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Sunshine Coast News Oct 7, 1985

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 |VSV Ixif  Sk-U.  Forced to borrow  Elphinstone District Girl Guides presented an "Anniversary Rose" to the Town of Gibsons last week,  and Mayor Larry Labonte did the spade work in planting it in the flower bed across from Pioneer Park.  The coral coloured full-blossom rose is in honour of the Guiding movement's 75th Anniversary.  ���Fran Burnside photo  Deficit recorded  feeling pinch  "The year 1984/85 was  another difficult one for your  hospital due to continuing  economic restraints," Nsaid St.  Mary's Hospital Society Chairman Guy Lewell in his report to  the society's annual general  meeting.  "Every effort is being continued  to control costs...including a  freeze on staff levels. Inspite of  this, I continue to believe there  is a continuing high level of patient care."  The restraints Lewell referred  to resulted in the hospital experiencing an operating deficit  of $113,180 for the fiscal year  ending March 31, 1985, the first  deficit over $10,000 ever experienced by the hospital. The  deficit was covered by surplus  funds accumulated over the  years.  "Now our surplus funds are  eroded," hospital administrator  Nick Vucurevich said in conversation with the Coast News.  "We have no more contingency  fund. From now on we have to  have a balanced budget.  "Everyone at the hospital cooperated in trying to keep the  deficit down,"  he continued.  "It   could   have   been   much  worse."  "This (deficit) was forecast  and came as no surprise,"  reported society treasurer Tom  Meredith.  ��� "Every prudent step was  taken, during the year, to  minimize expense...To see  carefully husbanded financial  resources eroded through consistent losses has been hard to  bear. Severe financial constraints...continue to be in  force. If further erosion to any  significant degree is experienced, your board, without additional provincial funding, will  he forced to seek permission to  cut some -of the services  offered."  In his report, Vucurevich  stressed the importance of continuing to develop a comprehensive quality assurance program  in the hospital, along new accreditation guidelines.  "The financial constraints of  recent years have increased the  importance of cost containment  projects and contributed to a  heightened sense of fiscal  responsibility in health institutions," he wrote. "...However, has the ability to cope  been at the expense of special  projects and services? It can be  aTgued    that    administration  should now consider  strengthening quality assurance  activities due to the adverse effects of cost containment."  Building, expansion and properties committee chairman  Stuart Mitton noted that "We  have spent another year marking time as far as our Extended  Care Unit expansion is concerned," but his committee is continuing to approach Victoria to  stress the depth of the need.  "As far as our existing  facilities are concerned, we have  been able to keep our total plant  in top operating condition," he  reported. "All necessary repairs  and replacements have been  made."  Much deserved praise was  given to the hospital auxiliary,  with its six branches.  Auxiliary president Betty  Laidlaw reported that the 346  members (including 17 life  members, 12 male members and  43 junior volunteers) worked a  total of 65,997 hours during the  1984 fiscal year, and provided  $55,242.92 for hospital purchases and $1,370.33 for the Extended Care Unit, plus a  number of "extras", the largest  of which was a birthing bed  from the Gibsons branch.  In addition to running the  Thrift Shop and the Gift Shop,  the auxiliary holds parties for  the patients, offers in-service  programs including hairdress-  ing, manicures, physiotherapy,  flower care, library cart, baby  photos and extended care services, and provides bursary  funds.  Chief of Staff Doctor Ron  Estey should perhaps be accorded the final word on St. Mary's  Hospital. In concluding his  report to the hospital society he  wrote, "St. Mary's Hospital  continues to be a most desirable  place to carry out the practice of  medicine. This is primarily due  to the wonderful relationships  the hospital has maintained  with auxiliaries, service clubs,  corporations and individuals in  the local community...Physicians are happiest when they are  able to perform medicine of the  highest standard with modern,  up-to-date equipment in a facility that works in a co-ordinated  and efficient manner. St.  Mary's Hospital offers all these  and it is hoped that the situation  will continue."  Candidates  Two candidates have indicated their intentions to seek office in the upcoming municipal elections in Gibsons.  Alderman John Burnside has decided to run for mayor.  Burnside has been an alderman for the past two years.  John Reynolds has indicated that he will again seek office  as alderman in Gibsons. Reynolds was a candidate in 1984  and during the recent by-election.  Coast News wins  The Sunshine Coast News renewed its award-winning ways  at the B.C. and Yukon Community Newspaper convention  held in Vancouver last week.  First prize in the Spot News Photography contest was won  by Eike Schroter lor a picture of a burning boat in Porpoise  Bay with the dejected mechanic who had been working on it  in the foreground. The picture was published in the June 10  issue of this newspaper.  Flu shots  Influenza Vaccine Clinics will, be held on the Sunshine  Coast this week.  At the Gibsons Health Unit on Fletcher Road there will be  a clinic from 1 to 3 p.m. on Thursday, October 10. The  Sechelt Clinic will be held on Friday, October 11, from 11  a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Hall on Mermaid Street.  Vaccination is recommended for all those over 65 years and  those with a history of heart disease, chronic lung disease,  chronic renal diseases, chronic diseases such as diabetes, and  anaemic diseases.  being  by unpaid  hurt  "We're hurting," said  Sechelt Finance Committee  Chairman Anne Pressley, and  handed out a fact sheet to explain the source of the pain, as  follows:  As-,at August 31, 1985, the  village of Sechelt was owed  outstanding taxes (delinquent  1983), arrears (1984) and cur-  rent (1985) totalling  $392,024.97, with additional ac-.  crued penalties and interest of  $38,490.60; which amounts to a  grand total of $430,515.57 owing to the village of Sechelt.  "When one considers that the  total budget for 1985 is  $ 1,506,062., the outstanding  taxes represent 28.5 per cent.  This is an extremely high  percentage of outstanding taxes  and means that the village of  Sechelt must borrow (with incurred interest costs being passed on to all property owners in  the village) to meet everyday expenses.  "The village of Sechelt acts as  a collection agency for school  taxes, SCRD, regional hospital,  fire, municipal finance authority and the B.C. Assessment  Authority - these agencies, by  law, must be paid even though  all.the taxes have not been collected. The agencies the village  collects for represent approximately 75 per cent of the total  tax levy. These agencies have  been paid - the outstanding  taxes owing are the village of  Sechelt's share of the total tax  levy.  "We urge all property owners  who have outstanding taxes owing to help the village of Sechejt  reduce operating costs (interest  on loans) by paying their  outstanding taxes as soon as  possible.  "I know the reason people  aren't paying is probably  because they don't have the  money," acknowledged  Pressley, "and we do charge interest on outstanding taxes so  there is a certain prospect of  recovering our expenses at some  time in the future. The monies!;  owed to us are all "secured;:  receivables",   but  it  certainly t  does put a strain on the cash,  flow." (y  Village Clerk Malcolm  Shanks noted that three properties had recently accrued to the  village when no bids for themy  were received at the tax sale.  One is a five acre rural parcel;  one is a commercial property  with a good sized building on it,  and the third is a property on  the hydro right-of-way. The  owners have one year as tif  September 30 to pay all current  and outstanding taxes in order  to recover the properties.      );���';  Shanks also pointed out that,  up to three years ago, the village  did not have to. borrow for  operating expenses "until  February or March. Last year it  was November and this year'it  will be by the end of this month  (October)." yy  Government decrees  Fishing fleet has priority  The complaints of commercial fishermen, objecting to being packed like sardines into the  crowded facilities at the Gibsons  government Wharf, has had the  result that all pleasure boats  moored at the wharf may soon  be ordered to leave.  At last Tuesday's regular  meeting of Gibsons Town  Council^ Lorraine * Gbddafcf,  Clerk-treasurer reported that  she had learned from assistant  wharfinger Howie Foley that  there are now more commercial  fish boats moored at the wharf  than ever before and in order to  make room for the entire  fishing fleet this winter, it appears necessary that private  pleasure craft will be forced to  move elsewhere.  After receiving numerous  complaints from commercial  fishermen about the lack of  space that has created impaired  fire lanes and damage to some  boats, Foley had contacted the  office of the operations officer  of fisheries and oceans, which  carries final responsibility for  the government floats, to determine the rights to moorage  space of fishermen over other  boats. According to Foley, it  was confirmed that commercial  fish boats have first priority.  "This is the law," said Mayor  Labonte. "Fishermen have the  right to park boats at the wharf  and pleasure craft will have to  move."  Alderman Burnside said,  "Before, we had no alternative;  now there is the Gibsons  Marina."  Questioned by Alderman  Peterson about enforcement,  Clerk-treasurer Goddard said  that the wharfinger, under the  rules and regulations of the  federal department of fisheries  and oceans, has the power to  physically move boats.  Alderman Peterson also asked if pleasure boats would be  allowed back in if all the spots  were not taken by the commercial fish boats. Mayor Labonte  responded that they would.  According to assistant wharfinger Foley there are approximately 40 pleasure boats and at  least 30 commercial fish boats  permanently moored at the  wharf. In addition, there are  tugs, water taxis, log salvagers  and various other work boats.  Of concern to many pleasure  boat owners is the difference  between moorage rates charged  at the government wharf and  those charged at private  marinas.  Moorage rates are based on  the length of the boat. Commercial fish boats at the wharf  are given a subsidized rate of  $.55 per foot, while all other  boats at the wharf are charged  $1.23 per foot. Electricity is  available as an option at $20 per  month.  The privately operated Gibsons Marina, located nearby  and where many of the pleasure  boats may have to go, charges a  varying set of rates depending  on summer or winter and the  length of commitment. The  winter rate on a one month  basis is $3 per foot ($2.10 per  foot when paying six months in  advance), while the summer rate  is $4.50 per foot.  Because spaces will be made  available next year at the Gibsons Marina for summer  visitors, boats over 29 feet that  intend to stay permanently will  have to pay an annual moorage  in order to be guaranteed of  staying beyond May 1, 1986.  Those most seriously effected  by the proposed eviction will be  the estimated 14 people that live  aboard nine of the pleasure  boats.  They may end up with no  place to go., Most, if not all���of  these boats do hot have holding  tanks to contain effluent, a  stipulation the Gibsons Marina  requires before allowing live-,  aboards in. No other local,  moorage is available. y'  These people comprise a vital  portion of a long existing subculture that has given lower;  Gibsons much of its character./  They are not happy at the news';  of a possible eviction. .  A dismayed Jim Harding^,  who lives on his 40 foot, partiafcx  ly finished ketch, the Salis/i:  Maiden and who has been a;  commercial fisherman himself;';  simply said "I guess I'll have to;  start making plans."  And from an agitated  Corrance, who has lived  nearly four years aboard  vessel, recently renamed  Einstein for a CBC  Beachcomber series:"Is a com-  ercial fishing boat more important because it's a business than,  my boat is because it's my  home?" He intends to fight the  issue the best he can. "This is  the bottom line; I'm getting run  out of town."  Another live-aboard, Johnny  "Cottonears" Moore, common  sight at the wharf as he daily,  watches over its comings and  goings,  is not  pleased either.:'  "You'd think they'd be able to;  Please turn to page 10  ;  Ian  foiv  his'  the  Pleasure craft at the Gibsons Government Wharf will soon have to make way for the commercial fishing  fleet which has grown over the year. Approximately 40 boats will be ordered to move. (See story)  ���Brad Benson photo L��CilSt.A-<��oe   U(baft&4  ��f)ftLteMGHl   &UlW>ltf^S -  /lOf'&Gifl.  ��>����� .  |VSV IXif  Sk-U.  Forced to borrow  Elphinstone District Girl Guides presented an "Anniversary Rose" to the Town of Gibsons last week,  and Mayor Larry Labonte did the spade work in planting it in the flower bed across from Pioneer Park.  The coral coloured full-blossom rose is in honour of the Guiding movement's 75th Anniversary.  ���Fran Burnside photo  Deficit recorded  feeling pinch  "The year 1984/85 was  another difficult one for your  hospital due to continuing  economic restraints," Nsaid St.  Mary's Hospital Society Chairman Guy Lewell in his report to  the society's annual general  meeting.  "Every effort is being continued  to control costs...including a  freeze on staff levels. Inspite of  this, I continue to believe there  is a continuing high level of patient care."  The restraints Lewell referred  to resulted in the hospital experiencing an operating deficit  of $113,180 for the fiscal year  ending March 31, 1985, the first  deficit over $10,000 ever experienced by the hospital. The  deficit was covered by surplus  funds accumulated over the  years.  "Now our surplus funds are  eroded," hospital administrator  Nick Vucurevich said in conversation with the Coast News.  "We have no more contingency  fund. From now on we have to  have a balanced budget.  "Everyone at the hospital cooperated in trying to keep the  deficit down,"  he continued.  "It   could   have   been   much  worse."  "This (deficit) was forecast  and came as no surprise,"  reported society treasurer Tom  Meredith.  ��� "Every prudent step was  taken, during the year, to  minimize expense...To see  carefully husbanded financial  resources eroded through consistent losses has been hard to  bear. Severe financial constraints...continue to be in  force. If further erosion to any  significant degree is experienced, your board, without additional provincial funding, will  be forced to seek permission to  cut some -of the services  offered."  In his report, Vucurevich  stressed the importance of continuing to develop a comprehensive quality assurance program  in the hospital, along new accreditation guidelines.  "The financial constraints of  recent years have increased the  importance of cost containment  projects and contributed to a  heightened sense of fiscal  responsibility in health institutions," he wrote. "...However, has the ability to cope  been at the expense of special  projects and services? It can be  aTgued    that    administration  should now consider  strengthening quality assurance  activities due to the adverse effects of cost containment."  Building, expansion and properties committee chairman  Stuart Mitton noted that "We  have spent another year marking time as far as our Extended  Care Unit expansion is concerned," but his committee is continuing to approach Victoria to  stress the depth of the need.  "As far as our existing  facilities are concerned, we have  been able to keep our total plant  in top operating condition," he  reported. "All necessary repairs  and replacements have been  made."  Much deserved praise was  given to the hospital auxiliary,  with its six branches.  Auxiliary president Betty  Laidlaw reported that the 346  members (including 17 life  members, 12 male members and  43 junior volunteers) worked a  total of 65,997 hours during the  1984 fiscal year, and provided  $55,242.92 for hospital purchases and $1,370.33 for the Extended Care Unit, plus a  number of "extras", the largest  of which was a birthing bed  from the Gibsons branch.  In addition to running the  Thrift Shop and the Gift Shop,  the auxiliary holds parties for  the patients, offers in-service  programs including hairdress-  ing, manicures, physiotherapy,  flower care, library cart, baby  photos and extended care services, and provides bursary  funds.  Chief of Staff Doctor Ron  Estey should perhaps be accorded the final word on St. Mary's  Hospital. In concluding his  report to the hospital society he  wrote, "St. Mary's Hospital  continues to be a most desirable  place to carry out the practice of  medicine. This is primarily due  to the wonderful relationships  the hospital has maintained  with auxiliaries, service clubs,  corporations and individuals in  the local community...Physicians are happiest when they are  able to perform medicine of the  highest standard with modern,  up-to-date equipment in a facility that works in a co-ordinated  and efficient manner. St.  Mary's Hospital offers all these  and it is hoped that the situation  will continue."  Candidates  Two candidates have indicated their intentions to seek office in the upcoming municipal elections in Gibsons.  Alderman John Burnside has decided to run for mayor.  Burnside has been an alderman for the past two years.  John Reynolds has indicated that he will again seek office  as alderman in Gibsons. Reynolds was a candidate in 1984  and during the recent by-election.  Coast News wins  The Sunshine Coast News renewed its award-winning ways  at the B.C. and Yukon Community Newspaper convention  held in Vancouver last week.  First prize in the Spot News Photography contest was won  by Eike Schroter lor a picture of a burning boat in Porpoise  Bay with the dejected mechanic who had been working on it  in the foreground. The picture was published in the June 10  issue of this newspaper.  Flu shots  Influenza Vaccine Clinics will be held on the Sunshine  Coast this week.  At the Gibsons Health Unit on Fletcher Road there will be  a clinic from 1 to 3 p.m. on Thursday, October 10. The  Sechelt Clinic will be held on Friday, October 11, from 11  a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Hall on Mermaid Street.  Vaccination is recommended for all those over 65 years and  those with a history of heart disease, chronic lung disease,  chronic renal diseases, chronic diseases such as diabetes, and  anaemic diseases.  being  by unpaid  hurt  "We're hurting," said  Sechelt Finance Committee  Chairman Anne Pressley, and  handed out a fact sheet to explain the source of the pain, as  follows:  As-,at August 31, 1985, the  village of Sechelt was owed  outstanding taxes (delinquent  1983), arrears (1984) and cur-  rent (1985) totalling  $392,024.97, with additional ac-.  crued penalties and interest of  $38,490.60; which amounts to a  grand total of $430,515.57 owing to the village of Sechelt.  "When one considers that the  total budget for 1985 is  $ 1,506,062., the outstanding  taxes represent 28.5 per cent.  This is an extremely high  percentage of outstanding taxes  and means that the village of  Sechelt must borrow (with incurred interest costs being passed on to all property owners in  the village) to meet everyday expenses.  "The village of Sechelt acts as  a collection agency for school  taxes, SCRD, regional hospital,  fire, municipal finance authority and the B.C. Assessment  Authority - these agencies, by  law, must be paid even though  all.the taxes have not been collected. The agencies the village  collects for represent approximately 75 per cent of the total  tax levy. These agencies have  been paid - the outstanding  taxes owing are the village of  Sechelt's share of the total tax  levy.  "We urge all property owners  who have outstanding taxes owing to help the village of Sechejt  reduce operating costs (interest  on loans) by paying their  outstanding taxes as soon as  possible.  "I know the reason people  aren't paying is probably  because they don't have the  money," acknowledged  Pressley, "and we do charge interest on outstanding taxes so  there is a certain prospect of  recovering our expenses at some  time in the future. The monies!;  owed to us are all "secured;:  receivables",   but  it  certainly t  does put a strain on the cash,  flow." (y  Village Clerk Malcolm  Shanks noted that three properties had recently accrued to the  village when no bids for thomy  were received at the tax sale.  One is a five acre rural parcel;  one is a commercial property  with a good sized building on it,  and the third is a property on  the hydro right-of-way. The  owners have one year ��� -asyd'f ���  September 30 to pay all current  and outstanding taxes in order  to recover the properties.      );���';  Shanks also pointed out that,  up to three years ago, the village  did not have to. borrow for  operating expenses "until  February or March. Last year it  was November and this year'it  will be by the end of this month  (October)." yy  Government decrees  Fishing fleet has priority  The complaints of commercial fishermen, objecting to being packed like sardines into the  crowded facilities at the Gibsons  government Wharf, has had the  result that all pleasure boats  moored at the wharf may soon  be ordered to leave.  At last Tuesday's regular  meeting of Gibsons Town  Council^ Lorraine * Goddafcf,  Clerk-treasurer reported that  she had learned from assistant  wharfinger Howie Foley that  there are now more commercial  fish boats moored at the wharf  than ever before and in order to  make room for the entire  fishing fleet this winter, it appears necessary that private  pleasure craft will be forced to  move elsewhere.  After receiving numerous  complaints from commercial  fishermen about the lack of  space that has created impaired  fire lanes and damage to some  boats, Foley had contacted the  office of the operations officer  of fisheries and oceans, which  carries final responsibility for  the government floats, to determine the rights to moorage  space of fishermen over other  boats. According to Foley, it  was confirmed that commercial  fish boats have first priority.  "This is the law," said Mayor  Labonte. "Fishermen have the  right to park boats at the wharf  and pleasure craft will have to  move."  Alderman Burnside said,  "Before, we had no alternative;  now there is the Gibsons  Marina."  Questioned by Alderman  Peterson about enforcement,  Clerk-treasurer Goddard said  that the wharfinger, under the  rules and regulations of the  federal department of fisheries  and oceans, has the power to  physically move boats.  Alderman Peterson also asked if pleasure boats would be  allowed back in if all the spots  were not taken by the commercial fish boats. Mayor Labonte  responded that they would.  According to assistant wharfinger Foley there are approximately 40 pleasure boats and at  least 30 commercial fish boats  permanently moored at the  wharf. In addition, there are  tugs, water taxis, log salvagers  and various other work boats.  Of concern to many pleasure  boat owners is the difference  between moorage rates charged  at the government wharf and  those charged at private  marinas.  Moorage rates are based on  the length of the boat. Commercial fish boats at the wharf  are given a subsidized rate of  $.55 per foot, while all other  boats at the wharf are charged  $1.23 per foot. Electricity is  available as an option at $20 per  month.  The privately operated Gibsons Marina, located nearby  and where many of the pleasure  boats may have to go, charges a  varying set of rates depending  on summer or winter and the  length of commitment. The  winter rate on a one month  basis is $3 per foot ($2.10 per  foot when paying six months in  advance), while the summer rate  is $4.50 per foot.  Because spaces will be made  available next year at the Gibsons Marina for summer  visitors, boats over 29 feet that  intend to stay permanently will  have to pay an annual moorage  in order to be guaranteed of  staying beyond May 1, 1986.  Those most seriously effected  by the proposed eviction will be  the estimated 14 people that live  aboard nine of the pleasure  boats.  They may end up with no  place to go., Most, if not all���of  these boats dp hot have holding  tanks to contain effluent, a  stipulation the Gibsons Marina  requires before allowing live-,  aboards in. No other local,  moorage is available. y'  These people comprise a vital  portion of a long existing subculture that has given lower;  Gibsons much of its character./  They are not happy at the news';  of a possible eviction. .  A dismayed Jim Harding^,  who lives on his 40 foot, partiafcx  ly Finished ketch, the Salis/i:  Maiden and who has been a;  commercial fisherman himself;';  simply said "I guess I'll have to;  start making plans."  