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Sunshine Coast News Dec 30, 1985

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 Vi s>v IXif  SU  SCRD goes it alone  ���:���������   Economic development  enters new phase  by John Gieeson  Christmas Day on top of Nob Hill and just the tops of Keats and Bowen Island appear above the low-  lying fog. Down in the valleys and along the coast it was a grey, dank day but just a few hundred feet up  brought the photographer to a still warm world of glorious sunshine and a different sort of White  Christmas.  ���Fran Burnside photo  pcantech puts in  Six new fish pens  v Last week Scantech moved  ��ix more pens into its Wood Bay  Salmon Farm, bringing the total  pens on its Underturn Rig up to  10-  Area A Director Gordon  Wilson met the following day in  Burnaby with Richard Webber  of the Ministry of Lands, Parks  and Housing.  ; According to Wilson, "Webber was quite upset and said he  would phone Clark Hamilton  (Scantech Vice-President) and  tell him to get the pens out immediately," as Scantech has not  been granted its long-term lease.  But when Wilson arrived  home in Pender Harbour, there  were messages on his answering  machine from Webber and  Hamilton.  ; It turned out, said Wilson,  that when Hamilton had been  instructed to remove the pens,  he reminded Webber that the  company had shown clearly in  its development plan that the  pens would go in, and had even  specified the exact date.  Webber went through the  files and verified this, so he told  Scantech that the pens could  stay.  "It's "amazing to me,"  Wilson told the Coast News,  "that the whole procedure is so  loose.  "What I think is really  behind it," he said, "is that the  ministry has made a decision  that Scantech will be granted a  permanent lease, probably in  mid-January. They as much as  told me that legally they can't  deny them."  Meanwhile, Scantech may be  leaving its site in Earls Cove, or  putting a fish farm there.  The company has said it is  looking at an alternate site for a  fish processing plant, which  area residents have vociferously  opposed since the spring, and  has applied to the lands ministry  for permission to build a launch  ramp on the original site.  Wilson said Scantech might  want to put a fish farm at the  end of the launch ramp but he  added that they may be thinking  twice about it due to the proximity of the ferry.  "Hamilton told the residents  that if they want to buy the property, he'll sell* it to them,"  Wilson said. "He was asking a  ridiculous price, mind you."  Residents have discussed buying the property and making it a  public boat launch facility but  Wilson said he didn't think they  could raise the money for it.  They are also going to ask  that the entire area be rezoned  from R3 to R2 in order to  restrict non-residential use.  But Wilson pointed out that a  rezoning would still not affect  the foreshore.  Wilson will meet with  Scantech on January 2 to  discuss the Earls Cove site.  \.  Local government-sponsored  -   economic development on the  Sunshine Coast is about to enter  ----& new phase. And it looks like  y 'the shift will be away from attracting outside investors, con-  ������;[ cehtrating   more   oh   helping  those   businesses   which   are  already here.  Currently there are two-  related functions budgeted by  the regional district: the  Economic Development Commission (EDC) and the Community   Development   Office  (CDO).  - The regional board-  appointed commission was  formed in 1978 to promote  economic growth in the area. In  1982, with funding mainly from  /tne provincial government, Oddvin Vedo was hired as a commissioner to execute EDC  strategies on a full-time basis.  Vedo's success, primarily as  the godfather of aquaculture in  the region, is widely known.  : The CDO was set up in 1985  , as a way of bringing the  development function closer to  the community, with more  direct links between its officer,  Irene Lugsdin, and coast  businesses and occupations.  Together the EDC and the  CDO drew up an area strategy  for future economic development.  , Also   in .1985   provincial  government   funding  ran  out  'and Vedo. submitted his resignation, Effective year's end. He  'thenjpresented his "Cadillac"  i, ypropbsal for a new Economic  ^'tfeveippment ^'fepfpo^tio'ny-  which asked for more support  staff, a bigger budget and less  accountability, especially to the  regional board.  The proposal was received  unenthusiastically by local  governments, who would now  be footing most of the bill, and  since then the EDC has  languished in a state of  unknowing.  Sechelt Mayor Joyce Kolibas,  reporting in December to the  village council, described her  most recent EDC meeting as  "not very pleasant. Everyone  was waiting for someone to  either say something or do  something and nothing happened."  She pointed out that the  budget has been turned over  largely to the CDO.  "The commission, I guess,  has to be dissolved or  something," she said.  At a regional board meeting  later that week, Chairman Jim  Gurney, who is a member of the  EDC, called for a policy on  economic development and then  unfolded his own.  He said he wanted to change  the emphasis to a more  community-oriented approach,  developing local sectors, Tike  forestry, which have been inadequately supported . by the  EDC.  Gurney recommended that  the CDO be retained to oversee  and co-ordinate the implementation of the district's strategy,  and that the two functions  under the regional board combine as one.  He said the board should  discontinue the position of commissioner and recommended  that Gibsons and Sechelt make  use of the Partners in Enterprise  program to carry on the position themselves.  "I'm not suggesting we drop  an orphan baby on their  doorstep," he said,  "but it's  their move. The action's in their  court."        V  Some objections to Gurney's  proposals came from the two  municipal representatives.  Gibsons Director Norm  Peterson said, "We're all three  partners and one member of a  partnership can't just make a  decision of this magnitude."  He said the'grant money  available "to the two municipalities ($37,000 would be  matched by the provincial  government) is not enough to  hire a commissioner and take  over the function.  Sechelt Alternate Director  Anne Pressley asked, "Now.  that the function has changed,;  can the municipalities opt out of  the function?" !,  Area A Director Gordon  Wilson said he was unaware of  all the facts, that something this  important in the community  had to be done with unanimous  consent, and asked for the  recommendation to be tabled  until January.  Gurney and the board agreed  to this.  A letter from Oddvin Vedo, ;  asking that he be. accepted.on  the EDC as a private citizen,  Please turn to page 4  Suspect remanded  The 20 year old man charged with the first degree murder  of Genoe May has been remanded until no later than January  22, when he will appear again in North Vancouver provincial  court.  Darren Andrew Kelly, of North Vancouver, will undergo  ���; psychiatric examinations, before a trial takes.place.    v.  Staff Sergeant Ray Slelteryof the Sechelt RCMP> declined  to give out any information regarding the case.  "The facts won't be made known before the trial," he  said.  Post Off ice hours  The local post offices will be closed on New Year's Day this  week, Wednesday, January 1. They will also close at 4 p.m.  on Tuesday, December 31.  Polar Bear swim  The third annual Polar Bear swim will start off at 11 a.m.  on New Year's day at Davis Bay. Changing rooms are available at the Bella Beach Motel and the Beach Buoy.  There are prizes and each contestant Will be awarded a  Polar Bear Certificate.  Sechelt beavers get reprieve  A beaver dam in the Sechelt  Marsh has been wrongly blamed for obstructing water flow  through the main channel, according to the Marsh Society.  Last fall Sechelt Council was  talking about removing the dam  after a report from its consultant engineer, Derrick Ash ford,  described the dam as responsible for some overflow in the  marsh.  But in December two members of the Marsh Society appeared before council to speak  in  defense  of the  family  of  beavers living there.  The dam is not a problem,  they said, because water cannot  run upstream and would have  to in order for the dam to affect  flooding.  Council did not argue with  the logic of this claim and  agreed it would keep the society  informed of any proposals for  remedying drainage problems in  the marsh.  "If the beavers got to be a  problem, we'd do something,"  said society president Doug  Roy, who is a civil engineer.  "But removal of the beaver  dam is not removal of the standing water or the ditch  -whatever hazard there is continues."  Roy said that in June he  visited the marsh with Ashford,  who accepted Roy's conclusions  about the dam.  "Besides," said Vince  Bracewell, "if we removed this  group we'd just get others moving in. And these ones seem to  be pretty laid-back beavers."  Pender Pool gets solar heat  >The high school at Pender  TIarbour is to have solar heating  i installed for the pool which is  i focated in the basement of the  | school, according to a letter  | received from N.J. Metz, of  I Killick, Metz, Bowen, Rose, ar-  I chitects and presented at the  :S I^ecember 17 school board  | pieeting.  y \| The project which will be  | p��id for by the Sunshine Coast  *, Regional District, owners of the  IfSpol, is anticipated to save the  ^tax-payers a substantial amount  ,|ih heating costs.  ; |i; The panels which collect the  IISDlar energy will be attached to  v-phe end wall of the gym, elim-  inating risks of snow load on  the roof, and will be in a relatively vandal-free location.  Metz has also expressed concern about the connection of the  panels to the building, especially  in respect to the penetration of  water at connection points; this  will be taken into consideration  by the engineers.  unc  f^hor  Measles update  The Sunshine Coast has apparently escaped, so far, the  epidemic of measles reported on the Lower Mainland recently.  A spokesman for the Coast Garibaldi Board of Health told  the Coast News last week that no cases of the disease had  been reported locally. Anyone who wishes to have a child immunized against measles is invited to phone the health unit at  886-8131.  A measles-mumps-rubella immunization campaign is to get  underway locally in January. Consent forms will be sent  home with school children.  The Langdale Elementary School presented its Christmas Concert to a packed house of parents and  friends last December 18. Shown are Mrs. J. Crosby's kindergarten class, which led off the evening with  its own concert. ���Brad Benson photo Coast News, December 16,1985  HOLIDAY  WITH STYLE"  call 886-2120  A Large Selection  of  INEXPENSIVE  GIFTS  For Alt Agea  OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK  Until Christmas  886-3812  4 doors from Dockside Pharmacy  "SAN7 VS HEADQUARTERS  OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK      M��n- "<"��� Fri- Ml 7 �����"������  Saturdays 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.  Sundays 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.  We've Got  GIFT  BASKETS  for everyone  on your      M  shopping list  ��� Bath Goodies  ��� Winemaking Supplies  ��� Coffees, Teas, Spices  ��� Candy & Dried Fruit  ��� Souvenirs  ��� Lots of  Stocking Staffers  Next to the Hunter Gallery  in lower Gibsons  COME IN,  HAVE A COFFEE  & WE WILL HELP  YOU WITH  YOUR  IDEAS  OPEN SUN., DEC. 23 10-4  Saturday Draw  Winners  Lorene Bamoth  Ernie Falles  Mrs. Johnson  Dorothy Cruice  Sunday Draw  Winners  Ann Pinsonnault  Jean Rosa  Gabriel Verdugo  Dana Angus  Gift from  Bank of Montreal  Dockside Pharmacy  Girls & Guys Beauty Salon  Beer & Wine Store  Give the Gift of Art this Christmas  Custom Picture Framing  Original art, hand dipped candles, pottery, blown  glass, wooden toys; also colourful posters and art cards.  j :  886-9213  Upstairs above the NDP Bookstore  Gift from  Landing Hair Design  Bank of Montreal  Gibsons Marina  Village Store  There will be 4 daily draws until  Dec. 24 - enter with every purchase  Winners of the  Coast News & Village Merchants  Christmas" Drawing Contest are:  1st: Kena White - Halfmoon Bayj.Age 7  2nd: David Johnson, Gibsons-Age 8  3rd: Aurea Flynn - Halfmoon Bay Age 7  See Drawings  Page 24  For SAME DAY SERVICE  and Quality  Reproduction*  - Bring Your Film to Us. c  %o��       20  SLIDE FILM  -41 Process  ~m* ^-W   in stock  CAMERAS &  BINOCULARS  %offf  Kodak & Fuji  the  candy store  Yummy  Christmas  to you all!  Gibsons Landing     OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 886-7522  in the Omega Block  Clearance  SALE  ^:  Just in time for those  last minute gifts  PHOTO ALBUMS  40 page only  $Q99  PHOTO  886-2947  Gower Point Rd., Gibsons (By the Omega Restaurant)  At the  - DAKIN STUFFED TOYS  From 99* to 829"  - AND MANY OTHER GIFT ITEMS  ��� Ask for your FREE  'Koala Bear" with  Purchase (Limit 1 per customer)  GIBSONS marina  7 DAYS - 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M.  '\��mA::��mmm9  ^��lHHilllll II   I' '"��  "HOLIDAY SPECIALS"  Lobster Tails n, $19"  B.B.Q. Salmon ib 728  Frozen Shrimp it>. 576  Smoked Oysters tm l22  Country Style Pate. 100 gm I84  Plus an Ever Growing Selection of  ��� Reasonably Priced, Gourmet Foods!  GIFT BASKETS & GIFT CERTIFICATES  available  Open 7 Days a Week 886-7888  FROM ALL OF US TO ALL OF YOU  �����  SS-S3?  May the true spirit of Christmas  be with ail of us, this year  and in the years to come.  SeAt TVteAet "ptvt * 'Tfea&tuf <i*td *%afifiy Hew- 'tym  'rz__  *  ��� ������  �� ���':'*.  Haig, Maureen, Joan, Victoria, Pat, Patti, Maria, Colleen  HOLIDAY HOURS: Monday thru Thurs.: Dec. 16th to 19th til 7 p.m.  Fri: Dec. 20 til 9 p.m. Mon: Dec. 23 til 9 p.m.  Sat: Dec. 21 til 6 p.m. Tues: Dec. 24 til 6 p.m.  Sun: Dec. 22 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Christmas Day and Boxing Day: CLOSED*  *emergency no. 886-2045  "SANTA'S HEADQUARTERS  //  Marine Drive,   Gibsons   886*8158 2.  Coast News, December 30,1985  ( Splendid example  The shadow of a little girl's death lies over the memory  of 1986 on the Sunshine Coast. It has saddened and horrified us all.  God knows, the senseless death of children is not uncommon in the last years of the 20th Century. Amnesty International estimates that 40,000 children every day die of  starvation in a world which has the resources to prevent it  happening, but when the death of a child takes place close  to home in the circumstances which darkened December  on the coast the shock and outrage goes deep to the heart  of us all.  It is to the everlasting credit of Tom May that in circumstances more terrible than any of us care to imagine he  found the personal resources and human dignity to remind  us all of the absolute necessity of the observance of due  process. We salute hiim with deep respect for his televised  statement reminding us all that the apprehended suspect  had yet to be found guilty in a court of law.  It is very difficult when such a terrible tragedy occurs to  remember, as the bereaved father so valiantly did, the  supreme importance of observing due process. In the  shock and the pain and the fear that follows such a crime  there is an understandable desire in people to take the law  into their own hands.  At the Coast'News we have long had a consistent policy  against printing material which seemed to urge vigilantism,  though we carry a letter in this issue which does just that.  We publish it to remind that extra-legal urges for revenge  or born of fear are in us all but secure that the bereaved  father's splendid example is a nobler and a truer example  of how we must behave even in times of terrible stress.  Such exemplary behaviour does not come easy. The  detailed city newspaper coverage of our tragedy, hungry  for the sensational, was unfortunately able to find those  whose heated words spoke of assassination of Genni  May's killer, in one case spoken by a man of mature years  reiterated the next day in another newspaper by two impressionable twenty-year olds. That such feelings are entirely understandable does not make their utterance excusable.  We must cling to the principles of due process. They are  the foundation stones of a decent and humane society. We  are all indebted to Tom May that out of his personal pain  and great grief he could make that point for us all.  And surely, too, we must pay tribute to the work done  by the RCMP in this matter. We will never know the hours  of overtime and tireless dedication which went into the investigation of the crime by an organization all too often  taken for granted or much maligned.  In such times of terrible trial we need the kind of example that Tom May was able to give us and we need also the  reassurance that the forces which represent due process are  efficient and vigilant. Such an example and such  reassurance we have been given and we all, in turn, should  give thanks.  Common ground  As we prepare for another year the essential conflict  which bedevils the Sunshine Coast and which must be  healed is between those who would develop the coast and  those who would have it as unchanged as possible.  Some change is both inevitable and necessary but all too  frequently those who are the spokesmen for change and  development antagonize and frighten the taxpayers of the  coast with a disastrous combination of proven incompetence in the past and unrealistic and grandiose  schemes for the future.  What we do not need is the exaggerated and self-serving  rhetoric of the extreme right which would see us turn our  communities upside down that they may prosper. We do  not need a constant stream of new claims and slogans  from those whose competence extends to nothing else.  We need a thousand little efficiencies to upgrade and  improve our environment; we need to learn to work  together with those of differing views, remembering  always that we share much more than divides us and that  to focus only on the divisions will lead only to rancorous  stalemate.  As a concrete example: the voices of the unreflective  right in Gibsons on. council are beginning to clamour for  the dismissal of the town planner. Armed with a  philosophy of retrenchment and economic withdrawal  discredited in the Great Depression fifty years ago, they  seek to deprive the town of the one voice of intelligent imagination available to it.  Let it be said: Gibsons cries out for imagination and vision as well as a necessary frugality; the success of the first  phase of the town's revitalization, accomplished with an  economy which amazed Victoria, should be credited to the  man who planned and designed the changes. That the present council fails to realize his value to the town indicates a  truly remarkable dimness of perception.  What we need on the Sunshine Coast is exactly what  Buchan has given Gibsons; subtle and effective change   ���  which delights all, within the necessary confines of a very  narrow budget.  Meanwhile the chief charlatans and self-proclaimed  geniuses among us have, and we will have more to say-.of  this again, succeeded in placing on both councils their  chosen representatives.      1986 will not be dull.  What we all share is a love of the Sunshine Coast; What  Rob Buchan has shown us in Gibsons Harbour is how we  can make changes at minimal cost which delight visitors  and resident alike. That is the common ground upon  which we all, save the rabid spokesmen of the outdated  right, can stand with dignity and joy.  The Sunshine  CO-PUBLISHERS  John Burnside M.M. Vaughan  EDITORIAL  Editor, Dianne Evans  ADVERTISING  J. Fred Duncan Pat Tripp  PRODUCTION ���  Fran Burnside  TVPESETTING  Saya Woods  DISTRIBUTION  Steve Carroll  The Sunshine COAST NEWS is a co-operative locally owned newspaper,.  published on the Sunshine Coast, B.C. every Monday by Glassford Press  Ltd., Box .460, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0. Gibsons Tel. 886-2622 or 886-7817;  Sechelt Tel. 885-3930. Second Class Mail Registration No. 4702.  The Sunshine COAST NEWS is protected by copyright and reproduction,  of any part of it by any means is prohibited unless permission in writing  is first secured from Glassford Press Ltd., holders of the copyright.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES  Canada: 1 year $30; 6 months $18; Foreign: 1 year $35  This photograph of Regatta Day, circa 1940, shows the Inglis family marina, Gibsons with its many boats and participants. In the  background the S.S. Capilano sails out of the harbour while in the  foreground smaller boats can be seen. In the middle of the harbour  the M. V. Mardred owned at the time by C.P. Ballantyne for whom  Bal's Lane was later named, makes a wide sweep. The boat was  later bought by John Inglis who added it to his water taxi fleet. His  two boats, M. V. Lark and M. V. PDQ are sitting at the marina ton  the right. In the foreground, behind a row boat made by Frederick  Inglis M.D., is a dugout canoe. Regatta Day was an annual event,  with speedboat and swimming races, jousting and other watery  contests. photo courtesy John Inglis  Musings  John Burnside  Strange indeed is Mayor  Diane Strom's quoted comment  on the subject of economic development.  "To tell you the truth,"  Mayor Strom is quoted as saying "we haven't really thought  about economic development  yet."  It must be presumed that the  fwe' referred to is . Gibsons  Council and perhaps it is collectively true for this new council.  Yet Alderman Norm Peterson  sits on council and surely he has  thought of economic development. Did he not travel to Vancouver Island with Mayor Larry  Labonte for the provincial  government's presentation of  the Partners in Enterprise program? Is not the Town of Gibsons signed up as a participant  in that program? The program's  purpose is economic development.  Alderman Bob Maxwell sits  on council and was a conscientious and interested attendant at  the fall convention of  municipalities where the  keynote speaker and several  workshops stressed the growing  role to be played by  municipalities in economic  development. Certainly Alderman Maxwell has thought of  economic development.  Perhaps Mayor Strom's 'we'  refers only to Alderman Marshall, Alderman Dixon and  herself.  It is likely that Alderman  Marshall has not thought about  economic development. He has  parlayed an obsession with the  purity of well water into a  political career, though that  obsession did not move him, as   .  Strange indeed!  chairman of the public works  committee on the last council,  to provide the town with a  stand-by pump for his well  water.  Alderman Dixon's notion of  the municipality's role in  economic development seems at  the moment limited to the need  for laying off of municipal  employees. Remarkably, Alderman Dixon's opinion on this  matter seems to have been arrived at without study of the situation. He has attended no  municipal meetings in recent  years, paid seemingly little attention to the town's affairs but  seems to know as by magic that  people have to lose their jobs..  May one point out to the new  wielder of the unemployment  , axe that the council in the first  year of "'Mayor Labonte's last  term also trimmed staff - but  they did so. after a year's  analysis of the situation and  some agonizing about the  human costs involved. It seems  only the decent and responsible  approach.  Which brings us to Mayor  Strom herself. We would be  content with the understanding  that after just a few weeks on  the job the mayor has not had  the time yet to acclimatize  herself to the task nor the time  to think of economic development.  