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Sunshine Coast News May 6, 1985

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 ! ;  Largest timbered building in Vancouver  Construction of the Native Education Centre long house is using fir timbers from the Sunshine Coast, logged in Porpoise Bay for Gibsons Building Supplies and Earl Carter. -Brian riimanphdib  The Native Education Centre's: (NEC) new $1.5 million  building located on East 5th and  Scotia in Vancouver, will be the  biggest timbered building in  Vancouver, and the Sunshine  Coast has been a part of the  construction.  The whole building, which  will cover 11,000 square feet, is  a joint project between Gibsons  Building Supplies and Earl  Carter. General contractor  Michael Knight, of Turnbull  and Gale, hired Carter to do the  pre-fabrication of the building;  all the fir was supplied by GBS  and Carter.  :The fir logs, some of which  were 44 inches at the top, were  logged by Ray Stockwell at his  claim in Porpoise Bay. From  there they were taken to the  L&K booming ground, bundled  and towed by John Smith to  Squamish. All the rafters were  milled by a six foot Alaskan  chainsaw mill by contractors  Kevin Hellenius and Michael  Vaughan; all the big timbers  measure 32 by 10 inches by 40  or 44 feet.  Superintendent Jack Crellin  masterminded the working  drawings taken from the architectural-drawings; according  to Carter, Creilin is the one who  'makes everything happen',  translating the design, created  by Larry McFarland, into practical diagrams for the workmen.  All the cedar for the building  came from Gambier Island; up  to two to three million feet of  timber was supplied by Western  Forest Products, including the  log for the totem pole.-  The building will house seven  classrooms, a library, office and  administration areas, a cultural  wing and a student lounge.  Howard Green, administrator  of the NEC for the past four  years, in a conversation with the  Coast News, described the  lounge as the most spectacular  part of the building, with its  sunken fire-pit and entrance  way through a ceremonial door  in the totem pole. Such a door  was the traditional method of  entry in the old days when long  houses were customarily in use.  The   NEC   offers   a   total  course of study in up-grading;  nine cultural courses, including  classes in drum making', silk  screening*and silver smithing,  combine with eight life skills  programs as well as academic  courses to give Native adults a  comprehensive grade. 12 education.;  The new Centre will enable  the programs to expand to include a course in Native public  administration and pre-  autdmated and automated office training programs.  There is considerable excitement about the new Centre.  Green explained; "People seem  to find it (the building, which is  along the lines of a North West  long house) a way of identifying  with the Centre and with their  personal identity as an Indian."  Green went on to say that  although most of the building  has been paid for there is a  shortfall of about $80,000.  ."We Have several grant applications in and we're hoping  they'll be lucrative," he said.  "We are a federal charity, so if  Please turn to page 21  ������-{J    I  tl  i!  9  vercrafi acquisition explored, but. . .  is short  Elphinstone students delighted audiences last week with a spirited and touching performance of "You're a  good man, Charlie Brown". Review on page 12. _j���h��� m,���.!*Pi.m��,  Heads Granville Island board  jri The concept of a group of  |$unshine Coast investors ban-  ;r:'jding together to purchase two  -���hovercraft   from   the   now  bankrupt Seaspeed may still be  alive,   according   to   Russell  Crum, who has been working  on a committee in an effort to  salvage the; vessels as a fast  marine transport system for the  Sunshine Coast..  In   an   interview   with   the  , O^^jpii^t^^m.jSaid,'' "VV*e.:,-;:  are st^^nyes^tiig^r^yi^iiliStt^^^^:  but you must remember, we are  trying to purchase two million:  dollars' worth of hardware and  weAonly have two to four weeks  left\o doit in."  The time constraint stems  from the fact that Expo 86 Corporation expects to have its  marine transportation contracts  signed soon. It is through such a  contract that a part of the cost  of the vessels is expected to be  returned and tourism on the  Sunshine Coast can receive an  extra boost from the large  crowds Expo 86 is expected to  draw.  Oddvin Vedo, EDC Commissioner has been negotiating with  the Expo 86 Corporation, and  according to Crum a workable  contract appears possible now  ^minimum booking for the service. This is an important, factor  in obtaining financing for the  project.  Routes discussed so far include the use of two vessels to  service the Expo site in False  Creek and Canada Place near  the SeaBus terminal. A third  vessel will be used to connect  the Sunshine Coast and other  areas, such as Richmond, with  the Expo site.  Commissioner Vedo has now  been asked to search out funding and/or guarantees to help  raise the $250-$500,000  necessary to take over the  vessels.  The Expo contract negotiations, fund raising efforts,  analysis of projected costs and  expenses, and financing  negotiations are, only ..the. first  .o.sfage of;xhevws|Ci.pf acqdtrtrtgv,  the vessels;^accordingtoi Crum.  ;;:Th'e\.V--secon^;^;t:siJ^e-r;-:inyoiyes/:..  ' creating the legal body which  will own and operate the  vessels. He sees it as a society,  broadly based within the community which has the ability to  generate investment by way of  private subscriptions.  "If we had a year, we'd have  a much better chance," said  Crum.       A  ���tt  Local man gets city post  by Dianne Evans  Maurice Egan, a local Sechelt  area resident, has been appointed chairman of the board  of trustees of Granville Island  by federal ministers Pat Carney  and Bill McKnight.  Egan is well known in B.C.  and Canada for initiating the  development of the Social Planning Department in the city of  Vancouver and for his work  with community groups and  social concerns.  At the local level, Egan has  been active as project advisor  for the Economic/Employment  Strategy Committee of the Sunshine Coast Employment  Development Society (SCEDS).  In a conversation with the  Coast News, Mr. Egan talked  about the development of social  planning as a viable concept.,  and the road that has led him to  his newest appointment.  Social planning, he explained, started in Vancouver in  1968; prior to that the term was  not used. Social welfare planning was more of a volunteer activity, often connected with the  United Way and with a certain  amount of government funding.  Vancouver was the firsf city  to undertake social planning on  a local government basis, doing  so at a time when the changes of  the sixties forced a rethinking of  environmental planning.  Trained as a social worker,  Mr. Egan entered local politics  as an alderman in Ottawa, in  order to have some influence on  local planning.  "I saw planning going on,  devoid of the consideration of  what it meant to people and  neighbourhoods," he explained. Offered the opportunity of  developing a department of  social planning and community  development in Vancouver he  became instrumental in plann  ing social services in the city.  As chairman of the planning  MAURICE EGAN  committee he established the  rehabilitation committee for the  residential section of Strathcona  (adjacent to commercial  Chinatown) and redeveloped  the area rather than seeing most  of it demolished.  "I suppose you could say we  killed urban renewal," Egan  said, "rehabilitation became the  goal. We were active in the  cultural field too. We were  responsible for funding arts  facilities, and recommending  grants for projects such as the  International Children's  Theatre Festival."  The development of the Permit Board, an approving committee for all development,  enabled the social planning  department t"o integrate  development.  "We ensured that things like  bicycle racks, day care, lunch  rooms, that sort of thing, were  available," he explained, "all  the things that make life a bit  more bearable.  "The term 'social' scares people a bit, because it has strong  political overtones, but it was  finally accepted in Vancouver,  and the name caught on," he  continued. Social planning is  now an accepted part of planning development.  There has been a big change  in planning in recent years, according to Egan. It was a field  primarily dominated by architects, but now involves,  among others, psychologists  and sociologists illustrating the  cross-discipline aspect of the  field.  "Planning is for people,"  said Egan, "whether it's  building one-way roads,  building houses, schools,  whatever. It's all for people.  "Commercial development is  also concerned with places  where people go. Planning has  tended to look at building so  many square feet for so many  dollars, the financial and structural aspects, but you have to  look at who is in the building,  what the building has to do,  how the people are going to be  affected by it."  Egan expressed his surprise at  being appointed to the Granville Island job, but pleased  nonetheless. He believes he  received the position because of  the work he has done since leaving Vancouver.  He has worked in Central  and South America as an advisor on municipal projects, and  spent a year as general manager  for a commercial fishing company set up by three northern  Indian tribes, the Nishka, North  Coast and Gitksan Carriar.  They bought the B.C. Packer  fleet of 250 gill net fish boats,  and Egan set up the company  and got it operating.  "The Sunshine Coast is one  of the most beautiful pieces of  real estate in the world," said  Egan, bringing the discussion  closer to home. "We should  have the best brains and  Please turn to page 14  Sechelt Food Bank is  homeless once again  "This is very short notice,"  said Maria Lwowski, Sechelt  Food Bank co-ordinator, in a  conversation with the Coast  News. On May 2, the Food  Bank was asked to vacate its  premises, opposite the Legion in  Sechelt, by May 15; the building  has now been rented out.  "There is now no place to  store and keep our equipment,"  continued Lwowski. "We've  had so much support since we  moved into our new building.  But now we have to find a place  to put our tables and chairs, two  deep freezers, shelving and  other food stuffs."  "I don't know what I'll do,"  she said. "I have a Food Bank  Day next Wednesday, and  Mother's Day after that. We are  in a position to pay our utilities  on any space that we can get,  but there's no way we can pay  rent."  The Sechelt Food Bank fed  203 people in the month of  April alone, according to  Lwowski, who has been instrumental in keeping the facility operating.  "We have to ha,^ pace to  store our things and from where  we can distribi our food  bags," Lwowski said. "Without a space the Food Bank will  close down."  Anyone who has a space  suitable for the Food Bank's use  or who wishes to donate time,  energy, money or food, please  call Maria Lwowski at  885-5532.  J\gimj[daiY  \ aimivcnctfto  Ken Malcolm and Laurie Hafrher of Calgary chose the Sunshine  Coasi to launch their marriage last Saturday. Skippering the "Rouie  Adire" was Rocky Cross, who is shown leaving Gibsons Harbour  with the wedding party on their way <o Gambier Island where the  ceremony, performed by Dawn Devlin took place. The couple will  honeymoon on the boat in Jorvis Inlet. Kruii iimmhi i.ihh<.  Locals finish       N  All three local residents who participated in the 1985 Vancouver Marathon completed the 26 mile 385 yard run successfully.  Irene Lugsdin finished in a time of three hours 57 minutes;  Sheilagh Germyn came in at three hours 40 minutes; and  Cam McKenzie finished in three hours 27 minutes.  **a Coast News, May 6,1985  Occasionally a letter comes across the desk which makes  a good point but is unfortunately not suitable for publication because it remains unsigned. We instituted the policy  of not publishing unsigned letters to prevent the proliferation of anonymous abuse; we feel that if you have a  criticism to make then you should be prepared to stand  behind it, at least to the extent of putting your name to it.  One such letter came to our attention this past week. In  it the writer raised issue with the recent decision by Gibsons council to award the clerk-treasurer a hefty salary increase, despite the pressures of restraint in the province  and the municipality.  The writer pointed out that below the council chambers  lies the Unemployment Action Centre where men and  women rummage for clothing and household goods and  the poor and unemployed go for help and advice. The inequities struck the writer and it is a valid point to make.  A 10 per cent pay increase is much more than should be  expected for any public official, especially one whose  duties include scrutiny of the budget and the accounting of  the financial state of affairs of the town of Gibsons, which  surely must show areas of far greater need.  This is not to say that the clerk-treasurer does not do a  good job, but it does say that some of the citizens of the  town are asking why such an increase should be  countenanced in the face of the obvious belt-tightening to  which we have all been subjected and which is still a sad  reality.  The matter deserves a second look.  Dianne Evans  On the chin  Two widely differing contestants took it on the chin in  the recent Ontario election.  One was right-wing whiz kid Patrick Kinsella. Kinsella  did in Ontario what worked in the election campaigns of  Bill Bennett and Brian Mulroney; he hid the leading candidate for the province's highest office from the electorate.  This time it didn't work. Perhaps the politics of images is  not the last word after all.  The other was NDP leader Bob Rae. Yet again we were  treated to the spectacle of an NDP leader pretending that  marking time was electoral progress. The soul-searching  within the NDP now should be as least as intense as that  taking place within the Conservative party.  ...from th�� filet of the COAST NEWS  5 YEARS AGO  Leslie Brown won his seat on Sechelt council with a  landslide victory in the aldermanic by-election on Saturday May 3.  Madeira Park residents will be paying 50% higher  land charges for their water, it was learned at the annual general meeting of the South Pender ^Harbour  WaterDistric4-df*Sunday. ~  Sechelt elementary youngsters are part of the team  who will be out on the streets in Sechelt cleaning up  this week as part of Anti-Litter Week.  10 YEARS AGO  Gibsons council announced Tuesday night six lots  along Prowse Road have been purchased by the village  for the purpose of park and marina development.  A committee in Sechelt has indicated four preferred  sites for the new secondary school out of 10 considered.  