'.-���  joints,tonight to inform us pn,?9^g��c0ming"a ypluriteer producer  the May 24th dance! Held at the^r. "��J$ tfj^ Coast Teh. or if ypu would  curling rink in Gibsons, the prpry  ceeds will be used to support the  swimming pool in Gibsons.  NATO: John Burnside interviews Commodore Ian Morrow  ENGLISH STYLE'- .*'  :'.:'  J. ;        -'V-\-:-.-w-  ROAST BEEF DINNER  ��jtp see coverage of a special  event please call us at the studio,  886-8505,. Ask for Steve Sleep  or leave a message with the  machine. : .  For Reservations, Call 886-2887  OCEAN BEACH ESPLANADE. GOWER PT.  Your guide to  the finest in  area dining  DINING GUIDE  A listing of  restaurants  and pubs  For those of you who haven't been to the Cedars Pub in  Gibsons lately, you're in for a surprise - a pleasant one.  The hew owners, brothers Pat and Francis Switzer from  Vancouver, have brought with them a commitment for offering their customers a first class pub.  They started with an extensive interior renovation that  now includes raised seating, new carpeting and frosted  glass windows. You can feel the difference in atmosphere  as soon as you come through the doors.  However, the most noteworthy change from the point  of view of this column is the change in their food service.  After hearing that the Cedars had just started their new  dinner menu, and wanting to rescue my companion from  her usual late Friday night work schedule, it was in a quiet  corner of the Cedars that we began finally unwinding from  the day.- ���  The menu is simple and straight forward; there are only  four hors d'oeuveres and five main entrees offered. But  what a choice. The hors d'oeuvres consisted of oysters  Rockerfeller, deep fried prawns, scallops and shrimp boat  - all for under $4. Three of the dinner entrees will be offered each night and include a steak sandwich, gourmet  burger, and club house - the most expensive being the  steak sandwich at $6.95. The other two entrees will vary  nightly.  We started dinner off by sharing the scallops and  shrimp boat and didn't regret the choice. I ordered the  steak sandwich (rare) and my companion ordered the club  sandwich. They were delivered with mounds of crisp,  golden-brown fries and a friendly splash of cucumbers,  tomatoes and the best grapes I've had in years. A visual  delight that did not disappoint in the eating. My steak was  tasty and cooked exactly as I like it.  Without the drinks, this excellent dinner for two came  to less than $20, and neither one of us could finish it all.  We'll be back.  You'll be pleased.  pm  M.C.-Master Card;  V.-Visa;  A.E.-American Express;  E.R.-En Route  r:-  :_  mi  AVERAGE MEAL PRICES QUOTED DO NOT  INCLUDE LIQUOR PURCHASES.  ��� V-"__. ���/_.���  Andy's Restaurant - Hwy ioi, Upper Gibsons - 886-3388. Open 11 a.m.  -10:30 p.m. Mon-Wed; 11 a.m. - 11  p.m. Thurs-Sat; 11a.m. - 10 p.m. Sun.  130 seats.  V.,  M.C.  Located in the  village of Gibsons kittycorner from Sun-  ���nycrest Mall, Andy's offers a variety of  popular meals in air conditioned comfort. A place to sit back and relax. Wide  lunch selection with daily specials. Menu  features steak,  pizza, seafood," pasta.  House specialties include veal dishes and  steaks. Children's portions available for  most dishes. Reservations recommended  on weekends. Average meal for two  $15-$20.  Creek House - Lower Road, Roberts  Creek - 885-9321. Open Wed-Sun 6 p.m.  - 10 p.m., Sunday Brunch 11 a.m. - 2  p.m. 40 seats. !V., M.C. Intimate dining  and fine cuisine are the hallmarks of  Creek House. The atmosphere is sophisticated yet casual. Brunch includes eggs,  crepes, pasta, seafood, salads,  croissants. Dinners include crepes, pasta  and meat entrees. Evening specialties include Filet A L'Echalotte, Stroganoff,  Lobster, Prawns. Two Daily specials  (one seafood) at $10.95 includes soup or  salad. Average meal for two $30. Reservations a must on weekends.  The Omega Pizza Steak and  Lobster H0USel538 Gower Pt. Rd.,  Gibsons Landing -886-2268. Open Sun-  Thurs; 4 - 10:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 4-11 p.m.  145 seats. V., M.C. With a perfect view  of Gibsons marina, and a good time atmosphere. The Omega is a people-  watcher's paradise. Cast members of  "The Beachcombers" can usually be  found dining here. Menu includes pizza,  pasta, steaks and seafood. Steaks and  seafood are their specialties. Banquet  facilities available. Very special  children's menu. Average dinner for two  $20. Reservations recommended.  Pronto's   Steak,   Pizza   and  Spaghetti House - Hwy IOI, Gibsons - 886-8138. Open 11:30 a.m. -11:00  p.m. Mon-Thurs; 11:30a.m. -midnight  Fri-Sat; 4 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. Sun. 130  seats. V., M,C. Located in the Cedar  Plaza in Gibsons, Pronto's serves an extensive variety of pizza, steak, pasta,  lasagna and ribs in a delightful family atmosphere. Lunch choices include sandwiches, pasta, burgers and daily specials  Mon-Fri.   Dinner   selections   include  steak, pizza, ribs and souvlaki. Steak  and   lasagna   the   house   specialty.  Children's menu available. All dinner  entrees served with salad and garlic  bread. Average family meal for four  $15-$20.  NIGHT ON THE TOWN  Lord Jim's Resort Hotel - 2 km  N. of Secret Cove. 885-7038 - Breakfast 8 a.m. - 11 a.m. Lunch 11:30  a.m.- 2 p.m. Afternoon tea 2 p.m. - 4  p.m. Dinner 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. until further notice. Lounge 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.  daily. V. M.C. - Banquet Facilities  -Fishing Charters, Outdoor BBQ  (June 1). Located on the waterfront  with a spectacular view of Ole's Cove  & Malaspina Strait. The rustic lodge  serves West Coast cuisine featuring a  varied menu of soups, appetizers &  entrees; But the emphasis is on seafood - flown in fresh from around the  world. Squid, swordfish, orange ruf-  fie, thrasher shark & yellowfin tuna  will be featured as available, local  swimming scallops, salmon, skate,  prawns & rockfish are also featured.  Reservations recommended. Average  meal for two - $40.  FAMILY DINING  Ruby Lake Resort - Sunshine Coast  Hwy, Pender Harbour -883-2269. Open 7  days a \veek 7 am -9 pm. 54 seats. V.,  MC. Breakfast, lunch and dinner served  daily in Ruby Lake's post and beam dining room. Lovely view of lake and good  highway access for vehicles of all sizes.  Breakfast served all day. Lunch prices  begin at $2.50, dinners from $5.50 including salad bar. Smorgasbord Sunday  nights includes 12 salads, three hot meat  dishes and two desserts, $10.95 for adults,  $5.50 for children under 12. Tiny tots  free. A great family outing destination.  Absolutely superb prime rib every Friday  night. Average  $20-25.  family dinner for four  The Homestead - Hwy IOI, Wilson  Creek - 885-2933. Open 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.  daily. 40 seats inside, 30 seat patio. V.,  M.C. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Daily lunch and dinner specials as  well as regular entrees. Lunches include  sandwiches, hSimburgers, pyrogies and  salads. Dinner selections include steaks,  chicken and seafood. Prime Rib and 15  item salad bar are the house specialty on  Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights.  Average family meal for four $25-$30.  DRIVE IN TAKE OUT  Chicken Shack - Cowrie St., Sechelt  - 885-7414. Open 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Mon-  Thurs; 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fri-Sat; Sun  noon - 8 p.m. Fried chicken, chicken  burgers, chicken nuggets, fries, salads,  onion rings, fresh hamburgers. All  prepared on the premises, all to go.  PUBS  Backeddy Pub - Egmont Marina  -883-2298. Open daily -11 to 11, Sat.  & Sun. 9 to 11. 60 seats inside, 20 on  the deck. All day menu features sandwiches, hamburgers, steaks and desserts. Snacks include fresh steamed  local prawns, fish and chips made  with local fish. Bright comfortable atmosphere overlooking Egmont Narrows. Also includes a 16 seat family  cafe, open 9 am -10 pm.  Cedar's Inn - Cedar Plaza, Gibsons - 886-8171. Open 10 am - midnight, Mon-Sat. 100 seats. V., M.C.  Delicious lunches 11:00 - 2:30. Evening menu 6:00 - 9:30. Sat. & Sun.  Brunch. Entertainment - Darts, Crib-  bage, Activities. Everyone welcome.  Elphie's Cabaret- Gower Pt. Rd.,  Gibsons - next to the Omega Restaurant  - 886-3336. V., M.C. Open Wed 9 p.m.  -2 a.m., Thurs (Ladies' Night) 8 p.m. - 2  a.m., Fri & Sat 8 p.m. - 2 a.m. (No cover  charge til 10 p.m.). No cover charge  Wed night. For a rocking good time,  come dance and party on the peninsula's  biggest dance floor.  Gilligan's Pub - Teredo St., Sechelt  -885-4148. Open 10 a.m. - midnight  Mon-Sat. 65 seats. V. Lunch and dinner  are served daily in the Coast's newest  neighbourhood pub. Menu includes  sandwiches, hamburgers, chicken platters and daily specials. Darts on Monday  nights.  Peninsula Motor Inn - Sunshine  Coast Hwy, Gibsons - 886-2804. Open  10 a.m. -12 p.m. Mon-Thurs; 11 a.m. -1  a.m. Fri-Sat. Pub food includes  breakfasts and lunches. Kitchen open  until 6 p.m. Exotic dancers. Live music. Coast News, May 19,1986  nternational rugby in Gibsons  The fanners and fishermen from Fishguard in Wales took on the  Gibsons rugby side last Thursday at Elphie field and the large  crowd was treated to some fast action. (See story this page)  l'~~~ ���Dianne Evans photo  Gibsons Rugby and Athletic  Club had what was probably its  busiest week ever entertaining  teams from San Francisco and  Wales, here to take part in the  Vancouver Centennial Rugby  Festival.  It was a great success for the  locals who provided the hospitality and comradeship for the  travelling gentlemen of sport  and good will. Gibsons filled  the visitors with warmth, food  and spirit.  Tuesday afternoon the San  Francisco Gaels took to the  Langdale pitch as though they  owned the park. A much larger  and heavier pack out-muscled  Gibsons' scrum, forcing the  Blues to play a defensive game.  The Americans play an aggressive game with fitness and  speed, and the Gaels shone,  racking up three tries, one conversion and a penalty goal against Gibsons' two penalty  goals. The final score was 17-6  '������ for San Francisco.  The Welsh side arrived on  Thursday to meet Gibsons at  Elphie field. The large group  touring from the small western  Wales coastal town of Fish-  guard played an experienced  style of rugby.  The visitors, mostly farmers  ��� and fishermen, fell behind early  in the game after a penalty goal  kicked by fullback Dave Rainier. But the Welsh side matched the field goal and pushed  ahead with fluid ball handling  by the backs, scoring two unconverted tries.  Break forward Clint Fox of  Gibsons narrowed the point  spread picking up a loose ball  deep in Welsh territory and  scoring late in the half, leaving  the score at a close 11-7 for the  Welshmen.  Second half action picked up  momentum with Gibsons often  pressuring the Welsh side but  not a single point was made at  either goal, giving Fishguard a  victory on Coast soil. ���,  A great time was ,had by all  after both the games when the  Athletic Club opened the doors  at the clubhouse for pot luck  dinners and social gatherings.  San Francisco apparently ate  too much but that's to be expected, judging from the size of  the players.  To meet people from abroad  in the sport of rugby usually  means a return match in future  years. " Perhaps Gibsons may  venture to Wales or San Francisco as they did last spring on  their return game to Ventura,  California.  The Club would like to thank  the Coast News for its coverage  and the many people throughout Gibsons who made our  visitors' stay a happy one.  Coast gets Minor Tennis League  ���  i  i  i  i  ���  ���  'THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS"  Carpets  A delightful saxony  of 3 designer colours.  ONLY  $  9.95  _.  ���  ���  ���  sq. yd.  |  Artificial Turf  Available in 6'  and 12' widths  IN  STOCK  NOW  ONLY  s4.29  PeVries Floor & Window Coverings  I  I  I  I  sq. yd. I  I  I  / The Sunshine Coast is among  ,40 sites across Canada chosen to  |host the 1986 Pepsi-Wilson  jMinor Tennis League.  ; Even more significant is the  ', jfact that the Canadian Tennis  |Association has awarded the  league rights to Ron Knight's  Sunshine Coast Summer Tennis  Program for an unprecedented  third year in a row.  This   rare  situation  occurs  because of the great success of  last year's program and the enthusiastic support from local  families, newspapers and merchants.  The Pepsi-Wilson Minor  Tennis League concept is  designed to bring high-quality  tennis instruction to children  and teens on public courts in  smaller communities.  Sunshine Coast sites this July  will be Elphinstone Secondary  School,   Hackett   Park,   and  Ladies' Softball  The Roberts Creek Legion  won its first game of the season  in an exciting contest against  Gilligan's Pub last Thursday.  Gilligan's got a good jump on  them at the start and kept the  lead until the last inning when  the Creek caught up and ended  the game 25-23.  Milynne Jager's three home  runs were certainly a factor in  the win, as was Gwen Carley's.  homer. But it was CheeChee  IvtcGombie's   home   run   that  brought in the runner from second base to win the game.  Trail Bay Sports won both  their games last week to remain  in first, place in the Ladies'  League. They defeated  Elphinstone Recreation 17-2 on  Tuesday and,home runs by Viv  Watson and Jessie August  helped them win 14-5 against  Ken Mac.  Other results are not available  because teams failed tc phone in  their scores.  8.  ���>*$  ..  May 19  May. 20  May 21  May 22  May 26  BP = Brother's Park  IR'���= Indian Reserve  LS = Langdale Elem.  LADIES'SOFTBALL     -  Coast Cable vs Ken Mac (BP)  .;.. ;   Eagles vs Gilligan's Pub (HF).  Cedars Pub vs Elphie Rec (IR)  ' Trail Bay Sports vs Roberts Creek legion (RC)  Elphie Rec vs Ball Hawgs (BP)  Gilligan's Pub vs Coast Cable (HP)  Ball Hawgs vs Trail Bay Sports (HP)  Roberts Creek Legion vs Eagles (IR)  Ken Mac vs Cedars Pub (LS)  Gilligan's Pub vs Ken Mac (BP)  HP = Hackett Park  RC = Roberts Creek Elem:  Men's Fastball  '���'! In men's fastball action, on  ;��� Sunday evening, May 12, Gib-  Ions Building Supplies (GBS)  'kept Elphie at bay, 3-1, until the  seventh inning when they came  back to even the score. Then, in  ; the next inning, Elphie got one  ��� more to post a 4-3 victory over  ;��BS-  > ;. .GBS has had some early sea-  Ion  pitching  problems  which  resulted in losses to Elphie on  Tuesday night, 8-1, and to  Gilligan's on Wednesday, 16-2.  The game of the week came  on Thursday when Weldwood  and Elphie met head to head.  Elphie was attempting to avenge  its only loss this season (to  Weldwood) and squeaked by  with a 2-1 victory in eight innings.  MEN'S FASTBALL STANDINGS  Elphie  Weldwood  Gilligans  GBS  May 21  May 22  May 25  8  1 3  2*  1   1  UPCOMING GAMES (starts at 6:30 p.m.)  Gibsons Building Supplies vs Weldwood (Hackett)  . Gilligans vs Elphi (Brothers)  Gilligans vs Wcldwoon (Hackett)  r  Physical Activity Week  �� This year's National Physical Activity Week, May 24 to  *���     June 1, is designed to increase awareness and mass participa-  t     tion of Canadians in physical activities' of all kinds.  Reference: Point Atkinson  Pacific Standard Time  For Skookumchuk Narrows add  1 hr. 45 min., plus 5 min. (or  each ft. of rise, and 7 min.  for each ft. of fall.  TIOELINS  ::��ORHN:BOSCH  '  :������'���'  LOGGING & MURINE LTD.  ,��� Mercruiser r V/6|vo   Pent;."��� Mariner".Qutboards.  * Rain Gear ��� Loc/yihcj Supplies.���'��� Safety Gear  ���vHus-ivarriii SayVs ���, Work Clbthes 8. B-pots  '.'��� Complete R/laripe Reparrsi vOMC Sterrv   V ^  Dfpve (Cobra) y..;���.;":..y'-..' ���-. y .���'���������. -~-..;���;..  Wharf Rd:/ Sechelt    885.4141  Pender Harbour Secondary  School.  The Pepsi-Cola and Wilson  Corporations have sponsored  the minor tennis league since  1977. Each year they provide  promotional materials plus tennis racquets and balls for each  site.  In addition, all participants  receive free Pepsis, Wilson  T-shirts, prizes, books, and  badges to help make their tennis  experiences as enjoyable as  possible.  The Canadian Tennis Association views the Pepsi-Wilson  Minor Tennis League as fundamental to its grassroots programming. The league is the  base from which it plans to  develop an increased number of  world class players to represent  Canada internationally.  As boys and girls are introduced to the game in public  parks, it is hoped that many will  continue in school and club pro-  Garden  Glub  .    ,.;b  1      *    / - ...a _.  by Marguerite  i<_  . . <  The members of thefGibsons  Garden Club enjoy__l&n informative and interesting'lecture by  Mr. Bernard Moore, the Pacific  Gardener at their meeting this  week.  We shall all enjoy the Pioneer  Parks 100 year centennial  display which was finished this  week by willing volunteer work  parties of the club. We hope for  sunny weather.  The members are going on a  bus tour of UBC Botanical  Gardens on Sunday, May 25.  The bus leaves the library  parking lot at 10 a.m.  There may be a few seats  available. Phone 886-9527.Br-  ing a bag lunch.  Keep those weeds down  regularly with the hoe, before  they multiply.  Enjoy gardening.  Student  Loan  program  The Student Venture Loan  Program, named "Be Your  Own Boss", is delivered jointly  by the Ministry of Industry and  Small Business Development  and the Ministry of Labour and  has operated successfully for  two years.  Students can apply for a loan  of up to $2000 ($3000 in partnership) to start and operate a  business during the summer.  Students must submit a business plan which is reviewed by  a panel from local Boards of  Trade and Chambers of Commerce. The Royal Bank of  Canada actually makes the loan  with the province guaranteeing  the funds. They must be repaid  by September 30, 1986.  Students can obtain loan application forms for this pro-,  gram from: Royal Bank branches, Ministry of Labour, Apprenticeship and Employment  Area Offices and Chamber of  Commerce offices.  I- wn  ��� 3L ��� ����� * ��' m _��� im %> m m  i ft ft _i ft �� t  ___   ���  ��� -  ���  -  Quote of the Week!  order in the world and for the  peaceful contentment of all that  dwell therein.  Religion  is  the  greatest of all  means for the establishment of  'Imm���__._._ _ _. _ u..ijfyt!  grammes, later advancing to  provincial and national levels of  competition.  Participation, enjoyment and  quality instruction are key  elements, of the Pepsi-Wilson  Minor Tennis. League. Forehand, backhand, serve and  volley are introduced and then  drilled in games arid friendly  competitions. Basic rules, scoring, and court etiquette are.alsd  discussed.  Later, in another exciting  phase, participants have the opportunity to take part in a mini-  tournament as well as the Tennis Canada Performance  Award Scheme. This series of  tests shows how far youngsters  have progressed in comparison  with other players across  Canada.  The Pepsi-Wilson Minor  Tennis League begins June 30 in  Gibsons and Sechelt and July 14  at Pender Harbour. Don's  Shoes, Trail Bay Sports and  Centre Hardware are handling  registration. Beginner to intermediate players, ages seven  tp 15 may join.  709 Hwy 101, Gibsons  886-7112  _-?  aft co4  w^  SUNSHINE COAST  REGIONAL DISTRICT  NOTICE OF TEMPORARY  CLOSURE OF COOPER'S  GREEN BOAT LAUNCH  Please note that the Cooper's Green boat launching  ramp will be temporarily closed from May 24 to May 30,  1986 inclusive for the purpose of construction upgrading. Reconstruction of the concrete launching  ramp is intended to better serve the public launching  ramp users at Cooper's Green Regional Park. We regret  any inconvenience caused by this temporary situation.  J.C. Johnstone  Planning Director  885-2261  Sunshine Coast Regional District  P.O. Box 800  Sechelt, B.C.  VON 3A0  ��� _..._ . ,'_���,.-..  &_*%m  GIBSONS  i��  PASSENGER  All Season  LIGHT TRUCK  All Season  P155 80R13  165 R13  P18580R13  P205 75R14  P 225 75 R 15  P235 75R15  S4300  5400  5800  7200  7300  92oo  LT195Rx14 6ply  LT235Rx15 6ply  LT750Rx.16 8ply  LT235Rx16 8ply  LT875Rx 16.5 8 ply  LT950RX 16.5 8 ply  $9Q00  9500  10500  14100  14300  15900  CONVENTIONAL  TREAD  CONVENTIONAL  TREAD  LT700Rx15 6ply s7��>00  LT235Rx15 6ply 9900  LT235Rx16 8ply 12800  LT875Rx16.5 8ply 12800  LT950RX 16.5 8 ply $13900  P 185 80 R 13  P185 75 R 14  P195 75 R 14  P215 75R14  P215 75R15  P22575R15  P235 75R15  \*  $5500  5600  52oo  6500  7900  725o  8670  9>  Alt prices include installation  QUANTITIES ARE LIMITED  886-2700  fttSlH.  tire  Brake    &.   Suspension  Centre  Ybifr Lg&itfy Owned TIRE LAND Store  HWy 101,,  One rvjijie,We'si  of Gibsons  886-8_67  1 Coast News, May 19,1986  13.  Old Gaels, in dark shirts pose for a portrait with the Gibsons Rugby Club during their visit to the Sunshine Coast last week. (See story page 12) ���Brad Benson photo  The spring meeting of the  14th Baden Powell Guild was  held at Camp Byng on May 8.  After an excellent pot-luck  super, a plant sale was held,  organized by Hilda Tierney.  . This was followed by a most informative talk on the important  subject of gardening, given by  David Hunter, the weD-known  B.C. gardener.  Our thanks to Mr. Hunter  and his wife, Margaret, for the  pleasure of their compainy and a  most interesting evening.  SC. Golf and Country Club  Ladles play Count Putts Round  by Alec Warner  The Ladies' Eighteeners  played a Count Putts Round on  Tuesday, May 13, ending with  the following winners:  First flight winner with 32  putts, Barb Mercer; second with  33, Doreen Gregory. Second  flight with 35, Vera Munroe,  and runner-up with 35, Judy  Frampton. Third flight leader  with 33 putts, Joyce McMillen,  with runner-up Hazel Wright  with 36.  The Ladies' Niners played  under mixed weather conditions  of sun and rain. The hidden  hole (no. 6), was won by Beth  Niddery and Isobel Cowley,  both with 6 strokes. Fewest  putts were sunk by Isobel  Cowley with 15, Mary McKin-  THE UNITED CHURCH  OF CANADA  Sunday Worship Services  GIBSONS  Glassford Road - 11:15 a.m.  Sunday School - 11:00 a.m.  ST. JOHN'S   ���.���:���'.:'-'���  Davis Bay - 9:30 a.m.,  Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.  : yi?:X   -.ey.^.AlexvGv^Reid.^^-^;-  Church Telephone     886-2333  -^ Sjk j-^p    ' 'i ii  ANGLICAN CATHOLIC  CHURCH OF CANADA  ST. COLUMBA OF IONA PARISH  HALFMOON BAY  Church of His Presence:  2nd Sunday     10:30 Morning Prayer  11:00 Communion  4th Sunday      10:30 Morning Prayer  5th Sunday 3:30 Communion  The Reverend E.S., Gale  885-7481 or 1-525;��760    ..;;   .,���  .    Traditional Anglican  Services & Teaching  1. ���     ���' fl|> Sfk *%* ' ���'   ������  NEW LIFE FELLOWSHIP  NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH  5836 Wharf Ave., Sechelt   *  ..Home of New Life Christian Academy KDGto Gr. 12 (Now Enrolling)  Service times: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Mid-week, Wed. 7:30 p.m.  Men's prayer & study,-Fri. 7:30 p.m.; Women's prayer, Thur. 10 a.m.  v'-���    Pastor Ivan Fox. Ph. 885-4775 or 886-7862  -4ft 4I.3&-  THE CHURCH OF  JESUS CHRIST OF  LATTER DAY SAINTS  Davis.Bay Rd. - Wilson Creek  Davis Bay Community Hall  Sacrament Service 9:00 a.m.  ;   Sunday School 10:15a.m.  Branch President Reg. H. Robinson  886-2382  ___��� a*.*..*   -_.��<_��-  GIBSONS  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  New Church building on  School Road - opp. RCMP  Pastor Ted Boodle  Sunday School  Morning Worship  Evening Fellowship  9:45 a.m.  11:00a.m.  7:00 p.m.  Bible Study  Weds, at 7:30 p.m.  Phone  886-9482 or 886-7107  Affiliated with Ihe  Pentecostal Assemblies  of Canada   . '. _4fl S(k 3& ��� :  ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S  AST.AIDAN'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  Parish Family Eucharist  Combined service at  St. Bartholomew's, Gibsons 10 a.m.  Church School 10 a.m.  ,    Rev. j.E. Robinson, 886-8436  -__& <S(4 fll���  CALVARY  BAPTIST CHURCH  North of Hwy. 101 on Park Rd.  Gibsons  Sunday School 9:30 a.m.  Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship 7:00 p.m.  ~ Weekly Home Fellowship Groups  Rev. Dale D. Peterson  886-2611  SUNSHINE COAST  GOSPEL CHURCH  Corner of Davis Bay Road  & Laurel Road  Inter-Denominational  Family Worship  Sunday - 11 a.m.  Sunday School  For All Ages  Sunday-9:45 a.m.  "We Extend A Welcome And  An Invitation to Come And  Worship The Lord With Us"  Pastor Arie de Vos   a��&&   CHRISTIAN SCIENCE  SOCIETY  SERVICES  Sunday Service &  Sunday School 11:45 a.m.  Wednesday 7:3�� P-m-  in United Church Building  Davis Bay  885-2506  -���ii.-n ���_-!-- Sgm -Tf^   1  PENDER HARBOUR  PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  Lagoon Road, Madeira Park  Pastor Tim Shapcotte  883-2374 or 883-2870  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Morning Worship       11:00 a.m.  Prayer & Bible Study  Wednesday, 7:30. p.m.   ������jfi&sfi   GRACE REFORMED  PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  Sunday  Sech It Elementary School  Sunday Sc ool 9:45 a.m.  Studies in Genesis 11:00 a.m.  Home Meetings  Studies in Matthew 7:30 p.m.  Wednesday  Home Bible Study 7:30 p.m.  J. Cameron Fraser, Pastor  885-7488 .  non with 16, and Hazel Earle  with 17.  The Men's Twilighters on  Wednesday, May 14, enjoyed  their second steak barbeque of  the season and posted the  following golf results:  First low net with a low, low,  28, Arnie Pettersen! Second low  net, Doug Elson (30),'and third  with a 3QV_, Ozzie Hincks.  