Is not this the lady, however,  whose slick brochure when she  sought election proclaimed proudly that she would create  steady new jobs 'through Expo  86 and beyond'? Does not this  election promise imply that the  maker of it has thought about  economic development? Is she  now going to follow up on such  a gaudy promise by presiding  over a council which is going to  deprive people of their livelihoods without an analysis of  the work to be done and the  bodies available to.do it?  Of course we know that  Mayor Strom's brochure was  the work of that master of  hyperbole Richard Tomkies of  the Sunshine Coast Tourism  Association. It may well be that  Mayor Strom did not know  what her brochure was going to  say until it arrived in the mail.  Meanwhile the opportunity  to maximize provincial help  through the Partners in Enterprise program has been lost.  $37,500 of provincial aid for the  Sunshine Coast in economic aid  will now go a-begging. Not too  many weeks ago Gibsons and  Sechelt Council met in joint session to discuss the means of getting the maximum aid. Chairman Jim Gurney was originally  invited but Mayor Larry La  bonte, the host, decided  regional involvement at that  stage was premature.  As it turns out that decision  was a mistake since the regional  board has now decided to go its  separate way, as it can well afford to do, and the Town of  Gibsons has little to show for  the Partners in Enterprise  possiblities but a coloured picture of the Minister of  Municipal Affairs which hangs  in the council chamber.  i  We cannot know at this stage  whether Alderman Dixon, who  led the polls with a vow to lay  people off, or Mayor Strom,  who promised job creation, will  prevail. But if it be Finance  Chairman Dixon the savings Effected in staff, regardless 6f  need, will "only in this first ye��r  equal the amount of money  already lost the coast by a mayor and her council who haVe  'not yet thought about economic development', y  A Reminder  "First they arrested the Communists -  But I was not a Communist, so I did nothing.  Then they came for the Social Democrats -  but I was not a Social Democrat, so I did nothing.  Then they arrested the trade unionists -  and I did nothing because I was not one.  And then they came for the Jews and then the Catholics,  but I was neither a Jew nor a Catholic and I did nothing.  At last they came and arrested me -  and there was no one left to do anything about it."  Rev. Martin Niemoller  Nazi Prison Survivor  Dianne  Evans  Reflections on 1985  by Dianne Evans  As the year draws to a close  tradition has it that we take a  look at the year past and try to  make some sense of it.  There has been a great deal of  activity in our community and  much of it has been positive.  But as with many things in life,  the positive frequently carries  with it the negative.  For example, the Sunshine  Coast has been catapulted onto  the world stage with the development of the area as a centre  for the aquaculture industry;  the number of aquaculture licences issued in the province in  the past twelve months has risen  dramatically; courses are offered at the local level; investment, both Canadian but predominantly foreign- has been  substantial.  The price for this development has been high; the fabric  of our community has been tattered by disputes between an  aquaculture company and local  residents and this conflict has  spilled into the political arena  where planners and elected officials alike have discovered that  the changing times call for more  vigilance in the decision-making  process.  An unfortunate side-effect of  the gold-rush approach to this  new and expanding industry has  been that other more labour intensive and, some would say,  more necessary industrial  development has been neglected  for the large part.  Our forests are still in  abysmal shape, we are still sorely lacking secondary industry,  we are still held hostage by the  vagaries of the B.C. Ferry Corporation so that investors often  fail to see the advantages of  locating on the Sunshine Coast.  Tourism is also a coin with  two sides. It can be a viable,  clean industry, which, with  some proper management, can  provide a fairly decent living for  most of the year for those who  depend upon it for their livelihoods, but it has become the  focus for a great deal of political wrangling, largely due to  the 'red menace' flag-waving of  the Sunshine Coast Tourism  Association, in particular its  president, Richard Tomkies.  That we need more tourists is  a fact we hardly need to repeat;  that we need secondary industries, a revival of primary industry with its year-round well-  paying jobs, that we need an infrastructure, to use one of the  new words of 1985, to keep our  residents employed, to keep  them living here, working here  and going to school here are  facts which have been somehow  lost in all the ballyhoo that has  accompanied tourism development in the year past.  This ballyhoo has had its effect too on 1985's municipal  elections where we saw the  spurious Sunshine Coast Electors' Association, largely composed of Tourism Association  members, mount an aggressive  and somewhat tarnished campaign to successfully seat a candidate whose competence is  questionable into the mayoral  seat in Gibsons. And this,  primarily to unseat a candidate  whose political views were seen  by this right-wing organization  as being too far to the left  though there is little evidence of  such a bias in his behaviour  while in office.  And such chicanery is not yet  done with. The disturbing part  of it all, at least to my eye, is  that so many of us refuse to  look at what is happenning  around us. Too few of us take  the time and trouble to be informed, to question, to demand  answers. It's a complaint I've  made often during 1985 and it's  one I'll continue to make.  Our community is a reflection of our entire province. We  have the right wing confronting  the left, often over issues which  they themselves have created,  while the unions, maligned %s  never before by the present  government, have mannied  Unemployment Action Centres  to help the thousands fallen vfc-  tim to 'restraint'. We have those  who do, and those who complain about it, we have those  who know and those whose ignorance compels them to mafeje  ill-advised decisions. '4  But what drew me to the Sunshine Coast some 14 years ago  was its beauty and.its rural sitting; what has kept me here has  been the sense of community  and caring I found among the  people I have come to know anjd  love as friends. I care what happens here, and I am hoping that  1986 can bring more of us into  the mainstream of community  life, that more of us will try fo  do what is right, not merely  what is expedient. |  p  After all, the end doesrf't  always justify the means. Vfe  have to take a stand for what >is  good and what can make us  proud. If there were one ne\v  yearns wish that I could make.rjt  would be that our community  becomes just that, a true community, united in our haftf  times and considerate of each  other during the good times. ~.  A happy new year to you afl. Coast News, December 30,1985  Role of welfare cheques  "Editor:  .;- The issuing of Welfare cheques a week early so that recipients can have them in time for  yChristmas seems to me to be a  mixed blessing. Few recipients  are able to resist over-spending  to give their families a good  Christmas and thus may run  short before the end of January.  A friend and I were discussing this questionable kindness,  and we came to the conclusion  (hat perhaps the government's  intent is not so charitable after  all. The more people spend,  after all, the healthier the  economy. If this is the case,  then I think it should be  acknowledged that paying people Welfare at a time when there  are not enough jobs to go  around is a lot better for the  economy than cutting us off  would be!  I know there are people who  believe that Welfare should be  abolished and that the unemployed should be forced to sink  \prswim - to survive in whatever  ���t,ways people manage to in coun  tries that do not have a Welfare  system (i.e. working at  degrading labour for starvation  wages br, failing that, turning to  crime, prostitution or begging in  the streets in order to keep  oneself and one's family alive).  The elimination of Welfare  would not only cause a host of  social problems but it would  also actually increase unemployment. In a community like  Gibsons, for example, because a  large segment of the population  is unemployed, if people were  suddenly cut off social  assistance so that they had no  money for necessities, never  mind the odd luxury, a lot of  small businesses would go belly-  up. Landlords would find  themselves with vacancies as  people would be forced to forego individual dwellings to live  with friends or family - or even  to live on the streets. The ranks  of the unemployed would actually swell. Poverty would be  epidemic.  Many see Welfare as a drain  on fhe country's finances, but  Notice of  Public Hearing  PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO TOWN  OF GIBSONS  ZONING BYLAW NO. 500, 1984  Pursuant to Section 720 of the Municipal Act, a  PUBLIC HEARING will be held in the Municipal  Hall, South Fletcher Road, Gibsons, B.C. on MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1986 at 7:30 p.m. to consider  By-law No. 500-9, (Zoning Amendment By-law No.  500-9, 1985). At the Hearing all persons who deem  their interest in property affected by the proposed  by-law shall be afforded an opportunity to be  heard on matters contained in the by-law.  The intent of the bylaw is to amend the present  zoning as described:  1 .That certain parcel or parcels of land in the  Town of Gibsons more particularly known and  legally described as Lot 13, Block 2, DL 686,  Plan 3130, be rezoned from Multi-Family  Residential Zone RM.1 to (General) Commercial  Zone 1 - (C.1).  2 .This by-law may be cited for all purposes as  "Zoning Amendment By-law No. 500-9, 1985".  Take notice that the above paragraph is deemed to be a synopsis of the by-law and not deemed  to be an interpretation thereof. A copy of the  amending by-law is available for inspection at the  Gibsons Municipal Office, South Fletcher Road,  during office hours, namely Monday to Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Thursday and Friday  8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Rob Buchan  MUNICIPAL PLANNER & APPROVING OFFICER  RMl  i-o Cl  really, it is one of the better  ways that the government  spends money. Welfare money  circulates locally, as recipients  cannot often afford shopping  trips to Vancouver or south of  the border. -  An. even better idea than  Welfare, however, would be a  guaranteed annual income.  Because such a scheme would  operate under the already existing Income Tax system  bureaucracy would be reduced  and the cost of the system  would be less.  It is true that with the  dismantling of the Welfare  bureaucracy government jobs  would be lost, but with the freeing up of funds, new jobs could  be created - useful, meaningful  employment whereby people  can do things that need to be  done, such as reforestation,  cleaning up the environment,  etc.  How about paying people for  the valuable work that is now  unpaid - mostly work done by  women who make up the majority of volunteers and whose  work in the home does not  receive a salary? People could  do work they like to do and that  needs doing, rather than, out of  desperation, taking jobs in  which they are hurting themselves, raping the environment,  or exploiting other people (all of  which, strangely enough, is seen  by many as more honourable  than being a "Welfare Bum").  I do not subscribe to the  belief that human beings are  naturally lazy and that, given a  guaranteed income, everyone  would just goof off. Most people want meaningful work. A  guaranteed income would provide a safety net so that no one  need feel frightened, desperate  or hungry.  Anne Miles  Thanks  front  Belinda  Editor:  I would like to thank Eve  Smart, Thea Leuchte, Joan  Marshall and all other members  of the Arts Council for their  wonderful farewell party and  very generous gift. I've had a  great time working with them  all, and look forward to continuing to be involved with the  Arts Centre as a volunteer.  I would also like to thank the  Coast News for their kind cooperation and excellent  coverage of Arts Centre exhibitions and events during the time  I worked there.  Belinda MacLeod  More  letters  page 13  New Year  thoughts  Editor:  Stitched with Faith's needle a  bright stitch here and there to  lift us into the glory of hoping  that the most trying situations  have been lived, and as the poet  says-  "Hope springs eternal in the  human breast  We look on and up each day  God gave us memories that we  "' may have roses in December"  A fresh new page in the shape  of a New Year is ours once  more. Gently and confidently  we set our sights to living it in  harmony   day   by   day.   Says  --1986-  ; "I pick up my hat  Pick up my walking cane \  and slip into your world" \  Welcome to our world, 1986!  From moonbeam to sunbeam, a bridge of dreams between. Let Thy peace, Dear  Lord, be over all. Amen.  Margaret Slinn  Confused  and  confusing  Editor:  I just don't understand!  Whatever happened to the  Twelve Days of Christmas?  If our Queen accepted an invitation to the Sunshine Coast,  we would spend much time and  effort in preparations, but  would not celebrate until she  came. Yet we celebrate  Christmas so early and so much  that December 25 becomes  almost an anti-climax.  Our celebration and depiction  of these events in art and music  include the "Three Kings"  almost stumbling over the  Shephards; yet their three gifts  were presented in a house, not a  stable, any time up to two years  later.  Why are we so confused and  confusing?  M.K. Pellatt  Our Business Is  also "BOOMING"  ��� Free dead car removal  ��� Truss sales & delivery  ��� Cash paid for scrap metal  ��� Home of the TURF FAIRY  Think of me when you need a lift  Garrvs Crane  &     Service 886-7028 ,  Editor:  Democracy is a great concept, it must be treated with  care and with moderation.  At present, the privilege of  living under a democracy is being abused by people who take  little or no interest in learning  what government is up to.  A case in point is the Gibsons  Town Council.  Very few Gibsons residents  take the time and effort to learn  what is going on throughout the  year despite open meetings and  extensive newspaper and radio  coverage.  With self-assurance, they are  so presumptious as to turn up at  the polls to cast their vote. Too  frequently, the result of this exercise in democracy demonstrates clearly the precise result  which might be expected wher  little or no homework is done in  advance.  The vast majority of the Gibsons population just doesn't  give a damn about the political  abuse of our Town Council, at  least not to the extent of taking  any genuine interest in how the  town is operating on a day by  day basis.  Perhaps this is due in large to  the fact that the majority of the  people don't want to rock the  political boat or shake the  political tree to watch some  political faces get red. Many  own property, have businesses,  or have a long term commitment to the political power  structure of Gibsons, Victoria  and Ottawa.  At the last municipal election,  one of the big issues was the  town council's decision to ignore the wishes of the people,  such as in tax reform, employee  credibility and voting on certain  by-laws.  Several candidates took the  view that opinions expressed by  the public would allow them to  obtain power. Having votes  cancelled out by the whims of  the majority is what our  democracy is all about.  But our so-called democratic  system is rapidly getting worse  and is fast turning into a  bureaucratic dictatorship. Too  much power is vested in the un  controlled hands of public servants who frequently tend to be  blinded by tunnel vision.  Government gives them  unlimited authority. They are  not responsive to the wishes of  the people.  Neither Federal, Provincial  nor Municipal politicians appear to have the clout necessary  to deal with the situation. Politicians come and go, while  bureaucrats tend to lord over  their own little empire. The  bureaucrats, in attempting to  simplify enforcement and protection, are unrealistic and inflexible to an unrealistic degree.  Let us take the proposed rezoning of "Zoning By-law No.  500, 1984" as an example:  Here we have a company  presently located in Sechelt, that  wishes to set up shop within the  legal boundries of Gibsons.  This relocation will be a new  business for the town and its  people, thus bringing additional  tax revenues and eventually setting its foundations as a good  corporate citizen by hiring local  people, attending the usual  business meetings in the community and purchasing additional items normally associated  with long term phase development.  But the old businesses in Gibsons tells a totally different  story.  They tell horror stories of  near bankruptcy, employee layoffs, inventory cutbacks, cuts in  wages, property sold due to unpaid taxes, decreases in sales,  and decreases in all other  business aspects.  They Find themselves struggling to maintain some form of  living to stay alive.  Why is it that a rich country  like ours has so many business  and consumer bankruptcies?  Why is it that the various  levels of government give tax  exemptions to the establishing  of new companies and give  FUDDLE DUDDLE to the old  ones?  Maybe 1986 will prove to be  the down fall of our so-called  democratic system.  Have a happy holiday and a  better 1986 than our past four  years of economic despair.  Benoit J. LePage  Thank  You  Wishing  SEASON'S GREETINGS  to all the people of the  Sunshine Coast  We thank each of you for your  co-operation and support in helping us to  protect jobs in the community.  With co-operation from the telephone company,  the Telecommunication Workers' Union will be  OPENING RETAIL AND SERVICE PHONE OUTLETS  in Sechelt and Gibsons very early  in the new year. Coast News, December 30,1985  r��i^^��^^^0^!^^^Q[^S^  From Katimavik at Christmas  by Maryanne West  We don't have a Katimavik  group on the coast this year, but  at Christmas news comes from  former participants who spent  three months here. These young  people touched many of our  lives and I thought an update,  to which others probably can  add, would be in order.  Some are still here like Annie  ('85) and some like Kim ('84)  have returned. Kim took this  year's mariculture course and is  presently working on a fish  farm on Nelson Island.  1 Of the '85ers Kevin, Guy,  Patrick, Claire, Heidi and Brad  are at college or university,  Kathy, David, Angie have jobs.  Mark (H) and Arlee worked to  finance a trip to England and  left early in November. Mark  Christopher is believed to be  finally back in Newfoundland.  From '84 Katherine who was  with the Roberts Creek group at  Camp   Douglas   writes   from  Jamaica where she is spending a  year as a rural development  worker, "way, way out in the  bush in a small community with  no electricity or running  water". She is a member of a  team building water catchment  tanks, pit toilets, rabbit pens  and teaching sanitation, nutrition, child care, first aid and  gardening. Her friend Andrea is  working in Chicago at an intercity mission.  Others who were in Gibsons  in '84 ask about Pioneer Park  where they spent many hours  doing the hard and dirty work  of site preparation. I find it sad  that no mention is made of their  contribution on the commemorative plaque. Dan and  Sandra are at UBC and it  sounds as if this group may  have a reunion in Vancouver in  '86. Louise is working in Toronto and Steve was back on the  farm in Alberta when last heard  from. Justin who had a summer  job to go back to and found  THE UNITED CHURCH  OF CANADA  Sunday Worship Services  GIBSONS  Glassford Road - 11:15 a.m.  Sunday School  -   9:30 a.m.  ST. JOHN'S  Davis Bay - 9:30 a.m.  Rev. Alex G. Reid  Church Telephone     886-2333  ~X.*.Xk-  ANGLICAN CATHOLIC  CHURCH OF CANADA  ST. COLUMBA OF IONA PARISH  HALFMOON BAY -  Church of His Presence:  1st Sunday -10 a.m. - Morning Prayer  11 a.m. - Holy Communion  3rd Sunday -10 a.m. - Morning Prayer  5th Sunday - 3:30 p.m. -  Holy Communion  DAVIS BAY - St. John's Church:  1st Sunday - 3 p.m. -  Holy Communion  3rd Sunday - 3 p.m. - Evening Prayer  The Rev. E.S. Gale - 885-7481 or  1-525-6760  Traditional Anglican  Services & Teaching   ���&���& a&   NEW LIFE FELLOWSHIP  CHARISMATIC REVIVAL CHURCH  5836 Wharf Ave., Sechelt  Home of New Life Academy KDG to Gr. 12 (Now Enrolling)  Service times: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Mid-week, Wed. 7:30 p.m.  Men's prayer & study, Fri. 7:30 p.m.; Women's prayer, Thur. 10 a.m.  Pastor Ivan Fox. Ph. 885-4775 or 886-7862  -*fi&&-  ���J��9 Sfi %Sfr-.  SEVENTH-DAY  ADVENTIST  CHURCH  Sabbath School      Sat. 9:30 a.m.  Hour of Worship Sat. 11:00 a.m.  Browning Road & Hwy 101  Everyone Welcome  For information phone  885-9714 or 885-2727  -^ft p^(4 p^-  GIBSONS  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  New Church building on  | School Road - opp. RCMP  Senior Pastor Ted Boodle  George Marshall  Visitation Minister  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Morning Worship        11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship       7:00 p.m.  Home Bible Study  Phone  886-9482 or 886-7107  Affiliated with the  Pentecostal Assemblies  of Canada   -fist*.   ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S  & ST. AIDAN'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  Parish Family Eucharist  Combined service at  St. Bartholomew's, Gibsons 10 a.m.  Church School 10 a.m.  Rev. J.E. Robinson, 886-8436  . *9(% Sfa J_%   CALVARY  BAPTIST CHURCH  North of Hwy. 101 on Park Rd.  Gibsons  Sunday School 9:30 a.m.  Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship 7:00 p.m.  Weekly Home Fellowship Groups  Rev. Dale D. Peterson  886-2611  -^ ���$& ��$S-  SUNSHINE COAST  GOSPEL CHURCH  Corner of Davis Bay Road  & Laurel Road  Inter-Denominational  Family Worship  Sunday - 11 a.m.  Sunday School  For All Ages  Sunday - 9:45 a.m.  "We Extend A Welcome And  An Invitation to Come And  Worship The Lord With Us"  Pastor Arie de Vos   S(,3<.#9   CHRISTIAN SCIENCE  SOCIETY  SERVICES  Sunday Service &  Sunday School 11:45 a.m.  Wednesday 7:30 p.m.  in United Church Building  Davis Bay  885-2506 or 886-7882  J*4*J*-  PENDER HARBOUR  PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  Lagoon Road, Madeira Park  Pastor Tim Shapcotte  883-2374 or 883-2870  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Morning Worship        11:00 a.m.  Prayer & Bible Study  Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.  -afi>3t%3<9-  GRACE REFORMED  COMMUNITY  CHURCH  Sunday  Sechelt Elementary School  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Studies in Genesis 11:00 a.m.  Home Meetings  Studies in Matthew 7:30 p.m.  Wednesday  Home Bible Study 7:30 p.m.  J. Cameron Fraser, Pastor  885-7488  -JK�� %l{k ��9fr-  THE CHURCH OF /ESUS CHRIST  OF LATTER DAY SAINTS  Davis Bay Rd. - Wilson Creek - Davis Bay Community Hall  Sacrament Service 9:00 a.m. Sunday School 9:55 a.m.  Branch President Reg. H. Robinson 886-2382   ,^f>     ,?&>     .'&   work afterwards, saved his  Katimavik honorarium and is  now the proud owner of a  sports car.  Nathalie ('83) has graduated  from McGill and having been  affected by the pictures of  drought and starvation in  Africa felt she could take some  time off before working for a  masters degree in Psychology  writes from Gabon, West  Africa where she is teaching  math to high school students.  