George Giannakos opens his new Omega Restaurant  on Gower Point Road in Gibsons.  CBC films a documentary film featuring the poetry of  Gibsons poet Peter Trower.  15 YEARS AGO  Record patient loads at St. Mary's Hospital lead the  expansion committee to start action for increased accommodation.  NDP opposition leader advises Sechelt Indians to  seek a meeting with Socred member Isabel Dawson.  20 YEARS AGO  Elphinstone Pioneer Museum Society is seeking to  compose a constitution for the society.  Local organizations decide to help the Sunshine  Coast Fall Fair to put on its fair in August.  25 YEARS AGO  A building permit for $15,000 is issued for the Glad  Tidings Tabernacle on Gower Point Road.  For the fourth successive year the Sechelt council  sets the tax rate at 10 mills.  Last year's school tax rate was 17.53 mills. This  year's is set for 17.52 mills.  30 YEARS AGO  Four new homes valued at $3,000 each will be built in  Gibsons this year.  Parker's Hardware and Clayton's Grocery in Sechelt  are increasing the space in their premises.  35 YEARS AGO  Francis Drage of Gambier Island announces that  despite his campaign against School expansion he has  changed his mind and urges the public to vote for the  by-law.  The Sunshine  ^v  CO-PUBLISHERS  John Burnside M.M. Vaughan  EDITORIAL  Brad Benson Dianne Evans  PRODUCTION  Fran Burnside  ADVERTISING  J. Fred Duncan      Pat Johnson      Pat Tripp  TYPESETTING  Zandra Jackson Anne Thomsen  DISTRIBUTION  Steve Carroll  The Sunshine Coast News is a co-operative locally owned newspaper,  published on the Sunshine Coast, B.C. every Monday by Glassford  Press Ltd., Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0. Gibsons Tel. 886-2622  or 886-7817; Sechelt Tel. 885-3930. Second'Class Mail Registration  No. 4702.  The Sunshine Coast News is protected by copyright and reproduction  of any part if it by any means is prohibited unless permission in  writing is first secured from Glassford Press Ltd., holders of the  copyright.  Subscription Rates:  Canada: 1 year $30; 6 months $18; Foreign: 1 year $35  This H. McCall photo shows the mouth of Roberts Creek at some  time during the early 1930's. The slipway was put in for the local  loggers. On the right is the "Creek Cottage", originally built by  Harry Roberts as a summer cottage. On the left, with the white columns is the "White House", built by Dr. White. It was unfor  tunately burned to the ground. The two houses, also on the White  property, shown in the centre part of the photograph, still stand today.  Photo courtesy of Mr. & Mrs. Charles Merrick  Musings  John Burnside  "What in the name of common sense is going on in this  province in education?" said  Jake.  We were sitting side by side  on a log on the beach. It was:a  May evening of incomparable  splendour. From the cove where  we were sitting the only other  creatures which appeared to be  enjoying it with us were a little  congregation of feeding ducks  bobbing together about 20 feet  off shore. There must have been  about 50 of them and just ais  Jake spoke they all went under  water as though at a prearranged signal.  "The last time I wrote  anything about the education  system, Jake, I found fault with  the government, the school  board and the teachers.' A  friend of mine in the profession  publicly called me a jerk and,  pending the apology, we?  haven't spoken since. Are you-  anxious to get me into more hot  water!"  "Hot water comes with the  territory you have chosen to  cover. What are you, a man or a  mouse?"  "Sometimes I wish I were a  duck," I said, watching as the  ducks re-appeared from the  feeding depths within seconds  of each other and bobbed  placidly in the sunset.  "They have their problems,  top," snorted Jake. "Come  now, enough of this cowardice.  Your views, please."  "They haven't changed,  Jake. Let's start with the  government. They've been flailing away at the education  system ever since Bill Vander  Zalrh was education minister.  There seems little doubt that the  changes they are instituting are  being improvised without  forethought, without planning,  and above all without consultation.  "People, generally, are acutely uncomfortable with change.  If you are going to change  things you have to know why  you are doing it, anticipate the  ramifications, and as much as  possible make sure that those  affected by the changes know  the reasons for and the extent of  the changes proposed. The  Social Credit government has  Loons and ducks  failed   on   all   of  the   above  counts."  "That's the easy part," said  Jake. "Government bashing  won't get you into hot water. I  don't think anyone in the province is entirely happy with the  way the Socreds have gone  about their business. Let's hear  you on the school trustees, for  instance. You imply criticism  there, too."  "Imply criticism? There are  those, Jake, who would not  hesitate to tell you that in my  stint of service at the Coast  News my criticism has been implicit and excessive where the  functioning of the school board  is concerned.  "In any case, it seems to me  that the government is just  about to make a lot of political  points by seizing on the Achilles  Heel of the school system, and  God knows I have fulminated  about it before this. They are  going to take dead aim at the  administration of the school  system. They are going to tell us  that there are too many administrators and they are making too much money. Quite  simply, I believe that they are  right and a lot of other people  will too when the figures are  made public."  "I believe I recall you  boasting you could do the job  of superintendent of schools  and run the newspaper and do  both from the Bahamas," said  Jake.  "I said I could if someone  would give me $150,000 of  public money every year to help  me do it. At the time, we had, in  addition to the superintendent, I  think three underlings making  50 or 60 thousand a year helping  him to do his job. His job is to  supervise the smallest school  district in the province, to  supervise people who are trained professionals in the first  place."  "So what are you saying?"  "I'm saying that successive  school boards have failed in the  elected official's first duty  which is to control the cost of  the bureaucracy which serves  them.  "I know why it happens. The  school trustee, perhaps more  than other elected officials even,  wants the best possible service  for the young of the community. It is an onerous responsibility. It makes them susceptible to  the arguments of administrators  who always think they could use  more help to deal with the  tedious details. If you don't  have to worry about a cash flow  to meet the payroll the temptation is great to hire more high-  priced help.  "Everyone wants their school  district to be among the best in  the province. Now we have a  situation where minor provincial administrators in education  are drawing salaries tens of  thousands of dollars more than  other public servants in the  same area charged with equal  responsibilities; drawing salaries  which are on a par with those  charged with the responsibility  of running the whole system.  "And it's not just the top  brass. Principals of relatively  small schools are paid more  than highly placed administrators in Victoria. The  gap between what administrators are paid and  teachers is much too great and is  increasing. Of course, there will  be silent howls of rage from  those involved. No one ever  thinks they are being paid too  much, but from the perspective  of the rest of the population,  the taxpayers, the view is different and the Socreds are going  to make political hay out of  this."  We watched a loon swim  busily between ourselves and  the diving ducks. He seemed as  pleased with his solitude as they  did with their social group.  "What about teachers?" said  Jake.  "I don't like criticising  teachers. It's a damn hard job  and they seem to get it in the  neck from everyone."  "Are you a duck or a loon?"  demanded Jake.  "A loon, I guess, but I used  to be a duck and old loyalties  die hard.  "I remember in 1969, when I  first taught here, Harry Turner  was coming back to teaching  from a period in the business  world. Harry kept trying to tell  us how good we had it but we  wouldn't listen. Didn't we have  the thousand and one aggravations associated with teaching,  not least of which was the top  heavy administration hired, it  often seemed, with little to do  except to make life difficult for  the poor sod actually doing the  educating?  "Harry was right then and  nothing has changed. There is  room for improvement in the  way teachers are regarded and  treated but compared with the  rest of the working world  they're living pretty high off the  hog and they quite honestly  don't know that.  "Again it should be the  school trustee who brings the  broader community perspective  to the employees but here there  has ' been a sad failure. I  remember the recession was  already underway when the  teachers who had negotiated in  the fall of 1981 were gloating  about the 18 per cent increase  they had won from the school  board. 1 told them that such an  increase at such a time, when  others were already losing their  jobs, was virtually obscene and  had, for my pains, my physical  safety threatened by one large  negotiator. That huge increase,  at the onset of a major recession  is catching up with them now."  "Well I suppose you have antagonized just about everyone  involved," said Jake.  The sun was setting and we  prepared to leave the beach.  The ducks were still bobbing  and diving in unison but the  loon had gone further up the  coast. I felt like joining him.  (Vlaryanne's    viewpoint  Epitaph on an Army  of Mercenaries  These, in the day when heaven was falling,  The hour when earths foundations fled.  Followed their mercenary calling  And took their wages and are dead.  Their shoulders held the sky suspended;  They stood, and earths foundations stay;  What God abandoned, these defended  And saved the sum of things for pay.   \E. Housman  Vignettes from the Peace Walk  by Maryanne West  A couple of vignettes from  the Peace March which gave me  food for thought.  We were waiting for the bus  at Georgia and Granville when a  lady asked if we knew when  there would be a Davie bus. Not  knowing how often they ran���I  told her one had just gone,  presuming that as a city person  she would know how long she  had to wait for the next one.  This proved to be the last straw:  for the lady who began to wail  loudly, convinced that the  whole world was conspiring  against her.  Everyone at the bus stop, and  there were at least a dozen people of all ages, looked acutely  embarrassed, pretending either  that they were invisible or stone  deaf. I was kicking myself  because I could so easily have  said, "there should be one coming in a few minutes" if I had  thought fast enough, instead of  telling her she'd just missed the  bus.  Everyone, that is, except the  lady with the seeing eye dog,  who put her arm around the  shoulder of the distraught person, spoke reassuringly to her  and in a short time everything  was under control again.  The march itself was as we  have come to expect it, a cross  section of the community, and  it is always interesting to see the  creative and imaginative ways in  which individuals and groups  put their message across. Banners and signs ranged from  humourous to wry to  thoughtprovoking.  We were standing on Cornwall Street watching the parade  and waiting to join the Sunshine  Coast group when it came  along, and a little old lady passed right in front of us.  She was small, dressed in a  brown coat and wearing running shoes, one of which was not  fastened because her foot and  ankle were badly swollen and  obviously painful.  With the aid of a walking  stick she was just able to put her  good foot a short way ahead  and bring the other up to it. Her  progress was painfully slow, but-  ooviously it was important to  her that she should walk as far  as she could, even if it was only  one block before she accepted  the comfort of the wheelchair  and the help of a friend to finish  the distance.  She was, I'd say, in her seventies and she had every reason to  stay home, so she must have  cared a lot about the world and  the rest of us to make such a  supreme effort to do her bit and  make the symbolic gesture of  walking for life, however difficult and painful it was for her.  I'll never know her name, but  I'll not forget her, her courage  and her devotion to humanity  and our hope for the survival of  this planet. Coast News, Ma  Editor's Note: The following is  in response to Jane McOuat's  moving article on Tiffy Reid's  untimely death, which appeared  in last week's issue.  Editor:  When I read the recent article  in this paper about Tiffy's death  I cried. What a waste���to die at  17 due to alcohol abuse. He  probably didn't even realize the  consequences. Do any of our  drinking teenagers?  As a recovering alcoholic,  myself I am aware of many of  the problems of alcohol abuse. I  have felt a burden for these  teenagers and have talked to  many of them in their  classrooms in all three high  schools on the Sunshine Coast.  Questionnaires that they have  answered for me anonymously  reveal a high percentage of  some involvement with alcohol.  About 40 per cent seem to be  developing many of the habits  of problem drinkers. (This coincides with U.S. figures.)  Many of our kids claim that  their parents don't even know  that they drink. These kids  aren't all drinking just for a  social lark. Some indicate they  are lonely; many drink to avoid  personal or family problems;  others drink to gain self-  confidence.  Can they go against the tide  of their parents, other adults,  their peers, without some help?  Is it reasonable to expect this?  There is something very  wrong somewhere. Do you  parents really care? Chatelech  and Pender Harbour secondary  schools had meetings in  December dealing with Alcohol  Awareness for the parents.  This was to coincide with student programs on Drinking-  Driving. There were even  special speakers brought in  from Vancouver. Both meetings  were abysmally attended.  Sechelts honour Simon Baker  Editor's Note: This letter was  received for publication.  Chief of the Sechelt Band,  Counsellors and members  of the Sechelt Band.  We would like to thank you  for the honour you have  bestowed on our father, Chief  Simon Baker. We as a family  are proud of his work and  achievements in his lifetime. It  gave us a great feeling of joy to  hear you had made him an  honourary Chief of the Sechelt  Band. He had devoted his life to  the goodness of the native people. The recognition you have  given him means a great deal to  him and us as a family. The  warmth and love you have  shown him over the years is felt  by all of us.  