And from an agitated  Corrance, who has lived  nearly four years aboard  vessel, recently renamed  Einstein for a CBC  Beachcomber series:"Is a com-  ercial fishing boat more important because it's a business than,  my boat is because it's my  home?" He intends to fight the  issue the best he can. "This is  the bottom line; I'm getting run  out of town."  Another live-aboard, Johnny  "Cottonears" Moore, common  sight at the wharf as he daily,  watches over its comings and  goings,  is not pleased either-.-:'-  "You'd think they'd be able to;  Please turn to page 10  ;  Ian  foiv  his'  the  i'VC"* '  ;--* ������  tm  f$&~  M  SI?;--'  ���pwJ!  mo  pk  fr  M  Pleasure craft at the Gibsons Government Wharf will soon have to make way for the commercial fishing  fleet which has grown over the year. Approximately 40 boats will be ordered to move. (See story)  ���Brad Benson photo  i  \ Coast News, October 7,1985  Bombing folly  Surely the world must be wearying of the Israeli policy  of massive airborne retaliation for acts of terrorism. Surely  the Israeli people must be beginning to question the  wisdom of the tactic.  Last week's bombing of the PLO headquarters in Tunis  in North Africa in retaliation for the murder of three  Israelis in Cyprus immediately backfired with more Israelis  being gunned down in return retaliation.  There never was any proof that the PLO had been  responsible for the Cyprus murders. There are so many  groups killing people in the Middle East at the present time  it could have been anyone of a dozen militia groups  responsible.  The timing of the raid against the PLO, with King Hussein of Jordon in the United States actively pursuing  peace, could not have been worse.  The initial response of President Reagan in support of  the Israeli bombers was stupid in the extreme. Six  Americans were being held hostage at the time Reagan  supported the bombing raids. Now there are Five. Surely  that was predictable. The fact that Americans did not veto  the United Nations condemnation of the raid indicates the  initial approval was a mistake.  Somehow, the terrible circle of murder and murderous  retaliation has to be broken. There is no future where acts  of terrorism are greeted with retaliatory acts of greater terrorism.  Apart from the questions of morality, the Israeli tactic is  fraught with doom for their own beleaguered little country. Only in peace is there a future and that is nowhere  more true than in the Middle East and for the embattled,  surrounded, and outnumbered Israelis.  John Burnside  imm the files of Hit COAST NEWS  5 YEARS AGO  Historic Whitaker House in Sechelt is scheduled for  demolition this week. The Sunshine Coast Credit Union  is planning to erect a new building on the site.  Opposition is expressed in Pender Harbour for a proposed 10 per cent hike in trucking freight rates for the  Sunshine Coast.  Commercial salmon season comes to a close with  almost all fishermen reporting a poor season.  10 YEARS AGO  Striking and pulp and propane workers on the Sunshine Coast are expected to be back at work within days  after the provincial government passes special legislation. --"��� >y"'"' ';^';' ���'���''���  15 YEARS AGO  Following three years of intensive signal studies  along with extensive engineering and commercial  surveys, Coast Cable Vision goes smoothly into operation on Thursday, October 1.  20 YEARS AGO  Gibsons fire district committee informs Gibsons  Council that it has dropped the idea of forming an outside fire department as a separate entity and wants to  continue the present arrangement with one fire department responsible for the village and rural areas.  The Bank of Montreal open house gives the public an  opportunity to inspect the new Pender Harbour Branch  at Madeira Park.  25 YEARS AGO  To assist young people in the area, the Port Mellon  Community Club has organized a film society. There  will be two film showings every month.  Residents of Halfmoon Bay, Redroffs and Welcome  Beach turned out in full force Saturday to honour  Reverend Canon Alan Greene, D.D., their now retired  pastor. Canon Greene was the popular parson of the  Columbia Coast Mission ship the John Antle.  30 YEARS AGO  B.C. Tel District Manager Eric Mallett announces additional long distance circuits between Vancouver, Gibsons and Sechelt at a Sechelt Board of Trade meeting.  The $17,000 project will service future growth in Sechelt  and an addition to the Gibsons switchboard.  35 YEARS AGO  Schools here will cost in the neighbourhood of  $500,000 before completion. Every modern method will  be used in their construction. Science will.attend every  movement until the final stone is laid. Then the School  Board will employ a water djviner to locate water on the  Roberts Creek School site. Permission will be sought  for Gambier Island school students to attend school at  Hopkins Landing until the Gambier Island school is  built.  40 YEARS AGO  Payment of a premium of three cents an hour for  night shift work in four B.C. pulp mills has been approved by the National War Labour Board.  Ernie Keen, carrying the two youngest, and his four  children escaped alive last week when their home in  Halfmoon Bay burned to the ground. The cause of the  fire is unknown. Mrs. Keen was visiting her parents in  Gibsons Landing.  The Sunshine  CO-PUBLISHERS  John Burnside M.M. Vaughan  EDITORIAL  Editor. Dianne Evans Brad Beiwon  PRODUCTION  Fran Burnside    Leif Pedersen      Jo Forrest  ADVERTISING  J. Fred Duncan Pat Tripp  TYPESETTING  AnneThomsen Sayu Woods  DISTRIBUTION  Steve Carroll  The Sunshine COAST NEWS is a co-operative locally owned newspaper,  published on the Sunshine Coast, B.C. every Monday by Glassford Press  Ltd., Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0. Gibsons Tel. 886-2622 or 886-7817;  Sechelt Tel. 885-3930. Second Class Mail Registration No. 4702.  The Sunshine COAST NEWS is protected by copyright and reproduction  of any part of it by any means is prohibited unless permission in writing  is first secured from Glassford Press Ltd., holders of the copyright.  v_  SUBSCRIPTION RATES  Canada: 1 year $30; 6 months $18; Foreign: 1 year $35  Vancouver's most photographed tree never had its picture taken  while it was standing! A Douglas Fir that had been broken off 310  feet above the ground, it grew just south of Georgia Street exactly  halfway between Seymour and Granville on the site now occupied  by the Pacific Centre. In 1885 this spot was part of the CPR  townsite, an area stretching from False Creek to Burrard Inlet and  running from the western boundary of "Gastown" to Burrard  Street. When the decision was made to extend the railway from  Port Moody to a new terminus at Vancouver, the CPR hired contractors to clear the townsite and selected the lot on the southwest  corner of Georgia and Granville for their first Hotel Vancouver.  Clearing began at the inlet and proceeed up the hill so that by  February 1886 fallers were at work on the hotel site and the adjacent lots. The job of falling the big Douglas Fir went to contractor  Alex Russell and he brought it to the ground on February 12.  Lachlan Hamilton, the CPR land commissioner who had surveyed  the Granville Street lots, came back after the tree was on the ground  and jotted down a few statistics in his field survey book. "On  stump," he worte,4ill feet 8 inches (in diameter); 30 feet from  ground, 8 feet 2 inches; 210 feet from ground, 3 feet 10 inches."  In this picture, taken in March 1886, five of Vancouver's citizens  pose beside the butt cut of the Big Tree for a "souvenir photo" to  send to friends and relatives in the east. The man in the centre is  Sam Brighouse, one of the "Three Greenhorns" who pre-empted  the West End. To his right is Captain Powers of Moodyville who  had been one of the contractors for the original Cariboo Road. On,,  the extreme right is Jack Fannin of the Hastings Mill Store. He was-  also postmaster there around 1880. The well-dressed man to  Brighouse's left has not been identified, but there is some evidence  that the rumpled man on the extreme left is Alex Russell, the contractor responsible for bringing the big tree down. The  photographer is unknown; no commercial studios operated in the  settlement until May 1886.  ���photo courtesy Belly C. Keller .  Musings  John Burnside  Perhaps I might be forgiven  for a little careful comment on  the media this week and the  ethics, or lack of them, which  govern the way the news is  covered. This essay is prompted  by recent events affecting the  Sunshine Coast and involves  both television and the print  media.  Let me begin with television  on the heels of a CBC documentary shot and screened last  week which, it is reported, was  notable for the air of unrelieved  gloom with which it portrayed  our town and its economic prospects.   ����� .      ,, ���,  My mistrust of film makers '.  and what they can do with their  editing techniques goes back a  long way. In 1947, when I was  nine years old and a passionate  supporter of the Glasgow  Rangers, soccer team, my elder  brother took me to a Scottish  Cup semi-final at Hampden  Park in Glasgow, against the  Hibernian team from Edinburgh.  It turned out that there were  147,000 people at that game and  we were in the park an hour and  a half before the kickoff so that  I could be near the front of the  standing crowd to enable me to  see the action.  During the long wait for the  game to start a Movietone news  crew came around and encouraged us to cheer boisterously which we affably did.  It was an excellent soccer  game, as I remember, unfortunately won by the detested  Edinburgh team by a score of  1-0. That was bad enough. The  insult was added to the injury a  week or so later in a movie  house when exerpts from the  soccer game were shown in the  Media role  news portion of the movie program. There was Hibernian  scoring their winning goal, cut  to the cheering crowd, and there  right in the middle of the shot  was yours truly cheering wildly  for the wrong team.  More recently, during the last  provincial election I was in  Powell River when Dave Barrett  made his only stop in this constituency. I was having a beer in  a Powell River hotel with Don  Lockstead and Alan Garr of the  Vancouver Province when the  evening news came on. The  travelling television crew who  were accompanying the Opposition Leader were also in the bar  watching their work of the  previous day. They were against  the incumbent government to a  man, as indeed I was, but I  couldn't help but be struck by  their undisguised glee as the  juxtaposition of various short  televised clips made provincial  cabinet ministers look bad. It  was apparent that attempting to  be objective had no high priority with the television men.  Last week the CBC crew were  here to cover the Town Hall  Meeting on the recent layoffs at  Port Mellon. They came around  the Coast News office Friday  morning. They said that they  felt Gibsons was like the province in microcosm and would I  oblige them with an interview.  They had, they said, a wonderful opening shot of a dark cloud  over Gibsons.  . I was interviewed but I wasn't  part of the show - just couldn't  get dark and gloomy enough, I  guess. They left town on the  12:30 ferry and apparently their  morning did allow them to find  three people who were depress  ing enough to match their opening cloud shot.  The show was screened at 6  p.m. the same day it was shot.  The results were immediate. At  least one local business which  had a deal negotiated for a sale,  a couple of retirement age bowing out, was scrapped as a result  of the gloomy view portrayed of  Gibsons and its prospects.  The point is that the television crew knew what kind of  show they wanted before they  fired off their cameras for the  first time. In a matter of three  hours they summed up and  presented for public consumption a view of Gibsons which  was filmed to make use of a  good cloud shot.  It was the height of journalistic irresponsibility and I  suspect from the previous experiences alluded to, entirely  characteristic of how television  goes about the business of relaying the news.  Watch your nightly news  telecast and notice how on  almost every story the last shot  is of an intense and meaningful  so-called reporter uttering a  piece of blatant and unsubstantiated opinion on the film clips  we have just been watching.  In the print medium what we  find frequently is a journalist  with a Watergate complex.  Otherwise inconsequential individuals armed with pencil and  notebook and a desire to reveal  some hidden corruption, usually imaginary, write with zealous  frenzy unmindful of whether  what they uncover has substance or, whether lacking  substance, they are causing  mischief and pain where none is  warranted.  Last week in a local publication a young man who has, we"  are told, a master's degree in  journalism, decided to play,  Watergate with a personnel  matter involving the Sunshine:  Coast Community Services-  Society.  Never mind that personnel.  matters are properly regarded as  private between the institution.^  and their employees. Our in-".J  trepid journalistic sleuth phones'J  around and finally finds one in-**  volved individual who will'-j  satisfy his hunger for a sensa-r*  tional story. .N  Never mind that responsible  members of the community  refute the ridiculous charges.^;  They are not asked for their opi- ���  nion. Our local Watergate man;  is satisfied. He has found so-;  meone who will make sensa-,;  tional allegations. The burden��  of proof of the allegations made >  are none of his concern. Thesj  smear against those still serving'��  on the Sunshine Coast Com: -  munity Services and those still-  working there on behalf of they  community has been made. Not  proof is required. Is this what is'.  taught in journalism courses?  >  These are difficult economic';  days and there are profound ';  philosophic differences at play;  in our society. Out of the dif>  ficulties and the differences we'*  are going to have to work our ;  way back to economic health.y  The cynical superficiality of the "j  television crew and the>  muckraking of our would be <  Watergater are just two more-  obstacles on the path to com-j  munity health.  In the meanwhile, those are  real people being hurt by irresponsible fools.  Maryanne's    viewpoint  A story still being written  by Maryanne West  Once upon a time there was a  beautiful land, a veritable  garden of Eden, where endless  forests grew, prairies of lush  grass stretched from horizon to  horizon, rivers and lakes teemed  with fish and wildlife was abundant.  Not many people lived in this  country, and as they hadn't  developed an industrial  technology and still had the  quaint idea that they held the  land in trust to a Great Spirit,  they lived in balance with  nature.  All this changed as the country was discovered by people  from across the sea, people who  came with a more advanced  technology and a belief that the  bounty of natural resources was  theirs for the taking.  For many years they made  only pockets of change in the  landscape, but as their  technology developed and they  were able to remove mountains  to get at the minerals, dam great  rivers, clearcut the forests, plant  great tracts of land to one crop,  build superhighways for their  cars and to manufacture all  manner of consumer goods.  They began to think they were  gods and there wasn't anything  they couldn't do or their  technology couldn't fix.  The workers in the plants and  mills united to pressure the  companies and the government  for more money and that combined with world wide shortages  after a war, produced a great  boost to the economy as  everyone had money to spend  on new cars, refrigerators,  televisions and a variety of consumer goods beyond the imagination of former generations. Everyone came to regard  an annual increase in salary as a  right and for a while it looked as  if there would be no end to the  good things technology would  provide for everyone.  It was only slowly that people  began to understand that  everything in their world was interconnected and that they'd  got into lots of sloppy habits  which couldn't be continued  with impunity.  Governments   began   to  monitor the problems of industrial waste and to implement  pollution controls, but industry  wasn't enthusiastic. All these  extras added to the cost of production, an important factor in  an increasingly competitive  market. Multi-nationals began  to invest their profits in countries where wages were lower  and pollution controls less stringent or non-existent.  Profit and the accumulation  of wealth had become almost  everyone's god, the whole point  of life.  The writing had been on the  wall for many a year that if they  continued to let toxic  substances, the waste materials  of industrial production, insecticides and chemical fertilizers  accumulate on the land, in the  water and in the air, they would  upset the natural balance and  trouble would be the result.  Eventually everything began  to catch up on the people of this  once productive and beautiful  land. They were beset on  everyside by problems: acid rain  killing fish and forests; greatly  reduced  fish  stocks;  depleted  forests; drought; grasshoppers;  falling prices on world markets  making traditional industries  uncompetitive. All the while  deficits soared and governments  dithered, and relied on outdated "solutions".  The end of this story has yet  to be written.  How will these people react  to the crisis in their world? Will  they dream up and support new  ways of doing things? Will they  make sure this time around that  these new ways are firmly based  on the laws of nature, that you  must put back what you take  out? Will they take waste  management seriously realising  that whatever the initial costs it  will save them in the long run?  Will they re-cycle used products  to save energy and materials?  Will they be willing to share,  help and support each other or  demand their "rights" and to  hell with others less fortunate?  Will they be willing to change  their life styles having learnt  that nothing in this world is for  free, it comes with a price attached?  We are writing this part of  the story now. Coast News, October 7,1985  3.  Editor's note: A copy of the  following letter was received for  publication.  The Honorable  Mr. Tom Waterland,  Minister of Forestry  Parliament Buildings  Victoria, B.C.  Dear Sir:  We must protest the proposed purchase of L&K Lumber  Limited   at   Twin   Creeks   in  Howe Sound. The purchase of  this sawmill by Terminal  Sawmills will see the re-location  of this operation to the Fraser  River which will mean the loss  of a possible 40 jobs in this hard  hit area.  Our understanding was that  when L&K Lumber Ltd. started  operation, their licences and  permits specified the Howe  Sound area.  With the recent lay-off of 98  men at Canfor Howe Sound  Pulp Division at Port Mellon,  and the possibility of many  more layoffs in the future, this  area has become the highest  area for unemployment. Not  only does this affect the men  and women out of work but  also almost every business and  individual on the coast.  We urge you to stop this pur-  Man's mismanagement at fault  Editor:  ; I would like to challenge  Laurel Sukkau (or anyone else  for that matter) to defend her  accusations (September 30  "Letters to the Editor"), showing from the word of God how  the concept of man's God-given  dominion over creation is  responsible for the abuses she  speaks of. If she cannot defend  her position from this source,  she is doing precisely what I  originally spoke against - judging God and His word according to the ungodly behaviour  and standards of men.  Contrary to her view that the  biblical concept of dominion  naturally results in exploitation,  God enjoins us to be good  stewards over the things He has  made. His explanation of the  suffering of the "Whole crea  tion" as being a direct result of  the disobedience of man (Rom  8:20-22; CF Genesis Ch.3)  should lead us to evaluate our  further impact on creation and  cause us to walk softly, rather  than to promote further un-  necesary suffering.  A reading of the book  "Pollution and the Death of  Man" by Francis Schaeffer  should put to rest the idea that  Cap College earns praise  Editor:  It is nice to be able to congratulate and thank an  organization for something they  had done. These days it seems  to be the in thing to do to run  things down so here's a change.  Last Wednesday, October 2,  was the first session of the  course titled Marine Invertebrates or The Spineless  ones, put on by Capilano College in Sechlet and first impres  sions lead me to believe that this  course taught by Vicky Troup is  going to be a winner.  Up to now the emphasis on  types of courses offered by the  college seems to have been on  teaching English, typing,  business management and such  subjects. I guess these are  necessary but it was so  refreshing to know that other  courses are available if requested and that the people on  the Sunshine Coast can, if they  want, have the opportunity to  study other subjects particularly  relevant to living in an area like  this with the sea, the mountains  and the rain forest with their interesting inhabitants in such  close proximity.  Congratulations, Cap College  and lets hope this is just the  beginning of a trend.  John Hind Smith  Self-help proposed on fish  Editor:  -In your September 30 edition  there was a letter written by J.  Smith who was suggesting that  something be done about putting more fish back into the  ff  Willi 1\11\11I1CB3  Quote of the Week ��  The earth is but one  country, and mankind its  citizens.  *s.s.^  ��� Baha'u'llah.  ocean so that he/she and his  American friends could be sure  of catching one when they went  fishing.  I don't know where J. Smith  lives on the coast but I would  like to suggest that if in fact  he/she wants more fish available for him/her to catch,  he/she could volunteer some  time to get involved with the  Department of Fisheries and  Oceans (DFO) Salmon Enhancement Programme, the main  object of which are to produce  SE  ELPHINSTONE ELECTORS ASSOCIATION  MEETING  Wednesday, Oct. 9, 1985  7:30 p.m.  Cedar Grove School  Agenda minutes & business  I  -guest speakers:  Anne Langdon  Tourism  Jim Gurney  report  Vic Walker  ExpOasis  * Discussion * Door Prizes  IE.'  salmon and improve the local  stream environment.  There are a number of projects up and down the coast run  by volunteers and with limited  resources they are having considerable success in raising  chum and coho salmon.  The DFO community advisor is Grant McBane who can  be reached at 883-2613 and I am  sure he would put J. Smith in  touch with the project closest to  him/her or may suggest he/she  start a project of his/her own.  John Hind Smith  Grateful  for  coverage  Editor:  Members of the Sunshine  Coast Arts Council would like  you and your staff to know how  very grateful we are for your  wonderful coverage of our  events in the Coast News.  In an organization such as  ours, newspaper coverage often  makes the difference between  success and failure.  We trust there will always be  mutual co-operation between  us, such as there has been in the  past.  Thanks again - and again.  Vivian Chamberlin  Correspondence  Secretary  ,dW  re  nil*1  de*"  V*  st��  tA<S>e'  <o^  e(  \����  >*<��  CO  OP  ov>^;:oc^.^c^^>^  rd*N  W  <_W  ce<<  \Ne  W  VJ^  6^��  ,e<^  c&**  ffl  tfaifc  M*  $#��  W  chase of L&K Lumber Limited  unless the prospective buyers  are willing to contunue to  operate this total operation at  its existing site.  Thank you for your attention  to this very important matter.  Verna Sim, Manager  Gibsons & District  Chamber of Commerce.  Christians are not concerned  about ecological problems.  Man's heavy-handed mismanagement is a result of not  exercising wise dominion and  not taking seriously our role as  good  stewards.   Don't   blame  God    for   fhp   pxn!njtatir��n<:   nf  men.  Nicol Warn  Halfmoon Bay  Passenger Bus  NEW SCHEDULE (SAME ROUTE)  Leaves Leaves Arrives  Omega Rest. Cedars Plaza Langdale  7:45 a.m 8:00 a.m 8:10 a.m.  11:45 a.m  .12:00 noon 12:10 p.m.  1:45 p.m 2:00 p.m 2:10 p.m.  3:45 p.m 4:00 p.m 4:10 p.m.  5:45 p.m 6:00 p.m 6:10 p.m.  7:45 p.m 8:00 p.m 8:10 p.m.  For information call 886-2268  16.  I*  !��:  COAST NEWS Photo   Reprints  Any published photo or your  choice from the contact sheets  3l    4  5x   7  8x10  P  t a  &  '���%  _ -   **  ���i  ALL RESIDENTS OF  THE SUNSHINE COAST  * ,����!���.. ���������*-:- v+fi, -..seas  i "'.vXJrm  wBIHpj  Please be advised that the Gibsons and the  Halfmoon Bay Refuse Disposal Sites will be  open from October 11, 1985 to October 20, 1985  for burnable refuse only.  G. Dixon  Works Superintendent  Sunshine Coast Regional District  i&^ll  j^t!ii:!!il!v::tiliiij>is  The Skoda GLS 5-Speed.  Proof that sometimes  you get more for less.  'X  f9_  ,*  ���9  *  .'.  r*.  *�����  '��  s  4.  ��  v.  ���*>  I*.  ��������  t  I  a*.  ��  You get more,  ���5-speed transmission ���  ���Front spoiler ���  ���Quartz halogen headlamps ���  ���Steel belted radial tires ���  ���Rack and pinion steering ���  ���Dual outside rearview ���  mirrors ���  ���Tachometer ���  ���Daily trip meter  ���Intermittent wipers  a lot more.  Low fuel warning light  Velour interior  Fully reclining bucket seats  Child proof rear door locks  Rear window defroster  Locking gas cap  Rear spoiler  5 year Waxoyl rustproofing  For less,  a lot less.  $5,898  Plus freight. PDI. Tax. license  MARK GUIGNARD  TIPS ON CAR BUYING  New SKODA'S are selling very well, consequently we have many fresh  trades at LOW LOW PRICES. Many customers ask me "How can you tell  if a salesman is lying to you?" This one easy to field: "His lips are moving!" (P.S. - Salesmen tell the truth, or their careers are short-lived.)  Keep those questions coming in._   1981 MAZDA PICKUP LONG BOX  ONE OWNER  5 SPD TRANS  FIBERMOLD CANOPY Screened & Lighted,  AM/FM Radio, Rear Step Bumper, Michelin  Radial Tires Including 2 Mounted Snow  Tires, Recent Tune Up & Oil Change  $4550  UNIQUE 1962 PONTIAC  PARISIENNE 2 DR HARDTOP  Original Paint/Chrome As New. Rebuilt 327 V8,  350 Turbohydromatic Trans, 4BBL Holley With  Headers, New Dual Exhausts, New B.F. Goodrich  T/A Radials On Chrome Spoke Wheels, Custom  Interior, Bucket Seats, Runs Very Well & Fast  SUPER SKOOKUM  p����  >*c  p����  ���*��  ���?*  t  ���t.  >*���  SUPER SKOOKUM  $2450  Skookum Auto  SALES 885-7512       SERVICE 885-7008     Deaierzaat Coast News, October 7,1985  Mj^M^MMSMMmSSW��&^^!M.  Pioneer stock still to the fore  by Joan Wilson, 883-9606  A PIONEER PENDER  PERSON  They say that one is never  happier than when one forgets  oneself in helping others. October's Pender Person is indeed  a happy person, for most of her  busy hours are spent helping so  many people in the Harbour  and in many other places.  Louella Duncan always has a  project on the go, either collecting clothes for overseas missions, packing up baby clothes  for northern families, or making quarts and quarts of applesauce for the local food  bank. Her cheerful smile and  keen interest in the welfare of  others have brightened up  Pender Harbour for more years  than she would care to have me  mention.  Her parents, Martin and  Martha Warnock, settled in  Bargain Harbour in the 1920's;  Louella was raised, married and  in turn raised her family right,  r  ��,.  *  ^  re  i:  t  't  "I  5,  W  ��  15  MR. CHARLES BU  PENDER HARBOUR  CREDIT UNION  Madeira Park  883-9112 883-2236  The Board of Directors of the  Pender Harbour Credit Union is  pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Charles Buscholl as  General Manager. ���  Mr. Buscholl comes to us from  Cochrane, Alberta, and brings  with him over 11 years of banking  experience.  Mr. Buscholl would be pleased to  discuss all your banking requirements with you at your  earliest convenience.  Pender  Harbour  Credit  Union  here in the Harbour.  You are a very special person,  Louella Duncan, and Pender  Harbour is proud to have -you  for a friend.  HAPPY ENDING  It sure pays to advertise! Only  a week after I mentioned the  Hedderson's lost dog in the column, Diane Dennis up on  Gulfview phoned John to say  she had seen her. Dog and  owner were happily reunited on  Tuesday! Thanks to all who  kept an eye out for Cashmere.  BADMINTON IS ON!  Joan Cameron called to say  that badminton will start up on  Thursday, October 17, and will  run Mondays and Thursdays  from 7:30 - 9:30. Get your  rackets out of retirement, grab a  birdie and come out for food,  exercise and fun.  A MESSAGE FOR MIKE  Joni, his family and friends in  the   Harbour   wish   Mike   a  speedy recovery in Powell River  Hospital.  HELP WANTED  Do you have a working fridge  that you don't need? The Community Room at Pender Harbour High School needs one as  soon as possible. If you could  donate one, please contact Ron  Cole at the secondary school,  883-2727,     before     2:30  weekdays.  STORK TALK  John and Trudy Paetkau  have a lovely little daughter,  Elisa Ann Helena, born- early  last Wednesday morning. Elisa  joins sister Kristina, who is 4,  and brother Michael, 20 months.  Welcome to Stephen Matthew Rose, born September 14  to Barbara and Glyn Rose of  the Harbour. Proud grandparents are Ron and Audrey  INVITE THE WORLD  Thanks to Jack Heidema and  the Pender Harbour firemen,  we are the first on the Sunshine  Coast to put up an Expo "Invite  the World" banner, right over  the main street! This banner  was given to us by the Tourism  Association last week as part of  the campaign to promote the  fair.  OPEN HOUSE CARD SALE  You can buy your Christmas  cards and other stationery needs  in comfort, and put your money  to a good cause at the Save the  Children "Open House Card  Sale", sponsored by St. Andrew's Church Women.  The sale will be held at the  home of Isobel McWhinnie on  Many things in a Japanese garden are miniature, but not these two  hubbard squash grown by Yoko Chance of Langdale. Weighing in  at 28 and 34 pounds, Mrs. Chance says she'll "chop them up and  give them to lots of friends.'' ���Fran Burnside photo  M'l'ii'HU'WK  frwi  Ideas?  Questions?  Concerns?  I  I  I- <j- V-;  i yV-  '-VU1,  y y  ���t y  .-r>,  If you have an idea or a problem, a beef or a bouquet, we would  like to hear about it. Complete a Tell Us! form and deposit it in  the Tell Us! box at your Credit Union. You can be sure your  voice will be heard. If you would like us to get back to you on  the matter, be sure to include your name and address in the  space provided on the Tell Us! form.  We welcome knowing what you think of our service and have  introduced Tell Us! to give us a better understanding of your  needs.  Tell Us! ... because we care about what you think.  -M  ::1  M  *&  'I  ��� 'it  PENDER HARBOUR^  CREDIT UNION  P.O. BOX 28 MADEIRA PARK, B.C. VON 2H0  883-9112 883-2236  BOTH MEMBERS AND NON-MEMBERS ARE INVITED TO RESPOND  f  Francis Peninsula Road, the second house on the water past  the bridge. Mark down Saturday, November 5 on your calendar, and drop in sometime between 10 and 4 to make your  selection and enjoy a cup of tea.  HOSPITAL AUXILIARY  The regular meeting of the  Pender Harbour branch of the  Auxiliary to St. Mary's  Hospital will be held Wednesday, October 9, 1:30 at St. Andrew's Hall.  A special welcome to new  members, and thank you to all  who stopped by the information  display at Madeira Park last  week. Much of the work done  by the auxiliary is unseen by the  public - until we land in the  hospital, or donate blood, or  visit friends confined at St.  Mary's. Thank you, ladies, for  everything you do!  THANKSGIVING  BREAKFAST  Put away your apron, Mum,  we're off to the Lions  Thanksgiving Pancake  Breakfast! Come out to Lions  Park and eat your fill for $3 - $2  for kids - on Sunday, October  13, 9 till 12.  At that very reasonable price  you can afford to treat the  whole family, and even bring  along your house guests! Pancakes, eggs, bacon, juice, coffee  - and no dishes to wash. We'll  be there for sure! Any money  raised goes to the Lions usual  good causes, many of which are  right here in the Harbour.  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  at  Books & Stuff  in Sechelt  until noon Saturday  "A Friendly r>��opl�� M��e��"  WALK-INS  ARE WELCOME  % OFF  your  autumn perm.  Pick from the best  perms money can  buy.  Expert styling. Curiy perms, body wave,  stacked, soft curl, combinations.  ��� Coloring ��� Permanent Waving  ��� Personality Hair Designing  f $ UNISiX *����"��  Sunnycrest Mall   Gibsons   Mon thru Sat  ->v  i88@PP!  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons  NEW MANAGEMENT  NEW PHONE NUMBER     886-8823  Let us prepare...  . Birthday party treats  - Chocolates, nuts, assorted candies, gifts boxed to your  requirements  - Nachos, popcorn  - Fresh coffee, soft drinks  - Ice cream products  ORDER HALLOWE'EN TREATS  PACKAGED NOW!  Free delivery  - town of Gibsons  Call or visit today  Get it at the  GIBSONS  PHARMASAVE  PRICE  ^��,  UNICURE  SHAMPOO  450 ml  SALE  PARAMETTE  Cnewables for Children  100s  SALE  $409  Allenbury's Basic  SOAP  100 gm Bar  Reg. 1.59  sale'*09  *.  HI DRI  TOWELS  By Kleenex  2's  SALE  98  ABSORBENT  BALLS  Pharmasave  SALE  99  TEN-0-SIX  LOTION  Bonne Bell  480 ml  Reg. 6.69  SAIS S49"  See our  GREAT TOY  VALUE  HELLAS  CHOCOLATE  BARS  100 gm size  Reg. 1.09  SALE  PLAYING  CARDS  Single Deck  Reg. 1.49  99  SALE  ENTR0PHEN  10  100 Tabs  Reg. 5.98  SALE*  Magnetic  BINGO  Wands & Markers  SALE  $C98  PUREX  TOILET  TISSUE  4's  SALE  $]39  :G}fl&QM&f��  ^Sunhycrje^:-J!l^afl;yj3i^0h5  886-7213  Post Office  it___t___t  _\____m9_J__Stu 111 M-itii*  Utility Bills Coast News, October 7,1985  IRl^itllifflWli  Key person needed  /  by Jeanie Parker, 886-3973  The institution of a "key person" has made Kraus Hall (the  joint use facility) much more accessible to the community.  Moira Richter has been opening  the building for users during  non-school hours so that a  school board employee is not required.  Continuing Education Coordinator Ricki Moss says this  arrangement has worked well  but Moria would like to turn it  over to someone else. Ideally  this would be somebody who  lives close to the school.  If you would consider taking  pn this position but would like  more information, talk to  Moira or phone Continuing  Education. It's a volunteer position but very important to the  community.  L.A. TONIGHT  Legion Auxiliary members  are reminded of the very important meeting tonight, October 7  at 8 p.m. Everybody please attend.  PARENTS NEEDED  Several people have indicated  interest in a Teen Club again at  the legion this year but parents  are needed to supervise. Come  on people, if you want activities  for your kids you have to be  willing to help with them!  Please phone Pam Lumsden  at 885-3522 or sign up at the  store.  PARENTS WEDNESDAY  You ARE planning on attending   the   parents   auxiliary  HOOVER  MODEL U441S075  If-  i  I  t  I  75th  Anniversary  .Convertible'  ..���.-,-  Upright Vacuum  ��� ATTRACTIVE COLOUR  COMBINATION OF CRIMSON  RUST AND ALMOND BEIGE  ��� 30 FOOT VINYL CORD WITH  STORAGE HOOKS  ��� 8.2 LITRE BOTTOM FILL  DISPOSABLE BAG  ��� 4 POSITION RUG  ADJUSTMENT  ��� 3 POSITION HANDLE  ��� FULL WRAP-AROUND  s    FURNITURE GUARD  ��� POSITIVE AGITATION  ��� EDGE CLEANfNG ON BOTH  SIDES  ��� POWERFUL 5.0 AMP.  COMPUTER DESIGNED  MOTOR  SPECIAL  M 59"  ���"..���_ GIBSONS  BUILDING SUPPLIES^  Two Locations:  Sunshine Coast Highway, Gibsons  Wharf and Dolphin, Sechelt  meeting this Wednesday aren't  you? It's vital "to the survival of  this important organization that  more people become active in it.  Meeting starts at 7 p.m. at  Roberts Creek elementary.  COMMANDER VISITS  Zone Commander Les Brown  will be visiting the general  meeting of the Roberts Creek  Legion this Wednesday, October 9. . .  Voting members are reminded that attendance at meetings  qualifies them for a rebate on  their membership dues. Meeting  starts at 7:30, not 8 p.m.  ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAY  Steve Hubert will be performing at the Roberts Creek Legion  this Friday. Steve has a vast  repertoire and can play to  anybody's tastes so drop in to  listen and dance.  The legion is holding a masquerade dance Saturday, October 26, with "Slim Pickins"  so start planning your costume.  Members and guests only.  FURNITURE DONATIONS  The Roberts Creek Legion is  furnishing a room as a TV  lounge so- that members and  guests can watch sports and  other events, Donations of comfortable armchairs and* sofas,  coffee or end tables, and lamps  would be most appreciated.  Please phone Sharon Kraus  at 885-3848 or Don Van Kleek  at 886-7424.  UPCOMING CLASSES  There are several one-evening  classes being offered at Roberts  Creek School in the next few  weeks.  This Thursday, October 10, is  "How to Protect your Child"  from sexual abuse. This is the  first of a free three part community awareness program being developed by the school  district.  Come to the community use  room at 7:30 p.m.  On Wednesday of next week  Katie Angermeyer will be  presenting "Back Talk" to help  deal with back and neck problems.  CRAFT FAIRE  Anybody interested in renting  a table for the Roberts Creek  Craft Faire on Sunday,  December 1, should phone  . Chris at 885-5206 .... d ,���.  LIBRARY NEWS  Among recent additions to  the library are Central America,  the Real Stakes by Lesler D.  Langley, an Accidental Tourist  by Anne Tyler, Joseph Heller's  new book God Knows, and  some adult and childrens works  that were featured at the  Writers' Forge.  Some volunteers have had to  drop out but we welcome the  new volunteers.  CRAFT DAY  Roberts Creek Branch of St.  Mary's Hospital will hold a  Craft Day at the home of  Dorothy Bruce on Cheryl Ann  Park Road on October 9, at 10  a.m.  All members are invited and  to bring any handwork they are  working on, also bring a sandwich and tea or coffee will be  supplied along with a goody.  NOTICE OF  PUBLIC HEARING  PROPOSED AMENDMENTS  TO TOWN OF GIBSONS  ZONING BYLAW  NO. 500, 1984  Pursuant to Section 720 of the Municipal Act a Public Hearing will be held in the Municipal Hall, 1490 South Fletcher  Road, Gibsons, B.C., on Tuesday, October 15,1985 at 7 p.m. to  consider Bylaw No. 500-3 (Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 500-3,  1985) and Bylaw No. 500-4 (Zoning Amendment Bylaw No.  500-4,1985). At the hearing all persons who deem their interest  in property to be affected by the proposed amendments shall  be afforded an opportunity to be heard on matters contained  in the bylaws.  1. Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 500-3, 1985, is intended to  amend Part 6 of the existing Zoning Bylaw No. 500, 1984.  2. Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 500-4, 1985, is intended to  amend the zoning of the property described as:  That certain parcel or parcels of land in the Town of Gibsons  more particularly known and legally described as the west 30  feet of Lot 1 of Lot "A", D.L. 1328, Plan 13440 to be re-zoned  from Comprehensive Development Area(C.D.A.) to Automobile  Commercial Zone 3 (C.3).  Take notice that the above is deemed to be a synopsis of the  bylaws and is not intended to be an interpretation thereof.  Copies of the amending bylaws are available for inspection at  the Gibsons Municipal Office, 1490 South Fletcher Road, during office hours namely Monday to Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to  4:30 p.m. and Thursday and Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Rob Buchan  MUNICIPAL PLANNER  & APPROVING OFFICER  A  Frozen Aristocrat Grade *��� _fm      wm _m           _m       mb ffe  young turkey k9 J.Ol lb.1.39  Fresh Whole Utility Grade g-��      4  A              _f__\ __%  roasting chicken *9Z. 18 �� .99  Smoked Bone-In Whole or Shank Portion gm       ������ jf*              f% f^  pork picnic kg 1.52 ,��� .69  Frozen Utility Grade  Cornish  game hens  Fresh  kg  3.51   1.59  shrimpmeat ,,10.78 ,.4.89  FRESH PRODUCE  *>       '       /  ���������< > \r K-  B.C. Grown DC Oil  brusselssprouts *9-8D ,��..39  *   Medium Grade  Medium Grade - li ���%      ��� ----���^ f*  California yams k9.42 ,��.. 19  B.C. Grown  mushrooms k94.37 ��,. 1.98  B.C. Grown ffc ffe ��* ������  Danish squash ...kg .bU ,���. ,&i  Oven Fresh White or 100% Wholewheat  hot  bread 450 am -ao  Oven Fresh  dinner  rolls  12's  Oven Fresh  pumpkin ,.  pie 1  Sunbeam 100%  Wholewheat  bread 675 9m  VALUE  1.39  Foremost Grade  large  eggs doz.  Ocean Spray  cranberry  SaUCe 398 ml  Heinz 3 Varieties  PlCKleS   1 ntre  Heinz 3 Varieties  dill  pickles ,i��,ei.8o  Hills Bros 3 Grinds ^    i%_f%  COffee.      .369 gm ����2I2S  7UP or Pepsi  soft  drinks  750 ml  Plus Deposit  Duncan Hines All Varieties       ^     mm _m  cookies      3500m 1.78  2.28  French's Prepared  mustard  Kraft  macaroni &  cheese  Heinz 3 Varieties  beans  .500 ml ���  .225 gm  .398 ml 6.  Coast News, October 7,1985  ISMBBiWSS^U^^S&W  i  ���f  t by Peggy Connor, 885-9437  ]FALL FARE  ;��� The volunteer Harvest Fair,  Sponsored by the Sunshine  fjoast Community Services, are  including a "Fall Fare" contest.  3rhey are looking for people to  .Tbring out their summer's  preserves to be judged. As the  rules have been published  before and will be again, this is  just a reminder.  ��� The event will be on Saturday, October 19 from 10 a.m.  Jo 3 p.m. at the Sechelt Indian  jjand Community Hall.  f Many local organizations  have taken advantage of the offer to participate in the fair,  Some with items for sale, plus  displays of their work and opportunity to sign up new  members.  4 Naturally all this is open to  Jhe public. Proceeds from table  fcpace will go to community services to aid their many  endeavors and proceeds from  Ihe sale of goods will go to the  Organizations providing same.  f�� Sounds like a something for  Everyone day.  $echelt branch  Auxiliary  vj! St. Mary's Hospital Auxiliary, Sechelt Branch are asking  its members to ��� bring several  Items to the next meeting on  Thursday, October 10 at 1:30  p.m., St. Hilda's Church Hall.  jjirst, they.would like a dona-  lion to the food hamper, then,  an article for the mystery prizes.  �� While cleaning house keep in  inind items for the white  'elephant stall.  :* A convenor is needed for the  jams, jellies and preserves. All  other areas are taken care of.  !The bazaar will take place on  Saturday, November 9, at the  Sechelt Indian Band Community Hall.  PROGRESSIVE  CONSERVATIVES MEET  X The Sunshine Coast Progressive Conservatives held an  ^anniversary pot luck dinner on  Saturday, September 28. Guest  ,'speaker was Tom Whalen of the  jixpo committee who showed  glides and described some of the  Exhibits to be at Expo 86. Dancing and entertainment followed  ,then the draw for a salmon was  $km by Tom Whaler*^  �� A general meeting will be  ���field in Powell River for PC  Ihembers October 20, the  ^eaker will be Mary Collins  ���^IP for Coast Capilano.  * The new executive for this  riding will be elected at this  .meeting. Please phone Myrtle  fcious for further information  $85-5424.  ��OLLINGWOOD REUNION  4 There were 400 people attending the 89th Collingwood Reu-  ��ion held on Sunday,  ���September 29 at Carleton  School auditorium in Vancouver. Eddie and Margo  Mathews, David and Margaret  punter were two local couples  1*hat were present.  $ dependable  Chimney clean  :��ree  Estimates  t  Special  Kates  'for  Seniors  886-8356  HEU DANCE  There are still a few tickets  left for the Hospital Employees'  Union's dance to be at the  Senior Citizens Hall on Saturday October 19. Music by Sunshine Ramblers and Joe the accordionist. Proceeds go to the  Variety Club. Tickets are $10  'and available, at Gilligan's Pub  in Sechelt.  SECHELT GARDEN CLUB  The October meeting of the  Sechelt Garden Club was held  on Wednesday, October 2 at St.  Hilda's Church Hall.  It was pointed out that with  Ena Harrold, Jack McLeod and  now P. Connor that makes  three garden club members to  be recognized as good citizens.  Nominating chairman will be  Carmen Grassie. The Christmas  Dinner will be on December 4 at  the Senior Citizens Hall in the  form of a pot luck dinner and  gift exchange.  A replacement request for  Paul Roth on the Kinnikinnik  Park committee came, from  Alderman Ken Short. Anyone  wishing to fill this position  should contact Ken.  Watch' for the plant sale by  the garden club at the forthcoming volunteer Harvest Fair.  President Barry Willoughby  won 29 ribbons out of a possible  42 plus $50 for the best seedling  at the recent show held by the  Vancouver Dahlia Society.  Barry is making a good name  for himself and the Sechelt  Garden Club in the gardening  world.  Good show, Barry!  Discussions on why carrots  split to what causes scabby  potatoes were amongst the problems discussed.  Two huge cabbages were on  display along with an enormous  radish. Bernice Devlin had  about six flowered roses on one  stem of a delicate pink/white  with pink edge brought for in-  dentification. Lou Wilson  showed an- English miniature  white michaelmas daisy, there '  were several other floral  displays from local gardens to  . add to the interest of the  meeting.  VOLUNTEERS FOR  ROCKERY  Alice Murray is heading the  committee at the Sunshine  Coast Arts Centre garden. We  are planning to make this  showpiece for 1986.  Help is needed to fix up the  rockery that will consist mostly  of heathers. Anyone at all willing to help, be at the Arts Centre on Thursday, October 10  from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Wheelbarrows and strong  arms will be a big help as three  feet of earth must be removed.  Phone Alice at 885-9662.  Hallowe'en  Dance  Tickets are now available for  the Hallowe'en Masquerade  Dance at the Roberts Creek  Community Hall on Saturday,  October 26. Music is by the Jim  Byrnes Band, so get your tickets  soon as they are sure to go fast.  The dance is a theatre benefit  for the Eileen Glassford Arts  Foundation, and tickets are $10  each, with prizes for the best  costumes. Tickets are at  Seaview Market, The Book  Store and Books and Stuff in  Sechelt and at Don's Shoes and  the Coast News in Gibsons.  S  20%  OFF  a wide array of  FALL FASHIONS including:  ESPRIT - TANGERINE  EMANUELLE - LA SEAT COVERS  plus all dress pants, lingerie  hosiery...and more!  02CIX3?  TRAIL BAY CENTRE  885-5323  SPECIALS THIS WEEK  %  BOY'S & GIRL'S  rr  %  BOY'S & GIRL'S SIZES 2-16  JEANS  g       MORE IN STORE SPECIALS  TRAIL BAY CENTRE,     885-5255    J  SECHELT J,  Gibsons volunteer firemen Wally Dempster and Tim Koftinoff,  pictured above, were on hand last Saturday at the Gibsons Fire  Hall's Open House. It was held to help promote "Plan to Get Out  Alive" day, a national campaign to cut down on fire-related  deaths. Fire engines will be in neighborhoods up and down the  Coast this Wednesday, starting at 6 p.m. to give residents a chance  to practice their own home fire drill. ���Brad Benson photo  Halfmoon  Bay Happenings  A busy month  by Ruth Forrester, 885-2418  WHERE DO WE GO?  There is a date in the month  of October on which decisions  will have to be made by many of  us from the Halfmoon Bay  area.  October 26 seems to be a  popular date as on that evening  recognition will be made to  Peggy Connor as citizen of the  year, an honour of which Peggy  is most worthy, and to whom  our hearty congratulations go  out.  Many local residents would  like to attend, but this is also the  night of the Halfmoon Hams'  show in the Seniors'Hall, and  of the annual Hallowe'en dance  at Welcome Beach Hall.  Information on the dance  may be obtained by calling  Midge at 885-3380 or Diane at  885-9061. This event is sponsored by the Halfmoon Bay  Recreation Society.  Saturday, October 12 is the  deadline for reservations for the  j^harvest^inner: dance, on October 19'put on by the Welcome  Beach Community Association.  THE STOVE DOCTOR EXPLAINS  CREOSOTE  PROBLEMS?  Creosote accumulation is  dangerous and often fatal.  It's that simple. Accumulated; creosote deposits in  your chimney or stove pipes  are highly flammable and  create the risk of chimney  fires, which damage the  chimney structure and  cause dangerous overheating of adjacent wood in  the walls and roof "of your  home. .  Incomplete combustion  in your woodstove produces  unburned gases which condense and accumulate as  creosote. Creosote and  smoke also represent  wasted energy and  unnecessary pollution. The  solution to these problems  is quite simple.  State of the art  technology and engineering  design have resulted in the  creation of the NU-TECH  CATALYTIC RETROFIT, intentionally simple in design  and easy to operate. The installation of a NU-TECH  CATALYTIC RETROFIT will  result in the reduction of  creosote (up to 90%), increased efficiency (at least  15 to 20% on most free  standing models), and  reduced smoke pollution  (that should make your  neighbours happy too).  Drop by and see us today  for complete installation  and operation details. Don't  forget with over 8 years of  woodstove installation,  safety and maintainance  experience, THE STOVE  uOCTOR knows best.  Francis Peninsula Place  Hwy 101, Pender Harbour  Toll Free Vancouver 669-2604  A note to all you shuffleboard players. Things will get  started a week earlier than planned, which will be Tuesday, October 8 at the hall at 7:30 p.m.  ONE DAY ONLY  Pre-payment is required for ALL workshops. Come have limited enroll   -  ment, so register soon!  Batik - Christmas Projects - Saturday, October 19, 10-6 p.m. at Craft  Studio, Gibsons, B.C. $20.  Back Talk - be your back's best friend; - Wednesday, October 16, 7:30  p.m., Roberts Creek Elem. $5.  Breadmaking - yum! fun! - Saturday, October  19, 9 a.m. -  1  p.m.,  Chatelech. $10.  Silk Painting : create a scarf - Sunday, October 20, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.,  Resource Centre, Gibsons. $25.  Word Processing, Level II - Saturday, October 19, 9:30 a.m. - 4:30  p.m., Elphinstone. $25.  Call Continuing Education for.registration and information 886*8841 or area  883 residents call 885-7871, Local 27.  reg.    $225  MEWS  DRESS PANTS  MEN'S  DRESS SHIRTS  JEANS V�� to V2 OFF  Vinyl  rain  sets  JACKET & PANTS  S749  SALE STARTS  TUES. OCT. 8th  MEN'S  STANFIELD UNDERWEAR  SHIRTS or LONGS  BOY'S  CORDS  $��49  BOY'S  JACKETS  Vs OFF  Many other in store specials  yM m   MbWIP BP  VISA& MASTERgHARGE ACCEPTED  ALL SALES FINAL ON SALE MERCHANDISE--^  Trail Bay Centre Coast News, October 7,1985  MiHWT5lS9!OuSIB*lA3VSi  Harvest Some Savings During Our  FESTIVAL!  OCTOBER 8-12th  W>  I  Enjoy A Bumper Crop Of Bargains  In Every Store In The Mall!  Remember, there's something for everyone at  m  V?  "Bring your family in to our family!"  