First low gross (as usual!),  with a 36, Brian Leckie, and second low gross at 38, Dick  Gaines.  Another perfect golfing day  for the Men's Seniors on Thursday when 72 teed off using only  three clubs and a putter. First  with a net 101l/*, the team of  Laurie Toddj Tom Held, Tom  Meredith and Geo Townsend.  Second, also with a score of  101 lA,   Pat   Mulligan*   Jack  Milburn, Bill Sutherland, aiid  Bob McCallum. Third at 102 Vz,  the team of Wilf Forshner, Bill  Utterback, Ed Pinkerton and  Bill Sexton. Closest to the pin  on the 8th for a double win,  Bob McCallum!  A correction for last week's  Men's Seniors results. Al  Bullock should have been  shown as a member of the winning team in place of Bill Babcock. Sorry Al, but I report 'em  as I read 'em.  I close with the sad announcement of the passing of  Walter Nichols on May 10, after  a valiant and lengthy struggle  against cancer. Our deepest  sympathy goes out to Mercia  and family^on this sad and trying occasion. Walter will be  greatly and sincerely missed by  all who knew him.  /  Through the mist of sorrow, watch for the soft beacons  of friendship to guide you. Your friends, neighbors and  family will support you and help to lead you to comfort and  consolation at the time when you need it most.... We pledge  ourselves to giving you the best assistance possible.  u-  'V.  You know ua  you can depend on our help.  ._<^_r*  Bottle drive  The Gibsons' Minor Ball Girls' Softball bottle drive will be  held on Sunday, May 25.  Covering the area from Langdale to Roberts Creek Camp?  ground, the drive will continue from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.  Minor Softball  ./3S     .*&    .^5>.  Sechelt Minor Softball is now  well underway. T-ball has four  teams - Shop Easy, Halfmoon  Bay Sluggers, N&N Log and  Sechelt insurance - all playing  some good beginning baseball.  Only one rdd thriller of j^  game last Friday, Clinic Swat  beat Hartley's Auto Body in the  bottom half of the last inning.  Good game kids!  Standings for the three older  divisions as of May 15 are:  M1XED SOFTBALL  dink Swat 4 4      8  Halfmoon Bay Rec 4 2 2 4  D&D Gulf 3 12 2  B&J Store/Welcome Beach   3 12 2  Hartley's Auto Body 2      2 0  GIRLS' SOFTBALL  L.A. Queen 3 3      6  Cactus Flower 3 12 2  Jets 2      2 0  BOYS'SOFTBALL  Swanson's Ready Mix 4 3 16  Anderson Realty 3 2      4  Buccaneer Marina  . 3     3 0  The midget girls' team, Coast  Cable Vision, which is playing  in the Women's Fastball League  is doing very well. They are  showing a lot of enthusiasm and  Hydro  cautions  B.C. Hydro is asking landowners to take special care  when burning off dead grass so  that hydro poles will not be  damaged by fire.  "It takes just a little  forethought to avoid the problem," says Erich Hensch,  Hydro's District Manager. "All  a person has to do is clear the  grass away from the base of the  pole for a radius of about one  metre and dampen the area  before setting the fire."  A check should be made to  ensure that the fire, which  should never be left unattended,  will not spread to adjacent property where poles may be  located.  A hydro pole-damaged by  fire is also a safety hazard, says  Hensch. "In one instance a line  of poles caught fire beside a  highway and we almost had a  power line down on the road."  Anyone seeing'a grass fire  threatening hydro poles should  call the fire department and  B.C. Hydro immediately.  Gibsons  H���^11C "On-*  Tuesday  -^ursday/-     ^^P-m.  Saturday ,, :3��-4p.Rl. ���  ST��RYTfME wT4^-    I  talent, r lacking only in experience. With Michelle Gillies  striking out batters the way she  did Thursday, their first win  can't be far away.-  1  Help build the  PERFORMING ARTS  PAVILION  in Holland Park  Make your pledge to provide dollars, goods  or services when the time comes  IT'S TAX DEDUCTIBLE!  Community contributions are crucial to  obtaining financial support from major funding  sources.  The dollar value of your pledge will be counted toward the goal  of $100,000 to be raised on the Sunshine Coast.  We will contact you when the design and construction phase begins.  To   help   build   the   Performing   Arts  Pavilion in Holland Park, I pledge to   (ua44c.  '    provide the following:  DOLLARS: $      PHONE:.  GOODS: *    (please print)  (please specify)  ADDRESS:.  (please print)  DOLLAR  VALUE: $_  SERVICES:.  (please specify)  I understand that I will be called upon to  deliver my pledge when the design and  construction phase begins.  DOLLAR  VALUE: $_  SIGNATURE:  Please mail your pledges to:    THE EILEEN GLASSFORD ARTS FOUNDATION  Box 683, Gibsons, BC VON 1V0  For more information call Ruby Buick at 886-6102, or Fran Burnside at 885-3577 or 886-2622. ,10.  Coast News, May 19,1986  i:>' *'<- ""'.CM- 'WTW4K^M.__r____w;___r*' v_' -**'" '-1  A    ,<--.'- ���  Ha-'s ____���-��� __�� ___B__>- -ggg -,W&*.WtSm..{____.. , -  i~j     '-'.    J  _    >U_____��__-Uil__--___--_-WI^^  M^]^^��^^?Sli!i6l^Bffil  DRIFTWOODJI presents  Jennifer Copping has been very successful throughout the years  rjhfere on the Coast and this year her performance at the Festival of  fjhe Arts in Prince George netted her the first place in the Intermediate Theatre Dance competition. (See story below)  .Dianne Evans photo  Public Notice  COAST CABLE VISION LTD.  RADIO ACT  Coast Cable Vision Ltd. hereby gives notice that it has  made application to the Department of Communications' Vancouver Regional Office for private microwave  radio stations at Bowen Island and Sechelt.  The proposed microwave system is to provide carriage  for KCTS (PBS) (Channel 9), KOMO (ABC) (Channel 4),  KING (NBC) (Channel 5), KIRO (CBS) (Channel 7): Seattle, Washington; KSTW (IND) (Channel 11), KCPQ (IND)  (Channel 13): Tacoma, Washington, and various FM  Broadcast Stations licensed for distribution in the Applicant's CATV System.  The proposed system consists of an eight (8) channel;  r12 Ghlz ;AML Microwave ..Repeater .located on Bowen  Island and a 12 GHz Receive Facility located at Sechelt.  this syistem will repeat the above signals received at  Bowen Island from an existing multi-channel AML  Transmit Facility owned and operated by Rogers Cable  TV-British Columbia Limited in Burnaby, B.C.  The proposed system is designed to satisfy the requirements of CRTC Decision 85-90 regarding the impact of CKVU on the reception of Channels 9 and 11 at  the Applicant's headend.  EXAMINATION OF APPLICATION  Copies of the application are available for examination  during normal office hours at:  Coast Cable Vision Ltd.  Wharf Road  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  Delta Cable Television Ltd.  5381 - 48th Avenue  Delta, B.C. V4K1W7  Department of Communications  1700 - 800 Burrard Street  Vancouver, B.C. V6J 2J7  INTERVENTION  Any interested person who is not a party to the application may submit a written intervention to support, oppose or modify the application. An Intervener shall mail,  telegraph or deliver his written intervention to the  Regional Director, Department of Communications,  1700 - 800 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 2J7 and  to the Applicant on or before June 16, 1986.  The intervention should contain a clear and concise  statement describing the interests and concerns of the  Intervenor respecting the application, together with any  document that may be useful in explaining or supporting the intervention. In general, interventions to be considered relevant to the application should address matters relating to the efficient and orderly development of  radio communications to meet the program signal  delivery requirements of the Applicant arid other Broadcasters in the area. Furthermore, the Applicant may  make written reply to the Department and to the Intervenor on any intervention on or before 20 days from  the expiry date of the intervention period.  Interventions and replies received in response to this  Notice will be put in a Public File for examination at the  above address of the Department of Communications  until such time as considered reasonable or until a decision has been rendered on the application.  Dated this 17th day of May, 1986.  COAST  CABLE VISION  Limited  Wharf Road  Sechelt, B.C.  VON 3A0  is  by Peter Trower  Cu-Ching was a great fisherman. Most cats content themselves with catching birds and  mice but he was forever dabbling in the sea. We would often  wake in the morning to find  small, fishy offerings on the  floor or the porch. One night,  he came leaping through the  window with a pulsing) translucent object that looked like an  unborn squid. 1 quickly  flushed the weird creature down  the toilet. "Cu-Ching's just  paying his board," I told my  alarmed mother.  Sadly enough, Cu-Ching's  penchant for angling was to  prove his ultimate undoing. He  'developed a kidney ailment  from spending so much tjme  around the salt water. Eventually, Cu-Ching's kidneys ceased  to function altogether and he  began tb dehydrate. The vet advised us that the only humane  thing to do was have the cat put  down.  I was surprised by my own  reaction to the news of Cu-  Ching's impending execution.  The terse pronouncement jolted  me to the quick. The loyal little  cat had a definite personality  and had become a true friend.  Perhaps it was a neurotic over  reaction but I. was devastated.  My mother was equally distraught. Neither one of us  wanted the responsibility of taking Cu-Ching to face the needle.  As it turned out, we were spared  this enormous duty by longtime friend, Jack Williams, who  was then my mother's tenant..  He offered to take Cu-Ching to  he vet and we gratefully ac-  .epted.  Jack returned shortly with  Tu-Ching's remains in a brown  oaper bag. I buried that sad  package in the garden outside  my shack and wrote an eulogy  to the cat that had something to  do with Cu-Ching's spirit growing up through the flowers. The  poem is far too maudlin to  quote here but the fact remains  that the cat's death moved me.  deeply. I had never gotten that  close to any animal before.  The house and garden seemed very empty with Cu-Ching  gone. I kept expecting to hear  him scratching at the door or to  see his small, piebald face peering down from the roof at. me.  We remained cat-less for several  months. Then one of my  mother's friends who was leaving the area, presented us with a  six month old orange torn.  Simba, as we almost immediately dubbed him, was a  different sort of cat from the  jaunty and well balanced Cu-  Ching. He was rather more prone to paranoia, particularly in  the matter of dogs. Simba had  been almost fatally mauled by  one as a small kitten. He hated  and feared the entire canine  species, irrespective of breed or  temperament.  Apart from his extreme  distrust of dogs, Simba proved  to be a gentle and affable cat.  He soon filled the vacuum that  had been left by Cu-Ching.  Simba's terror of dogs did  not extend to other male cats.  He was a tenacious alley-fighter  during mating season and was  always coming home with torn  ears and other minor badges of  combat. Finally, Simba had a  savage battle with a much larger  cat and was badly bitten. The  wound abcessed and nearly killed him. The vet bills were getting ridiculous and it was  mutually decided that Simba  had sowed enough wild oats.  The inevitable, operation was  duly performed.  Neuterhood effectively put an  end to Simba's self-destructive  brawling. He became a docile  and affectionate house cat who  seldom strayed outside the yard.  We grew as fond of him as we  had been of Cu-Ching.  To be continued  Festival success  Jennifer Copping^ "almost 15", of Sechelt has won the Intermediate Musical Thfeatfe.Dance competition at the recent  FesitvaJ of the Arts in Prince George.  '���'Jennifer has been very successful here on the Cbast in past  years, but now her family'js planning to relocate in Burnaby  so that Jennifer may be closer to more opportunities in Vancouver.   .'  .        'yyy   .'.''   .  "I want to go on with this," Jennifer told the Coast News,  "I definitely want to do this as a career."  The Coast News extends its congratulations to Jennifer for  her recent win and wishes her every success in her future endeavours:  Other successful entrants from the Sunshine Coast were  Rachel Poirier who was first runner up in the Senior Musical  Theatre Dance, Erin K. White, first runner up in the Junior  Musical Theatre Dance, andTandrea Der, first runner up in  the Junior Ballet.  Hunter Gallery Show  The Seasons on Gambier by Ursula Fritsch is the theme of  the show to run from May 20 to June 9 at the Hunter Gallery  in lower Gibsons. ,  This innovative artist works in acrylic and her work was  selected for the Festival of the Arts which was opened recently by Diana, Princess of Wales, in Prince George.  Table  Manners  Driftwood Players' current  production Table Manners written by English humourist Alan  Ayckbourn and directed by Betty Keller can be seen at the Gibsons United Church Hall on  Thursday, May 22, Friday, May  23 and Saturday, May 24 at  8:00 p.m.  Tickets are available at the  usual ticket outlets or at the  door.  This hilarious comedy is part  of Ayckbourn's trilogy The  Norman Conquests and deals  with the trials and tribulations  of a family as seen during one  weekend.  GIBSONS  LEGION  Branch #109  WEEKEND ENTERTAINMENT  Friday, May 23rd  Catfish Willie  Saturday, May 24th  The Wave Trio  GENERAL  MEETING  Tues., May 20, 8 p.m.  A comedy by Alan Ayckbourn    . Directed by Betty Keller  THURS., FRI. & SAT. \  May 22, 23 & 24  Gibsons United Church Hall 8 p.m.  TICKETS: Adults $5  Students & Seniors $3.50  Available at usual outlets  & at the door  The  SUNSHINE COAST  POTTERY GUILD  is having a  SALE and POTATHON  Sunday, May 25  11 a.m. - 2 p.m.  at the Craft Studio  (corner Hwy 101 & North Rd.)  EVERYONE WELCOME  Keep Our  Swimmers Afloat!  Dance to the BIG BAND SOUNDS of the  HARBOUR LIGHTS ORCHESTRA  on Saturday, May 24th  8:30 p.m. - 1:30 a.m.  at Gibsons Curling Club  All proceeds to support the on-going  operation of our community swimming pool.  TICKETS: Available at several locations ���-..-���  in Gibsons, Roberts Creek and Sechelt  .  IONA CAMPAGNOLA  & DOVE HENDREN  (Pres. Nat. Liberal Party)(Pres. BC Liberal Party)  To Visit The Coast  Meet and talk with these two  dynamic Canadian women, at the  Parthenon Restaurant  WEDNESDAY, MAY 28th  at 7:00 p.m.      -     -;  Tickets $20.00 ea. Available, at:  Chinese restaurant in Pender Harbour,  The Bookstore, Strings.& Things the  Parthenon Restaurant in Sechelt, and  Truffles the Candy Store in Gibsons or  Phone 885-7029 '  ENTERTAINMENT BY SECHELT 49'ers  Notice Board    _ ^J  Popsi-WHson Minor Tennis League. In Gibsons and Sechelt, June 30 to July 10  and in Pender Harbour July-14 to 31. Register now: Don's Shoes, Trail Bay  Sports, Centre Hardware, 883-2854.  Sunshine Coast Employment Development Society Annual General Meeting,  May 26, 7:30 p.m. at the SCRD office. New members welcome.  Driftwood Players present "Table Manners" by Alan Ayckbourn, Thurs, Fri and  Sat, May 22, 23, and 24 at 8 p.m.. Gibsons United Church Hall. Tickets: Adults  $5, Students & Seniors, $3.50, available at usual outlets and at the door.  Gibsons Minor Bail, Girls' Softball Bottle Drive, Sunday, May 25, Langdale to  Roberts Creek Campground, 10-2:30 p.m.'  Shorncliffe Auxiliary Monthly Meeting Tuesday, May 20 at 1:30 in the activity  room at Shorncliffe. Speaker: Barbara Estey. Meeting to be followed by an appreciation tea sponsored by Shorncliffe. Please note change of meeting location for  this month only.  1st Gibsons Beavers, Cubs & Scouts Bottle Drive 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Langdale to  Seaview Cemetery, Saturday, June 7.  "Your Christ is too Small" video presentation & discussion. Roberts Creek  Elem. School. To run each Wednesday from April 23 to May 21 at 7:30 p.m.  Sponsored by'Grace Reformed Pres. Church. Coast News, May 19,1986  _r- ;^i   _?....._.__ ^^jg. j ___.    Teresa Kobayashi, left and Takeo Yamashiro will be performing at the Arts Centre next Saturday, May  24. These two fine musicians return by popular demand and the concert promises to be an exciting one.  Tickets are $5 and tea and sushi will be served.  Ceramics students excel  Students of Halfmoon  Ceramics under the direction of  Joan Clarkson won 135 awards  [at the Vancouver Island  [Ceramic competitions held in  Victoria, May 9, 10 and 11.  Eleven trophies, 119 ribbons  and seven certificates of merit  were won.  The show was judged by  .three judges under the International Ceramic Association  point system and although Vancouver Island has many excellent judges of their own, the  ICA rules state the judges must  be from outside the area of  competition.1  These pieces must be of top  quality and must be near  perfect. Second, third and  fourth ribbons are awarded in  the ��ame manner by the number  of points.  Ribbons are nQt given to look  pretty, some entries do not  receive any ribbons because  they have not received sufficient  points to qualify. Ribbons are  earned and the participant  deserves credit for having earned a ribbon, no matter what colour.  Below are some of the local  winners, in alphabetical order,  although space does not permit  listing of all names.  Garell Carmichael, Gibsons;  tvyjtt.firsts; two Best of Division. tr  Joan Clarkson, Halfmoon  Bay; three firsts; five seconds;  one third; three Best of Division; two Best of Category; Best  of; Show trophy for Greenware  Adaptation.  ;Ed Davies, Gibsons; two  firsts} one second; Best of Division; Best of Category.  Jamie Dixon, Sechelt; one  first; Best of Division; Best of  Category; Best of Show trophy  for rheh.   ���  Del Elliott, Halfmoon Bay;  two firsts; one second; two Best  of Division; one Best of  Category, Best of Show trophy  for Handmodelling.  Mary Garnett, Shorncliffe;  one second; Oldest Entrant  trophy, (age 95).  Jessie Hairpnick, Halfmoon  Bay; two firsts; two Best of  Division.  Fred Hunsche, Madeira  Park; first; Best of Division;  Best of Category; certificate;  Best of Show trophy for teens,  (age 16):  Beth Knight, Halfmoon Bay;  two firsts; Best of Division; Best  of Category, Best of Show  trophy for amateurs.  Laurane Norstrom, Gibsons;  three firsts; three seconds; two  Best of Division; two Best of  Category; Best of Show trophy  for novices.  Pauline Provan, Shorncliffe;  first; Best of Division; Best of  Category.  Candace Olney, Campbell  River; first; Best of Division;  Best of Category; Best of Show  trophy for Children under 12;  Best of Show trophy for  Amateur��� Jiiriiors.  Helen Jennie,   Halfmoon  ^���\^Mf-r   '���. .  The Cedars  PUB  Cedar Plaza  s^/ Hwy .101, Gibsons  Menu  from D-y. OU pm  You'll be pleased!  Bay; first; two seconds; two  thirds; Best of Division} Best of  Category; Best of Show trophy  for Miniatures. *  Gail Sangster, Gibsons; first;  Best of Division; Honourable  Mention; Certificate.  Verda Schneider, Gibsons;  first; Best pf Division.  Jesi West, Sechelt; second;  certificate, (age 9).  . Nellie   Woodward,   Shorncliffe; first; Best of Division.  Visiting grandchildren of  Audrey Browning (Candace  and Shaun Olney, Ages 11 and  6 respectively, from Campbell  River), and Laurane Norstrom  (Philip LaCoursiere from  Squamish, Age 11) sat in on  classes and came out winners.  Joan Clarkson, who donates  her time tp/ teach Shorncliffe  residents and has only just  started teaching them last  month has proven that you're  never too young, old or handicapped to do ceramics and  come out winners.  Halfmoon Ceramics Studio  A^lso won the "Studio Trophy".  The Elphinstone Pioneer  Museum Society will be presenting a special Open House on  the weekend of May 25 to coincide with the return of many of  our local pioneer families for  the centennial celebrations.  We are very proud to be  housing many fine artifacts and  photos; a great deal of them  having been donated from our  pioneer families. The lower  floor of the museum houses a  large collection of Indian artifacts, the excellent Charles  Bedford shell collection as well  as the superb B.C. rock and  mineral collection of Jim Laird.  The museum is especially proud  to be introducing our new Inuit  display which uses the many  fine artifacts and clothing collected by Ross Gibson while sta-.  tioned in northern Canada with  the RCMP.  The upper floor of the  museum is like a walk through  time, from the rustic tool shed  to the recreated family kitchen,  artifacts are displayed largely as  they would have been used at  the turn of the century..  Elphinstone Pioneer Museum  is the regional museum for this  area. Operating largely on a  volunteer basis it relies mainly  on the donations of a generous  public and membership dues.  Be a part of our centennial  celebration; join us across from  the Gibsons Post Office on  Winn Road. We are wheelchair  accessible. Support your local  museum and become a member  for the small sum of $6 per year  for family or $4 per year for individuals. Your membership  would entitle you to have input  into museum decisions as well  as access to all the museum  facilities.  There is ho compulsory ad-  missio'n fee, but donations are  gratefully appreciated.  11.  BUS BUSINESS j  ��� Need a working J'  partner j  ��� Investment required   "  CaSI 8882288  L*      ASK FOR TARRY       |  -" u��BliK> __________> __________-_!  �����a__B-�� ^aam* ^mBm�� *awB+ ���mmmmw^vm^m^ ���^mm*^  In lower Gibsons, near Ken's Lucky Dollar.  j  Now also open weekend nights,  t Hamburgers, sandwiches, entrees  I & daily homecdoked specials   1  i will be served FRIDAY & SATURDAY  J evenings from 5-8 p.m.  |    NEW HOURS:  (Mon -Thur 7-4  ������������        Fri & Sat 7-8 ^.......  \ Sun & Holiday 8-4 ^%,  Sunday  BRUNCHBUFFET  11 a.m. - 3 p.m. :  overlooking Gibsons Harbour  OMEGA  RESTAURANT  Reservations- 886-2268  On Channel Ten  TUESDAY, MAY 20  7:00 P.M.  Expo Update: This week's  exciting news from the Expo '86  site.  Peninsula Review: The final  showing pf the third episode of  Peninsula Review. This biweekly news program was produced, crewed, written and  directed by senior broadcasting  students from Elphinstone.  The Real Kitchen: The third  cooking show for the Real Kitchen crew.- This week, Pat  Taylor and Bernie Mahoney  make Chicken Cordon Bleu.;  Next time it's Marinated RaSbirj  prepared in the Real Kitchen.   '-.  Look Back to the Hill: This  play, performed by members of  the Gibsons Baptist Church was  taped in the studio. A good per- .  formance, well worth watching.  on NATO's involvements in today's world.  ��� Timber Days Parade: Coast  Ten plans coverage of this  year's Timber bays. Parade.  Weather permitting we will be  put with multiple cameras this  year hoping for the best  coverage ever. An equipment  failure caused the loss of our  ��      THURSDAY, MAY 22  5:00 P.M.  Expo Update: Repeated from  Tuesday.  7:00 I*.M.  Coastal Update: The Coastal  Update crew wraps up their  season with the final news program by the broadcasting  students from Elphie.  Gordon   Wilson   Area   A  Director   for   the   Regional ��� v  Board, visits the studio to talk  with  Dianne Evans on local       footage _ of the Better Beater  topics. . Race held Saturday. Our ap-  Pool Fundraising Dance: JoeJ ".'q _Pologies to interested viewers.  Bornstein and Sheila Kitson.-t. _���; tf' vou are interested in  joints, tonight to inform lis on^jlj&omipg a ypluhteier producer  the May 24th dance. Held at thftG(n ^lf Coast Ten. or if you would  curlingrink in Gibsons, theprpr.. ^Uke^p see coverage of a special  ceeds will be used to support the       event please call its at the studio,  i@ #o nnie broofe llob ge  DINING ROOM  FULLY LICENSED  Fine Dining  THURS-SAT  Each week a limited and unique selection of taste pleasures.  THIS WEEK CHOICES INCLUDE:  tBv^L  Spinach Salad Nimosa. Bisque of Prawn  Asparagus Tips with Hot or Cold Sauces;  Poached Snapper. The Bonniebrook Steak  '   ENGLISH _^LEV!c'  '��� .'V'/-"-/-' '.���'   ���' :-':".-':';-:  ROAST BEEF      swimming pool in Gibsons.  NATO: John Burnside interviews Commodore Ian Morrow  886-8565...Ask for Steve Sleep  or leave , a message with the  machine. ���',.  For Reservations, Call 886-2887  OCEAN BEACH ESPLANADE, GOWER PT.  Your guide to  the finest in  area dining  DINING GUIDE  A listing of  restaurants  and pubs  For those of you who haven't been to the Cedars Pub in  Gibsons lately, you're in for a surprise - a pleasant one.  The hew owners, brothers Pat and Francis Switzer from  Vancouver, have brought with them a commitment for offering their customers a first class pub.  They started with an extensive interior renovation that  now includes raised seating, new carpeting and frosted  glass windows. You can feel the difference in atmosphere  as soon as you come through the doors.  However, the most noteworthy change from the point  of view of this column is the change in their food service.  After hearing that the Cedars had just started their new  dinner menu, and wanting to rescue my companion from  her usual late Friday night work schedule, it was in a quiet  corner of the Cedars that we began finally unwinding from  the day.