Over the years, with opposition and  problems,  it  would  muffins  have been easy for him to turn  his head and walk away. But,  not our father, he always  thought of the needs of his  native people and fought for  what he believed in. It's  recognition like you have given  him that makes his efforts worthwhile. To be honoured by  your own people is the greatest  honour of all.  "When things get tough and  you want to stop/Think of your  people and try for the top/Like  the eagles that soar so free/The  rewards are sometimes hard to  see.  "But love and respect are like  a seed/They grow and bloom as  time proceeds/We as natives  have to learn to share/To show  each other how much we care.  "Years of work and devotion will  be repaid/By knowing the foundation has been laidAts the love  of our people that leads us  on/With hopes it will pass onto  our sons."  On behalf of my mother, all  the children and grandchildren  of the Baker family, thank you  for making our father that  much prouder of his lifetime  work.  Baker Family  We hold the key  JVOIV OPEN!  Offering fresh muffins,  do-nuts, ice cream,  coffee, tea, cold drinks,  "croissandwiches", picnic  & box lunches to go.  For your delight homemade cabbage rolls,  perogies and chicken  wings.  Enjoy here at. our  outdoor tables, or take  home.  Open from 8 a.m. -  11 p.m. so drop in after  theatre or a stroll along  the seawalk.  See you soon at the  open window over  Gramma's Pub -across  from Molly's Reach!  Joannie Thompson  886-8229  Editor:  I went on the Peace Walk for  the first time this^year. It is a  stirring experience and one 1  found particularly encouraging.  To be part of such a diverse  group of people, all of whom  have come together because  they desire the one objective, is  a deeply significant experience.  Peace Walks and demonstrations have long been  misunderstood. Those who  have never participated can  have no concept of the amount  of positive energy and hope  engendered by those of like  goals coming together. Indeed,  many of the participants are  unaware of the significance of  their contribution to world  peace simply by being there.  I always maintained that each  of us has a way of declaring  ourselves lor world peace, that  not all of us need to walk or  demonstrate, that all our individual contributions are important. I still agree with that,  but I must add that I believe  that such a great coming-  together of people with many  different opinions and ideas on  how peace might be achieved,  but still with the common goal  ELPHINSTONE ELECTORS'  ASSOCIATION MEETING  Wednesday, May 8, 1985  Cedar Grove School, 7:30 pm  8:00 pm What To Do Until The  Ambulance Arrives  GUEST SPEAKER: Mike Saunders, E.H.S.  9:30 p.m.    Report by Jim Gurney  LUCKY DRAW: ASSORTED GOODIES  iC'  Lte��f^  8&.-<K  I THE WORLDS  I FUNNIEST 8c  wmA       MOST  | AMAZING  I       STAGE SKOWi  Saturday, May 1  LIMITED TICKETS  Bus service from Pender Harbour: *3.S0 return.  8 pm SECHELT ARENA  TICKETS: Fritz Restaurant, Earl's Cove; Hayestack, Madeira  Park; Macleods & Big Mac's, Sechelt; Sunshine Groceries &  Kenmac Auto Parts, Gibsons.  Due to limited parking at the arena, SHUTTLEBUS SERVIVE  will be available from Trail Bay Centre $1.00 return.  Info: 883-9165  SPONSORED BY: PENDER HARBOUR LIONS & LIONESS CLUBS  of peace, is a great power for  good in our world.  I believe that the energy produced by such a group makes a  difference in the world���not  just as an example of how many  thousands are willing to walk or  march for peace���but as a  tangible force field that disrupts  all the negatives and wars that  have their seeds in man's mind.  Peace Walks cross all the barriers man erects to keep himself  separate from man: colour,  race, creed, philosophy.  For those few brief hours, the  world was indeed at peace for  man is at peace with himself and  his fellow travellers. Peace is a  gift each one of us can give  from a heart filled with unconditional love and acceptance of  others.  Thanks to all those who  walked, sang and talked and to  those who arranged it.  Something was definitely accomplished if we can remember  that day with joy and carry that  peace into our daily relationships. We have the key to peace  in this world���it is ourselves.  Valerie Jenkins  Garden Bay  NDP calls  meeting  Editor:  There is a new and dynamic  change occuring within the  NDP on the Sunshine Coast.  The Gibsons and Sechelt clubs  have joined together as one club  in an attempt to streamline the  organization as well as bring important educational opportunities to the whole Sunshine  Coast.  There will be a meeting May  8 at Chatelech (7:30 p.m.). The  purpose of the meeting will be  to create a new executive structure. The annual general  meeting, where nominations  will take place will be June 12,  7:30 p.m. at the Roberts Creek  Joint Use Facility.  This is an invitation for all  members to come out, and all  supporters to come and join.  Brett McGillivray  Gibsons NDP Club  More  letters on  page 18  Computer magazines,  books, accessories  and supplies.  ^_9^ \..    I -~" ���III! .   _   -*��� ^  DOWNTOWN SECHELT  886-2000  Does anyone really care  about this overwhelming social  problem that is affecting our  teenagers? Do you want to deal  with the problems or push them  further into the closet? The easy  response is to do nothing.  Jane McOuat asked how we  could let the kids know we  deeply love and cherish them?  Do we love and cherish them? If  so are we prepared to show  them we care by doing  something constructive about  this problem?  Kids believe it is their right to  drink. However for some of  them once they start, it is very  ' difficult to stop. Therefore they  need help. Would any concerned parents be interested in getting together with me to discuss  this issue further? If so please  call 886-3958.  Jan Mennie  I  I  i  I  I  I  Kraft  Miracle Whip  SALAD DRESSING 1 l  Use this coupon and  SAVE $1.00 OFF  the regular price of $3.49  Limit one coupon per jar.  Offer expires Saturday, May 11  Shop+Easy  La���..  ^���aa HB wmm Hal I  Trail Bay Centre   ������  SECHELT    I  GOAST NEWS Photo   Reprints  Any published photo or your  choice from the contact sheets  3x 4-3- 5  5x 7-5" *  ��x 10-8" I:  Words Don't Describe  the 1985  MERKUR  XR4TI  Test Drive This Unbelievable Car Today At  132& Wharf Rd.,  885-3281  MDL5936  Sechelt. B.C.  DO MOST ANYTHING YOU PLEASE  The Skoda GLS 5-speed s5898*     trades welcome  SUPER SKOOKUM MAY SALE  1979 Ford Pinto Station Wagon  Economy V6 with automatic transmission,  power steering, power brakes, chrome roof  racks.  $2950  SUPER SKOOKUM MAY SALE  Magnificient Mercedes 250S  Beautiful inside and out, automatic  transmission, power steering, power  brakes, electric sunroof, AM/FM & more.  Was $7800   ARE YOU AWAKE!   $61 50  Was $3495 NOW  MANY MORE UNITS TO CHOOSE FROM $650 and up  More coast people are switching daily  to SKOOKUM SERVICE . .  in fact we're  moving our service facility to even larger premises.  885-7512  Rate $30/hr. INCLUDES Valet Service & Courtesy Wash  IMPORTS OUR SPECIALTY - DOMESTICS NO PROBLEM  SKOOKUM AUTO  .. .the fast growing little dealer!  * Plus Freight & PDI Dealer 7381  siipo* Coast News, May 6,1985  Gmwnmtmn  Gibsons' new Open Market was favoured with good weather last Saturday for the first day of their summer  season. To be held every Saturday in lower Gibsons, weather permitting, this new event features food, crafts  and exotic whatevers for Gibsons Harbour sightseers. Vendors wishing to participate should contact  organizer Jacqueline Brown at 886-8881. -Brad Benson photo  Carnation Week in Gib-  sons/Sechelt/Pender Harbour  will be May 6 to 12, says John  Peat of Mitten Realty, urging  all residents to support the  Multiple Sclerosis Society's  1985 carnation campaign.  Symptoms of MS vary widely  from person to person. It is a  potentially crippling disease of  the central nervous system,  which can affect balance, sensation, energy level and the ability  to walk and see. Canadians are  at very high risk for MS, since it  tends to attack persons of northern European descent and is  more prevalent in areas further  from the equator.  "Usually MS is diagnosed  between ages 20 and 40," says  Peat. "It's really hard for people to get it at that age, when  they have young families and  are just building careers."  For information, and to  volunteer, call 885-3295.  DELIVERY  Vi PRICE to Sechelt  & Gibsons on $20.00 order.  May 10 & 11th  only.  PLEASE ORDER EARLY  886-3371  CfttfN SCENE  Flowers & Plants  Sunnycrest Mall  George    in    Gibsons  Veteran determined to aid salmon  iiiiiuiiiiUanwugiiHuiniinmnBPjannnnnw"  &p#\  Fred Holland maintains his  determined participation in the  salmon enhancement program,  "Because," he says,  "I can  remember when all creeks down  this end of the peninsula were  chock full of salmon at run  times. That was in the 20's and  Diabetes symposium  There will be a symposium on May 11, from 10:45 a.m. to  5:15 p.m. at the Baptist Church, Trail and Mermaid Streets,  Sechelt. The symposium will deal with diabetes, and the  public is welcome to attend. Pre-registration is preferred. Call  886-9193 for further information.  Is your car begging  for a second chance?  Fully equipped  for all body and  paint repairs  Brian's Auto Body  & Painting Ltd.    Secheh  Beautiful bodies are our business     885-9844  Box 605,  30's. But after the clear cutting  of timber on Elphinstone," he  went on, "in the 40's and 50's,  creeks like Chaster weren't the  same, and the salmon almost  disappeared."  Fred said the logging on  Elphinstone will likely start  again in the 1990's and the community must ensure the creeks  are not damaged.  "Salmon eggs deposited by  the hen fish are always in  danger of being washed away in  a freshet, or of being stranded  when a creek course suddenly  changes," Fred says, "and our  enhancement projects on the  Coast are designed to give a  place for eggs to hatch safe  from wash-out and debris and  supplied with running water at  the right temperature."  "Our project on Wilson  Creek," says Gibsons Wildlife  Club's president, George Ruggles, "is only one of several  along our Coast. There's Bill  Chinnick's at Granthams, and  another at the L & K on Twin  Creeks. iWe'rA^-y c ^ on  ting one on Chaster '-rec*  ?,*$  PENINSULA  HYDROPONICS  & GREENHOUSE  systems  hwy 101, sechelt  885-3538  Drop in and see our  Showroom at  Peninsula Glass  Fred Holland's place. Then the  public can come and see what  the project is all about, and the  kids can learn why there are  salmon in the creeks at certain  times. That way we can get  them involved in conservation,  and cure some of them of looking at spawning salmon as  targets for rock throwing."  "We'll keep at it until the  creeks, or some of them, have  those runs again. Who knows,"  says Fred, "I may even see a run  of pinks again on Corkum's  Creek on Keats."  ELPHIE GRADS  Joanne Williams, winner of  the Inglis Memorial Bursary at  last year's Elphinstone graduation, has just completed her first  year in arts and science at U.  Vic. She plans to return to Ur  Vic next college year.  "I intend to transfer to UBC  after that," says Joanne. "My  goal is to be a lawyer, a corporate lawyer, and I will take a  commerce degree in corporate  Jaw. first."  Right now Joanne is looking  for summer employment.  Another Elphie grad of 84,  Gail Stewart married Kevin  Johnston last July 14. Kevin  launched out last year as an independent trucker and both he  and Gail have travelled the west  coast since. Now Gail will not  be travelling for a while as she  takes care of daughter, Sarafa,  who was born May 1.  The Kiwanis Bursary for a.  student in vocational training  was put to immediate use by last  year's winner, Cheri Adams.  Cheri completed the year's  course of training for medical  office assistant at the Pacific  Vocational Institute and is at  present employed part-time in  Grace Hospital in Vancouver.  Cheri held the Grad of the Year  plaque this last year, a trophy  awarded bv student vote.  20  %  OFF  Handbags  by Brixton, Elegance,  Panache & Artel.  Choose her favourite from an  attractive assortment of both  casual and dressy bags in  leather, farbic alone or  leather/fabric.  DonTs Shoes  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons  886-2624  You'll Love,9.  ��� Chocolate coated strawberries (hand dipped)  ��� Chocolate coated bananas (with nuts)  MOfTIS - We make up goodie bags for  parties. Get your helium balloons here!  Sunnycrest Mall 886-2925  WO&ft  CHECKLIST FOR  SPRING  GARDENING  NOW IS THE TIME  TO START  SEED3D    v  SOIL HEATING CABLES   D  GERMINATION TRAYS     ���  NUTRIENTS  (PLANT FOOD)  POTTING MEDIUM  SOLAR OPENERS  LIGHTING  GREENHOUSE  BOOKS  THERMOMETERS  FREE ADVICE  GERMINATION KITS  BALCONY PLANTERS  MAX.MIN.  THERMOMETERS  LIGHT MOISTURE &  pH METER  GREENHOUSE  COVERINGS  TIMERS  u  **  ���  V*  ���  S  ���  V  ���  S  ���  lS  ���  ft  ���  tS  ���  tS  D  lS  ��� ���  ��� *  10'X 10'GREENHOUSE  KIT INCLUDES  3 YEAR GUARANTEE  ONLy$14900  SOLAR  VENT OPENERS  $4995  HALIDE &  HPS LIGHTS  AT VANCOUVER  PRICES!  SPRING GARDENING  SPECIALS  Everything for  the indoor &  outdoor  Grower!  iWonderBra  MAIL IN REFUND OFFER  Buyl  SAVE $400 Coast News, May 6,1985  Dudley Gerow showed up early last Thursday to help Vera of the  Come Home Cafe celebrate her fifth anniversary in business and her  birthday on the same day. He was among many well wishers.  ���Fran Burnside photo  Roberts    Creek  Parents to meet  by Jeanie Parker, 886-3973  This Wednesday's Parents  Auxiliary's meeting will serve a  double purpose: to educate  parents about a program to  head off the incidence of child  abuse and to plan the Fun Faire.  It may sound like an incongruous combination of  topics but both are important.  Meetings to disseminate information on things like child  abuse are generally not well-  attended. People seem to need a  crisis to get concerned. But  despite budgetary cutbacks,  Ministry of Human Resources is  trying to develop ways of  teaching kids to, look after  themselves. Aren't you, as  parents, interested in how they  plan to go about it?  The Fun Faire is important,  especially with cutbacks in the  school budgets. The Parents  Auxiliary provides some of the  "extras" which are now turning  into necessities and the Fun  Faire is the main means of raising funds for that purpose.  Your help is vital. Meeting  starts at 7 p.m. at the school this  Wednesday, May 8.  DAZE PLANS  There was lots of enthusiasm  but not many people at last  week's meeting to organize  Roberts Creek Daze. Hopefully  more people will get involved.  It's a good year to do  something: with money tight  you can either think of  something that's cheap and fun  to do or set up a food or craft  booth to bring in a little extra  cash.  