She's disappointed to find that  in this third world country  which still has exploitable  natural resources and is not so  badly off, children are lazy and  not motivated to apply themselves to such subjects as  mathematics!  Juliette ('83) has graduated  from the University of Alberta  qualified to teach at the elementary level and is now attending  university in Caan, France to  improve her French and qualify  as bi-lingual.  Jamie who was here in the  fall of the same year studied  forestry at Peterborough, Ontario and worked for the summer supervising tree planters  near Kapuskasing, northern  Ontario, is now working  towards his forestry degree at  the Lakehead University at  Thunder Bay.  Jennifer ('82) took a business  administration   course   at"  Queen's   University  and   now  works in Toronto.  Rosemary Gough, Gibsons'  group leader '83-'84 is back  from her six month adventure  travelling in Nepal, India, Burma and Thailand and is working again with Katimavik in  Vancouver. Rick Carton,  Sechelt group leader '83-'84,  writes from Aix de Provence in  southern France where he is studying French, history, East-  West relations and poetry all in  the context of French civilization. It's a university town with  thousands of foreign students  from Europe, Africa and the  Middle East - "a wonderful mix  of cultures" he writes.  If we want  to have these  groups of young people back on  the coast to help with community projects this might be a good?!  time to apply again.  Doctors  present  car seats  The B.C. Medical Association is again presenting infant  car seats to the first baby born  in 1986 in each of the 89 hospitals in British Columbia where  babies are delivered.  Infant and child restraints,  when properly used, can reduce  fatalities by 90 per cent and  disabling injuries by 65 to 70 per  cent, studies show.  In a 1984 Transport Canada  survey, less than 62 per cent of  BC children under five were in a  restraint system appropriate for  their age. Less than 32 per cent  of those in appropriate restraints used them properly. As a  result, less than 20 per cent of  children under five in BC are  properly restrained.  Twelve BC children under  age five were killed and 590 injured in motor vehicle accidents  in 1984.  Usage rates of restraint  systems for children ages newborn through five years jumped .  70 per cent between 1980 and  1984. For every one per cent increase in the wearing rate of seat  belts and child restraints, there  is a cost saving of $1.35 million ,  in health care and insurance  costs.  All new safety seats sold in!  Canada must be approved by  Transport Canada. The Canadian Motor Vehicle safety  sticker (CMVSS 213.1) on the;'  back o'f the seat indicates the  manufacturers' compliance  with federal safety standards.  "Many people don't know  that a safety seat can be extremely dangerous in an accident or sudden stop unless it is  installed properly, "said Dr.  David Jones, BCMA Communications Committee chairman. "The added force of an"  improperly secured seat can  catapult a child through a window or into knobs or other protrusions, causing terrible  damage to the head and face."  ^1^11^11.^...^  j Quote of the Week  i He hath lent a fresh  J impulse, and set a new  i direction to the birds of  ' human hearts.  J - Baha'u'llah.  ^\ .^,^-yyy ,.  The Queen of Coquitlam was out of refit in time to provide Christmas service between Langdale and N  Horseshoe Bay. B.C. Ferries reported very heavy holiday traffic to the coast, but there were a few tight ���*  squeezes, nobody was left behind waiting. The loss of the Coquitlam next summer has some people wor->:'  ried that during Expo the opposite will more often by the case. (See story page 16)        ���John Gleeson photo:j  Economic development  enters new phase  Continued from page 1  was referred to the commission  for its recommendation, which  is board procedure.  Vedo told the Coast News  before the meeting that the  CDO co-ordinates activities  which the EDC generates.  Without the EDC, he said, there  will be nothing for the CDO to  co-ordinate.  Community Development  Officer Irene Lugsdin, in a conversation the next day with the  Coast News, called this statement "erroneous."  But she added that her job is  to listen to and work with individuals, whereas "Vedo has  been good at dealing with the  movers and shakers, which may  become the vacuum."  She said she believes the  aquaculture industry has the  momentum and organization  now to keep itself going, but  that if Vedo's role in the industry were to continue, the  provincial government should  hire him.  "The regional district has  done its bit," she said.  She added: "I certainly hope  the commission as a body continues."  This distinction - between the  commission and its hired commissioner - has been lost on  some observers, even on some  of the players, who cannot imagine the former continuing  without the latter.  EDC Chairman Barrie  Wilbee, who has been with the  EDC since its inception, was  quick to make this point in an  interview:  "The commission existed for  over three years without a commissioner, hiring out on a contract basis, and it can continue  to function without one."  Wilbee said the root of the  current problem was that  regional board directors didn't  think Vedo was accountable.  "Now, since all the funding  will be coming from the local  taxpayers, they feel the function  has to be accountable - to them.  The CDO was the start of their  new accountability," he said.  Wilbee said he realizes the  EDC will change but he was  proceeding with his efforts to  attract Gibsons and Sechelt  chambers of commerce appointees, and encouraging this  direction for the EDC's future.  Jim Gurney backed up  Wilbee's statements in an interview, clarifying that legally if  the district is involved in  economic development, it must  have a commission.  "It's just we're being commissioned and committeed to  death. What I meant by combining the two was perhaps  combining the EDC with the  CDO's advisory committee."  But he stressed that Lugsdin's  office would remain under the  direct authority of the board  and its secretary-treasurer.  "If the EDC wants a commissioner," he siad, "they can  go to the municipalities. If they  don't want that, there are still  things they can do, like estab  lishing a small business centre  on the coast."  Gurney said community  development is broader based  than economic development.  He summed up the difference,  as he sees it:  "Trying to create 1200 new  jobs in this area is a near-  hopeless task, impossible. But if  each employer could hire one  more person, there would be  your 1200 jobs. And it would be  doing it right, helping the ones  who are already here."  Gibsons planner Rob Buchan  has headed his priority list for  the coming year with economic  development.  But Mayor Diane Strom, in a  conversation with the Coast  News, declined to speak about  the town's future role in the,  function, saying council would  have to discuss it first.  "To tell you the truth," she  said, "we haven't even thought,  about economic development."'.  Union sets up  new phone marts  Phone Marts will be opening  up in both the Sunnycrest Mall  in Gibsons and Sechelt's Trail  Bay Centre in the new year and  Marie Synnot of the Telecom-  unication Workers' Union  (TWU) is delighted.  "It's quite a step forward for  Bill Clarke, (head of the  TWU)" Synnot told the Coast  News. "We appeal to the people  of the Sunshine Coast to patronize the phone marts so that  B.C. Tel can see they are really  wanted."  Earlier in 1985 B.C. Tel had  closed the Gibsons Phone Mart,  located on North Road, and  had given the two employees the  option of relocating or losing  their jobs. The TWU refused to  co-operate in this and instead,  through public meetings and extensive advertising, as well as  lengthy negotiations with B.C.  Tel, attempted to re-open the;  phone mart in a more practical;  and central location.  A letter of agreement has  finally been obtained from the  company which will, supply  stock, allow bills to be paid,-;  even provide one-day delivery-,  on new orders, Synnot said.    *,  "We were afraid that we.  could be dismissed if we went,-  back to work in the new,-  marts," Synnot continued,,  "but B.C. Tel has given us a letr.'  ter saying that if we participate  it is with their full permission .  and our jobs will be intact."    !.  Further meetings will take,  place early in the new year bet.-.  ween Clarke and B.C. Tel \o>.  iron out details of the agrees:  ment which will see the TWU  pay the workers' wages and)-  B.C. Tel provide the stock and  services, such as repairs. Coast News, December 30,1985  5.  rTTie Roberts Creek elementary Christmas Concert was a highlight  of the season once again and this time a combined choir sang three  delightful carols in French as part of the program.  ���Dianne Evans photo  Halfmoon Bay Happenings  Joy from little ones  by Ruth Forrester, 885-2418  The little people of Halfmoon Bay deserve a great big  thank you from all of us for the  pleasure and joy that they  spread around the area over the  holiday.  First of all, the Halfmoon  Bay Brownie pack and their  leaders gave joy on December  17 when they visited the homes  of senior citizens in the area and  sang carols. At the same time  they presented reindeer  Christmas ornaments which  they had made themselves. The  Brownies also made ornaments  for the lovely Christmas tree in  the Welcome Beach Hall.  Then on December 21 they  pleased shoppers in the Sechelt  shopping mall when they gave a  ..program of carol singing. So,  once agian, on behalf of us all,  thank you Brownies.  The annual Christmas concert of the Halfmoon Bay  School was presented to packed  halls for two shows this year. ���  There was standing room only  on the night of December 18  and seats were all filled up for  the matinee the next day.  The kindergarten children  were included in the show which  was a musical called The Happy  Snowman. Each child had a  part to play or sing and they did  a fantastic job which was a  credit to their teachers who  must have worked very hard to  have everything off pat. It was a  most delightful evening shared  and enjoyed by so many of us in  the area.  So, our grateful thanks go  out to the children and staff of  the school with special mention  of Elsie Julian who accompanied on piano and enjoyed  every moment of it.  BIRTHDAY GREETINGS  Happy birthday wishes to a  couple of Halfmoon Bay guys  DEPENDABLE  CHIMNEY CLEAN  Free chimney  inspection  FREE  ESTIMATES  who are heading "Over the  Hill" on the last day of the year  and the first day of the new  year. To Gordie Brooke and to  Ian Coluhoun - Happy Birthday!  A GUID NEW YEAR  New Year's greetings to all  our readers and friends go out  in the form of the first two lines  of a song which is usually sung  at new year gatherings in Bonnie Scotland: it says - "A guid  new year tae ane an' a', and  mony may ye see." Translated  it means - a good new year to  one and all and many may you  see.  Have just recently discovered  that there are many people who  do not know about the old Scottish tradition of "first footing"  at new year. So, for those of  you who care or would like to  know, here is a brief explanation so that you will know what  we are talking about.  The First Foot is the first person who steps over the entrance  to your home after midnight of  December 31, and after the new  year bells have rung. This person should be a man - preferably a dark haired man - and  he should bring one or all of the  following gifts:  A piece of coal will promise  that you will always have a  warm house, some Christmas  cake or currant bun will see to it  that you are never hungry, and  a wee mickey of Scotch just  does wonders for whatever ails  you.  It is impossible to First Foot  all our friends, but may you all  have those good things which  we would bring if it were possible.  CHURCH SERVICES  Many residents will be happy  to learn that the little church on  Redrooffs, 'The Church of His  Presence' will open again for  services on the first and third  Sunday of each month. For further information call Reverend  E. Gale at 883-9493 who will be  conducting Anglican Catholic  Church of Canada services.  HOSPITAL AUXILIARY  A reminder to members and  prospective newcomers that the  Halfmoon Bay branch of the  Hospital Auxiliary will meet at  10 a.m. on Monday, January 6.  Come along and support your  new executive who will be introduced in next week's column.  PUBLIC  NOTICE  The first phase of the new regional house  numbering system, from Langdale to Sechelt,  is nearing completion.  HOUSE NUMBERS ARE NOW AVAILABLE  TO PROPERTY OWNERS IN THE TOWN OF  GIBSONS, and may be obtained at the  Municipal Hall on South Fletcher Road, upon  completion of application.  As the new system will soon be in use by all  emergency services, it is of benefit to all  owners to obtain their new numbers as soon as  possible.  Rob Buchan  MUNICIPAL PLANNER & APPROVING OFFICER  Teen Club  starting  up again  by Jeanie Parker, 886-3973  The Roberts Creek Teen  Club will be starting up again  next week on Tuesday, January  7. The evening is well supervised  but unstructured, giving kids an  opportunity for games, music,  visiting, or whatever they want  to do.  Teen Night proved very successful the last two winters but  did not draw a crowd before  Christmas, due mostly to the inclement weather. Roberts Creek  teens are urged to come out if  they want to see this kind of activity continue. Doors open at  6:30 Tuesday nights.  NEW BOARDS  The game of darts is becoming popular and the Roberts  Creek Legion has installed  several new boards. You can try  them out Saturday afternoons  beginning next week, January  11.  Drop in around 1 p.m. for an  English pub kind of afternoon.  Bring your own darts if you  have them or use the ones at the  branch.  BELATED WISHES  I neglected to wish everybody  a Merry Christmas because I  thought there would be another  issue of the paper before  Christmas. A lot of people are  looking forward to a new start  in 1986 so Happy New Year to  all.  NEW YEAR'S EVE  Speaking of New Year's, the  Roberts Creek Legion will NOT  be open on New Year's Eve so  don't include it in your plans. A  lot of people are going to  celebrate at the Peninsula Hotel  where you can dance the night  away with Slim and The  Pickups. Or you can enjoy an  elegant meal at the Creekhouse.  Make reservations.  LEGION ENTERTAINMENT  Judy Smith, always a popular  act, will be playing at the  Roberts Creek Legion on  January 4. Members and guests  are welcome.  Sechelt  Scenario  Season's  Greetings  from Peggy  by Peggy Connor, 885-9347  HAPPY 1986 TO ALL  Quoting  a fine gentleman,  "May your best day in 1985 be  your worst day in 1986." What  better wish could one want?  SHORNCLIFFE AUXILIARY  The meeting date for the next  gathering of the Shorncliffe  Auxiliary will take place on  Tuesday, January 21 at 1:30  p.m. at the Bethel Baptist  Church.  The Christmas party held by  the auxiliary for the residents of  Shorncliffe on Thursday,  December 19 was a huge success. The auxiliary presented the  people residing there with a  large screen for viewing slides or  movies.  The black Labrador pup that  came to replace Cliff proved a  little too rambunctious so after  finding a good home for him,  they gave a good home to  Daisy. Daisy is a five year old  Springer Spaniel, black and  white with a great capacity to  love the humans that have  adopted her wholeheartedly.  HAPPY BIRTHDAY ADA  To the lady who keeps more  abreast about what is going on  in the world, in the country and  right here at home, Mrs. Ada  Dawe, a most happy birthday  for you on Friday, December  27. I can say it was a happy birthday because her family will  have seen that it was.  MARSH SOCIETY  Regular monthly meeting of  the Sechelt Marsh Society at the  Arts Centre 7:30 p.m., Friday,  January 10.  Guest speaker will be former  Sunshine Coast resident and  naturalist Allison Watt giving  an account of her recent work in  the Peruvian Andes and  Amazon.  QUALITY MEATS  Regular  ground beef        k92A8  Wiltshire Sliced - 2 Varieties  side bacon 5oo9m 1.99  Canada Grade A Beef - Boneless  outside round or  rump roast        *96.59 b 2.99  Previously Frozen  pork side  spareribs  kg  3.51   1.59  Wiltshire  regular weiners  .450gmea9  Florida Grown  field  tomatoes  28 oz. basket  C��  ti$i  m  �� ��� ��� ��� ���  im  -��  3 lb. bag  B.C. Grown  medium     ��/ OO  onions       CI .99  'M  <V  With 1 Complete  Super Saver  4 roll Card  Purex  bathroom  tissue  Super Valu  oranqe  .      ��� ** With 1 Complete  JUICe 355m/       SuperSca7dr  Super Valu  salad  dressing 5oom/  Weston's  country harvest  - . with 1 Complete  oread 67sgm   superssz  Without  Super Saver  Card  Without  Super Saver  Card  With 1 Complete  Super Saver  Card  Without  Super Saver  Card  Without  Super Saver  Card  Bick's  pickles ...mtre 1.99  Nalley's  potato  ChipS 225 gm -99  Super Valu  hash  browns     ���g.99  Foremost  cottage  cheese soogm 1 -49  Foremost Fruit or Plain  yogurt2oo9m2/.99  Viva  paper  towels     2 ron. 99  Crest  toothpaste 150 ml I m 99  Nalley's ��� All Varieties  chip  dipS 225gro .99 Coast News, December 30,1985 Coast News, December 30,1985  7.  Unless otherwise stated, all courses in this  brochure are given at Capilano College Sechelt,  1360 Inlet Avenue.  ACADEMIC/CAREER/  VOCATIONAL COURSES (Credit)  Classes commence the week of January 6. Fees are  $21.50 per credit hour plus $20 registration fee.  English 191-71 Creative Writing (3 Credit hours)  Prerequisite: English Diagnostic Test or English  Placement Test. An intensive workshop course  where students will present their own prose, poetry,  or drama. The focus is on the development of each  student's style.  14 Wednesdays, 6 to 9 p.m.  Art 267-71 Loom Weaving (3 Credit hours)  Prerequisite: None. A continuation of Art 169 with  emphasis on texture and colour. Includes samples  and finished projects on floor and table loom.  Tuesday 6 to 9 p.m. alternating with Saturday  mornings for 15 sessions.  Business Management 179-71  Accounting II (3 Credit hours)  Prerequisite: Accounting I. A continuation of  Business Management 178 covering analysis of  funds, flows of cash and working capital and other topics.  15 Mondays 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.  Business Management 160 Starting a  Small Business (3 Credit hours)  Prerequisite: None. A credit tele-course  commencing February 12 on Channel 3. Teaches  you to develop a business plan, to do financial  planning and deal with marketing and operations.  Print material and tutor provided.  Fee: $84.50  Education 370-71 Role of the Teacher for  Children Under Three (3 Credit hours)  Prerequisite: None. This course focuses on  planning environments, scheduling, and program  activities for toddlers and infants.  15 Tuesdays 4 to 7 p.m.  MISS OUT ON HIGH SCHOOL?  NEED TO REVIEW WHAT YOU KNEW?  Capilano College's Adult Basic Education/College  Foundations Program Offers:  - self paced learning in English, Math and Sciences  - daytime and evening classes, full-time and part-time  ��� individual instruction in small groups  - access to all college facilities  Prerequisite: 17 years old and one year out of  school. Phone now for an interview for January  1986 admission.  ACHIEVEMENT RESOURCE CENTRE  Offers workshops and English as a Second  Language tutorials; counsels students with  learning difficulties and provides materials on time  management, essay writing, exam preparation,  note-taking, study techniques, and efficient reading.  LIBRARY SERVICES  A small collection is held at the Sechelt Campus.  Access to books and media collection at the North  Vancouver campus is provided by microfiche  catalogue and is available to the public and students.  COUNSELLING SERVICES  The community is encouraged to take advantage of  this service. A counsellor is on duty on a part-time  basis in Sechelt. Call for an appointment.  EXTENSION PROGRAMS AND  WORKSHOPS  10% discount on these courses up to January 11, 1986.  WORD PROCESSING ON THE MICRO-COMPUTER  Starts January 21, Tuesdays 7 to 9 p.m. Fee: $105.  Introduces students to word processing using  WORDSTAR and includes letters, memos, tables,  multi-page documents and mail-merge techniques.  Each student uses a computer terminal.  DECISION MAKING FOR HIGHER PROFITS  Starts January 20, Mondays 7 to 9 p.m. Fee: $80.  Using a case study of a typical business, each pair  of students will share a computer and play the role  of Owner/Manager engaged in analysing the  business and preparing the next year's business plan.  BED AND BREAKFAST WORKSHOP  Starts February 22, Saturday 9 to 4 p.m. Fee: $45.  Covers history and municipal by-laws, how to run a  good operation, possible problems, types of  breakfasts, insurance tips and more on running a  bed and breakfast business.  THE SUNSHINE COAST ENVIRONMENT  Starts February 5, Wednesdays 7 to 9 p.m.  Fee: $40. Learn more about the environment and  issues like fish farming, the impact of logging and  silviculture, waste disposal and ecology and the  geology of the coast.  COLOUR AND DYEING WORKSHOP  Starts March 22/23, Sat./Sun. 9 to 4 p.m. Fee: $30.  A practical workshop for weavers, knitters and  others who want to dye their own wools. How to  mix colours* to obtain precise results.  CERAMICS WORKSHOP  Starts February 22/23, Sat./Sun. 9 to 5 p.m.  Fee: $40*. All levels of student can take  handbuilding and sculpture with demonstrations,  slide presentations, group working sessions, and  critiques. Preregister by February 14.  DESIGN WORKSHOP  Starts March 15/16, Sat./Sun. 9 to 5 p.m. Fee: $40*.  Suitable for both beginners and the more advanced  student, this workshop includes illustrated lectures,  demonstrations and studio work.  LOG SCALING AND GRADING COURSE  Starts January 15, Wednesdays 7 to 10 p.m.  Fee: $575*. Prepares students to write the  provincial exam under Section 78 of the Forest Act.  Please contact the Sechelt Campus for details and registration.  'Excluded From Fee Discount  SPECIAL PROGRAM  ELDERHOSTEL  The Sechelt campus is sponsoring two weeks of  courses in the international ELDERHOSTEL  program, June 1986. Local people over 60 years of  age can join in by billeting students and taking the  courses. Call us for information.  Call 885-9310 for further Information,  Capilano College, Sechelt Campus  Intel Avenue, Sechelt, B.C.  Happiness  is  by Ann Cook, Phone on hold.  HAPPINESS IS...  Grandchildren.  The past few days I have  spent with the family. After  several years of no small  children in the family for  Christmas get-togethers, this  year we have two babies and  what a difference that makes.  Every home should have a  wanted baby.  Everyone - aunts, uncles,  cousins, friends - fuss over these  babies, feeding, changing,  holding and hugging them.  They all thrive on hugs.  At one point three people  were watching TV and five were  watching the baby. And all the  baby does is stretch, smile and  flap arms without commercials.  They arrive to visit for a couple of hours with bags and bags  of baby stuff and walkers, and  car seats and cuddle seats and  toys. For a moment I thought,  oh no! they are moving home,  but they didn't have the TV so I  knew they were just visiting.  I have to admit, for quite  some time (years) I have had my  doubts about these two sons  growing up, even called them a  couple of yahoos at times.  Well! You should see them  now. God's truth, 9 a.m. Boxing Day both were lined up at  Zellers for diapers that were  "half-price door opening  special."  