- - ���  The menu is simple and straight forward; there are only  four hors d'oeuveres and five main entrees offered. But  what a choice. The hors d'oeuvres consisted of oysters  Rockerfeller, deep fried prawns, scallops and shrimp boat  - all for under $4. Three of the dinner entrees will be offered each night and include a steak sandwich, gourmet  burger, and club house - the most expensive being the  steak sandwich at $6.95. The other two entrees will vary  nightly.  We started dinner off by sharing the scallops and  shrimp boat and didn't regret the choice. I ordered the  steak sandwich (rare) and my companion ordered the club  sandwich. They were delivered with mounds of crisp,  golden-brown fries and a friendly splash of cucumbers,  tomatoes and the best grapes I've had in years. A visual  delight that did not disappoint in the eating. My steak was  tasty and cooked exactly as I like it.  Without the drinks, this excellent dinner for two came  to less than $20, and neither one of us could finish it all.  We'll be back.  M.C.-Master Card;     A.E.-American Express;  <^jgf     V.-Visa;     E.R.-En Route  fP.-\ \ ��� _\        AVERAGE MEAL PRICES QUOTED DO NOT  \ :::���// include liquor purchases.  i_L^_-l__r__.  Andy's Restaurant - Hwy IOI, Upper Gibsons - 886-3388. Open II a.m.  -10:30 p.m. Mon-Wed; 11 a.m. - 11  p.m. Thurs-Sat; 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sun.  130 seats. V., M.C. Located in the  village of Gibsons kittycorner from Sunnycrest Mall, Andy's offers a variety of  popular meals in air conditioned comfort. A place to. sit back and relax. Wide  lunch selection with daily specials. Menu  features steak, pizza, seafood, ~ pasta.  House specialties include veal dishes and  steaks. Children's portions available for  most dishes. Reservations recommended  on weekends. Average meal for two  $15,520.  Creek House - Lower Road, Roberts  Creek - 885-9321. Open Wed-Sun 6 p.m.  - 10 p.m., Sunday Brunch 11 a.m. - 2  p.m. 40 seats...., M.C. Intimate dining  and fine cuisine are the hallmarks of  Creek House. The atmosphere is sophisticated yet casual. Brunch includes eggs,  crepes, pasta, seafood, salads,  croissants. Dinners include crepes, pasta  and meat entrees. Evening specialties include Filet A L'Echalotte, Stroganoff,  Lobster, Prawns. Two Daily specials  (one seafood) at $10.95 includes soup or  salad. Average meal for two $30. Reservations a must on weekends.  The Omega Pizza Steak and  Lobster House 1538 Gower Pt. Rd.,  Gibsons Landing -886-2268. Open Sun-  Thurs; 4 - 10:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 4-11 p.m.  145 seats. V., M.C. With a perfect view  of Gibsons marina, and a good time atmosphere. The Omega is a people-  watcher's paradise. Cast members of  "The Beachcombers" can usually be  found dining here. Menu includes pizza,  pasta, steaks and seafood. Steaks and  seafood are their specialties. Banquet  facilities available. Very special  children's menu. Average dinner for two  $20. Reservations recommended.  Pronto's Steak, Pizza and  Spaghetti House - Hwy IOI, Gibsons - 886-8138. Open 11:30 a.m. -11:00  p.m. Mon-Thurs; 11:30a.m. -midnight  Fri-Sat; 4 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. Sun. 130  seats. V., M.C. Located in the Cedar  Plaza in Gibsons, Pronto's serves an extensive variety of pizza, steak, pasta,  lasagna and ribs in a delightful family atmosphere. Lunch choices include sandwiches, pasta, burgers and daily specials  Mon-Fri. Dinner selections include  steak, pizza, ribs and souvlaki. Steak  and lasagna the house specialty.  Children's menu available. All dinner  entrees served with salad and garlic  bread. Average family meal for four  $15-$20.  NIGHT ON THE TOWN  Lord Jim's Resort Hotel - 2 km  N. of Secret Cove. 885-7038 - Breakfast 8 a.m. - 11 a.m. Lunch 11:30  a.m.- 2 p.m. Afternoon tea 2 p.m. - 4  p.m. Dinner 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. until further notice. Lounge 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.  daily. V. M.C. - Banquet Facilities  -Fishing Charters, Outdoor BBQ  (June 1). Located on the waterfront  with a spectacular view of Ole's Cove  & Malaspina Strait. The rustic lodge  serves West Coast'cuisine featuring a  varied menu of soups, appetizers &  entrees; But the emphasis is on seafood - flown in fresh from around the  world. Squid, swordfish, orange ruffle, thrasher shark & yellowfin tuna  will be featured as available, local  swimming scallops, salmon, skate,  prawns & rockfish are also featured.  Reservations recommended. Average  meal for two - $40.  FA MIL Y DINING  Ruby Lake Resort - Sunshine Coast  Hwy, Pender Harbour -883-2269. Open 7  days a Week 7 am -9 pm. 54 seats. V.,  MC. Breakfast, lunch and dinner served  daily in Ruby Lake's post and beam dining room. Lovely view of lake and good  highway access for vehicles of all sizes.  Breakfast served all day. Lunch prices  begin at $2.50, dinners from $5.50 including salad bar. Smorgasbord Sunday  nights includes 12 salads, three hot meat  dishes and two desserts, $10.95 for adults,  $5.50 for children under 12. Tiny tots  free. A great family outing destination.  Absolutely superb prime rib every Friday  night. Average family dinner for four  $20-25.  The Homestead - Hwy 101, Wilson  Creek - 885-2933. Open 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.  daily. 40 seats inside, 30 seat patio. V.,  M.C. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Daily lunch and dinner specials as  well as regular entrees. Lunches include  sandwiches, hamburgers, pyrogies and  salads. Dinner selections include steaks,  chicken and seafood. Prime Rib and 15  item salad bar are the house specialty on  Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights.  Average family meal for four $25-$30.  DRIVE IN TAKE OUT  Chicken Shack - Cowrie St., Sechelt  - 885-7414. Open 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Mon-  Thurs; 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fri-Sat; Sun  noon - 8 p.m. Fried chicken, chicken  burgers, chicken nuggets, fries, salads,  onion rings, fresh hamburgers. All  prepared on the premises, all to go.  PUBS  Backeddy Pub - Egmont Marina  -583-2298. Open daily -11 to 11, Sat.  & Sun. 9 to 11. 60 seats inside, 20 on  the deck. All day menu features sandwiches, hamburgers, steaks and desserts. Snacks include fresh steamed  local prawns, fish and chips made  with local fish. Bright comfortable atmosphere overlooking Egmont Narrows. Also includes a 16 seat family  cafe, open 9 am -10 pm.  Cedar's Inn - Cedar Plaza, Gibsons - 886-8171. Open 10 am - midnight, Mon-Sat. 100 seats. V., M.C.  Delicious lunches 11:00 - 2:30. Evening menu 6:00 - 9:30. Sat. & Sun.  Brunch. Entertainment - Darts, Crib-  bage. Activities. Everyone welcome.  Elphie's Cabaret- Gower Pt. Rd.,  Gibsons - next to the Omega Restaurant  - 886-3336. V., M.C. Open Wed 9 p.m.  -2 a.m., Thurs (Ladies' Night) 8 p.m. -2  a.m., Fri & Sat 8 p.m. - 2 a.m. (No cover  charge til 10 p.m.). No cover charge  Wed night. For a rocking good time,  come dance and party on the peninsula's  biggest dance floor.  Gilligan's Pub - Teredo St., Sechelt  -8854148. Open 10 a.m. - midnight  Mon-Sat. 65 seats. V. Lunch and dinner  are served daily in the Coast's newest  neighbourhood pub. Menu includes  sandwiches, hamburgers, chicken platters and daily specials. Darts on Monday  nights.  Peninsula Motor Inn - Sunshine  Coast Hwy, Gibsons - 886-2804. Open  10 a.m. -12 p.m. Mon-Thurs; 11 a.m. -I  a.m. Fri-Sat. Pub food includes  breakfasts and lunches. Kitchen open  until 6 p.m. Exotic dancers. Live music.  I  *  "_  . _  ���a  -.  _  ���.  _  - .  .  ��� m  *  V>  ��i .  ���x  ��.  1  t  .  f!_  _?.  _i  I  si  ���I 12.  Coast News, May 19,1986  international rugby in Gibsons  The fanners and fishermen from Fishguard in Wales took on the  Gibsons rugby side last Thursday at Elphie field and the large  crowd was treated to some fast action. (See story this page)  :y ���Dianne Evans photo  Gibsons Rugby and Athletic  Club had what was probably its  busiest week ever entertaining  teams from San Francisco and  Wales, here to take part in the  Vancouver Centennial Rugby  Festival.  It was a great success for the  locals who provided the hospitality and comradeship for the  travelling gentlemen of sport  and good will. Gibsons filled  the visitors with warmth, food  and spirit.  Tuesday afternoon the San  Francisco Gaels took to the  Langdale pitch as though they  owned the park. A much larger  and heavier pack out-muscled  Gibsons' scrum, forcing the  Blues to play a defensive game.  The Americans play an aggressive game with fitness and  speed, and the Gaels shone,  racking up three tries, one conversion and a penalty goal against Gibsons' two penalty  goals. The final score was 17-6  ; for San Francisco.  The Welsh side arrived on  Thursday to meet Gibsons at  Elphie field. The large group  touring from the small western  Wales coastal town of Fishguard played an experienced  style of rugby.  The visitors, mostly farmers  and fishermen, fell behind early  in the game after a penalty goal  kicked by fullback Dave Rainier. But the Welsh side matched the field goal and pushed  ahead with fluid ball handling  by the backs, scoring two unconverted tries.  Break forward Clint Fox of  Gibsons narrowed the point  spread picking up a loose ball  deep in Welsh territory and  scoring late in the half, leaving  the score at a close 11-7 for the  Welshmen.  Second half action picked up  momentum with Gibsons often  pressuring the Welsh side but  not a single point was made at  either goal, giving Fishguard a  victory on Coast soil.  ,  A great time was had by all  . after both the games when the  Athletic Club opened the doors  at the clubhouse for pot luck  dinners and social gatherings.  San Francisco apparently ate  too much but that's to be expected, judging from the size of  the players.        '  To meet people from abroad  in the sport of rugby usually  means a return match in future  years. Perhaps Gibsons may  venture to Wales or San Francisco as they did last spring on  their return game to Ventura,  California.  The Club would like to thank  the Coast News for its coverage  and the many people throughout Gibsons who made . our  visitors' stay a happy one.  Coast gets Minor Tennis League  ���  B  I  1  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  'THIS' WEEK'S SPECIALS"  Carpets  A delightful saxony  of 3 designer colours.  ONLY  l/iVV  Artificial Turf  Available in 6'  and 12' widths  ONLY  ,N STOCK  s4.29  DeVries Floor & Window Coverings  %  I  I  I  I  sq. yd.   |  NOW        [  I  I  sq. yd. I  I  I  . The Sunshine Coast is among  ,40 sites across Canada chosen to  host the 1986 Pepsi-Wilson  Minor Tennis League.  ; Even more significant is the  fact that the Canadian Tennis  Association has awarded the  league rights to Ron Knight's  Sunshine Coast Summer Tennis  Program for an unprecedented  third year in a row.  This   rare  situation   occurs  because of the great success of  last year's program and the enthusiastic support from local  families, newspapers and merchants.  The Pepsi-Wilson Minor  Tennis League concept is  designed to bring high-quality  tennis instruction to children  and teens on public courts in  smaller communities.  Sunshine Coast sites this July  will be Elphinstone Secondary  School,   Hackett   Park,   and  Ladies' Softball  The Roberts Creek Legion  won its first game of the season  in an exciting contest against  Gilligan's Pub last Thursday.  Gilligan's got a good jump on  them at the start and kept the  lead until the last inning when  the Creek caught up and ended  the game 25-23.  Milynne Jager's three home  runs were certainly a factor in  the win, as was Gwen Carley's.  homer. But it was CheeChee  IVIcCombie's   home   run   that  brought in the runner from second base to win the game.  ��� Trail Bay Sports won both  their games last week to remain  in firstj place in the Ladies'  League. They defeated  Elphinstone Recreation 17-2 on  Tuesday and home runs by Viv  Watson and Jessie August  helped them win 14-5 against  Ken Mac.  Other results are not available  because teams failed to phone in  their scores.  < i-  , i-  !.'  May 19  May 20  May 21  May 22  May 26  BP = Brother's Park  IR = Indian Reserve  LS = Langdale Elem.  LADIES'SOFTBALL     -  Coast Cable vs Ken Mac (BP)  Eagles vs Gilligan's Pub (HP)  Cedars Pub vs Elphie Rec (IR)  ' Trail Bay Sports vs Roberts Creek Legion (RC)  Elphie Rec vs Ball Hawgs (BP)  Gilligan's Pub vs Coast Cable (HP)  Ball Hawgs vs Trail Bay Sports (HP)  Roberts Creek Legion vs Eagles (IR)  Ken Mac vs Cedars Pub (LS)  Gilligan's Pub vs Ken Mac (BP)  HP - Hacked Park  RC = Roberts Creek Elem.  Men's Fastball  I In men's fastball action, on  Sunday evening, May 12, Gibsons Building Supplies (GBS)  kept Elphie at bay, 3-1, until the  seventh inning when they came  back to even the score. Then, in  the next inning, Elphie got one  more to post a 4-3 victory over  ��}BS.  i GBS has had some early season  pitching  problems  which  resulted in losses to Elphie on  Tuesday night, 8-1, and , to  Gilligan's on Wednesday, 16-2.  The game of the week came  on Thursday when Weldwood  and Elphie met head to head.  Elphie was attempting to avenge  its only loss this season (to  Weldwood) and squeaked by  with a 2-1 victory in eight innings.  MEN'S FASTBALL STANDINGS  j;  Elphie  4 18  ^  Weldwood  1113  .**  Gilligans  2  12*  .��  GBS  4  11  y    .  UPCOMING GAMES (starts at 6:30 p.m.)  ��*  May 21  Gibsons Building Supplies vs Weldwood (Hackett)  a ;  May 22  . Gilligans vs Elphi (Brothers)  f.  May 25  Gilligans vs Weldwoon (Hackett)  Physical Activity Week  <_ ���  I This year's National Physical Activity Week, May 24 to  <:     June 1, is designed to increase awareness and mass participa-  !���     tion of Canadians in physical activities-of all kinds.  Ay.     TIDE  TABLES  _             A  ____���..  _________'.  Wed. May 21  Fri. May 23  Sun. May 25  m^LWWWW _____ \.  0235         14.5  0335         14.6  0010         11.5  W        \i  0935          3.6  1050            .6  0445         14.4  K      . ^  1615         13.4  1815         15.2  '1220           -.3  ' ___���_���_ mi     ���  2135          9.2  2320         10,9  2005         15.7  \    Tue. May 20  Thurs. May 22  Sat. May 24  Mon. May 26  f   0205         14.5  0300        14.6  0405         14.6  0110         11.7  *   0900          5.4  1010          1.9  1135            -.2  0530         14.0  >    1515         12.3  1715         14.4  1910         15.6  1315             .1  1   2040          8.3  . 2225         10.2  2100         15.7  \   Reference: Point Atkinson  For Skookumchuk Narrows add  1 hr. 45 min., plus 5 min. (or  ;. Pacific Standard Time  each ft. of rise, and 7 min.  for each ft. of fall.  _____________  "���___^���___?--^^^--*_-_  ^7____*^*_^_"��__�� ^ij-*1  I IDElrlNfi  yPORMN B0SCH  LOGGING & MJIBINE LTD.  .���������_IVI.erc.rui.S-ef.;* Volv/o   Pont.t ��� M .inner QutbOards  ��� Rain Gear ��� Loyyiny Supplies'��������.' Safety Gear  ��� Huscjvarna Saws ��� Work Cloth6s  _* Boots  .���'��������� Gort.pjete Mar��le Reparrs V OM;C Stern.  Drive (Cobra)  VWInirf R<tt., Sechelt    885-4141  Pender Harbour Secondary  School.  The Pepsi-Cola and Wilson  Corporations have sponsored  the minor tennis league since  1977. Each year they provide  promotional materials plus tennis racquets and balls for each  site.  In addition, all participants  receive free Pepsis, Wilson  T-shirts, prizes, books, and  badges to help make their tennis  experiences as enjoyable as  possible.  The Canadian Tennis Association views the Pepsi-Wilson  Minor Tennis League as fundamental to its grassroots programming. The league is the  base from which it plans to  develop an increased number of  world class players to represent  Canada internationally.  As boys and girls are introduced to the game in public  parks, it is hoped that many will  continue in school and club pro-  Garden  . ���    y-'o  yykcm  by Marguerite  m  The members of thefGibsons  Garden Club enjoyed;, an informative and interesting'lecture by  Mr. Bernard Moore, the Pacific  Gardener at their meeting this  week.  We shaHall enjoy the Pioneer  Parks 100 year centennial  display which was finished this  week by Willing volunteer work  parties of the club. We hope for  sunny weather.  The members are going on a  bus tour of UBC Botanical  Gardens on Sunday, May 25.  The bus leaves the library  parking lot at 10 a.m.  There may be a few seats  available. Phone 886-9527.Br-  ing a bag lunch.  Keep those weeds down  regularly with the hoe, before  they multiply.  Enjoy gardening.  Student  Loan  program  The Student Venture Loan  Program, named "Be Your  Own Boss", is delivered jointly  by the Ministry of Industry and  Small Business Development  and the Ministry of Labour and  has operated successfully for  two years.  Students can apply for a loan  of up to $2000 ($3000 in partnership) to start and operate a  business during the summer.  Students must submit a business plan which is reviewed by  a panel from local Boards of  Trade and Chambers of Commerce. The Royal Bank of  Canada actually makes the loan  with the province guaranteeing  the funds. They must be repaid  by September 30, 1986.  Students can obtain loan application forms for this pro- .  gram from: Royal Bank branches, Ministry of Labour, Apprenticeship and Employment  Area Offices and Chamber of  Commerce offices.  C______^__V^*^^pq_^VM-P*PaV^_-|v����P-__��-_p  ( fc^*M*"*^"fc -���������-- ^ --��� ^ ^- n in a  Quote of the Week  4 Religion is the greatest ot all  ;| means for the establishment of  \ order in the world and for the  j peaceful contentment of all that  dwell therein.  __ _. ���_������ _. _. _ _. .-^yyy^fr  grammes, later advancing to  provincial and national levels of  competition.  Participation, enjoyment and  quality instruction are key  elements of the Pepsi-Wilson  Minor Tennis League. Forehand, backhand, serve and  volley are introduced and then  drilled in games arid friendly  competitions. Basic rules, scoring, and court etiquette are alsd  discussed.  Later, in another e?cciting  phase, participants have the opportunity to take part in a mini-  tournament as well as the Tennis Canada Performance  Award Scheme. This series of  tests shows how far youngsters  have progressed in comparison  with other players across  Canada.  The Pepsi-Wilson Minor  Tennis League begins June 30 in  Gibsons and Sechelt and July 14  at Pender Harbour. Don's  Shoes, Trail Bay Sports and  Centre Hardware aire handling  registration. Beginner to intermediate players, ages seven  to 15 may join.  709 Hwy 101, Gibsons 886-7112  $ft C��#  %HM&  SUNSHINE COAST  REGIONAL DISTRICT  NOTICE OF TEMPORARY  CLOSURE OF COOPER'S  GREEN BOAT LAUNCH  Please note that the Cooper's Green boat launching  ramp will be temporarily closed from May 24 to May 30,  1986 inclusive for the purpose of construction upgrading. Reconstruction of the concrete launching  ramp is intended to better serve the public launching  ramp users at Cooper's Green Regional Park. We regret  any inconvenience caused by this temporary situation.  J.C. Johnstone  Planning Director  885-2261  Sunshine Coast Regional District  P.O. Box 800  Sechelt, B.C.  VON 3A0  GIBSONS  n  PASSENGER  All Season  P155 80R13  165 R13  P185 80R13  P 205 75 R 14  P 225 75 R 15  P 235 75 R 15  LIGHT TRUCK  AM Season  $4QO0  5400  5800  72oo  73oo  g2oo  LT195Rx14 6ply  LT235Rx15 6ply  LT750Rx.16 8ply  LT235Rx16 8ply  LT875Rx16.5 8ply  LT950RX 16.5 8 ply  sgQoo  9500  10500  141oo  14300  15900  TREAD  LT700Rx15 6ply s7_>00  LT235Rx15 6ply 9900  LT235Rx16 8ply 128����  LT875Rx16.5 8ply 12800  LT950 Rx 16.5 8 plys13900  CONVENTIONAL  TREAD  P 185 80 R 13 s5500  P 185 75 R 14 5600  P 195 75 R 14 6200  P 215 75 R 14 6500  P215 75R15 7900  P 225 75 R 15 7250  P 235 75 R 15 8670  \%  ^Hrtlfi^1'  AH prices include installation  QUANTITIES ARE LIMITED  f*Et_  l-<ou.  ______  V-V  886^2700  ���'-'.:..-Tire; Brake v it Suspension Centre  Your; Locally O wired TlftE LA AID Store  ,Hwy 101,   \ .  One Mile West  of Gibsons  886-8T67 Coast News, May 19,1986  uiid  Old Gaels, in dark shirts pose for a portrait with the Gibsons Rugby Club during'their visit to the Sunshine Coast last week. (See story page 12) / ���Brad Benson photo  The spring meeting of the  14th Baden Powell Guild was  held at Camp Byng on May 8.  After an excellent pot-luck  super, a plant sale was held,  organized by Hilda Tierney.  This was followed by a most informative talk on the important  subject of gardening, given by  David Hunter, the wellrknown  B.C. gardener.  Our thanks to Mr. Hunter  and his wife, Margaret, for the  pleasure of their company and a  most interesting evening.  S,C? Golf and Country Club  Ladies play Count Putts Round  by Alec Warner  The Ladies' Eighteeners  played a Count putts Round on  Tuesday, May 13, ending with  the following winners:  First flight winner with 32  putts, Barb Mercer; second with  33, Doreen Gregory. Second  flight with 35, Vera Munroe,  and runner-up with 35, Judy  Frampton. Third flight leader  with 33 putts, Joyce McMillen,  with runner-up Hazel Wright  with 36.  The Ladies' Niners played  under mixed weather conditions  of sun and rain. The hidden  hole (no. 6), was won by Beth  Niddery and Isobel Cowley,  both with 6 strokes. Fewest  putts were sunk by Isobel  Cowley with 15, Mary McKin-  THE UNITED CHURCH  OF CANADA  Sunday Worship Services  ���   GIBSONS  Glassford Road -11:15 a.m.  Sunday School - 11:00 a.m.  ST. JOHN'S  Davis Bay - 9:30 a.nri.  Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.  ,-^ifX Rev.-Alex:;Gv.|tei^:#^''  Church Telephone.    886-2333  i       ^fr Jf�� l%m-     ,���������''    ���'       ������ ���  ANGLICAN CATHOLIC  CHURCH OF CANADA  ST. COLUMBA OF IONA PARISH  HALFMOON BAY  Church of His Presence:  2nd Sunday     10:30 Morning Prayer  11:00 Communion  4th Sunday      10:30 Morning Prayer  5th Sunday 3:30 Communion  The Reverend E.S. Gale  885-7481 or 1-525^760    y   ..,���  ;    Traditional Anglican  Services & Teaching  -4k <_�����_!-  NEW LIFE FELLOWSHIP  NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH  5836 Wharf Ave., Sechelt   �����  .Home of New Life Christian Academy KDG to Gr. 12 (Now Enrolling)  Service times: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Mid-week, Wed. 7:30 p.m.  Men's prayer & study.-Fri. 7:30 p.m.; Women's prayer, Thur. 10 a.m.  /���...    Pastor Ivan Fox. Ph. 885-4775 or 886-7862  ���*$& Sjm��  THE CHURCH OF  JESUS CHRIST OF  LATTER DAY SAINTS  Davis Bay Rd. - Wilson Creek  Davis Bay Community Hall  Sacrament Service 9:00 a.m.  Sunday School 10:15 a.m.  Branch President Reg. H. Robinson  "> 886-2382  ��� ,...      ' .. ���  .. .���J%�� A(m> J^��i i. -..I- .i  ���������- I-. ���  GIBSONS  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  New Church building on  School Road - opp. RCMP  Pastor Ted Boodle  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Morning Worship       11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship      7:00 p.m.  Bible Study  Weds, at 7:30 p.m.  Phone  886-9482 or 886-7107  Affiliated withlhe  Pentecostal Assemblies  of Canada  -_._��*��-  -4141-  ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S  & ST. AIDAN'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  Parish Family Eucharist  Combined service at  St; Bartholomew's, Gibsons 10a.m.  Church School 10 a.m.  .    Rev. I.E. Robinson, 886-8436  ������..   ��� �����'���-..M --Aft $fr -Jfr- -        -���-���'  CALVARY  BAPTIST CHURCH  North of Hwy. 101 on Park Rd.  Gibsons  SundaySchool 9:30 a.m.  Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship 7:00 p.m.  _��� Weekly Home Fellowship Groups  Rev. Dale D. Peterson  886-2611  SUNSHINE COAST  GOSPEL CHURCH  Corner of Davis Bay Road  & Laurel Road  Inter-Denominational  Family-Worship  Sunday- 11 a.m.  Sunday School  For All Ages  Sunday-9:45 a.m.  "We Extend A Welcome And  An Invitation to Come And  Worship The Lord With Us"  Pastor Arie de Vos  ____��������� .i i ��%* <$& _^f_>  CHRISTIAN SCIENCE  SOCIETY  SERVICES  Sunday Service &  Sunday School 11:45 a.m.  Wednesday 7:30 p.m.  in United Church Building  Davis Bay  885-2506  _^p s&9 ��sy*���  PENDER HARBOUR  PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  Lagoon Road, Madeira Park  Pastor Tim Shapcotte  883-2374 or 883-2870  SundaySchool 9:45 a.m.  Morning Worship       11:00 a.m.  Prayer & Bible Study  Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.  -rfl(* Sgrn &{+~  GRACE REFORMED  PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  Sunday  Sech It Elementary School  Sunday Sc ool 9r45a.m.  Studies in Genesis 11:00 a.m.  Home Meetings  Studies in Matthew 7:30 p.m.  Wednesday  Home Bible Study 7:30 p.m.  J. Cameron Fraser, Pastor  885-7488 ,  non with 16, and Hazel Earle  with 17.  The Men's Twilighters on  Wednesday, May 14, enjoyed  their second steak barbeque of  the season and posted the  following golf results:  First low net with a low, low,  28, Arnie Pettersen! Second low  net, Doug Elson (30)* and third  with a 30Vi, Ozzie Hincks.  First low gross (as usual!),  with a 36, Brian Leckie, and second low gross at 38, Dick  Gaines.  Another perfect golfing day  for the Men's Seniors on Thursday when 72 teed off using only  three clubs and a putter. First  with a net 101._., the team of  Laurie Todd j Tom Held, Tom  Meredith and Geo Townsend.  Second, also with a score of  101 Vi,   Pat   Mulligan,   Jack  Milburn, Bill Sutherland, arid  Bob McCallum. Third at 102H,  the team of Wilf Forshner, Bill  Utterback, Ed Pinkerton and  Bill Sexton. Closest to the pin  on the 8th for a double win,  Bob McCallum! .,    ...  