The basic format for the  Daze will be the same as usual.  The ladies' softball team has  thrown down the gauntlet to the  firemen for a game on the Friday night (that's July 19). The  parade will be the next morning  and somebody is needed to line  up the entrants.  Saturday afternoon will be  centred at the mouth of the  Creek with food booths, games,  crafts, and music. Coordinators for the kids' games  and crafts are still required.  Saturday night climaxes with  the Mr. Roberts Creek contest  and dance. All you guys out  there start working on your beer  bellies and tapdancing. Word is,  the Legion has a surprise con-  ' testant lined up already!  The next Daze meeting is  Wednesday, May 22. Put on  your thinking caps and decide  how you want to get involved.  It's more fun!  MEETING CALL  Voting members are reminded of the general meeting of the  Roberts Creek Legion this  Wednesday at 8 p.m. There are  some important matters of  business, including the election  of a new vice-president.  Incidentally, if you haven't  paid your dues you're no longer  a member in good standing.  You can pay at the bar or by  mail but do so soon!  LIBRARY REPORT  During April the Roberts  Creek Community Library was  open and staffed for 24 hours  (six hours per week). The  volunteers put in the same  number of hours on  preparatory work: ordering,  tracking overdue books, record  keeping, and general  housekeeping. Currently the  small building stocks about  2700 adult books and over 800  childrens' books.  0 BCFGRRIGS  VICTORIA DAY 1985  Holiday  Sailings  Effective Friday, May 17, Saturday,  May 18, and Monday, May 20,1985 only:  In addition to the regular sailings on  these routes, the following extra sailings  will be in effect:  VANCOUVER-SECHELT PENINSULA  HORSESHOE BAY-LANGDALE  Lv. Langdale  10:30 am  Lv. Horseshoe Bay  11:30 am  JERVIS INLET  EARLS COVE-SALTERY BAY  Lv. Saltery Bay  1:30 pm  Lv. Earls Cove  2:30 pm  GIFT CERTIFICATES  $25 travel certificates are sold at major  BC Ferries outlets for travel on any  BC Ferries route. An ideal gift.  4576  A  Canada Grade *���   Beef - Boneless ������     ffe gm  top sirloin steak limit-*....*, O.So ,*  Ready To Serve - Partly Skinned ��� Shank Portion -       gm      gm  f*  113111 Bone In   kg mm m   I O  Quarter - Cut Into Chops 0*     g�� ���������  pork loin ,0.93 m.  Fresh - Halves 4*     g�� ffc  frying chicken *9O.Ub lb.  Wiltshire  pork sausage 5oogmPI<g.  PRODUCE  Central America m g%  bananas kg ��� fo    3-/**  Libby's - Drink Mix gn  banana frost      segmPkg.Ea. i89  Flowering Plants tor Mother's Day  4RQ      8" Reiger's Hanging fl    flfi  m%M*M      Begonia Basket Ea. UiUU  5" Potted Mums  Ea.  m^kWmm**mm^piE> V ^r%# Jl ���    I I���?  UnwWBn I  ; w aJUfckiUESi  Minute Maid  orange  juice  .355 ml  1.59  Kraft  Miracle  Whip  1 litre  2.89  Capri  bathroom no  tissue 4 ron.Bo  LIMIT 3 WITH $25.00 ORDER  Heinz  tomato 0 on  ketchup       .//.re ��.9*1  Unico ��� Choice  tomatoes     ?96mi  Foremost - Pure  apple  jUiCe 1 litre ���  LIMIT 2 WITH $25.00 ORDER  1.09  Miss Mew  cat  food  170 gm  3/. 79  LIMIT 12 TINS WITH $25 ORDER  Unico  tomato -j/ HO  paste        isemiCi .09  Torino's ��� 5"  pizza  360 gm  2.98  3 Varieties  Kraft Parkay  margarine  2.79  7.36 kg  OVEN  Oven Fresh - 100%  BAKERY  Oven Fresh  honey whole      .. no  wheat breads am 1.09  Mother's Day  C3K6S   r��  4.99  White or Chocolate  Weston's ��� Homestyle  white  bread  Oven Fresh  flour  .570 gm  12's   ��� C 6.  Coast News, May 6,1985  t:  r  i:  W^^S^^^^^^^^^^^  by Joan Wilson, 883-9606  This is the decade of the computer. My first introduction to  computers years ago was a  room full of complicated electronic hardware and thousands  of cards with funny holes in  them. At that point, I decided  that computers were not for me.  ��� However, life today is filled  with computers, in ever-  decreasing sizes and ever-  increasing capacity. My life is  made much easier by the tasks  that computer can do: multi-  branch banking, airline reservations, supermarket checkouts  with PUC scanners. Unfortunately, my knowledge and  understanding of computers is  still pretty sketchy.  If you too are a "computer illiterate", join me at Madeira  Park elementary on Tuesday,  May 14 at 7:30 for an evening  of hands-on computer experience. Although the teachers  A New Name  A New Look  Just in time for  A New Season!  MARINAS INC.  GARDEN BAY, B.C.  (Formerly Taylor's Garden Bay Store)  > /  MOTHERS LW  mfjd  HANGING BASKETS - Mixed or Fuchsia  $1295&*1595  Rhododendrons  Fruit Trees  Strawberries  Raspberries  all 20% OFF  Fuchsias  20 Varieties  2Va" pots 35* each  ���ill   ����������� ^r   /O   V^u ���  alb.        ' ^"w   ^V. *  .  Fawn Rd. 885-2760  Open 7 Days A Week  9 am - 6:30 pm  PUBLIC  NOTICE  Proposed Extension of Boundaries  Town of Gibsons  Take Notice that under section 22 of the Municipal Act  the Council of the Town of Gibsons intends to request  the Minister of Municipal Affairs for an extension of the  area of the municipality to include the following described lands:  Block 6, D.L. 842, Plan 6755, and  Lots A, B and C, Block 3, D.L. 683, Plan 17550  And Further Take Notice That if a request of at least one-  tenth in number of the electors of the municipality is  received by the undersigned within 30 days of the last  publication of this notice in a newspaper, the question of  the extension of the area of the municipality to include  the aforesaid lands will be submitted for the assent of  the electors.  And Further Take Notice That any resident within the  area herein described having objection to the proposed  extension of the boundaries of the municipality should  notify the Minister of Municipal Affairs, Parliament  Buildings, Victoria, B.C. V8V 1X4, of his objections within  30 days of the last publication of this notice in a  newspaper.  And That this is the first of two publications of this notice  in a newspaper.  Town of Gibsons  R. Lorraine Goddard  CLERK-TREASURER  i-r  Highway 101  ���a  (0  Gower,  Point  Road  /""v-  *\ Block 6, PI. 842, PI. 67551  r iiiiterate  involved will be there from both  the elementary and Pender Harbour secondary, it will be  STUDENTS who show us how  they are using and learning  about computers in their  schools. Everyone is welcome.  GOLF CLUB  The drafted constitution of  the Pender Harbour Golf Club  is at the Info Centre for the  perusal of members. Stay tuned  for exciting things in June.  SPRING REPORT  You will have received in  your mailbox recently the Spring '85 report from Comox-  Powell River MP Ray Skelly.  Take a look through it for some  valuable information on retirement and how to receive special  congratulations from your local  member of parliament or the  Queen herself. (You have to be  100 to rate a letter from Her  Majesty, but anyone 75 or older  may receive birthday greetings  from the prime minister.) From  one to three months notice is required, so plan ahead and surprise someone special with a  really memorable birthday or  anniversary message.  MOTHER'S DAY  If my mother lived in  Madeira Park, I'd treat her like  a queen by taking her to the tea  and fashion show put on by the  Pender Harbour branch of the  hospital auxiliary. This will take  place Saturday, May 11 at the  Community Hall, 2 p.m. For  only $2, we'd have a lovely  afternoon, and benefit the  hospital auxiliary, too. Then,  on Sunday, I'd treat her to a  delicious Pancake Breakfast at  Lions Hall, served up by the  Pender Harbour Lions Club, 8  to 11 a.m.  If you're looking for a gift  for Mum, try the Hayestack,  Centre Hardware or call  Pauline Babcock for a lovely  piece of ceramic ware. Pauline  has been in business in Pender  Harbour for many years now,  and creates some beautiful  items. She'll even replace  broken cannister lids!  REVEEN  The world famous hypnotist  Reveen has thrilled audiences  for many years, and May IT.is  your opportunity to enjoy nis  talents at the Sechelt arena, 8  p.m.  Our own Pender Harbour  Lions and Lionesses are sponsoring this show, and have arranged for bus transportation,  by our own Larry Curtiss, from  Madeha Park Shopping Centre  at 6:15. Cost is a very modest  $3.50 return. Please call Jack or  Marilyn at 883-9165 for reservations.  Parking at the arena may be a  problem, so park at the Sechelt  mall if you do drive, and take  the shuttle bus  for only $1 ���'  return.  Tickets for Reveen are.  available at the Hayestack for  $10. Wouldn't this be a super  Mother's Day treat for your  super mother? Seating is  limited, so get those tickets  now.  Lose weight  for life.  hat you learn about healthy,  natural weight control at the Diet  Center will stay with you the rest  of your life. No drugs, crash diets,  or special foods to buy. Lifetime  maintenance program.Your first  personal consultation is free.  Call today.  r   DIET   >  CENTER:  886-3438  Box 159, Farnham Rd., Gibsons  WELCOME  Three new families have  come to live in beautiful Pender  Harbour in the last few months.  Janet and Bud Laumaillet, with  sons Robert, Richard and  Daniel moved up from North  Vancouver to their summer  home on Malcolm Road.  Nearby is the Berehulke family, from Abbotsford: Brenda,  Glenn, daughters Janice and  Jessica and wee son Jade, who  is recovering from surgery at  Children's Hospital.  The Dodds family moved  from Langley: Darlene, Fred  and children Deanna and  Phillip. To all of you from all of  us: welcome to Pender Harbour!  CRUNCH!  Yes, I did have a little mishap  in my shiny new car, but no, I  wasn't hurt at all. Yes, I'm driving it again, but no, it's not  quite fixed yet. Thanks to all  who assisted me, particularly  Father John Paetkau, David  Giampa and Hartley Hughson.  OOPS!  A watchful reader reminded  me that thanks ought to have  gone out to those who supported the bake sale by the  Pender Harbour Branch of the  Hospital Auxiliary. The clinic  auxiliary does many good  things, but, unfortunately, not  this one. Sorry, ladies of the  hospital auxiliary.  ADAPTED AQUATICS  The staff at the Pender Harbour Aquatic Centre are very  pleased with their new adapted  aquatic sessions, made possible  until June by the Pender Harbour Lions.  Robi Peters reported that the  sessions, with a physiotherapist  and nurses in attendance, were  really enjoyed by residents of  Shorncliffe and members of the  Stroke Club.  CONGRATULATIONS  Congratulations to Robi and  all the members of the cast and  crew of Gordon Wilson's play  Blue Cheese and Jazz, performed at Presentation House in  North Vancouver. We hope to  have this new play here in  Pender, perhaps in the fall.  A BOOK is a  Mother's Day Gift  That lasts for years  The Bridge Across Forever by Richard Bach  Out On A Limb by Shirley MacLaine  Joanie Greggain's Total Shape-Up  Country Church Cooking  Pauline by Bettey Keller  The Enchantress by Han Suyin  The Twelfth Transforming by Pauline Cedge  B.C. Heritage Cookbook by Mary Evans Atkinson  COWRIE ST.  SECHELT  885-2527  A REAL;  Mother's Da^  SPECIAL!  ONE DAY ONLY  Saturday, May 11th  EVERYTHING in the store  1/2  PRICE  (Excepting Undergarments and Accessories)  WE ADD 5% TO VISA  AND MASTERCHARGE  COWRIE STREET, SECHELT  IMOKKaJT  PRE'INVENTORY  10% ��� 30% OFF  Prices In Effect  MAY 6 ��� 18th  EQUIPMENT  CALCULATORS  Sharp EL540  Pocket  Adler 12 P  Heavy Duty  Adler 1228 PD  Executive  Olivetti EC162PD  Olivetti 522PD  Sugg. Retail  ���29.95  189.95  319.95  169.96  219.95  TYPEWRITERS  Sugg. Retail  Sharp PA1000 ��399.oo  Portable Electronic  Olympia CER 12      349.95  Portable Electric  Olivetti Praxis 20     499.00  Olivetti Praxis 40     599.00  Olivetti ET225 2195.00  Memory Typewriter  Sale  s25.49  159.95  239.95  114.95  167.95  Sale  *359.00  314.95  399.00  509.00  1799.00  Savin 7010  Compact  Savin 5015  Dry 15 C.P.M.  Savin 5015RE  Reduce   Enlarge  PHOTO COPIERS  Sugg. Retail Sale  '1895. $1695  2995.  3995.  Olivetti ETV300  Word Processor  Olivetti M18D  128K Desktop  Olivetti M18P  256K Portable  COMPUTERS  Sugg. Retail  ���4895.  3895.  3995.  . .and many more specials  Assman MC4  Pocket Recorder  M105  Transcriber  M400  Transcriber  DICTATION  Sugg. Retail  ��279.  475.  735.  2595.  3495.  Sale  s4395  2999.  3079.  Sale  s195.  359.  588.  SCHOOL & OFFICE SUPPLIES  THE LARGEST SELECTION ON THE SUNSHINE COAST  Reg. Sale  Typing Paper 144 Sheets       *3.15 s2.45  Typing Paper 500 Sheets       6.95 5.99  Loose Leaf Filler 200 Sheets   3.90 2.89  Ball Point Pens                10/3.50 10/2.90  ^�� 50% OFF  SOME OFFICE SUPPLIES  Vinyl Binders 1"  Vinyl Binders vk"  Vinyl Binders 2"  Dixon Pencils  '3.50  5.05  6.40  10/3.50  Sale  s2.49  3.99  5.19  10/1.95  PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY  WHILE STOCKS LAST  CHECK OUR CLEARANCE BIN  Wharf Rd., Sechelt  885-3735 Coast News, May 6,1985  W^^?^!^^^^^i^^W&%  The view across the bay from Earl's Cove makes waiting for the ferry  a pleasant experience, especially with snow still on the mountains on a  sunny day in May. -��i��niwiwphot(>  Egmont     News  More daylight  by Ann Cook, 883-9167  WELCOME  Welcome, daylight saving  time, glad to have you back.  Just as soon as this winter  weather is over we will get out  and enjoy, whatever, land clearing, gardening. Some of us just  move rocks from one place to  another and call it gardening, or  just clean up the yard. Where  does all that junk come from?  Three broken TV antennas; half  a roll of wet insulation; a  broken oar; part of a car; a  plastic bucket, split down the  side: do I own all this? How can  I get rid of it all without it  costing me my week's "happy  money"?  ; Oh well, I have some extra  daylight hours to think about it.  NEW SPRING SHOWING  Come to the Thrift Store on  Wednesday for a first showing  of the Egmont T-shirts. There  are lots of different sizes and  colours to choose from. Some  of the T-shirts are used ones  from the Thrift Store. They  were sent to our local artists to  work on.  ;"* Do come and see the results.  :You may become the wearer of  a second time around tank top  'or T-shirt. Thank you Sue Tar-  noff, and Hydro Denny. Proceeds from these shirts also goes  to our Community Club.  SCHOOL NEWS  The school trip to Hornby  Island is shaping up. There are  one or two more bikes needed  and some better weather. All 10  students say a big thank you to  the Pender Harbour Lions Club  for their most generous donation, and to the kind people  <who are offering to loan their  bikes.  "A DILEMMA"  by Joni Nixon  'r, A young high school student  was given an important task to  do by her mom. Late Friday  afternoon, the papers which she  was to deliver were left behind  in her locker at school.  This girl was nervous and  scared and was now faced with  the problem of how to get the  papers. She phoned the school  and found a friend who retrieved the papers and rushed them  to the intersection where our girl  was anxiously waiting, and with  a sigh of relief made the  delivery.  .   Miss Wilson, as a responsible  student you have earned an  "A". Heaven knows what you  would have earned if you hadn't  got your mother's column to the  Coast News on time.  PERSONAL  Hey, Joe the Bartender,  where are you?  You promised to come back.  My dancing shoes are getting  dusty.  REVEEN WEEK  Yes, this is it folks, step right  up, get your tickets for an evening's entertainment, 8 p.m. at  the Sechelt arena, May 11.  That's right, Saturday night,  fun and laughts with Reveen.  Come early for a good seat.  Proceeds from this show go  back to the people as Pender  Harbour Lion and Lioness  clubs are the sponsors of this  fund raising event.  BITS & PIECES  Super low day tides all week  if you are thinking of oyster  stew or clam chowder.  Isn't it a crime the way our  beautiful highway is getting littered with cans, bags and  cigarette packages? Be a crime  stopper, use a litter bag.  Roller skating at the Sechelt  arena is the "in" thing for Friday nights. Sunday afteroon or  Monday evening, if you like  baseball, the Broncos will give  you your money's worth. They  play at Gibsons, Sechelt and  Madeira Park. I call Darrin  Reid at the Gulf station for  times, etc.  Last Sunday, as the game was  over, there was a clap of  thunder, streaks of lighting, hail  and a cloud burst. I hoped it  was the weather Gods cheering  the Broncos.  HAPPY MAY BIRTHDAYS  Happy birthday Hurbert  Evans on your ninety-third.  Brenda Martin, Kevin Graham  and Timi Newcomb wherever  you are. Marie Wallace, Kay  Birch and Edna Howitt. Gene,  Wally and Bruce Silvey, Tim  Wismer and his daughter Jennifer. Suzy Cook, Irene Spence,  Lyn Vaughan, Jennifer Joseph  and Julie Tyndale. Chic Page  our faithful school bus driver.  A LIONS' TREAT  A Pancake Breakfast will be  held on Mother's Day, Morrison Hall at Lions Park, Sunday, May 12, 8 a.m. to noon.  Parents $3, children 12 and  under $2. Everyone is welcome.  ��-;v-;- -->'<, \*^**-V'V5 s* '"'-v ' - *< V''-'s - -.?��� '-; -'   '" ----   *       ' ���  ^fca��Ma>ai����laaaAaiHajla1Hatia*alMa>B>^   The Sunshine Coast Concert Band will be holding its first rehearsal in tne  music room at Chatelech school at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,  May 7. All  instrumentalists welcome - please bring stands!  St. Mary's Hospital Aux. Gibsons Branch, Mother's Day Tea, May 11, 2-4  p.m. United Church Hall. Door prizes.  Open Air Market at the Omega parking lot Gibsons every Saturday from 9  a.m. to 2 p.m. 886-9251 for more info.  Artists & Craft people let the world enjoy your talent during Timber Days in  Sechelt. Put on your heritage costume & bring your wares to the street Saturday, May 18. Contact 885-5858 for help or info on setting up.  Musicians - help Sechelt celebrate Timber Days! Put on your heritage  costume, play, sing, dance, and have fun. Pass the hat to merchants and  visitors Saturday, May 18. Phone 885-5858 for info or just come.  Sunshine Coast Peace Committee. Next meeting Monday, May 13, 7.30 p.m.  Roberts Creek elementary school. Everyone welcome. 885-4613.  Walk with the Scouts hikathon in memory of Rev. Ted Dinsley at Lions Park,  Pender Harbour on Sat. May 11 at 10 a.m.  by Ruth Forrester, 885-2418  OFF TO A GOOD START  The Cystic Fibrosis Fund  raising campaign got off to a  good start the last Saturday in  April when the Halfmoon  Hams and guests played to an  enthusiastic full house at  Welcome Beach Hall. Just over  $400 was raised from the event.  The Hams would like to say a  big "Thank you" to the ever  popular 69'ers and to Ronnie  Dunn for adding so much  pleasure to the evening. Special  applause to the audience too  who supported the occasion and  who were such a responsive  group. A big bouquet to Alva  Dinn for providing  refreshments at intermission  and goodies for the cast, not  forgetting a special thanks to  the Welcome Beach Community-Association for the use of the  hall. A good combined local effort. ,  In case any of you had a hard  time recognizing your friends in  the picture last week of the  Hams doing a rock number,  .they were���from left to  right���Floyd Carmen, George  Carpenter, John Hamilton on  drums, Marg Carpenter, Ruth  Forrester, Katherine Kelly and  Nikki Weber.  The Welcome Beach Hall was  the scene last Saturday of a  most enjoyable dinner dance for  the shuffleboard group.  Welcome Beach Community  Association Chairman Bill  Vorley presented a little gift to  Bill and Mary Ewan in appreciation of their work and  organization of shuffleboard  events throughout the year.  A special fun presentation was  also   made   to   "Twinkletoes"  Fred Astaire and partner���nee  Fred Greaves.  WRITERS TAKE NOTE  The Suncoast Writers' Forge  will have, as guest speaker at the  next meeting, Donnie Patterson  of the Computer Centre. The  topic is "Tools and Toys for up  and coming Writers".  Everyone   will   be   made  welcome on Wednesday, May 8  at 7:30 at the Arts Centre.  LOGO CONTEST  The Country Fair of Halfmoon   Bay  is   looking   for  a  design for a logo. This fair has  been an annual event for the  past 18 years. It began as a  centennial project and has  grown from a very small affair  to what it is now. If someone  comes up with a suitable logo it  will be used on t-shirts, hats etc.  for sale at the fair and other  outlets.  A prize will be awarded the  winner, and entry forms are  available at Halfmoon Bay  store, Family Bulk Foods and  Books & Stuff in the mall.  Deadline for entries is May 25  so you haven't got too much  time. The fair will be held at  Connor Park on Saturday, July  20.  CONGRATUALTIONS  Best wishes go out from the  many friends of Lorene Taylor,  former teacher-in-charge at  Halfmoon Bay school on the arrival of baby girl Lieran.  MOTHERS' DAY  BREAKFAST  The Halfmoon Bay volunteer  fire department have taken on  yet another fundraising effort  towards the Hallowe'en  fireworks and party for our  local kids. They will be serving  Mothers' Day breakfast from 8  till noon on Sunday, May 12.  Sounds like a good deal at $4  per plate and $2.50 for seniors  and those under 12. For seconds  the charge will be $1 a plate.  A reminder from the firehall  that permits are now required  for outdoor burning. The  number to call is 885-5712  where you may leave your name  and phone number and someone will get back to you. It is  also hoped that by now you all  know your fire hydrant number  in case of emergency.  Some time in the near future  the guys will be re-painting the  hydrants and it would be a good  help if you would see to it that  the area around yours is cleared  of weeds and growth. Every little effort helps.  DOYLE'S ROAD  Only a small section of  Doyle's logging road, between  O'Brien and Mintie Roads,  across from the Halfmoon Bay  store is closed. Lots of calls concerning this misunderstanding  have been received following  last week's item.  ,;.;.;.;.;.;.;.w.;.y.MM^  mcmto^sm  Celebrate  MOTHER'S DAY  with us!  Our Special Features Are  PRIME RIB Au Jus  STEAK & PRAWNS  Regular Menu Available  Happy Mother's Day  from Everyone at Andy's!  (Andy's will be closing at Dinner  time Wednesday, May 8th for a  Fashion Show.)  �����<:���:���  Join Us For  SUNDAY BRUNCH  11 A.M.    -    3 P.M.  ^���flS^  - 20 Minute  Sessions $ A AAA  ONLY    0!f  SUPER SHAPE  Hair & Skin Care  TANNING CENTRE  COWRIE STREET, SECHELT 885-2818  1 pound  Sultana Raisins  wholefoods    ��Pen Monday ��� Saturday 10-5 pm  with every  $10 purchase  886-7974  SMOOOOT  OFFER:  Stock up now on the most  exhaustively researched  lubricants in Esso's history.  And you'll receive valuable  and attractive free merchandise with a purchase of more  than 60 litres of Esso  lubricating oils.  Ask your Esso agent for  details.  NEW ESSO LUBE XD3  Our best-ever multi-purpose  engine oil, proven over-more  than a decade in actual use, has  been reformulated for modern  engines. It reduces wear, controls deposits, extends engine  life.  NEW ESSOLUBE HPD  Our soot-fighting engine oil for  Nigh Performance Diesels!  Developed specifically for the  latest high performance diesel  engines, HPD maintains its  viscosity while fighting soot  deposits. We believe it to be the  best in the industry!  HYDRAUL  All-purpose transmission, differentia! and hydraulic fluids. Ask  your ESSO dealer for the specific  grade you need ��� and benefit  from Hydraul's anti-wear,  corrosion fighting, and foam  reducing characteristics.  \bu make us better. >8  Coast News, May 6,1985  :;SM��l|��lli|S^  I Maurice Hemstreet has graciously donated his time and energy to  �� teach these youngsters the art of modern square dance, Friday even-  \ ings at West Sechelt elementary school.  p  t  ���Dianne Evans pholo  Forest tour set  I As a part of National  I Forestry Week this week, the  I Sechelt Forest Service has set up  �� a demonstration forest tour  t above Wilson Creek.  | The tour has been set up to  {acquaint the public with some  �� of the principles of forest  f management by which our  ��� coast's major industry is run. It  [has been separated into five  {stops, each one designed to  J show the various steps and  {methods used to effectively  I manage the renewable forest  I resource.  The first stop is a site that has  been clearcut logged as recently  as 1983. It was then burned and  planted in 1984. The fifth stop  is a site that was first logged  selectively in the late 1800's,  then burned and left to  regenerate naturally.  The tour can be reached by  driving up Field Road to the  power line and following the  markers placed by the Forest  Service. For information on  times, phone the Sechelt Forest  Service office at 885-5174.  Seniors Sechelt  by Robert Foxall  | If you would like to see Expo  { before the shine is all worn off  j phone Alice Oulette and book a  ; seat on the bus she is arranging  (for Seniors' Day, June 6, leav-  ��, ing from the Royal Bank at 7:30  j a.m. It will cost you admission  ��� of $2.25 plus your bus fare, of  i course. Phone Alice at 885-3978  | to make a reservation.  I Unfortunately our last after-  II noon of cards for the summer  jjwill be held on Tuesday, May 7.  t Carpet bowling will continue  Sunder the direction of Ernie  I Wiggins who is taking over  j from Ted Wickland. We have  [.to give Ted a great huge vote of  thanks for the fine way he looked after the bowlers for some  considerable time.  Dancing is also being  suspended. There are just too  many other activities during the  summer but don't hide your  dancing shoes, too far away  because we will be having a  dance in June. The exact date  will be in another report.  I have nothing further to  report in regard to our new  building except that we are all  champing at the bit waiting for  the word to start.  Have a good summer and be  ready to go to work at most any  time.  - Pender Harbour  Secondary news  by Michelle Cochet  at  on  Some amazing talent was un-  < folded this week at Pender Har-  [������ bour secondary school during  ! our first annual Lip Synch con-  ; test. The entrants, who were all  C spectacular, put on a great show  [for the remainder of the  ^students as well as the staff,  j Even some of the teachers par-  I ticipated in this event.  | Mrs. Whatley, Ms Kenderic,  rand Mrs. Shioy's performance  [as the Andrew Sisters singing  f'The Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy  jfrom Company B" was one of  *the more humourous acts of the  'afternoon, and Ron Cole, who  iportrayed the bugler, was not  ��too bad either.  \ I'm sure that the judges must  Jhave had a tough decision deter-  [ mining who would claim the  ^prizes for these great  ^demonstrations of precision and  ��skill, but the final results are:  JFirst place-Liz Lawrenuk,  * Paula Metcalf and Carrie  ^Hillhouse for their hilarious  tportrayal of the Beach Boys,  r singing "Papa ooh mow mow";  ^Second place-Virginia Mavin as  ^Madonna singing "Crazy (for  |you)"; Third place-Virginia  r Mavin and Loree Villeneuve as  'Mick and Rick singing "Just  ^another night".  ,'. I would like to congratulate  Ithese people on their accomplishments, and wish all the  'trest of the students the best of  ;luck for next year!!  \ Also, I would like to remind  everybody about the computer  Clean Sweep  CHIMNEY  CLEANING  demonstrations to be held  Madeira Park elementary,  May 14 at 7:30 p.m. The  demonstrations, which will be  conducted by both elementary  and secondary school students,  will cover such computer skills  as word processing, some student projects, and the interim  report systems.  These demonstrations will be  open to anybody interested so  please come and observe how  our students have progressed  during the past few months.  Hope to see you all there!!  by Peggy Connor, 885-9347  GRADS FASHIONS GREAT  The Chatelech graduates of  1985 put on a good show of  fashions on Tuesday, April 30  in the school gym. It was well  arranged with lighting, runway  with backdrop and good sound  system, all in all a fine production.  Commentator Sheryl Winters  was very competent in her  presentation of the fashions  supplied by Cactus Flower,  Morgan's Men's Wear, Trail  Bay Sports and Karen Kreations  with hairstyles and makeup by  Super Shape Hair and Skin  Care.  The six graduating girl  models were Eileen McKibbin,  Michelle Smith, Andrea Cam-  posano, Jennifer Wetmore,  Lisa Black well, Heidi Brongers  and Theresa Ladner and the  male modelling was justly done  by Neale Flummerfelt, Jim  Brackett, Mike Davis and Bob  Watts.  Then always there are the  background people who  organize, plan and present a  show; Kirsten Kuch, Catherine  Crucil, Andrea Rayment and  Teresa Robilliard and Paul  Morris along with other grads  who helped in the dressing etc.  Jeans and the casual wear,  exercise outfits, bathing suits,  shorts and jogging suits with a  few dresses and dress pants  rounded out the show, modelled  simply and in keeping with the  clothing worn. Well done  Grads!  SALUTE TO THE NEW  SQUADRON  Sunshine Coast Power  Squadron is sponsoring a new  squadron in Pender Harbour.  There are 19 charter members  whose first commander will be  Bill Roxborough and secretary  Gail Adams.  Presentation of the warrant  will take place in Pender Harbour May 23 and all Power  Squadron members are asked to  attend to welcome the new  squadron.  SECHELT ELEMENTARY  WOWS AGAIN  The Sechelt elementary's Spring Fait held oh Thursday, May  2 was once again a huge success"'  with recreation games in ^'the  gym, cake walk, games of  chance and of course  "Butcher's Bountiful Bingo"  with fabulous prizes from local  merchants.  A turkey draw took place  every hour, plus raffles of gift  certificates. A delicous looking  bake table was loaded with  cakes, cookies etc.  