Goddard's Radio Shack Vagabond Travel  The Royal Bank Upstairs & Downstairs Shoppe Mitten Realty  Books & Stuff Zippers Nova Jewellery  Sew-Easy Headquarters Hairstyling Trail Bay Hardware  Morgan's Men's Wear Bobbie's Shoes The Snack Bar  Pharmasave 173 Cactus Flower Shop-Easy Coast News, October 7,1985  immr  The annual Fall Plant Sale at the Senior Citizens Hall in Sechelt  was, as can be seen from the smiles on these ladies' faces, a great  success. Proceeds will be used for construction of their new hall on  land already purchased near the Art Centre. ���Brad Benson photo  Area    C    Soundings  Dressing s  filling a  Twenty-four people turned  out to help at the last meeting of  the Sunshine Coast Dressing  Society, the largest turnout  ever. But then, it takes alot of  help to make the 35 dozen,  that's 420, 8x8 dressings that are  regularly needed on the coast  each month.  The Dressing Society began  on March 1982, as an off-shoot  of some work that the Eastern  Star was doing.  "The Eastern Star was helping cancer patients with dressings, and it was felt there were  others in the community who  needed dressings just as badly,"  said group spokesperson Lucy  MacKay. The group now makes  dressings for five chronic patients, plus for post-operative  Party being planned  by Jean Robinson, 885-2954  HALLOWE'EN  The Davis Bay Elementary  School will have their annual  Hallowe'en Party on October  31, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. At that  time the fireworks will take  place. These fireworks are  carefully controlled and all care  is taken to make the display extremely safe. However, some of  the responsibility does fall on  the shoulders of the parents to  THE UNITED CHURCH  OF CANADA  Sunday Worship Services  GIBSONS  Glassford Road - 11:15 a.m.  Sunday School  -   9:30 a.m.  ST. JOHN'S  Davis Bay - 9:30 a.m.  Rev. Alex G. Reid  Church Telephone   ^99 &B9 &0k   886-2333  SEVENTH-DAY  ADVENTIST  CHURCH  Sabbath School      Sat. 9:30 a.m.  HourofWorship Sat. 11:00a.m.  Browning Road & Hwy 101  Everyone Welcome  For information phone  885-9714 or 885-2727  _jK& sfk J)p>-  GIBSONS  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  New Church building on  School Road - opp. RCMP  Senior Pastor Ted Boodle  George Marshall  Visitation Minister  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Morning Worship        11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship       7:00 p.m.  Home Bible Study  Phone  886-9482 or 886-7107  Affiliated with the  Pentecostal Assemblies  of Canada  .\9 Sfr ^ft  ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S  & ST. AIDAN'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  Parish Family Eucharist  Combined service at  St. Bartholomew's, Gibsons 10 a.m.  Rev. J.E. Robinson, 886-8436  St. Aidan's, Roberts Creek  Evensong and Holy Eucharist  6:30 p.m. 1st Sunday in month   ^(k ��(9 Jg%   ST. HILDA'S &  ST. ANDREW'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  St. Hilda's Anglican, Sechelt  Holy Eucharist 8:00 a.m.  Church School 9:30 a.m.  Family Service 11:00 a.m.  St. Andrew's Anglican  Pender Harbour  Worship Service 2:00 p.m.  Rev. John Paetkau 885-5019  THE CHURCH OF  JESUS CHRIST  OF LATTER DAY SAINTS  Davis Bay Rd., Wilson Creek,  Davis Bay Community Hall  Sacrament Service 9:00 a.m.  Sunday School 9:55 a.m.  Branch President Reg. H. Robinson  886-2382  ANGLICAN CATHOLIC  CHURCH OF CANADA  St. Columba's Parish  Services  1 pm St. John's Church  Davis Bay  2nd Suncl.iy - Holy Communior  4th Sunday - Evening Prayer  Phone: Rev. E. Gale  112-325-6760  InformatioYi: 88.1-949.5  Traditional Anglican  Services & Teaching  ���Ht ssk .*%%  SUNSHINE COAST  GOSPEL CHURCH  Corner of Davis Bay Road  & Laurel Road  Inter-Denominational  Family Worship  Sunday - 11 a.m.  Sunday School  For All Ages  Sunday - 9:45 a.m.  "We Extend A Welcome And  An Invitation to Come And  Worship The Lord With Us"  Pastor Arie de Vos   ��l*l.*l   CHRISTIAN SCIENCE  SOCIETY SERVICES  Sunday Service &  Sunday School 11:45 a.m.  Wednesday 7:30 p.m.  Thanksgiving Service  11 a.m. Monday, October 14  Children Welcome  in United Church Building  Davis Bay  885-2506 or 886-7882  ��� -4(4 ��fld JKl , ,_ .  PENDER HARBOUR  PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  Lagoon Road, Madeira Park  Pastor Tim Shapcotte  883-2374 or 883-2870  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Morning Worship       11:00 a.m.  Prayer & Bible Study  Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.   at* j��j> jk*   GRACE REFORMED  COMMUNITY  CHURCH  Sunday  Sechelt Elementary School  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Studies in Genesis 11:00 a.m.  Home Meetings  Studies in Matthew 7:30 p.m.  Wednesday  Home Bible Study 7:30 p.m.  J. Cameron Fraser, Pastor  885-7488   3fi&S��   CALVARY  BAPTIST CHURCH  North of Hwy. 101 on Park Rd.  Gibsons  Sunday School 9:30 a.m.  Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship 7:00 p.m.  Weekly Home Fellowship Groups  Rev. Dale D. Peterson  886-2611  .^b    .<&    .'&  teach the children the dangers  of fire and fireworks.  SAVE THE CHILDREN  The Save the Children group  will be holding their first fall  meeting on Tuesday, 1 p.m. at  Sylvia Duffs, 885-4793. This  group will have a table at the  volunteer fair on October 19  Eileen Bystedt will be selling  Save  the  Children Christmas  cards at the Spinning Wheel on  Cowrie Street, Sechelt.  BRIDGE  Bridge will begin on October  11 at 1 p.m. at the Davis  Bay/Wilson Creek Community  Hall. Phone your bridge playing  friends and remind them. It is  still  $1.50  to  play.  ROD AND GUN  The Sechelt Rod and Gun  Club are back in business after a  summer holiday. One o'clock  on Sunday afternoons at the  club is the time and place for  those interested.  RIDING CLUB  The Timber Trail Riding  Club held its elections last week.  New executive is: Sonja  McFetridge - president; Julie  Clarke - vice-president; Caron  Hayward - secretary, Heidi  Lambert - treasurer. Directors  are: Don Cross, Janine Ell-  ingham and Colleen Horvath.  Colleen Horvath and Tracy  Smith are two club members  who will be attending the  Thunderbird Equestrian Centre, Langley, on October 14. it  is a Quarter Horse Show. Colleen, in her early 20's has  already won a bronze medal at  the B.C. Summer Games. Her  horse is the beautiful Who's  Colonel.  Tracy is a very promising 14  year old who has already won  High Point Youth Rider at the  the North Shore Riding Club on  September 22 after having won  the High Point Intermediate  Rider ribbon at the Timber  Trail Club on September 8. She  rides Texas Ed usually but has  also shown with Greatly Styled,  a two year old quarter horse  gelding.  Supplies  &  Fishing  Tackle  AVAILABLE  AT  BOTH  LOCATIONS  GIBSQNS  BUILDING SUPPLIES^  Two Locations:  Sunshine Coast Highway, Gibsons  Wharf and Dolphin, Sechelt  ociety  need  'ami  OO'  patients and any others who  may be referred by the Coast  Garibaldi Health Unit. Its  dressings are supplied free of  charge."  It takes one three foot wide  roll of gauze, six rolls of absorbent cotton and two rolls of  cellucotton to make the monthly order of 35 dozen dressings. Plus there are 4x4 dressings and 4x4 gauze bandages  kept in stock as well. The group  buys all of the supplies itself,  and is supported by donations  from community organizations  and private individuals. The  group presently has enough in  its account to meet its needs until December of this year, but  will continue to require donations from the community to  keep it going.  In 1984, the group logged 498  hours of work, and made a total  of 290 dozen dressings of  assorted sizes that's 3,480 in all.  "We'll need many more this  year," said Mrs. MacKay. "The  public is becoming aware of our  service and the demand is increasing. Fortunately it looks  like our group is increasing  too." Last year, meetings drew  an average of 16 people, which  dropped to 11 or 12 this summer. "We had no surplus at all  then," added Mrs. MacKay.  "We had to keep working all  summer just to keep up."  The group meets the fourth  Thursday of each month in  Wilson Creek Community Hall,  which is kindly provided free of  charge by the Wilson Creek  Community Association and  the group makes a donation in  appreciation of this generosity.  Some members prefer to do  their work, mainly cutting of  materials to the correct sizes, at  home, which helps the group  start out a bit ahead on work  days.  "We meet from 10 a.m. to 2  p.m., but people come and go  as they must, and every hour  helps," said Mrs. MacKay.  To join this dedicated and  community-minded group, or  to find out more about the service it provides, call Lucy  MacKay at 886-9473, or  Dorothy Parsons at 885-9788.  ^  Cowrie St., near the Cenotaph, Sechelt  .    Monday to Saturday 9:30 to 5:30  885-7767  U.*i.  -W-t. SPECIALS  OCT 7-12     While Supplies Last  Bread Crumbs 79 lb.  Calamata �� #����*  Greek Olives 2.39 Ib.  Choc Chip  Cookie Mix 1.79 lb.  Heinz Kosher  Dill Pickles 3/.75  Old Fashioned  Mince Meat 1.39 lb.  Natural Smooth or Crunchy  Peanut Butter 1.89 lb.  Poultry Seasoning 49 oz.  Lots of In-Store Specials!  9W9-mW_^^%MW^ 9999W     ^_W  Hwy. 101 & Pratt Rd., Gibsons 886-7359  Ken Devries & Son Ltd.  Annual Fall Sale  Here now!  100's of rolls to choo^  only  Ends  Tues. Oct. 15th  $4  r  99  per  roll  (reg. *11" per roll)  30%  OFF  BLINDS by  WOW!  In Stock Wallpaper  more than  Come in and ENTER  our DRAW  L to WIN FREE  k STEAM  CLEANING  for your  dining room  living  room  and  hall  5��%OFF  SUPERIOR  and by  \7__ ABBE  j Verosol  j 1" Mini Blinds  _m= Vertical Blinds  Woven Woods  1" Mini Blinds  20 /O   OFF ALL DRAPERY FABRICS  - the finest custom made drapes available.  Cut to measure Drapery Tracks up to 20% off  Grandiose Sculptured  CARPETS 100% NYLON  available in beige or brown   FOAM BACK  $"795        MANNINGTON  / CUSHION FLOOR  sq. yd.  Vega" reg. s995 sq. yd.  Hen fyevti^  Hyyy ioiv Gibsons ���P.  ~i  M  15  t  5*  i  I  Si  to*.  rMMMW3^^MMW��i  Coast News, October 7,1985  9.  Fitness, thrift, and thanks  Gibsons Alderman John Burnside pointed out features completed in the first phase of the "Downtown  Revitalization" project to Capilano College geography students, here on a field trip with instructors Gordon Wilson and Brett MacGHlivray. ���Fran Burnside photo  George    in    Gibsons  Earthquake memories  by George Cooper, 886-8520  The earthquake in the early  sixties in Anchorage, Alaska,  sent a tidal or tsunami wave up  inlets along our outer coast.  Stan Jones who lived in  Zeballos at the time, recollects,  "It was like the tide rising and  receding very high but quietly,  about three or four times in as  many hours in the narrows. Salt  water was pushed up the roads  about half a mile further than  any wild southeasterly storm  had ever done."  Stan added, "The bays were  littered with floating red snappers, their air bladders popping  out of their mouths. Eagles  slumped on tree branches stuffed full, looking as though they  couldn't fly or were afraid to  try.  li-  ii  i!  **���������������  VANCOUVER  The Way It Was  by  Michael Kluckner  THE BOOKSTORE  Cowrie St. Sechelt  885-2527  "My   chum   and   I   filleted  about 200 pounds of snapper  that   afternoon,"   he   added,  "and our log booms that had  broken from their moorings and  gone   out   with   the   receding  water were rounded up intact."  Anne   Gurney   of   Gibsons  said, "I was working in Anchorage at the time of the earthquake there, and was on a stairway going to the street when  everything began to tremble and  move.  I just wasn't  able to  move at all.  "That was only a block and a  half from the spot where one  side of the street sank suddenly  about 17 feet," Anne said,  "and the wood frame house  where 1 had an apartment was  unharmed. But a concrete  apartment block across the  street collapsed into rubble.  "It was not the tremendous  quake like the one Mexico has  just had," she said, "but being  that close to a quake gives me  an understanding of the fear  and shock those people are suffering from."  CORRECTION  A correction is needed in the  paragraph in last's week's news  corner concerning the opera  Fidelio.  The opera with Lyn Vernon  in the role of the heroine,  Lenore, will be staged at the  Queen Elizabeth theatre on the  dates mentioned.  Very early in her career,  before she went to Europe, Lyn  appeared on the QE stage in a  1^  VOLUNTEER HARVEST FAIR  Sat. Oct. 19 - 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.  Sechelt Indian Band Community Hall  ff'F��  35 group displays from all over the  coast. Crafts, Baked Goods, Door  Prizes, Clowns, Balloons, Minstrels,  Hot & Cold Food & Beverages. "Fall Fair"  competition. Judging of Jams, Jellies,  Pickets, Relishes, WINE and BEER.  For further information call:  885-5881  organized by the Volunteer Action Centre  of Sunshine Coast  Community Services Society  *���  Alano Club Flea Market - Every Sunday,  886-2993 for more information  Sealions Football Team's 3rd Annual Dance October 25, Gibsons Legion.  Tickets - B. Lincez 886-3883; G. Prentis 884-5240. Parents: Please help  support your boys.  Gibsons United Church Youth Ministry Fund Craft and Bake Sale. Saturday,  October 19, 10-? Sunnycrest Mall (across from Toy Store).  Sunshine Coast Pottery Guild meets 2nd Monday of each month. Corner of  Reed & Hwy 101. 886-7757, 886-9515.  Duplicate Bridge, Tuesday nights, starting October 1, 7:15 p.m. at the golf club.  For info, phone 886-9785.  Toastmasters International will help you sharpen your communications skills. This  social education club meets Wed. 6:30 p.m., Marine Room, Gibsons. All  welcome. Info, call 885-2060.  Girl Guides of Canada Thanksgiving Tea & Bake Sale - Oct. 12 at St.  Bartholomew's Church Hall, 2-4. Admission: adult $1, student & seniors $.75.  Western Weight Controllers Branch no.54 would like to help you make a change to  a thinner you. Come and join us and make new friends. We'll give you support  and encouragement. We would like to help you meet the New Year a new you.  Meetings: Thursday 1-3 p.m. For further info, please cal! Donna at 886-7736.  Western Weight Controllers Branch 47 is starting up again for Fall in West Sechelt.  Lose weight sensibly, call 885-5547 (Wendy)  Suncoast Fighter Stroke Group. Stroke victims, join our group for therapy  etc. Meetings every Friday, 10 a.m. St. Hilda's Anglican Church Hall. For  details phone 885-9791.  small part as an Indian maid in  Puccini's opera Girl of the  Golden West.  That production was enlivened by a stage prop - a live horse  -that did its part in all propriety  but its clip-clopping hoofs could  be heard for long seconds after  its exit as it walked what seemed  like miles backstage.  Now we can hope her appearance this month will be  followed by other appearances  in the seasons to come in Vancouver opera.  LOGGER YARN  A story that won third place  in a contest in the newspaper,  The Elder Statesman, appeared  in the September issue was written by E.M. Lumsden.  The opening sentence of the  story, entitled by the way, Ol'  Walnut-King of the Loggers,  "The country on the Sechelt  Peninsula was a logger's  paradise and we had them in all  shapes, colours and sizes...He  climbed, rigged, and topped  more of the giant virgin fir on  his own than any crew."  That dates the time of the  story a good many years back,  doesn't it. The logger humour  in the story is straight form Old  Nick, himself - a rollicking tale.  Does anyone know of the  author? He is not one of the  Lumsdens in the phone book.  CLEAK SWEEP  CHIMNEY CLEANING  SERVICE  Commercial Vacuum Equipment  Servicing All Heating Units  Free Estimates  ALLAN REID  88S-S034  GENERAL DELIVERY'  MARLENE ROAD  ROBERTS CREEK. B.C.  VON 2WO  by Ann Cook, 883-9167  LET'S GET FIT!  Last call for a Monday and  Thursday fitness class.  Get together time is 7 p.m.,  Monday, October 7. That's this  evening. If you want to join but  can't make it this evening, call  Diana at 883-9319.  If you feel you are not fit  enough to keep up with a fitness  class, you don't have to.  Everyone goes along at their  own pace. I have a gimpy knee  that won't like me jogging and  jumping on it, someone else has  a bum shoulder, etc., etc.; like I  say, it's at your own pace. The  plus is you will feel like the age  you are, not ten years older.  Hope to see you there.  Maybe you have a medical  problem you feel you have to  check out first; then come to the  clinic on Wednesday, October  9, at approximately 2:30 p.m.  THRIFTY THOUGHTS  The Thrift Store is open all  day Wednesday. Doris and the  coffee pot are settled in upstairs  at the community hall for the  winter. You won't be pressured  to buy anything, you don't even  have to browse if you don't  want to. It's a friendly place to  stop and socialize.  Hallowe'en early birds were  in last week buying up wigs and  fun clothing. One customer was  more than pleased with the  dress; wig, white shoes and  purse to match so didn't fuss  because there weren't any  gloves. He clomped all over in  the high heels. Two young girls  were snickering at him; he turned and said to them, "When  you get to my age you have to  wear comfortable shoes."  Thanks to everyone for dropping off donations.  YOU ARE INVITED  The Pender Harbour Lions  Club is treating us to a  Thanksgiving Pancake Breakfast on Sunday morning between 9 a.m. and 12 noon, October 13. Adults - $3, children  under 12 - $2. (Maybe it's 12  and under???)  The message is it's pancakes,  it's Sunday and Everybody  Welcome!!!  SCHOOL ALIVE AND  WELL  The little school is alive and  well, squashing the annual  rumours it's closing:  Shane, Marie, Erin and  Kellie, welcome back for  another term. Welcome to the  new kids - Sophie, Toby*  Charlie, Ben, Cloe, Jed and  Ami. You are all a pleasure to  have in our little school.  Then there's Jennifer, Tina  and Nikki, three well-mannered, friendly and happy  sisters whom everyone has enjoyed, but they are Alberta  bound.  Tork is the lone mascot for  the  school yard,  Sadie must  have gone on to Pender High  THANKSGIVING  Thanksgiving weekend coming up. I'm thankful to be in  Egmont, far away from earthquakes, hurricanes and such  happenings that are more than I  can comprehend.  I'm thankful those highball  loggers only felled trees across  the power lines two days this  week instead of three. Lucky  for them the Hydro crew had  the power on by the 6 p.m.  football game or they would  have been in real serious trouble.  Happy Thanksgiving folks.  Autumn<^A  Wallcovering Sale  Sept. 16th thru Oct. 15th  SAVE  20% OJFF  BOOK PRICES!  Come to  Floorcoverings  for all your  FLOOR  and  WALL  decor.  SAVE  Your ferry fare, enjoy  Vancouver prices right  here on Cowrie St.  Sechelt!  l*^>8N  'BEST OF THE  BOOKS"  SALE  ^!*y;y  ��AV��     -  20%  JFFBOOK  PRICES  mini  ccna  CBH  t<fem^ir<p9j��  1  FLOOR COVERINGS LTD.  Cowrl* Str����t, S��ch��lt 885-2923  ceaadg  n  ;|  % i  :a   i  tt i  $ i  fs    1  :i i  1  I I  fe::  fey  0 ���  I  m  Chapman Creek Homes  Are pleased to announce  Dave Reid  is again selling mobile homes.  Anyone having any inquiries  regarding a NEW or USED home  may contact DAVE at  885-3859  m  m-.  m  )��������� K  n  Vi  Chapman Creek Homes  OCTOBER OFFERINGS;  - All new homes for October  will have a wood burning stove.  -14' wide x 56', stove, fridge,  drapes.  $24,400 & wood stove  fl  i  '.j!  Bank repossession: 1981 Manco  - 4 years young, 1400 sq. ft.  - Replacement value, $52,000  Bank asking s35,000  Make your offer now!  885-5965  Jeannie's  GIFTS & GEMS  ** \D on  30%  PB\G��S  Oct. 7 thru Oct. 12 every item in the store is on sale  ALL CARAT  GOLD RINGS  20%OFF  this includes a good  selection of diamonds  emeralds and rubies  OFF  ALL GOLD CHAINS   25%  GLASSWARE 30%OFF  many more in store specials  sale items may be purchased on layaway  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons Coast News, October 7,1985  s^^yy^-'y^'iiy^'^-.iy '.ysyy ���' vy ���  This 1917 Model T Ford was one of sis vintage cars which stopped  in Gibsons en route to a visit in Powell River last weekend. They  belong to the Totem Model A and T Ford Club - "We let one  Cadillac, a Packard and a Pontiac in, too," said a member - the  biggest old car club in the lower mainland. ���Fran Burnside photo  Cap College applies  for tourism grant  Capilano College has applied  to the ministry of education for  a $28,000 grant from the local  economic renewal and development fund for a tourism  development proposal to increase employment on the Sunshine Coast.  "If we receive funding, we  would use it to find out what is  needed on the Coast, and then  to provide instruction to help  accommodate those needs,"  said principal Doctor Doug Jardine. "That includes helping to  maximize and improve existing  businesses. People in the tourist  industry need to ensure that  levels of hospitality are such  that   people  who   come  here  while visiting Expo sill return in  '87 and beyond."  The college is connected to  the Coast "over the longer haul  of economic development,"  said Jardine, and needs a show  of community based support if  it is to be successful in obtaining  funding for both its short-term  training opportunities and its  long-term programs.  It expressed its need for such  support at a "Brainstorming  Session" with invited community representatives last week, and  subsequently the councils of  both Sechelt and Gibsons moved to write letters in favour of  the current application for funding by the college.  Federal grant for  Harmony Hall  A Gibsons seniors group will  use a $12,000 federal New  Horizons program grant for a  community project.  The Old Age Pensioners  Organization No. 38 will use the  funds to repair the roof of its  senior centre, the Harmony  Hall. The leaky geodesic design  roof will be replaced by a tar  and gravel roof. The seniors will  then be able to resume their  winter programs without endangering themselves and their  equipment.  Thirty-seven seniors groups  in the province received a total  of $311,340 in funds under the  New Horizons program this  month.  Fishing fleet has  priority at wharf  Continued from page 1  arrange things to work out. The  wharf will be empty in the summer otherwise (when the fishing  fleet is out)."  Moore said that three vears  ago, Leonard Plourde, the wharfinger at the time the same issue  was being dealt with, stuck up  for the pleasure boaters by  pointing out the serious effect  their absence would have on the  wharf's moorage revenues. The  town of Gibsons is responsible  for revenues and expenses under  its lease with the department of  oceans and fisheries.  Though no current study has  been made of the economic consequences of evicting the  pleasure boats, "There will be  less dollars coming in," said  Foley, who stands to lose  because his employment with  the town is based on a percentage of revenues.  Said Clerk-treasurer Goddard, "We are not doing this  for the economics. We are doing this because we have been  advised by fisheries and oceans  to make room for commerical  fishermen."  Lowell Pearl, a life time resident of Gibsons who owns two  commercial fishing boats, the  Pacific Clipper and the Whirley  Waugh, is not happy about the  situation either. "I don't know  one commercial fisherman who  is out to get pleasure, boaters.  We've just got a congested problem here." It's his impression  that the commercial fishing fleet  has doubled in the last three  years.  Congestion has meant that  boats are sometimes tied three  and four deep, restricting the  fire lanes that would allow a  burning boat to be quickly towed out to sea. According to  Pearl, his insurance company  won't insure him if there aren't  open fire lanes.  Assistant wharfinger Foley  said, as he looked over the  troubled waters of Gibsons harbour, "It's a hard one to  resolve."  Sex abuse aid  Jan Sipple is a community education consultant specializing in sexual abuse prevention who will give a presentation  How To Protect Your Child at Roberts Creek Elementary  School on Thursday October 10 at 7:30 p.m. For parents of  pre-school and school age children. Topics will include:  myths and facts about sexual abuse, as well as practical  methods for teaching prevention skills. Part of the movie  Feeling Yes: Feeling No will be shown; local resource people  will also be on hand during the question period.  This program is free, and baby-sitting subsidy is also  available. For registration and information, call Continuing  Education at 886-8841 or 885-7871, Local 27 (883 residents  only please).  Fire drills  This Wednesday, at 6 p.m., fire sirens will be turned on up  and down the Sunshine Coast as fire trucks hit the streets in a  nation-wide home fire drill.  In Gibsons, Sechelt and other communities across Canada,  Wednesday, October 9, has been proclaimed "Plan to Get  Out Alive Day".  The exercise focuses on every family taking the time to  preplan its escape routes from the home in case of a fire, including a meeting place outside.  It has become necessary in order to correct the fact that  Canada has the worst record in the industrialized world for  fire-related deaths. Ninety per cent of those deaths have oc-  cured in residential homes.  Every family is encouraged to participate by exiting their  homes as the fire trucks drive by.  If you require help or information in formulating your  family's escape plan, please call any member of your local  fire department.  