A correction for last week's  Men's Seniors results. Al  Bullock should have been  shown as a member of the winning team in place of Bill Babcock. Sorry Al, but I report 'em  as I read 'em.  I close with the sad announcement of the passing of  Walter Nichols on May 10, after  a valiant and lengthy struggle  against cancer. Our deepest  sympathy goes out to Mercia  and family_pn this sad and trying occasion. Walter will be  greatly and sincerely missed by  all who knew him.  /  Through the mist of sorrow, watch for the soft beacons  of friendship to guide you. Your friends, neighbors and  family will support you and help to lead you to comfort and  consolation at the time when you need it most.... We pledge  ourselves to giving you the best assistance possible.  You know us ... you can depend on our hdp.  u.  _ i  1665 Seaview  Gibsons  D.A. DEVUN  Orecto.  886-9551  HP  Bottle drive  The Gibsons' Minor Ball Girls' Softball bottle drive will be  held on Sunday, May 25.  Covering the area from Langdale to Roberts Creek Camp?  ground, the drive will continue from 10 a.m..to 2:30 p.m.  Minor Softball  Sechelt Minor Softball is now  well underway. T-ball has four  teams - Shop Easy, Halfmoon  Bay Sluggers, N&N Log and  Sechelt Insurance - all playing  soihefgood beginning baseball.  Only one real thriller bf ^a-  game last Friday, Clinic Swat *  beat Hartley's Auto Body in ithe  bottom half of the last inning.  Good game kids!:      ^  Standings for the three older  divisions as of May 15 are:  MIXED SOFTBALL  Clink Swat 4 4      8  Halfmoon Bay Rec 4 2 2 4  DM) Gulf 3 12 2  B&J Store/Welcome Beach   3 1 2 2  Hartley's Auto Body 2      2 0  GIRLS' SOFTBALL  L.A. Queen 3 3      6  Cactus Flower 3 12 2  Jets 22 0  BOYS'SOFTBALL  Swanson's Ready Mix 4 3 16  Anderson Realty 3 2      4  Buccaneer Marina 3      3 0  The midget girls' team, Coast  Cable Vision, which is playing  in the Women's Fastball League  is doing very well. They are  showing a lot of enthusiasm and  Hydro  cautions  B.C. Hydro is asking landowners to take special care  when burning off dead grass so  that hydro poles will not be  damaged by fire.  "It takes just a little  forethought to avoid the problem," says Erich Hensch,  Hydro's District Manager. "All  a person has to do is clear the  grass away from the base of the  pole for a radius of about one  metre and dampen the area  before setting the fire."  A check should be made to  ensure that the fire, which  should never be left unattended,  will not spread to adjacent property where poles may be  located.  A hydro pole damaged by  fire is also a safety hazard, says  Hensch. "In one instance a line  of poles caught fire beside a  highway and we almost had .a  power line down on the road."  Anyone seeing a grass fire  threatening hydro poles should  call the fire department and  B.C. Hydro immediately.  talent, lacking only in experience. With Michelle Gillies  striking put batters the way she  did Thursday, their first win  can't be far away.-  Help build the  PERFORMING ARTS  PAVILION  In Holland Park  Make your pledge to provide dollars, goods  or services when the time comes  IT'S TAX DEDUCTIBLE!  Community contributions are crucial to  obtaining financial support from major funding  sources.  The dollar value of your pledge will be counted toward the goal  of $100,000 to be raised on the Sunshine Coast.  We will contact you when the design and construction phase begins.  ..��*&    -��>    /*_>.  provide the following:  DOLLARS: $  GOODS:  To   help   build   the   Performing   Arts  Pavilion in Holland Park, I pledge to   mamc.  ��� __������______.___��!_���-__ 4_______ ��_���-___!_���_._____________���  (please print)  PHONE:  (please specify)  DOLLAR  VALUE: $   ADDRESS:  (please print)  SERVICES:.  (please specify)  I understand that I will be called upon to  deliver my pledge when the design and  construction phase begins.  -_____���__��_��������  DOLLAR  VALUE: $_  SIGNATURE:  Please mail your pledges to:   THE EILEEN GLASSFORD ARTS FOUNDATION  Box 683, Gibsons, BC VON 1V0  For more information call Ruby Buick at 886-8102, or Fran Burnside at 885-3577 or 886-2622.  r> Tmyr^^^risimiTTUtafmatm^m^m  14.  Coast News, May 19,1986  Campagnola visits Coast  Iona Campagnola, President  of the National Liberal Party,  and Dove Hendren, President  of the B.C. Liberal Party, will  be on the Sunshine Coast Wednesday, May 28, to meet with  Coast residents.  Iona is no stranger to many  people on the Coast as she has a  long involvement with coastal  concerns dating back  to  her  term in the federal parliament.  Since assuming office as National President, Iona has concentrated her efforts in the  rebuilding of a National Party,  and has been a strong voice for  the rights of minorities, the handicapped, and women not only  within the Liberal party, but .  also within federal legislation.  Travelling with Iona will be  wmmmmmmm  WHO NEEDS IT  Some people think only highly paid  executives can afford financial  planning services, but that isn't the  case, financial planning can help  anyone get the most from their hard-  earned dollar.  Even if you have only a small amount  each month to save, I can help you  to start following a financial plan  designed expressly for your needs  and goals. Call me today.  J.N.W. BUDD 885-3397  DEBORAH ME ALIA  886-8771  JIM BUDD 886-8771  lffrwed��o%&  PROFIT FROM OUR EXPERIENCE  m  Dove Hendren, the President of  the Liberal Party in B.C. Dove  was elected President at the recent Liberal convention.  The agenda includes speaking  engagements at the high schools  on the Coast, followed by a dinner at the Parthenon restaurant  in Sechelt, at 7 p.m. Entertainment will be provided by the  Sechelt 69ers.  Other times that people are  free to meet and speak with  Iona and Dove include breakfast at the Gypsy Restaurant in  Gibsons at 8:45 a.m., lunch at  the Homestead Restaurant in  Wilson Creek at 11:45 a.m.,  and coffee at the Chinese  Restaurant in Madeira Park at  3:45 p.m.  Tickets for the dinner are $20  each, and may be purchased  from the Chinese Restaurant in  Pender Harbour, the Book  Store, Strings 'n Things, and  the Parthenon Restaurant in  Sechelt, and Truffles Candy  Store in Gibsons.. Tickets may  also be obtained by phoning  885-7029.  The Coast Newsywas one of the stars of a recent Beachcomber  foreground plays the newpaper's publisher.  Cap College announces  segment. Shirley Broderiek in the  ���Dianne Evans photo  Elderhostel a success  :>.-k  OPEN LE. TER #2  TO  ,>"'  PARENTS AND STUDENTS:  continue to .****���< *���  I>SV:-.'  SSr��� o�� i��ES_��S���� %��?& tne  Your  voluntary artivities;  As. you  the same  Such activities as sports  aclivMes which we a��e"       ^ for our^^ . at ,ea5t equ  D��<*e Tjt Board Know that we must be  ac^es which we *&*&��&. s^^sTwe^^^  We tealise that you w^ ^ ^BSTCMo ^^ atiSe.  available to defend ''���'"Representative as  V��" *ls�� COmg!IZ contueS understand,n6.  Thank you tor youi  THE  SUNSHINE COAST  TETHERS' ASSOCIATION  When April, Struthers started  planning for a pilot program to  bring students over 60 years of  age to use the Sechelt Campus  of Capilano College she was  worried the program wouldn't  attract many students.  "Along with a group of community people helping to advise  on the program's development,  I was projecting that at most 25  people would be travelling to  Sechelt to take part in our  courses and community events.  "I was surprised and  delighted when I learned early  in April that our Elderhostel  program was one of the most  successful of all the offerings;  across North America.''  The Sechelt Campus extended its courses to take in 55 people in each of two sessions.  "Students are coming from all  over the continent, with about  two thirds being from the  United States and the remainder  from all over Canada," says  April.  The large response to the  Sechelt courses means that more  places have to be found to host ,  students than was first expected.  "Unlike most Colleges," says  April, "we are placing students  in private homes during their  stay here. We are inviting interested hosts to also take at  least one of our courses and to  join us for activities like tours,  cook-outs, receptions after class  time. There is also an allowance  to cover basic expenses of housing and feeding given to the  .host." .  ^According to Ms Struthers,  &  v  /���--1  COMMUNITY INFORMATION SYSTEMS  -n  ���y  \c  ������/;  <J  a  c  ."-_  C:.  :&  V?  <3  ^       - Your Newv Phone Stores -  </ are having their  OFFICIAL GRAND OPENING  Saturday, May 24 at 10 a.m.  > ' ��� '"'..-������.���  Join us for refreshments and we'll tell you  what's new in telephones, equipment and service '  J:-- on the Sunshine Coast  Your hosts are:  - BARBARA CHIASSON - - MARIE SYNNOT -  Community Information Systems Community Information Systems  Sunnycrest Shopping Plaza Trail Bay Centre  Highway 101, Gibsons Cowrie St., Sechelt  You can pay your current phone bills  at the Community Phone Stores  _.\  ��.  ...  f.  cy  ./  D  &  The Community Information Systems Stores  are a joint effort of the TWU  and the people of the Sunshine Coast  THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT  0  p  o  o  v  XL  D  Elderhostel is a network of colleges, universities and' other  educational institutions, providing a central registry to  students who wish to travel  around North America or to  Europe and to take courses at  the same time.  Students must be over 60  years.of age and prepared to  embrace the hostelling  philosophy, so that adequate  but not luxurious meals and  accommodation are offered. \  In return students get the  chance to take college level  courses with no exams, to meet  other Elderhostelers and to visjt  other places. j  Anyone who wishes to kno<jv  more about the program, or tb  take a student during June 1 to  7 or 8 to 14, can call April  Struthers at 885-9310, Capilano  College in Sechelt, 12:30 to 4:30  p.m. weekdays. ' \\y  All over the Coast the flowering  rainy springtime.  dogwood is a delight even in thjs  ���John Burnside photo  At  Hall  by Gladys Coates  The May meeting was prefaced : by a lovely display of  ceramics done by our seniors  under the direction of Bernice  Charnberlin. The work shows a  vast improvement over the first  showing. > ,  The meeting opened with a  tribute to Marguerite Myers,  who this Week celebrates her  88th birthday. Following that  one minute of. silence was  observed in honour of Anne  Burns, a long-time member of  our branch.  . Florence Tolberg and Ralph  Lynds were winners of the door  prizes which are obtained by the  collection of Super Valu sales  slips.  '..>...  Oliver Bray, another old  timer was winner of the whirly  gig made by Jim Monro.  New business included selection of a committee to plan a  tenth anniversary for the hall. It  will be held as an open house  for everyone, and will include  tea and a display of hobbies.  Helen Raby has been appointed as historian for OAPO  38, and hopefully she will have  some highlights for our anniversary party.  We were sorry to hear that  'Cob' Johnson has resigned as  area representative of the Provincial OAPO. He has become  very involved with a committee  to   study   Alzheimers   disease  which is becoming an increasing  menace to the health of many.  Most activities at Harmony  Hall are finished for the season,  starting up again in September  and   October.    The   carpet  bowlers attended a banquet on  Wednesday, May 7 at Pronto's  Restaurant.    Prizes    were  distributed to winners of the  various categories, and Ed and  Molly Connor who supervise  the bowling,  and  Norm and  Mary Lambert in charge of the  dart competition were presented  with lovely baskets of flowering  plants.  WANTED  Used Furniture'  and What Have You  We buy Beer Bottles  886-2812  . The trip for May wUl take us,  - td; Varid eriZalm 's Galrclen Worlipj  in Richmond, and in June a visft;  to Expo with tour guides, which!  should be very helpful to thosfej  who plan on further trips to Efy  po. 11  It    was   reported   that  ��� 2||'  members attended the singing j  group, which is now practising'  under the leadership of Mrs.;  Ron Vernon. ' >,;  It is hoped that they wiflj  demonstrate some of their new;  singing techniques at the June;  meeting to he held oh Monday^  June 1 at 1:30 p.m. Hope wd  have a good turnout as this wilj,  be the last meeting until',  September.        ' �� j  Isn't Gibsons a beautiful ���;  place to live at this time of the\  year with all the flowering  shrubs, the wild cherries and ���  dogwood trees blooming, green \  grass everywhere, and especially !  Gibsons' Pioneer Park. Enjoy! \  Spring has sprung. 3 !  Police Ii  news !l  SECHELT RCMP ��;���  Police received a report of a;  prowler in the early mornin|;  hours in the Mission Point area I  last Saturday. '.; 1  On Friday, May 9, a worlij-l  shop was entered in We|!  Sechelt and a quantity o|!  mechanic's tools were taken, iri-j  eluding a large tool chest. Police',  are investigating. $ \  Police were called late Satuft ;  day, May 10, to Big Mac'^s j  Superette where a plate glass !  window was smashed. % \  A vehicle was entered or} 1  Francis Road and Hwy 101 in j  Pender Harbour. A tape decic j  was reported stolen. ��j  On Thursday, May 15, a j  residence in Selma Park was !  broken into and a stereo stolen;.' j  Crime    Ij  stoppers !���  Oh March 17, 1986 a red an! \  beige pickup pulled up to a \  residence at the foot of SoutI�� j  wood Road and Redrooffs I  Road. Two males got out an^l j  proceeded to load approximate- !  ly 100 to 150 red bricks int()  their truck. They drove off in sj  southerly direction. ^  Anyone knowing more corj*  cerning this crime please contact  the RCMP in Sechelt. Our fife  number: 86-0630. Coast News, May 19,1986  <..  Homes ���  Births  *-...lHl_��!f��_^J  **-      s/l  ' _J  ,3i..  .#?_��  ^y'$i?y  iW  "'^Uyh  Jtcwn'd.  _Bi_____ .^  Tr*v��l  *____��*  iF��_*_ffe..  t>;  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  Classifieds  at any of our convenient  Friendly People  ^.Property  Madeira Park Fisherman's one  bedroom condo on water, own  moorage, $49,900, boathouse  extra. Ph. 298-7400. #24  Gibsons waterfront, Marina view,  ideal retirement or vacation home,  self contained mother-in-law st.,  no yard maintenance, 618 Bay  Rd., $118,000 inc. most furn. &  appliances. 886-7559. #22  Lockyer Rd., 1700 sq. ft. 3  bdrm., 5 yr. old home on 5 acres,'  plus 1000 sq. ft. shop & 300 sq.  ft. c/port, wood/elec. heat, 2 lg.  greenhouses, $90,000.  886-9648. #21  Spacious 4 bdrm. house, 3 FP's,  2 baths, full bsmt., exc. cond.,  central loc, large ass. mtg.,  $78,600,886-7668. #21  Gibsons, beautiful 1700 sq. ft.  home on landscaped half acre,  close to school and beach, wrap  around deck, 3 fireplaces plus  wood stove in unfinished bsmt.,  large sunken living rm., family  rm., formal.dining rm., built in  vac, dble. gar. Must be seen.  $119,900:886-2982. #20  Births  ��� J  -IN  PENDER HARBOUR   Centre Hardware & Gifts 883-9914  John Henry's 883-2253  HALFMOON BAY-  '       ���  B & J Stbre 885-9435  SECHELT ������ ���  BoOkS & Stliff (Trail Bay Centre) 885-2625  The Coast News (Cowrie st) 885-3930  DAVIS BAY������-���-��� ������  Peninsula Market 885-9721  ROBERTS CREEK .  ,..;..   "  Seaview Market 885-3400  V\U GIBSONS  : ���-  RadlO Shack Sunnycrest Mall, 886-7215  The Coast NeWS (behind Dockside  Pharmacy) 886-2622  DEADLINE IS NOON SATURDAY  FOR MONDAY PUBLICATION  Born to Pat and Marylynn McConnell on May 10, 1986, a girl,  Christine Marie, 7 lb., 1 oz. Proud grandparents, Bob & Bonnie  McConnell of Gibsons & Mr. &<  Mrs. R. Schinkel of Ontario. #20  Quarry: Dylan is pleased to announce the arrival of his sister  Elyse Nichole, born May 8,  weighing 7 lbs. 12 oz. Special  thanks to coaches Aunty Susan,  and Irene, Dr. Berlin and the excellent nursing staff at St.  Mary's. #20  Obituaries  . V^-.^V'-^M  -_____!______. I  GALLIFORD: on May 10. 1986.  Ralph Edmond Galliford, aged 57  years of Vancouver, survived by  his loving family; his father, John  Galliford; sister Gwen Boyte and  family, all of Roberts Creek; his  two sons, Michael and Steve of  Vancouver. Memorial service was  held Thursday, May 15 at 1 p.m.  in the Kitsilano United Church,  2490 West 2nd Avenue, Vancouver. Cremation. Donations to  the B.C. Heart Fund would be appreciated. Arrangements through  First Memorial Services.       #20  Thank You  Three big thank yous to Andy's  Restaurant for the marvelous  salad for the party of the graduates of the aquaculture pro-  ��� gram. From Gill and the Gang.  #20  Many thanks to my friends Diana  and Sue for their kind and  thoughtful care, and my eternal  gratitude to Dr. Stan Lubin for  allaying my fears so successfully.  Thanks also to the nurses at St.  Mary's for their cheerful humouring of a somewhat apprehensive  patient and toJDr. Paetkau for his  skill - it doesn't hurt a bit! Dianne  Evans. #20.  We wish to extend'our sincere  thanks to our many friends &  neighbours who sent cards &  'words of condolence & kindness  shown us in the recent loss of our  beloved husband, father, grandfather & great grandfather,  Joseph Mitchell. Also sincere  thanks to Dr. Yaxley & Dr.  Berinstein, St. Mary's Hosp.  nurses & volunteers for all the  TLC given so willingly. Margaret  Mitchells, family; #20  South Coast  Ford  1985 CADILLAC  ELDORADO  Loaded - 12,000 kms  Absolutely Mint     ���  "Last of Its style .;  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  . 1 4' painted fruit cone sign. Wed.  on Dougal or Gower Pt. Rd.  Reward. 886-2937. #20  South Coast  ford      *  WANTED!!!  Good used cars  & trucks.  Trade or we pay cash!!  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  Found  On Hwy 101, Mulitcode pager.  Phone 886-2622. #20  Pets  __. Livestock  Horses for sale or rent.  Horseshoeing,' Western lessons,  tack, manure sales. 886-9470.  #21  1/4 horse X mare  886-2877 after 6.  and  filly.  #20  CANINE OBEDIENCE  And intruder awareness training.  Reg Robinson, 886-2382.    TFN  L    an              Music  ^/kjPMBBi______.^_._______-F  ������*. PIANO  TUNING  repairs &. appraisals  Ken Dalgleish  886-2843  Tama 8 piece drum kit, extras,  $1500.886-3748. #21  Guitar & music theory lessons.  Jim 886-2673 eves. #20  _���____,_. .? .  Drop off your classifieds at Centre  Hardware & Gifts ��� our "Friendly People  Place" in Madeira Park.  MC DONALD: passed away sud  denly on May 12, 1986, Con-,  stance Mary McDonald, late of  Sechelt. Survived by two sons,  Don of Surrey and Trevar of  Langiey; one daughter, Dianne  Cumberland t>f Richmond;  six  grandchildren; one sister Frances  Mason of Vancouver.  Funeral  service was held Friday, May 16.  in St. John's United Church,  Davis Bay. Reverend Stan Pinkerton officiated. Interment, Seaview  Cemetery. Devlin-Funeral Home,  directors.  Remembrance donations may be made to the Cana-.  dian Wildlife Federation,  1673  Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ont.,  K2A  3Z1;   or to  St.   Mary's  Hospital. #20  Personal  The Sunshine Coast News  reserves the right to classify  advertisements under appropriate headings and  determine page location.  The Sunshine Coast-News  also reserves the right to  revise or reject any advertising which In the opinion of  the Publisher is In questionable taste. In the event  that any advertisement is rejected the sum paid for the  advertisement will be  refunded.  Minimum *4** per 3 line Insertion.  Each additional line *1M. Use our economical last  week free rate. Pre-pay your ad for 2 weeks & get  the third week FREE.  THE FOLLOWING CLASSIFICATIONS ARE FREE  Birth Announcements, Lost and Found.  ��  No billing or telephone orders are accepted except  from customers who have accounts with us.  Cash, cheque* or money orders  must accompany all classified advertising.  NOON SATURDAY  jeuiuu me sum |juiu rur _n�� Jl_t 9    _-H__n___f___>  I     advertisement   will   be _^��i___J��*!2__i  refunded. '        -PfliOP- TO!  ^mmmimmimiimmmmmmwBMmuemmmvmwmiea  Please mail to:  w��mam to mmmrmoH  Please mail to:  COAST NEWS Classified. Box 460. Gibsons. B.C. VON 1V0  Or bring in person to one of our  J  friendly People Places listed above  Minimum *4m per 3 line Insertion.  I  Depression: Pharmacist reviews  symptoms and therapy Monday,  May 5, 7-9 p.m., Roberts Creek  Elementary. $2; pre-pay before  May 1; Continuing Education,  886-8841 or 885-7871, Loc. 27.  #21  When it's time to seek help with  your problems call Eleanor Mae  Counsellor Therapist. 885-9018.  #22  Alcholics Anonymous  883-9251, 885-2896, 886-7272,  886-2954. TFN  Dynasty Sailing  Lessons - Charters  Ken Collins, 886-8615  #20  Announcements  If someone in your family has a  drinking problem you can see  what it's doing to them. Can you  see what it's doning to you? Al  Anon can help. Phone 886-9826  or 886-8228. TFN  .10 :..or.> 11  aluminum  885-2339.  Wanted  ft.   fiberglass   or  boat,   seaworthy.  #20  Scrap, cars & trucks wanted. We  pay cash for some. Free removal.  Phone 886-2617. TFN  Male.'--cat, orange  neutered. 21/. yrs.,  clean. 883-9113.  &y white,  friendly &  #22  Free kittens, Siamese cross.  Phone 885-3522.    . #21  Impress your Expo visitors! Have  your dead car(s) removed FREE  by Garry's Crane Service.  886-7028. _", ' TFN  Fiberglass fenderto fit '68-73  Datsun 510, driver's side, new,  $60,886-7090. #22  Moving, must sell, furn. & misc.  items. Ph. 886-8224 aft. Tues.  May 20. #20  PHOTOGRAPHY  Complete dark room, $350 OBO.  885-9406. - #20  Double bed-chesterfield, good  cond., foam matt.. $130.  886-2382. y   .   #20  Mushroom   Manure,   $20/yd.;.  $2/bag; topsoil too; 72 Dodge  PU, $699. Ph. 886-7914.     #22  EXPO  FOAM  SPECIALS  at W.W. FOAM SHOP  ,46x72x2 ^Ifi^S'  '48x72x2 ��� %M  W.W. UPHOLSTRY &  BOAT TOPS  637 Wyngaert, Gibsons  886-7310  | YOUR COMPLETE UPH0UTI.Y CENTRE j  Onan electric plant, 4kw, low  time, ace. 886-7611, eves.,  885-5057. #22  T Fiberglass dinghy, $350; professional hair dryer in gold chair,  $106,886-7559. #22  Tools, tools, all kinds, all used,  A1 shape, moving, must sell,  cheap. 886-7559. #22  Table tennis table, $50; steamer  trunk, $50; mahog, organ, $75;  2-bed couch, $15; canopy, 'AT,  truck, $5; studio knit, mach.,  $50, as is; shot guns: $150;  303, $75; 22, $35.. 886-2311.  #20  72 Landcrulser wag., offers!;  10" Craftsman radial arm, $375;  Boys' small BMX bike w/train.  wheels, $30.886-8048.      #22  Belmont upright piano, exc. condition, $1500 (firm): 885-5690,  eves., 3-10 p.m. #22  Fresh or frozen prawns & shrimp.  886-7819, #20  Hosiery, 1 size fits all, (90-155  lbs.), $1.50 pr., $17.50 doz., 35  fashion colours. 885-5366.   #21  RHODODENDRONS & AZALEAS  Locally ; grown. ��� Local honey.  Roberts Creek. 886-2062.   . #20  ClaydbnRd., Garden Bay, cottage  on I.R. lease land; FP, $20,000.  [. 1-461-9.063, owner. #21  CHEAP FIREWOOD  $80 for 2 cords plus. 886-8251.  '.��������� -.>,-:'' m  1976 Chev. window van, good  ; cond.; power steering & brakes.  886:9050; #21  BABYSITTERS  i Get your name on the Babysitter  ! List, part of the Sunshine Coast  1 Home Business Directory, to be  i published June/86. Good for 6  ?mos. Only $7. Swell Publications.  885-3925; #21  Mike's Marine  3871 River Road  Ladner, Delta  946-9747 Yard  946-1744 Res.  New & Used  ��� Aluminum Cladding,  $1.50 per lln.lt.  24? &32V long sheets  ��� Gauge .04' nylon rope,  Vh" to 4", $1 per lb.  ��� Fish Netting, all sizes,  50�� lb.  ��� Electric Cable  ��� Tech, triplex & quadraplex  chain.  ��� Anchors, Bouys, Barges  ��� Bollards, Cleats  ���Pipe, Steal I Beam  ���Timbers, Pilings  ��� Lumbar, Plywood  Discover  the ALTERNATIVE  Alum  Gutter    59*/l.f  4" Brass House  Numbers  (special order only)  $4.19 63  ALTERNATIVE  Hey101, QftMM SSS-S2S4  : Krau toa SM Stff Smw  ELPHINSTONE  Secondary School  15 YEAR REUNION  1971 grads and non-grads  Sat, Aug 16 & 17, 1986  Please contact BY JUNE 30  Linda Hansch (Smld)  885-5690  Glanys McLeod (Hudson)  885-9868  Phyllis Crowston (Richmond)  885-4684  I���I���L LJ   _n  ���   r~i���i���i���i���i   i  M  :     m               ������ __  ���sC-  JO  I  i  I  I  I  I  I  I  8\     Weddings  & Engagements  ���6  C-  11  c     -       :  11  c            m:  zjojzz  :_x  11  CLASSlFiCATlOW: e.g. For Sale, For Rent, etc.  I  I  I  r  Mr. & Mrs. K. Schroers of Gibsons are pleased to announce the  marriage of their daughter. Kelora  to Tom Clingwall, son of Mrs.  Lorrie- Clingwall, Davis Bay on  May 17 at Gibsons Pentecostal  Church. #20  Phone us today about our  beautiful selection of personalized  wedding invitations, napkins,  matches, stationery, and more!  Jeannie's Gifts & Gems.  886-2023. TFN  Annual yard sale at Beemans opposite Rbts. Creek Picnic site, 10  a.m., May 24. #20  Huge yard sale, Hwy 101 near  traffic light & North Rd., furniture, lots of plants, washing  machine, clothes, -household  goods, Sat., May 24, 9-5; Sun.  May 25,9-12.     " #20  Giant multi-family garage sale at  Kin Hall, Dougal Park, Sun., May  25, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. No early  birds. #20  Boat trlr.; 9.9 0B; sofa & chair  cabinets; dresser; bed; Nat.  Geo's crafts; odds & sodds, Sat.  & Sun;, Sunnyside Dr., 9 a.m. -?  '��� ���   ,��� #20  Neighbourhood sale. Sat., May  24,10a.m., Shoal Lookout, Gibsons, "on the bluff". #20  Rickard's. . Velvet Rd. (off  Chaster), 10 a.m.-4p.m., May  24. Includes wine making supplies. #20  Yard sale, 10-4, 24 & 25, Pratt  Rd.,nearKearton. #20  Sun., Jun. 1st, 11 a.m. -?. 