Honest, 9 a.m. Boxing Day!  No hangovers, no borrowing 20  bucks and your car to go to  another party.  My cup runneth over. Happy  New Year.  RESOLUTION  A New Year's Resolution to  think about - Destroy Enemies.  "The best way to destroy an  enemy is to change him into a  friend."  Sechelt Food Bank co-ordinator, Maria Lwowski, was pleased to receive a trunkload of hulk food  donated by the Mackenzie Liberals before Christmas. New candidate Gordon Wilson said the party  would continue bringing in Food Bank donations on a monthly basis. ���John Gieeson photo.  Pender  People  'rr   Places  December Pender Person  by Joan Wilson, 883-9606  December's Pender Person is  a lady who never blows her own  horn. I've known her for four  years, and have only begun to  discover all the things she does  in the Harbour and on the Sunshine Coast.  She came with her husband  and two small daughters from  Vancouver to make her home  first at Silver Sands, then right  in Madeira Park. She was  school secretary at Madeira  Park Elementary for many  years.  Her volunteer activities range  from the clinic auxiliary to the  Food Bank, from the ballet to  the Harbour Lights band. You  might see her at the pool, out  walking, or even helping at a  Guide Camp!  Now that her family has  grown, and her husband Ray  has retired from the tugs, she  has a little more time for travelling and sailing, two of her  loves.  Yes, Doreen Lee, it's you! I  won't even try to list all the  things you have done and continue to do here in the Harbour.  Your friends and those who  work with you know, and they  appreciate your talents. You are  an asset to our community,  Doreen, and we want you to  know that we appreciate all the  things you do!  IN PRAISE OF  VOLUNTEERS  At the end of the year, we all  look back on what we have  done   throughout   the   year.  Sometimes we decided to drop  some activities, or take up some  new ones.  I'd like to thank all the  volunteers in Pender Harbour  -everyone who gives their time  and talents to whatever group,  be it Lions Club, Golf Club,  Beavers, Brownies, Swim Club,  Library, Bargain Barn, the  Legion - everyone who has contributed to our community life.  I urge those of you who  haven't yet found your  volunteer niche to investigate  the many organizations, formal  Area C Soundings  Davis Bay holiday spirit  by Jean Robinson, 885-2954  I did it again! Let December  25 slip by without wishing you  all a sincere "Happy  Holidays". Hope it was the  greatest.  Holiday spirit came to Davis  Bay with an absolutely superb  Christmas Concert put on by  the children and staff of Davis  Bay Elementary School. In  three years of watching these  concerts, this one surpassed all  others.  The work put into this by the  teachers must be tremendous.  We do hope they can relax  and enjoy two weeks as they  greatly deserve.  HAPPY CAROLERS  We in Davis Bay are truly  fortunate to have some happy  carolers who yearly "come  upon an evening clear" to sing  several carols. The clear night  air carries their voices for some  blocks, gladdening the hearts of  all who hear them.  This year there were some 50  adults and children, with two  guitarists to keep them in tune.  After singing for an hour and a  half at various homes  throughout the neighbourhood  they stopped by Jim and Susan  Brown's for mulled wine and  hot chocolate. This has been  hosted by Reg and Lynne  Dickson in previous years.  STORY HOUR  Don't forget the Moms and  Tots Story Hour at 10:30 a.m.  January 3, at the hall. Come  and have a coffee, mom, while  your pre-schooler is read to by  one of the excellent staff.  HAPPY NEW YEAR  Well, now is the time to wish  one and all a very happy 1986.  A helpful hint, take a minute to  write '86 on a few of your cheques so there will be no  mistakes.  It is countdown to New  Year's Eve. The party at the  Hall begins at 9 p.m. on  December 31 and has to be one  of the best deals in town.  Tickets are $7.50 each. There  are still a very few left at the  Peninsula Market. You bring  your own drinks, mixer is  available and the dinner at midnight is more like a banquet.  This year as an added treat,  we will have some live music,  besides the tapes. It is like a big  house party, friendly, warm and  a great way to begin the year.  Make a fancy hat and win a  prize for the best.  TREE BURNING  On Sunday, January 5 at 6  p.m. there is the Annual Pot  Luck Dinner and Tree Burning.  Bring the family, a casserole,  your tree for burning and a  donation for the Elves hamper.  There will be some entertainment after to keep us amused  while the clean-up takes place.  POLAR BEAR SWIM  See you at the Polar Bear  Swim at the Davis Bay wharf.  and informal, in the Harboui*  and offer your time to one. Ai  the very least, be supportive <Sf  those who do volunteer, and l<jt  them know you appreciate theif  work. ';.*���  PRINCE OF PEACE i  At Christmas time we celebrate the birth of the Prince of  Peace, and the bells ring put  "Peace on earth!" On bal-  tlefronts, soldiers - even tho&  who are not Christian - la^  down their guns for a few  hours. A small gesture, to be  sure, but worth the effort to add  one small light to this dar^c  world. >  The Messiah promised peace  to men, but He also demandeB  action on our part, and obedience to His commands.       >  Mother Theresa told la  woman who asked her how she  could help the world, "Cip  home and love your family."'J  Let us all love one another in  deed this coming year, make  peace with our neighbour, ah$  live in harmony in our com-  munities. Only when we can live  at peace with two or three can  we have any hope at all for the  world. 1  HAPPY HOLIDAYS 1  Merry Christmas and a very  Happy New Year to everyone i#  Pender Harbour! This is my laljt  column for 1985, and I woul3  like to take this opportunity to  thank everyone who has enj-  couraged, supported, corrected  and enjoyed my work thus far.  See you all in 1986! ���������!  Girl Guides  ofCanada  Guides   :>  du Canada  SllAMN  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons  8869413 ������"BB  O  O  ��  NOW  ON!  OUTSTANDING  VALUES!  REDUCTIONS  IN EVERY  DEPARTMENT  o  ��  All itemi ara (ubject lo prior  sale and puces effective  ONLY while quantities last 8.  Coast News, December 30,1985  The homeless animals cared for by the SPCA were not forgotten at  Christmas, as least not by the Roberts Creek Brownie pack who  brought a gift of doggie biscuits. ���John Gleeson photo  George in  Gibsons  Dorothy remembers  by George Cooper, 886-8520  Dorothy Cruice says that she  remembers Bette Lumsden very  well indeed but, "When you  asked about E.M. Lumsden,  the author of a logging story set  in Sechelt, I was not sure a  month ago if the two names applied to the same person.  "Bette was one of our  reporters some years ago and it  was a pleasure to see her again  last year in Kamloops."  Dorothy added, "Our son  Ron had a get together in  Kamloops for Bette and Fred  and me to renew old times. If  we met now she could tell me  about her new granddaughter  and I could tell her about my  great grandson."  Bette Lumsden worked for  the Coast News from 1950 to  1960, and then went to the  Kamloops News where she  worked off and on for some  years as the Women's Editor  and as a columnist "flavoured  with my offbeat sense of  humour.  "I like to think that the increase in circulation of the  paper was due in great part to  my column," Bette said.  "I'm still writing for  papers," Bette added, "as a free  lance, and I'll be preparing  some material on travel in B.C.  for a Vancouver publication  Nite Lite which distributes  through stores and the B.C.  Ferry system.  GIVING  When my driver's license  renewal recently arrived, a small  orange sticker came along with  it. A grisly thought no doubt to  many of us, this donating of  organs and bones, skin, and  corneas. From the recipient's  view, however, it means living  normally again. A thought for  this time of giving.  The decal and consent card  may   be   obtained   from   the  health unit, the pamphlet says.  HOLIDAY  A few days' holiday in Victoria in the winter when hotels  offer special bargains from time  to time is a treat for the visitor.  Where else can one walk from  lodgings to shops, museums,  and even the legislature, all in a  few minutes?  Among the V-12's and the  straight 8's in the Classic Car  Museum is the 1933 Austin 7,  "Baby", the tiny roadster that  ran 50 miles per gallon. Here in  the west we preferred the Model  A Ford with the rumble seat.  And the provincial museum  with its new display of railway  history, among its other views  of times past, and its 20 seat  cinema showing old "silents"  turns our thoughts to our own  museum and its potential attraction for the visitor to our town  and district. But it needs, as  Tarn Johnson, the Museum  Society president says, some  assistance from individual  volunteers.  "Right   now,"   Tarn   says,  "I'm working there alone in the  building."  P.O. PLAUDITS  How was your Christmas  mail delivery? Despite the common jokes that make the post  office their object of derision,  we must say at our house that  all that extra load of letters we  received arrived within a few  days of posting. Of course  about those people who have  been sending cards and letters at  this season for years - did they  write this year or not?  OOPS!  This news corner offers $25  to any registered charity named  by the reader who finds the  grammatical error made in the  issue of December 16 this year.  This is a self-imposed penalty  for carelessness, and by way of  covering embarrassment.  4 Sechelt Seniors  by Robert Foxall  Let's get started right by  wishing every one a HAPPY  NEW YEAR. I missed my  Christmas wishes but must  blame my Olivetti for that. It  just decided that Christmas  week was no time to be working  and broke down. That is all  changed for the New Year and  it has been over-hauled and  even equipped with a new ribbon. This should make life a little easier for the proof reader.  We aire starting 1986 with a  slightly changed executive. I  want to give a hearty welcome  to the new members of the executive and assure them that  they will enjoy the work.  Here are the results of the  election held December 19:  President, Larry Grafton;  First Vice-President, Gerry  Chailleur; Second Vice-  President, Herb Richter;  Treasurer, Johnny Johnson;  Secretary, Rita Stanfield; and  the new members of the executive are Mike Timms, Ernest  Wiggins, Bernie Ackerman.  At this meeting thanks were  issued to the Claytons and the  Super Valu for their donations  to our monthly draw which saw  eight certificates issued at this  meeting.  I will admit I have been out  of gear over the Yuletide  holidays so will make this short  and promise you a more full  report in the new year and  establish our programs anew.  Happy New Year To All.  Pender High news  by Michelle Cochet  What a fantastic way to end  the year!! Last Thursday in a  breathtaking game against  Sechelt, our senior boys basketball team defeated the Eagles by  a total of 10 points. The boys  claimed that they were not very  ^ure of themselves at the beginning of the game, but the final  score of 50-40 proves that they  got their act together in plenty  of time.  I would like to congratulate  the team on their win and commend their coach, Mr. John  Clements on his excellent job of  managing the boys. I'm sure  they could not have done nearly  as well without him. Good work  guys! Let's see more of it in the  new year.  Also, last week the Student  Council held their Christmas  Dance for the students. Unfortunately, due to a lack of time  and planning, it was not quite  the event the council had  previously scheduled it to be.  Everybody who attended the  dance looked very nice, as the  Thursday of this event was also  the Thursday planned by the  council as "Formal Day".  For the dance, the members  of the council provided drinks,  and some very nice prizes were  given out to the winners of  various dance activities. All in  all, our dance did not turn out  too badly.  Have a very merry Christmas  and an excellent New Year.  Also, for the sake of yourself,  and everybody you care for,  don't drink and drive.  H(#y Hwi IJeot  Open   ^  California  NEW POTATOES  Florida  GRAPEFRUIT  r  (kg. 86) lb.  California Large Size  AV0CAD0ES  California Emperor  GRAPES  39  4/1.00  49  ea.  Dare Chocolate Coated _m_9��  cookies    3oo3m\.o9  C{overleaf t,   ^ ,;  smoked  oysters     ;Mg,, 1.09  Nabisco _****  Shreddies 6753m2.09  Carnation  Coffee-  mate500gm 2.69  Heinz  tomato  ketchup    75omi 2.39  Sunrype White Label  apple juice  i ,,.85  Powder Detergent  ABC 2 kg Ob DO  Stuart House Kitchen Refill  garbage  bags 3os 1.19  Stove Top  stuffing  miX 170 gm 1.49  Ivory  liquid  detergent i.5/��re4.59  9.49  Toddler's 36's  Toddler Plus 32's  Extra Absorbant 48's  Pel HI P6 TS Diapers..  Delta  long grain o  riCC 907 gm   I ��� 49  Cloverleaf Solid White  tlina 198 gm I ��� 98  Perfex  liquid  bleach      /.��/,tre1.19  No Name  long  spaghetti    N 1.29  Colgate  toothpaste kw m, 1.29  Stayfree  maxi pads      4.33  Purex  bathroom  tissue        4ron 1.57  Kelloggs  Frosted  FiakeS 525 gmfc-Tl If  Christie's   i  CTBGKQYS   .150-225 gm m 99  Meal Mates, Calais. Old Fashioned &  Hi Fibre  Day by Day Item by  Item We do more for you  C'Vnrittv  Deli and Health  Jfboosi  Convenient  Howe Sound Pharmacy  PRESCRIPTION PICK-UP  For prescriptions call  886-3365 days, 886-7749 24 hrs   886-2936  BOUTIQUE  in the  Lower Village  CLOSED  until JAN. 10th  When everything in store  will be     *>C��,      ,,  ��3% off  Girl  SGuss  Hair: Salon  For a holiday  with STYLE...CALL US.  Whatever your look isi..  we will perfect it.  886-2120  IrTtrie tpvyer Village  W Show Piece ^  1^   Gallery   _J_  Above Ihe  NDP  Bookstore  THANKS  for your patronage  and  HAPPY NEW YEAR  corner of  Gower Pt. & School Rd.  886-9213 Dollar  GOWER POINT ROAD GIBSONS  886-22W  sFfflEE^^  .is  We fully guarantee everything we sell to be satisfactory or money cheerfully'refunded.   We reserve the right to limit quantities.  DOLLAR  .Ken's will be CLOSED  JAN.   1st  ?v' "New Year's Day'  Prices effective  Dec. 31 - Jan. 5 Weaccept  Sundays & Holidays  10 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Mastercard  Meddo Belle Mild. Medium or Aged  Cheddar Cheese  Meddo Belle  German Butter  Cheese  10% off  reg.  price  'I  >   IS  !3  Delnor - Assorted Varieties  vegetables wo 3m\ .09  n.  ��f McCain 10'  I Hawaiian  pizza 2  75  Our Own Freshly Baked  french  bread /<><,/ .79  Limited Quantities!  Our Own Freshly Baked j%#%  brownies     r.1.69  SAFETY MATCHES  ��� Barbeque & fireplace  ��� 11 inches long  Regualr price $1.49  SPECIAL  PURCHASE  PRICE  1.09  I i  if  f   '?  COFFEE MUGS  By Anchor Hocking  Regular price $1.49  SPECIAL  PURCHASE  PRICE  /    >;-fUM..  \  X  .99  h  i >;f  g '<  MEAT  Canada Grade A Beef - Boneless  SIRLOIN TIP OR INSIDE  ROUND ROAST  (kg 6.59)   lb.  2.99  Frozen Grade A  ROCK CORNISH  CHICKENS  1.69  f /eg 3.73) lb.  K_  Canada Grade A Boneless ^  BEEF STEW ,*S5W��,2  Fletcher's Premium _  SLICED SIDE BACON ��?��2  Fresh  VEAL CUTLETS ^��.��,��.5  59  29  95  IT WAS  when I couldn't find any clam chowder recipe that I panicked. For days  it was only fish I'd been inspired to cook and I was running out of  recipes. It seemed that I had fish on the brain. (Is that why it's called  brain food I mused to myself.) At night in my dreams fish danced  before my eyes and not just any fish. I spent my nights chasing white  whales. Oh, Captain Ahab, I know how you must have felt. And if you,  dear reader, would like to know too, come to Greene Court, January 3  and 4 at 8 p.m. and meet not just Captain Ahab but Cuddles the Clown  and a host of other entertainers. Bring the kids - and the aunties and  uncles - and have some fun.  And now for something fishy that's not from Nantucket:  NEW ORLEANS JAMBALAYA  1 dozen oysters  2 cups shrimps  2 tablespoons butter  Vz cup chopped onion  1 cup tomato sauce  1 teaspoon salt  1 red pepper, chopped  1/8 teaspoon black pepper  few drops tabasco  sprinkle of cayenne  1 cup rice  1 cup water  1 . Saute oysters and shrimps in  butter for five minutes.  Remove and drain.  2 .Saute onion until transparent.  3 .Add rice and saute five minutes. Add tomato sauce, water, red pep  per and seasonings. Stir well and cook for 10 minutes.  4 .Add oysters and shrimps for 20 - 25 minutes or until liquid is ab  sorbed. Adjust seasoning and serve.  See you at the show!  NEST LEWIS  fS*s-;  in prdvidirig VarietyyQualityv & Friendly Service  ?: t  r ;  TiDP BdQhstore  886-7744  Corner Of School &  Gower Point Roads  20 % off  ALL BOOKS  til Jan. 4th  Sjl&jBg We're  your hot water  HEATING PEOPLE  Call us for  an estimate.  SERVING THE SUNSHINE COAST  Seaside Plumbing Ltd.  886-7017  $10oo PR|ze  DRAWN EACH SAT. at 5:30 p.m  starting in the new year  Drycleaning Service  ���    Fur, Leather, Shirts  k  DRAPERIES  TAKE DOWN & REHANG SERVICE  886-2415  stra Tailoring & Design  next to Ken's Lucky Dollar  THi^\^  ^\1       SALE  886-3812  in lower Glbsdi>?  EXTRACTAWAY  Carpet & Upholstery Cleaner  hrs  Phone  886-2257  Cleaning Solution  reserve 10.  Coast News, December 30,1985  9%*i9+��Jj2Z-<**9*^^  Cuddles the Clown does his stuff as part of the high-spirited Pot  Pourri fundraiser for the Eileen Glassford Theatre project which  was put on by Driftwood II. The hi-jinks will be on display at  Greene Court in Sechelt this week. See story this page and follow  ing review.  ���Brad Benson photo  Creek resident  goes on tour  Long-time Roberts Creek  resident David Morgan has been  playing guitar for twenty years  now, but it wasn't until eight  months ago that he finally set  out on the road to make a living  at what he likes to do most.  Raised in Seattle, David  played mainly jazz in those  days, studying with Barney  Kessel, one of the jazz greats,  while a member of the Gary  Givens Quartet.  After his move to the Sunshine Coast some ten or eleven  years ago, David played and  practised, sitting in from time to  time with week-end bands.  When the present Gypsy restaurant in lower Gibsons was  still Fitzgerald's, David used to  play with Ken Dalgleish and  Randy Rayment, son of the well  known Elphinstone band teacher. Eight years later it was Ran-,  dy who called David to ask him  if he was still playing guitar and  would he like to audition for a  new band.  j     ,--..' >sy.-yyyy;yv;yi34i\,^g:  DAVID MORGAN  *  :      "That was it," David told the  i  Coast News.  "I was accepted  into the band, Colorado   and  we went on the road after a  month of steady rehearsals.  This Christmas break is my first  in seven months."  The band has played all over  the prairies, and now heads  back to Alberta once again,  before returning to play three  weeks in Vancouver. Plans are  exciting for 1986.  "We are then heading down  to California, and we hope to  spend '86 travelling up and  down the West Coast, in Hawaii and Japan," he continued.  The band also hopes to spend a  couple of months in Texas in  the summer.  "I want to stay in music  now," David added. "There's a  lot to learn and being with the  band is really teaching me a lot.  It's enabled me to get my feet  wet, to learn how to accompany  vocalists - we have two excellent  female singers - and I'm learning new music all the time.  "We perform music from the  early sixties, right up to last  week's songs. Every song we do  is a million seller - that's pur  hook, you might say," he continued.  While David lived in Roberts  Creek he frequently played with  not only Ken Dalgleish, but also  with other bands such as Used  Guys and worked on other  musical projects whenever he  could.  New Year's Eve is one the  band looks forward to. This  year Colorado plays at the Air  Force Base in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, after which the  band returns to begin three  weeks in Vancouver come early  February.  It's a local-boy-makes-good  story with a happy ending.  Pot Pourri fun  For those who enjoy getting  out for an evening with the  family, Driftwood II is presenting the second weekend of their  laughter and surprise filled  Christmas Pot-Pourri at  Sechelt's Greene Court this Friday and Saturday.  The show was first presented  last weekend at Gibsons United  Church Hall to enthusiastic audiences of all ages. The  evening's entertainment was a  mixture of magic tricks, clowns,  juggling, music and concluded  with the delightfully rowdy play  Moby Dick.  In store for the Sechelt audience will be the additions of a  short and strange experiment in  the theatre of coarse acting, and  a skit by the irrepressible David  Karmazin.  Show times are Friday and  Saturday, January 3 and 4 at 8  p.m. Tickets are available at the  door.  So turn off the TV set, grab  the kids, get Gramma and  Grampa, and come on over to  Greene Court and enjoy  yourselves.  The Sunshine  Notice Board  Madeira Park Seniors meet the first Monday of every month at 7:30 at  Madeira Legion Hall.  Single? Join Cameo Singles Club for dancing, pot luck dinners, etc. Phone  886-2550 or 886-7605.  Weal's Christmas Lights are on daily, Dec. 12 to Jan. 1, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.  886-2153.  Toastmasters International will help you sharpen your communications skills. This  social education club meets Wed. 6:30 p.m., Marine Room, Gibsons. All  welcome. Info, call 885-2060.  Suncoast Fighter Stroke Group. Stroke victims, join our group for therapy  etc. Meetings every Friday, 10 a.m. St. Hilda's Anglican Church Hall. For  details phone 885-9791.  *|gg-����|^^  by Peter Trower  When we reached Powell  River, we were taken in tow by  Janet Metz, the English instructor who had organized the  reading. Ms Metz was a blonde,  expatriate Jewish lady from  New York, a tad on the prim  and proper side but pleasant  enough. She and her husband,  Carl, also a schoolteacher, were  renting a large farmhouse between Powell River and Lund  and had kindly agreed to put us  all up.  Janet Metz had secured the  use of a Legion hall for the  reading. It was a roomy facility  and 1 felt a bit apprehensive.  Ours was an untested commodity. We'd look pretty foolish  playing to all that empty space  if nobody showed up.  I needn't have worried for  Janet had not stinted on the ad:  vance publicity. There were  items in both papers and posters  all over town. The reading was  set for 8 o'clock and people  began arriving from seven thirty  on. By the time we were ready  to go, the hall was almost full.  Pulpmill towns are hardly noted  for being hotbeds of literary interest. Probably the fact that it  was Sunday with the pubs closed had something to do with it,  but the healthy turnout was an  encouraging surprise.  Our 'act' consisted mostly of  orchestrated poems plus a few  songs by Mike and Ken. We  had just got the performance  underway when a loud voice interrupted one of the poems with  a Celtic whoop of encouragement - "That's not a word of a  lie, me bye!" For the first time,  I noticed John Fogarty, stalwart  patron of the arts, full of Irish  whiskey and unbridled enthusiasm, grinning at me from  the back of the hall. This could  be a long night.  For the next hour and a half,  Mike, Ken and I became the  reluctant targets for Fogarty's  one-man rooting section. His  supportive outbursts came at  regular intervals, generally at  the most inappropriate.  momenjts. It. was like bein,'"  under a'sort of benign seige; '  Janet    Metz's   sense   of  decorum was visibly affronted.  If looks could kill, the noisy,;  Doctor   Fogarty   would   have  keeled over in his seat.  For our part, we tried to ignore Fogarty's over enthusiasms. If nothing else, he  was very definitely on our side.  