Prices effective  Oct 8-13  Opent   9 a.m* till 6:;^^4rwiif"rf:V���V"~���FsiP���-1iibpfcSf;��fc'"^JHrli:;-5^;-/|fS^;ir*��:-=  California  TOMATOES  California  YAMS  California  SWEET POTATOES  BRUSSEL SPROUTS  Trebor  bulk  Cdlldy (4,99kg)lb. �������������/  Criscooil    ,2.65  Pick WMix  Dole  ...540 ml  1.09  pineapple  j  Duncan Hines  cake  ITIIX6S ..520gm   I at)9  Dishwasher Detergent  Cascade   25., 6.49  Stuffing  Stuff 'n'  Such  170 gm  1.19  Wasa  crispbread2oo9mi.29  tm+9  lkg  1 litre  2.49  2.49  Spic 'n  Span  Liquid Detergent  Joy 2  Post Cereal  Sugar  Crisp  Jelly Powders  Jello       s   27.95  Nalley's  potato  chips  .200 gm  .95  Steinfeld's  dills   1 litre   I ���D%f  PolskU Garlic & Baby  400 gm  2.29  Aylmer's Fancy  tomato  juice  1.36 litre  1.39  Food Savers  Baggies 1.39  Kraft  Dad's  cookies  .450 gm  1.99  Royal City Fancy  pumpkin  398 ml m  69  liquid  dressings    ,1.09  Powdered Detergent  Sunlight 9.49  Day by Day Item by Item We do more for you  C Vnvittv  Deli and Health  dfoob��  Acupressure  SANDALS  1 \i /o Thjs Week  886-2936  ill      in the  Lower Village  BOUTIQUE  <3��  HaSloween &  Costumes  & accessories  Girl SGuss  Hours: Tues - Sal.  II -5  8B<>-am  Consignment &  New Wear  Hair Salon  Once you're  accustomed to quality  the ordinary will  never again suffice  886-2120  In the Lower Village  ^Show Piece 1%\  Ik    Gallery    A  - Custom Framing -  Needlework Stretc hing.  Consi'rv.ilion Malting, Papier  Tok\ Photographs, Posters.  Reproductions & Original Fine  Art, Pottery & Blown Glass.  corner ot  Cower Pt. & School Rel.  886-9213 Coast News, October 7,1985  11.  BWiSB^M��f^M0^M9W&^  WMSzMm  ^ilEftai^  We fully guarantee everything we sell [to be satisfactory or money cheerfully refunded.   We reserve the right to limit quantities.  oid-Fashioned Thanksgiving Favorites  Sundays & Holidays   10 a.ni. td^5 p-iri  Monarch  margarine  ^sm .77  Palm  sour  cream       500 mil.49  Whipped Topping  Cool  Whip  Minute Maid  orange  juice  .500 ml  .89  .355 ml  1.39  1.29  Our Own Freshly Baked  dinner  buns idoz  Our Own Freshly Baked  pumpkin  pies * 1.59  PANTY HOSE  By Gina  ��� One size fits all  ��� Assorted colours  Regular price $1.39  SPECIAL  PURCHASE  PRICE  $.89 ea.  BAKER'S SECRET  CAKE PAN  By Ekco  ��� Non-stick, easy to clean  ��� Reduces baking time by  approximately 20%  8" x Viz", 203 cm x 3.8 cm  Regular price $3.29  SPECIAL  PURCHASE  PRICE  $2.29  FRESH GRADE A TURKEYS  AVAILABLE THURSDAY OCT. 10  - NO RESERVATIONS PLEASE -  Frozen Grade  A  with tender timer  TURKEYS  Ready to Eat  SMOKED HAM  Fresh Handpeeled  SHRIMPMEAT  Fletcher's Frozen  SAUSAGE MEAT  Fletcher's Frozen  POULTRY  DRESSING  (kg 3.51) lb.  1.59  1.29  (kg 2.84) lb.  Shank Portion  (kg 12.99) lb.  .500 gm ea.  5.89  1.29  500 gm ea.  1.39  IT IS TRULY AMAZING  the way the Canadian language keeps evolving. Only last week a brand  new word entered my vocabulary, one which you will not yet find in any  dictionary. This word is used after one's garden has produced an  overabundance of tomatoes - so many in fact that one doesn't know  what to do with them. The word is not what you might be thinking of  -oh, no, no! The word is very simple - it is "tomatoed". It is used in  such phrases as "I'm tomatoed right out", meaning that one simply  couldn't face another one, red or green. I know how it feels to be  tomatoed right out because I recently became the recipient of the remainder of my friends' harvest, after they'd tomatoed themselves to a  standstill!  After you've canned, and frozen, and eaten raw, try these for variety.  RED TOMATOE SAUCE  4 cups chopped ripe tomatoes  2 cups chopped apple      6 cloves  Vt cup brown sugar 1 inch ginger root, coarsely chopped  Vz cup chopped onion      12 peppercorns  1 teaspoon salt 2 dried chillies  72 cup white vinegar  1 .Simmer tomato, apple and onion until onion is soft, in covered  pan.  2 .Add other ingredients, simmer in covered pan for 30 minutes.  3 .Strain, pushing as much pulp through as you can.  4 .Return to pan, do not cover, and simmer until thick. Pour into  sterilized jars and seal.  GREEN TOMATO SAUCE  4 cups green tomatoes  1 cup chopped apple  1 cup white sugar  Va cup chopped onion  IV2 teaspoons salt  V2 teaspoon pickling spice  % teaspoon pepper  Va teaspoon dry mustard  1 cup white vinegar  1 .Simmer all ingredients for approximately 1 hour, stirring occasionally.  2 .Strain, re-heat until desired consistency is reached  3 .Pour into sterilized jars and seal.  Here's to Thanksgiving - when I hope I'll be tomato free! Thanks P &  P!  NEST LEWIS  The  PoP  Shoppe  Ken's Lucky Dollar's Pop Shoppe is located between  the dairy case & the produce department.  By the case  12-850 ml  any flavour  24-300 ml  any flavour  $749  ��� + Deposit  $6  99  + Deposit  To Book Your Event  CALL  886-2257  Planning a dance? Having a banquet?  Need space for your exercise class?  Want a quiet spot for that business seminar?  Our hall above the store, has  daytime and evening openings.  The hall is fully equipped - with  chairs and tables available to seat  groups from 25 - 100.  iruproyidirig Variety, Quality, & Friendly Service  y3';.y?Ac*.��^'  TlDP BooKstore  866-7744  Coiner Ot School 4  Gowei Point Roaas  Farm Journal's  COMPLETE PIE  COOKBOOK  ONLY $2.95  Mon.-Fri. 9:30 - 5:30  Sat., 10-5; Sun., 11-4  Kitchen  or bathroom  faucets not  working? Call us!  SERVING THE SUNSHINE COAST  Seaside Plumbing Ltd.  886-7017  �� Poi  PICK UP  & DELIVERY  Port Mellon lo Halfmoon Bay  Drycleaning Service  Fur, Leather, Shirts  DRAPERIES  TAKE DOWN & REHANG SERVICE  886-2415  stra Tailoring & Design  next to Ken's Lucky Dollar  ty/Nfctt*6  We now have  TROPICAL FISH  886-3812  itHbwe.r. Gibsons  EXTRACtA WA Y  Carpet & Upholstery Cleaner  4 hrs- $15.00  plus cleaning solution  Phone  886*2257   to reserve it ���12.  Coast News, October 7,1985  r  Minimi iiiiM'r luniiumn  W^  >  "I Am Who You Are", a piece using oil paint on laminated wood  by Mark Evans took third place in the seventh annual Juried Art  Exhibition at the Art Centre in Sechelt. First place winner was  Susan Wolpert's "Garden" and second place winner was Trudy  ISmalFs "Fire in the Woods". This excellent showing of Sunshine  Coast art will be available to viewer until October 20.  ���Brad Benson photo  *&M&M&M&M&M&M&M��M��mm  ENDS TUE OCT 8  "COMPROMISING  POSITIONS"  WARNING: Occasional Violence  ���#  i  i  i  ALL TICKETS $2����  WED-THUR-FRI-9-10-11  FOR THIS SPECIAL RE RUN ONL Y  ��|^9*9 ^y^^Bfc^y  Some Nudity and Suggestive  Scenes. B.C.F.C.O.  C14 YEARS J  WARNING: Frequent Violence.  Occasional Very Coarse Language  And Sweating. B.C.F.C.O.  FOR ONE WEEK STARTING SAT 12th  BACK AGAIN  "BACK TO THE FUTURE"  REGULAR PRICES  (���MATWtf)  WARNING: Occasional  Sweanng   B CF C 0.  FOR TIMES PRICES  CHANGES ��� PHONE  886-2827  $*tf*mmmtiw&mMmm%?m  COAST NEWS Photo   Reprints  Any published photo or your  choice from the contact sheets  3x   4-3  5x   7-5M  8x10-8  :������    I  r  THRU OCTOBER -  pasta  festival  the fixmmS  a dUlivmt poftta  &pwd eoek Ktghi oi dee week...  Spaghetti, La&aqm, T&tlrftoa, TeUaccim  CawMm, KihqUhL, RigafcwL.utiik  mwbd &aum.   REGULAR MENU AVAILABLE   ProntoS  Cedar Plaza, Gibsons   886-8138  MMMelB&iS^BMIrW-  7th Juried show  The Seventh Annual Juried  Exhibition is on display at the  Arts Centre, Sechelt until October 20. The juror, Burrell  Swartz, decided that all entries  should be exhibited this year,  but picked a first, second and  third award winner and sixteen  honourable mentions.  In adjudicating the show,  Swartz gave awards to works  which combined obvious technical competence and drawing  ability with originality or the  successful communication of a  mood or atmosphere that the  artist was trying to convey.  First prize went to Susan  Wolpert's "Garden" which  Swartz praised for its poetic interpretation and close observation of nature as well as its  skillful design and superb use of  the difficult medium of cut  paper.  Both the second prize winner,  Trudy Small's collage and the  third prize winner, Mark Evans'  relief painting on plywood were  chosen for the artists' willingness to experiment with  materials and originality of content. Other works the juror liked were David Burns' mat-  chstick man and woman because the artist had dared to  work on a large scale instead of  the usual living room wall size.  He also complimented Noreen  Marshall and Vivian Cowell on  their landscapes and Phyllis Mc-  Crimmon, Gordon Munro and  Joan Warn for their excellent  watercolours.  Writers active  by Ruth Forrester  Anne Dyck, a member of the  Suncoast Writers' Forge and a  resident of Gibsons, will be  speaker at the October meeting  of the Forge on Wednesday,  October 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the  Sechelt Arts Centre.  Anne recently sold yet  another confessions story to the  McFadden Publishing Company. She will lead a discussion  of confession writing techniques  and will tell you how you can  crack this market and make  some big bucks.  Betty Keller, president of the  Suncoast Writers' Forge, has  signed a two month option with  the Arts Club on Granville  Island for her play Bone Game.  Written nearly 10 years ago, this  work languished in a filing  drawer until this spring when it  was submitted to the Arts  Club's Playwrights' '86 contest,  and it now appears to be in line  for production in the 85-86  season.  Yet another Forge member,  Rosella Leslie, has recently had  a children's story accepted by  Prairie Publishing. The title is  Michael and the Shinglewood  Tree and the illustrations,  drawn by her sister-in-law, have  also been accepted. The  publisher wants two more  stories of the same standard in  order to publish all three as a  book. Well done, Rosella.  Those of you who are interested in either reading or  writing should plan to come  along to the Forge evenings,  which are on the second  Wednesday of each month at  the Arts Centre.  Gillian  Lowndes  award  Nominations are now being  accepted by the Sunshine Coast  Arts Council' for the annual  Gillian Lowndes Memorial  Award.  If anyone wishes to nominate  someone please drop off your  letter of recommendation either  at the Hunter Gallery in Lower  Gibsons or the Arts Centre in  Sechelt and not later than October 30.  Sechelt song recorded?  Sechelt Council is looking  ahead to next year when it will  celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the town's incorporation, and has referred the pressing of records of "The Sechelt  Song" to its finance committee  for consideration as a special  Anniversary Project for 1986.  A presentation to council at  it's last meeting by Steve Hubert  indicated that, for an initial sum  of $1500, council could purchase the copyright of the song,  buy time in a recording studio  and pay for musicians to perform, arrange and produce the  song to the stage of a "demo"  recording.  For a total of $4500, council  could receive 2500 copies of a  professionally produced, two-  sided record, which Hubert suggested could sell for $2.50 to $3  ��acli  Hubert noted that, even selling the record at $2.50, the initial pressing would guarantee a  return on the investment. He  predicted a gross return of  $6250 if sold at $2.50, and  $7500 if the cost were $3. "And  a reprinting would increase the  profit margin," added Hubert.  "We would be gaining a unique thing for the area, even if  there wasn't a profit," said  Alderman Bill Forman. "Our  money could be spent in far  worse ways in other areas."   .  The finance committee will  discuss the project at its next  meeting.  Channel Ten  Thursday, October 10  7 p.m.  1. Gertie Pierre talks to Clint  Fox, teacher of the Native  Studies program at Chatelech.  We also hope to have some  students from the program with  us at this time.  2. Fire Prevention Part 5 of our  fire prevention series deals with  smoke detectors.  3. The Town of Gibsons and the  Village of Sechelt report on the  Union   of   British   Columbia  municipalities annual convention held in September.  4. Home Fire Prevention Series  Part 6. This is the final episode  in our home fire prevention  series dealing with fire extinguishers and common home  fires.  5. Discussion on Holistic Healing. Doctor John Farrer, Evans  Herman, Doctor Ian Kerr join  moderator May Beth Hoagland  for a discussion on holistic healing including location footage  of a new spa set up on the Sunshine Coast.  %JR@ "A FAMILY AFFAIR"  as  Licensed  Marine Dr., Gibsons - Half a Block from Molly's Reach  f) Thanksgiving  *s* ���  1$ Dinner    ^  ���_'    Roast   lurUry with .ill Irmimiiujs  .���/ijjv"  Monday, Oct. 14    Served all day  2 Fori  Every Thurs. Evening  Schnitzel - Specials  '-~"jSpecial with YorUshm" Pudduuj  *** 0        Every Saturday Evening  ASK ABOUT OUR  PARTY AND BANQUET FACILITIES  Check out our Winter prices  Oceanside Terrace 886-8632  ^^^^^S^9^i^t^9^^^^i^i^^9^9^^iW^K^9W^S&&SM  Gibsons  MiiiiiiiWil  -FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT-  Friday, Oct. 11 & Saturday, Oct. 12  a musical  treat  In the  Lounge  flHHHHHi^^BHPi^  THE WHARF  RESTAURANT  invites you to our  (Oktobcrfcst  4?:  a'  1  1  S  celebration  Beginning October 8th  Featuring: Bavarian Food  and Bavarian Music  with a  GRANDE FINALE PARTY  on OCTOBER 12th  For reservations call 885-7285  eeeei 0 mm mm m m mm mm m m 0 m 0 mm 0 m.  Thursday Nights...  LADIES' NIGHT  WITH  RANDY POWERS  DOOR PRIZE FOR THE LADIES  LADIES ONLY TILL 10 PM  _____*>..   .-v ...&i ..*  hi, iiffJuirtiiKm mi tfi.tiM  NEW FALL HOURS  WEDNESDAY: 9 p.m. - 2 a.m.  THURSDAY: LADIES' NIGHT  8 p.m. - 2 a.m.  FRI. & SAT: 8 p.m. - 2 a.m.  (No cover charge til 10 p.m.)  DRESS CODE  NO COVER WED.   886-3336  Mrs*. u-  ��--  I."  v.-  u ���  i*.  A "Reno Casino Night" run by the Sunshine Coast Lions Club netted over $500 for the ExpOasis committee last Friday, in its first  fund-raising venture. Refreshments were donated by Shop Easy,  Super Valu, Ken's Lucky Dollar and the ladies of the Country Stars  Square Dancing Club. Door prizes were a desk lamp from Gibsons  Building Supplies, a ceramic vase from Verda Schneider and a bottle of wine in a basket from Ethel Scrimshaw.      ���Fran Burnside photo  | Is your car begging  for a second chance?  Fully equipped  lor all body and  paint repairs  Brian's Auto Body  & Painting Ltd.    *-�����  Beautiful bodies are our business     885-9844  Chamber sponsors workshop  Coast News, October 7,1985  .13.  Gibsons and District  Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a series of three Tree  workshops to be held on October 16, 1985 throughout the  day in the Marine Room. The  instructors for these workshops  are from the Federal Business  Development Bank.  The workshops are as  follows:  Information    Workshop   (1 Vi  hours)  By completing the workshop exercises, the participants will:  ��� Learn  the   basic  types  of  business inforamtion;  ��� Learn the general sources of  these types of business information;  ��� Learn how to use the information available.  Financing Workshop (1 Vi  hours)  ��� Through the workshop exercises the participants learn the  various types of financing  available;  ��� Sources, terms and conditions  under which business financing  is granted.  Management Skills Assessment  Workshop (VA hours)  The objective is to demonstrate  a simple, effective method of  Pender High news  by Michelle Cochet  Last week I mentioned that  our grade 12 students would be  collecting pledges for their  "Gradathon" on the weekend  of October 19. Since that time I  have had many people ask me  what exactly is a "Gradathon".  A "Gradathon" is a massive  cleanup of both public and  private grounds. It is an attempt  by our graduating class of this  year to beautify both our community, and aid any Pender  Harbour residents with their fall  yard cleaning as well.  Rather than setting a fixed  price for their services, the grads  will be collecting pledges from  the various businesses and  residents of Pender Harbour.  If you wish to have some  yard work done for you and  have not been called upon by  one of the grade 12 class  members, Ms Wendy Sim-  monds will be available at both  home and school for your  pledges. Please call and help  both yourself, and your community, school -883-2727 or  home-883-9271.  Another item concerning our  grad '86 class is their house  cleaning service. The previously  quoted price of $5 per hour per  person has been reduced to $4  due to lack of business.  Hopefully, this new, reduced  rate will create some interest  among the various home  owners of our community. We  can always hope.  evaluating   ones   management  strengths and weaknesses.  If you are interested in any  one or all of these workshops,  please contact the chamber office at 886-2325 between 9 a.m.  and 1 p.m., Monday to Friday.  After hours call Verna Simm at  886-3839.  panto's $3  Hwy iOI, Gibsons  ��86-3388  Dinner Special  This Weekend  CHICKEN  MAESON  Luncheon Specials  Daily  Join Us For  SUNDAY BRUNCH  11 A.M. - 3 P.M.  Your guide to  the finest in  area dining  I  Ti  Cafe Pierrot is a bustling  little restaurant with a charming decor and a couple of  small tables outside for fine,  sunny days. That it is always  busy at lunchtime is easy to  understand; for nourishing,  tasty food, generous in portion and easy in price, the  Cafe Pierrot can't be beaten.  In Teredo Square, the cafe  is Sechelt's most popular  lunch spot. The service is  brisk, especially if you indicate that you're pressed for  time and a simple soup and  sandwich more than adequately bridges the gap betwixt breakfast and dinner.  I've tried the excellent  soups before; if the borscht is  on the daily menu, try it, it's  delicious as is the New  England clam chowder.  There is a new soup most  days, and I've yet to hit one I  didn't enjoy. Sometimes  unusual, as in the cream of  cauliflower or cream of broccoli, they're always hot, filling and served with a couple  of slices of the Cafe Pierrot's  own homebaked bread with  plenty of soft butter, a touch  not unappreciated.  The bread is what makes  the sandwich selection  special, from a simple tuna  fish or egg salad, to a splendid concoction of avocado,  cream cheese, tomatoes and  sprouts which would made  Dagwood himself a devotee.  If you're really hungry, try  soup and a sandwich; it  usually runs at about $4.25  and changes each day.  The Cafe Pierrot quiche is  another taste delight; the day  I went, there were three  specials, smoked salmon and  cheese, ham and cheese or  bacon, onion and  mushroom;   I've  tried  the  CHINESE CUISINE  Seaview Gardens - 1556 Marine  Drive, Gibsons Landing - 886-9219.  Open 11:30 - 9 p.m. Tues-Thurs; 11:30  a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri-Sat; 11:30 a.m. - 9  p.m. Sun. 48 seats in dining room, 20  seats on the deck. With a beautiful harbour view, the Seaview Gardens serves  Occidental and Oriental food. Western  menu features hamburgers, fish & chips,  steaks and fried chicken. Chinese menu  features combination dinners, chow  mein, Hot Pots, fried rice and family  dinners. House specialties include  Prawns in Lobster Sauce, Gong Bo Guy  Ding, Lychees Chicken and BBQ Duck.  Sat. Smorgasbord 5-8 p.m. $4 Seniors,  $3.50 children, $6.95 regular. All items  available to go. Average family dinner  for four $25.  vegetable quiche before and  found it excellent. Served  with a large fresh salad with  house dressing, a quiche  selection makes a full meal,  and at prices ranging from $5  to $5.50, it's a deal that's  hard to beat.  There are also meat patties, oyster or shrimp patties  on homemade buns, or if  you'd just like a quick bit,  try a muffin.  I had the curried chicken  crepe the day I went; it came  promptly, with a large salad.  Delicately flavoured, the  crepe was as thin as a good  crepe should be and filled  with plenty of tender chicken  and smothered in a cream  curry sauce. At $3.95 it's an  economical, filling lunch.  I felt that to do without  dessert would be to do the  cafe an injustice; I've tried  the cheesecake, and it's light  as a feather and sinfully rich.  The Hello Dolly bars are out  of this world being a cross  between a brownie and a  Nanaimo bar; the muffins  are always freshly baked and  moist, but my favourite is the  carrot cake. It's moist, filled  with pineapple, walnuts, cinnamon and other spices and  topped with thick cream  cheese icing; it's a treat not  soon forgotten.  The Cafe is open for dinner as well, and there is a  modest but good selection of  wines and beer available, as  well as a wide selection of  herbal teas and the usual tea  and excellent coffee.  My lunch .bill was $6.80;  those prices and the quality  of the food make the Cafe  Pierrot a must for lunch the  loyal clientele would indicate.  NIGHT ON THE TOWN  Andy's Restaurant - Hwy ioi. Upper Gibsons - 886-3388. Open 11 a.m.  -10:30 p.m. Mon-Wed; 11 a.m. - 11  p.m. Thurs-Sat; 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sun.  130 seats. V., M.C. Located in the  village of Gibsons kittycorner from Sunnycrest Mall, Andy's offers a variety of  popular meals in air conditioned comfort. A place to sit back and relax. Wide  lunch selection with daily specials. Menu  features steak, pizza, seafood, pasta.  House specialties include veal dishes and  steaks. Children's portions available for  most dishes. Reservations recommended  on weekends. Average meal for two  $15-$20.    , ; .    ;1.  Cafe Pierrot - Teredo St. Sechelt  -885-9962. Open from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.  Mon-Sat; 5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. Thurs.;  5:30 p.m. - 11 p.m. Fri-Sat. 43 seats.  V., M.C. Located in Sechelt's Teredo  Square, Cafe Pierrot features light  meals and a selection of teas and coffees in a cheery well-lit Westcoast atmosphere. Lunches include sandwiches, burgers, salads and quiches.  Dinner includes seafood, pasta, quiche  and meat entrees. Leg of Lamb Pro-  vencale a house specialty. Espresso,  Capuccino and plenty of parking.  Average meal for two $20.  Casa Martinez Restaurant - Sunshine Coast Hwy., Davis Bay - 885-2911.  Open 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. daily except Sat.,  5 p.m. - 10 p.m. nightly. 80 seats. V.,  M.C. A.E. Lovely view and warm intimate atmosphere. Lunch menu  features sandwiches, egg d'shes, burgers.  Dinner selections include pasta, seafood,  chicken and steaks. All dinner entrees  served with fresh vegetables and choice  of potato. Paella the house specialty-  minimum order for two. Chicken feast  Sunday nights 'til 9 p.m. includes bread,  salads, potatoes, vegetables, choice of  dessert and all the chicken you can eat  for only $6.95. Banquet facilities up to  90 people. Average dinner for two $25.  Reservations on weekends.  Creek House - Lower Road, Roberts  Creek - 885-9321. Open Wed-Sun 6 p.m.  - 10 p.m., Sunday Brunch 11 a.m. - 2  p.m. 40 seats. V., M.C. Intimate dining  and fine cuisine are the hallmarks of  Creek House. The atmosphere is sophisticated yet casual. Brunch includes eggs,  crepes, pasta, seafood, salads,  croissants. Dinners include crepes, pasta  and meat entrees. Evening specialties include Filet A L'Echalotte, Stroganoff,  Lobster, Prawns. Two Daily specials  (one seafood) at $10.95 includes soup or  salad. Average meal for two $30. Reservations a must on weekends.  Gypsy  Gourmet  International  Restaurant - 1500 Marine Dr., Gibsons Landing - 886-8632. Open Mon,  Tues, Thur & Fri from 9:30 a.m. - 2:30  p.m. and 4:30 - 9:30 p.m. Sunday from  9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Closed Wed. 100 seats.  V., M.C. Open for breakfast, lunch and  dinner, the Gypsy's casual atmosphere  and balanced menu makes it an interesting dining destination. Lunch selections include hamburgers, seafood,  sandwiches and more. Dinners include  seafood, schnitzels, chicken and steaks.  Fresh seafood is the house specialty.  Selection varies with what is freshly  available. Outdoor dining on the deck.  Average meal for two $15-$25.  V.-Visa; M.C.-Master Card; A.E.-American Express; E.R.-En Route  AVERAGE MEAL PRICES QUOTED DO NOT  INCLUDE LIQUOR PURCHASES.  The Omega Pizza Steak and  Lobster Housel538 Gower Pt. Rd.,  Gibsons Landing -886-2268. Open Sun-  Thurs; 4 - 10:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 4-11 p.m.  145 seats. V., M.C. With a perfect view  of Gibsons marina, and a good time atmosphere. The Omega is a people-  watcher's paradise. Cast members of  "The Beachcombers" can usually be  found dining here. Menu includes pizza,  pasta, steaks and seafood. Steaks and  seafood are their specialties. Banquet  facilities available. Very special  children's menu. Average dinner for two  $20. Reservations recommended.  Parthenon Theatre Restaurant  -The Boulevard, Sechelt '- 885-9769.  Open 11:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Mon-Tues;  11:30 q.m. - 2:30 p.m. Wed; 11:30 a.m. -  9:30 p.m. Thurs; 11:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.  Fri; 4 p.m. -10 p.m. Sat; 4 p.m. - 9 p.m.  Sun. 100 seats. V., M.C, A.E. Lovely  view of Trail Bay and a variety of  popular menu selections. Lunches include sandwiches, quiche, hamburgers,  lo-cal plate. Dinners include seafood,  ribs, salads, steaks, chicken and veal.  Steak, seafood and pasta the main attractions. Full pizza menu for dine in or  take out. Average dinner for two $ 15-20.  Reservations on weekends.  Pebbles Restaurant - Trail Ave.,  Sechelt - 885-5811. Open 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.  Mon-Thurs; 7 a.m. -9:30 p.m. Fri-Sat; 9  a.m. - 9 p.m. Sunday. 62 seats. V.,  M.C, A.E. Open for breakfast, lunch,  dinner and Sunday Brunch. Lunches  begin at $4.25 and selections include  sandwiches, burgers and daily specials.  