2  fam. rgar. sale, good qual. items  & bargains galore! 1177 Chaster  Rd., Gibsons, across st. from  Cedar Grove Elem. School. No  early birds please. #20  South Coast  *���':'    Ford    .'���?.  1980 FORD SUPER  CAB F250  V8 auto, camper special, very  clean  SAVE $$$  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281 /  Recliner rocker, green velvet,  exc: cone., $125.886-3707. #20  Windsurfer, complete, new condition, $900 OBO. 886-9386. #22  6 fir logs, 3 lg., 3 small, view on  S. Fletcher, best offer. Call John,  886-8344 eves. #20  7pc. din. rm. St.; '/.HPrnt. whl.  barr; gas BBQ & ace; rod, reel &  tack; tbl. lamps; med. chest;  14" ch. saw; lg. plants; shelv.,  42x77; pat. tbl. 886-9501.   #20  SUNSHINE COAST  HOME BUSINESS DIRECTORY  Only $30 (for 6 mo.), to advertise  your home based business in the  5th Ed. of this well established  bi-annual publication. Babysitters, $7. Pub. date, June '86.  Call Swell Publications now!  885-3925. #22  100 AMP electric service, $95;  Beta video movies, $19.50 ea.;  145 sq. ft. kits for gazebo, guest  cottage, greenhouse for $65 set;  20 Ib. prop bottles, $18 ea.; low  band tone voice pagers, $65 ea.  886-7311. #20  1 all purpose baby car seat, 1-20  lbs. 886-3985. #20  Single captain's bed with mattress, $250; single maple bed  with mattress, $150. 886-3714.  #20  Rebuilt   lawnmowers,   blade]  sharpening, repairs, alum. strm.  screen door, 2'8"x6'8", left hd.  open. Ph. 886-9590. #22  2-Chr-Bd,gd.cond. Vz pr., new  Imbr.;2x4-.8'&16'.2x8-10'&  16'; Big Mac mulcher. B&S 7  HP, '/. pr.; mn. & Idy. 5 spd."  bikes, Vz pr.; misc. 385-3635.  #21  Mushroom manure, $20/yd. Free  del. on min. orders, topsoil too!  Ph. 886-7914. #20  FOR EXPLOSIVE REQUIREMENTS  Dynamite, > electric or regular  caps, B'lifie E cord and safety  fuse. Contact Gwen Nimmo,  Cemetery Road. Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound Farmer  Institute. TFN  Satellite  Systems  SALES, SERVICE  &  SYSTEM UPGRADES  Green Onion  Earth Station  886-7414 884-5240  1977 % T. Chev. 4x4, new'  brakes, paint,  carb.,  muffler,  looks good, $2,800. 886-3095.  - _���������>'���;:��� ���: #21  79 Malibu Classic, 2 dr.. 305  aulo., PS/PB, easy on gas, ex-,'  cellent condition,. $3495'.  886-7090- ��� #22  75 Granada, 4 dr., V8 auto.,  PS/PB/PW. AM/FM. very good  condition, $1595. 886-7090. #22  1985 Ford Tempo, front w_ drive.  5 spd., like brand new.  886-9464. #22  1980 CJ5 Eagle, many options,  exc. cond. 886-2491. #22  14 ft. flatdeck, $400 OBO.  886-7377. '   TFN  73 Chrysler Newport, runs well,  $600 OBO. 886-7879. #20  1976 Austin Mini pump dodger,  only $1450.886-7311.        #20  1977 Ford F250 4x4, PS/PB,'  $3500 OBO.  Days,  883-2606;  evenings, 883-9602. #20  '69 Land Rover, SWB. good condition,, ready to go anywhere,  $1800. 885-7297 after 5 p.m.  #20  79 Ford F250T4X4. canopy. CB.  good condition, $5700. Ph.  886-3940. #20  South Const  Ford  1982 GMC  6.2 k Diesel  High Sierra, sun roof,  AM/FM cassette,  very nice condition  Wharf Rd., Sachalt  DL 5936 865-3281  71 & 73 Ford F250 % tons,  parts, $1 & up; '67 Chevy II,  $125 OBO. 886-8251. #21  '54 Chev. dump truck, $1000;  '51 Ford dumping flat deck,  needs work, $500. 885-3835.  77 Dodge van, V8, auto, PS, PB,  raised top, fully camp., good  cond., asking $5950. Ph.  883-2562 or 886-2402::      #21  W$.  Discover  the ALTERNATIVE  BEHRmf  Exterior Stains  $18_98/gal  6x8 tarps  s3.99ea  theUTERNATIVE  Hwy 101, ttttJioni S8S-3ZM  ���creti from Shtf Stlf Servt  _���_���_���__���_���___-_-__���__������_������  Deluxe swing set plus 11 ft.  slide. Sears Best, as new, cost  $470, sell $250. Ph. 883-2739  aft. 6 p.m. #20  Multicycle Inglis auto washer,  $295. Guaranteed & delivered.  883-2648. TFN  Super single waterbed with headboard, $215; Security.camper for  parts, best offer; camper jacks,  $75.886-7150. #20  T &SS0IL  Mushroom, manure, $25/yd.,  $24 for seniors. Cheaper by the  truckload. Steer manure now  available. Call aft. 6 or anytime on  weekends & holidays. 885-5669.  TFN  Cotoneaster ground cover. 4"  pots. 25 or more, $1 ea. Hedging  cedars, 3 varieties. Direct from  grower, 1 gallon size, min..order  25, $3 ea. with fertilizer or $4  planted. Free delivery locally.  B&B Farms, Roberts Crk.  885-5033. TFN  COAST COMFORT  Teas, herbs, sachets, potpourri,,  mulled wine spice, mineral bath  & more. Great gifts from $1.95 to  $3.95. Available at THE  -BOOKSTORE, Cowrie St.,  Sechelt, 885-2527 & other local  stores. TFN -  No matter what your home  business is, it is time to get your  advertisement into the 5th Ed. of  the well established bi-annual  Sunshine Coast Home Business  Directory Publication date June  15/86. For more info, call Swell  Publications 885-3925. #22  Autos  1975 Supercab Ford Vz ton  pickup, $400.886-3921.      #21  77 MGB convertible, 4 cyl., 4  spd., AM/FM, cassette, exc.  cond., new exhaust system, exc.  radial tires, great summer car,  asking $3900. 886-9761.     #21  74 Ford PU, flat deck, good con-  .dition, $500 OBO. 886-2974. #21  77 Dodge 318 PU, 4spd., 2 new  studded snow tires & wheels, will  trade alum, boat as part payment.  885-7738. #21  SUNSHINE  $99. -$1999.  AUTO & TRUCK  SALE  Saturday 25th May  1974 AMC Hornet 4 dr.      $99  1974 Plymouth Fury 2 dr. $699  1976 Mercury Rideiu  4 dr. $999  1977 Maverick 4 dr.       $1199  1975 AMC Gremlin 2 dr. $1999  1975 Firebird 2 dr. $1799  1976 Malibu 4 dr. $1999  1976 Merc. Monarch  2 dr. $1999  1978 AMC Matador 2 dr. $1999  ^MTRUCKS  1973 Ford Van  (partly camperized) $499  1974 Jeep 4x4 $1799  1975 GMC 3/4 Ton   . $1199  1976 GMC Jimmy 4x4 $1999  1978 GMC Jimmy 4x4 $1299  1975 Dodge  Ramcharger 4x4 $1999  1975 Ford Club Wagon $1999  1977 Ford Super  Cab P/U $1799  1977 Chev Van  (partly camperized) $1499  1973 Slumber Queen  8' Camper $1999  SUNSHINE  MOTORS ltd.  Used Car & Truck  Lot  DL 5792  Corner of  Wharf & Dolphin  Sechelt  1966 Mustang GT, Boss 302,  Holly carb.. headers, racing cam,  4 spd., Hurst stick shift, TA tires  on Gregor mags, new burg,  paint, black int., AudioVox  stereo,$6000. Call Jacques,  886-7067. #20  '82 Ford Escort, 4 dr., 4 sp.. ps  & pb. $4200. Between 12 noon to  5 p.m. 886-2433. 885-7450. #20  1978 Honda Civic, sunroof,  cassette, radio, good cond.,  $3000.886-3378. #20  74 VW Westphalia, sleeps 4.  clean, runs well, large tent attaching; $3400.886-2543.   #21 Coast News, May 19,1986  77 Maverick, body good, engine  needs work, $500. 886-7593.  #20  1978 Chev.  Impala SW,  well  kept, $3000 OBO. 885-7728. #21  1977 GHEVR0LET  CAPRICE 4 door, air conditioning, good family vehicle,  Michelin tires.  SKOOKUM DEAL $3995.  1976 VOLARE STN WGN  famous slant 6 cyl., automatic,  interior/ like new, excellent  tires, runs very well.  SKOOKUM DEAL $2495.  , ~ .;<_>|^<,.,,t  y, 1     . .      .     -      .  -. *  ��� .  _,>>  s *  * i  .4x4 Wood Truck  ��� Flatdeck Wood Truck  OPEN TO OFFERS  Don't forget that  LUBE/OIL/FILTER  More you set off on vacation!  COURTESY WASH & VACUUM  SUPER  ��5K0Dfl  NOW ON DISPLAY  .     IN OUR  MODERN SHOWROOM  Skookum  Autoi  INC.  SKODA  HIGGS MARINE  SURVEYS LTD  Insurance Claims  Condition and Valuation  Surveys  Phone 885-9425  or 885-3643  ���   SALES  SERVICE  ._.-���. est.-ias*.  OOD-3433      Dealer 8084  20.  Campers  Motorhomes  1976 20' Wilderness Travel trl.;  fully equip., very clean, $6000  OBO. 886-3386.        ,        #20  16 ft. camp, trlr., handyman  special, $400 OBO. 886-3147.  #20  10' camper with propane fridge,  stove, oven, heater, toilet, jacks,  sleeps 4, fits 3/4 ton, $1500  OBO, good' deal, must sell.  886-3896. #20  Bonair hard top camping trailer,  sleeps 6, clean, good shape.  $2300.886-9525. #21  28' Prowler trlr., very good  cond., rear bdrm., awning, lg.  fridge& stove. 886-9648.     #21  Marine  12' aluminum boat, $650; 3  horse outboard motor, $225; boat  trailer, $275.. Phone 886-7184  aft. 5 p.m. #22  16' Rivera Ski boat, 1983, 115  HP Evin., Pt., w/trailer, $4000  OBO. Call Joey, 886-3864,  886-7094. #22  20' deep V, FG weekender, stan-  dup head, 233 HP Merc.  883-2632. #22  19' aluminum work boat, 2 stage  steering & controls, rebuilt 360  Chrysler, T/2-1 gear. IV2" shaft,  18" stainless wheel, spare  wheels, shaft, rudder, 200  doglines, 4 swifter lines, towline,  076 Stihl. & misc. tools,  $14,000,885-3429. #22  8' fiberglass with 6 HP Evinrude,  $450. 886-3262, 885-9366. #22  ALUMINUM BOATS  Harbercraft 10'-14'  10", 56" beam '899  12", 58" beam '999  14*. 61" beam $1099  DINGHYS      horizon  fiberglass 8V2 rowboat   7, 8,  9& 10 cathedral hull style  JOHNSON OUTBOARDS  Check our special  discounts for cash  TRAIL BAY i SPORTS  7.-: ���'. Av\'   H1 r.nviirlP St.,  ��� Sechcit: ���'���;        ".85i-2S'i_..  Classic 25' 1961 Chris, very  good cond., many extras, needs  engine. $5000. 885-9435.    #20  14'/2' GlassCraft, new seats, full  vinyl top, trailer, 40 HP Evin.  w/low hours. $1800 OBO.  885-2394. #21  32 ft. alum, cabin cruiser, 225  Merc. I/O, 8 ft. dingy, radio,  sounder, many extras, on trailer.  886-9308. #21  38'3" Double ender, converted  fish boat, diesel powered, '_���  gal./hr., 180 mi. cruising range,  fir & cedar on oak ribs, no knots,  radio & other extras, needs appreciation & TLC. Call John,  886-8344. #21  South Coast  *-      Ford   '    \  1933 F250  SUPERCAB 4x4  XLT Lariat  V8, automatic,  1"owner, nice condition  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  OL 5936 885-3281  ���^ i, ^  15V2' Sangster Run-About, no  engine, best offer. Call John,  886-8344. #21  '20' Daysailer, n/motor, trlr.,  ready to go. 886-3962.        #21  13V2' ply-fib. boat, exc. cond..  many new parts, good solid boat.  883-2679. #20  Mobile Homes  12x60 Embassy, 4 appl., wood  stove, open to offers. 886-3962.  #21  LOW LOW INTEREST  1979 14x70, 2 bdrm;, 3 appl.,  china cab., acorn f/p. 886-8619.  #20  Mobile home space available.  Sunshine Coast Mobile Home  Park. 886-9826. TFN  South Coast  Ford       1  1981 MUSTANG  GHIA  6 cyl./automatic  p/s, p/b  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  Motorcycles  1976 Yamaha XS 650 motorcycle, good cond., $575, inc. extras. 886-8478. #22  1980 Honda XR75 dirtbike, c/w  helmet and bumper carrier,  $325. 886-3262, 885-9366. #20  '81 Honda Twinstar 200, exc.  cond.. low miles, no rust, stored  indoors, c/w helmet, $650.  886-2700.    . #20  1978 Yamaha GT 100, exc.  cond., $500 OBO.'885-9208 after  5 p.m. #22  '78 Kawi. 750, $1000.  886-3748. #21  Hondas: 81 400E, $850 OBO; 78  185 Twinstar, $650 OBO, exc.  cond. 886-2375. #20  South Coast  >.      Ford       >  1980 F250 4x4  SUPERCAB  Great work truck  $4995.  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  Wanted to Rent  3 bdrm. house in Roberts Creek  by small rel. non-smoking family.  Ph.aft. 6,885-2686. #20  Req. on long term, mod. 2 bdrm.  house for July 1, Sech. or Gibs,  area, with appls., carpets, etc..  by semi-retired cpl., careful  tenants, refs., rent neg.  885-4692. #21  Resp. gent, plans retiring to  Hopkins-Gibsons area. Seeks  small dwelling, preferably furnished, can do repairs or improvements. Please reply to Box  18, Granthams Ldg., VON 1X0.  #20  For Rent  2 bdrm. house with studio loft,'  June 1st, Davis Bay, $350.  885-3835 or 1-263-8918.     #22  2 bdrm. view, Granthams,  adults, no pets, referances,  $375.886-7204. #20  Avail.- imm., 2 bdrm. hse.,  Hopkins, view, 4 appl., bsmt.,  yr. rnd.. nr. ferry. 885-9553  eves. #20  Mobile home pad, Irwin Trlr.  Court, close to shopping.  886-3331. #20  Office space avail, imm. in  renovated office bldg. on Gower  Pt. Rd., adjacent Harbour Cafe,  rents from $150 - $250/m.  886-2281, 886-9213, days. #21  1, 2, 3, bdrm. apts., heat and  cable vision inc., reasonable  rents. 886-9050. TFN  South Coast  :kr-v Fo__- '������..,-.  1985 BRONCO II  V6, automatic,  1 owner, 12,000 kms  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281 /  Waterfront cabin, semi-  furnished, wood heat, 1 or 2  adults, ref. req., $250.  886-7247.' #20  ���June 1, Gibsons, 4 rm., 1 bdrm.,  lg. living rm., smart kitchen, appls., 1-2 adults, no pets.  885-2198. #21  Commercial  Mfg/repair shop area.for rent,  Gibsons area. Also secured  covered & outdoor storage space  avail. 886-8628. #20  Summer rental - furn. 1 bdrm.  w/f cottage, Mission Rd., June 1  - Aug. 30, quiet tidy person or  couple, $300/mo. 885-3618.#20  Bright, 3 bdrm. apt., Gibsons,  convenient area, 3 appl., $350.  886-8628. #20  Fishing at the front door, new  Seaview Apt. units avail. June 1,  water access, Seven Isles,  Madeira Park. 885-3910 eves.  #20  South Coast  ".      Ford  1980 CHEV  CITATION  V6, Standard Shift,  Nice Car  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  PL 5936 8853281      _/  Community Hall for rent in  Roberts Creek. Phone Debbie,  886-3994, 7-10 p.m. TFN  TEREDO SQUARE  Office space to lease, excellent  location, elevator service, 3rd  floor, view, carpeted, some space  can be subdivided and/or combined.  No. 1 - 390 sq. ft.  No. 2 - 1940 sq. ft.  No. 3 - 1015 sq. ft.  For information call 885-4466.  f "���     '     ',,'-.-.'::;:..;: ,. TFNL  Lower;Gibsons, 3-bdrrp. HS.-2.  bath, rec. room, c/port, F/S,  ref.,  avail.  Jun. i,   $450/m.  1-694-3519; #21  Commercial  Prime retail space - Gibsons area.  2500 sq. ft.. will divide to suit tenant. 886-8628.   .        .    #20  Office space for rent, 2nd floor  above Gibsons Building Supplies.  886-8141. TFN  F/TorP/T  Salesperson  Wanted  We're looking for a  well organized, detail-  oriented person with a  good sense of,  humour.  The successful  candidate will be  dependable, willing to  accept challenge, and  a team player.  Good communications  skills and willingness  to provide high level of  service to our  advertising clients is  essential.  Sales experience and  paste-up ability are  assets. Training  provided.  Must be motivated for  salaried sales  position.  Please reply to:  PAT TRIPP  COAST NEWS,  Box 460,  Gibsons, BC  ABC CASINO  Supply Co. will train black jack  dealers. For interview Ph.  886-3351 or 886-8201.        #21  Experienced dining room waitress  part-time wanted with some  bartending experience. Call  Creekhouse. 885-9321.       #20  Part-time waitress with bar experience & dishwasher. Please  come in person to Jade Palace .  Rest, from Tuesday to Saturday.  Work Wanted  -Wanted to Buy -  Standing timber. 886-3937. #20  Typing? - - Let our fingers do  your talking. Arbutus Office Services. 885-5212. #20  Our Business Is  ^cp    "BOOMING"  ��� FREE dead car removal  ��� Truss delivery  ��� Home of the TURF FAIRY  Think of ma when yoii nMd a lift  Garry* s Crane  Service 886-7028  Full-time work wanted for late  model 5 ton high side dump truck  w/24 cu. yd. cap. Collect,  294-2204. #20  Reliable rsas. carpenter, all work  guar., refs. avail. Kevin,  886-9070. #21  ���South' Coast  Ford       H  1983 RANGER 4x4  4 cyl./4 speed-  Nice Condition  Great Price  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  >- _-S  TREE TOPPING  Tree removal, limbing & falling,  hydro cert., insured & lowest  rates. Jeff Collins, 886-8225. #21   _*_   Good worker - lawns, gardening,  light maintenance, painting,  reasonable. Rick, 886-7531. #21  r-ELECTRICAL WORK*-.  Guaranteed  Master Electrician 886-7298  NO JOB TOO SMALL.  SAME DAY SERVICE  Additions,   Repairs,   Rewiring.  Lighting, Household Appliances and  Maintenance.    SENIORS DISCOUNT  CLEMENT SAWING SERVICE  Portable sawmill avail, to cut  channel or bevel siding, lumber  or beams. Small amount OK.  886-8218. ,       . #22  CARPET INSTALATION  Qualified carpet & lino instala-  tions. Call Bili, 886-8387.     #22  Exp. plumber needs work, old or  new jobs, reasonable rates.  886-9149. #25  Reliable carpenter, electrician &  plumber, 35 yrs. exp. Phone Tom  at 886-9316, 886-2922.       #22  1981 ESCORT  2 dr., 4 speed  .   Immaculate  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  Heavy duty tractor with rototilier  for hire, $30/hr., includes  operator. 886-9959. TFN  LAWN MOWING & TRIMMING  Have my own equipment.  886-7968. #20  Landscaping, garden maint.,  trees" pruned & sprayed. Get  ready now. 886-9294. TFN  BABYSITTING  AVAILABLE  Responsible 15 year old girl  will give quality care to your  infants,   tots  or  elementary  school kids - available after  school, eves., or .weekends.  Have 4 yrs. expy  - 52/hr. 'v*  If you  need  quality  care call  DANA at  886-2558  COAST NEWS  has an office in  The Bookstore  Cowrie St., Sechelt  885-3930  Notice to Creditors  and Others  NOTICE is hereby given that  Creditors and others having  claims against the Estate of  Elizabeth   Eugenia   Benson,  deceased,   who   died   on  February 28.1986. are hereby  required to send them to the  undersigned Executor at RR 4,  Gibson's,   British   Columbia,  VON 1V0, before the 20th day  of June, 1986, after which  date   the   Executor   will  distribute   the   said   Estate  among   the   parties   entitled  thereto, having regard to the  claims of which it has notice:  RUSSEL THOMAS NASH  EXECUTOR  BY: J. WAYNE ROWE  Barrister 4 Solicitor  RR 4, Gibsons, B.C.  VON 1V0  Notice to Creditors!  and Others     ^  NOTICE is hereby given that .  Creditors arid, others, having^  claims against the Estate of:  MARTHA   ORRE,   deceased ,|  who died on March 5th, 1986,|  are hereby required to send',  them to the undersigned.Ex-'  ecutor  at   RR  4,   Gibsons,^  British Columbia. VON 1V0,;;  before the 16th day of June,  1986, after which date the Executor will distribute the said.  Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to  the claims of which it has  notice:  TORUEFORRE  EXECUTOR  BY: J. WAYNE ROWE  Barrister & Solicitor  RR 4, Gibsons, BC  V0N1V0 .  South Coast  k      Ford       i  OVERLOADED!  We've got a huge inventory.  C'mon down,  Let's Make A Deal...  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3261  Powerful truck mounted  STEAM  CLEANING    <  equipment, for the ^  best possible     [fri  results!!!      ,  CHERISHED  CARPET CARE  886-3823  �� DIVISION Of ��N OEVRIES & SON' FIOCRCOVERINGS  Hardwood floors resanded arid  finished. Work guaranteed. Free  est. Phone 885-5072.  \  k.  'TFN  PEERLESS TREE \ \  ��    SERVICES! LTD:   I \  Topping-Limbing-Dangej.  tree  removal.   Insured, :_gu��Tran|eed  work. Free estimates, J85-2109.  Will do your garden, clean yard,  chop wood, other odd jobs,  $5/hr. 886-3149. #20  South Coast  _       Ford       3.  1977 CHRYSLER  VB^niofiifll^* ___ftition  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  \^ ,., PL 5936 885-3281  Young girl looking for part-time or  ^lirnmer work'.'' txperiencerj in  babysitting, cash-& 649,'.'refs.  available, '������ Superhost cert. Call  LQrenz.,.886-;9581.   . #21  Payment must be  received by  NOON  SATURDAY  to assure  ���    publication.  Enjoy the  Convenience  of  Phone-In  Classifieds  Now you can phone  us from anywhere on  the Coast and we'll  help you place your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIED  BY PHONE!  Call  885-3930  1 TO 4 PM  TUESDAY TO FRIDAY  Cowrie St., Sechelt  Help Wanted  Journeyman Electrician with Electronics Training & Experience.  School District 46 Maintenance  [Department has an immediate  opening for the above employee.  The position is five (5) days per  week, eight (8) hours per day,  and a typical distribution of time  would see 21/2 days spent repairing audio-visual equipment and  Apple computers, one day on fire  and intrusion alarms and. PA  systems and 1 Vi days on general  building electrical problems.  Training on computer repair can  be provided, but this applicant is  expected to possess the other  skills required.  Salary is at the tradesman's rate  in the contract with Local 801,  CUPE which is $14.53/hr. until  June 30, 1986.  Applications will be received by  the undersigned until Tuesday,  May 27th, and must provide full  details of training and experience  and at least two references who  may be contacted. Persons having an appropriate application on  file within the last six months will  automatically be reconsidered.  R. Mills,  Secretary-Treasurer  Box 220  Gibsons, BC VON 1V0  #20  Director Required  Wilson Creek' Family Centre requires a temporary director. This  position is being posted for the  period-July 1/86 to July 1/87.  The successful candidate will  have a wide range of experience  & education in areas including  family work, child care work,  community work, supervision of  staff team & administration. MSW  an asset. Send resumes by June  10/86 to: Wilson Creek Family  Centre, Box 770, Sechelt, BC  VON 3A0. #22  Driver Owner Taxi operators,  M/F, Pender Harbour, Sechelt,  Gibsons. Inquire 885-9509.   #20  We how accept  VISA and MASTERCARD  BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  ' Th��se Ads appear in the more than 70 Newspapers  of the B.C.. and Yukon Community Newspapers Association and reach 800,000 homes and * potential two million readers.  $119. for 25 words   ($3. per each additional word)  Call The at to place one.  AUTOMOTIVE  Where can you lease a truck  for only $119.97 per month?  Call R.C. Bell collect at  525-3481 or toll-free at ;1-  800-242-7757. DL 5674.  Lease 4x4 $244 per month!  Factory order to your specs!  Lease/buy car/truck-GM-  Ford-Chrysler-lmports. Call  Bob Robinson Toll-free ,1-  800-242-4416, DL 7836.  One hour credit approval!  Possible with our exclusive  Dial-A-Car and instamatic  credit program. Lease/ purchase with or without option, your choice. Harold  Pleus at Royal GM. 922-  4111. West Vancouver. D.L.  5534.  Ford Diesel and Gas Trucks.  Nothing down OAC with my  easy to own plan. Call Curly  464-0271 or toll-free 1-800-  242-FORD. DLS231.  Large selection used trucks.  Nothing down OAC with my  easy to own plan. Call Curly  464-0271 or toll-free 1-800-  1 242-FORD. DL5231.   Mitsubishi Diesel - cut that  . fuel bill in half and travel  twice as far. Will repower  pickups, tow trucks, campers & motorhomes. Recondition or used engines from  $1795. with overdrive transmission. Simpson Power  Product, 110 Woolridge St.,  Coquitlam, B.C. V3K 5V4.  1-520-3611.           Credit no problem. New  trucks from $199. per month. New cars from $179. per  month. Call collect 291-7761  for free credit check.  Take over payments, 86  F250 Super Cab XLT 6.9L  auto, $510. per month. Call'  collect 1-872-5162. Ask for  Bob Siska or Andy Jessa.  Take over payments. 86  Mustang LX 3.0L five speed  $298. per month. Call collect 1-872-5162. Ask for Bob  Siska or Andy Jessa.   "Drive-Bac" Plan. Make  your down payment at the  end of your purchase. Only  $99. delivery charge O.A.C.  Call Gary collect: 533-4701.  Langley's Rancho Hyundai.  D.L.7783.  .  No down payment necessary  to lease your Ranger Bronco  or diesel Pick-up. Large inventory; low rates. Immediate delivery. Call Jim Gau-  thler collect at 1-792-1361.  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES ,  Thriving Automotive Repair  Business in Fraser Valley.  Good repeat clientele.  Potential for expansion.  Grossing $380,000. yearly.  Suitable for individual or  partnership. $155,000.  Phone 1-859-3142 evenings.  Show me you're sincere & I  will show you how to earn  up to $5,000. per month.  Bob McKenzie, (604)922-  7095, #815 - 22nd St., W.  Vancouver, B.C. V7V 4C1.  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES  EDUCATIONAL  DryFry�� is High Profit.  French fries, more, without  deepfrying. CSA/UL approved low install venting,  insurance costs.' Portable  R.I.S. Food Systems Inc.  1-800-667-7464. Brochures.  Fastest growth business  currently on the market:  opportunity exists dealing  with the Hotel/Motel industry on an exclusive franchis-  ed basis. Immediate cash  flow; return of investment  in the first year. Contact  Doug or Norm at 681-6106  or write: Inn House Systems  1370-200 Granville Street,  Vancouver, B.C. V6C 1S4.  "Paradise'*.'- live and work  on a 40' luxury vessel in  Campbell River, B.C. Very  lucrative salmon fishing  charter business for sale.  Call Wayne. (604)286-6343.  Offering fully modern licensed restaurant in South  Okanagan. New equipment,  capacity 135, banquet facilities, non-smoking area.  $179,000. terms. Write Box  377, Summerland, B.C. VOH  120 494-1302.    Resort for Expo or early  retirement? Kamloops area.  Fully equipped log. Six acres. Six lakes. Six lbs. Rainbows. Picturesque, private.  Was $169,000. Now  $99,000 (604)376-7970.  Inventors you can profit  from your ideas. For free  information call Pacific Inventions Inc. at 1-604-684-  5030 or write: 704-1050 Har-  wood  Street,   Vancouver,  B.C. V6E 1R4.   Start small think big, guarantee yourself income for as  little as $150. investment.  Apply today: Forget-Me-Not  Lingerie, P.O. Box 87017,  North Vancouver, V7L 4L1.  929-7640.   BUSINESS PERSONALS  Want an inexpensive way to  start your own business?  Join with the fastest growing nutrition company in the  world! Call now. 421-5600.  Positivity Distributors Inc.  EDUCATIONAL          Auction School, 14th year,  1,200 Graduates. Courses  April, August and December. Write Western Canada  School of Auctioneering,  Box 687, Lacombe, Alberta.  TOC ISO. (403)782-6215,  evenings (403)346-7916.  Summer School of Sound -  1986. Enroll in our week  long intensive Sound & Recording Engineering Courses. Three levels, trade  school certified, tax deductible & very affordable.  Classes begin June 9th &  continue throughout summer. A sound reason to  come to Vancouver! Bullfrog  Recording School, 2475  Dunbar St., Vancouver,  B.C. V6R 3N2. 