Cheered on by our noisy fan,  we muddled through the  reading.  Janet's post-reading plans  called for a small literary get-  together at her house. She had  invited several other English  teachers, obviously envisioning  a few polite hours of genteel  conversation. Doctor Fogarty  was definitely not on her guest  list.  Forgarty, of course, had no  earthly intention of being excluded. He rushed up after the  performance, showering effusive praise and pledging three  cases of beer to the proceedings.  Since the liquor stores were  closed, his offer swayed the rest  of us in short order. With obvious reluctance, Janet bowed  to the wishes of the majority.  Fogarty insisted that 1 accompany him to his place to pick up  the beer. He directed me to a  battered panel truck.  Fogarty's establishment was  located some miles from the  hall, a large, single story house  set among trees on a headland,  close to the water. The interior  was in a state of considerable  disarray. Clothes lay scattered  around and the sink was full of  dirty dishes. "Wife's away for a  bit," Fogarty explained. "The  kids and meself are batching."  There were apparently five  junior Fogartys, all in their  teens. None of them were in  evidence but I could hear music  from the beach. "Sounds like  the young buggers are having a  party," Fogarty observed.  He began rummaging around  for the beer. It was nowhere to  be found. "By God," said  Fogarty, "I wonder...?"  At that moment, one of his  sons came in, a dark kid around  sixteen,   obviously  feeling  no  Sift's'  pain. "Where's me damn  beer?" demanded Fogarty.  "Oh, we borrowed it, dad,"  said the kid calmly. "We didn't  figure you'd mind."  "Well, I'll be goddamned,"  declared Fogarty, "you thievin'  young devils!" But there was a  twinkle in his eye. He seemed  more amused than angry.  "We'll see what else is around."  After more rummaging,  Fogarty dug out a full bottle of  Bushmills from the back of a  cluttered cupboard. "At least  the young scallywags didn't find  this," he sighed thankfully.  "Well, me bye, let's go to the  party."  Things were very quiet and  low-key when Fogarty and 1 arrived at the Metz farmhouse.  People were having subdued  conversation in corners. The  only liquor in sight was a small  bottle of wine and a bowl of  very weak punch that wouldn't  have raised eyebrows at a  church picnic. It was as civilized  a gathering as Janet Metz could  have wished for - up to this  point.  With the arrival of Fogarty,  myself and the whiskey, the  tempo of the affair began to  alter perceptibly. Serious  literary discussion went by the  board in favour of less weighty  topics. Mike brought out his  guitar and a fairly raucous singsong got underway. One by  one, Janet's schoolteacher  friends began to leave. Janet  herself, looking disgruntled,  pleaded a headache and went up  to bed. Ken Dalgliesh, who  wasn't much on drinking,  retired to a spare room. Soon,  only the die-hards were left.  Fogarty had developed a fixation on Mauchlin's girlfriend,  Florence, from the moment he  cast eyes on her. He began  following her around like a  lovesick Irish setter, endeavouring to trap her in corners.  Minette was obliged to step lively to dodge his advances.  Mauchlin took it with a grain of  salt for a while but he was obviously getting irked.  Around 2 a.m., even the  anaemic punch was gone and  "the party seemed to have run it's?  course. We had not reckoned  with the incorrigible Fogarty,  however. The vet took a quick  trip to his truck and returned  with yet another full bottle of  Bushmills.  I like parties as well as anyone  but this little session was sliding  right over the edge. 1 swore I  could hear noises from upstairs.  "Hey, maybe we should call it a  night," I suggested worriedly.  "Hell, let's crack the  sucker," said Mike, reaching  for the whiskey.  Everything went to hell on a  rollerskate "from this point.  Fogarty resumed hes blatant  pursuit of Florence and  Mauchlin finally exploded.  "Sir, you are annoying my  lady!" he shouted.  An argument began with  Fogarty strenuously protesting  his innocence. Somehow, the  subject veered away from  Florence and became a crazed  debate on the respective merits  of Scotchmen as opposed to  Irishmen. Mauchlin's voice in  high dudgeon was equal in  volume to Fogarty's any day of  the week. The slanging match  grew louder and louder. The  very rafters were rattling.  The outcome was quite  predictable. Long suffering  Janet Metz came storming  downstairs in her robe, almost  hysterical with rage and frustration. "Get out of my house, you  terrible man!" she screamed at  Fogarty. "You've ruined  everything!"  At this point, the unpredictable Mauchlin did a complete  turnaround. It seemed to him  that Doctor Fogarty was being  discriminated against. "If he  goes, I go!" he shouted in a  sudden burst of Celtic solidarity.  And the two men, who had  been at each other's throats only moments before, exited arm  in arm with the bottle of  Bushmills.  Mike Dunn and I looked at  each other, shrugged and  stumbled off to bed.  So much for literary nights in  the westcoast boondocks.  It was the last time I was to  see the volatile Doctor Fogarty.  A few months later, he packed  up family and belongings and  moved lock, stock and barrel  back to Ireland. He has not  returned to these parts again.  Curiously   enough,    Janet  Metz invited  Mike,  Ken  and  myself back for a return engagement, about a year after this.  On   the   second   occasion,  however,   we   were   pointedly  booked into the Lund  Hotel.  Perhaps Ms Metz feared that  Doctor Fogarty might fly back  from   Ireland   for  the performance.  USED BUILDING SUPPLIES  Quality, used lumber, bricks, windows, lights, plumbing, etc.  P A B USED BUILDING MATERIALS  11947 Tannery Rd., Surrey  MONDAY-SATURDAY 8BS-1311  We-also-buy used building materials  Diesel Engine Rebuilding  Industrial Parts  Hwy 101,  Madeira Park  883-2616  -~ .. ������,���.-.������������ ������������������������������ ���.���������������.^^^:-:.-.-.:-:.-.-.v.-.-.-..>v:-^..:-..:.v.-.. -.-������ Y)y���������v^V^fl��r^i���i^i������i;���^^^���i^^^^���'^ llll  ProntcS  STEAK, PIZZA & SPAGHETTI HOUSE  (Cedars Plaza, Gibsons, 886-8138)  Happy ttm  We will be open again  from 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 3rd,  and look forward to serving you  in this New Year.  For a special evening, join us.  best party in town"... Only $4.00  New Year's Eve  at the Cabaret  Free party favours  light buffet and  bubbly beverage.  Get your  tickets now  .  Put * group  together and  now  Thursday...  LADIES' NIGHT  featuring  ROBBO  Lots & Lots of .  BALLOON PRIZES!  ladies only 'til 10 p.m.  ty.  vein  e*/a  POQi  yisii  'ght  retu  rns  ten.  NT  8  WEDNESDAY: 9 p.m.  THURSDAY: LADIES' NIGHT  8 p.m. - 2 a.m  FALL HOURS  2 a.m. FRI. & SAT: 8 p.m. - 2 a.m.  (No cover charge til 10 p.m.)  DRESS CODE       886-3336  Gibsons    next to OmeR.i Restaurant Christmas Pot Pourri  Coast News, December 30,1985  11.  bv Dianne Kvans  The action is fast and funny in Dritfwood H's uproarious version of Moby Dick presented last weekend  at Gibsons United Church. Funds raised go towards the Eileen Glassford Arts Foundation Performing  Arts Pavilion, planned for Gibsons. ���Dianne Evans photo  It's a rollicking good time at  the Driftwood II Christmas Pot  Pourri which was held this past  weekend at the United Church  Hall in lower Gibsons. A similar  program will be presented next  weekend at Greene Court in'  Sechelt.  The show begins with some  splendid fiddle music from Jean  Pierre le Blanc which had the  audience tapping their feet and  clapping their hands.  The many children who came  for the show were enthralled by  the next act, Patrick Smolski  whose juggling and quiet good  humour kept young and old on  their toes. This was an effective  act, involving members of the  audience with plenty of 'business' to keep attention drawn to  the stage, but it did seem a little  long.  Cuddles the Clown followed  Your guide to  the finest in  area dining  I  New Year's Eve can be an exciting night although  there are some who prefer to lay low and stay home to  bid farewell to the old year.  However, if you would like to have an evening out on  the town, there's plenty to do right here on the Sunshine  Coast.  For an elegant and delicious dinner try the  Creekhouse in Roberts Creek. The menu features  Oysters Rockefeller or Escargots Bourguignonne, green  salad, Filet Mignon and Atlantic Lobster, Souffle  Grand Marnier and is not over-priced at $50.00 per couple. Reserve by calling 885-9321.  Andy's Restaurant in Gibsons will be open at 5.00  p.m. for dinner and for a warm and friendly evening a  visit to this charming establishment won't be far wrong.  Then of course there's Elphie's Cabaret in lower Gibsons, where you can rock the night away if it's the biggest party in town you're after. The $4 tickets are a  bargain and a light buffet and bubbly beverage is included in the price.  Slim Pickins and The Pick Ups are the%and at the  Peninsula Hotel and if last year's party is any indication, this year's should be quite something. Tickets are  $10 each, and include party favours and party food  plates.  Then for those who live in the Davis Bay and Wilson  Creek area, there's a neighbourhood party at the Wilson  Creek Community Hall. Tickets for this event are $7.50  and available at the Peninsula Market, Davis Bay.  Most of the restaurants on the coast will be open for  business, so support your local eatery and dine out on  New Year's Eve.  And remember, if you plan to quaff a little of the  bubbly, please don't drive.  v // // / J    h\  School board  vetoes war toys  The school board has decided  to prepare a resolution expressing its views that war toys are  generally undesirable and supporting a redirection of focus  from toys which are preoccupied with violence and force  to those which encourage co  operation, peace, and positive,  constructive behaviour.  This decision was reached in  response to a request from the  school board of the New Westminster to support a similar  resolution which that board had  drawn up.  Lottery winner  A Sechelt resident, Garry  Feschuk, received an unexpected Christmas present last  week when a Super Loto ticket  he purchased on impulse at Big  Mac's from Elmeda White turned out to told the winning combination for a brand new  Cadillac.  "He was in the store and  another fellow came in to buy  some scratch tickets," Mrs.  White told the Coast News.  "We were right out so he took a  Super Loto ticket instead. Garry said, 'Oh, give me a couple of  those too.'  "We were joking and he said  'I'm going to win two  Cadillacs'," Mrs. White continued. "Well, sure enough, he  came back a while later and asked me how many matching symbols he had to have to win the  Caddy and I told him three, and  he said, 'That's what I've got  -I've won a Cadillac!' It was  really something."  NIGWT ON THE TOWN  Andy's Restaurant - Hwy 101, Upper Gibsons - 886-3388. Open 11 a.m.  -10:30 p.m. Mon-Wed; 11 a.m. - 11  p.m. Thurs-Sat; 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sun.  130 seats. V., M.C. Located in the  village of Gibsons kittycorner from Sunnycrest Mall, Andy's offers a variety of  popular meals in air conditioned comfort. A place to sit back and relax. Wide  lunch selection with daily specials. Menu  features steak, pizza, seafood, pasta.  House specialties include veal dishes and  steaks. Children's portions available for  most dishes. Reservations recommended  on weekends. Average meal for two  $ 15-520.  Cafe Pierrot - Teredo St. Sechelt  -885-9962. Open from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.  Mon-Sat; 5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. Thurs.;  5:30 p.m. - 11 p.m. Fri-Sat. 43 seats.  V., M.C. Located in Sechelt's Teredo  Square, Cafe Pierrot features light  meals and a selection of teas and coffees in a cheery well-lit Westcoast atmosphere. Lunches include sandwiches, burgers, salads and quiches.  Dinner includes seafood, pasta, quiche  and meat entrees. Leg of Lamb Pro-  vencale a house specialty. Espresso,  Capuccino and plenty of parking.  Average meal for two $20.  Casa Martinez Restaurant - Sunshine Coast Hwy., Davis Bay - 885-2911.  Open Tues-Sat 5 to 10 p.m., Sundays  (Chicken Feast Only) 5 to 9 p.m. 80  seats. V., M.C. A.E. Lovely view and  warm intimate atmosphere with European hospitality. We now feature Atti  Voulgaris our Maitre D par excellance,  who is preparing tantalizing entrees and  desserts at your table. Dinner selections  include pasta, seafood, chicken and  steaks. All dinner entrees served with  fresh vegetables and choice of potato.  Banquet facilities up to 90 people.  Average dinner for two $25. Reservations on weekends.  Creek House - Lower Road, Roberts  Creek - 885-9321. Open Wed-Sun 6 p.m.  - 10 p.m., Sunday Brunch 11 a.m. - 2  p.m. 40 seats. V., M.C. Intimate dining  and fine cuisine are the hallmarks of  Creek House. The. atmosphere is sophisticated yet casual. Brunch includes eggs,  crepes, pasta, seafood, salads,  croissants. Dinners include crepes, pasta  and meat entrees. Evening specialties include Filet A L'Echalotte, Stroganoff,  Lobster, Prawns. Two Daily specials  (one seafood) at $10.95 includes soup or  salad. Average meal for two $30. Reservations a must on weekends.  The Omega Pizza Steak and  Lobster Housel538 Gower Pt. Rd.,  Gibsons Landing -886-2268. Open Sun-  Thurs; 4 -10:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 4-11 p.m.  145 seats. V., M.C. With a perfect view  of Gibsons marina, and a good time atmosphere. The Omega is a people-  watcher's paradise. Cast members of  "The Beachcombers" can usually be  found dining here. Menu includes pizza,  pasta, steaks and seafood. Steaks and  seafood are their specialties. Banquet  facilities available. Very special  children's menu. Average dinner for two  $20. Reservations recommended.  Parthenon Theatre Restaurant  -The Boulevard, Sechelt - 885-9769.  Open 11:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Mon-Tues;  11:30 q.m. - 2:30 p.m. Wed; 11:30 a.m. -  9:30 p.m. Thurs; 11:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.  Fri; 4 p.m. -10 p.m. Sat; 4 p.m. - 9 p.m.  Sun. 100 seats. V., M.C, A.E. Lovely  view of Trail Bay and a variety of  popular menu selections. Lunches include sandwiches, quiche, hamburgers,  lo-cal plate. Dinners include seafood,  ribs, salads, steaks, chicken and veal.  Steak, seafood and pasta the main attractions. Full pizza menu for dine in or  takeout. Average dinner for two $15-20.  Reservations on weekends.  Pebbles Restaurant - Trail Ave.,  Sechelt - 885-5811. Open 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.  Mon-Thurs; 7 a.m. -9:30 p.m. Fri-Sat; 9  a.m. - 9 p.m. Sunday. 62 seats. V.,  M.C, A.E. Open for breakfast, lunch,  dinner and Sunday Brunch. Lunches  begin at $4.25 and selections include  sandwiches, burgers and daily specials.  Famous for halibut and chips. Dinners  include meat, poultry, seafood and  more. Rack of Lamb and chicken or  veal Cordon Bleu are house specialties.  Brunch features omelettes, full  breakfasts, Shrimp Pebbles and Eggs  Driftwood. Average dinner for two  525-S30. Beautiful view of Trail Bay and  across to Nanaimo. Reservations a good  idea.  Pronto's Steak, Pizza and  Spaghetti House - Hwy lOl, Gibsons -886-8138. Open 11:30 a.m. -11:00  p.m. Mon-Thurs; 11:30 a.m. - midnight  Fri-Sat; 4 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. Sun. 130  seats. V., M.C. Located in the Cedar  Plaza in Gibsons, Pronto's serves an extensive variety of pizza, steak, pasta,  lasagna and ribs in a delightful family atmosphere. Lunch choices include sandwiches, pasta, burgers and daily specials  Mon-Fri. Dinner selections include  steak, pizza, ribs and souvlaki. Steak  'and lasagna the house specialty.  Children's menu available. All dinner  entrees served with salad and garlic  bread. Average family meal for four  $15-$20.  M.C.-Master Card;  V.-Visa;      A.E.-American Express;  E.R.-En Route  AVERAGE MEAL PRICES QUOTED DO NOT  INCLUDE LIQUOR PURCHASES.  and it was a pleasure to see simple tricks well-performed.  Again, the children were captivated but all were roaring with  laughter at his wonderful attempt at tight-rope walking between two very unco-operative  chairs.  One short play had to be  cancelled due to illness, but the  main play, Moby Dick had one  and all rolling in the aisles.  A play designed to spoof  amateur theatricals, it did just  that, with some imaginative  props and a "cast of  thousands" which created  chaos on the stage and hilarity  out front.  A nice touch was the inefficiency of the lighting lady who  managed to miss Ian Corrance,  narrator and would-be whaler  Ishmael, almost constantly, hitting home only sporadically and  then blindingly with an erratic  spotlight. >  Jay Pomfret was a Captain  Ahab like no other - piratical  and nasty, at least until a cranio  in his leg threw him, his pegle^g  and crutch to the floor. �����  For anyone who has ever sat  through a truly 'amateur theatrical' evening of entertainment,  this is a program you shouldn? t  miss. ���  Next week's performances  are at Greene Court on January  3 and 4; show time is 8.00 p.m��.  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  at  B A J Store  in Halfmoon Bay  until noon Saturday  ���A Friendly P*opt�� Mac*"  h  Ftt[.K\\V.KlJXKK\V.K\\:s.\\K}Jsl~Xf.\\W^^  i,i 11 i.i i iii- . i .-rr  ,%W'.\iJ,��i'.'.��.,.,.i.W??I|,!*?!,.,.*,,.,.,.,5  ^onoy^sM  Hw>    lOl,   Gibvorn  886-3388  Join us for  NEW YEAR'S  EVE  DiNNER!  (Starting at 5 p.m. - Reservations please)  HAPPY NEW YEAR  TO ONE AND ALL!  CLOSED JAN 1st  Don't Forget Our  SUNDAY BRUNCH  11 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.  A listing of  restaurants  and pubs  FAMILY DINING  Come Home Cafe - Marine Drive,  Gibsons - 886-2831. Open 5:30 a.m. - 3  p.m. Tues-Sun. 28 seats. Famous  throughout the Coast for their enormous  breakfasts which are served all day.  Bacon and eggs (we don't count the  bacon), omelettes and giant deluxe  burgers are the house specialties.  Fritz Family Restaurant - Earls  Cove -883-9412. Open 7:30 a.m. - 10:30  p.m. daily (summer), 9:30 a.m. - 8:30  p.m. daily (winter). 60 seats. Breakfast,  lunch and dinner are served daily in a  rustic country cabin atmosphere. Full  selections of quick foods for those in  ferry line up and lots of good home  cooking for those with time on their  hands. Fresh caught local seafood the  house specialty. Homemade pies and  soups. Average family dinner for four  $20.  Ruby Lake Resort - Sunshine Coast  Hwy, Pender Harbour -883-2269. Open  7 days a week 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. 54 seats.  Breakfast, lunch and dinner served daily  in Ruby Lake's post and beam dining  room. Lovely view of lake and good  highway access for vehicles of all sizes.  Breakfast served all day. Lunch prices  begin at $2.50, dinners from $5.50 including salad bar. Smorgasbord Sunday  Nights includes 12 salads, three hot meat  dishes and two desserts, $10.95 for  adults, $5.50 for children under 12. Tiny  tots free. A great family outing destination. Average family dinner for four  $20-$25.  Village Restaurant - cowrie St.,  Sechelt - 885-9811. Open 7 a.m. - 8 p.m.  daily. 85 seats. V., M.C. Large all day  menu features good selection of  breakfasts, lunches and dinners.  Breakfast prices start at $2.15 and selections include the Village Special-$4.75.  Lunch choices include sandwiches, hamburgers and cold meat plates. Dinner entrees include steak, chops, seafood,  pasta, veal cutlets. Steak and lasagna  very popular. Half orders available for  children. Lunch specials Mon-Fri, dinner specials nightly. Average family dinner for four $25.  DRIVE INTAKE OUT  Chicken Shack - Cowrie St., Sechelt  - 885-7414. Open 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Mon-  Thurs; 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fri-Sat; Sun  noon - 8 p.m. Fried chicken, chicken  burgers, chicken nuggets, fries, salads,  onion rings, fresh hamburgers. All.  prepared on the premises, all to go.  PUBS  Backeddy Pub - Egmont Marina  -883-2298. Open 3 p.m. - 11 p.m. daily.  Sat & Sun 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. 60 seats inside, 20 on the deck. V., M.C. All day  menu features sandwiches, hamburgers,  steaks and desserts. Snacks include fresh  steamed local prawns, fish and chips  made with local fish. Bright comfortable  atmosphere overlooking Egmont Narrows. Also includes a 16 seat family  cafe. Open 9 a.m. - 10 p.m.  Cedar's Inn - Cedar Plaza, Gibsons  -886-8171. Open 10 a.m. - midnight  Mon-Sat. 100 seats. V., M.C. Good pub  food and 4-6 daily specials. Lunch prices  start at $2.25. Saturday breakfast special  includes ham, bacon, fresh scrambled  eggs and three pancakes for only $2.95.  Live entertainment most nights. Darts  tournaments Sat afternoons. Everyone  welcome.  Elphie's Cabaret Gower Pt. Rd.,  Gibsons - next to the Omega Restaurant  - 886-3336. V., M.C. Open Wed 9 p.m.  -2 a.m., Thurs (Ladies' Night) 8 p.m. - 2  a.m., Fri & Sat 8 p.m. - 2 a.m. (No cover  charge til 10 p.m.). No cover charge  Wed night. For a rocking good time,  come dance and party on the peninsula's  biggest dance floor.  Gilligan's Pub - Teredo St., Sechelt  -885-4148. Open 10 a.m. - midnight  Mon-Sat. 65 seats. V. Lunch and dinner  are served daily in the Coast's newest  neighbourhood pub. Menu includes  sandwiches, hamburgers, chicken platters and daily specials. Darts on Monday  nights.  Peninsula Motor Inn - Sunshine  Coast Hwy, Gibsons - 886-2804. Open  10 a.m.- 12 p.m. Mon-Thurs; 11 a.m. -1  a.m.    Fri-Sat.    Pub   food   includes 8  breakfasts and lunches. Kitchen open J  until 6 p.m. Exotic dancers. Live music. J 12.  Coast News, December 30,1985  Sky notes  by Neil Sandy, 886-8356  If you couldn't see comet  Halley last month, you can take  advantage of the moon-free  nights, from January 1 to January 12, to try again.  After January Halley's won't  be seen again until March.  Halley will then be a morning  sky object, appearing low on  the horizon just before dawn.  The comet, this month, appears much lower to the horizon  than it did in December so try  and get out as early in the evening as possible.  You may notice I have included the planet Jupiter in this  month's finderchart. This  bright beacon has been shining  steadily in the evening sky for  many months now.  Jupiter is not hard to find. It  appears to the naked eye as a  very bright star located near the  southwestern horizon.  If you train your binoculars  on Jupiter you should be able to  see the planet's four brightest  moons. If you have a telescope,  see if you can glimpse any surface detail.  Try using Jupiter's position  to help you locate comet Halley.  Best of luck and be sure to let  me know if you can or can't  find comet Halley.  Ready for rugby?  by Jay Pomfret  ; Basketball action was breathtaking last Thursday when the senior  ���Pender Harbour Secondary boys defeated the Sechelt Eagles at  ' thatelech by a score of 50-40. ���Joan Wilson photo  !: Duffy back in form  V Tony Duffy went back to the  ^drawing board, did some  serious training and displayed  ���bis stuff last weekend in Haney  ���with a unanimous decision over  'the 19 year old Tim Hunter  from Cambell River.  ������>.> Hunter, a solid puncher and  "faithless inside scrapper, never  landed the knock out blow that  he was obviously attempting to  ���achieve.  ���< Ronnie Brackett and Brad  iBJ) Edgar of the Sunshine  Coast won their second straight  victories over Maple Ridge opponents. Both boys showed a  'remarkable improvement since  their last outting December 1 in  Gibsons.  