TIMOTHY NEW COMBE  1897-1985  Tim Newcombe's father  came from West Virginia and  his mother from Washington;  Tim was born in Nanaimo in  1897. As a First World War  veteran he served with the  Canadian forces in Kimmel  where he met Jane his wife to  be. The couple were married in  St. Asath Cathedral in England  and enjoyed a long happy marriage with one daughter to add  to the joy. Thelma is married to  Ernie Blunt and lives in Van  couver; grandchildren are  Midge and husband Ed, Wayne  and Timmie, great grandchildren, Eddie, Troy and De-  nean.  Tim and his brother Clarence  logged up and down this coast  for many years starting in the  Sechelt area in 1945,. true  pioneers with their wives right  there with them. There was no  funeral by request.  Tim never had a harsh word  about anyone and was a truly  wonderful fellow.  SECHELT BRANCH MEETS  St. Mary's Hospital Auxiliary, Sechelt Branch, will be  meeting on Thursday May 9 at  St. Hilda's Church Hall starting  at 1:30 p.m. The topic for  discussion will be the coming  businesspersons' lunch to be  held on Thursday, May 30 at  the Sechelt Indian Band Community Hall.  Mrs. Alice Collette is the convenor assisted by Peggy Gallo  and everything seems to be  under"control, but there are still  some areas where they may  need extra bodies.  President Muriel Hutchison is  still at St. Mary's Hospital hoping to get out soon.  When a shepherd is called from thi  a loss must be faced, look to your family and friends. They'll  be with you ... gather them close and you'll find consolation  and support among them while you await a time when  peace and joy can return to your heart.  You know us ... we're a friend of the family.  COAST  NEWS Photo   Reprints  Michelle Smith was one of the  grads modelling some fine  fashions   at   Chatelech   last  Week. ��� P����ty Connor photo  Ann published photo or your  choice from the contact sheets  3x 4  5x 7  8x10  Let Mom know how special she really is...  Surprise her with a  co-ordinated outfit from  L.A. SEATCOVERS  Now featured at  FREE ESTIMATES  SPRING SPECIALS  A Wotfoi '* Way Sfitctal  WHAT A GREAT IDEA!!  Rugby Pants  11I PRICE!  \jffcsy0iM  ^���^   Al i    CAI CO  riMAI    nil  PAi rc\  ..,-(-.��....  ALL SALES FINAL ON SALES MERCHANDISE  Visa A Mastercard Accepted  K^H^^KMi^!^^!KB.8'jBi^Kf T-    .?���    -T-    -S ���  r   --"���*'  Coast News, May 6,1985  9.  memvmmmQmMmmmm;  MOTHER  DAY  wttk u&l  Win pinner For Mom ...  DINNER FOR 2 AT PEBBLES RESTAURANT  ?  ... and a Dozen Roses  LONG STEMMED, FROM ANN-LYNN FLOWERS  Simply rJrint your name & phone number on the back of a sales slip.  Deposit it in the entry box supplied by the Trail Bay Merchant where  you make your purchase. One winner only. Value approximately  $100.00, courtesy of Trail Bay Merchants.  (Entries from Trail Bay Centre employees & their immediate families are not eligible)  DRAW WILL BE MADE AT 4:30 pm SAT. MAY 11th  REMEMBER, May 12th is MOTHER'S DAY  DOESN'T SHE DESERVE SOMETHING SPECIAL?  YOU'LL FIND IT AT TRAIL BAY CENTRE!  Goddard's  Ann-Lynn Flowers  The Roya! Bank  Books & Stuff  Sew-Easy  Morgan's Men's Wear  Pharmasave 173  "Bring your family in to our family!"  Radio Shack  Upstairs & Downstairs Shoppe  The Muppet Shop  Headquarters Hairstyling  Uncle Mick's Family Shoes  Cactus Flower  Vagabond Travel  Mitten Realty  Nova Jewellery  Trail Bay Hardware  The Snack Bar  Shop-Easy 10.  Coast News, May 6,1985  School  vandalized  0��  A..  J/i  by Jean Robinson, 885-2954  .... The  Davis  Bay elementary  school was vandalized on the  last weekend in April. A window   was   broken   and   the  greenhouse   was   senselessly  demolished. Now the children  who were going to present their  mothers with a tiny plant for  Mother's Day, grown in their  school greenhouse, are heartbroken that some stupid people  did this to the greenhouse and  ultimately, to them, Start your  ."^Jown Crime Stoppers kids and  ���"j keep your eyes and ears open.  7, ROD AND GUN CLUB  \tf    There will be a fun shoot on  ' June 15 at the Sechelt Rod and  y^Gun   Club.   There  will   be  a  ;-, seafood dinner and dance after.  5��� Tickets   are  $7.50.   Jan   Pare  ���j',, 885-9370, would like volunteers  to help with the dinner please.  George Leach and Gil Boyd  won money at the Powell River  shoot in April. Bert Robinson  was a second runner-up in the  doubles.  Gunnar   Wigard   is   in   St.  . Paul's Hospital. Get well soon  C T  01  Oi  V.  -fl  '.Mi  Gunnar.  n  .. GUIDES FLOATS  ���' Lauralee Solli 885-3510,  ','.- would like anyone with pictures  ^ of Girl Guides' floats from 1980  J>, parades on, to please phone her.  W.C. FIELDERS  .',    The W.C.  Fielders will be  !.'��� playing baseball on May 7, 6:30  \,. p.m. at Upper Chatelech and  again on May 11,1 p.m. at nor-  ��� theast Hackett Park. They need  T our support so get out and cheer  r."them up.  ,. BLEACHERS  Jt     A work party from the Davis  Bay/Wilson Creek Community  Association executive took  t'-j down the bleachers in Whit-  ��� taker Park. The rotten condition of the wood presented a  ',' hazard. It is hoped that funds or  .,',' lumber will be donated to re-  ,,'.build them soon as the minor  ' leagues are using the field now.  w GENERAL MEETING  f,    Please   attend   the   general  meeting on May 13, 7:3Q p.m.  .at the hall as there is a money  ^motion on the agenda. Also,  |J(how about considering a big  ^carved sign to denote the Whit-  J,take Park and playground.  ^Does anyone know who does  '.that sort of thing or have you  " any ideas? Let me know.  m  Gwen in  Gibsons  1<l  Cavalcade  Fashions  by Gwen Robertson, 886-3780  -(.  .FASHION SHOW  .:   Andy's Restaurant is the setting for a fashion show put on  ���j by the Queen Pageant Commit-  J.tee of Gibsons Sea Cavalcade.  ij.The six lovely contestants as  well as members of the committee will be showing fashions  ^elected  from Goddard's and  Pippy's   and   some   lovely  .sweaters   hand   knitted   from  ,,Cosy Corner Crafts. There will  jbe door prizes as well.  ::   There will be a no-host happy  -hour from 7 to 8 p.m. and the  ^fashion show and dinner begin  ^at 8 p.m. Most of the tickets are  rsold but you may be able to find  ^some at Goddard's, Pippy's or  :Andy's Restaurant.  -TINNITUS  ,   A loud ringing, buzzing or  ipiercing noise in your ear or  !ears is a very frightening and  annoying experience. There is,  as yet, no known cure but there  may   be   some   alleviation,  depending upon the type and  degree of tinnitus.  r  Meetings of tinnitus sufferers  are being held in North Vancouver and I attended one at St.  Paul's Hospital in late March. I  was impressed by the numbers  of people, by the organizers,  themselves   tinnitus   sufferers,  and by the variety of treatment  offered by a variety of doctors.  Two of those admitted to having tried to commit suicide.  ������������ I know of some tinnitus sufferers   here  on  the  Sunshine  Coast   who   wish   to   share  knowledge and experience and I  am   gathering  news  clippings  and have sent for material from  the North Vancouver group to  share with others.  : Please give me a call and I  will include you in our next get-  together.    The   telephone  numbers are 886-3780 Gibsons  or 885-3359 Sechelt.  *.?*  Day by Day Item by Item  We do more for you in providing  Variety, Quality & Friendly Service  WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD ON  THESE ADVERTISED ITEMS. WE FULLY  GUARANTEE EVERYTHING WE SELL TO  BE SA TISFACTOR Y OR MONEY  CHEERFULLY REFUNDED.  WE RESERVE THE RIGHT  TO LIMIT QUANTITIES  9 a.m. fill 6 p.m. - Open Fridays till 7 p.m.        Sundays & Holidays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.  GOWER POINT ROAD GIBSONS  886-2257  FREE DELIVERY TO THE WHAR.-  DATES  EFFECTIVE     Tues. IVI ay 7    to    Sun. May 12  REAL WIN  K.L.D. Winner  #243  Christine Jeffries  $50  GROCERY DRAW  WINNER  $50  GROCERY  DRAW  ENTRY  COUPON  1. Fill Out & clip.  2. Attach Your  Sales Slip.  3. Return to  Ken's Lucky dollar  NAME:  TEL:  POSTAL ADDRESS:  1     ' ���  DRAW TO BE MADE  5 P.M.  EVERY SUNDAY  BXTRACTAWAY  Carpet &  Upholstery  Cleaner  4 hrs. ��� $15.00  plus  cleaning solution  Phone  886-2257  to reserve it.  The  PoP  Shoppe  24-300 ml  Any Flavour  $6.49 + Deposit  12-850 ml  Any Flavour  $6.99 + Deposit  "iiii,  IB  M  Fresh Utility Grade  WHOLE  FRYING CHICKEN WM) ��,  BREAST QUARTERS <kg3.06) H.. 1.39  LEG QUARTERS (kg 3.06) lb. 1.39  Fresh  VEAL CUTLETS  Canada Grade f\ Beef - Boneless  INSIDE ROUND  STEAK or ROAST  (kg 14.31) lb.  6.49  (kg 6.59) lb.  2.99  Fletcher's - Valu Pak  SIDE BACON  ENDS        2 kgBox- ea. Om h|5I  r  Fletcher's  SAUSAGE  STICKS   500gmea.   I -If SI  5 Varieties  >;&.���.  '���*>?:  California - Sunkist  ORANGES  New Zealand  GALA APPLES  Florida  TOMATOES  California  BROCCOLI  California  ZUCCHINI SQUASH  138's  (kg 1.10)  libs.  R is for Re-run  I'd meant, of course, to write about something completely different but then she told me she'd lost a certain  recipe and would i please save her because the rh'ubard  was ripening.  Mrs. T.'s Rhubard Cake  Vs cup shortening  1Vi cups tlemorara sugar  1 egg  2 cups flour  1 teaspoon baking soda  Va teaspoon salt  1 teaspoon vanilla  Vz cup chopped raisins  Vz cup hot water  Vz cup miik  2 cups rhubarb, coarsely chopped  Vz cup demerara sugar  2 teaspoons cinnamon  1. Cream shortening and sugar until soft and fluffy.  2. Beat in egg.  3 Add flour, soda, salt, vanilla, rasins, water and milk.  Mix well.  4. Stir in rhubarb.  5. Pour the mixture into 2 8" x 8" x 2" greased pans.  6. Sprinkle tops with remaining sugar and cinnamon.  "���TaaTanananrTriJ  ,JW  <fcSl"4^  K V            ,   Silt -< y,-    v   dlSaffinsssffisf '��r.  (kg 1.96) lb.  (kg 1.06) lb.  (kg 1.30) lb.  (kg 1.52) lb.  7. Bake at 350�� for 40 - 45 minutes.  8. Let cake cool in pan. When just warm turn out. Serve  cold - or - delicious! Warm with vanilla ice cream.  While I'm at it. Why not re-run...  Rhu-Nut Crisp  Base: 4 cups chopped rhubarb  Vz cup honey  Topping:        2 cups rolled oats  1 cup margarine  Vz cup coconut  1 teaspoon cinnamon  1 cup sugar  1. Chop rhubarb finely. Place in casserole and drizzel  honey over.  2. Chop margarine into oats. Add other topping ingredients and stir well. Sprinkle over rhubard  3. Bake 350��F for 45 minutes.  Yum, yum, yum!  vw-.AWrvvwwwdvwvwyw-^.vw^Nest Lewis Coast News, May 6,1985  11.  rf#  1  Sunspun  apple  JUiCe l936litre  I md.  Sunspun - Stuffed Manzanilla  olives       250ml 1.29  Powdered Detergent  Sunlight       ,8.88  Dishwasher Detergent  Sunlight    is jt9 3.99  Liquid Detergent  Sunlight 2.49  1 litre + 500 ml Bonus  Alcan  aluminum  ��� Oil 12"x25' I bSjU  Kellogg's  Honey Nut  Corn Flakes    2.49  525 gm  Weston's  stoned  wheat thins    1.99  600 gm  Hunt's  tomatoes    398 mi .89  ���ppia^MMapMaMlanaaapagM  Imperial v  margarine i.36kg  2.69  Selected Cuts -     Monterey Jack, Feta, Swiss  Mozzarella,  Meddo  Belle  Cheese  10% Off  Regular Price  ALL CHEESES ARE CANADIAN  P  Rupert - Cod  nuperi - L,oa 4*    j m  fiSh & ChipS 566 .gm/t. . I 51  Honeydew - Drink j     jm  orange or grape 341 m/ I -19  Our Own Freshly Baked *    flfl  rye bread ea. I ��U9  Our Oiun Freshly Baked  Light or Dark  brownies Pk3. ojs 1 ��� #3  m  <&$>  </  BOXED  Wasa  crispbread     1.1  200 - 250 gm  Nabob Tradition  COffee 369gm 3.19  Vegetable Spray Coating ^  Pam 369gm if �����$��!  Brunswick  sardines .100 9m 2/. 99  In Oil or Tomato Sauce  Duncan Hines .  cookies    350 3m 1.69  Nikka Ramen  noodles   85 sm 3/. 95  Prego  spaghetti  sauce       39w1.09  Plain or with Mushrooms  Heinz  tomato  soup       2S4,,/2/.75  Purina  cat  chow i*��� 1.79  Cloverleaf  pink  salmon       iwsm .79  Bassett's  licorice ^ ^  allsorts .....Z350 3m 1.69  HOUSEWARES  ICE CUBE TRAY  by Rubbermaid  Twist & Pop.  Regular price $1.09.  SPECIAL  PURCHASE  PRICE  ���S  NITE-LITE  Zoo Pal.  4 different styles to choose from:  pink   pig,    yellow   duck,    pink  elephant,   yellow  giraffe.   20,000  hour bulb. Plugs into any 125 volt  wall outlet. Regular price $4.49.  SPECIAL  PURCHASE  PRICE  $2.29  For your Mother  u-sa  mmmmm  ^  -Vanftp ^  Deli and Health  JfooHs  For a super deal  on a luncheon meal  Ham & Cheese  on a bun $1.80  886-2936  FISH  :*iakki:t  Fresh  HALIBUT  is  here!!  886-7888  Girl  5 Guvs  Hair   Salon  GIFT  CERTIFICATES  are a great idea for  MOTHER'S DAY!  886-2120  In the Lower Village  Show Piece  Gallery  \ Above the  NDP  I Bookstore  Give a gift of  ARTWORK  this Mother's Day  ��� Blown glass perfume bottles  ��� Pottery by Elaine Futterman  GIFTS & CARDS  corner of  Gower Pt. & School Rd.  886-9213  HDP BooKstore  886-7744  Comic ot School &  Gowet Point Ro��ds  Hardcover  Raincoast Chronicles 6/10  Collector's Edition  Stories & History of the  B.C. Coast $24.95  Mon.-Fri. 9:30 - 5:30  Sat., 10-5; Sun., 11-4  Did you know?  If you change over  from an oil to an electric  hot water boiler, B.C.  Hydro will pay up to  $800. CALL US.  Serving the Sunshine Coast  Seaside Plumbing Ltd.  886-7017  For a very special    f^Pji  Mother - Very T3F  Special Chocolates.     g^.���  ONLY AVAILABLE  AT TRUFFLES  886-7522  Betu-i'rn the Hunlrr Gall��rv <ind  ihr MX' BiHilmurr on Guurr Pi. Hit  10:30-5. 7 daym u,*ek  S       Mi  Dry Cleaning Services  ��� Furs & Leathers *  ANNIVERSARY  SPECIAL  50% Off  PANTS  K .i.in.-b p.m. Mon.-S.it.  886-2415  (stra Tailoring & Design  next to Ken'.-. Luckv Doll.ir  ���:;$/  ##*  or your Favourite Lady we have  CHOCOLATES  reg. price  JKCOFFEE MUGS  for Mom or Gramma  V^��-  mother c��P>\  he  p~  3 ��� ��  at**!-  FRUIT BASKETS  Is small��p4��I#5  large $���)��� 9*9  10% OFF  reg. price  i or made to order O^  /K  complete  The Economic/Employment  Strategy Committee held a  meeting on May 2 at the Sunshine Coast Regional District  (SCRD) offices; more than 20  members of the public were present to hear a presentation by  John Struthers and John  Reynolds and to ask questions  about the recently developed  economic strategy and research  conducted into feasible projects  for LEAD participation.  A review by John Struthers  of existing conditions on the  Sunshine Coast shows that if  unemployment is to be held at  1984 levels, at least 500 more  jobs will have to be created by  1991. If unemployment is to be  reduced to 11 per cent by 1991,  1000 more jobs will have to be  generated.  Marketing is one of the key  factors in the development of  any industry especially one  which involves the manufacture  or production of goods. Here  on the Sunshine Coast there are  many small businessmen who  find it difficult to market their  goods because of financial constraints and lack of available  time.  Tourism is seen as one of the  most important areas of potential employment in the future.  Canada-wide the emphasis is  shifting towards the tourist industry and it seems that on the  Sunshine Coast new attitudes  have to be developed towards  the tourist, and different  focusses developed, such as the  development of a major tourist  attraction, the study shows.  