734-4617.  Free: 1986 guide to study-at-  home correspondence Diploma courses for prestigious  careers: Accounting, Atrcon-  ditioning, Bookkeeping,  Business, Cosmetology,  Electronics, Legal / Medical  Secretary, Psychology, Tra-'  vel. Granton, (1A) 1055  West Georgia Street #2002,  Vancouver. 1-800-268-1121.  Fraser Valley College offers  a two year diploma program  in Agriculture Production  Technology. Courses in production, agri-management  and marketing, prepare students for employment in  farming and agriculture services. Courses begin September 1986. Register now.  For further information  phone (Chilliwack) 792-0025  local 288.   FOR SALE MISC.  Buses for sale. 1966/1967.  Clean, some with A/C. Passed Alberta inspection,  available immediately. Call  Bob Findlay at (403)463-  7520.    Lighting Fixtures: Western  Canada's largest display.  Wholesale and retail. Free  Catalogues available. Nor-  burn Lighting Centre, 4600  East Hastings Street, Burnaby, B.C. V5C 2K5. Phone  1-299-0666.   Montreal Military Surplus:  Workshirts $2.75, workpants  $3.50, workboots $15. Handcuffs, bags, knives, parkas,  combat pants, etc. $2 for  catalogue (reimbursement  oh first order). Military Surplus, Box 243, St. Timothee,  Quebec. JOS 1X0.   GARDENING   10' x 10' Greenhouse $149.  1000W Metal Halide $175.  Plus 10,000 gardening, products. Great prices. Send  $2. for info-pack. Western  Water Farms, 1244 Seymour  Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6B  3N9 (604)682-6636.   Curved glass patio extensions starting at $970. Hobby greenhouses starting at  $549. Full line of greenhouse  accessories. Call B.C.  Greenhouse Builders toll-  free 1-800-242-0673 or write  7425 Hedley Avenue, Burnaby, B.C. V5E2R1.  Coming to Expo? Visit the  largest hydroponics store in  Canada. Just two blocks  from Expo. Western Water  Farms, 1244 Seymour  Street, Vancouver, B.C.  V6B 3N9. (604)6636.  HELP WANTED   Advertising person required  for weekly newspaper. Experience in sales, design,  layout and paste-up essential. Resume to Mountain-,  eer, Box 660, Grande  Cache, Alberta. TOE OYO.  HELP WANTED  Rock scalers, previous high  scaling experience, blasting  picket an asset. In and out  of town work. Reply Box  7268, C/O. North Shore  News, 1139 Lonsdale, North  Van, V7M 2H4.  SERVICES  NOTICES  Homecoming. Mission B.C.  July 26-27/86 Pioneer Days.  All former residents are invited to attend a reunion.  Meet friends and register at  Legion 10-5.  PERSONAL  Will You Enter? In Noah's  day eight survived. Only  Joshua and Caleb entered  the Promised Land. Today,  Are You Sure? Free Literature, Box 767D, Armstrong,  B.C. VOE 1B0.  Start something special with  Beginnings Plus introducing  singles 19 and over with  similar interests by phone.  Selective, reliable, safe, inexpensive.' Call 684-5855 or  931-5082 today!      Prestige Acquaintance Service is an introduction bureau for unattached adults  seeking lasting relationships. Successful, reliable,  selective. Call toll free 1-800  -263-6673. Hours: 9 a.m. to  7 p.m. ___  Singles-Line. An easy, fun  and affordable way for Singles to meet by telephone.  Ladies register free. Serving  all ages and areas. Call  1-681-6652.    Serious about losing weight?  Do It the safe, natural way.  Tried all the others? Then  call us now! Money back  guarantee!! Positivity Distri-  butors Inc. 421-5600.  Free catalogue of adult novelties, lotions, marital aids,  condoms and more! Prompt,  discreet service. Phone anytime to: 1-493-7767, or write  to Top Quality Supplies Ltd.  P.O. Box 940, Penticton,  B.C. V2A 7G1.   REAL ESTATE  For Sale by owner. 56 acres  view property, overlooking  Okanagan Lake. Subdivid-  able. Not in A.L.R. Write to  Box 1588, Fort Nelson, B.C.  VOC 1R0.   Three bedroom 2,720 sq./ft.  .8 acre, retirement, family  home. View, privacy, air-  conditioning, fireplace,  woodstove, patios, ./trees,  grapes, extras. $120,000.  494-1418. AS351 c/o Box  309, Summerland, B.C. VOH  1Z0.   40 acres/$18,900. Towering  pines, lofty peaks, spectacular views, good access, superb investment, excellent  recreation, secluded, terms.  Map & photo. Call (206)454-  1715. R.E.C.A.  Suffering an ICBC Personal  Injury Claim? Carey Linde,  Lawyer; 14 years, 1650 Dur-  anIeau, Vancouver, B.C.  V6K 3S4.:Phone 0-684-7798  for Free How To information: ICBC.Claims and A-  wards. "If you have a  phone you've got a lawyer."  Major persona! injury  claims. Joel A. Wener, Lawyer experienced in litigation  since 1968. Call collect 0-  736-8261. Free initial consultation. Contingency fees  available. 1632 West 7th,  Vancouver. ' '  TRAVEL '  "Summer Camp" - Register  now, three exciting - programs - horses, motorcycle,  sail boarding &.much more  - Call Circle "J" Ranch,  791-5545. 100 Mile House  B.C. "Free Transportation"  from most major cities.  Visiting Expo 86? Make our  home your home. 25. minutes to Expo site. Can accommodate couples-to large  families. From $45. double.  (604)272-1973.       Expo family bargain housekeeping suites. Kits beach,  sleeps four - six. Burnaby  suite sleeps two - six, seven  min. to sky train. Both  suites $20. person, children  $14/ea. 931-6634/435-0244.  Expo 86 deluxe bed &  breakfast accommodation,  double from $60. suites and  private rooms. Call Steppe  inns, your congenial hosts.  Call now 1-467-1748 or 1-  467-9247.        '  45 minutes to Expo, Bowen  Island, two bedroom cottage  plus bunk house, sleeps six  or more, treed grounds near  safe beach. $275. per week.  922-1111. -  Australia/New Zealand travel plans? Now you can call  free to ANZA Travel the  Down Under experts. Lowest fares, best planned trip.  Toll-free in B.C. 1-800-972-  6928 or 734-7725.  Explore the sunny Shuswap  with Explorer Houseboat  Rentals. Book now for the  ultimate houseboat, experience. Daily/weekly rates  available. For information  call (604)955-2235 or '675-  4355.   Vacation Kelowna! The  Highlight of the Okanagan.  Ask for your chance to win  up to $2,500. holiday cash.  Call toll free 1-800-663-4345  and Vacation Kelownal  WORK WANTED  Road Grader 1981 top condition 14 foot Mould Board  and Scarifiers. Looking for  summers work. Self contained accommodation. Will travel. Call 392-4704 or 243-  2279.  __:_*_qs-  ^_%W A fire last Thursday evening on Camellia Way off Skyline Drive in  the Gibsons Bay area saw a large shed damaged on the exterior, the  wood pile burned and smoke damage in the interior. Fire Chief  Randy Rodrigue told the Coast News that the fire is under investigation, but appeared to have started underneath the building.  - ���Ron Edmonds nhntn  Hiring program  The British Columbia and Yukon Regional Office of  Statistics Canada announced today, May 9, 1986 that hiring  of some 4500 Census Representatives for the region has been  completed.  Statistics Canada had previously announced that a large  percentage of these Census positions were targeted for a  Student/Youth Employment Program. As of April 29, just  over 2000 students/youths had been hired in B.C. and the  Yukon to conduct the 1986 Census of Pupulation.  The Census Representatives will begin training May 21,  and during the last week of May they will begin dropping off  Census questionnaires at every household in British Colum-  bia and the Yukqn.        '  ���  TENDERS FOR  ALARM MONITORING  School District 46 invites tenders for the service of  opeiating an alarm monitoring system in the School  District for the period July 1st, 1986, to June 30th, 1988.  A sample agreement can be obtained at the School  v.!f-'yBoar-d^ffice. :153*_S- Eletcher Rd.,; Gibsons, ._:'_.'  SEALED''TENDERS will be received by the undersigned  UP TO NOON, TUESDAY, JUNE 10th.  R. Mills, Secretary-Treasurer  Box 220  Gibsons, BC VON 1V0  Coast News, May 19,1986  ��� ?y,*'s" ./. % ',j&  17.  Continued from page 1  for  "Then   who's  pushing  it?" a woman asked.  "The provincial  government," said Gurney,  "who want to unload roads and  policing. They add some incen.  tives to make it look good for a  municipality."  And he added: "It's a lot  easier to structure a municipality with a special interest group  than a regional board. That's  what's really behind it. Some of  the business community and the  developers ran this thing  through."  The meeting ended with a  general assurance that nothing  would "run through" the lower  Coast so easily and president  Joan Mahlman's directive: "We  have to present both sides."  " The other side, according to  Jon McRae, wants to find solutions to problems which  Gurney's side hasn't the confidence to address. He said  Gurney's assumptions about  negotiating with the provincial  government are wrong. "If you  negotiate, you will make sure  the figures work."  He said restructuring could  solve many of the Coast's problems, which he ascribed to  poor organization. As he sees it,  local government administrators should be transferred  around the district to lend their,  particular expertise where it's  most needed. While areas surrounding the Sechelt and Gibsons cores would have representation inside the cores because  they share specific concerns,  Roberts Creek, Halfmoon Bay  and Area A would become a  "provincial district" where provincial bureaucracies would be  integrated in the district and so  the entire Coast.  "Let's put it all into one good  bureaucratic structure," he  said. "Keep the same people  and do it as a unit."  McRae is in fact talking  about a restructuring of the key  provincial government ministries. Asked if he was working  from precedent, he said, "No, I  thought it up myself...Pool our  resources and then turn to the  province to tell us how we tie.it  up.  "If the minister (of municipal  affairs) just stepped in and  assigned new boundaries - bang  - it would be done. Then someone needs to go in there and  negotiate, like Stan Dixon who  did a dynamite job."  But if just Sechelt goes and  "the job's done piecemeal,"  said McRae, "it will be terrible  : y- ~V.*;;  ~>r. ..... .. .__   -_Js... ___.. _,____. ______.> ^*,*����� .$^B^^fc'-^K_B��uN_j^ ������___��____[  ____. jBkH|a|,��a JKjHnM   '��� '*-___- _���__________*:________'_____PI _____  ". V  ^SVS^:^  ��� MISC SERVICES ���  310-20630  Mufford Crescent.  Langley.B.C.  SHOP: 534-0411  RES: 576-2685  T & G MOBILE TRUCK REPAIRS ltd  ��� Heavy Duty Tractor & Trailer Service  ��� Complete Engine Rebuild & Overhaul .  (Detroit, Diesel, Cat, Cummins) ��� Transmissions  ��� Differential ��� Modification  ��� Competitive Rates ��� All Work Guaranteed  6 Days a Week 24 Hour Mobile Service Available)  .MM  For further information call: 735-4193  Need this space?  C_ll  the  COAST  NEWS  .it   886.2622 or 885 3930  John CLYDE'S  Gov't C-rtllltd  Welding Service  ��� All types of welding Repairs ��� Fabricating  Specializing in Excavator Booms 4 Buckets  ^MOBILE FROM EGMONT TO PORT MELLON 883-2328./  25 YEARS PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE  AUTHORIZED DEALER  SOUNDERS ��� VHF RADIOS ��� MARINE ANTENNAES  Sunnycrest Mall arsons     886-7215  WEDDING ��� PORTRAIT  FAMILY ��� COMMERCIAL  Don Hunter  Photography  Box 1939; Gibsons 886-3049  We Come To You Anywhere On The Sunshine Coast  ROLAND'S-"  HOME IMPROVEMENTS LTD  ��� 5" Continuous aluminum gutters  ��� Aluminum soffits & fascias  ��� Built-in vacuum systems  le Vinyl siding 885-3562  ^MnR_________DHH-Bt��____i_____M____l_____^___________  9dm Hcovmm  Refrigeration &  Appliance Service  BACK AT PRATT RD. 886-9959  for  the  Coast.   Worst  thing  possible for the Coast."  He said he sees in Gurney's  and others' responses to the  issue "everyone fighting for  their territory and it's just sad.  Because those are the people  that can make this work. With  the ministry's help, we can do  it. If Gurney would just mellow  out a bit. Nobody's anybody's  enemy."  John Callan, who is an assistant deputy in the ministry, said  Thursday that in the event of a  Gibsons restructure it would be  provincial policy to discourage  the inclusion of Port Mellon.  The province has to protect industry, he said, from excessive  municipal taxation. He added  that Port Mellon would be too  far from Gibsons anyway to expect even a district town to look  after the roads there.  John Burnside, a former  fellow board member with  McRae, defended the regional  structure as "an effective  bulwark against tasteless and insensitive development." He said  the parochialism of .which  McRae accused Gurney was "a  conditioned reflex" based on  many developers' track records  of incompetence over the years.  "And any man with such a  touching faith in the provincial  government: you have to  wonder," he said.  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  at  B ft J Stor ���  in Halfmoon Bay  until noon Saturday  ���A Friendly People Mm  >'fw*/':  mym  '-?_____  o ..'*__.,*/'. .-*y "tPy&lzz&'J^te  VERTICAL  ��� mltti Mlnitm  *      ���������-  . . ..���', *A<  micro blinds + pl*mtm<t mhmdvt  l~ FREE DRCORATO��  SUREWAy BLINDS  _^/-.__'<- -Vi ; ;'"*3 .  KENDALL AGENCY LTD  886-3932  School District No. 46 (Sunshine Coast)  FOR SALE BY TENDER  School District 46 has available for sale by tender the  following:  ��� One only 1978 Toyota Pickup truck - as is. where is.  This vehicle is considered to be not roadworthy. It is  to be removed at bidder's expense. Unless a  Mechanics Certificate is provided the vehicle must be  towed away.  ��� One only Ride-on Lawnmower - age unknown, parts  only.  ��� One only A.B. Dick Model #326 Tabletop Offset  Printer.  These items may be viewed at the Maintenance Shop,  North Road/101, from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.  SEALED BIDS will be received UNTIL 3 p.m. on  FRIDAY, MAY 30th. The highest or any bid is not  necessarily accepted.  R. Mills  Secretary-Treasurer  Box 220  Gibsons, BC VON 1V0  ��� AUTOMOTIVE ���  ��� CONTRACTING ���  NEED TIRES?      Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  TIRE & SUSPENSION  CENTRE  886-2700      886-8167  Hwy. 101, just West of Gibsons  LEANING SERVICES ���  /"SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon to Ole"s Cove  Commercial Containers Available  V 885-9973 886-2938^  ��� CONTRACTING ���  Swanson's  Ready Mix Concrete Sand & Gravel(  Dump Truck Rental  Formed Concrete Products  V Phone 885-9666 ��� 885-5333,  RENO VA TIONS  by  GEOFFKELSHAW  885-5903 ��� 886-8399  ROOFING  FREE  .^  ESTIMATES  Specializing in all types of  commercial & residential roofing  886-2087  eves.  ALL WORK  GUARANTEED  POMFRET  CONSTRUCTION  For all aspects of  residential & commercial construction  885-9692  P.O. Box 623. Gibsons. B.C.  22 BC FGRRIGS  v Schedule  VANCOUVER-SECHELT PENINSULA  HORSESHOE BAY-LANGDALE  SPRING '86  Effective Thursday, May 1,  through Thursday, June 22  JERVIS INLET  EARLS COVE-SALTERV BAY  Lv. Horseshoe Bay  7:30 am 5:30 pm  9:30 7:25  11:30 9:15  1:15pm 11:15*  3:30  Lv. Langdale  ��� 6:20 am  8:30  10:30  12:25 pm  2:30  4:30 pm  6:30  8:20  10:15*  Lv. Saltery Bay  5:45 am  7:35  9:15  11:30  1:30 pm*  3:30 pm  5:30  7:30  9:30  11:15+  Lv. Earls Cove  6:40 am  8:20  10:30  12:25 pm  2:30*  4:30 pm  6:30  8:30  10:20  12:15 am+  * Sailings on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Holiday Mondays only. (Monday.  May 19 and Monday. October 13,1986)  IMINI-BUS SCHEDULE!  Scheduled sailing May 16 to 19 and October 10 to 13,1986, only.  + Scheduled sailings on Fridays, Saturdays. Sundays and Holiday Mondays only  (Monday, May 19 and Monday, October 13,1986)  Leaves Sechelt  for Gibsons  The Dock, Cowrie Street  Monday  8:40 a.m.  '10:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  ' 3:15 p.m.  Tuesday  8:40 a.m.  10:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  2:30 p.m.  Wednesday      Thursday  8:40 a.m.  '10:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  ' 3:15 p.m.  8:40 a.m.  '10:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  2:30 p.m.  Friday  8:40 a.m.  10:00 a.m.  3:15 p.m.  Leaves Gibsons  for Sechelt  Lower Gibsons.1  Municipal Parking Lot,  Gower Pt. Rd.  9:15 a.m.  10:45 a.m.  1:35 p.m.  4:00 p.m.  LOWER ROAD" route  9:15 a.m.  11:45 a.m.  1:50 p.m.  ' 4:00 p.m.  9:15 a.m.  '10:45 a.m.  ' 1:35 p.m.  4:00 p.m.  9:15 a.m.  11:45 a.m.  ' 1:35 p.m.  ' 4:00 p.m.  9:15 a.m.  10:45 a.m.  4:00 p.m.  via Flume Road. Beach Avenue & Lower Road  ��� EXCAVATING ���  ��� HEATING*  SUNSHINE KITCHENS  - CABINETS >  886-9411  Showroom: Pratt Rd. & Hwy. 101  Open: Sat. 10-4 or anytime by app't. j  (    JANDE EXCAVATING  Backhoe       Sand & Gravel  Bulldozing    Land Clearing  Drainage  RR. 2. Leek Rd. _,��� ^ __ _  ..Gibsons, B.C. VON i vo S86-9453  Dump Truck  Excavating  joe & EDNA  BELLERIVE.  V.  ICG LIQUID GAS  ��� Auto Propane  ��� Appliances  ��� Quality B-B-Q's  885-2360  Hwy 101, across St.  from Big Mac's, Sechelt  EL_.GJH!l__L_i^  886-7359  Conversion   Windows,   Glass,  (_>  \-urii_e.ra>_Ufi    tfiriM __��_. >     __���--��  Auto  &  Marine Glass, Aluminum Windows  Sr ^rreens Mirrors  & Screens, ^ ^ & ^ R��  iouis   I  ���ors     J  rCHAlNSAWS^  SALES & SERVICE  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER &  CHAINSAW LTD.  HWY. 101 & PRATT RD.   886-2912  TARSUS  ENTERPRISES,,,,  ��� Machine Work  ��� Screened Topsoil  24 hour message  883-9949  Need this space?  Gall  the COAST NEWS  ���...���'.������'���'.'  . .it  886 2622 or 886;3930   .    : 18.  Coast News, May 19,1986  ������; I  . ��� i  f ��  /  .. v  On aquaculture, with government  Regional directors agreed  that a meeting held last week  with officials of the Ministry of  Lands, Parks and Housing in  the regional board offices had  gone some considerable way to  dispelling some misconceptions  on the part of the Ministry, concerning the regional board's attitude towards aquaculture.  The delegation from the  ministry was led by H.K. Boas,  manager of Land Administration.  Area A Director Gordon Wilson, in whose jurisdiction the  great majority of fish farms lies,  told the regional board at last  week's planning meeting that  the ministry officials left the  meeting convinced that what the  regional board has been saying  has some merit.  "Boas and Butler entered the  meeting convinced by 'voices  out there'," said Wilson, "that  this board was opposed to  aquaculture and wanted it off  the Sunshine Coast. When they  left they realized that what we  On commercial property  Water rates still an issue  At a Public Utilities Committee meeting held on May 15,  Director Gordon Wilson tried  to raise the subject of the controversial water rates and metering policy for commercial premises which has long been a  bone of contention within Sechelt. '  "It would appear that current  policy is perceived by a significant minority as to be a serious  inequity. The Ministry of Municipal Affairs has questions  about this policy. It is not apparent to me that there is no inequity."  Regional Board Chairman  Jim Gurney defended the present policy.  "We cannot make distinction  between vacant and non-vacant  buildings," said Gurney. "The  user can apply for disconnec  tion. No jurisdiction operating  in B.C. operates by recognizing  vacant and non-vacant buildings. It could not be policed."  Gurney said that the badgering of the Minister of Municipal  Affairs by local taxpayers is  holding up the modified by-law.  "If the amended by-law is  delayed further," said Gurney,  "inequities will continue."  Wilson's attempt to get a  review of the matter failed to  win the support of his fellow  directors.  Cat killer prowls  At least 25 household cats  have been found dead in Area E  and Joan Mahlman told the  Coast News that people are starting to get worried that a child  might be next.  Poison is believed to be the  most common cause of death  and one woman has sent her  cat's body to UBC for an  autopsy. Other cats have been  found with their backs broken  and one has been shot, said  Mahlman, as the incidents have  spread in both directions from  Pratt Road, and gone as far as  Gospel Rock and Malaview.  The RCMP have been  brought in to the case, said  Mahlman, who is hoping that  the autopsy results expected  soon will increase concern for  what is happening.  3  o  Save  SIMMONS  Sleep  PRICE  ROOM SUITES  Canapar  9 pc. DINING ROOM SUITE  Oak veneers & wood solids, MSL $5995  Embassy  5 pc. CHROME SUITE  Grey finish, MSL $899  Embassy  5 pc. CHROME SUITE  Almond finish, MSL $899  sales2995  SALES469  SALES469    j  o  o  Q  Selig  LEATHER SOFA  Taupe, MSL $1999  Selig  LEATHER LOVESEAT  MSL $1789  SALE $1695  (As advt. by  the Bay)  SALE S1495  Fame  SOFA & CHAIR SQQft  Grey on Off White, MSL $1189 SALE *0_��0  Fame  SOFA only, MSL $799  SALES639  Alan White by Kroehler  SOFA, LOVESEAT, CHAIR &  OTTOMAN  Sand w/burgandy & wine, SOOifl  MSL $3999 SALE*2!o4_S  Whirlpool  WASHER/DRYER  WASHER has 2 speed - 4 cycles &  4 water temperature selections  DRYER has auto dry - 3 cycles  and 3 temp, selections  ���10.48SI  Whirlpool  DISHWASHER  $R7fi88  built-in      VI O  Whirlpool  REFRIGERATORS  Frost Free, 17.1 cu. ft.  S98888  <__i-  home  J F|li.msiiiiiqs^  Sexiview Pliuie; Gihsor. s       886-8886 f^tfy  Tues.^Thurs 9:30-5:30  Fri: & Sat. 9:30-9.00  Sti'n, & Mon.    Closed  iM StORE fiNANClNG  .AVAILABLE O.A.C  are saying is that there are a  finite number of possible sites  and that we are asking for orderly development. We are suggesting a responsible approach  to a responsible industry."  The discussion centred  around the identification of  areas of high conflict with  residential property, medium  conflict and no conflict. The  Ministry of Lands, Parks and  Housing will prepare maps.of  such areas for the Minister's  perusal by June 15.  To drive home the point that  they were not opposed to aquaculture, only to the misguided  and unregulated approach to  the industry which brought it into conflict with residents and  gave it a bad name, the directors  voted again to pass a resolution  that they were in favour of the  orderly development of the industry and so inform the Minister in writing.  The usual prize of $5 will be awarded the first entry drawn which  correctly locates the above. Send your entries to reach the Coast  News, Box 460, Gibsons, this week. Last week's winner was Aaron  Hamilton, R.R. 1, Mason Road, Sechelt, who correctly located the  safety sign at the Canfor Mill, Port Mellon.  NO RAD TOO BIG OR SMALL -  WE DO 'EM ALL!  FROM SMALL TUBE LEAKS TO  SKIDER RAD REC0RES  SERVICE  BODY SHOP  AUTO BODY  REPAIR &  PAINTING  Come on in and get it  straight with the  ultimate frame machine:  Call RICK PEARSON manager  today for FREE ESTIMATES/  %  Financing  0 OAC.  to choose from on display now  LIMITED TIME OFFER  ENGINE SHAMPOO with every  lube-oil-filter service or minor  tune-up until Friday, May 23, 1986  /  i 18.  Coast News, May 19,1986  ������; I  . ��� i  f ��  /  .. v  On aquaculture, with government  Regional directors agreed  that a meeting held last week  with officials of the Ministry of  Lands, Parks and Housing in  the regional board offices had  gone some considerable way to  dispelling some misconceptions  on the part of the Ministry, concerning the regional board's attitude towards aquaculture.  The delegation from the  ministry was led by H.K. Boas,  manager of Land Administration.  Area A Director Gordon Wilson, in whose jurisdiction the  great majority of fish farms lies,  told the regional board at last  week's planning meeting that  the ministry officials left the  meeting convinced that what the  regional board has been saying  has some merit.  "Boas and Butler entered the  meeting convinced by 'voices  out there'," said Wilson, "that  this board was opposed to  aquaculture and wanted it off  the Sunshine Coast. When they  left they realized that what we  On commercial property  Water rates still an issue  At a Public Utilities Committee meeting held on May 15,  Director Gordon Wilson tried  to raise the subject of the controversial water rates and metering policy for commercial premises which has long been a  bone of contention within Sechelt. '  "It would appear that current  policy is perceived by a significant minority as to be a serious  inequity. The Ministry of Municipal Affairs has questions  about this policy. It is not apparent to me that there is no inequity."  Regional Board Chairman  Jim Gurney defended the present policy.  "We cannot make distinction  between vacant and non-vacant  buildings," said Gurney. "The  user can apply for disconnec  tion. No jurisdiction operating  in B.C. operates by recognizing  vacant and non-vacant buildings. It could not be policed."  Gurney said that the badgering of the Minister of Municipal  Affairs by local taxpayers is  holding up the modified by-law.  "If the amended by-law is  delayed further," said Gurney,  "inequities will continue."  Wilson's attempt to get a  review of the matter failed to  win the support of his fellow  directors.  Cat killer prowls  At least 25 household cats  have been found dead in Area E  and Joan Mahlman told the  Coast News that people are starting to get worried that a child  might be next.  Poison is believed to be the  most common cause of death  and one woman has sent her  cat's body to UBC for an  autopsy. Other cats have been  found with their backs broken  and one has been shot, said  Mahlman, as the incidents have  spread in both directions from  Pratt Road, and gone as far as  Gospel Rock and Malaview.  The RCMP have been  brought in to the case, said  Mahlman, who is hoping that  the autopsy results expected  soon will increase concern for  what is happening.  