Lee DeMarni fought courageously but lost a unanamious  decision from Ladner's Shane  McLean.  Girls  hockey  GIRLS HOCKEY HIT  The highlight of the weekend  was a visit from the Delta  Knights Girls Hockey Team.  They played two local PeeWee  Boys Teams and both games  ended up in entertaining ties. As  was the case last year, the bigger  Delta girls were gentle with the  smaller boys and when not so  gentle, they were very solicitous.  They were fun games with presents exchanged and Santa appearing between periods.  The PeeWee Trail Islanders  were involved in some exciting  hockey coming from behind a  3-0 deficit to beat a south Vancouver contingent 5-4.  TOP   POINT   GETTERS:  ATOMS: Cody Munson, Brad Pro-  tocky, Mike Lewis, Graham Ruck,  Glenn Allen.  PEEWEES: Ken Ewen, Shane Joe,  Daryl Brackett, Brian Dusenbury, Clay  Munson, Mark Poulsen, Sean  Longman, and David Paetkau.  BANTAMS: Doug Hamilton, Darren  Pollock, Chris Campbell, Ken Engelken  and David Mclntyre.  MANY THANKS  Once again it is appreciation  time and Minor Hockey would  like to thank the following  sponsors: in Bantams, it is  Super Valu, Sechelt Esso, and  Dan Wheeler Esso Agent; in  PeeWee division it is Sunshine  Coast Credit Union, Trail Bay  Sports, Gordon Dale Logging,  Legion 109 Gibsons, Sechelt Indian Band, and Scantech  Resources.  OUT OF TOWN  COMPETITION  Once again, a Lower  Mainland house team was no  competition for the local  PeeWees, losing badly in two  games. However in the Bantam  Division, the games were a lot  closer with Vancouver teams  winning two out of three games.  TOP POINT GETTERS  BANTAMS: Chris Campbell, Ian  Sweet, David Mclntyre, Robbie  Stockwell, Colin Joe and Doug  Hamilton.  PEEWEES: David Paetkau, Sean  Longman, Shane Joe, Owen Joe, Tim  Horseman, and Darren Brackett.  ATOMS: Cody Munson, Dean  Stockwell, Glenn Allen.  PUPS: Jesse Smith, Chris Hahn.  CXEAJS SWEEP  CHIMNEY CLEANING  SERVICE  Commercial Vacuum Equipment  Servicing All Heating Unlts^  Free Estimates  *������������  ALLAN REID  88S-B034  GENERAL DELIVERY  MARLENE ROAD  ROBERTS CREEK. B.C  V0N2W0  Sunshine Coast boxers will  resume training on January 6 at  Roberts Creek School.  The Gibsons Rugby Club are  now preparing for their league's  second half. In first half play  the club's two sides both placed  in the top four teams of third  and fourth division in the Vancouver Rugby Union.  With proper conditioning  and the continuing good fundamental skills, the hometown  blues should press their city opponents in a guaranteed tough  second half.  Team members are to start  practises at Chatelech Tuesday,  January 7 and Thursday,  January 9 at Elphinstone, 6 until 8 p.m.  The Club also would like to  mention if there is anyone out  there interested in playing rugby  to come on out. No experience  is necessary - just bring your  sweat suit and runners.  Thirds meet last year's champions, the Meralomas, February  8 in Vancouver.  ���e WORKWEM?  /IK WORLD'S  *3fe  COMET HALLEY FINDERCHART FOR  JANUARY 1986  \  w      Great Square of Pegasus  / r,r  Pisces  \ X Water Jar  Jan. 1 ^  Aquarius  Jan. 10  Jan. 20  Jan. 25  ��� JUPITER  Southwest  HORIZON  i  i  Hurry in!  Prices in effect  While quantities last  THRU JANUARY 18th  SAVE  to #2OFF  mens OUTERWEAR  ��� VESTS, COATS. JACKETS  $|Q99$/i099  rw  NOW  to  i-.:*  nH  &  K\&  sv>  ^  *��>  Style* .  ^taiistrip,r>9,  y and P;n.  H'Ping  %  **>'  100% LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED  1W  i^H working for you f  VISA  iMaslerCard  Cowrie St.  Sechelt  885-5858 Coast News, December 30,1985  13.  The Sunshine Coast Building Supplies building was gutted by fire last week, and another Sechelt landmark is lost. ���Dianne Evans photo  w���� Hinwmtmmmmmmmnm  Letters to the Editor  Pleas from the letterbox  Editor:  My letterbox seldom disappoints me. Scores of people all  b.ver Canada write to me, having heard the word passed  ground that I am a soft touch,  fhey plead on behalf of every  Affliction known to humanity  jhd present a form begging  ���fonations which descend in  ���\rder of value from $500 to an  ���mpty square marked other.  friese appeals are honest and  Worthy and wrench my heart  ijit I, a pensioner of modest  '.{leans, cannot shoulder all the  4;oes of the world.  | I have already a list of pet  .{auses I do support and to these  !; donate my widow's mite,  tjther. One of them is World  {federalists of Canada. Their  advisory board is an imposing  array of luminaries which includes, to mention only a few,  rSonourable lona Campagnola,  I>r. Pauline Jewett, M.P., Dr.  George Ignatieff, Most  Reverend Ted Scott, and  publisher Mel Hurtig. They  describe themselves as a "movement for a just world order  through a strengthened United  Nations."  j. There are 159 autonomous  nations in the world today facing one another at the crossroads of all history; each competing in its own national interests and for its own advantages. New methods of international co-operation and communication must be set in place  to overgrow the wounds of old  wrongs, old grudges and old  pride. This is the ambitious program of World Federalism and  one worth pondering now on  the threshold of our new and  dangerous year, 1986.  There is a recording on the  market which was made in  Africa   and   performed   with  thrilling, dark energy by a  chorus of black musicians. The  refrain of their song is significant for all of us: "I'm sitting  on the top of Kilimanjaro. I can  see a new tomorrow." Surely,  we too can foresee the birth of a  planetary consciousness and  responsiblity.  Isabel Ralph  Not a redneck!  Editor:  In regards to the recent Genni  May tragedy on the Sunshine  Coast:  This appallingly senseless act  of violence is an attack on her  family as well as all the decent  people in our communtiy.  Her murder must not be forgotten and lost in a series of  legal battles and manoeuvers by  fast talking defense lawyers  whining of their client's civil  rights.  In the back pages of newspapers all over this country are  accounts of incidents of child  assaults and rapes and in many  instances, no prison terms are -  meted out - merely probation or  other "slaps on the wrist".  What is wrong with our  society and legal system? The  vast majority of people in my  community and I'm sure the  country as a whole are in favour  of tougher laws/legislation for  acts of violence especially those  involving children. Why do people continually vote for governments that do nothing unless its  "politically fashionable"?  I am not a "right wing redneck nor am I a bleedingheart  liberal", merely a human being  and a father who is sickened by  this senseless act and the seemingly indifferent attitude of our  government.  Why do we continue to pay  hundreds of thousands of  dollars a year to keep "scumbags" like Clifford Olson in  three good meals a day and  private exercise facilities - these  people cannot be rehabilitated!  When will we have a free vote  on-capital punishment?  It seems to me that 25 years in  prison is not enough to pay for  the life of a three year old child  and the grief her parents must  bear for the rest of their days.  And quite frankly the thought  of these "lowlifes" out on the  street at any age scares the hell  out of me.  Angered by this intolerable  act of inhumanity and  frustrated by our "toothless"  legal system, I see more and  more of my neighbours determined to protect their families  at all costs. Heaven help anyone  who gets caught by a mother  and father breaking into their  house around here!  B. Gillham  Thanks  Editor:  I would like to once again  thank Fletchers Meats, Bob  Hobbs, Palm Dairies, Al's  Salad King - each parent who  helps me put the dinner on, and  the coaches who made it all  happen - Sealions supporters  have a safe and happy holiday.  See you in '86.  Barbara Lincez  GIBSONS RCMP  A warning has been issued to  Gibsons and area residents as a  result of reports of nuisance  telephone calls received by local  residents as of December 24.  The caller, a male with a soft  spoken voice using a false  name, a non-operating phone  number and the pretence of  representing a modelling agency, has been phoning local  women and requesting information as to their physical description, size and willingness to pose  as models. Anyone receiving  such calls is requested to contact  the RCMP.  Report of a break and entry  into a summer cabin located on  Point Road was received on  December 23. A ghetto blaster  valued at $80 was stolen.  Eugene Joseph of New  Westminster was charged in  Sechelt with break, entry, theft  and breach of probation. Having been remanded in custody in  Gibsons, on December 25, the  suspect escaped lawful custody.  Having   been   remanded   in  custody   in   Gibsons,   on  December   25,   the   suspect  escaped lawful custody. Having  been picked up later the same  day by B.C. Ferries adrift in a  boat, the suspect was taken to  The suspect was picked up later  the same day by B.C. Ferries  adrift in a boat and taken to  West Vancouver Police Department   and   is   now   in   police  custody.  SECHELT RCMP  Vandalism to a vehicle parked at the Waterfront Reserve  was reported on December 21.  Several hundreds of dollars  worth of damage was done to  the roof of a car. It appears that  vandals rubbed gravel on the  roof.  On December 24, a brick was  thrown through a glass window  of the Coast Cycle building.  Police have suspects.  A similar incident was  reported on December 24 from  Madeira Park when vandals  threw a rock through a plate  Bulmer gets award  It has taken almost a year,  but school trustee Mary Belle  Bulmer has finally been awarded the costs incurred in the  judicial recount necessary after  the 1984 school board elections  for School District 46.  After November, 1984's elections a judicial recount was held  because, in Bulmer's words,  "there were a large number of  rejected ballots that I felt were  not valid, and the results were  very close."  On December 7, 1984 Judge  VanderHoop declared Bulmer  I ?v. "-^Wk"*-'>vyry��u>?v\;-���<, *VNk.4  the winner over Bowen Island  candidate, Pat Tinham but  costs of the recount were not  granted.  Bulmer has pursued the matter and in November 1985 her  lawyer appeared before Judge  Leggatt in County Court where  the certificate of results granted  by Judge VanderHoop was  amended to grant those costs incurred, and the school board  has now agreed to pay Bulmer.  "Let's hope that is the end of  the matter," Bulmer told the  Coast News.  Sunshine Coast  glass window of the liquor  store. No entry was gained intp  the store. :  Two juveniles and one adult  are facing charges of break, en-f  try and theft as a result of a  break-in into a Sechelt residence  reported to police on December  23. The suspects also stole a  truck parked at the residence  after the break-in. I  Another suspect has been arrested and charged in connect  tion with a break-in reported to  police on December 24 by a rest-  dent of Selma Park. The suspect  entered the residence and stole  all the Christmas presents from  under the tree, including a  mountain bike.  Speakers and a Sony  Walkman were stolen from an  unlocked vehicle parked in  Selma Park on Nestman Road  on December 24. The theft  could have occurred ori  December 23.  An elderly woman reported,  the theft of groceries and of her  purse on December 24. The  woman had left her shopping  cart on the sidewalk while she  went to open her car door.  When she returned to her shopping cart, her groceries were  gone and also her purse which  contained $150 in cash. 1  A 1977 Yamaha 500 bike was  reported stolen from the yard of  a Selma Park residence on  December 25.  Minor injuries were sustained  by the two drivers of vehicles involved in a head-on collision  which took place in Davis Bay  on December 26.  On December 23, a fire completely destroyed the Sunshine  Coast Building Supplies building. Investigation into the fire is  continuing.  vC'  ?K  ��� AUTOMOTIVE ���  NEED TIRES?      Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  ���'"' TIRE & SUSPENSION  CENTRE  886-2700      886-8167  Hwy. 101, just West of Gibsons  ��� CLEANING SERVICES ���  ( SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon to Ole's Cove  Commercial Containers Available  885-9973 886-2938^  ��� AUTOMOTIVE ���  f fyauim  QIC AUTOMOTIVE  REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES        -  "The Rad Shop"  COLLISION REPAIRS 886-7919  B.C.A.A.   Approved Hwy 101. Gibsons  ��� CONTRACTING ���  ROOFING  FREE  ESTIMATES  Specializing in all types of  commercial & residential roofing  ALL WORK  GUARANTEED  886-2087  eves.  ��� CONTRACTING ���  Call:  For:  Swanson's  ^\  r  Ready Mix Concrete Sand & Gravel  Dump Truck Rental  Formed Concrete Products  Phone 885-9666 ��� 885-5333>  ��� EXCAVATING ���  |ANDE EXCAVATING  POMFRET  CONSTRUCTION  For all aspects of  residential & commercial construction  886-3770  P.O. Box 623, Gibsons, B.C.  ��� EXCAVATING*  Backhoe  Bulldozing  R.R. 2, Leek Rd.  Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0  Sand & Gravel  Land Clearing  Drainage  886-9453  Dump Truck  Excavating  JOE & EDt-JA  BELLERIVE  J0f  ���*W��W"^(^H  Bonniebrook Indu��tr1t$ Ud. : P?| ���  ��� Comm*septfetmu-*-<tern^����scfe>vva   ���  ��� Portable Toilet Rental* # Sajrtle T$nj< $��t#i$   '  Refrigeration &  Appliance Service  BACK AT PRATT RD. 886-9959 J  SUNSHINE KITCHENS  .CABINETS -  886-9411  Showroom: Pratt Rd. & Hwy. 101  Open: Sat. 10-4 or anytime by app't. _j  ri'i-i  X  386-7359  Conversion   Windows,   Glass,  &   Marine  Glass, Aluminum Window.  '..Auto  'i& Screens,  Hwy 101 & Pratt Rd.  Mirrors  J  Call  the COAST NEWS  at 886 2622 or 885-3930 '  rCHAINSAWS  SALES & SERVICE  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER &    CHAINSAW LTD.  HWY. 101 & PRATT RD.   886-2912 J  ��� F LO O RCOVERING*  ( KEN DE VRIES & SON  FLOOR COVERINGS LTD.  Carpets - Tiles - Linoleums ��� Drapes  Wallcoverings - Custom Window Shades  Steam Cleaning  886-71 12 Hwy 101, Gibsons  ��� HEATING ���  1  ^  LIQUID  GAS LTD   IT  Hwy   101   Sechelt   between   St. Marys  B CANADIAN |  Hospital and Forest Ranger's Hut.  Mon.-Fri.    8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 885-2360 14.  Coast News, December 30,1985  1.  Homes &. Property "  -   17.  Barter &. Trade  2.  Births  18.  For Sale  3.  Obituaries  19.  Autos  4.  In Memorlam  20.  Campers  5.  , thank Vfm,  21.  Marine  6.  Personal  22.  Mobile*. Homes  7-  Announcements  23.  Motorcycles  8.  Weddings*.  24.  Wanted to Rent  Engagements  25.  Bed & Breakfast  9.  Lost  26.  tor Kent  -  to.  Fourth  27.  Help Wanted  11,  Pets ��.livestock  28.  Work Wanted  12.  Musk  29.  Child Care  13.  Travel,  30.  Business  14.  Wanted  ��  Opportunities  15.  free  31.  legal _   -  16.  Garage Sales  32.  B.C & Yukon  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  Classifieds  at any of our convenient  Friendly People  Places  ���..���;',:'���;. HblTieS  & ��� Property..  Obituaries  IN PENDER HARBOUR   Centre Hardware & Gifts 8839914  John Henry's 883 2253  IN HALFMOON BAY   B & J Store 885-9435  SECHELT :   BoOkS & Stuff (Trail Bay Centre) 885-2625  The Coast News (Cowrie st) 885-3930  DAVIS BAY   Peninsula Market 885 9721  ROBERTS CREEK :   Seaview Market 885 3400  ���IN GIBSONS   Adventure Electronics (sunnycrest Maio  886-7215  The Coast NeWS (behind Dockside  Pharmacy) 886-2622  DEADLINE IS NOON SATURDAY  FOR MONDAY PUBLICATION  5 acres, mostly wooded; older  house, needs some attn., within  Sechelt Village limits, $61,500.  Ph. 988-7262. #2  Gibsons duplex, tax shelter, exc.  invest., comp. updated,  $600/m. income, lg. lot, retiring  owner will look at offers.  885-2198. #2  FOR THE TAKING  4 bedroom home, waterfront  Pender Harbour, purchaser  responsible for all costs in moving  it off the properly via water,  $7500. Call Gord, days,  253-2303; evenings, 738-4034.  #1  We have customers for small  acreages with older homes in the  Gibsons & Roberts Creek areas.  Please contact Gibsons Realty.  886-2277. TFN  1 3 bdrm. house, country kit.,  Vk bath, wood/elec. heat, on 1  acre, semi-waterfront, landscaped, good well, asking  $63,000.886-2758. #1  Hall acre waterfront, gov't lease,  Sechelt Inlet, $3500. 885-2898.  TFN  3 plus acres w/ 3 bdrm, 1152  sq. ft., modular home on unfinished basement in Roberts  Creek. Excellent financing terms  available for qualifying purchaser. Vendor will consider rental/purchase option, $71,900.  Contact Dale 885-3257.   #  TFN  Births  There's always a smiling face to receive  your classifieds at SEAVIEW MARKET,  our friendly people place in Roberts  Creek.  Maureen & Guy wish to announce  the birth of Wesley Dec. 18,  weight 3836 gm. Thanks St.  Mary's Nurses, Drs. Estey &  Overhill, Madeira Pk. road crew,  & special thanks to Dr. Pace &  Dorothy. #51  Clayton: Scott Essex Clayton was  born 2:44 p.m. December 4/85.  Proud parents Neil & Edie, sister  Christina. Grandparents: Dick &  Vona Clayton, Murray & Ruth  Katchnoski, Pat Kimpinsky. Great  grandparents: Bert & Hazel  Erickson, Florence Clayton,  Sophie Kimpinsky.  #51  Allan: Siony and Don are  delighted to announce the birth of  their son Thomas Matias on  December 23, 1985 weighing 8  lbs. #51  CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  Copyrlflht and  The Sunshine Coast News  reserves the right to classify  advertisements under appropriate headings and  determine page location.  The Sunshine Coast- News  also reserves the right to  revise or reject any advertising which in the opinion of  the Publisher is in questionable taste. In the event  that any advertisement is rejected the sum paid for the  advertisement will be  refunded^   Minimum MM per 3 lino Insertion.  Each additional line MM. Use our economical last  wiik frm rata. Pre-pay your ad for 2 weeks & get  the third week FREE.  THE FOLLOWING CLASSIFICATIONS ARE FREE  Birth Announcements, Lost and Found.  No billing or telephone orders are accepted except  from customers who have accounts with us.  Cash, chequas or money orders  must accompany all classified advertising.  dLASSSFIKD DKA0UNE  NOON SATURDAY  PRIOR TO SMMHTIOM  Please mail to:  |    COAST NEWS Classified. Box 460. Gibsons. B.C. VON 1V0  I   Or bring in person to one of our  I   Friendly People Places listed above  I      Minimum *4M per 3 line Insertion.  NO. OF ISSUES  1  1  I  i  '5  ��  a  '6  c  3  3  nnz  c                                  :r  HTJ  I  I  I  I  I  I  _u  ,r     m     _        m        id  I  I  CLASSIFICATION: e.g. For Sale, For Rent, etc.  J  HAMILTON: passed away  December 13, 1985, Irene Edith  Hamilton, late of Madeira Park.  Survived by her loving husband  Bruce; two brothers, Jim  Crawford and Gilbert French; one  sister, Betty Reyburn; one son,  Douglas Warren; stepdaughter,  Kathleen Melrose; stepson Brian  Hamilton; three grandaughters,  and two grandsons. No service.  Private ��� cremation arranged  through Devlin Funeral Home.  #51  SUMMERS: passed away  December 15, 1985, Sydney  Patrick Summers, late of Gibsons, in his 76th year. Survived  by his loving wife Olive, a niece  Paula and many friends. No service, and no flowers by request.  Private cremation arranged  through Devlin Funeral Home.  #51  COOK: passed away December  19, 1985, Clarence Allen, aged  64 years, of Gibsons, B.C. Survived by his loving family: wife  Mary; daughter Barbara Wiseman; grandson Chad; gran-  daughter Roxanne; stepdaughter  Linda Voll; step grandchildren,  Shari and Christopher; stepson  David Mcintosh and wife Linda;  step grandchildren Terena,  Laura, Brian; mother-in-law,  Mrs. Mary Fletcher, all of Gibsons; brother-in-law Alfred Fletcher and wife Elsie and family of  Nanaimo: many cousins,  relatives, and friends. No service  by request. Private cremation arranged through Devlin Funeral  Home. Flowers gratefully declined. If so desired donations to the  charity of your choice would be  appreciated. #51  In Memoriam  MENNIE: In loving memory of my  dear husband, Bert, who passed  away December 30, 1984. 'His  gentle touch and cheerful smile  will always be missed. Loving  wife Marie. #51  Thank You  Thanks to Quality Farms for the  straw and the Coast News for our  song books. Elphinstone  Carolers. #51  Personal  Single? Join Cameo Singles Club  for dancing, pot luck dinner, etc.  886-2550 or 886-7605. #2  NEED TO GET AWAY?  For reliable economical travel arrangements, Call Ruth Forrester  at 885-2418 evenings & weekends. Sales representative for  North Vancouver's Capilano  Travel. TFN  Wanted: one lady bohemian antiquarian, musician, artist, scholar  with ethical scintillating intelligence. Should be 30-40 yrs?  Medium to slim, unencumbered,  guileless from go, A-materialistic,  unattached not bored and committment minded. A servant of  nicotine, a factotum & gentleman  scribe of 39, I'll gladly trade  missives, pics, guitar licks &  rendezvous. Romantics, unitarians, diaspora & hedonistical  sensualists welcome. Come out,  come out wherever you are. Write  box 164, c/o Coast News, Box  460, Gibsons. #51  Alcoholics Anonymous  883-9251, 885-2896, 886-7272,  866-2954 TFN  Announcements  If someone in your family has a  drinking problem you can see  what it's doing to them. Can you.  see what it's doing to you? Al  Anon can help. Phone 886-9826  or 886-8228. TFN-  Announcements  Found  Don Hunter Photography  Wedding - Portrait  Family - Commercial  We come to you anywhere  on the Sunshine Coast  or visit our studio  886-3049  #2  The Bookstore Library. Free  membership. All books - 99* for  two weeks. Open Mon. - Sat.  Cowrie St., Sechelt, 885-2527.  TFN  WANTED favorite recipes for our  Sunshine Coast Cookbook.  PRIZES! the Bookstore, Cowrie  St., Sechelt, 885-2527. TFN  Computer Astrology Calculations  & Readings. Rune Stone &  Psychometry Readings,  Auragraphs & Past Life Regressions. The Bookstore, 885-2527.  TFN  8*      Weddings  & Engagements  Pure black cat, female, friendly,  Highway & Lower Rd. Phone  886-3138. #51  Orange & white adult male cat  with short & crooked tail,  Langdale area. 886-7736.     #51  'Pets  & Livestock  For Sale-  Siamese & Snowshoe kittens,  ready by Christmas, reserve now.  885-5938. #51  CANINE AND INTRUDER  AWARENESS TRAINING  Canine obedience training.  Private instruction. Phone Reg  Robinson 886-2382. TFN  Music  Large fireplace insert, Fisher  style. $300; 1976 Yamaha YZ 80,  good cond., $200. 886-9131 .#52  HORSE OWNERS  For a perfect gift. Hand engraved  silver bit., rattle snake design.  Cost over $400, never used.  $325 or trade WHY. 886-2348.  #1  Patio doors, 6'  or 885-7977.  $105. 885-3402  #1  i&  Phone us today about our  beautiful selection of personalized  wedding invitations, napkins,  matches, stationery, and more!  Jeahnie's Gifts & Gems.  886-2023. TFN  Pair of men's hiking boots between Davis Bay and Sechelt.  585-9685 collect after 5 p.m. #51  Heavy chained antique gold chain  bracelet between Sechelt and  Langdale. Reward. 885-7256.  #51  Dec. 25th, Austrian Silky Terrier,  brown, wearing blue collar, missing from Leek & 101. 885-9509  or 886-3690 #51  Found  Eyeglasses - Where? Pay phone  in Sunnycrest Mall. Can be picked up at Radio Shack in Sunnycrest Mall. #51  In West Sechelt. black  Lab/Shepherd cross, male, 6  mo. old, wearing choke collar.  885-7751. #51  Organ lessons needed for 8 yr.  old. Call 886-7028. #51  For Sale  15 He-Men with weapons.  (Masters of the Universe), $4 ea.  Call 886-8337. #1  Great Christmas gift - Mini Pubs  one-step brewing - quality beer  for pennies a glass. Skip or Julie,  886-3534. #1  Franklin style wood stove, $100  OBO. 886-3534. #1  Three horses avail, for full time  lease, Eng. & West., $80/m.  886-2001. #1  17 cu. ft. Inglis fridge, white LH  door, exc. cond., $300 OBO.  