John Reynolds presented a  brief summary of the various  projects he has examined with a  view to finding a project  suitable for the LEAD enterprise. The federal government is  making available funds for a  pilot project through the LEAD  organization; $350,000 per year  for five years will be available to  set up and operate a viable  enterprise, with a view to  creating jobs and hopefully  breaking even or making a profit, which will be then turned  "* track into the business or used to  ^finance yet another project.  : Only $50,000 capital costs are  allowed and this must be repaid  at the end of the five year period  or when the project is completed. The rest of the funding  is viewed by the federal government as a contribution to the  community.  After Reynolds, in his role as  research consultant, has viewed  all the prospective projects, a  feasibility expert will be engaged  to do a complete and very  thorough examination of  whichever project is deemed  most suitable.  When that has been completed, and the strict government and community criteria  satisfied, SCEDS (Sunshine  Coast Employment Development Society), a non-profit,  non partisan, community  organization, will then make the  final decision and a project will  be undertaken.  Three different projects are  currently under close scrutiny.  Onejs in electronic manufacturing, the next a sawmill operation and the third a large  firewood producing concern.  There was a certain amount  of scepticism expressed by the  audience, but the committee  present, Irene Lugsdin, Maurice  Egan, Bonny Pyplacz, John  Struthers and John Reynolds  answered the many questions at  some length, and the final feeling seemed to be one of optimism about this new concept  in government funding and  community participation.  The work currently being  undertaken on the Sunshine  Coast will be a model for con>  munites across the province, ac-  cording to Irene Lugsdin, and  Maurice Egan pointed out that  the new federal program is a  'flagship of the new conservative government' and as such  will be wholeheartedly sup*  ported by the government and  its bureaucracies.  The one negative aspect of  the entire strategy/enterprise  program to date has been the  lack of local input, especially by  local businesses who have, in  the words of Ms Pyplacz, 'been  doing their utmost to ignore us.'  Community input is vital to the  success of the SCEDS/LEADA  ESC project; the Employment  Development Society is  representative of the whole  community, and any projects or  enterprises undertaken will be  of benefit to the area as a'  whole, said Lugsdin, SCEDS'  Chairman.  1 Coast News, May 6,1985  W '*ffc V* *.  A painting of rats, painted in 1983, to celebrate the Year of the Rat is  one of the paintings by Sui-chang Wong on show at the Arts Centre  Until MaV 12. ��� IManneKvans photo  At the Twilight  The most successful movie of  the year opens a week-long run  at the Twilight Theatre on  Wednesday, May 8.  Amadeus, the cinematic  study of the star-crossed genius  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart,  swept eight Academy Awards  this year including best movie of  the year and the award for the  year's best acting performance.  In Amadeus, we see the  towering genius of Mozart  through the envious eyes of a  contemporary but lesser composer, Antonio Salieri. Through  Salieri's eyes we see the paradox  of the somewhat silly vulgarity  of the Mozart personality and  the awesome facility of his  genius.  Amadeus is a moving study  of the tragically short life of one  of music's greatest geniuses; it is  a contemplation of the mystery  of genius itself, and in the work  of Best Actor F. Murray  Abraham, as the envious and  tortured Saltieri, it has one of  the great acting performances  on recent film.  Amadeus will be shown once  nightly at 8 p.m commencing  Wednesday, May 8.  WINNER!  Academy  Awards  8  including  Best Picture   0   Best Actor  F. Murray Abraham  ivvilight theatre  For One Week Commencing  Wednesday, May 8th  ONE SHOW NIGHTLY - Starts 8 pm Out 10:45 pm  CJKUOlim) WARNING: Occasional Coarse Language ��� B.C.F.C.O.  PRICES: Adult M.50   Child *2.00  Youth & O.A.P. *3.50  I  Gibsons 886-2827  Gibsons tegtoft  Friday & Saturday night  In the Lounge  Bingo - 8:00 p.m.   Monday  I The Legion Kitchen is open Monday through  Saturday 12 noon - 8 pm.  - Phone Jake at 886-2417 to book  1 Parties, Banquets and Wedding Receptions  i FOR HALL RENTALS CALL 886-2411  Members &  Local performers have won  awards at the recent North  Shore Zone Drama Festival.  Deidre Hartwell received the  award for outstanding cameo  performance in her role as Betty  in Gordon Wilson's "Blue  Cheese and Jazz", directed by  Betty Keller and seen recently in  Roberts Creek.  "Blue Cheese and Jazz" also  received the award for the  outstanding design which was  the work of Gordon Wilson. Set  construction was by Fred Inglis,  John Bolton and Gordon  Wilson.  Sandy Decker, who played  Theresa in "Theresa's Creed"  by Michael Cook, directed by  Janet Dolman, and Ronnie  Dunn who played Lil in "Blue  Cheese and Jazz" were both  nominated for best actress and  received honourable mentions  in that category.  Barry Krangle was awarded  an honourable mention for the  best supporting actor in his role  as the Reverend Hurt in "Blue  Cheese and Jazz".  Gordon Wilson, in a conversation with the Coast News,  said that Suncoast Players, who  presented both plays, will in all  probability be doing both in  Pender Harbour in a couple of  weeks, and may perhaps do a  repeat performance in the Gibsons/Roberts Creek area.  person ��w lS-  Lucy pulls the ball away and Charlie's flat on his back again. Brigitte  Marteddu and Lance Gregorchuk were especially good as Lucy and  Charlie.  ���John Burnsidr photo  Charlie Brown  ever charming  PENINSULA  MOTOR INN  Hwy 101, Gibsons  FEATURING POPULAR  VANCOUVER COUNTRY ROCK BAND  May 10th & 11th  "JIM FLEET  AND  WHISKEY BENT  (Advertised by Elmer Tippe  on WX 1130)  LOCAL TALENT  WELCOME TO PARTICIPATE  WITH KEITH KEMP\  ON KEYBOARDS  by George Cooper  You're A Good Man Charlie  Brown delighted the audience in  Elphinstone gym last Friday.  There were four performances  last week; it could bear a repeat  of another four in the coming  season. The same folk would  gladly return, I'm sure, to see  and hear it again.  There is a streak of the  downtrodden Charlie Brown,  and of the spiteful Lucy in us  all, and we can chuckle comfortably time and again at life as  the comic strip portrays it.  The cast was well schooled in  stage jyork���timing superb^"  lines aiid 'stage business clearly**  defined and robustly delivered,  songs sometimes faintly  delivered yet acceptable,  lighting and props more than  adequate. ���*..-,  The players were obviously in  complete empathjf with the  play's characters and from the  opening moment they accomplished  what  every actor  Channel  hopes to do���they created an illusion and drew the audience into it immediately and held them  spellbound until the last word.  Congratulations, - on a Lucy  scale of 0 to 100 - of 99.9 for a  charming evening, to Judith  Wilson, the director-producer  of the play and drama instructor in Elphinstone secondary.  And congratulations to Bill  Rayment and the Elphinstone  school orchestra and pianist  Sylvia Gentles for the accompaniment that blended so  flawlessly into the whole presentation.  The printed program notes,  the assistance of many other  students in choreography, artwork, printing, lighting and  house duties. Compliments then  to the Elphinstone secondary  school.  For your entertainment..,  >i  Ten  Mon. Tues. Wed.  JAM  CATS  Now serving from  5:30... Create your own  sandwich with salad or try  one of our Nightly  HOT SPECIALS  Wed. Night  BARBEQUED  RIBS       $095  With Fries O  Thursday  PRESSURE  FRIED CHICKEN  BILL'S NO LONGER SORRY  Thur. Fri. & Sat.  0114 VADO  5  piece  band,  with  Shelly  and  Jerome (formerly of the Waves)  SPECIALTY BAR-Tues., Thurs., Fri. & Sat.  Gmt your SALMON SHARK  LOTTERY TICKETS hern.  SLOW   PITCH  Games Tues. & Thurs. night.  Check the pub for team schedules.  Tues. & Thurs. Baseball Special  GOURMET    $i  7C  HOT DOG I���f w  Have one before and alter the game. ;  LUNCH SPECIALS.99  Mon - Fri  SLOW PITCH SCHEDULE  May 7th      Elson Glass vs Knight Shift-Elphie East  B.C. Tel vs GAB-Elphie West  Cedars A vs Cedars B-Langdale  School Bd. vs Oscar's Crew-Brothers West  May 9th     Elson's Glass vs B.C. Tel-Elphie East  Knight Shift vs GAB-Elphie West  School Bd. vs Cedars A-Brothers East  Oscar's Crew vs Cedars B-Brothers West  Thursday, May 9 - LIVE  7:00 pjn.  1. Sechelt Elementary  Brad Hunt and teacher Mrs.  Short will be in the studio to explain their totem pole project.  2. Nigeria Today  Helga Conner is here on a  visit from Nigeria. A former  resident   of   Roberts  Helga    discusses   her  Africa.  3. Katimavik Goodbye  Katimavik participants are on  their last stay here and before  they go, discuss their past activities and experiences.  Live shows this week so  phone-in is always possible at  886-8565.  Creek,  life   in  SUNSHINE COAST LIONS' CLUB  20th Annual  Mothers' Day    *********  ***  ***  ***  ****  TM&.&-  .******  v&h  B*S  ***  ***  ****  ****'  uiUIU  j^ai-aiSiffl^  ,th  Sunday, May 12*  8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon  Green Court Hall  Adults:    $3.00  Children:    $1.50  Bring Your Mother for Breakfast!  i  f Coast News, May 6,1985  13.  A little over a year ago, L&K  Lumber Limited, an important  employer on this Coast, filed an  assignment in bankruptcy; today, L&K is still in bankruptcy.  With its operations curtailed,  THE UNITED CHURCH OF CANADA  Sunday Worship Services  ST. JOHN'S  Davis Bay - 9:30 a.m.  Rev. Alex G. Reid  Church Telephone 886-2333   ��t*t4rt   SUNSHINE COAST  GOSPEL CHURCH  Corner of Davis Bay Road  & Laurel Road  Inter-Denominational  Family Worship  Sunday - 11 a.m.  Sunday School  For All Ages  Sunday - 9:45 a.m.  "We Extend A Welcome And  An Invitation to Come And  Worship The Lord With Us"  Pastor Arie de Vos  ���~3& ���%% *��*-  -GIBSONS     '.  Glassford Road - 11:15 a.m.  Sunday School  -   9:30 a.m.  ��� -i. ' ���Sf�� ^(* Sgk...   -     '������������  CALVARY BAPTIST  CHURCH  Park Road, Gibsons  Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.  Sunday Worship Services  11:00 a.m. & 7:00 p.m.  Home Fellowship Groups  Rev. Dale D. Peterson  886-2611  -Sfi.5fl.Xi-  GIBSONS  PENTECOSTAL CHURCH  New Church building on  School Road - opp. RCMP  Senior Pastor Ted Boodle  George Marshall  Visitation Minister  Sunday School 9:30 a.m.  Morning Worship       11:00 a.m.  Evening Fellowship      6:00 p.m.  Home Bible Study  Phone  886-9482 or 886-7107  Affiliated with the  Pentecostal Assemblies  of Canada  -Sift.*! .31-  ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S  & ST. AIDAN'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  Parish Family Eucharist  Combined service at  St. Bartholomew's, Gibsons 10 a.m.  Rev. J.E. Robinson, 886-8436  St. Aidan's, Roberts Creek  Evensong and Holy Eucharist  6:30 p.m. 1st Sunday in month  ,11% afisjk   ST. HILDA'S &  ST. ANDREW'S  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  St. Hilda's Anglican, Sechelt  Holy Eucharist 8:00 a.m.  Church School 9:30a.m.  Family Service 11:00 a.m.  St. Andrew's Anglican  Pender Harbour  Worship Service 4:30 p.m.  Rev. John Paetkau 885-5019   .   .   -A* ���*&�����>   SEVENTH-DAY  ADVENTIST  CHURCH  Sabbath School      Sat. 9:30 a.m.  HourofWorship Sat. 11:00a.m.  Browning Road & Hwy 101  Everyone Welcome  For information phone  885-9750 or 885-2727   SfJ^J*   PENDER HARBOUR  PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  Lagoon Road, Madeira Park  Pastor Tim Shapcotte  883-2374 or 883-2870  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Morning Worship       11:00 a.m.  Prayer & Bible Study  Wednesday, 7:00 p.m.    3>a> &9 ���S^ .  CHRISTIAN SCIENCE  SOCIETY  SERVICES  Sunday Service &  Sunday School 11:45 a.m.  Wednesday 7:30 p.m.  in United Church Building  Davis Bay  885-2506 or 886-7882   sft^i^i-   GRACE REFORMED  COMMUNITY  CHURCH  Sunday  Sechelt Elementary School  Sunday School 9:45 a.m.  Studies in Genesis       11:00 a.m.  Home Meetings  Studies'in Matthew       7:30 p.m.  Wednesday  Home Bible Study        7:30 p.m.  J. Cameron Fraser, Pastor  885-7488  ^Sfri&Sfr-  THE CHURCH OF  JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS  Davis B.iy Rd. - Wilson Creek ��� Davis B.iy Community Hall  S.krament St'rvict' 9:00 a.m.Sunday School 9:55 a.m.  Branc h President Kc'K- H. Robinson BHh-2iH2   .of0     -To     .*>,;>   but with its most important  assets intact, the company faces  a stable, though uncertain  future.  A medium sized lumber company for B.C., L&K owns  timber licences granting it the  right to cut 325,000 cubic  meters annually; dry and wet  log sorting facilities at Langdale  capable of handling 400,000  cubic meteers annually; and a  Langdale sawmill, which if ever  completed, will be B.C.'s largest  coastal log sawmill.  The company went under owing liabilities of over $33 million  and, according to Colin Rogers  of Peat Marwick Limited, the  trustees in bankruptcy, the company has assets that are currently valued at $20 million and a  tax loss that can be utilized by a  purchaser of $20-25 million.  Nine Sunshine Coast companies are listed as unsecured  creditors with claims totalling  $7000.  Company employees, including employees of subcontractors cutting on L&K's  timber licences totalled approximately 300 before the  bankruptcy. Today, with the  North Vancouver sawmill liquidated, total employees are  now 275. Employment on the  Sunshine Coast, which includes  the Twin Creeks log sorting  facilities and two or three subcontractors is now at  prebankruptcy levels, according  to Rogers.  Though the Twin Creeks  sawmill is now completely shut  down, it had only employed  three or four men cutting rough  cut lumber.  Employment at the log sorting facilities has actually increased by about 15 employees  how that the dry land sorting  operation is open. Though affected by normal seasonal cutbacks, these facilities employ  approximately 40 people at  peak periods.  A recent loan to L&K has  enabled it to finance the cutting  of this season's quota on their  timber licences. Timber licence  holders must cut at least 50 per  cent of their allocation in any  year and at least 90 per cent  over a five year period in order  to maintain their licence.  According to Rogers, L&K,  which is in its fourth year of the  cycle, is meeting its requirements. Employment  figures for the sub-contractors  who do the cutting were not  available.  