3  o  Save  SIMMONS  Sleep  PRICE  ROOM SUITES  Canapar  9 pc. DINING ROOM SUITE  Oak veneers & wood solids, MSL $5995  Embassy  5 pc. CHROME SUITE  Grey finish, MSL $899  Embassy  5 pc. CHROME SUITE  Almond finish, MSL $899  sales2995  SALES469  SALES469    j  o  o  Q  Selig  LEATHER SOFA  Taupe, MSL $1999  Selig  LEATHER LOVESEAT  MSL $1789  SALE $1695  (As advt. by  the Bay)  SALE S1495  Fame  SOFA & CHAIR SQQft  Grey on Off White, MSL $1189 SALE *0_��0  Fame  SOFA only, MSL $799  SALES639  Aian White by Kroehler  SOFA, LOVESEAT, CHAIR &  OTTOMAN  Sand w/burgandy & wine, SOOifl  MSL $3999 SALE*2!o4_S  Whirlpool  WASHER/DRYER  WASHER has 2 speed - 4 cycles &  4 water temperature selections  DRYER has auto dry - 3 cycles  and 3 temp, selections  ���10.48SI  Whirlpool  DISHWASHER  $R7fi88  built-in      VI O  Whirlpool  REFRIGERATORS  Frost Free, 17.1 cu. ft.  S98888  <__i-  home  J F|li.msiiiiiqs^  Sexiview Pliuie; Gihsor. s       886-8886 f^tfy  Tues.^Thurs 9:30-5:30  Fri; & Sat. 9:30-9.00  Sti'n, & Mon.    Closed  iM StORE FINANCING  .AVAILABLE O.A.C  are saying is that there are a  finite number of possible sites  and that we are asking for orderly development. We are suggesting a responsible approach  to a responsible industry."  The discussion centred  around the identification of  areas of high conflict with  residential property, medium  conflict and no conflict. The  Ministry of Lands, Parks and  Housing will prepare maps.of  such areas for the Minister's  perusal by June 15.  To drive home the point that  they were not opposed to aquaculture, only to the misguided  and unregulated approach to  the industry which brought it into conflict with residents and  gave it a bad name, the directors  voted again to pass a resolution  that they were in favour of the  orderly development of the industry and so inform the Minister in writing.  The usual prize of $5 will he awarded the first entry drawn which  correctly locates the above. Send your entries to reach the Coast  News, Box 460, Gibsons, this week. Last week's winner was Aaron  Hamilton, R.R. 1, Mason Road, Sechelt, who correctly located the  safety sign at the Canfor Mill, Port Mellon.  NO RAD TOO BIG OR SMALL -  WE DO EM ALL!  FROM SMALL TUBE LEAKS TO  SKIDER RAD REC0RES  SERVICE  BODY SHOP  AUTO BODY  REPAIR &  PAINTING  Come on in and get it  straight with the  ultimate frame machine:  Call RICK PEARSON manager  today for FREE ESTIMATES/  %  Financing  0 OAC.  to choose from on display now  LIMITED TIME OFFER  ENGINE SHAMPOO with every  lube-oil-filter service or minor  tune-up until Friday, May 23, 1986  /  i _ -a*-, .��� ^���~, st^-^tymjv-rfr-  The Sunshine  ^.'i.*^^_^^S__v  Published on the Sunshine Coast  May 19, 1986  >tf\S>-��W     *   ��*..��*  .S__*  S -  _3P��\^*J  GIBSONS  CENTENNIAL  Celebrating 100 years of Growth  May 24th,  1886 to 1986  At left:  Our Founder, GEORGE GIBSON  *-=  8.    ��ss*  *.__.*��_ �� ����� -�� ���  _.   t .,    V '    *       I Coast News Centennial Supplement, May 19,1986  CHARLOTTE GIBSON  GEORGE W. GIBSON  Arrival at Gibsons Landing  by John Burnside  Late one evening in May, 1886, an 18-foot boat dropped her sail and  anchor off Keat's Island, Howe Sound.  It was the Swamp Angel, and had been built by George Gibson at  Oyster Bay, Vancouver Island, and he with his two sons, George W.  and Ralph Henry, were on their way to the Fraser River, where they  had a job of building to do for Dan Woodward.  George Gibson looked westward, shading his eyes against the setting  sun, and what he sawpleased him..Theyjowed aCTpssTand thel57 yiear  old pioneer stood upon the shore of what was soon to become Gibsons  Landing. He entered in and possessed the land.  "This is the place I want," he said, and he never changed his mind.  When Gibson and his sons drove the stakes into their selected  holdings, he was launching into a pioneer life at an age when most men  would be thinking of retiring, or at least, staying in the place where they  were established.  But not Gibson. The tall, vigorous man had a good many days' work  left in his frame, and another quarter of a century - to be exact, another  27 years were to pass over his greying head before he was laid to rest in  the little private cemetery of the Gibson family, behind the United  Church, which the pioneer himself built.  It was not strange that George Gibson's restless spirit should seek out  the almost unknown country and try his luck in new ventures. The roving spirit in those who look toward far horizons was in him from his  youth up.  Born in Lincolnshire, January 31, 1829, he was entered on the rolls  of the Royal Navy at the age of 12, ait a time when ships were under sail,  and strongly reminiscent of the sea writings of W.H.G. Kingston.  He was a lieutenant when Jie was placed in charge of a boarding party when it stormed a wanted yessel .lying at anchor off the coast of  Spain. The tars boarded in'tKe- good old style,- cutlasses between their  teefh;and taking the crew by surprise; quickly subdued them. Lieute  nant Gibson had the task of taking the prize back to England, for which  he received a medal.  This, and the record of his sea life, was unfortunately destroyed in a  fire at Gibsons, and the family today have but a hazy recollection.  West Was Far Horizon to Be Investigated  His naval service over, he erriigrateid to Canada. Later he married  August Charlotte Purdee at Bay Cityr Michigan, and lived there for a  time, but finally moved to Chatham, Ontario, where he was a market  gardener. But the west was being talked about, and for Gibson it was a  far horizon which had to.be investigated. .-'.'���' \  They headed for Victoria, via San Francisco, in 1885, and located at  Oyster Bay, where work was to be found in a lumber mill. It was there  he built his boat, and started out on that voyage across the Gulf which'  was to end for him his search for his last home.        .' "  Meanwhile, having staked their land, the Gibsons proceeded to Van-  ; couver, did the Woodward job, artd went through the experience of the  great fire of 1886. Gibson took a hand in building the first wharf there,  with his son George helping, while Ralph drove a stage from New  Westminster for a time.  Other jobs followed, one being building scows for Morrison Bogg. In  between these activities George built his house at Gibsons and commenced clearing the land. Then he and his family, who followed him  from the east, settled down.  George William Gibson, coming of good old Lincolnshire stock, was  not content with-looking for his own material advantage.  He took part in the life of the growing village and gave his services in  the interests of the coming generation. He served as postmaster, also as  magistrate for 25 years. In addition he had a place on the first school  board. '  They buried him, this grand old man and pioneer, ex-naval officer,  and worker, in the little'cemetery not far from where he first set foot on  the sfiore, full of years and honour, in 1913. He died July .11. His wife  had predecea^d.h.in} three years previously. _:;:.-_���=__<__ jSSE  Coast News Centennial Supplement, May 19,1986  3.  Stein  ntiferremem  by George Cooper, 886-8520  The black cat sits solemnly, watchful-at the door of Herb arid  Dorothy Steinbrunner's -back  porch. And nearby in the woodshed rests Herb's 14 foot carvel  boat, its Briggs and Stratton  engine stored in the basement.  "I used to catch about 2000  pounds of salmon every year.  That's not recently. How? Trolling. Always trolled and that little  engine ran at just the right speeds.  But you know it was hard to give  the salmon away.  "That black cat at the door is  one of two I carved from a yellow  cedar round," Herb said, "and the  other was-taken, from-my front  porch by somebody who didn't  ask if he could have }t.  "I got to carving years ago when  I was working for some people..  who were summering on Hermit  Island. One of the kids wanted a  toy canoe so I started whittling one  with my pocket knife."  Herb went on, "But with their  noses right in line with my knife  blade as I whittled, I had to wait till  later to do it. Then, to be fair, I  made a canoe for each of the  three!"  Herb's knife and chisel have  turned out many canoes since,  some; as detailed lamp stands.  He has carved patterned walking %, sticks. "Twenty-one  altogether. I still have one or two  in the house. Used alder or yellow  (cedar, and one in holly.  Herb said, "I need a stick now  j as my legs aren't so good. But I'm  89 now and my birthday comes  j round again on December 1."  Herb has a set of photos of his  j collection  of carvings which he  proudly shows his visitors. The  [photos   show   his   handiwork  -animals, people, a wooden chair  -in splendid array..  "Mary Christmas of Roberts  j Creek is a very good phpto-  jgrapher," said Herb, and added,  ["My granddaughter, Dawn, is go-  ling to get the carvings because she  Isaid she'll look after them."'  Herb was a logger practically  Jfrom his childhood until he was in-  ���jured when he was 27 or 28; He  Igrew up on the family homestead  ���at the old S-bend, where the Sun-  [shine Coast Mobile Home Park is  inow.  "When a lad was a little taller  [than the can of oil or grease for the  |skid road," said Herb, "he was  ready to start logging."  Herb handled many a length of  sight to 12 foot diameter logs.  "I've hauled them out with cattle which were trained to the yoke,  jnd with horses, and with  [donkeys'."  Herb   has   a   photo  showing  limself and the rest of the crew sit-  Pioneer  Herb  Steinbrunner  relaxes  at  home  with  his  memories and his carvings. ���Brad Benson photo  ting atop>Jog about eight feet  across that vvas loaded on an  eight-wheel wagbn. "It was my job  to load those big Ibgs with block  and tackle. \ -���' ���  "Accidents \were common,"  said Herb. "When I\ got that  broken hip, it took me five years to  recover. \  "Cutting firewood one day, I  chopped my thumbs off J' Herb  said, "and a fellow pat it back in  place and wrapped it up. When,  the doctor saw it a few days later ^  he just changed the bandage.  "It healed on/' said Herb, "but it .  didn't work like a thumb should.  Found out I couldn't milk cows  anymore."  Herb and Dorothy have lived in  Gibsons on the same lot on Fletcher, and School for the past 51  years - all their married life.  "Not the same house. We built  this later when Charlie Hoslam  milled the lumber for it at his place  at Wilson Creek. It cost $300  then." \  Herb said, "We chose this site  for the view, but the trees on the  lots belbw have grown and cut off  ithe view of the harbour."  Time hangs a little heavy for  Herb now - he has always had  some project to work on. "I tried  to work bri that Briggs and Stratton the other day but I had to give  ;_t up.".;'.'  There are some happy recollections, however, when he opens  his photo album to show a visitor.  There's his first cougar when he  was still a boy.  "That one was a sheep killer,"  he said. "My old dog, deaf as he  was, got him treed in a little green  cedar. Got 13 cougars altogether  by the time I was 19."  Herb said there was a time  when he didn't expect to reach the  age he is now.  "30 years ago several heart attacks laid me up. I was told my  heart was an odd shape but if I  took great care and rested I might  last two years more.  "Well," said Herb, "I got tired of  sitting around and. went out and  dug the garden. Then I went  fishing. Some years later I read  that was the best thing I could  have done."  Gibsons Landing, about 1912. A portion of the original  George Gibson building on the site of the present Molly's  Reach appears to the left of the public wharf, which had  been in place for a decade. F.W. Grantham's real estate office sits at the foot of School Road. The Methodist church  occupies what will become Pioneer Park. W.W. Winn and  son Harry have just acquired the store and house, at centre,  from James Chaster, who had contracted the Charnberlin  brothers with their splendid horses to clear the property.  Joseph Boyd has sought the seclusion of the West Howe  Sound waterfront. George Gibsons has retired to the new  home at the extreme right. In this scene, Harry Winn has  recorded a pioneer homestead in the process of becoming a  community. ��� Photo courtesy City Archives. L.R. Peterson.  *. Cowt News Centennial Supplement. May 19,1986  Mayor says we must remember our past  by Dianne Evans  Diane Strom, Gibsons mayor in  this centennial year, arrived in  Gibsons in June 1950 with her  parents and five brothers and  sisters, "straight off the train from  Hamilton". It was "rickety old bus  MAYOR DIANE STROM  to Sechelt" and a new beginning  in Selma Park where the family  stayed until 1954 when the mill at  Port Mellon re-opened and the  Granthams road was paved for  the first time.  Mrs.   Strom,   in   conversation  with the Coast News, reminisced  ' about her early days in Gibsons.  "I   went   to   school   at   Elphinstone, that was before the  Super Valu was built. The grocery  . store was the M and W Store  down in the old Bals Block, (now  the Johnson Block in lower Gibsons)  aod there  was a  movie  house upstairs.  "I remember we'd been roller  skating the night of the big fire,  when the Bals Block burned. We  -were walking down the hill on our  way home when we saw the  smoke. We went running down  the hill yelling Pure! Fare! and we  were there when the roof lifted off,  ever so slowly with the smoke  billowing out.  "There was always so much to  do, even when we lived in Selma  Park. There were community picnics in the summer, always  Hallowe'en celebrations, Labour  Day at Port Mellon, die regatta at  Pender Harbour. In those years  on the May 24 holiday the Sea  Cadet Band from North Vancouver would come up and it was  quite something for all us 10 to 12  year old girls!  "It was a different time - where  the bus stop is (in lower Gibsons)  across from the Johnson block  there was a long railing and all us  kids would sit along there just like  crows in a row. And in the evening, everybody went to the wharf.  My husband Danny and the older  fellows built a bob sled and would  come down the old hill and the  only way to stop was in the old  wharf shed filled with straw!  "If there was nowhere to toboggan in the town we'd go out to  Weatherby Beach and every winter the fire department would  flood the tennis courts for us to  skate on."  Mrs. Strom married in 1963  and it was when her oldest  daughter Tracy was in nursery  school that she first became involved in community activity.  "It was the Jack and Jill  Playschool and parents have to be  involved. I became the president  of the school and from there I just  seemed suddenly to "be  involved".  "I remember Louise Carroll and  I built a fabulous float for Sea  Cavalcade that year - a six foot tall  boot - for the Old Woman Who  Lived in a Shoe. It was a wood  frame and we covered the whole  thing with cardboard and papier  mache. It took us months! When  we'd finished the kids could actually stand up in the toe of the  boot and see put the windows.  We had flower boxes all over and  kids tumbling out of the shoe.  It was in 1980 that Mrs. Strom  was first elected to public office  -Alderman in the Town of Gibsons - although she had worked  on the Official Community Plan  virtually since its inception.  "Every resident should get involved in the local community  plans. You leam so much about  the community and get to see it  better as a whole," Strom said.  And what would Mayor Strom  wish for Gibsons' birthday?  "I'd like to see it grow without  changing from being the close-knit '>  community that it is - continuing  '  growth without losing the things  within the community that make it *  so special.  "So much about this commun- '--  nity is unique - we have to grow  without losing that. Anything can  be done if we put our minds to it.  "And the incorporated town is  just a small part of it - all the areas   >  surrounding   Gibsons   are   very   \  much a part of Gibsons and its  history. '"'..  "I think the place is absolutely  beautiful. The main thing is-to���  continue   our   ties   with -' oor.��  founders and the older residents.! *  None of us should ever take the is  community for granted and we . ~>  should encourage our young to be >'  more aware of our history, f *    <      ,  "I do wish Gibsons the very ��� >  loveliest 100th Birthday celebration."  Working for Gibsons  Sheila Kitson, President of the  Gibsons and District Chamber of  Commerce, came, with husband  Michael, to the Sunshine Coast  almost 25 years ago, drawn from  Port Alice on Vancouver Island by  the promise of work at the Port  Mellon mill.  It was only a few years after  their arrival in Port Mellon that  Sheila and Michael moved up to  their present property on Henry  Road - "20 acres and slowly diminishing" - where they began to  raise sheep with the help of their  next door neighbours, the  Swabeys..'.;.-���:-..-...,���',      ,.-'.-'. ��� ������.-...-.-  Sheila's involvement in community affairs began in the mid  seventies with a five year stint on  the school board. In those days  the board office was above Kruse's  drug store, where- the Hunter  Gallery now steriids. although it -  did move up to North Road to the  old B.C Tel building.  "After that I lay dormant for a  while v although I did get into a less  than successful business venture  for a while, until two years ago  when I started out on my own in  the candy store," Sheila told the  Coast News.  Starting out in the candy business - the pictuersque.little Truffles candy store in lower Gibsons is  Sheila's domain - also started  Sheila's career in the Chamber of  Commerce, first as a director and  then as vice president. This is the  beginning of Sheila's second year  as president.  Her enthusiasm for the job is  evident in the way she talks about  the growth of the organization? and  what lies ahead.  "It's going very well;'- we have  wpriderfuldjrectors. There's a lot  of energy there and it's infectious.  It takes a working group and  we've got to work together to get it  done," Sheila said.  From 39-JTiernbers when she  took on the office of president, the  Chamber has grown to 122 paid  up members, and if Sheila has her  way, they'll keep on coming.  Gibsons' 100th Birthday is a  good,time to look back and to  look forward and Sheila shared  some of her thoughts about the  place she's called home for all  these years.  "I believe we're unique in.the  way that so many descendants of  the original settlers are still living  here. There have been changes  but the area is still recognizable  and that's part of its charm.  "It's nice to be able to say hi to  Jack Inglis in the morning and  chat with him (the Inglis family is  one of the earliest). Ifs been sad to  see some of the old buildings go,  but Gibsons has. retained ���its  character":  ;'  Working together for Gibsons is  the aim of the Chamber of Com -  'merce arid Sheila Kitson; as its  president, embodies the spirit of  enthusiasm, imagination and persistence that will get the job done  and make Gibsons lOOth year  one to rerhember;i        '"' ���  SHEILA KITSON,  PRESIDENT, CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Coast News Centennial Supplement, May 19.1986  DR. AND MRS. FRED INGUS  They were the doctors  by John Burnside  |'or more than 60 years of Gib-  Is' century the name Inglis was  fonymous with medical care.  r. Fred Inglis brought his fami-  jiere in 1913 after some years  a ^medical missionary in  fegraph. Creek. Four children  re born to Dr. Inglis' wife Alice  i elegraph Creek and two more  fe born in Gibsons.  Inglis built two of Gibsons'  gst   old   houses,   the   Marina  _se on Marine Drive and the  |lis House', the fine white struc-  which stands above the five  lers at the head of Gibsons  larf.    ;' ::^y'qyy".  }he Inglis House was, in effect,  jtaany years the medical centre  le Sunshine Coast. As well as  |ig the home of the Inglis farrii-  it   was   the   dispensary   for  criptibn drugs and an emer-  jcy operating centre.  .   Inglis'   practise   extended  Haifmoon Bay and Sechelt  iibsoris and the surrounding  ids.-One of his. principal dif-  fties was, naturally, transporta-  and for years he covered his  Itory-ori a small horse called  |dy.   Paddy  eventually  gave ,  to a motor bicycle on which  travelling    medical    man  _me quite a virtuouso. then  j)we<_l a Model T Ford, then a  lei A and finally a speedy V  Roadster.  asides his extended and active  [heal practise. Dr. Inglis was an  /e participant in all community  |rs. His home became a centre  >hilos6phic discussion where a  lip which Mrs. Inglis cheerfully  td 'the pundits' met and  isseH the affairs of man. Pro  minent merribers of Gibsons' Finnish community were among this  group.  To the big white house above  Gibsons wharf came J.S.  Woodsworth and his family during  the First World War when Woods-  worth's pacifist views brought him  into conflict with his Gibsons  church. The Woodsworths: and  their six children shared the Inglis  house with the Inglis' and their six  children for more than two years.  It is arguable that in the Inglis  house during these meetings of  the members of the Finnish and  Anglo components of Gibsons in  which Woodsworth particiapted  was laid the seed which later in  Regina was to become the CCF  party_of Canada.  Dr. Inglis' steadfast service to  the coastal communities of the  Sunshine Coast continued almost  to the end of the Second World  War. During his latter years of service he - was assisted by his  youngest son. Dr. Alan Inglis, and  after failing health caused the  elderly.;doctor's retirement Dr.  Alan was joined by the eldest of  the three Inglis boys, Dr. Hugh Ig-  ^iis,.^::-.:>;:;'v'-';:-'.  J Dr.-Hugh Inglis continued to  practise jri Gibsons from 1946 to _  1975 after Dr. Alan turned his ef-    .  forts towards Vancouver.  Thus for more than 60 years  the Inglis family served the com-  muntiy which George Gibsons  founded, and not there alone as  oldtimers in Sechelt, Halfmoon  Bay, Keats and Gambier Islands  would be quick to tell you.  The family founded by Dr- Fred  Iglis was and is a family of musicians, as well as being near the  centre of philosophic and intellec  tual debate during much of their  honourable time in Gibsons.  The tapestry of a community is  made of many threads, but the  descendants of Dr. Frederick Inglis  can take just pride in the threads  of community woven by their  family during Gibsons' first 100  years.  MAYOR JOYCE KOLIBAS  It is my pleasure to congratulate our neighbouring  municipality on the occasion of its 100th birthday.  May the next 100 years be  years of progress for the  Town of Gibsons, the new  town of Sechelt, and the  whole Sunshine Coast - but  may we always remember  our pioneers.  Mayor Joyce Kolibas  Village of Sechelt  GROWING  TOGETHER  We thank the following businesses and organizations  which have helped to sponsor this historical review.  ESTABLISHED 1922  Bonniebrook Lodge  Gower Pt. Rd., 886-2887  ESTABLISHED 1930  Royal Canadian Legion  Hwy 101, 886-2411  ESTABLISHED 1941  Credit Union  Cedar Plaza, Hwy 101, 886-8121  : ESTABLISHEI. 1941  The Sunshine Coast News  #1 Ciruice Lane, 886-2622  . ..-  .^  Hwy 101, 886-9500  ESTABLISHED 1946  Bank of Montreal  Marine Drive, 886-2216  Devlin Funeral Home  1665 Seaview, 886-9551  Gibsons & District  Chamber of Commerce  Hwy 101, 886-2325  ESTABLISHED 1947  Gibsons Building Supplies  Hwy 101, 886-8141  The Ritz Motel  Gower Pt. Rd., 886-2401  (under new management - 1986  The Ritz Motel & Fishing Lodge  ESTABLISHED 1948  Hill's Machine Shop  1646 Marine Drive, 886-7721  ESTABLISHED 1951  Nick's Shell Service Station  1557 School Rd., 886-2572  Smitty's Marina  1545 School Rd., 886-7711  ESTABLISHED  1953  Irwin Motel  Hwy 101, 886-3331 6.  r  Coast News Centennial Supplement, May 19,1986  GROWING  TOGETHER  We thank the following businesses and organizations  which have helped to sponsor this historical review.  ESTABLISHED 1956  Richard's Men's Wear  262 Gower Pt. Rd., 886-2116  Super Valu  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-2424  ESTABLISHED 1957  Al's Used Furniture  Jack's Lane, 886-2812  ESTABLISHED 1960  Don's Shoes  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-2624  Gibsons Bowling Lanes  Hwy 101, 886-2086  ESTABLISHED 1963  K & E Towing  Hall Rd., Roberts Creek, 885-2919  ESTABLISHED 1967  Len Wray's Transfer  Hwy 101, 886-2664  ESTABLISHED 1968  Sunshine Coast  Mobile Home Park  Hwy 101, 886-9826  ESTABLISHED 1969  Sunco Printing Service  Hwy 101, 886-7614  Sunshine Coast  Disposal Services  Hopkins Landing, 886-2938  ESTABLISHED 1970  Coastal Tires  Burton Drive, off Hwy 101, 886-2700  Ken's Lucky Dollar  1541 Marine Drive, 886-2257  Pharmasave  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-7213  W.W. Upholstery  1779 Wyngaert Rd, 886-7310  Elson Glass  Hwy 101, 886-7359  ESTABLISHED  1971  Archdeacon Thain rem em b  by Maryanne West  Archdeacon Edwin Thain died  in Edmonton a year ago; he was  in his 77th year, but at the age of  24, fresh out of the Anglican  Theological College in Vancouver  he had come to Gibsons Landing  to be parish priest for the communities from Hopkins Landing to  Sechelt.  His memories of those days  make fascinating reading and I  thought they'd make a worthwhile  contribution to the history of Gibsons' first 100 years.  