Phone 886-2150. #2  2 twin beds; dresser; night table;  couch & chair; lazy boy; ping  pong table; fish tank. 886-7819.  #2  Trophies, plaques, & engraving,  Novelty Key Chains. Tony's Lock  & Sharpening, Sechelt,  885-5415. #51  Firewood pickup load, Alder or  Maple $40. split & delivered.  885-5267. #2  Apt. size fridge, $20; full size  fridge, $40; both in working  order, Roberts Creek. 291-6307  eves. #2  Kenmore Dehumidifier. Call  886-7980 after 5 p.m. #51  KITCHEN CHAIRS  1 DAY SERVICE  (bring one chair lor estimatel  Fabrics & vinyls & an supplies  lo.' ihe doit yourseltei  Scanadown quilts - feather  pillOWS. Kitchen chairs ��� 1 day service (bring one chair lor estimate)  Plexiglass Coroplast  W.W. Upholstery &  Boat Tops Ltd. 886-7310  Barge: 30 x 90 ft. to salvage, neW  buildings bolted to deck, best offer. 683-5626. #51  Firewood: Alder $80; Red Cedar  $50/cord, we deliver. 886-8193..  TFN  Complete ladies ski outfit in new  cond.; 180 Elan skis with 270  bindings, $200; Nordica boots  7V2, $75; white ski suit, sz. 12,  $75; navy ski suit, $30.  885-2418. #51  ftmnm.tt.niviv;  SIMMONS  MATTRESS  SALE  DEEPSLEEP SUPERB  OFF  25  %  Queen Size  M.S.L. $679"  SALE  509  95  Be ready !or Spring. Do it  now. Custom Boat tops.  Upholstery, Mooring, windshields, etc.  W.W. Upholstery &  Boat Tops Ltd. 886-7310  Fresh or frozen prawns & shrimp  avail., del. on orders over 20 Ib.  886-7819. #51  2 used snow tires, exc. condition. G78-15, $60. 886-2928.  #51  Firewood, cut to 16" lengths,  small split, $75/cord, local del.  886-9751. TFN  Photo equipment, enlarger, print  dryer, etc., tape recorder, shop  vac, floor polisher, carpet, radio  receiver, col. TV, all good.  885-9597. #51  Heintzman piano; approx. 30 yr.  old, apt. size, mint cond.,  $2300. 886-8373 eve. #51  Lots of lovely junque at 20% off.  Shell Station, Garden Bay Rd.,  883-9113. #51  Ping Pong table, $50; cabinet fish  tank, $35. 886-7819. #51  Upright piano. 885-5759.      #51  FOR EXPLOSIVE REQUIREMENTS  Dynamite, electric or .regular  caps, B line E cord and safety  fuse. Contact Gwen Nimmo,  Cemetery Road, Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound Farmer  Institute. TFN  Firewood, split Alder, del.  $75/cord; $140 2 cords; $260 4  cords. 883-9235. #51  c. 1880's Settee, burgundy  brocade, $1500. 886-7303  Mon.-Wed. TFN  KERN'S  HOME  FURNISHINGS  886-8886  sac  QEsxassssss  COAST COMFORT  Teas, herbs, sachets, potpourri,  mulled wine spice, mineral bath  & more. Great gifts from $1.95 to  $3.95. Available at THE  BOOKSTORE, Cowrie St.|  Sechelt, 885-2527 & other local  stores. TFN  Cotoneaster ground cover. 4'.'  pots 25 or more $1 ea. Hedging  cedars. 3 varieties. Direct from  grower. 1 gallon size. Min. order  25, $3 each with fertilizer or $4  planted. Free delivery locally;  ���>B&B Farms, Roberts Crk'.  885-5033. TFN  GREAT GIFTS  from .  THE BOOKSTORE  Inside Passage & Northwest  Coast Wall Maps, $.9.95;  laminated, $24.95. Cowrie St.,  Sechelt. 885-2527: TFN  ... PENINSULA HYDROPONICS  10x10 greenhouse, $149; Marley  glass greenhouse. $499:  Reindeer Products, metal halides.  Everything for your indoor & outdoor gardens. 885-4643.      TFN  T & S SOIL ,  Mushroom manure $25 per yd.;  S24 for seniors.Cheaper by the  truckload. Call aft. 6 or anytime  on weekends & holidays:  885-5669. TFN  Multicycle Inglis auto washer,  $295. Guaranteed & delivered'  883-2648. TFN  Payments may be  dropped off at any  of our  Friendly People  Places.  Payment must be  received by  NOON  SATURDAY  to assure  publication.  s*OTBaoM*smaB��v(aBaawKMUM��maraM��Mai��w  Enjoy the  Convenience  of  Phone-In  Classifieds  Now you can phone  us from anywhere on  the Coast and we'll  help you place your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIED  BY PHONE!  Call  885-3930  1 TO 4 PM  TUESDAY TO FRIDAY  Cowrie St., Sechelt  From Egmont to Port Mellon, the Sunshine Coast's  most widely read newspaper. Coast News, December 30,1985  15.  GREAT GIFTS  from  THE BOOKSTORE  A wonderful selection of 1986  calendars, many with mailers,  $3.50 to $14.95. Cowrie St.,  Sechelt. 885-2527. TFN  SCREENED TOP SOIL  883-9294 863-2220  TFN  W.W.  Foam Shop has mattresses: all  sizes, pillows, cushion torms. chips  (bolsters many shapes & sizes), exercise mats, mattress anchors.  Specials on olf cuts  W.W. Upholstery &  Boat Tops Ltd. 886-7310  s*-ll  liiii lii I ill  Gibsons, attractive 4 rm., 1  bdrm., lg. living rm., smart kitchen & appl., 1-2 adults, no  pets. 885-2198.  #51  1-2-3 bdrm. apts., heat & Cbl. vision inc., reas. rents. 886-9050.  TFN  2 bdrm. with view, lower Gibsons, lg. yard, carport, no pets,  ref. req. 278-9224. #2  1 Bdrm Lt. Hskpg. Suites  Complete  $350/m. or $100/wk  1 Bdrm Cabins  Complete-  Lg. $350/m. or $100/wk  . Sm. $300/m. or $90/wk  886-2401  New small cabin, exc. beach &  view, avail. Jan. 1st, $275/m.  inc. elec. 886-2738. #1  2 bdrm. trailer, hydro inc., sorry  no   pets   or   kids,   $285/m.  #1  886-2726.  2 bdrm. house', 4 appl., garage,  view, convenient to all amenities,  $40Q/m. 886-8585. #51  2 bdrm. mob. home, priv. lot,  view, W/W, rec. rm. attached,  wood stove, $375.886-7779.#51  Executive House, Gibsons, 1  bdrrn. suites now available, FREE  HOT WATER. Phone 886-8350.  #51  1974 F250 Camper Special,  reblt. heads, 8 tires & wheels,  runs good, body great, alum,  canopy, $1500 OBO. Steve,  886-3841. #2  FREE tank of gas with this 1981  Ford Courier, 4 cyl., 4 spd.,  47,000 miles, all new tires, nice  canopy, great on gas, only  $3800. Call 886-9519. #2  1979 Datsun PU, 4 spd., w/L.  box, canopy, good mech. & body,'  $3000 OBO. 886-2689. #2  77 Ford Crew Cab pickup,  $1400. 73 Ford 4x4 pickup,  $1400. Phone 885-3306.        #2  1968 Datsun, needs work, $200.  885-2527 days,'885-5431 eves.  TFN  1980 Ford 1 Ton,-V8, 4sp., PS,  PB, $7000 firm; 79 Scout II, V8,  PS, PB, $5500 firm. Both in exc  cond. 886-3543 or 886-8323.  #51  1978 Ford; PS, PB, 40,000'mi.,  400 cu. in. motor, runs vifell,  good work truck. 886-7819. #51  1980 Plymouth Horizon, 4 dr.,  std., very good cond., radials,  asking $3250 OBO. 886-3751'. ���  #51  Mobile Homes  'i-i/ 9%\ \iik  1it\W/F*  2 mobile homes: 1 two bdrm., 1  three bdrm., $9200 a piece, fair  shape. 886-8328. #2  1979 Leader; 3 appl., location  -quiet mobile home park; open to  offers. 886-8619. #51  Mobile  home  space available.  'Sunshine  Coqst  Mobile  Home.  Park. 886-9826.      . TFN  2 bdrm. grnd. lv. ste., secluded  house, access to private beach,  Roberts. Ck., prefer female tenant, single parent or resp. couple, N/S, $350 & % util.  291-6307 eves. #1  1 3 bdrm. nouse, country kit.,  1V2 bath, wood-elec. heat, on  Gambier Is., rent neg. 886-2758  eves. #1  One 2 bdrm. self cont. suite,  1356 Fletcher, avail, now, ref.,  $225/m. Collect 1-926-5353. #1  1 bdrm. house, view, hear ferry,  $300. Call 980-2154. #2  One bedroom- house on Lower  Road, Roberts Creek, $300/m.  Phone anytime, 885-5206.     #1  Jan. 1, central Gibsons, fridge &  range, 1 bdrm. ste., balcony  w/view, $260. 886-3351.  Bachelor ste., $225. 886-8646.  #1  Furnished mobile home at Irwin  Trailer Court, close to shopping,  elderly person pref., reasonable  rent. 886-3331. #1  Rent the "Cliffhouse" in West  Sechelt a lovely 3 bdrm. home on  the WF overlooking Vane. & the  Trail Is., no dogs pis., ref. req.;  $600/m. 943-4888. #1  Mobile home space. Ponderosa  Pines, adults only. Free est. on  reloc. 885-5995. TFN  Clean spacious apt. ste., lv. rm.,  fam. rm. & kitchen on main floor,  3 bdrms., bathroom & sundeck  upstairs, lower Gibsons 4-plex,  $340/m., refs. pise. 921-7788  aft. 5 p.m. TFN  Help Wanted  THE MANSE TOWNHOUSE  IS TAKING RENTAL  APPLICATIONS  ��� modern two bedroom  townhouse  D one and a half baths  D fully carpeted  D five appliances including  dishwasher, washer  and dryer  D private sundeck  D enclosed garage  ��� family oriented  D close to Sunnycrest Mall,  schools, tennis court &  jogging field  ��� good references required'  D $425 per month  Call Peter, 886-9997  evenings  Paid volunteer canvassers req.  immed. forannual campaign. $10  to $20/hr, Robts. Crk. to Port  Mellon. 986-9746. #51  Bids for Janitorial Services at the  Royal Canadian Legion 109, Gibsons, B.C. will be accepted up to  January 14, 1986. Job description may be obtained from the  Branch Secretary. Replies to  Royal Canadian Legion, Box 257,  Gibsons, BC VON 1V0. #51  Work Wanted  Able worker. Almost any job.  Min. $3.50/hr., Sechelt area.  Ph. Aaron, 13,885-2339.       #1  Daycare, my home, $2.50/hr  day; night & weekend, also New  Year's Eve all night, $30, exp. &  ref. 886-7227. #1  Waterfront or acreage w/or w/o  house, long term or possible purchase. Reply to S21.C12, RR 1,  Gibsons. #1  For Rent  if  2 bdrm. house until end of June,  Beach Ave., Roberts Creek,  $425/m. 433-1492. #2  3 bdrm. house, fridge & stove.  "* wood stove in basement, Gibsons  ! area, $425.885-9044. #2  *  :   j Small 2 bdrm. cottage, lower Gib-  jsons. Ph. 886-3165 or  1525-1589. #51  * __���.  12 bdrm. upstairs, 2 downstairs, 4  J appliances, no pets, ref. req.,  J$495/m. Ph. 936-0167. #51  i.       .  !;2 bdrm. waterfront home,  ;Rutherford Rd., Halfmoon Bay,  parf: 1.885-5972. #2  Attractive 1 bdrm. suite, elec.  ht., FP, rec. room, Gibsons. Century West, 885-2235. #51  Spacious bright 3 bdrm. suite,  complete top-, floor of house,  stove, fridge & FP, quiet residential area, close to schools & shopping, etc., $375. ref. please.  886-8212. TFN  Nice clean modern 2 bedroom  home, Chaster & Gower Pt. Road,  ref. please, $400/m., available  Dec. 15/85.886-8212.        TFN  1 bdrm. duplex, beach frontage,  newly renovated, $300/m.  886-2887. TFN  2 bdrm. semi-furn. suite, Wilson  Creek area, heat & light incl.,  $3407m. Phone 886-3866 days,  886-7042 eves. TFN  2 bdrm. hse., lower Gib'., wood  heat, F/S, across from Dougal  Pk., $300. 886-3924. #51  Waterfront, Pender Hbr., 2 plus  bdrms., older style house, wood  floors, washer /dryer, fridge,  stove, garden fireplace, fab.  view, full sun. 883-9433 or  251-4578. TFN  HI! I'm a  responsible  15 year old  student.recently moved  to Gibsons, and looking for  part-time work.  BABYSITTING  Will give quality care to your infants, tots or elementary school  kids - available after school,  eves, or weekends. Have 4 yrs.  exp. - $2 hr.  ODD JOBS  Lawn mowing, housecleaning,  what have you. References  available. ,$4. hr.  If you  need  any help  please call  DANA at  886-2558  Exp. plumber needs work. New &  old jobs. Call any time,  886-9149 #4  REPAIRS/MAINTENANCE  Electrical, plumbing, structural  int./ext., painting. Call Ken  Grasser, 886-2949. #51  PEERLESS TREE  SERVICES LTD.  Topping-Limbing-Danger tree  removal. Insured, guaranteed  work. Free estimates. 885-2109.  TFN  Landscaping, garden maint.,  trees pruned & sprayed. Get  ready for winter now. Phone  886-9294. TFN  MOBILE HOME MAINTENANCE  Roof repairs, skirting, levelling.,  stairs, etc., any mobile home problems. 885-5995. TFN  Hardwood floors resanded and  finished. Work guaranteed. Free  est. Phone 885-5072. TFN  Avail., clean 2 bdrm. apt., F/S,  ��� no children, no pets, $265/m.  Ph. 886-2065. . #51  TEREDO SQUARE  Office space to lease, excellent  location, elevator service, 3rd  floor, view, carpeted, some space  can be subdivided and/or combined.  No. 1 - 390 Sq. ft.  'No. 2-1940 sq.ft.  No. 3 - 1015 sq. ft.  For information call 885-4466.  TFN  Office space for rent. 2nd floor  above Gibsons Building Supplies.  886-8141. TFN  Community   Hall   for   rent   inj  Roberts Creek.  Phone Debbie,  886-3994. 7-10 p.m. TFN !  Mature babysitter, your home,  days, nights, w/ends, $2.50/hr.  Lee, 886-8105. #51  50 ���������     Business  Opportunities  tf��  KA  0  (/I  O  en 99*  It was "Formal Day" at Pender Harbour Secondary last Thursday and many of the students came in  suitable attire; a formal dance followed. ���Joan Wilson photo  January baby clinics  Baby clinics will be held in  Gibsons from 1:15 to 3:15 p.m.  on January 7, 14, 21 and 28.  Sechelt baby clinics will be  held from 1:15 to 3:15 p.m. on  January 8, 15, 22 and 29 and in  Pender Harbour from 10 to  11:30 a.m. on January 14 and  from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on  January 28.  Gibsons Traveller's clinics  will be held in Gibsons from  3:40 to 4:25 on January 7, 14,  21 and 28.  Tuberculosis testing is in Gibsons  from  3  to 4 p.m.  on  January 6,13, 20 and 27, and in  Sechelt from 3:30 to 3:45 on  January 22.  Please make appointments  for all clinics for Gibsons and  Sechelt by calling 886-8131. For  Pender Harbour call 883-2764.  Prenatal classes take place in  Gibsons from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m..  on January 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30.  The hospital tour takes place  on the last Wednesday of" the  month. Please phone St. Mary's  Hospital Switchboard for this  information (885-2224). Prenatal classes in Pender Harbour  arranged upon request.  Drop-in baby group, where  new parents meet to discuss  common concerns, takes place  on Tuesdays, 2 to 3:30 p.m., at  Coast-Garibaldi Health Unit,  1538 South Fletcher Road, Gibsons. Telephone 886-8131.  There will be a Prenatal Glass  in Pender Harbour January 29,  5 to 7 p.m. Please phone the  Pender Harbour Clinic at  883-2764 to register.  There is no fee for any of  these services.  BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  These Ads appear in the more than 70 Newspapers  of the B.C. and Yukon Community Newspapers Association and reach 800,000 homes and a potential two million readers.  $119. for 25 words   ($3. per each additional word) Call the COAST NEWS at 885-3930 to place one.  AUTOMOTIVE  For Sale: Computer Store - good  location and potential. Sunsoft  Enterprises Ltd., Box 457,  Sechelt. TFN  Ford Diesels, crew Cabs,  Super Cabs, Regular Cabs,  Cube Vans, new, used 4x2,  4x4. Sell, lease. Call Bob  Langstaff 522-2821. Out of  town call collect.   Where can you lease a truck  for only $119.97 per month?  Call R.C. Bell collect at 525-  3481   or  toll-free  at   1-800-  242-7757. PL 5674.   Buy or lease new or used  trucks direct from B.C.'s #1  volume Ford dealer. Nothing  down we pay transportation  OAC. Call Tim or Gary  collect 464-0271. Metro  Ford.   Lease 4x4 $244 per month!  Factory order to your specs!  Lease/buy car/truck-GM-  Ford-Chrysler-lmports. Call  Ray Lovell-Toll-free 1-800-j  242-4416. D.L. 7836. i  One hour credit approval!  Possible with our exclusive  Dial-A-Car and instamatic  credit program. Lease-purchase with or without option,  your choice. Low, low payments to suit your budget.  Featuring a complete line of  GM cars and trucks. Also,  alwyas available, an excellent selection of quality pre-  owned luxury vehicles for  the discriminating buyer.  Ask for Harold Pleus at  Royal GM {home of white  glove service). 922-4111. 680  Marine Drive at Taylor Way,  West Vancouver. D.L. 5534.  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES  Inventors you can profit  from your ideas. For free-  information call Pacific Inventions Inc. (604)684-5030  or write 704-1050 Harwood  St. Vancouver, B.C. V6E  1R4.   Profitable long established  printing business in Williams Lake, B.C. Favourable  lease. Contact Alan E. Vanderburgh, Administrator, #5  - 123 Borland St., Williams  Lake, B.C. V2G 1R1. Telephone: 392-7161.   AUTOMOTIVE   Where can you lease a truck  for only $119.97 per month?  Call R.C. Bell collect at 525-  3481 or toll-free at 1-800-  242-7757. DL 5674.  Lease/Purchase 1985 trucks  starting $154.52 $3200 LEV,  Cars starting $138.49 $2400  LEV 48 mo OAC. Hundreds  in stock. Call Bob Langstaff,  collect 522-2821, Fogg  Motors Ltd.       Buy or lease new or used  trucks direct from B.C.'s #1  volume Ford Dealer. Nothing down we pay transportation OAC. Call Walley or  Ken collect 464--0271. Metro  Ford. -  Lease 4x4 $244 per month!  Factory order to your specs!  Lease/buy car/truck-GM-  Ford-Chrysler-lmports. Call  Ray Lovell Toll-free 1-800-  242-4416. D.L. 7836.   One hour'credit approval!  Possible with our exclusive  Dial-A-Car and instamatic  credit program. Lease-purchase with or without option,  your choice. Low, low payments to suit your budget.  Featuring a complete line of  GM cars and trucks. Also,  alwyas available, an excellent selection of quality pre-  owned luxury vehicles for  the discriminating buyer.  Ask for Harold. Pleus at  Royal GM (home of white  glove service). 922-4111. 680  Marine Drive at Taylor Way,  West Vancouver. D.L. 5534.  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES   Travel. That's an exciting  word... certainly more exciting than pizza or muffler,  right? Right, so why not  build a career for yourself in  the World's number one  growth industry and enjoy  worldwide travel benefits in  addition to developing equity in your own retail travel  agency. Uniglobe is the largest retail travel franchise  network in North America.  No previous travel experience necessary. Investment  required. Call Uniglobe Travel Canada collect 1-270-  2241.  BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES  FOR SALE MISC.  HELP WANTED  REAL ESTATE  Travel. That's an exciting  word... certainly more exciting than pizza or muffler,  right? Right, so why not  build a career for yourself in  the World's number one  growth industry and enjoy  worldwide travel benefits in  addition to developing equity in your own retail travel  agency. Uniglobe is the largest retail travel franchise  ^network in North America.  No previous travel experience necessary. Investment  required. Call Uniglobe Travel Canada collect 1-270-  2241.  EDUCATIONAL  Auction School - 14th year,  ��)si200 graduates. Courses,  ,^:!Aprrt; August and Decerns  -,,ber. .Write Western  School  of Auctioneering,  Box 687,  Lacombe,   Alta.   TOC   1S0.  Phone (403)782-6215.  Free Career Guide describes 200 learn-at-home correspondence Diploma Courses: Accounting, Art, Bookkeeping, Business Management, Clerk Typist, Secretary, Journalism, Television  Servicing, Travel. Granton  (1A), 1055 West Georgia,  #2002, Vancouver. (604)685-  8923. ������  EQUIPMENT &  MACHINERY   1974 Timberjack 404 Line  Skidder. Very good condition. First $13,000. takes.  Phone 397-2470, 100 Mile  House.   FOR SALE MISC.   Adventures 86. 384 coupons  with over $4,000 in savings.  Skiing, dining, entertainment, recreation, hotels &  motels, in your area &  throughout B.C. Free Expo  Pass draws. Send $35. for  book. Adventures, 837 Hamilton Street, Vancouver, B.C.  V6B 2R6. 681-6652.   BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES   Fragrance Consultants  Wanted. Market Seasons' 30  exclusive Replica Perfumes  & Colognes. World's finest  Fragrances! Earn Hundreds  saving others Thousands.  Special. $300 Retail Kit $99.  1-800-387-7875.   EDUCATIONAL   Free Career Guide describes 200.learn-at-home correspondence Diploma Courses: Accounting, Art, Bookkeeping, Business Management, Clerk Typist, Secretary, Journalism, Television  Servicing, Travel. Granton  (1A), 1055 West Georgia,  #2002, Vancouver. (604)685-  8923.  Penticton School of Hair-  dressing taking applications.  Classes Beginning Jan. 6th.  Spaces limited, filling fast.  For more information 493-  2747. 207 Main St.,  Pentic-  ton, B.C. V2A 5B1.   FOR SALE MISC.   Lighting Fixtures. Westerr  Canada's largest display.  Wholesale and retail. Free  Catalogues available. Nor-  burn Lighting Centre Inc.,  4600 East Hastings Street,'  Burnaby, B.C. V5C 2K5.  Phone 1-299-0666.  Montreal Military Surplus:  workshirts $2.75, workpants  $3.50, workboots $15. Handcuffs, bags, knives, parkas,  combat pants, etc. $2. for  catalogue (reimbursement  on first order). Military Surplus, Box 243, Saint Timo-  thee, Quebec. JOS 1X0.  Adventures 86. 384 coupons  with over $4,000 in savings.  Skiing, dining, entertainment, recreation, hotels &  motels, in your area &  throughout B.C. Free Expo  Pass draws. Adventures, 837  Hamilton Street, Vancouver,  B.C. V6B 2R6. 681-6652.  Home Movies transferred to  video tape. Five cents per  foot. Send for order details:  Memory Lane Video, 40  .Richmond St. Chatham, Ontario. N7M 1N6.  Business Cards: 2"x31/2"  $47100. Address labels  Vfc"x1V6" gummed &. self  sticking. For free samples  write: Cards & Labels, Box  1249 Station. 'A', Surrey,  B.C. V3S 4Y5.   Sale of Assets. Williams  Lake, B.C. Small engine  sales & service equipment &.  stock. Written offers to Receiver Manager by January  10th, 1986. For further information contact: Ms. V.  Jeves 392-3626. Receiver  Manager, 2nd floor 366 Yor-  ston St. Williams Lake, B.C.  V2G 4J5.   Lighting Fixtures. Western  Canada's largest display.  Wholesale and retail. Free  Catalogues available. Nor- i  burn Lighting Centre Inc.,  4600 East Hastings Street,  Burnaby, B.C. V5C 2K5.  Phone'1-299-0666.  GARDENING   Curved glass patio extensions starting at $970. Hobby greenhouses starting at  $549. Full line of greenhouse  accessories. Call B.C.  Greenhouse Builders toll-  free 1-800-242-0673 or write  7425 Hedley Avenue, Bur-  naby, B.C. V5E2R1.  HELP WANTED   Require one full time CSLT  Registered Lab Technologist  (Grade One Position). Submit resume to Marcel Georges, Acting Administrator,  Ashcroft & District General  Hospital, Box 488, Ashcroft,  B.C. VOK 1A0.   General News and Feature  Reporter/Photographer with  one-two years experience required for community newspaper. Send resume to Elsie  Neufeld, Editor, Grande  Prairie This Week, 10518 -  100 Avenue, Grande Prairie,  Alta. T8V 0V9. Phone (403)  532-0606.   FOR SALE MISC.  Official Licensed Products  with your favorite sport team  logo. Football, CFL, NFL,  Hockey, NHL, Baseball National and American. Jersey  golf shirts, jackets, pennants, hats and much more.  Write for complete price list.  276-0330. Pro Sports Den,  125-4940 No.3 Road, Rich-  mond, B.C. V6X 3A5.  Computer Users! Using a  friction feed printer? Avoid  wasting expensive paper!  Cheaply quickly, effectively.  Send $5 for details: Box  58467, Station L, Vancouver,  B.C. V6P 6K2.   Rural Delivery Magazine reminds people of one old  Family Herald. Write for  free introductory copy. Rural  Delivery, a country journal,  Box 1509, Liverpool, Nova  Scotia, BOT 1K0.   Trapline for Sale. 75 miles  north of Fort Nelson on  Alaska Highway. For information: Cliff Andrews, c/o  mile 392, Alaska Highway,  B.C. V1G 4J8. Mobile  YJ25805 Summit Lake Chan-  nel through Fort Nelson.  For Sale: Planer, Resaw,  Diesel Motor & Trailer.  Phone 569-2537 or 569-2717.  Evenings.   Satellite T.V. Complete packages from $595. Four foot  $595, Eight foot $895, 10  foot $1,395, 12 foot $1,695.  Satellite World, 5320 Imperial St., Burnaby, B.C.  V5J 1E6 (604) 430-4040.  GARDENING   Free metal halide 1000W  grow light with every 21st  Century Garden. Limited  time special. Call or write  for details. Western Water  Farms, 1244 Seymour  Street. Vancouver B.C. V6B  3N9. (604)682-6636.   HEALTH & BEAUTY  Diminish lines, wrinkles ���&  tighten pores. Exciting new  "once" cleanses, tones,  moisturizes, exfoliates naturally. Distributor opportunity.  8511 Fairhurst Rd, Richmond, B.C. V7C 1Y7. (604)  277-3931. (Independent Dis-  tributor).   Manager/Cook - Operate  kitchen, manage kitchen,  bar, clubhouse, staff, Golf  Country Club. Commencing  March 1st to October 31st,  1986. Forward resume by  February 15, 1986. To President, Summerland Golf &  Country Club, Box 348,  Summerland, B.C. VOH 1Z0.  Realtyworld North Country  requires ambitious, innovative and self-starting real  estate salesperson for small  office in Houston, B.C. Contact Jim McNeal for details.  847-3217 Smithers, B.C.  PERSONALS   Dates Galore. For all ages  and unattached. Thousands  of members anxious to meet  you. Prestige Acquaintances. Call Toll Free 1-800-  263-6673. Hours: 9 a.m. - 7  p.m.   