Famous for halibut and chips. Dinners  include meat, poultry, seafood and  more. Rack of Lamb and chicken or  veal Cordon Bleu are house specialties.  Brunch features omelettes, full  breakfasts, Shrimp Pebbles and Eggs  Driftwood. Average dinner for two  $25-$30. Beautiful view of Trail Bay and  across to Nanaimo. Reservations a good  idea.  Pronto's Steak, Pizza and  Spaghetti House - Hwy 101, Gibsons - 886-8138. Open 11:30 a.m. -11:00  p.m. Mon-Thurs; 11:30 a.m. - midnight  Fri-Sat; 4 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. Sun. 130  seats. V., M.C. Located in the Cedar  Plaza in Gibsons, Pronto's serves an extensive variety of pizza, steak, pasta,  lasagna and ribs in a delightful family atmosphere. Lunch choices include sandwiches, pasta, burgers and daily specials  Mon-Fri. Dinner selections include  steak, pizza, ribs and souvlaki. Steak  and lasagna the house specialty.  Children's menu available. All dinner  entrees served with salad and garlic  bread. Average family meal for four  $15-$20.  The Wharf Restaurant - Davis Bay  -885-7285. Open from 7 a.m. - 2:30p.m.  Tues-Sat, 8 a.m. - 2:30 Sunday. Dinner  from 5 p.m. nightly. 66 seats inside, 40  seats patio, 40 seat meeting room. V.,  M.C, A.E., Access, J.C.B., E.R. The  beautiful Wharf dining room has real  West Coast ambiance and a striking  view of Davis Bay. Lunch offerings in-  - elude sandwich platters, entrees and  salads. Dinners include steaks, poultry,  schnitzel, rack of lamb and live atlantic  lobster offered nightly. Children's portions available on many selections. Sunday Brunch features egg dishes, omelettes, pancakes and more. Reservations  recommended on weekends. Banquet  facilities available. Average dinner for  two S25-S30.  A listing of  restaurants  and pubs  FAMIL Y DINING  Come Home Cafe - Marine Drive,  Gibsons - 886-2831. Open 5:30 a.m. - 3  p.m. Tues-Sun. 28 seats. Famous  throughout the Coast for their enormous  breakfasts which are served all day.  Bacon and eggs (we don't count the  bacon), omelettes and giant deluxe  burgers are the house specialties.  The Homestead - Hwy lOl, Wilson  Creek - 885-2933. Open 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.  daily. 40 seats inside, 30 seat patio. V.,  M.C. Open for breakfast, lunch and  dinner. Daily lunch and dinner specials  as well as regular entrees. Lunches include sandwiches, hamburgers, pyrogies  and salads. Dinner selections include  steaks, chicken and seafood. Prime Rib  and 15-item salad bar are the house  specialty on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. Average family meal for four  $25-$30.  Fritz Family Restaurant - Earls  Cove -883-9412. Open 7:30 a.m. - 10:30  p.m. daily (summer), 9:30 a.m. - 8:30  p.m. daily (winter). 60 seats. Breakfast,  lunch and dinner are served daily in a  rustic country cabin atmosphere. Full  selections of quick foods for those in  ferry line up and lots of good home  cooking for those with time on their  hands. Fresh caught local seafood the  house specialty. Homemade pies and  soups. Average family dinner for four  $20.  Ruby Lake Resort - Sunshine Coast  Hwy, Pender Harbour -883-2269. Open  7 days a week 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. 54 seats.  Breakfast, lunch and dinner served daily  in Ruby Lake's post and beam dining  room. Lovely view of lake and good  highway access for vehicles of all sizes.  Breakfast served all day. Lunch prices  begin at $2.50, dinners from $5.50 including salad bar.Smorgasbord Sunday  Nights includes 12 salads, three hot meat  dishes and two desserts, $10.95 for  adults, $5.50 for children under 12. Tiny  tots free. A great family outing destination. Average family dinner for four  $20-$25.  Sea Galley - Pender Harbour Hotel,  Sunshine Coast Hwy, Pender Harbour  -883-9019. Open - 46 seats. V., M.C  Serving lunch and dinner with a lofty  view of the Pender Harbour area. Lunch  selections include sandwiches, hamburgers, hot dogs, fish and chips and  eggs benedict. Dinner prices start at  $7.50. Entrees include veal, steaks,  chicken and fresh local seafood. All dinners include salad, garlic bread, potato  or rice. Hearty, breakfasts from 7:30  a.m. till noon daily. Average family dinner for four $25-$30.  Sunnycrest Restaurant - Sunnycrest Shopping Plaza, Gibsons  -886-9661. Open 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. Mon-  Thurs; 7 a.m. - 8 p.m. Fri; 8 a.m. - 7  p.m. Sat. Open for breakfast, lunch and  dinner. Menu features sandwiches, hamburgers and fish and chips. Average  family dinner for four $10-$15.  Village Restaurant - cowrie St.,  Sechelt - 885-9811. Open 7 a.m. - 8 p.m.  daily. 85 seats. V., M.C Large all day  menu features good selection of  breakfasts, lunches and dinners.  Breakfast prices start at $2.15 and selections include the Village Special-$4.75.  Lunch choices include sandwiches, hamburgers and cold meat plates. Dinner entrees include steak, chops, seafood,  pasta, veal cutlets. Steak and lasagna  very popular. Half orders available for  children. Lunch specials Mon-Fri, dinner specials nightly. Average family dinner for four $25.  DRIVE IN TAKE OUT  Chicken Shack - Cowrie St., Sechelt  - 885-7414. Open 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Mon-  Thurs; 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fri-Sat; Sun  noon - 8 p.m. Fried chicken, chicken  burgers, chicken nuggets, fries, salads,  onion rings, fresh hamburgers. All  prepared on the premises, all to go.  Frances' Burgers - Madeira Park  -883-9655. Open 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Mon-  Sat. Fresh made hamburgers, fish and  chips, hot dogs and chicken and chips.  Frances Burger, the house specialty.  PUBS  .. . .v.vi      /.-.-.\\  *^ mi  V,--i /_  Backeddy Pub - Egmont Marina  -883-2298. Open 3 p.m. -11 p.m. daily.  Sat & Sun 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. 60 seats inside, 20 on the deck. V., M.C. All day  menu features sandwiches, hamburgers,  steaks and desserts. Snacks include fresh  steamed local prawns, fish and chips  made with local fish. Bright comfortable  atmosphere overlooking Egmont Narrows. Also includes a 16 seat family  cafe. Open 9 a.m. - 10 p.m.  Cedar's Inn - Cedar Plaza, Gibsons  -886-8171. Open 10 a.m. - midnight  Mon-Sat. 100 seats. V., M.C. Good pub  food and 4-6 daily specials. Lunch prices  stail at $2.25. Saturday breakfast special  includes ham, bacon, fresh scrambled  eggs and three pancakes for only $2.25.  Live entertainment most nights. Darts  tournaments Sat afternoons. Everyone  welcome.  Gilligan's Pub - Teredo St., Sechelt  -885-4148. Open 10 a.m. - midnight  Mon-Sat. 65 seats. V. Lunch and dinner  are served daily in the Coast's newest  neighbourhood pub. Menu includes  sandwiches, hamburgers, chicken platters and daily specials. Darts on Monday  nights.  Peninsula Motor Inn - Sunshine  Coast Hwy, Gibsons - 886-2804. Open  10 a.m. -12 p.m. Mon-Thurs; 11 a.m. -1  a.m. Fri-Sat. Pub food includes  breakfasts and lunches. Kitchen open  until 6 p.m. Exotic dancers. Live music. 14.  Coast News, October 7,1985  Ciose ru  The hits were heavy at  Balaclava Park last Saturday  where Gibsons third division  lost an extemely close match to  the Vancouver Kats 6-3.  Kats, always known for  fielding aggressive hitters did  just that. In the defensive battle  possession was not a problem  for the Gibsons pack. They've  shown continuous improvement  over their last two matches playing very well in set scrums and  line outs. Grant Gill has proven  dominance in the front jumper  slot with Brent Lineker and  newcomer Jim Davidson always  supporting the tight maul.  The Gibsons three line were  hammered by the Kats' backs  causing an uneasy approach to  offensive thrust. Fullback Steve  Almond saved Gibsons on  numerous occasions by break-  OSS  FIT  FOR  TWO  STARTS  WEDNESDAY  OCT 16  Pre/Post Natal Fitness  10:30 a.m., Wed & Fri  Exercises & information for  the childbearing years  ��� IV2 hour class includes  ��� light warm-up  ��� specific exercises to  stretch & strengthen muscles  that are necessary for  an effective birth  ��� Yoga postures that  improve flexibility and  good breathing techniques  ��� visualization & relaxation  FIT FOR TWO  provides you with  exercises & breathing  during and after pregnancy  for physical & emotional  well being  Tl��  WEIGHT ROOM *  FITNESS CENTRE  Hwy 101 (North Rd.) Gibsons 886-7675  HOOVER.  MODEL S32710O1  SPIRITM 900  VACUUM  ��� POWERFUL 900 WATT  COMPUTER DESIGNED MOTOR  ��� QUADRAFLEX- POWERN02ZLE  ��� DUAL BRUSHED EDGE  CLEANING  ��� AGITATOR ACTION CONTROL  WITH INDICATOR  ��� FULL WRAP-AROUND  FURNITURE GUARD  ��� CHROME WANDS  ��� SUCTION CONTROL  ��� TOOL STORAGE  ��� BUILT-IN CARRYING HANDLE  ��� BAG SIGNAL LIGHT  ��� CORD REWIND  ��� SWITCH PEDAL  ��� 7 LITRE BAG CAPACITY  SPECIAL  SQggoo  BUILDING SUPPLIES^  Two Locations:  Sunshine Coast Highway, Gibsons  Wharf and Dolphin, Sechelt  ing up Kat rushes with expert  tackling.  Scoring was the question  mark for the entire game for  both sides. Stand-off Dave  Rainer finally broke the ice  from a Kat off-side penalty by  kicking a 30 yard field goal.  Unfortunately Gibsons were  caught unalert late in the second  half. An offside penalty on the  Gibsons' five yard line was  quickly taken by alert Kat centre Martin Wright who drove  thru before the blue shirts were  able to react. A lesson the team  will learn not to forget.  Next weekend third division  take on Ex Britannia Of Vancouver east end.  In the Classic League Gwen  Edmonds rolled a 310 single and  a 936 four game total and in the  Tues. Coffee League Nora  Slinksy had a 300 single and an  812 triple which is her third 800  plus total already this year.  In the Gibsons "A' League  Freeman Reynolds a 316 single  and 791 triple, Irene Rottluff a  322 single and 668 triple in the  Slough-off League and in the  Ball & Chain League Ray  Chamberlin put it together and  rolled a 308 single and a 728 triple. In the same league Pam  Lumsden had a 299-690 score  and to finish the week Jack  Hoffman a 328 single and a 765  triple in the Phuntastique  League.  Other high scores:  CLASSIC:  Hazel Skytte  Rita Johnsont  Joe Bellerive  Freeman Reynolds  TUES. COFFEE:  Michele Whiting  272-893  268-921  261-928  291-961  240-652  Golfing news  by Alec Warner  The full limit of 90 golfers  took part in the annual Fall  Mixed Scramble Tournament  on Sunday, September 29.  The tournament convenors,  Ann and Tony Burton, and  Barry Reeves, organized an excellent 'fun' tournament, even  to providing perfect golfing  weather.  Teams were in groups of six  and the winning team with a  score of 64 was Luke Lappin,  Tony Burton, Barry Reeves, Ab  Chambers, Nancy Nanson, and  Betty Laidlaw. Hope you all enjoy your Thanksgiving turkey  dinner! The second team, scoring a 65, was Norm Tupper,  Glen Phillips, Marion Reeves,  Bill Sutherland, Barbara  Lawrence, and Bill Clancy.  On Ladies' Day, October 1,  the ladies played the frist round  of a two day Eclectic Tourna  ment. Final results will be announced next week.  The results of Men's Wednesday, October 2 Twilight play  were as follows: first low net,  Gordon Dixon, 32; second with  a 33, Ted Kurluk, with Don  Elson third, also with a 33.  First low gross, with a low,  low, 36 was Brian Leckie. Second low gross of 40 was turned  in by Freeman Reynolds. *  Remember! Men's Twilight  tee-off is at 4:30 p.m. for the  balance of the season.  Saturday, October 19,  gourmet dinner! Entertainment! Annual awards! Tickets  are available in the Pro-Shop.  Pick up yours now! Happy  hour at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7  p.m. Get your tickets as early as  possible so that 'your' house  committee can plan their catering needs.  The Fall "Divot" is now  available at the clubhouse.  Don't forget to pick it up.  Minor hockey news  At last Tuesday's general  meeting, the emphasis was on  our midgets. Plans were discussed to make this a most successful year for them.  They will be carded, enrolled  in tournaments and play many  exhibition games. The Suncoast  Breakers have offered to help.  Manager Dal Tetzlaff, is very  encouraged, but needs more  adult help.  The redecorated arena is  ready to go this week. It will be  a great year for minor hockey  and all boys and girls interested  in joining, and who have not  done so, are urged to do so  now. Phone Jackie Doyle  885-2558. There is room for 10  more at hockey school.  Skating  Sunshine Coast Figureskating  Club begins its 85/86 season,  offering 10 weeks of fun recreational skating. The is offering:  FAMILY SKATE - starts October 7, 4 to 6 p.m. (Mondays).  Lessons for tiny tots, beginners  and juniors. The cost will be $40  per family plus CFSA membership ($12 for the first member,  $8 for each additional member).  SENIOR GIRLS AND  CONFIGURESKATE - lessons  start October 10, 4 to 6 p.m.  (Thursdays). The cost will be  $50 plus SCFSA membership.  SENIOR GIRLS OPEN  SESSIONS - starts October 8,  Tuesday p.m. and Saturday  morning October 12.  For more information call  Celia, 886-2362.  There will be a $75 prize to  the boy that sells the most raffle  tickets (Breakers firewood  prize). The second prize is $50.,  Get your tickets at the Spinning*  Wheel or from Myrla Maclntyre, 886-9827.  COAST   O  TRACTOR  INDUSTRIAL &  FORESTRY EQUIPMENT  Coquitlam, B.C.  toll free 112-800-242-1988  Sales  Representatives  Archie Morrjson  Res. 939-4230  Ian Davies  Res. 941-3245  /' :  ��� K,(V ,:������ :;T|DE-TA:BLES^:.::;;.;.,,..j/  ^^HK\ I     Wed. Oct 9  Fri. Oct 11     j      Sun. Oct 13    H  V 1  jBlkj   0655  0215         11.9  1    0425         13.5   JL  AmmmmmmL 1445  0845           4.7  1025          6.0   tt  ���^a^-^^Vt^^l  2055         10.2  1545         14.5  1640         14.7  1  Tue. Oct 8  Thur. Oct 10  2155           7.8  2305           4.7  0545           4.8  0050         1) .3  Sat. Oct 12  Mon. Oct 14  1400         14.0  0755           4.6  0320         12.7  0525         14.2  2025         10.9  1515         14.4  0940           5.2  1110           7.1  k    1  2250         11.1  2120          9.2  1610         14.6  1705         14.8  "'  2225           6.3  2345           3.2  "    P.  For Skookumchuk Narrows add  1 hr. 45 min., plus 5 min. for               [|  ->     |  1   Reference: Point Atkinson  '     ll  |   Pacific Standard Time  each It. of rise, and 7 min.                  _  for each ft. of fall.                                |  UP TO  40%  LESS  than regiitftr prices  sold at major  department stores*  s  FACTORY *  DISCOUNT 9  PRICES  Free  Installation  on alt Vortical  Blind order��  ��� Hvndttttls of designer col'  ours and textures to complement any deoor.  ��� Past Delivery  ��� Bring ��n your window  measurements or call u&fqr  free 'shop-at-home* service.  9ftmm9*mmm9m9m9WK9Wmm99W9Wma9m9W��^  SUREWAy BLINDS  n-vcmcLTD.  "Our Way h  the Sure Wuyn  SUMMER HOURS:  MON.--SAT. S-5  Elmbrldfle Way  {carnftr Gilbert}  Richmond, B.C.  (904) 276-88S6  Gibsons       886-3922  Ahbetefortl 859-7383  Occultism 838*8411  Out oi Town inquiries  Wsicoma - Ce�� Collect  Jocetyne Boyce  276-663  Vicki Allen  255-703  SWINGERS:  Ena Armstrong  242-601  Mary Lambert  257-624  Grace Gilchrist  283-643  Andy Stewart  239-635  GIBSONS "A":  Kathy Clark  261-690  Barb Christie  274-695  Ron Slack  267-644  Jim Middleton  248-645  Don Slack  271-726  WED. COFFEE:  Edna Bellerive  228-643  Willie Buckmaster  250-658  SLOUGH-OFFS:  June Fletcher  219-641  Bev Drombolis  247-651  BALL & CHAIN:  Sandra McHeffey  290 617  Gloria Tourigny  216-624  Art Drew  263-639  Frank Redshaw  243-664  PHUNTASTIQUE:  Jane Graham  272-698  Jim Gilchrist  218-635  Joe McOuskie  282-649  NIGHT OWLS:  Garry Lockett  237-605  Bill Grant  262-635  Ray Mahoney  278-691  SECHELT G.A.'S:  CecByers  224-612  Merle Hately  234-619  Len Hornett  237-606  Sunshine Coast Arena  Public Skating Schedule  Youth  Three games were played last  week in the Sunshine Coast  Youth Association soccer  leagues.  In the 8 and 9 year old division the Lions defeated Shop  Easy by a score of 5-0 and  Elphie Rec. defeated Pharmasave by a score of 3-2.  In the 10 and 11 year old division West Sechelt defeated  Sechelt by a score of 2-1.  Friday Sessions  starting Oct. 11th  Parents & Pre-schoolers  2:30 - 3:30  Public Skating  3:30 - 5:00  Sunday Sessions  starting Oct. 20th  Public Skating  3:00 - 5:00  Inquire about specia  rentals and hall facilities  General Office  885-2955  Lounge  885-3135  ^  ^  %y\ :4yl  ^ t y-\y >  \ Sv ������    ^ ^   irpp-MPijipppppji^'ij  ^ yy>y  p.\*\^  ^kx  RC  PAVILION  REPORTS  \>v\  yy^N5  y>  *$*?$  IT'S OUR SHOW. Since the 1851 Crystal Palace Fair in  London, World Expositions have linked together the nations of  the world to celebrate achievements in new technology. Now, after  78 fairs have come and gone, it's our turn.  From May 2 ro October 13, 1986, the eyes of the world will be  on British Columbia as we host Expo 86 ��� a festival of events,  innovations and entertainment. It's an exciting tradition which  B.C. is carrying on in grand style.  But we mustn't forget that Expo is much more than an exciting  event. It's the greatest opportunity of this century for British  Columbia to promote our industries, skills and tourism potential to  the world.  That means we have two major responsibilities ar the B.C.  Pavilion. The first is to create B.C.'s home at the fair ��� a place  where people from all over the province will feel comfortable and  proud. The second is ro play host to the world ��� and make the  best possible impression on our visitors. Everyone in B.C. has a stake  in this process, and we need to work together to put our best side  forward. As shareholders, you need to stay advised on how we're  doing ��� and how we're presenting you to the world.  That's what this report series is about.  WELCOME TO YOUR PAVILION. Lets begin by  setting the stage ��� the B.C. Pavilion Complex now under  construction. We've selected the largest site at Expo ��� 4-5 hectares  (11 acres) of land between B.C. Place Stadium and False Creek.  It's a prime location, and the three pavilions we've built here will be a  permanent legacy for us to enjoy in years to come.  To thrill residents and visitors alike, we designed our flagship  pavilion as a voyage of discovery into all that is unique and  unknown in the province. Called "Discovery B.C.," this 98-foot  high, glass-roofed building is home to the Discovery  Trees ��� circular exhibit towers focusing on how our spirit of  innovation has made us creators of sophisticated technology.  Below is a 200-seat B.C. Restaurant; above, our 520-seat  Theatre ��� the first in North America designed exclusively for  the giant Showscan film medium.  Here too is the Regional Marketplace, where the nine B.C.  regions are represented in photomurals, theatre and audio  visual displays. And because we want our guests to return to British  Columbia after Expo, we've designed a Tourist Information Centre  complete with computer terminals and hosts, located close by.  There's more. Next to Discovery B.C. is the Challenge  Pavilion offering a reflection of our economic past and future.  There is also a Conference Facility for trade delegations, and a  Business Information Centre to brief them on investment  opportunities in B.C.  All this is clustered around the Plaza of Nations, a paved and  covered area where up to 10,000 people can gather for major  ceremonies and special presentations.  WE'RE STEAMING AHEAD. Our pavilions are up and 70  percent complete. Exhibitry is in the fabrication stage and our  programs are in motion. By February, 1986, we'll be installing  exhibitry for our May opening.  This is it, British Columbia.  Our time ro shine.  Next month: Our world class  exhibitry.  THE HONOURABLE DON PHILLIPS, MINISTER RESPONSIBLE  UPDATE  LOOK FOR THE B.C. MOBILE  PAVILION IN YOUR COMMUNITY.  IT'S A "PREVIEW ON WHEELS" OF  THE LARGER PAVILION. OUR  MOBILE HAS BROUGHT THE EXPO  THEME TO 15 B.C. COMMUNITIES  IN THE PAST THREE MONTHS.  SPONSORED BY:  Sunshine  British  Columbia  pavilion  EXPO 86  ~tf Coast News, October 7,1985  Hosnes 8. Property  Berths  Obituaries  In Memori*nt  Thank You  Personal  Announcements  Weddings il  ERgagem-ents  Lost  Found  Pets &�� Livestock  Music  Travel  Wanted  Free  Garage Sales  Barter 6. Trade  For Sale  Autos  Campers  Marine  Mobile Homes  Motorcycles  Wanted to Rent  led ft. Breakfast  For Rent  Help Wanted  Work Wanted  Child Care  Business  Opportunities  Legal  B.C. ft. Yukon  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  Classifieds  at any of our convenient  Friendly People  Places  IN PENDER HARBOUR   Centre Hardware & Gifts 883 9914  John Henry's 883 2253  IN HALFMOON BAY   B & J Store 885 9435  IN SECHELT-  BoOkS & Stllff (Trail Bay Centre) 885-2625  The Coast News (Cowrie st> 885-3930  IN DAVIS BAY   Peninsula Market 8859721  IN ROBERTS CREEK-  Half acre waterfront, gov't lease,  Sechelt Inlet, $3500. 885-2898.  TFN  New 3 bdrm. house, $43,000,  Gibsons area. Call North Van aft.  6,980-1780. #41  To trade beautiful view lot near  Sechelt for a motor home in good  condition.Phone 836-4534 or  write Box 681 Sicamous, B.C.  #42  Exec, home with ocean frontage,  will lease, excellent references.  576-1228.- #40  Are you looking for true value?  We have a spacious home with 4  bdrms., loads of extras, a full un-  fin. bsmt., located close to all  services. Requires a small D/P to  assume a 10 V? per cent first  mtge. Must be sold. Reduced to  $72,900. To view call 886-7668.  #40  Part, cleared, potential view lot,  Bonniebrook Hts., with  underground services & culvert  in, $11,500. 886-2196.        #40  3 plus acres w/ 3 bdrm, 1152  sq. ft., modular home on unfinished basement in Roberts  Creek. Excellent financing terms  available for qualifying purchaser. Vendor will consider rental/purchase option, $71,900.  Contact Dale 885-3257.   #  TFN  Seaview Market 8853400  IN GIBS0NS-  Adventure Electronics (Sunnycrest Mali)  886-7215  The Coast NeWS (behind Pebbles Realty)  886-2622  DEADLINE IS NOON SATURDAY  FOR MONDAY PUBLICATION  WC-fCJ^U&W  m  m^  Sharlene and Robert Sully are  pleased to announce the birth of  their son Daniel Robert Gerald,  born Aug. 21/85 weighing 6 lbs.  5 oz. at 11:38 a.m., Prince  i George Regional Hospital. Proud  ! grandparents are Gerald & Rose  Martin of Gibsons and Murial &  Robert Sully of Sechelt.        #40  Rod & Sheahan Camposano are  pleased to announce the birth of  their son Braeden Daniel, 7 lbs.  12 oz., Oct. 1, 6:20 a.m. at  Grace Hospital. A brother for  Meghan. #40  H*  l}*#  ^ -sP  fcWIfcj  You'll receive courteous service from the  folks at B & J Store - our "Friendly People  [Place" in Haffmoon Bay.  c  Obituaries  )  KENDALL: Elsie Irene (nee Stein-  brunner), passed quickly and  peacefully from this earth on Sunday, September 23, 1985 at her  home in Sooke, B.C. Born at Gibsons, B.C. on March 4, 1912.  Although we know that she has  gone to join predeceased loved  ones, she will be deeply missed  by her family. A memorial service  was held at the Church of Jesus  Christ of Latter Day Saints in Victoria, B.C. on Friday September  27,1985. #40  CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  CopyHeht and  4U*vmrUm*r*Q  The Sunshine Coast News  reserves the right to classify  advertisements under appropriate headings and  determine page location.  The Sunshine Coast- News  also reserves the right to  revise or reject any advertising which in the opinion of  the Publisher is in questionable taste. In the event  that any advertisement is rejected the sum paid for the  advertisement will be  refunded.    Minimum *4M per 3 line Insertion.  Each additional line M". Use our economical last  w*��k free rat*. Pre-pay your ad for 2 weeks & get  the third week FREE.  THE FOLLOWING CLASSIFICATIONS ARE FREE  Birth Announcements, Lost and Found.  No billing or telephone orders are accepted except  from customers who have accounts with us.  Cash, cheques or money orders  must accompany all classified advertising.  NOON SATURDAY  pfttoff to iNsarjmoM     .  Please mail to:  COAST NEWS Classified. Box 460. Gibsons. B.C. VON 1V0  Or bring in person to one of our  ���   Friendly People Places listed above  ���     Minimum '4*�� per 3 line Insertion.  I  I  I  I*  1  1  1  I  I  I  I  I  I  i*C  ,  :          zr  I r  :             ZLTJ  ��� i i i i i i i ���      :         IE]  1  r~  m     :  :          in  I  I  I  I  CLASSIFICATION: e.g. For Sale, For Rent, etc.  L,  ]  I  J  ft  L.  Persona?  Get trim for Christmas. Weight  Watchers meets Monday, 6:45 at  Senior Cit. Hall, Sechelt.  885-3165 or 886-7516.        #42  Single? Join Cameo Singles Club  for dancing, potluck dinners.  886-2550 or 886-9058.        #42  Exp. housesitter avail, by quiet,  mature adult, Nov. to June. Long  or short term. 886-9213.      #42  A/coholics Anonymous  883-9251, 885-2896, 886-7272,  886-2954 TFN  F  (Am  Announcements  )  The Gibsons Medical Clinic is  pleased to announce that Dr. Ed  Berinstein will be returning to  practice Oct. 15/85. #40  SEWING FOR BEGINNERS  One student at a time in your  home or mine, any age, $40 per  course. 886-7483. #40  WANTED favorite recipes for our  Sunshine Coast Cookbook.  PRIZES! the Bookstore, Cowrie  St., Sechelt, 885-2527. TFN  Computer Astrology Calculations  & Readings. Rune Stone &  Psychometry Readings,  Auragraphs & Past Life Regressions. The Bookstore, 885-2527.  