It was 1933. "Gibsons Landing  had been a summer resort, a few  permanent residents, but mainly  summer homes. Now in the depth  of the depression riiany people  whose work was in Vancouver  and who had lost their jobs had  moved out to their summer  homes where they could live more  cheaply than in the city.  "For the first months I was a  bachelor deacon living in lodgings  - boarding with a farmer. The one  farmer there who had two cows as  I remember it. They were not  large farms because the ground  was so hard to clear, very heavily  wooded, very big trees and big.  roots. They used to say the only  way to farm successfully was to get  your grandfather to start it for you  and then to inherit in your turn  when the clearing was done.  "It was a fascinating community .  and I could not covet for any  young priest a better place to start  than I did - not because of the  place, because of the people. I  never cease to give thanks for the  kind of people to whom I went to  minister, when I think about them.  "At first they ministered so  much to me and were so patient  and taught me so much. I went  from college, of course, very  sophisticated and knowing all the  answers and very clever, knowing  a great deal about Scripture.  Perhaps not a great deal about  Scripture itself, but a great deal  about it! And I went to people who  had a basically simple straightforward faith in the living God. I must  have been a bit hard to take but  they gave me no sign of that.  "The farmer I lived with had  two cows but most of the people  had goats. One of the things one  got used to after a while was the  odd house where they had a  billygoat and everything smelled  of goat. After a while one got used  to it and didn't notice.  "There was a small fishing corii-  munity as well, but these were  not, by and large. Christian people. There had been a communist  experiment up the Coast on an  Island called Sointula. For some  reason this had failed and the people had moved down the Coast  and many of the Finnish people  from that communist experiment  had settled in Gibsons and lived by  fishing.  "There w<as a church at Gibsons,  Landing, a small wooden church  shingled all over on the outside  but it had never been painted or  stained. The only church building  was at Gibsons, I held services in  houses or in schools at other  places.  "At Roberts Creek there were  two school houses, one at Roberts  Creek East and one at Roberts  Creek West. The United Church  Minister went to one of them and I  went to the other at first. Thet  after a little while the United  Church stopped going there and  was asked to go to both. I did thaj  for a little while and then we con  centrated on one school arid com  bined the congregations there  "It   was   a   tremendous   ex  perience."  "I was due to get married abouj  three months after I went there  For those three months 1 was abltjj  to go around on the bicycle am  visit people and if they said wi|  you stay for lunch or dinner!  could say "yes" and stay antj  spend all my time with them  "Then I got manned and foun<j  for the first time something th  every married priest finds at somi  point in his life; now there was  wife at home and meals waiting  for me when I was invited to sta;  for meals and I would say "n  thank you, I must get home",  thought before very long I'm gobi  to either neglect my parish or  lect my wife -1' don't see how I caj  do justice to both. ' f r  "I was very fortunate. My fathe;  confessor at the time was WilberJ  force Cooper, the rector of St  James' Church in Vancouver whi  I suppose was the centre of th  spiritual life and inspiration of mos]  of the young'-clergy of the dioce  regardless of churchmanship  "He was a companion of th  Community of the Resurrection,  convinced, celibate; extremelij  high churchman and I took m|  dilemma to him, feeling sure h<  would say; "Ed, you are a pries  and God has called you to thv  ministry arid you must not negle  your parish".  "But to my joy and surprise an  great help he said. "Ed, the sam  Beach Avenue, Gibsons Landing, c.1911. Bridge over Gibson Creek at The Glen, at boundary  between Gibsons Landing and Chekwelp Reserve. *���*  ers his early years in Gibsons  i  :t;  I'f';  6. ���'  r  I*  ��  God who gave you a parish gave  you a wife and you will never do a  better job for your parish than  show them what a Christian family  should be like. Never, never neglect your wife".  "I have always remembered it  and have passed it on to other  clergy as I have had opportunity  because it's a constant dilemma  and many poor clergy wives suffer  because of it.  "At first when we did marry we  rented a place .A woman's husband had died, she was moving  away and she rented her house to  us. I remember we bought'her kitchen stove, her bed and the kitchen table and four chairs, all for  $45. We had to get a new mattress, but the stove was a wood  stove and in beautiful condition all  polished and looking like new and  she threw in a big round galvanized iron tub full of odds and ends,  things that would have cost a lot of  money to buy .to start out with,  rolling pin, egg beater and slice  and saucepans and that sort of  hinq.  "Later the Archbishop raised  the money (less than $150), to  purchase the materials to build a  summer cottage. The outside  measurement was 18 feet by 20  feet, it was advertised by one of  the lumber companies in Vancouver. There was everything we  needed, 2x6 joists and single  tongue and groove flooring, '2x4's  for the framing, but no subfloor.  Half inch rustic siding to go on the  outside and half inch or less -very  thin - V joint for the inside, which  was full of knots many of which  dropped but after a while.  "Of course there wasn't plywood then. Shiplap and cedar  shingles for the roof. Two doors  and two windows and the necessary hardware, nails arid hinges  and two cheap locks. And so we  built the house.  "The men came and helped to  clear the land beside the church.  Terrible job because the roots  went so deep and were so widespread. It took a long, long time.  "There was a huge cedar, tree  which had fallen across the lot  some years before. It was dry and  I'll never forget the; size of it  because one slice (I used to cut it  with a crosscut saw), would last a  week when we got it into the  house for heating and cooking.  We cut up just enough of it to  make room for the house to begin  with and then I went on cutting it  up after we moved in.  "The Archbishop visited us at  one point. He said, "It's not every  rectory that you could reach out of  the window and get an armful of  wood". I felt like saying "no it's not  every rectory you can put a bucket  out of the door and get it full of  water", because there was quite a  lot,of drainage, the water went  through the lot under the house  and we had to build the house  three feet off the ground on cedar  blocks.     .  "I don't know what the pioneers  in B.C. would have done without  cedar, it splits so nice and straight  and true and was so easy to prepare and to use for building  thinqs."  I)  ���   ^  i'  Itor  r  Coast News Centennial Supplement. May 19,1986  7.  Logging in 1904. Dan Patterson is standing on the log, Arthur  White holds the saw, and Ron Wells has the reins of George  Gibson's team of horses on the skidroad obove the Glassford  home.  GROWING  TOGETHER  We thank the following businesses and organizations  which have helped to sponsor this historical review.  ESTABLISHED 1972  Ernie & Gwen's Drive-In  Hwy 101, 886-7813 .  Harrison Refrigerator  & Appliances  Pratt Rd., 886-9959  Quality Farm &  Garden Supplies  Pratt Rd., 886-7527  ESTABLISHED 1973  Jamieson Automotive  Hwy 101, 886-7919  NDP Bookstore  School Rd., 886-7744  Turenne Concrete  Pratt Rd., 886-7022  ESTABLISHED 1974  Gibsons Realty  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-2277  Hyak Marine  Gower Pt. Rd., 886-9011  ESTABLISHED 1975  Andy's Restaurant  Hwy 101, 886-3388  Cedars Inn  Cedar Plaza, Hwy 101, 886-8171  Gibsons Travel Agency  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-9255  The Omega Restaurant  1538 Gower Pt. Rd., 886-2268  ESTABLISHED 1976  Bank of Commerce  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-8111  Coast Architectural Group  Gower Pt. Rd., 886-2281  Gibsons Fish Market  1543 Gower Pt. Rd., 886-7888  Gibsons Ready Mix  Veterans Rd., 886-8174  Sunshine  Kitchen Industries  Hwy 101, 886-9411 Coast News Centennial Supplement, May 19,1986  Gibsons lifetime:  From the pioneer farm till today  by John Bumside  Wiljo Wiren is one of Gibsons'  pioneer residents. Born in  Finland; he came to live here with  his family in 1906 at the age of  four, and today from his quiet  home on Reid Road he looks back  over more than 80 years in this  community.  Wiljo   remembers   that   there  were only three or four houses on  the waterfront in Gibsons when  the Wirens took up 160 acres not  ���      far from where he now lives: The ���  '���'.'   first problems to face the pioneer  .  settlers involved the clearing of the  land. Wiljo remembers that the .  Steinbrunners   had   the   largest  clearing back in the early years of  the century. Their place was on  the site of the present day Trailer  Park on Highway 101.  "Those stumps were really  something," remembers Wiljo.'  "You can imagine a man with  handtools trying to move six foot  stumps with all their robfe." The  Wirens had a team of workhorses  and with the aid of blocks, Wiljo  reckons, a horse could pull as  much as 32 horses but even then  the stumps would have to be split  with powder when it could be obtained and hauled out in pieces.  Of all the early day families only  the Steinbrunners and the Wirens  managed to make themselves entirely independent on land they  cleared themselves.  By 1913 or 1914 the family was  in a position to sell to others  potatoes and milk they produced  themselves, arid one of Wiljo's  jobs as a young boy just prior to  the outbreak of the First World  War was tb deliver the milk. At  first he used a hand-drawn cart,  delivering milk all the way to  Granthams. Later the family  bought a pony and milk deliveries  were made by pony and demo-  ,      crat.  I.'. ' Only one or two families lived  i year round in Granthams at the  i time though many more used it as  I a summer resort and so it was  1 'largely in surriimer that the milk  1 deliveries were made, the production of the cows being geared for  I the time of the year.  i In addition to the potatoes and  i milk that they sold, the Wirens  | also had a large vegetable patch  I for their own use and at one time  I as many as 100 apple trees,  i though there was very little market  for the fruit at the time.  Schoolboys remain schoolboys,  throughout the ages and Wiljo  remembers the use the young early Gibsonites made of the springs  from ladies' corsets which cpuld be  salvaged occasionally. They  would chew a portion of their exercise books until they had got it  goSd and wet and then with the.  corset spring fire across the room  at a chosen target. Wiljo remembers one occasion quite early in his  school career when he fired just  such a spitball at Herb Steinbrun-  ner but missed and had it land on  top of the teacher's head. "She  turned around quick enough but  didn't know where it had come  from. I had my head down looking at my book but I couldn't tell  you: whether it was rightside up or  not. I was so scared I couldn't  ..see.*'-..-;. -....-:'���..-.- ...'-.'������ V  Wiljo remembers Jake Hensa  who was a friend of J.S. Woods-  worth. He was a school trustee  and came sometirnes to offer support for the occasionally  beleaguered teacher. "He was  good-natured but with a rough exterior. He had been in a Jot of mining camps."   ;.''���"���  Wiljo's high school education  was something of a problem. He  had to try to educate himself while  helping on the farm. He had a  wad of papers in his back pocket  and while he worked, haying or  coming up the hill behind the  horse after delivering milk, he  would whip his papers out and  study his French vocabulary or his  georrietry theorems. Nonetheless  he presevered and even managed  to work in a few years at university. In fact he taught in Saskatchewan for half a year before he  found his way back to Gibsons to  teach locally for another couple of  years in the 1920s.  He took his first stint as a logger  when he gave up school teaching  and remembers collapsing. face  down and fully clothed on his  bunk after supper after his first day  on the job with schoolteacher's  muscles.  In 1932, "right at the bottom of  the Depression". Wiljo married  Florence Charman who was born  in Roberts Creek, though she had  left and come back in 1929, the  year that the Village of Gibsons  was incorporated. The couple  remembers how tight money was  in those Depression years. Wiljo  scrounged lumber for their first  house wherever he could, the  bush, anywhere. "One time I got  lucky and got 1200 feet of what  they called reject lumber for $8.  Reject? You can't find anything  like it today." When the house  was finished the Wirens moved in  and it had cost them all told $130.  It sat on 20 acres they bought  from the government over a  dozen years. The first two years,  they were required to make improvements and after that they  paid it off at $50 a year.  The 30's were lean years with  Wiljo supporting his family at any  job he could find. In-summers he  worked in the jam factory and  peddling vegetables for growers.  Sometimes he went handtrolling  . for salmon which he sold to a fish  buyer on the wharf for four cents a  pound. On one occasion the  unemployed were taken down to  Port Mellon to load lurnber from  the sawmill there. "We were green  as grass." says Wiljo. "We just had  no idea what we were doing." He  remembers that the inexperienced  labour loaded the ship so awkwardly that when she ran into high  seas   she   had   to   come   back.  because the lumber was loose and  knocking her apart.- "It was a great  scheme, that one."  When all else failed there was  government'relief. "$3 a day and  that for only three days in the  month."  By the time the war came Wiljo  had got back into logging. "That  was alright." says Wiljo. "$5 a day  working for Ted Osborne putting  lots into Halfmoon Bay." Wiljo  was frozen in that occupation for  the duration of the war. working at  most of the jobs in the woods but  mainly as a faller.  Today this son of one of Gibsons' earliest pioneers lives in qui>?t  retirement. He has seen this place  grow from raw forest to its present  development. He has twice left  and twice returned and talking to  him. one gets the feeling that  despite the hardships of the  pioneer life, he has never regretted that his parents'brought him  here in 1906.  Vancouver, June, 21, 1886. The Burrard Inlet settlements at  Hastings Mill and at Granville, known colloquially as Gastown,  had been incorporated as the City of Vancouver in April. An  election had been held in May. The "New Townw had burned on  June 13. There had been no City Hall. This tent was the first.  Mayor M.A. MacLean is seated under the sign, profile, looking  toward Alderman L.A. Hamilton, who had surveyed the  townsite. Unidentified for many years in Vancouver's records,  George Gibson stands in the background to the left in this H.T.  Devine photo. Gibson had supervised construction of the "City  Wharf on which he stands, at the foot of Carrall Street, and  which had escaped the conflagration. Three weeks prior to the  fire, Gibson had laid claim to a quarter section of land on West  Howe Sound. Within a few years, he and members of his family  had built a wharf to create a port of call at Gibsons Landing.  ���Photo courtesy Vancouver Archives and Elphinstone Pioneer Museum Coast News Centennial Supplement, May 19.1986  .  v-  / grew amid a world Just then gone by;  A day suspended, ageless, in-between:  Old legends said thai legends would not die;  That now was shadow of what might have been.  Still-grease-marked ' skidrbadsfrom a yonder shore  Teased forest ghosts that echoed ox-bell chime:  Abandoned homes, smokeless, with empty door,  Seemed to defy the probing search of time.  So each hew generation sees the last  As some illusive late-extinguished flame;  Looks for an hour before which is no past,  And dreams of glimmerings that evade a name.  But pre-dawn gardens beyond gardens rise,  And proto-pyramids haunt old pyramid skies. '  L.JZ. Peterson  Gibsons Landing, about 1910.  Kirkwood home on edge of  The Glen, above Glassford  home, built on a subdivision  of George GlassforcTs property  behind Chekwelp Reserve.  . John Hicks photo  from glass negative.  Gibsons Landing, c.1911: Communtiy May Day picnic at home of Finnish settler Andy  Wilander. -John Hicks photo  GROWING  We thank the following businesses and organizations  which have helped to sponsor this historical review.  ESTABLISHED 1977  Aelbers Real Estate  Marine Dr., Granthams Landing, 886-7215  Elite Travel  Cedar Plaza, Hwy 101, 886-3381  Kingo Diesel  Hwy 101, 886-8181  Saan Stores  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-9413  ESTABLISHED 1978  Jeannie's Gifts & Gems  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-2023  1979  ESTABLISHED  Dockside Pharmacy  (previously Maxwell's Pharmacy)  Marine Drive, 886-8158  Gramma's Pub  1552 Marine Dr., 886-8215  ESTABLISHED 1980  Landing General Store  1553 Gower Pt. Rd, 886-2818  Party Stop  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-3813  Sunshine Grocers  Cedar Plaza, Hwy 101, 886-8413  ESTABLISHED 1981  Creekhouse Restaurant  Roberts Creek, 885-9321  Elphie's Cabaret  Gower Pt. Rd., 886-3336  Fleetline  Parts & Equipment  Hwy 101, 886-2480  Pebbles Realty  Gower Pt. Rd., 886-8107  Radio Shack  Authorized Sales Centre  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-7215  ESTABLISHED 1982  Garry's Crane Service  .   Wharf Rd, 886-7028  v.* r;_;'l...fc---V<.  ������>J'*  .v"''^  10.        Coast News Centennial Supplement, May 19,1986  The lives of the  pioneers  Gibsons Landing, c. 1912. Johnny Wyngaert holding the last ox in the community.  (photo taken from site of present day Knit Wit)  Mr. & Mrs. H.C Charnberlin  Mr. & Mrs. CH. Charnberlin  July 5,1909, Mr. and Mrs. Glassford requested the pleasure  of company at the double wedding of their daughters Mary  Grace and Charlotte Mabel to the brothers H.C. and CH.  Charnberlin.  George Taylor beside his North Road split cedar home, 1912.  ��� John Hicks photo Coast News Centennial Supplement, May 19.1986        11.  As the Canadian Pacific Railway had reached tidewater at Port Moody in 1886, the City of Vancouver had come into being. George Gibson, who had supervised construction projects along the  waterfront prior to incorporation, had already claimed a preemption inside the western entrance to  Howe Sound. Now, in 1892, citizens who are prominent in trade and commerce have chartered Captain Mooney's steamer Burt to call on George and Charlotte Gibson. They have spent some hours at  the Gibson home, and they are seen here with their families on the deck and cabin of the little vessel.  They are our first tourists. The precedent set by this excursion is to profoundly affect the pulse of life  along the Sunshine Coast throughout the years ahead.  , *_��        - .Photo couresy Cecil F. Carter-Cotton collection and City "Archives. L.R. Peterson.  Gibsons Landing, about 1910. Four cords of shingle bolts are being sledded down a  skidroad which reached sea level slightly north of the public wharf. Clair Charnberlin,  arms folded, and Fred Soames stand beside the huge bolts, which they must unload at  the beach and later repile on a scow for shipment to a mill. ���John Hicks photo  ^  GROWING  TOGETHER  We thank the following businesses and organizations  which have helped to sponsor this historical review.  ESTABLISHED 1983  Charnberlin Gardens  Charnberlin Rd., 886-9889  Kelly's  Lawnmower & Chainsaw  Hwy 101, 886-2912  The Gypsy Restaurant  1500 Marine Dr., 886-8632  ESTABLISHED 1984  Gibsons Green Grocers  Cedar Plaza, Hwy 101, 886-3568  The Knit Wit  Hwy 101, 886-2717  Peninsula Motor Inn  Hwy 101, 886-2804  Pronto's Restaurant  Cedar Plaza, Hwy 101, 886-8138  Showpiece Gallery  Gower Pt. Rd., 886-9213  Truffles - the candy store  Gower Pt. Rd., 886-7522  ESTABLISHED 1985  The Green Scene  Sunnycrest Mall, 886-3371  Landing Unisex  Hair Designs  School Rd., 886-3916  ESTABLISHED 1986  The Alternative  Hwy 101, 886-3294  Skookum Auto Inc.  (new to Gibsons in'86)  Hwy 101, 886-3433  The publishers wish to apologize  to those who would like to have  helped sponsor this tribute, but  who could not be contacted prior  to publication.  L -? ��� *-i"i,:  ������^>��*+^^~^i&**tmv^lf^S-^X!W'>** ,��-<L^-*_��r��*-^-M��_.  %.t*-  Gibsons Landing, Howe Sound, B.C. c.1900-1910. Lester R. Peterson, of  Gibsons, B.C. wrote, August 1954 and January 1955, to City Archives,  Vancouver: The store was built by George Gibson senior, around 1900. It  was burned down in 1910. It stood at the head of the wharf where the John  Wood Hardware store now stands. (jNow Molly's Reach.) The legal  description is Lot seven, Parcel A, Block CD 686. There was no such subdivision at the time it was built, or ih Operation. It was not the oldest store,  the present Howe Sound Trading Co.'s structure being built by Mr.  Gibson's eldest son about 1895. Mr. Gibson and his sons built their own  pile driver, so I am told by our Clerk, Mr. Robert Bums, who saw it when  Acknowledgements  he was a boy; it had a capstan for raising the hammer. They drove pilings  midway between the present wharf arid where the LePage Glue Factory  once stood, and they remained in use until 1900 or 1901, when, the glue  factory and the first government wharf were built." Information on authority Mrs. Grace Charnberlin, grandaughter, and Robert Burns, Esq.;  Municipal Clerk. Left to Right: Boy unknown; Mr. White; Mrs. Albert Mc-  Coll, nee Hattie Gibson; Mrs. Patterson, nee Nellie Gibson; Don Patterson;  Tom Wells, holding Veta McColl; Mrs. Gibson; Mr .George Gibson* and  two Chinamen who. worked for Mr. Gibson.  Photo Courtesy of Elphinstone Pioneer Museum  We are indebt _>d to the support of the many fine people who helped us compile materials for this centenary  tribute: the pioneer families who shared their time and their memories; the Elphinstone Pioneer Museum  and Mr. Tarn Johnson for their trust and support in allowing us the use of their invaluable historic  photographs; Mr. Lester R. Peterson for his always invaluable aid. And most assuredly I must thank the staff  of the Coast News who gave that little bit extra to bring it all together.  Thank you, one and all.  John Burnside, President  Glassford Press Ltd.  .-j*   __u  A.****ri%>-.��f--*"-��r .._..-���*������ iff. &  j-ir-��- at je**��� rjfr *:.���*��� *t'.x~ A' a_��  .a**.'**** ������  A GLASSFORD PRESS PUBLICATION  -_r�� j_r tr __>-__ '_*-��^- p   _?".  !-���-*->��� v* if srir-vv .tr.sr.'.r.l .  !-:���-: _r. -*,-:__-!������----<���w_r'��"-��i_r ^ _V_V.-s_^^^T-.*.. ff:^-._TJ-nTT-i*v _r-st.a-.- -> "-."--.  ���>.����-      ~"    -,1(   *   -  ~^>ti*xtm*W2f^stK*t2r$]W'>**-- V.t^-W^iery*^!,.^^  12.        Coast News Centennial Supplement, May 19,1986  -_._-*���  Gibsons Landing, Howe Sound, B.C. c.1900-1910. Lester R. Peterson, of  Gibsons, B.C. wrote, August 1954 and January 1955, to City Archives,  Vancouver: The store was built by George Gibson senior, around 1900. It  was burned down in 1910. It stood at the head of the wharf where the John  Wood Hardware store now stands. (Now Molly's Reach.) The legal  description is Lot seven, Parcel A, Block CD 686. There was no such subdivision at the time it was built, or ih Operation. It was not the oldest store,  the present Howe Sound Trading Co.'s structure being built by Mr.  Gibson's eldest son about 1895. Mr. Gibson and his sons built their own  pile driver, so I am told by our Clerk, Mr. Robert Burns, who saw it when  Acknowledgements  he was a boy; it had a capstan for raising the hammer. They drove pilings  midway between the present wharf and where the LePage Glue Factory  once stood, and they remained in use until 1900 or 1901, when, the glue  factory and the first government wharf were built." Information on authority Mrs. Grace Charnberlin, grandaughter, and Robert Burns, Esq.,  Municipal Clerk, Left to Right: Boy unknown; Mr. White; Mrs. Albert Mc-  Coll, nee Hattie Gibson; Mrs. Patterson, nee Nellie Gibson; Don Patterson;  Tom Wells, holding Veta McColl; Mrs Gibson; Mr. George Gibson, and  two Chinamen who. worked for Mr. Gibson.  Photo Courtesy of Elphinstone Pioneer Museum  We are indebted to the support of the many fine people who helped us compile materials for this centenary  tribute: the pioneer families who shared their time and their memories; the Elphinstone Pioneer Museum  and Mr. Tarn Johnson for their trust and support in allowing us the use of their invaluable historic  photographs; Mr. Lester R. Peterson for his always invaluable aid. And most assuredly I must thank the staff  of the Coast News who gave that little bit extra to bring it all together.  Thank you, one and all.  John Burnside, President  Glassford Press Ltd.  A GLASSFORD PRESS PUBLICATION  _*--__��.- -ax 4_ .��*���'__[' __  ._*��� __��� -v .  '"i^*^ jt-��-,*���*jfj^_.-.*.-_t_-_x.2r.-C' j* a  :.a\-��fx.-��'s** -*r**jr-3P--Jf _=.- .* *�� y jr -if __~.r-._r- __������-��   v t __���-*.'  *"_--��-_-* n> i_r-__ - _�����" ��^- jr ���-_".!  * sr-z���vv .-r.v^pktr  ���. v,:v..-rz~r.TT^*\-*r. -��.J

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