Singles Directory: Meet others through our unique Singles Club. A publication of  unattached adults throughout B.C. Close Encounters  ... 837 Hamilton Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6B 2R7. 876-  4270. ���  Christmas Special! St. Ives  Shuswap Lake, view. Three  bdrm., 1700 sq. ft. 6" construction, electric plus wood  heat, stream, Vs acre. Block  to beach. $49,000. Owner  898-4149.  SERVICES  Suffering a personal injury  insurance claim? W. Carey  Linde, BA LLB, Lawyer in  practice since 1972. 1650  Duranleau, Vancouver, B.C.  V6K 3S4. Phone Collect  Anytime 0-684-7798 for Free  "How to" Information:  Claims and Awards.  TRAVEL  Bellingham, Washington  Motels. Coachman Inn &  (new) Park Motel. Modern  units. Canadian moneys/at  par. Special reduced rates' -  two people for $42.00 plus  tax. (206)671-9000 or Van.,  B.C. (604)224-6226.   Australia/New Zealand  travel plans? Now you can call!  free to ANZA Travel - the I  Down Under experts. Lowest i  fares,   best   planned   trip.  Toll-free in B.C.  1-800-972-  6928.  blanket  Miir^i  one call  25 words $119.  Call the COAST NEWS  at 885-3930,  HELP WANTED  David Jason Hosiery. Direct  sales people required for  B.C. territories. Full & part-  time. Earning potential  $500/week. Quality brand  name hosiery, perfume and  mens socks. 1-689-1420.  Realtyworld North Country  requires ambitious, innovative and self-starting real  estate salesperson for small  office in Houston, B.C. Contact Jim McNeal for details.  847-3217 Smithers, B.C.  Newspaper Production Director. An award winning  advertising newspaper in  Cranbrook B.C. has a staff  opening for a production  manager who will play a key  role in the growth of our  paper. We require a creative  individual with organizational abilities. If living in beautiful East Kootenay appeals  to you, send resume &  salary requirements to: The  Kootenay Advertiser, Box  369, Cranbrook, B.C. V1C  3H9.   Restaurant Manager opportunity in Fraser Canyon.  Exciting challenge to individual who is willing to relocate. Resume: Ken Capos-  tick, Box 129, Hope, B.C.  VOX 1L0. Call 867-9277 for  interview.   PERSONALS  Oriental Ladies seek to contact Canadian men for  friendships, marriage. For  complete information and  photos, send $2: Equator,  Box 14443-G, Toledo, Ohio.  U.S.A. 43614.   Help Keegstra in defence of  freedom. Donations will be  accepted by the Christian  Defence League of Canada,  Box 272, Bentley, Alta. TOC  0J0.   Singles Directory: Meet others through our unique Singles Club. A publication of  unattached adults throughout B.C. Close Encounters  ... 837 Hamilton Street, Vancouver. B.C. V6B 2R7. 876-  4270.  PERSONALS  Dates Galore. For all ages  and unattached. Thousands  of members anxious to meet  you. Prestige Acquaintances. Call ToH Free 1-800-  263-6673. Hours: 9 a.m. - 7  p.m.      "���    .   SERVICES  Suffering a personal injury  insurance claim? W. Carey  Linde, BA LLB, Lawyer in  practice since 1972. 1650  Duranleau, Vancouver, B.C.  V6K 3S4. Phone Collect  Anytime 0-684-7798 for Free  "How to" Information:  Claims and Awards.  TRAVEL  Vancouver's Pacific Palisades Hotel. Special winter  rates until Jan. 31, 1986.  "Suite Deals" - $69. Studio  Suite, $79. One Bedroom  Suite. Robson at Jervis. 1-  800-663-1815.   Bellingham, Washington  Motels. Coachman Inn &  (new) Park Motel. Modern  units. Canadian money at  par. Special reduced rates -  two people for $42.00 plus  tax.   (206)671-9000 or Van.,  B.C. (604)224-6226.   Australia/New Zealand travel plans? Now you can call  free to ANZA Travel - the  Down Under experts. Lowest  fares, best planned trip.  Toll-free in B.C. 1-800-972-  6928.         Skiers: Lake Louise, Canada's favorite ski area, has  ski weeks from $119. ski  train packages (Vancouver-  Lake Louise) from $203.  three day packages from  $69. Information/ Reserva-  tion: 1-800-661-1158.   WANTED   One set Welco grapple forks  for JD644A or B. Phone  (604)425-7767.   blanket  c  tA��  cms call does it all 16.  Coast News, December 30,1985  .���$������ ���  W\  C  gpffrwwrfffiTTti^ii^tS  Guess  The usual prize of $5 will be awarded the first entry drawn which  correctly locates the above. Send your entries to reach the Coast  News, Box 460, Gibsons, this week. Last week's winner was Ernie  Burnett, Roberts Creek, who correctly located the seagulls on the  corner of Lower Road and Cheryl Anne Park Road in Roberts  Creek.  SCRD opposes  booming  ground  Sunfor Logging Company's  application to establish a booming ground on Sechelt Inlet near  Tuwanek came to the regional  board for referral in December.  The decision will be made by  the Lands Ministry but the  board's recommendation is to  deny Sunfor the booming  ground.  Directors gave two reasons.  First, they are not convinced  that the booming ground is  necessary to get Sunfor's logs to  market.  Second, they see the shoreline  there as a recreational area.  So in addition the board will  request a foreshore recreational  lease for the area from  Tuwanek Point south to the  southern end of a park reserve.  The board accepted Area A  Director Gordon Wilson's am-  mendment that it meet early in  the new year with the Ministry  of Forests, which holds title to  the area upland of the  foreshore, to establish a use of  the upland as well, perhaps  designating the entire area in  question recreational.  Bus service safety  to be studied  "We owe it to our parents to  conduct this study," said trustee  Janice Edmonds at the December 17 school board meeting  where she brought to the attention of the board the safety of  school children on school buses.  It was decided by the board  to have a committee investigate  the latest findings on the ef-  fientcy of seatbelts and padding  on school buses.  The secretary-treasurer, Roy  Mills, said that children do not  stand on the buses, and that to  his knowledge it has been  discovered that increasing the  padding on school buses gives  much more protection than do  seat belts.  While school buses do not  provide door to door service  they do pick up as close to the  children's homes as is possible,  Mills said.' If there is only one  child down a side road however  the bus will not make a special  trip. It is possible for parents to  apply for a transportation  assistance allowance to cover  the cost of taking the child to  the closest bus stop, he added.  "It would be hard to provide  a better service," Mills said.  The research committee will  report to the board in the new  year.  Pub hearing again  The Casa Martinez owners'  request for a neighbourhood  pub beneath their restaurant in  Davis Bay will go to public  hearing early next year.  The request has been turned  WANTED  Used Furniture  and What Have You  fife w   1MP13W��  FUMIITURE  We buy Beer Bottles  886-2812  down in past years due to heavy  popular opposition but the  Martinezes are hoping that a  survey taken in the fall, which  indicates that 70 per cent of the  people in the area are in favour  of the pub, will be borne out at  the public hearing.  Area C Director Jack  Marsden said at a December  regional district planning committee meeting that the survey  indicated "a strong feeling for.  or against the Martinezes, not a  pub.  "Based on past stands, I say  turn it down," he said..  But the board chose instead  to let the rezoning application  go to public hearing  B.C. Ferry Corporation  (BCFQ is giving the Sunshine  Coast a new schedule for the  months of Expo 86 but some  people in local government say  the coast ferries will in effect  have less capacity than during  last summer.  "We are basing a lot on increased traffic flow during Expo," says Gibsons Alderman  Norm Peterson. "But we're  gonna get it in the ear. They're  cutting back service."  According to the new  schedule the shoulder months of  May and June, and then  September through the middle  of October, will see the addition  of a daily late morning sailing  and a late night sailing for  weekends and holiday Mondays.  The disputed change concerns the peak months of July  and August when the 360 car  Queen of Coquitlam will be  replaced by two 180 car stretch  ferries, one leaving each side  about every hour, making 16  trips a day.  Peterson told Gibsons Council in December that while the  new schedule might look like it  will provide increased service, it  will in fact give the coast less  than it had last summer.  "People are talking about  building campgrounds, they're  investing money, but if we can't  get more tourists over to them  then we had last summer, 1  can't see it," he said.  Mayor Diane Strom, who  had attended a meeting with  representatives of the ferry corporation, said people came out  of the meeting feeling that they  could live with the new  schedule.  She recalled figures provided  by BCFC indicating a passenger  increase over 1985 capacity.  But Aldermen Peterson and  Bob Maxwell decried the word  of BCFC officials, Maxwell alluding to "some very inexperienced reports" they had provided to council.  Planner Rob Buchan said if  Peterson's claims were correct,  a serious planning problem had  occurred.  "Land is being purchased,"  he said, "plans are being made  for a considerable influx of Expo traffic. The ferry schedule  was barely adequate to handle  last year's bumper season. If the  new schedule is not going to  support additional traffic  generated by Expo, the public  should be made aware."  But Strom reiterated the ferry  service would be gaining capacity.  "I've got my information,"  said Peterson, "straight from  ferry employees. I would like to  see the actual figures but the  corporation hasn't shown us  these."  "We were assured by the  ferry commission," said Strom.  "But if the assurances aren't a  fact, I guess we should be worried."  Peterson took his complaint  to the regional board, where he  is the Gibsons director, later in  the week.  Chairman Jim Gurney, having met with BCFC, said he  considered the schedule "acceptable."  But Peterson made his argument} concluding, "I know it's  probably cast in stone, but I'd  like to see us fight to keep the  Coquitlam, with maybe one of  the smaller boats for four runs a  day."  Area F Director John Shaske  agreed about diminished service: "Even by last year's  figures, the line ups will be  worse. We can expect three-  hour instead of two-hour line  ups."  Gurney said that in cases of  increased demand BCFC would  run the stretch ferries with the  flaps down, increasing capacity,  or even "throw on an extra  ferry."  He added that BCFC had little choice, given their resources  and the expected traffic flow for  Vancouver Island, and the  board did not follow up Peterson's urge to protest the new  schedule.  Vic Walker, chairman of the  ExpOasis committee, said in a  conversation that he felt BCFC  had done the best it could in the  circumstances.  "We can speculate all we like  but nobody knows what next  year's volume will be," he said.  "Who needs the really big  numbers, anyway? We need  some solid holiday-makers who  will come here and spend a few  days and then hopefully come  back. Not a million people just  skipping through." y  Walker said his committee :|s  trying to make the coast as attractive and pleasant a place lo  visit as possible: >  "If half the people who dp  the criticizing would step in to  help us," he added, "it would  make the situation a lot better:"  * 30% ��%  Sty  e*te  /���$  ..*ti  Ml  l^pieJ^S^fteil  885-5858  "mm*  Total French  . ,- ' .  ���"       it*   i."        ���       ���  courses sought  A local chapter of the Canadian Parents for French have  offered to help school board  trustees and administration of  school district 46 to gather information about the community's interest in French immersion.  A letter from Allison Payne  and Christopher Akehurst was  received by the board and two  interested parents, Ardeth Kent  and Marilyn Berinstein were  present at the December 17  school board meeting to offer  their support for the program.  "We would like to offer our  services to help the superintendent of schools to plumb the interests of the community," Ms  Kent said, adding that the group  would be hopeful of having  preliminary work completed in  time for the program to begin in  September of 1986.  "With our energy and input  it could happen that soon," she  continued, "We have the time  to put into it."  A survey was conducted by  the school district six or seven  years ago,, although results of  that survey were not available at  the meeting.  Ms Berinstein said that her  group had done preliminary  research and had had very good  response from those parents  and interested people to whom  they had spoken.  Mary Belle Bulmer was enthusiastic about the interest of  parents in a French immersion  program and expressed the  board's appreciation.  A report is to be prepared  outlining results of previous official surveys and giving current  information and will be presented to the board by trustee  Doris Fuller at the January 28  business meeting of the board.  Semi-Annual  Dec. 30 - Jan. 4  20% off  EVERYTHING IN STORE  including 1986 calendars  30% to 70% off  Selected Books  CHRISTMAS BOOKS . Vi PRICE  THE  BOOKSTORE    Cowrie St..Secheit 885-2527  . -.��M��I��i��I^ * ��,  HOLIDAY HOURS:  jlllllllllllllli^pBH  ason's Greetings  from staff, management and directors  of the Sunshine Coast Credit Union  HEAD OFFICE: Teredo Square, Sechelt 885-3255  GIBSONS OFFICE: Cedar Plaza, Gibsons        886-8121  unshine Coast  Credit Union  0  0  0  o  0  o  a  o  9  Q  Q  Q  Q  Q  0  Fantastic Savings on  In-Store Home Furnishin  and Appliances  gs  vtySw  COME IN TODAY!  HOME  FURfllSHIHGS  Seaview Place; Gilisans      886-8886  Tuos.     Thurs.  Fri/��f Sot,  Sun. & Mom.  9:30    5:30.  9.3.0     9:00-  Closod  IN STORE FINANCING  AVAILABLE Q A O  'b^QttOOQpQQQOCOO'OCfiQOQP'Oft 16  Coast News, December 30,1985  The usual prize of $5 will be awarded the first entry drawn which  correctly locates the above. Send your entries to reach the Coast  News, Box 460, Gibsons, this week. Last week's winner was Ernie  Burnett, Roberts Creek, who correctly located the seagulls on the  corner of Lower Road and Cheryl Anne Park Road in Roberts  Creek.  SCRD opposes  booming  ground  Sunfor Logging Company's  application to establish a booming ground on Sechelt Inlet near  Tuwanek came to the regional  board for referral in December.  The decision will be made by  the Lands Ministry but the  board's recommendation is to  deny Sunfor the booming  ground.  Directors gave two reasons.  First, they are not convinced  that the booming ground is  necessary to get Sunfor's logs to  market.  Second, they see the shoreline  there as a recreational area.  So in addition the board will  request a foreshore recreational  lease for the area from  Tuwanek Point south to the  southern end of a park reserve.  The board accepted Area A  Director Gordon Wilson's am-  mendment that it meet early in  the new year with the Ministry  of Forests, which holds title to  the area upland of the  foreshore, to establish a use of  the upland as well, perhaps  designating the entire area in  question recreational.  Bus service safety  to be studied  "We owe it to our parents to  conduct this study," said trustee  Janice Edmonds at the December 17 school board meeting  where she brought to the attention of the board the safety of  school children on school buses.  It was decided by the board  to have a committee investigate  the latest findings on the ef-  fientcy of seatbelts and padding  on school buses.  The secretary-treasurer, Roy  Mills, said that children do not  stand on the buses, and that to  his knowledge it has been  discovered that increasing the  padding on school buses gives  much more protection than do  seat belts.  While school buses do not  provide door to door service  they do pick up as close to the  children's homes as is possible,  Mills said.' If there is only one  child down a side road however  the bus will not make a special  trip. It is possible for parents to  apply for a transportation  assistance allowance to cover  the cost of taking the child to  the closest bus stop, he added.  "It would be hard to provide  a better service," Mills said.  The research committee will  report to the board in the new  year.  Pub hearing again  The Casa Martinez owners'  request for a neighbourhood  pub beneath their restaurant in  Davis Bay will go to public  hearing early next year.  The request has been turned  WANTED  Used Furniture  and What Have You  fife ���   IMPfeplf  FUMIITURE  We buy Beer Bottles  886-2812  down in past years due to heavy  popular opposition but the  Martinezes are hoping that a  survey taken in the fall, which  indicates that 70 per cent of the  people in the area are in favour  of the pub, will be borne out at  the public hearing.  Area C Director Jack  Marsden said at a December  regional district planning committee meeting that the survey  indicated "a strong feeling for.  or against the Martinezes, not a  pub.  "Based on past stands, I say  turn it down," he said..  But the board chose instead  to let the rezoning application  go to public hearing  B.C. Ferry Corporation  (BCFC) is giving the Sunshine  Coast a new schedule for the  months of Expo 86 but some  people in local government say  the coast ferries will in effect  have less capacity than during  last summer.  "We are basing a lot on increased traffic flow during Expo," says Gibsons Alderman  Norm Peterson. "But we're  gonna get it in the ear. They're  cutting back service."  According to the new  schedule the shoulder months of  May and June, and then  September through the middle  of October, will see the addition  of a daily late morning sailing  and a late night sailing for  weekends and holiday Mondays.  The disputed change concerns the peak months of July  and August when the 360 car  Queen of Coquitlam will be  replaced by two 180 car stretch  ferries, one leaving each side  about every hour, making 16  trips a day.  Peterson told Gibsons Council in December that while the  new schedule might look like it  will provide increased service, it  will in fact give the coast less  than it had last summer.  "People are talking about  building campgrounds, they're  investing money, but if we can't  get more tourists over to them  then we had last summer, I  can't see it," he said.  Mayor Diane Strom, who  had attended a meeting with  representatives of the ferry corporation, said people came out  of the meeting feeling that they  could live with the new  schedule.  She recalled figures provided  by BCFC indicating a passenger  increase over 1985 capacity.  But Aldermen Peterson and  Bob Maxwell decried the word  of BCFC officials, Maxwell alluding to "some very inexperienced reports" they had provided to council.  Planner Rob Buchan said if  Peterson's claims were correct,  a serious planning problem had  occurred.  "Land is being purchased,"  he said, "plans are being made  for a considerable influx of Expo traffic. The ferry schedule  was barely adequate to handle  last year's bumper season. If the  new schedule is not going to  support additional traffic  generated by Expo, the public  should be made aware."  But Strom reiterated the ferry  service would be gaining capacity.  "I've got my information,"  said Peterson, "straight from  ferry employees. I would like to  see the actual figures but the  corporation hasn't shown us  these."  "We were assured by the  ferry commission," said Strom.  "But if the assurances aren't a  fact, I guess we should be worried."  Peterson took his complaint  to the regional board, where he  is the Gibsons director, later in  the week.  Chairman Jim Gurney, having met with BCFC, said he  considered the schedule "acceptable."  But Peterson made his argument^ concluding, "I know it's  probably cast in stone, but I'd  like to see us fight to keep the  Coquitlam, with maybe one of  the smaller boats for four runs a  day."  Area F Director John Shaske  agreed about diminished service: "Even by last year's  figures, the line ups will be  worse. We can expect three-  hour instead of two-hour line  ups."  Gurney said that in cases of  increased demand BCFC would  run the stretch ferries with the  flaps down, increasing capacity,  or even "throw on an extra  ferry."  He added that BCFC had little choice, given their resources  and the expected traffic flow for  Vancouver Island, and the  board did not follow up Peterson's urge to protest the new  schedule.  Vic Walker, chairman of the  ExpOasis committee, said in a  conversation that he felt BCFC  had done the best it could in the  circumstances.  "We can speculate all we like  but nobody knows what next  year's volume will be," he said.  "Who needs the really big  numbers, anyway? We need  some solid holiday-makers who  will come here and spend a few  days and then hopefully come  back. Not a million people jugt  skipping through." y  Walker said his committee^  trying to make the coast as attractive and pleasant a place lo  visit as possible: >  "If half the people who dp  the criticizing would step in to  help us," he added, "it would  make the situation a lot better:"  *0o/o  -*ms,'%ket��  e*fe  /���$  ..*ti  Ml  Mm  !^i^$S^H��I  885-5858  SSIi  Total French  courses sought  A local chapter of the Canadian Parents for French have  offered to help school board  trustees and administration of  school district 46 to gather information about the community's interest in French immersion.  A letter from Allison Payne  and Christopher Akehurst was  received by the board and two  interested parents, Ardeth Kent  and Marilyn Berinstein were  present at the December 17  school board meeting to offer  their support for the program.  "We would like to offer our  services to help the superintendent of schools to plumb the interests of the community," Ms  Kent said, adding that the group  would be hopeful of having  preliminary work completed in  time for the program to begin in  September of 1986.  "With our energy and input  it could happen that soon," she  continued, "We have the time  to put into it."  A survey was conducted by  the school district six or seven  years ago,, although results of  that survey were not available at  the meeting.  Ms Berinstein said that her  group had done preliminary  research and had had very good  response from those parents  and interested people to whom  they had spoken.  Mary Belle Bulmer was enthusiastic about the interest of  parents in a French immersion  program and expressed the  board's appreciation.  A report is to be prepared  outlining results of previous official surveys and giving current  information and will be presented to the board by trustee  Doris Fuller at the January 28  business meeting of the board.  Semi-Annual  Dec. 30 - Jan. 4  20% off  EVERYTHING IN STORE  including 1986 calendars  30% to 70% off  Selected Books  CHRISTMAS BOOKS . V* PRICE  THE   BOOKSTORE     CowrieSt..Sechelt 885-2527  '��M��I��i��I��^^ ��> ��.  HOLIDAY HOURS:  *mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm9Wm!mmmmmMm!0&!&!!M  iiilllllllllllli^pBH  m9W9*9im99999m9��mm  Season's Greetings  from staff, management and directors  of the Sunshine Coast Credit Union  HEAD OFFICE: Teredo Square, Sechelt 885-3255  GIBSONS OFFICE: Cedar Plaza, Gibsons        886-8121  unshine Coast  Credit Union  o  0  0  o  0  o  a  o  9  Q  Q  Q  Q  Q  0  Fantastic Savings on  In-Store Home Furnishin  and Appliances  gs  vtySw  COME IN TODAY!  HOWIE  FURHISHIHGS  Seaview Place; Gilisans      886-8886  Tuos.     Thurs.  Fri/��f Sot,  Sun. & Mom.  9:30     5:30r  9.3.0     9:00-  Closod  IN STORE FINANCING  AVAILABLE Q A C  Q&QQQQQ��QQQQQ9Q~��Q��QQQQQQ

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