TFN  South Coast  V       Ford       -j  Gas Saver Special  Pinto Wagon  Runs well!  $399  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  PL 5936 885-3281       _J  The BOOKSTORE Library  Free Membership  Open Mon.-Sat.  Cowrie St. Sechelt, 885-2527.  TFN  Moving? We will buy most of the  items you no longer need. Odds &  Sodds. 886-8557. TFN  Small appliance service. If it's  electrical we'll fix it. Fast, reas.  886-3247. #41  We need mature men for a beginners square dance group. Lots of  fun and good exercise. Ph.  885-9245. #40  DON HUNTER PHOTOGRAPHY  Wedding - Portrait  Family - Commercial  We come to you anywhere  on the Sunshine Coast  886-3049  #40  If someone in your family has a  drinking problem you can see  what it's doing to them. Can you  see what it's doing to you? Al  Anon can help. Phone 886-9826  or 886-8228. TFN  i���muffins���  A very large THANK YOU lo all our  patrons for making (he summer a  success. We shall hopefully and  happily return in the spring.  Winter well everyone!  Sincerely.  Joan Thompson  Our great muttins & bread  will be at the Green Grocer  at Cedar's Mall.  ( 8.     Weddings j  I &, Engagements J  \��   ttmv^_��;"'^_T-t9  m    *S  Cliff & Joan Mahlman wish to announce the wedding of daughter  Melanie L. to Mr. Randy L.  Wheating, son of Bryon and  Shirley Wheating of Maple Ridge.  The ceremony will be held Sunday. October 13, 1985, at New  Westminster, B.C. #40  Gerald & Rose Martin of Gibsons  are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Geraldine  to Micheal Smith, son of Judith  Smith, Roberts Creek. Wedding  to take place in October/85.  #40  Phone us today about our  beautiful selection of personalized  wedding invitations, napkins,  matches, stationery, and more!  Jeannie's Gifts & Gems.  886-2023. TFN  Small female multi-coloured cat.  Evenings 886-2154. #40  Male cat mostly orange wilh  white patch under neck. Wearing  brown flea collar. Found around  Gibsons Elem. School. 886-9791.  #40  Male collie-cross puppy, gold-  coloured, Roberts Creek.  885-5420. #40  Found, Shepherd-Collie X young  female dog in Grey Creek area.  885-5676. #40  Female Persian cat, gray burl, at  top of Hall Rd. near Firehall.  885-3301. #40  South Coast  t        Ford  1983 MARQUIS  WAGON  V6 Automatic, PS, PB, Tilt  Wheel,.  Air   Conditioning.  Very Clean.  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  Responsible professional man 50,  has experience in home repairs is  looking for house to babysit for  winter months. 886-2502.     #41  Old carpenter's & cabinet maker's  tools, such as: planes, levels,  chisels, transits, etc... Call collect  1-576-6370.,**.^   _��*   #47  r  Split firewood $60 per cord. Ph.  Sat. aft. 4 p.m. Pam or Scott  886-2941. #40  15.  Free  1  GARRY'S CRANE SERVICE  For   free   dead   car   removal.  886-7028. TFN  Free to good home, Bantam  roosters. Please call 885-2898.  #42  2 wooden floats from old Granthams wharf. Free to whoever  removes them. 886-7830 or  886-9238. .    #40  2 young cats, Siamese, 6 mo.,  both male, very loving, hd. shots,  wormed. Ph. 885-5938.       #41  5 kittens, 6 weeks old, free to  good home, 3 males & 2 fern.  886-7029. #40  Canine obedience training.  Private instruction. Phone Reg  Robinson 886-2382. TFN  CI 2.  JL-  r4  Music  )  PIANO  TUNING  repairs &. appraisals  Ken Dalgleish  886-2843  Sm. uprt. Wurlitzer piano,  $1600, like new. To view, Driftwood Inn, B.O'Keefe or call  574-3295. #40  Snow tires, P155/80R13, and  rims for Chevette. 886-2429.  #40  Electric cement mixer, heavy duty  wheelbarrow, airtight wood stove,  all-nighter type preferred, stained  glass windows. Ph. 886-2658.  #42  Giant garage sale, Sechelt Airport, top of Field Rd., Sat., Oct.  12,10-2 p.m. Sellers res. a table  for $5. 885-3165.  3 family gar. sale, Creekside  Crescent, Sat. 9-noon. No early  birds. #40  Sun. noon, Reed Rd., fridge,  stove, utility trailer, lg. fold,  table, inq. 885-2117. #40  South Coast  Ford      J,  A wood truck special  '68 Dodge  V8, auto, good runner, good  tires.  s399  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  f 17.  (Bai  D  Barter & Trade  Adam Colecovision computer  (never used) for old piano.  885-9969. #42  For Sale  )   S=L  The Doll's \  House     \  Children's 2nd Hand  Consignment Boutique  Quality used clothing,  toys equip. & maternity  Tues. - Sat. 10:30 - 5  Next to Variety Foods  past Kvn's Luckv Dollar  886-8229  Ladies Nordica boots, 7%, &  Dynastar 180 skis & binds..  Tyrolia 260 & poles, $250; skates  sz. 5. $10. 886-3662. #40  South Coast  r     Ford    ���",  1982 OLDS  CUTLASS  V8, Automatic,  ���Grey/White - Nice Car?  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  Small 4 ft. bathtub, old fash.,  sink, medicine chest with mirror,  apt. size Hitachi washer/spin  dry. 886-9778 eves, or  weekends. #42  200 gal. oil tank, oil furn. comp.  with pipes, exc. cond., 2 elec.  forced air panels, ideal for kitchen. 886-2788. #42  Toddlers bike with training  wheels, $15; child's bike, $45;  girl's 3 spd. bike, $85, all good,  cond.; car seat, $20; girl's  skates, szs. 10 & 13, $25 ea.;  child's life jacket, $10; 35 mm  camera & access..- $75.  886-7304. #42  Sunshine Satellite Sales, complete systems from $1395. New];  Do it yourself system with in-;  structions. For information phone  883-2557 or 883-9114.        #42  Opening Fitness Centre or want,  one at home? Now you can get^  tanning bed and sauna to com-,  plete   it.   Ph.   885-2109   or  885-5797. '#42'  FOR EXPLOSIVE REQUIREMENTS  Dynamite, electric or regular,  caps, B line E cord and safety  fuse. Contact Gwen Nimmo,,  Cemetery Road, Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound Farmer  Institute. TFN"  Cotoneaster ground cover. 4v.  pots 25 or more $1 ea. Hedging  cedars. 3 varieties. Direct from  grower. 1 gallon size. Min. orc%  25. $3 each with fertilizer or $4  planted. Free delivery locally/  B&B Farms, Roberts Crk���.  885-5033. TFN  LATE SUMMER SPECIAL  Fresh Cut Alder $80 per cord  Hemlock $75 per cord  Dry Red Cedar $50 per cord  Fall Is Coming Soon  We Deliver  886-8193  TFN  5 pc. dining room suite, $375.  886-2659. #40  Electrolux  on sale new & used. Lindsay  Beynon 886-9339; Geri Strojec  886-8053;    Stella    Mutch  886-7370. #42  Firewood for sale, $50/cord, cut,  split, & delivered. Ph. 886-3715.  #40  Alder, $60 cord, delivered in Gibsons area, 10% discount for  seniors. Ph. 886-3976.        #40  Phillips telephone answering  machine, $75. 883-2897.     #40  Macleods ViHP elec. conv. well  jet pump, constant press, tank,  c/w intake hose & filter, exc.  cond., $250. 886-9194.       #40  Trailer for 16-17 ft. boat, $225;  rebuilt 4 cyl. Volvo, 318 block  Volvo 100 stern drive plus access, $350; Campbell speed  prop., brass, 1 1/8" bore, 18"  dia, 20" LH, exc. cond., $200;  GE range, SC oven, avocado,  good cond., $350. 883-2557.  #42  Apt. Hoover W&D, $100; chain  saw P10 Pioneer. $150; gas  weed eater XR85. $150; GM  motor home, $6000; all in perfect  condition. 886-2963. #40  Dormel FP insert, glass dr., 2  spd. fan, $480. 886-8290.    #40  Firewood, split alder, delivered,  $75 cord; 2 cords, $140, 4  cords, $260. 883-9235.       #40  South Coast  >       Ford      >.  1979 ZEPHYR  2 Or., 4 Cyl., Auto  One Owner, 48,000 km  Excellent Economy in  A Family Sized Car.  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281      J  Large metal shaper, sell or swap.  Ph. 886-2459. #40  New 5/8 wave CB base station  antenna with 60' RG, 8V cable,  $60; mar. VHF 12 chan. no.  (saltwater use), $100; OMC cont.  box with 16' cables, as new,-  $65; new stain, steel anchor,  17'-20' boat,$50; Scotty Depth  King downrigger, as new, $50.  886-8258. #40  Deluxe converted wood stove,  new $700. now $500 OBO. 1 yr.  old, used 2 mo. 886-8796 aft. 5.  #41  8 ft. satellite system, $988. Cal!  Green Onion Earth Station  886-7414. TFN  Apt.   size  arborite  table  w/4  chairs; 5 HP rototiller; 8" radjal  armsaw w/stand; exercise bike.-  886-2788. #40  2 prs. girls figure skates, size  12, $15;  new Goodyear radial ���'  snowies, PI55/80RI 13", $50.'  Ph. 886-7267. #40;  T & S SOIL  Mushroom manure $25 per yd..)  $24 for seniors.Cheaper by the!  truckload. Call aft. 6 or anytime-  on   weekends   &   holidays. ]  885-5669. TFN'    t  Multicycle Inglis auto washer, j  $295. Guaranteed & delivered. >  883-2648. TFN!  South Coast  Ford  WANTED!!!  Good used cars  & trucks.  Trade cr we pay cash!!!  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  {  Enjoy the  Convenience  of  Phone-in  Classifieds  Now you can phone  us from anywhere on  the Coast and we'll  help you place your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIED  BY PHONE!  Payment must be  received by  NOON  SATURDAY  to assure  publication.  Call  885-3930  1 TO 4 PM  TUESDAY TO FRIDAY  Cowrie St., Sechelt  From Egmont to Port Mellon, the Sunshine Coast's  most widely read newspaper. Coast News, October 7,1985  Crafts,   plants,   baked   goods,  ��� helium balloons, door prizes, face  "painting,   and   raffles   galore.  Judging   of   homemade   jams,  ; relishes, wine and beer. Displays  from 35 groups on the coast.  'Entertainment   throughout   the  day. Don't miss the Volunteer  Harvest Fair, Sat. Oct. 19,10-2  at Sechelt Indian Band Hall. For  details call 885-5881. #41  Zero Clearance F/P, 4 yrs. old,  full working cond., $175 OBO.  885-7297 aft. 5 p.m. #42  Franklin wood heater, folding  front doors, exc. cond., $95.  886-8362. #40  8' truck canopy (Marlon).  886-2136. #42  South Coast  Ford       4  1985 TOPAZ GS  Automate^  _&r  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 685-3281 ,  V  s  Sears wood stove, $200 OBO;  Runabout boat & 85 HP motor,  take offers. 886-9166. #40  FIREWOOD  DUMP TRUCK SALE  . Hemlock, Cypress, $200 per load  Red Cedar, $150 per load  (Approx. 2V2 + cords)  We Deliver. 886-8193. TFN  ��� Boat tops, seats &  windshields  ��� Repairs our specialty  BOAT HAULING  WW Upholstery &  Boat Tops Ltd.  886-7310  Your complete upholstery centre  c.   1880's   Settee,   burgundy  "brocade,   $1500.   886-7303  Mon.-Wed. TFN  Washer & dryer, $150 ea. or both  for $275. Ph. 886-2914.       #40  2 young nanny goats ready for  breeding. 886-2520. #41  Franklin "0" clearance FP Ik.  new, glass doors, $325; men's  10 spd. bike, $80. 886-9480.  #41  Moped, for parts, $125 OBO;  men's 10 spd. cycle, Hoover  wash-spin, $75; lawn chairs.  886-8829.   . #41  FOAM   All Sizes  Mattresses,     pillows,  bolsters, chips, etc.  Some specials.  WW Upholstery &  Boat Tops Ltd.  886-7310  Your complete upholstery centre  Pender Harbour COOKBOOK,  $6.95. Available at the  BOOKSTORE, Cowrie St.,  885-2527 & many Sunshine  Coast Stores.  TFN  COAL  50 lb. Sacks  886-7017  ���. #48  Gendron baby buggy, good  cond., navy blue, modern style,  $50; crib, $50. 886-8462.    #42  ���Complete set of Merit kitchen  cabinets (oak), good cond.  886-9816. #42  Fisher insert, solid cast doors,  nickel trim w/screen, 24"x18"  firebox, spin drafts on doors,  $450 OBO. 886-8595. #40  Air conditioner works fine, $125;  bean bag chair as new, $25;  black armchair, $25; pr. Sony  speakers, $35; shop vacuum,  $25; BMX child's bike, $10; 18  lb. Norwegian anchor, $30; 4 dr.  legal file cab., $45; 3' tall Alberta  Spruce trees, $19 ea. or $190 for  12.886-2513. #42  Fir & Cypress firewood, very dry  & ready to burn, $60 for % Ton  ��� load. 885-3985 after 5.        #42  5 heavy solid oak antique chairs  made in Canada, $150 OBO.  886-8087. #40  PENINSULA HYDROPONICS  10x10 greenhouse, $149; Marley  glass greenhouse, $499;  Reindeer Products, metal halides.  Everything for your indoor & outdoor gardens. 885-4643.     TFN  SCREENED TOP SOIL  883-9294 883-2220  TFN  165 HP 2 valve diesel, needs  blower work, price $1800. Phone  883-2270. #41  Horse manure,.$20 a load. You  load. 885-9969. TFN  1985 CHEV  ASTRO VAN  4.3 Liter Engine, Automatic,  1,753 Km. AS NEW  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885-3281  19.  ���>rx  Autos j I  75 N. Yorker, loaded, $1000;  78 Twinstar, $500. 886-3368.  #41  1966 Impa SS, $1100 invested in  283 engine, PS, PB, $550.  886-7934. #41  Autos  1976 VW Rabbit, 2 dr.. hatchback, new tires, needs work,  low mileage. Phone 886-3839  after 5. #42  Lease  All  Makes  All  Models  ��� ��� ���  TOYOTA  NISSAN  HYUNDAI  CHRYSLER  VOLVO  BMW  MERCEDES  PORSCHE  ��� ���  ���  Let us quote  on your lease  requirements.  Call  Harvie McCrackeri  today.  SOUTH COAST  LEASING  885-3281  ��*v,  on  1985 BRONCO II  WAGON  Raven Black/Red cloth, XLT  Trim, Mags, Many Options.  Buy or Lease.  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  ^     PL 5936 885-3281        >  76 GMC truck, % T., 350  automatic, good running order,  $1200 OBO. 883-9235. #40  74 Charger, white, beautiful  cond., $2000 OBO, or swap for  sm. car. 883-9412 or 883-2269.  #40  1969 Cooper 998, modified  fiberglass hood, stored last 3  years, $1500 OBO, parts, BRM,  wheels & more. Phone after 7  p.m. 886-3733. #40  71 Chev. Chevelle, runs well,  some rust, $400. 885-3557.  #40  '80 Ford Vz T. with canopy, only  57.000 km., good cond., $5000  firm. 886-7304. #42  73 Datsun 610 station wagon,  auto, 4 cyl., good run. cond.,  $600.886-9418. #41  1975 Dodge Dart, good running  cond., low mi., $1100.  886-8059. #42  1973 VW Super Beetle, no structural rust, exc. cond., 70,000  miles. 885-7297. #42  South Coast  ���>       Ford  !85 BLOWOUT!  4x 1985 ESCORTS  4 to choose from  1 x 1985 MERC LYNX  only 1 left  2 x 1985 MUSTANGS  1-2 dr. hatchback  1-2 dr. coupe  Savings on $$$  1985% ESCORT WAGON  1985V2 LYNX 2 DOOR  1985 MERC COUGAR  3x1985 FORD TEMPOS  2x1985 MERC TOPAZ  2x1985 BRONCO II  5x1985 RANGER 4x4  1xF150 4x4  1x F250 SUPER CAB 4x4  WE WILL NOT BE  UNDERSOLD  I     Wharf Rd., Sechelt  \^    dl 5936 885-3281        a  '68 Ford van, 302 std., exc. running, good on gas, $450.  885-4588. #41  '69 Plymouth Fury 318, needs  tune-up & exhaust work, $300  OBO. 886-3031. #40  '81 Toyota Celica, lots of extras,  exc. cond., must be seen, $7100  OBO. 886-7908. #42  1972 Chev. 1 ton, 12 passenger  window van, V8, auto, asking  $750.886-9069. #40  20.  Campers  70 Chev. Vz ton PU, "283", 4  spd., steel flat deck, wht. spks.,  W/T tires, PTO winch, needs  clutch, $1000 OBO. 886-9480.  #41  South Coast  Ford  South Coast  Y       Ford      i  1983 MUSTANG  3 Or. Hatchback  4 Cyl. Automatic  Sporty & Economical  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  ^     PL 5936 885-3281       J  8 ft. security camper, good condition, best offer. 886-8244.  #42  32 ft., 1980 Nomad trailer, 4x7  frt. tip out. Like new, one owner,  $11,500,883-2505. #42  8' OK camper, fridge, stove,  heater and jacks, good cond.,  $2000.886-7304. #42  South Coast  V       Ford       1  1980 FORD T-BIRD  Loaded! Mags, V8 Engine  Priced Right$$$  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  DL 5936 885*3281 I  20' Winnebago motorhome for  sale. Excellent condition.  885-5995. TFN  Holiday trailer, 25 ft., self contained, $5200.883-2897.     #40  !"������������    ^  t Mobile Homes J  ^��ewaattl*nMHHMrMei��rMiaMaB^^  12 x 52 mobile home for sale,  $8500, Comeau's Mobile Home  Park. 886-9811. #42  Mobile home space available.  Sunshine Coast Mobile Home  Park. 886-9826. tfn  ! Pad for rent for 12 or 14 ft. wide.  Comeau Mobile Home Park, North  Rd. 886-9581. #41  (26.  Waterfront, Pender Hbr., 3 bdrm.  older style house, wood floors,  washer/dryer, fridge, stove,  garden, fireplace, fab. view, full  sun. 883-9427 or 251-4578. TFN  23.  Motorcycles  J  1982 XR200R, exc. cond., low  hrs.; 1982 YTM225 three  wheeler, shaft drive, low hrs.  886-9539 Wayne. #42  '80 Honda ZR50 Minitrail, just  like new, $275. 885-4588.    #41  [24.  IWai  Wanted to Rent  Resp. family desires nice waterfront home to rent. Will consider  all sizes, locations and prices.  Write to Box 159, c/o Coast  News, Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.    #40  Last week of July & first week of  Aug./86, W/front 2 or 3 bdrm.  cottage or house with gd. swimming beach. Ref. avail. Ph. aft. 9  p.m. 984-6417. #42  CHa.  For Rent  1 bdrm. view house, Central  Ave., Granthams, completely furnished,   $350/m.   886-2440,  Snowbirds! 74 VW camper, only j eves. 980-5417.  41,000 mi., $4200, come see.  885-2383 after 5. #41  #40  1982 28' Prowler trlr., exc.  cond., awning, AM/FM cassette,  $12,800,886-9648. #41  2OV2' trlr., exc. cond., awning,  air cond., 4 burner stove/oven,  full bath, 4 new tires & much  more, $6995 OBO. 886-7216.  #41  Mobile home space. Ponderosa  1 Pines, adults only. Free est. on  TFN  reloc. 885-5995.  C_  Marine  1967 28' Trojan cabin cruiser.  Mahogany & teak constr. w/351  Ford V8, FWC, CB, DS, head,  askinq $14,000. Ph. 886-2236.    #41  12' aluminum boat, Sangster  Craft, $395 OBO. 886-2401.     ���  #41  14Vz ft. fibreglass boat, 40 HP  Merc. & trailer. 886-8619.    #40  14' alum. Alaskan Smoker Craft,  bdl bottom, 9V2 Evinrude, boat  trlr w/springs & shocks, $850.  886-9682. #42  24' wooden cabin cruiser, 165  HP Merc. Cruiser, IB/OB, stand  up  head,   depth  sounder,   CB  radio, $2500 OBO. 886-8281.    #42  South Coast  Ford  1977 PONTIAC  TRANS AM  4 Sp., 6.6 Litre Engine  65,000 Miles, Nice Shape  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  PL 5936 885-3281  HIGGS MARINE  SURVEYS LTD  Insurance Claims  Condition and Valuation  Surveys   .  Phone 885-9425  or 885-3643  17V2 ft. boat, camper top, 85HP  Evinrude, galvanized trailer, good  cond., $4000. 886-7304.      #42  John&n 1980 50 HP long or  short shaft with controls, 2  props., lots of parts, $350.  886-8344. #40  Sangster 15'  glass over ply.,;  $300,886-8344. #40  22 ft. Sangster-1/0 188 Mercl.,  galley pkg., head & anchor pkg.,  2 props. 886-9119. #42  14'  Springboc alum,  boat, tilt  trailer & 9.8 HP Merc, $1000  OBO. Ph. aft. 5 p.m. 886-9827.   #42  South Coast  "-Ford   ������.-..'',  1984 RANGER 4x4  '69 Suburban 283, stand., body  gd. shape, $650080. 886-7139.  #40  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  '^      PL 5936 885-3281       J  Organizational meeting for Gibsons Yacht Club Oct. 20, 7:30  p.m. at Marina House, 1668  Marine Dr., Gibsons. 886-8029.  Anybody interested is welcome.  #40  Equip, wanted. 110 V winch  capable of pulling 4000 Ib. boat &  trailer up a beach. Phone  886-8029. #40  Heavy duty tandem boat trailer,  extra heavy tubular construction,  will carry up to 22' boat, $1295.  886-7312 or 886-3730 eves. &  weekends. #40  3 bdrm., 4 appl., fireplace, avail.  Oct. 1, $375/m. Phone  886-7596. #40  Sechelt, 2 bdrm. suite, stove,  fridge, washer/dryer, $375.  885-9366 or 886-3262 after 6.  #42  3 bdrm. mobile home, elec,  Roberts Creek, private, $350.  885-5963. #40  3 bdrm. townhouse, view, fire  place, lower Gibsons, $450; 2  bdrm., $425, adults. 886-7204.  #41  South Coast  *-.      Ford  2nd Car?  Dodge Aspen  6 cyl., auto, easy on gas.  s499  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  PL 5936 885-3281  Gibsons, attractive 4 rm., 1  bdrm., lg. living rm., smart kitchen & appls., 1-2 adults, no  pets. 885-2198. #42  Langdale, 4 bdrm., W/W, F/P,  view, no pets, avail. Nov. 1.  886-8469. #42  These beautiful 3 bdrm. stes.  renting at $450 per month have  been reduced to $350 per month  due to the location. 20 mins.  drive from shopping mall on the  Port Mellon Hwy. 886-9352 or  884-5398. #42  2 bdrm. apt., central Gibsons,  hot water, heat incl., clean &  quiet, adults, no pets. 886-9038.  TFN  1 bdrm. ground level suite, 1000  sq. ft., fridge, stove, mature,  -ef.. now. 1-926-5353.        #42  Sm. 2 bdrm. dbl. wide, Hall Rd.,  g. treed property, $325.  886-8593.      . #42  Large, 3 bdrm., 1% bath, 2  iiieplace, 3appl., full bsmt., centrally located in Davis Bay. Occupy Nov. 1. $450/m. Ph.  274-7608. #42  2 bdrm. duplex, turn., all elec,  $275/m. plus util., avail. Nov. 1,  sorry no pets or children. Call  886-9826. TFN  Soon to rent at low, low prices.  Industrial building, three 1000  sq. ft. units at $300 each. Rent  one, two or all three. For further  details call 886-8073. #40  4 bdrm. house, Sechelt, 4 appl.,  refs. req., resp. people only.  Reply Box 160, c/o Coast News,  Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.        #40  Waterfront, Lindall cedar cottage,  Porpoise Bay, Oct. 1-May 15,  Acorn F/P, propane stove,  fridge, shower, elec. expected  this winter, lg. wharf, $225/m.  224-0584. #42  New 2 bdrm. home, sundeck,  beach view & access, electric &  airtight woodheating, W/W, 4 appliances, ideal for working couple, no pets, available Oct. 20,  ref. required. 886-8291.       #40  2 bdrm. mobile home at Irwin  Motel, single person pref., sorry  no pets. $300/m. 886-3331.  #41  Large lower Gibsons view suite,  suitable for single person, all expenses included in $300 rent.  886-3719. #40  Rent and free, own brand new  microwave or VCR, 2 bdrm. near  Cedar Grove Sch., 1 bdrm.  s/wfront, 1653 Marine Dr.  886-3908. #42  For Rent  Cozy furn. 1 bdrm. cottage on  Lee Bay, $250 plus utilities,  avail. Oct. 1.883-2649.        #40  Nice sized grd. floor, view, 3 rm.  ste., full bath & shower, all elec,  reas., near ferry. 886-2104. #40  Spacious bright 3 bdrm. suite,  complete top floor of house,  stove, fridge & F/P, quiet  residential area, close to schools  & shopping, etc., $425/m., ref.  please. 886-8212. TFN  SouthCoast  Ford    -���'*.  Winter Wheels  Chevy Caprice  V8,   auto,   good   running  order.  $599  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  \ DL 5936 885-3281 J  1 bdrm. suite, over 1,000 sq. ft.,  comp. turn., heat & elec incl.,  c/port, $325/m. 886-7421. #40  Central Gibsons, view, 2 bdrm.,  duplex suite, sundeck, appls.,  etc. 886-2940. #41  1-2-3 bdrm. apts., heat & Cbl. vision inc., reas. rents. 886-9050.  TFN  Avail. Nov. 1, clean, spacious  apt. ste.. LR, Fam. rm., bthr &  kit. on main floor, 3 bdrms. & lg.  sundk. upst., view, lower Gibsons 4-plex, $350/m., refs., also  avail. Oct. 1, 3 bdrm. apt. ste.  921-7788 aft. 5 p.m. TFN  3 bdrm. mobile home on Vz acre  lot near Redrooffs Rd., 5 appl.,  $325/m., refs., no pets. Ph.  885-3360 or 433-9812.        #40  Waterfront 2 bdrm. cabin, wood  heat, suit couple or single adult.  Oct.-June, $350. Gower Pt.  438-3843 or 886-2627.        #41  Waterfront trailer pads, full hookups, Pender Harbour. 883-2892.  #41  Waterfront units, Madiera Park,  $150/m., plus utilities, deposit  req. 883-2892. #44  4 bdrm., 2V2 bath, 3 stor. hse in  quiet cul du sac, $500. Evn.  886-9777. #41  3 bdrm. apt., Hopkins, all appliances, heat incl., $395/m.,  avail. Oct. 15 or before. Ph. Bill  885-4748 or 886-2257.        #40  Trueman Rd., 2 bdrm., SxS  duplex, F/S, W/D, other furn. &  drapes avail, if req. Norm  886-9722 or 886-8171.        #41  2 bdrm. waterfront home,  Roberts Creek, elec. heat.  278-2352 eves., 886-2113 wk.  ends.  #41  Office space for rent, 2nd floor  above Gibsons Building Supplies.  886-8141. TFN  Community Hall for rent in  Roberts Creek. Phone Debbie,  886-3994, 7-10 p.m. TFN  Waterfront units, $150/m.,  moorage avail., deposit reqd.,  Madeira Park. 883-2892.     #41  28.  Work Wanted  ��� GARRY'S CRANE,  SERVICE    886-7028E  ��� 6 Ton Crane  ��� 40 Ft. Trailer  ��� Sod Delivery  ��� Free Dead Car  Removal  3 bedroom home, S. Fletcher,  view, close to park & marina,  avail. Oct. 1/85. Phone  926-4972. #40  3 bdrm. mobile home, elec, next  to Cedar Grove School, $300/m.  886-7206. #40  RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE  IN Sechelt, near Hospital  Reasonable Rent  Also 1400 sq. ft. of  storage area at rear.   ���  885-5315  WATERFRONT LUXURY  1 bdrm. ste., loft, high ceilings,  stained glass, priv. deck, furn.,  moorage, laundry room, $400/m.  886-7830. #40  3 bdrm., 2 full baths, double  garage, 4 utilities, partly furnished, W/W rugs, adults, no pets,  Bonniebrook -area, $500/m.  886-2350. #41  c  27.  Help Wanted  )  1 Bdrm Lt. Hskpg. Suites  Complete  $350/m. or$100/wk.  1 Bdrm Cabins Complete  Lg. $350/m. or $100/wk  Sm. $300/m. or $90/wk  SECURITY DEP. REQ. ON  MONTHLY RENTALS  886-2401  Certified dental asst. required for  Fridays. Call Dr. Bland.  886-7020 for info. #42  Qualified teacher wanted for Jack  and Jill Preschool commencing  Jan. 1986. Please apply in  writing by Oct. 18, 1985 to Mrs.  S. Audet. Personnel Chairperson.  S6 C56 Pratt Rd., R.R. 4, Gibsons, B.C. #40  HI! I'm a  responsible  15 year old  student, recently moved  to Gibsons, and looking lor  part-time work.  BABYSITTING  Will give quality care to your infants, tots or elementary school  kids - available after school,  eves, or weekends. Have 4 yrs.  exp. - $2 hr.  ODD JOBS  Lawn mowing, housecleaning,  what have you. References  available. $4. hr.  If you  need  any help  please call  DANA at  886-2558  Exp. plumber needs work. New &  old jobs. Call any time 886-9149.  #45  GLAZIER  8 yrs. local exp., all types of  glasswork incl. auto glass. Peter  Kerbis 886-9812. #42  Window washing, house carpet  cleaning. 886-3051 or 885-2615.  #42  TERRY McBRIDE  General Contractor  886-7289  New   Homes   ���   Renovations  -Additions  c  30��     Business  Opportunities  )  Service station shop in Gibsons.  Good location. Some tools &  equip, avail. For details. Ph.  886-8621 days. TFN  Hardwood floors resanded and  finished. Work guaranteed. Free  est. Phone 885-5072. TFN  PEERLESS TREE  SERVICES LTD.  Topping-Limbing-Danger tree  removal. Insured, guaranteed  work. Free estimates. 885-2109.  TFN  MOBILE HOME MAINT.  Gutters, skirting, additions,  roofs. Anything to do with mob.  homes. 885-5995. TFN  Wanted: Dirty carpets and  upholstery. For free estimate Ph.  885-9061. Foley's Carpet Care.  #40  Complete landscaping service &  fencing of any kind. Tractor for  hire. 885-5033. TFN  Landscaping, garden maint.,  trees pruned & sprayed. Get  ready for winter now. Phone  886-9294. TFN  BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  The!* Ads appear in the more than 70 Newspaper ol the B( . and Yukon ( ommunitv Newspapers Association and  reach 690,000 homes and a potential 1.8 million readers.  $109. for 25 words   ($3. per each additional word)  Call The   COAST NEWS       885-3930 to place one.  AUTOMOTIVE   Where can you lease a truck  for only $119.97 per month?  Call Ed Black collect at  525-3481 or toll-free at 1-800  -242-7757. PL. 5674.   FORD TRUCKS ... New and  used Ford pickups, vans and  Broncos. Gas or diesel.  Make your next truck purchase or lease a Vancouver  event. Buy from us, we'll  pay your overnight suite at  the Sheridan Plaza. For information call collect, the  truck people, 872-7411. We  are Vancouver's downtown  Ford truck headquarters.  06102.   Lease/Purchase 1985 trucks  starting $154.52 $3200 LEV,  Cars starting $138.49 $2400  LEV 48 mo OAC. Hundreds  in stock. Call Bob Langstaff,  collect 522-2821, Fogg  Motors Ltd.   All new Drive-Bac Plan!  New and used pick up trucks  and vans from $119. per  month. Call collect: Trucks,  872-7411. D6102.   1976 Vista Liner 40 tt. 5th  wheel Travel Trailer. Two  bedrooms, washer/dryer, air  conditioner and awning.  Built for the cold. Furnished.  $17,000. o.b.o. Phone 465-  9307.   80 Freightliner C.O.E. Cummins power available with or  without steady haul. Call  collect Simon Postles 525-  3481 or 888-0157. DL 5674.  Toyota. Shop by phone. New  and used cars and trucks.  Also Hyundai Ponys. Lowest  prices, highest trade-ins.  Full financing O.A.C. Call  Patrick Blayney collect (604)  530-3156. D 6978.           BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES   For sale: Radio Shack franchise in scenic Northern BC.  Invest approx. $70,000. Earn  $50,000 per. annum. Located  in shopping mall. Contact G.  Wall, Box 70, Smithers,  B.C. VOJ 2NO.  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES  EDUCATIONAL  Prosperous family business.  Licenced restaurant, gas.  store, cabins and more.  Eight acres. Living area. No  competition Year-round  business in busy recreational  lake area. 456-7524 N Green  Lake^        Trade or sell. 10,000 sq. ft.  + /- non-operating 26 room  lodge + four-br. new log  house, river frontage, clear  title. $150,000. 883-9052,  Box 152, Madeira Park, B.C.  VON 2H0.  36' commercial fishing boat,  "A" licence, w/c troller -  gillnet combined. Full electronic-hydraulics, some  gear. Wood hull built 1955  Exc. cond. Diesel engine,  aluminum poles, drums.  $46,000. Katie Devlin, Egmont, B.C. VON 1N0, 1-883-  9253.   Very Profitable and fun!  Several exciting home based  projects. Free details. Send  self-addressed stamped envelope to O.J. Walton, 207-  534 Smith Ave. Coquitlam,  B.C. V3J 7B8. __  Full service grocery store.  Excellent location in Victoria. Low rent. New equipment. Annual sales over  $200,000. Super price: $69,-  000. plus stock. Call  1-604-  384-4431.   Sell. Amazing free heat machine Fireplace Heat Extractor. Earn up to $300.-$1200.  per week, simply using your  in home unit as demonstrator. Send today for complete  information kit. Granny's  Woodstove, 3345 TCH Cobble Hill, B.C. VOR 1LO.  Phone David Estey (604)743-  4411.   "Seasons" - Canada's first  name in Colour Analysis and  Glamour. Earn up to $100.-  $300./Day! (Chatelaine)  Academy Certification, 212  Products, Cosmetics, Skin  Care, Silks, Replica Per-  fumes. 1-800-387-7875.  Love at first bite, Love the  products, Love the high profits. High quality DRY FRY��  oven tumbles french fries,  many other food products  through hot air. Never buy  oil again. Greatly reduced  calorie count. High volume,  handles peak periods eas:ly.  No extra fire insurance. CSA  /UL approved, little venting,  low installation costs, fantastic profits for your arena,  rink, restaurant, club, bar,  catering business. Portable.  World class equipment, Buyers call collect (604)273-6522  anytime for free brochure &  nearest dealer. R.I.S. Food  Systems Inc., Exclusive Canadian Distributor, #15 -  12871 Bathgate Way, Rich-  mond, B.C. V6V 1Y5.  EDUCATIONAL   Free Career Guide describes 200 learn-at-home correspondence Diploma Courses: Accounting, Art, Bookkeeping, Business Management, Clerk Typist, Secretary, Journalism, Television  Servicing, Travel. Granton  (1A), 1055 West Georgia,  #2002, Vancouver. (604)685-  8923.    Housewives, Farmers, Businessmen. Learn Income Tax  preparation at home. Write  U & R Tax Schools, 1345  Pembina Hwy., Winnipeg,  Man. R3T 2B6 for Free  Brochure. No obligation.  Victor Hairdressing School,  738 Fort Street, Victoria,  B.C. V8W 1H2. Now accepting applications for October  1st and November 1st classes. Professional instruction  with latest teaching meth-  ods. Phone 388-6222.  EQUIPMENT  & MACHINERY   Portable Sawmill. Steel Construction. 52" Headsaw.  Cuts 24' lengths, c/w portable Diesel Power Unit. Four  years new. $35,000. Call  395-4586. Stubbert Ranch,  Box 1437, 100 Mile House,  VOK 2E0.   FOR SALE, MISC.   Lighting Fixtures. Western  Canada's largest display.  Wholesale and retail. Free  Catalogues available. Nor-  burn Lighting Centre Inc.,  4600 East Hastings Street,  Burnaby, B.C. V5C 2K5.  Phone 1-299-0666.   We have cookstoves in every  province. There is a reason.  If you cook or heat with  wood (or should) write for  information $1.00. Supper-  time stoves, Route 4, Ayl-  mer, Ontario. N5H 2R3.  One 54 Man Bunkhouse,  complete with washrooms,  closed in corridors. Consists  of nine 10 x 54 units, one 10  x 54 washroom. Phone 837-  5774, 837-5532.   Lost your keys? Just whistle!  New powerful sound-activated beeper will find your keys  instantly anywhere up to 40  ft. away. Great gift idea!  $15.95, two for $29.95, cheque, moneyorder. Bomel Enterprises Inc., Box 687, Win-  field, B.C. VOH 2C0.  Animal traps. Conibear,  Longspring, Coilspring,  Snares, Lures, Books. Lowest Prices. Satisfaction guaranteed. Free catalogue.  Trapping booklet $2. Milton  trapping Supplies, Dept.C2,  RR2, Milton, Ont. L9T 2X6.  (416)828-9198.   Gun Bargains. Save up to  40% by subscribing to "The  Gunrunner", the Canadian  monthly newspaper listing  hundreds of new/used, modern & antique firearms for  sale or trade. Subscription:  $15. per year. Gunrunner,  Box 565T, Lethbridge. Alta.  T1J 324. Sample copy $1.50.  FOR SALE, MISC.  Win Lotto 649. Our unique  number selection method  correctly picked all six winning numbers on August 10  & June 22 draws. To obtain  method send S.A.S.E. for  free information. P.O. Box  128, New West, B.C. V3L  4Y4.   Parts and Service for Mercury MC14 hi pressure  pumps, also new pressure  washers. Valco Sales Ltd.,  P.O. Box 2646, Vancouver,  B.C. V6B 3W8. Tel. (604)  738-7420.   HELP WANTED   Realtyworld North Country  requires ambitious, innovative and self-starting real  estate salesperson for small  office in Houston, B.C. Contact Jim McNeal for details.  847-3217 Smithers, B.C.  Jobs available for tradesmen, labourers, office staff  and professionals. For free  information send self-  addressed, stamped envelope to: Box 65894 Stn. F,  Vancouver, B.C. V5N 5L3.  Experienced Ford Car +  Truck Parts person required  for existing Ford Dealer in  Southeastern B.C. Good  earning potential with annual bonus. Send resume:  Box 1150, Creston, B.C. VOB  1G0.   Needed immediately. Representatives and Hostesses for  Home Parties. Excellent opportunity for extra needed  money! Wicker International, Box 1764, Taber, Alberta, TOK 2G0. Phone (403)  222-2130, (604) 423-3960.  NOTICES   Bud Haynes Gun Auction,  Saturday, October 12, 10:00  a.m., Great West Inn, Red  Deer, Alberta. New; used;  antique guns, plus gunsmith  dispersal. Phone (403) 347-  5855.   Hobby Farmers, Commercial  Growers/ Greenhouses. Sell  your fruit, vegetables, honey, eggs in Victoria's largest  shopping centre. Day tables  from $12., water and electricity included. For complete  details & reservations, call  The Market at Hillside Centre, Victoria 595-7154 (office  hours). Reserve now for our  Grand Opening Extravaganza October 23.  PERSONALS  PERSONALS   Dates Galore. For all ages  and unattached. Thousands  of members anxious to meet  you. Prestige Acquaintances. Call Toll Free 1-800-  263-6673. Hours: 9 a.m. - 7  p.m.   Get Spicey! Meet a secret  new friend by mail. Adult  penpal club. For free information write: The Exchanae.  P.O. Box 7391, Depot D,  Victoria, B.C. V9B 5B7.   REAL ESTATE  Commercial Money Makers.  New buildings, 12% triple  net, new leases. Government tenancy. Henry Des-  noyer, Tradeland Realty,  3410 Coldstream Ave., Vernon.   B.C.   Phone 545-5325  542-8712.   Sunny Okanagan three bedroom home. Oliver. Full  basement, cathedral entrance, attached double garage, assorted fruit trees,  shrubs, lot 60 x 180, workshop 12 x 20, well water.  $65,000. 498-2159.   SERVICES   Suffering a personal injury  insurance claim? W. Carey  Linde, BA LLB, Lawyer in  practice since 1972. 1650  Duranleau, Vancouver, B.C.  V6K 3S4.. Phone Collect  Anytime 0-684-7798 for Free  "How to" Information:  Claims and Awards.   TRAVEL   Bellingham, Washington  Motels. Coachman Inn &  (new) Park Motel. Modern  units. Canadian money at  par. Special reduced rates -  two people for $42.00 (206)  671-9000 or Van., B.C. (604)  224-6226.   When in Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond "The Most  Beautiful Breakfast in The  World" is a must!! Huge  Dutch Pancakes. Only at  Dutch   Pannekoek   Houses.  Seven locations.   Book your Expo visit with  Van-West Bed + Breakfast  registry, 200B - 115 School-  house Street, Coquitlam  B.C. V3K 4X8. Homes also  required.   Scandinavia. Copenhagen  $545./U.S. Oslo $615./U.S.  Stockholm $615./U.S. Helsinki $595./U.S. From Seattle. Call collect 294-3261  Lorna Travel Ltd., 3501 E.  Hastings St. Vancouver,  B.C. V5K 2A8.   Vancouver Getaway - Heart  of Downtown, Dufferin Hotel  683-4251. Weekly $150. '-  Daily $31. single/double &  Abbotsford Hotel 681-4335  bed & breakfast special $39.  single. Colour T.V., phone  private bath.   Mantel  classifies Kevin Ihe bus driver wanls lo remind one and all that there is a Gibsons bus which meets all ferries. Details of route and schedules on  Page Three. ���John Burnside photo  Fund run  On Friday, October 11, Gibsons Elementary School will be  holding a run to support the  Rick Hansen Man in Motion  World Toiir to raise funds for  spinal cord research.  We will be running a maximum of five kilometres between 1:30 and 2:30 p.m. and  would graciously appreciate any  support offered through  pledges.  WANTED  Used Furniture  and What Have You  AL'S used  We buy Beer Bottles  886-2812  ���M_MHM_��My  GIBSONS RCMP  Report of a break and entry  into the Sunnycrest Esso Station  was received on September 29.  A quantity of merchandise was  stolen.  On September 30, a Gibsons  man reported that he had  received a card in the mail from  International Travel advising  him that he had won a three  days; 2 nights vacation. To  claim his prize however, a payment of $29.95 was required.  Further investigation revealed  International Travel to be a  phony company. Members of  the public are reminded to  scrutinize such offers and to  report these incidents to Corporal Wilhelms at the Gibsons  detachment. A similar report  was received by the Sechelt  RCMP last week.  SECHELT RCMP  An attempt to break and  enter a Norwest Bay Road  residence was received by police  on September 28. The attempt  was foiled by the occupant of  the house. A break and entry into a residence in the same area  was reported the same night. A  purse was taken. A Stihl chain-  saw was reported stolen from  the back of a truck parked in  the   Madeira   Park   area   on  ��� AUTOMOTIVE ���  NEED TIRES?      Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  TIRE-SUSPENSION   CENTRE  886-2700      886-8167  Hwy. 101, just West of Gibsons  ��� CLEANING SERVICES ���  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon to Ole's Cove  Commercial Containers Available  885-9973  886-2938 J  ��� CONTRACTING ���  ��� AUTOMOTIVE ���  f    ^imi&SW AUTOMOTIVE  REPAIRS TO All. MAKES  "The Rad Shop"  COLLISION Rf-I'AIRS  B.C.A.A.   Approii'd  '   886-7919  Hwy 101. (iibsons  ��� CONTRACTING ���  ROOFING  FREE  ESTIMATES  Specializing,in all types of  commercial & residential roofing  886-2087  eves.  ALL WORK  GUARANTEED  r  Call:  nson's  For: Ready Mix Concrete Sand & Gravel  Dump Truck Rental  Formed Concrete Products  Phone 885-9666 ��� 885-53337  \_  POMFRET  CONSTRUCTION  For all aspects of  residential & commercial construction  886-3770-    P.O. Box 623, Gibsons. B.C.  _C_*_d-k.  ���\  r  ��� EXCAVATING ���  RAY HANSEN  TRUCKING  & CONTRACTING LTD  Gravel, Clearing & Excavating,  Septic Systems, All Types of Gravel  Box 218 Midsiri Pirk VON 2H0       813-9222  JANDE EXCAVATING  Div  ol Kowa Enterprises Ltd.  450 Loader Land Clearing  R.R. 2. Leek Road.       DumP Truck Joe 8. Edna  .Gibsons. B.C. VON IVO       886-9453        Bellerive  GIBSONS READY MIX  SUBSIDIARY OF RENCO CONCRETE LTD.  886-8174  886-8174  P.O. Box 737, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0  ��� EXCAVATING ���  Need this space  Call  the  COAST  NEWS  at  886 2622 or 885 3930  September 29.  Attempts to break into a Sandy Hook residence was reported  on October 3.  Three rifles were stolen during the break-in of a Wilson  Creek residence reported on October 3.  As a result of police investigations into six separate cases of  break, entry and theft of four  Sunshine Coast businesses,  charges of break and entry,  possession of stolen property  and of theft over $200 have  been laid against Sechelt  residents Wayne Eric Riepe,  Daniel Brett Brown, Gavin  Owen Wallander, John Dennis  Spence, Vincent Mill and Gerry  Donald Kane. The four  businesses involved were T&T  Welding, Gibsons Brake Tune  and Muffler Ltd., Shop Easy  No. 5 and Tideline Logging and.  Marine Ltd.  Sechelt RCMP are continuing  their investigation into the  shooting of William John Garn  which occurred in west Sechelt  shortly before midnight on  September 28. Garn is listed in  stable condition at St. Mary's  Hospital following treatment of  a gunshot wound to the hip.  A suspect into the shooting  has been apprehended by police  and has been charged with attempted murder.  Fish farm  zoning  Continued from page 18  has formally made its objection  to the practice.  , Director McGillivray said  that it was stressed at the  workshop that they were -not  there to argue with Scantech,  but to find out what the issues  were from the point of view of  all parties so that the board  could determine what zoning  changes could be made to avoid  future conflicts. He said it was  the unanimous feeling at the  meeting that "No one wanted  these conflicts happening."  A major problem with the  board's present by-laws regarding aquaculture is that when  they were set up, it was, not exacted that fish; farming would  locate in rough open waters and  therefore no provision was  made against them operating in  specified areas. However, fish  farming technology has changed and the open shore lines of  .the coast are now considered  ideal locations.  No decisions were made at  the meeting, 'it's now back to  the planning department," said  McGillivray. There it will be  assessed and more questions  may still need answering before  the appropriate amendments to  the by-law are made.  Coast News, October 7,1985  17.  STORAGE  ��� 10,000 sq. ft. of  heated, gov't,  approved  storage  ��� Dust-free  storage  inclosed  wooden pallets.  Member of  ALLIED  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER LTD.  Custom Packing, Storage. Local & Long Distance Moving  HWY. 10V GIBSONS  P- 'i<l< :   i.iP[,',ur customers        flflft>9fiR_l  i..-a:,i- . an  .ollecl. "���"       fcUW"f  Light follows darkness and grief-grown clouds do  vanish . . . but in a storm of sorrow who remembers?  We do, your friends ... let us lead you through this darkness.  You can depend on us for support and consolation.  ... we understand your needs.  You know us . . . our assistance is just a phone call away.  IfifiFi Rpavifiw     ���s*l&   -i   DA   DP VI IN // V?  1665 Seaview  Gibsons  D.A. DEVLIN  Director  886-9551  /  <; .*<y.; ����   -vS'.x*  " ^ic \y;y ~--;^.y/ ���;,<&$���'  .t*&y .*_��� -yl-^y  ���J  -' '^���'____i___(^_^^llW0^  ^ BC FGRRIGS  ^ Schedule  VANCOUVER-SECHELT PENINSULA  HORSESHOE BAV-LANGDALE  FALL '85 - SPRING  86  Effective Monday September 9,19851  through Sunday, April 27, 1986  inclusive:  JERVIS INLET  EARLS COVE-SALTERY BAY  Lv. Horseshoe Bay    Lv. Langdale  7:30 am  *3:30pm     6:20 am     2:30 pm  *9:30 5:30 ���8:30 4:30  1:15 pm  *7:25       *12:25pm     6:30  9:15 *8:20  MINI BUS SCHEDULE  o ~ y>  ~ 2  *-  S ^ 5  Lv. Earls Cove  Lv. Saltery Bay  6:40 am     4:30 pm  5:45 am     3:30 pm  10:30           6:30  ���9:15        *5:30  12:25 pm     8:30  11:30            7:30  * 10:20  9:30  The Dock  Leaves Sechelt  for Gibsons  Cowrie Street  Monday  8:40 a.m.  *10:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  * 3:15 p.m.  Tuesday ���  8:40 a.m.  ���10:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  2:30 p.m.  Wednesday  8:40 a.m.  *10:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  * 3:15 p.m.  Thursday  8:40 a.m.  '10:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m.  2:30 p.m.  Friday  8:40 a.m.  10:00 a.m.  3:15 p.m.  Leaves Gibsons  for. Sechelt  Lower Gibsons.1  Municipal Parking Lot.  Gower Pt. Rd.  9:15a.m.  ���10:45 a.m.  * 1:35 p.m.  4:00 p.m.  9:15 a.m.  11:45 a.m.  1:50 p.m.  ' 4:00 p.m.  9:15 a.m.  ���10:45 a.m.  *  1:35 p.m.  4:00 p.m.  9:15 a.m.  11:45 a.m.  '. 1:35 p.m.  ' 4:00 p.m.  9:15 a.m.  10:45 a.m.  4:00 p.m.  * "LOWER ROAD" route ��� via Flume Road. Beach Avenue & Lower Road  NOTE: FRIDAY RUN FROM SECHELT TO GIBSONS AT 1:00 PM AND RETURN TRIP AT 1:30 PM HAVE BEEN CANCELLED  ��� FLOOR COVERING ���  ��� FLOOR COVERING ���  r.  CONCEPT ONE INTERIORS]  CARPET 8 LINO INSTALLATION & REPAIRS  Authorized installer for Bridgeport Carpets  BRENT COLEMAN 885-5776  Box 1546, Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  KEN DE VHIES & SON ^  FLOOR COVERINGS LTD.   j  Carpets - Tiles - Linoleums - Drapes  Wallcoverings ��� Custom Window Shades  Steam Cleaning  886-71 12 Hwy 101, Gibsons  ��� HEATING*  Need this space?  Ca" the COAST; AlfeVVS  yat 886-2622 or 885-393(1:   /  Hwy. 101   Sechelt   between   St. Marys  Hospital and ForestRanger'sHut.  Mon.-Fri.    8 a.m. - 5 p.m.  LIQUID  GAS LTD ^  I CANADIAN I  885-2360   J  ��� MISC SERVICES ���  Bonniebrook Industries Ltd.  r  * Concrete Septic Tanks * Crane Services  ��� fc&rtabJe Toilet Rentals * Septic Tank Pumpfo$  SUNSHINE KITCHENS  - CABINETS -  886-9411  Showroom: Pratt Rd. & Hwy. 101  Open: Sat. 10-4 or anytime by app't. a  "\  PENDER HARBOUR  BOAT WORKS  Professional Repairs,  Restoration or Modifications  in Fibreglass or Wood on  any size boat.  LARGE COVERED SHOP AND WAY.  Phone  After Hours  *<.  883-1170  883-9465  886-7359  Conversion   Windows,   Glass,  Auto   &   Marine Glass, Aluminum Windows  & Screens,                                                  Mirrors  . Hwy 101 & Pratt Rd.   J  rCHAINSAWS"^  SALES & SERVICE  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER &  CHAINSAW LTD.  ^ HWY. 101 & PRATT RD.   886-2912  J  ��� MISC SERVICES ���  9��Jck HwvtUm  Refrigeration & Appliance Service  Sunshine Coast Hwy. Gibsons  (across from Peninsula Transport)  .   886-9959  r  Serving the Sunshine Coast for 14 years  W.A. Simpkins Masonry  SPECIALIZING IN FIREPLACES  ��� Brick ��� Block ��� Stone  y       885-2787 W7zt  ' ROLAND'S"���  HOME IMPROVEMENTS LTD  ��� 5" Continuous aluminum gutters  ��� Aluminum sotfits & fascias  ��� Built-in vacuum systems  ��� Vinyl siding 885-3562  Serving the Peninsula since 1954  Residential & Commercial Wiring  ...ALL WORK GUARANTEED...  V  Box 351  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  885-2062 18.  Coast News, October 7,1985  The usual prize of $5 will be awarded to the first entry drawn which  correctly locates the above. Send your entries to reach the Coast  News, Box 460, Gibsons, this week. Last week's winner was Jake  McGillivray of Lower Road, Roberts Creek, who correctly located  the new Nuclear Free sign just past the oil tanks from the ferry on  North Road.  SCRD mulls fish  farm zoning  \ The conflict that has come up  \ over the last few months bet-  ? ween residential property  \ owners and the establishment of  i fish farming operations on the  | Sunshine  Coast  is  being ad-  ��� dressed by the regional board.  > Prompted by a memo to the  t board from Ian Vaughan,  ', Regional Board Director from  J Area A, to change the ap-  ; propriate zoning by-laws regar-  I ding land, use as pertains to  : aquaculture, the regional board  veheld a workshop on the subject  * last Thursday, October 3.  Chaired by Regional Board  ;: Director Brett McGillivray, the  j workshop included representatives from the aquaculture in-  ���dustry, elected representatives  U'rorn Gibsons and Sechelt and  ;the Sunshine Coast Regional  : District (SCRD), the Department of Fisheries and Oceans,  .' and residential property owners.  Aquaculture operations must  conform to local zoning by-laws  for their land based operations  and receive foreshore leases  from the Provincial Ministry of  Lands, Parks and Housing for  their sea pens and docks.  In the Wood Bay controversy, all zoning by-laws were complied with, however, because of  an emergency the aquaculture  company, Wood Bay Salmon  Farms Ltd., a partially owned  subsidiary of Scantech  Resources Ltd., the Ministry of  Lands, Parks and Housing immediately issued a temporary  one year lease. It was granted  without going through the normal referral process to the local  government; in this case, the  SCRD.  According to Director  McGillivray, the. regional board  was not aware this kind of exception could be made and it  Please turn to page 17  Your Thanksgiving  memories processed  in only 1 hour!*  ���machine time  DOWNTOWN GIBSONS 886-2947  WEBBER <f Hour  886-2947       ��� PhOtO  I  Gower Point Rd. Gibsons  Near the Omega Restaurant  Mon thru Wed 9:30 -5:00  Fri & Sat 9:30 - 5:00/Closed Thur & Sun  Cwut Ghoul  yew cot?  t|wi fcel 9 do!  Craig Roland  PRE-WINTER  INSPECTION  Mechanical Inspection Report  1) Check shocks & springs  2) Engine comp. fluids checked  3) Belts, hoses, wires  4) Trans fluid  5) Driveshaft cond.-U-joints  6) Differential fluid  7) Exhaust system checked  8) Brake inspection - Lines  Fronts -  % Rears - __  9) Check all lights  10) Report & Estimate repairs, if required  SUNSHINE  RAKE & MUFFLE  PHONE FOR AN  APPOINTMENT  885-7600  Wharf Rd. & Dolphin St.  ASK FOR  LARRY  CBC Television on it's 6 p.m.  news report, Friday, September  27, carried a segment on the  economic outlook of Gibsons  that has many Sunshine Coast  viewers upset.  Alderman Robert Maxwell  brought the matter up at council  last Tuesday, saying, "CBC,  who is one of our partners in  Gibsons (with it's TV series, the  "Beachcombers") has done us a  disservice. I don't object to  (them) holding up traffic occa-  sionaly, but I do object,to them  sounding our death knell."  The segment was apparently  spurred by the recent laying off  of nearly a hundred employees  at Port Mellon. It opened with a  shot of a cloud over Gibsons  and continued with interviews  of doom and gloom by residents  and business people.  Alderman Maxwell was  phoned by a local bank  manager who saw the show and  objected that the picture it portrayed was not accurate; that his ���  figures show business is on the  upswing.  Alderman Peterson said,  "the majority of people I talked  to said they were not happy with  the show."  It was agreed that Alderman  Burnside would write to CBC,  objecting to the show's  distorted view.  6  # m   fe *  But it's in Sechelt now!  1985  CHEV ASTRO  GETAWAYVAN  The ultimate Mini-Van conversion.  Three models now in stock to choose from  .1 in SERViCEl  lNo.1 in SALESl  CONGRATULATIONS TO WAYNE WRIGHT are in  order. Wayne has been appointed as our new service  manager. Ron is now general manager and in the sales  department. For all your service needs please call Wayne at  885-5131  ONLY 18 1985s LEFT IN STOCK  NEW 86s ARE ARRIVING NOW  COME IN AND MAKE YOUR BEST DEAL SOON  #-�����������>��.���>-���'��>. m m 9 9_mmm  &  ;r^v  6  <5  ONE YEAR  NO INTEREST FINANCING  \Q  m  ���  On Approved Credit  20% Down Payment Required  Buy ANY ITEM In the store  (Valtied at $500 or more)  with payments spread over one year, and pay  NO  9  Q  Q  Q  Q  Q  Q  ��� No Payment for 45 Days from Date of Purchase  EXAMPLE  ELECTROHOME  VCR  IF YOU BUY THIS  ELECTROHOME VCR  PRICE  TAX  S66900  4683  TOTAL COST  DOWN PAYMENT  71583  -14317  4 HEAD VCR  ��� Microprocessor controlled operation  ��� 25 function remote control  ��� Front loading  ��� 4 event, 2 week programmability  and more. SfiftQOO  MSL s99900  $57266  PAYMENTS OVER 12 MONTHS  $669(  57266   +    12   =    S4772  THEREFORE YOU HAVE A MONTHLY  PAYMENT OF s4772 FOR 12 MONTHS!  WO INTEREST CHARGE  Q  9  KOfflf  FURMISHIrlGS  !n:Store fia<-mcingy  available O.A.Cl',  ���Tues-;    Thurs.  Fri. & Sal.  Sun. & Mon.  9:30    5:30  9:3Q - 9:00  Closed  $eavievv PliaceyGibsons  886888(5

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