The main objective of the  trustee in bankruptcy at this  time, said Rogers, is to sell the  company with all of its operations intact. Potential purchasers want, "the whole  package", said Rogers, adding  that there are currently three or  four companies actively interested. All of them are Canadian companies and all but one  are headquarted in B.C.  In response to a question as  to the truth to rumours that  there may be a Chinese company interested in buying L&K,  Rogers stated that, "there has  been interest shown by offshore companies, but so far, it  has only been general".  Sunshine Coast employment  would be boosted by approximately 50 workers per shift if  the Langdale sawmill is ever  completed.  However, this will require a  buyer capable of investing the  estimated $22 million required  before the mill can produce the  finished lumber it was designed  for.  If and when a sale of L&K  takes place, unsecured  creditors, may receive  something on their claims, according to Rogers. To date, no  creditors have been paid  anything.  Overlooking Gibsons Haibour  "HOME OF THE BEACHCOMBERS"7  886-2268  The SUNCOAST WRITERS' FORGE  is pleased to announce that their new PHOTOCOPY MACHINE has found a home at  SHADOW BAUX GALLERY on Cowrie St.,  Sechelt.  Celebration Prices:  Forge Members: 5* per copy. Non Members: 10'.  GIB & LIZ INVITE YOU TO MAKE  MOTHER'S SPECIAL DAY  REALLY SPECIAL!  BRING MOTHER TO DINNER AT  RUBY LAKE RESTAURANT.  RELAX AND ENJOY OUR  SUPER SMORGASBORD  IN A PARADISE SETTING  Reservations 883-2269  Complimentary Corsages  for Mother  Used Furniture  and What Have You  AL'S used  FUMITORE  We buy Beer Bottles  886-2812  Ruiujlote  RedtauJtaid  883-2269  TELL MORE  AND  SELL MORE  An ad in the Yellow Pages does a terrific  selling job for you every day, all year round.  And the best way to make your ad work even  harder, is to tell all in a display ad.  Display advertising quickly grabs a reader's  attention. That gives you a great opportunity  to let prospective customers know all they  need to about your business. Like the products  and services you offer. And the experience you  have. And the credit cards you accept. And  perhaps even a map showing where you are.  Remember, 9 out of 10 British Columbian  households use Yellow Pages every month. So  when all those fingers are walking, it pays for  your ad to be talking.  Yellow Pages.  Good for business.  yellow pages Coast News, May 6,1985  Newly manufactured fish pens in Agammemnon Channel show the three small pens within the larger; a  walkway will later be attached to the upper struts on the outer ring. _Dlanne Evilns p^,o  Nets manufactured here  Three local men have begun  manufacture of a newly  developed fish pen for use in the  burgeoning aquaculture industry.  Hans Kuck, Randy Petersen  and Paul Heberman, assisted by  the British Columbia Research  Council, have come up with a  new design in pens, one which  will cut manufacturing costs by  up to half and which has the added advantage of almost  eliminating stress on the fish.  The system is made from  high density polyethyline from  Dupont, who will guarantee the  material for fifty years. It is  very durable and is built to  withstand a constant battering  from 2.5 metre waves. The  material is used to construct oil  pipe-lines so has been extensively tested under rigorous conditions.  The larger pens are 100 feet in  diameter; always 16-sided, the  pens can be made in different  sizes. In fact, three smaller  pens, each 46 feet in diameter  can float within the larger pen.  These small pens will be used  to contain young fish, and when  they have grown and need more  Peninsula Typewriter Service  8ALE8, SERVICE, RENTALB ON MOST BUSINESS MACHINES  I am pleased to  announce I have been  appointed SALES ft SERVICE  REPRESENTATIVE  for the new  I.B.M. ELECTRONIC  TYPEWRITERS  on the Sunshine Coast  roH nrroRMATion ob dkmonbxratiok phohx  885-7424   CANON TYPEWRITERS, CALCULATORS Se PERSONAL COPIERS  Jade Palace *g  Restaurant  n  5/^i  MtouWft Day Special  Sunday Chinese Smorgasbord  5 p.m. - 8 p.m.  Adult $7.50  Children $4.50  Hwy 101, Seaview Plaza 886-2433  ON DISPLAY  DIESEL DUAL PROP  jSoutboards  CHAINSAWS  Husqvarna ��� Jonsereds  WRIGHTS  WIRE ROPE  Chokers, Straps, Haul Backs  Logging rigging & Main Lines  Hydraulic Hose and Fittings  XT-3 Aeroquip  Weatherhead  FULL LINE OF CROSBY CLAMPS,  SHACKLES & BOOM GEAR  Estimates on Shore Fastings, Layouts & Installations  WORK CLOTHES 4 BOOTS RAIN GEAR  Fish farms & maricultural-related works  space it will be a simple procedure to loosen the smaller nets  and allow the fish to swim out  into the larger pen. This means  that the fish will be handled  much less and consequently suffer less stress, an important factor in fish disease.  Although round pens have  been used in Norway for some  years, these new pens use state  of the art material and a process  which is relatively simple to  follow.  "We are a Canadian company," said Kuck, "and we  have had no financial assistance  from the government at all. We  have spent thousands of dollars  on the Sunshine Coast on rope,  fuel, lumber, nail, supplies and  other such things. And even if  we only make one extra job, it is  better than none at all."  The company, Skookum-  chuck Salmon Farms, has  already manufactured 12 pens,  some of which they are keeping  to use in their own operation  which will be stocked with fish  by the end of June.  Continued from page 1  technical know-how, but we  don't seem to have enough appreciation of what's here.  "Development has been  allowed to proceed on an ad hoc  basis. It bothers me to see the  way development has happened.  "Unfortunately small communities don't have the tax base  to raise funds for things that  might be done. There is a need  for greater assistance in planning from both the provincial  and federal governments.  "Gibsons and Sechelt should  keep their own characteristics  and flavour. Each municipality  brings a special touch of its  own. But there is a strong need  for overall planning. A village  like Sechelt should have the  resources to hire a first class  planner who'll take all aspects  into its planning - not just the  architecture, but how it fits  together. What is to come is  sometimes very difficult to see.  "There is no one to negotiate  development overall - we need a  set of guidelines, some ground  rules and someone to sit down  with the developers and make  sure we are doing what's best  for the whole community."  The project with which Egan  is involved here on the Sunshine  Coast will provide a five year  strategy which will lay down  some guidelines for the investment of capital and the creations of jobs, according to  Egan.  "This would help the  Economic Development Commission to set priorities and  create a framework for the  regional board to assess the  development of business. It will  give an idea of where the thrust  should be,  where the SCRD  go up  After many hours of study,  Sechelt council made public  their 1985 budget at last week's  meeting. The budget was given  its first three readings, with the  final approval set for their next  meeting on May 15.  Village revenues and expenses  for 1985 are projected at  $758,050. Public works, including road improvements,  drainage, sidewalks and waterfront will require $140,065 this  year. Since there are no borrowings in this year's budget, it has  been necessary to appropriate  $95,567 from the village's  surplus account, leaving a  balance in that account of approximately $45,000. It is projected that the Sunshine Coast  arena will require expenditures  of $187,528, which will be mostly offset by arena revenues of  $180,427.  Property tax rates, which will  generate $243,688 in 1985, will  remain at the 1984 levels except  for residential properties. This  rate will increase to $3.50 per  thousand dollars of valuation  from   1984's   rate   of  $2.92,  representing a 20 per cent increase.  However, due to the decreased assessed valuation (ranging  between 10 and 30 per cent)  given residential properties,  total residential tax revenues to  the village will increase only  11.6 per cent over 1984. Though  the business rate of $5.90 per  thousands dollars of valuation  remains the same as 1984, new  properties added to the tax rolls  and reassessed valuations will  slightly increase the village's tax  revenue from this source.  Utilities and industrial class  properties taxed at rates of $13  and $10, respectively, will only  generate $3,394 to the village in  1985.  Alderman Anne Pressley said  that council's decision to increase the residential rates to  $3.50 while holding the business  rates at $5.90 was made in view  of the wide fluctuations  business property assessments  went through last year together  with an attempt to bring the  ratio of the two in line with  what council feels is fair.  L0OOSN0 * HABINS LTD.  Dorhn Bosch - Wharf Ave., Sechelt  885-4141  IN STORE SPECIALS  all day Saturday.  Refreshments will be served - EVERYONE WELCOME  should be encouraging people to  invest.  "Our (SCEDS) priority is the  creation of jobs, although we  are trying to look at economic  development and job creation  as parallels. We want an overall  view of what is appropriate for  the Sunshine Coast."  TRIMMERS  Madeira Park  COAST TOOL & POWER 883-9114  Sechelt  AL'S POWER PLUS SERVICE 885-4816  Gibsons  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER & CHAINSAW  886-2912  ANNOUNCING  aaaM^atMM^Ha^MM^ataanaaaiB^ta^aHaHMMaaM  Phone-In Classifieds  The Coast News already offers an un-  parallelled classified service on the Sunshine Coast.  Two days after our classified deadline  your message is distributed to every  household on the Coast. No other  medium offers that fast and effective service.  Now we are improving it. Phone your  Classifieds from anywhere on the Coast to  885-3930  Tuesday through Thursday, 1 to 4 p.m.  for distribution in the Coast's only full-  service, full circulation newspaper.  NOTE:  Payment must be received  by  noon Saturday for prompt inclusion.  J Coast News, May 6,1985  15.  CONTEST  ������*~-^ *'$���&��*  i ..���?��� ���.������...**t-*v:y ��������>*''�� 7-'-  -'iVi  <'  Love My Mother Because  ��� ��� ��� ���  Participating  Merchants  Computer Centre  Cowrie Street, Sechelt - 885-2000  Maxwell's Pharmacy  Cedar Plaza, Gibsons - 886-8158  Gibsons Pharmasave  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons - 886-7213  Family Bulk Foods  Cowrie Street, Sechelt - -885-7767  Truffles  Gower Point Road, Gibsons - 886-7522  Wishful Thinking  Marine Drive, Gibsons - 886-3812  The Bookstore  Cowrie Street, Sechelt - 885-2527  Major Appliance Servicing  Seaview Place, Gibsons - 886-2422  Harrison Appliances  Highway 101, Gibsons - 886-9959  Webber 1 Hour K.I.S. Photo  Gower Point Road, Gibsons - 886-2947  Knit Wit  Highway 101 hill, Gibsons - 886-2717  Cafe Pierrot  Teredb Square, Sechelt -' 885-9962  Super Savings Store  North Road, Gibsons - 886-8762  Marlee Fashions  Cowrie Street, Sechelt - 885-2916  Don's Shoes  Sunnycrest Mall, Gibsons - 886-2624  Gibsons Building Supplies  Highway 101, Gibsons - 886-8141  Gibsons Building Supplies  Wharf & Dolphin, Sechelt - 885-7121  Gypsy Restaurant  Marine Drive, Gibsons - 886-8632  Cactus Flower  Trail Bay Centre, Sechelt - 885-5323  Galiano Market  Wharf Road, Sechelt  Sunshine Coast News  Marine Drive, Gibsons - 886-2622  Sunshine Coast News  Cowrie Street, Sechelt - 885-3930  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  i  1  I  I  1  $25.00 CASH will be awarded to the entry judged best  in each age category, based on neatness and originality.  NOTE. Entries may be given to any participating merchant  or brought directly to the offices of the.COAST NEWS either  Sechelt or Gibsons.  Deadline for an entries is Saturday, May 11.  at noon  All entries, become the property of The Sunshine COAST NEWS and  the decision of trie judging panel is final. .  Category No. 1 ��� Ages 2 thru 4  Category No. 2 ��� Ages 5 thru 6  Category No. 3 - Ages 7 thru 8  Category No. 4 ��� Ages 9 thru 10  Category No. 5 ��� Ages 11 thru 12  NAME   AGE  CATEGORY  ADDRESS  CITY   I      PHONE  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  B  I  1  I  I  I  I  I  I  Winners will he announced in The Sunshine COAST NEWS on May 13. JJfiMH&&>  16.  Coast News, May 6,1985  This year's league will have  five teams, down one from last  year.  Kenmac and the Cowboys  have folded. One new team has  joined, Gilligans, and with Wee  Pee Peers pitching for them  they are sure to be battling for  top spot.  Another early favourite is  G.B.S. Some former Kenmac  and Cowboys players have added punch to the GBS lineup.  Elphi Old Boys will have a new  look, only six players remain  from the 14 who won last year's  league playoffs.  Weldwood and the Bluenosers found out the league and  little is known of either yet.  League play starts this week.  FASTBALL SLATE  Monday, May 6  Tuesday, May 7  Wednesday, May 8  Thursday, May 9  Sunday, May 12  Sunday, May 12  Monday, May 13  Bluenosers vs Gilligans at Hackett  Elphi vsG.B.S. at Brothers  Bluenosers vs Weldwood at Hackett  Gilligans vs G.B.S. at Brothers  Weldwood vs Gilligans at Hackett  Bluenosers vs Elphi at Brothers  Elphi vs Gilligans at Hackett  Gibsons first IS take on Vancouver's Meralomas in league finals at  Jericho Beach. -.>,,�� suit^no-pho.,,  From the fairway  by Alex Warner  mmm,  iSZMSTTSZ^^  ���mm-  w?m  'K^xi*   \  "*       O*-  ft. Ws  $mMmim<:vA  Sitim  aU  Diesel Engine Rebuilding  Industrial Parts  Hwy 101,  Madeira Park  883-2616  j^iiiifiiititti^^  ���������A���<���������>������ �����,.���-������������. A .-. ���  ���4*WW*W4MfiMC*��*tf������0^^  '��  COAST  a  TRACTOR  INDUSTRIAL &  FORESTRY EQUIPMENT  Coquitlam, B.C.  Toll Free   112-800-242-1988  SALES REPRESENTATIVES   Archie Morrison       Ian Davis  Res. 939-4230    941-3245  /���  MDE   TABLES  f  L\  Wed. May 8  Fri. May 10  Sun. May 12  '        ^  0205        11.2  0455        11.2  0045        14.8  �� 1.-3  0630        13.5  0755        11.8  0745         9.5  1355         1.5  1540         3.6  1100       10.2  2150       15.3  2350        14.9  1745         5.9  Tue. May 7  Thur. May 9  Sat. May 11  Mon. May 13  0105        10.8  0315        11.4  0630       10.5  0130       14.7  0545        14.1  0705        12.7  0910        10.9  0830         8.5  1310           .9  1445         2.5  1640         4.8  1300       10.3  2045        15.4  2250        15.1  1855         6.8  For Skookumchuk Narrows add  1 hr. 45 min., plus 5 min. Tor  Reference:  Point Atkinson  Pacific Standard Time  ���i   .    - ...  each fl. of rise, and 7 min.  for each fl. of fall.  The first of the 1985 "Mixed  Twilight Golf evenings was  organized on Monday, April 29  starting at 5 p.m. The Receveurs  (Herb and Doris) and the  Knights (Bob and Elinor) are  the convenors. Come and enjoy  an evening of fun golf and  relaxing company, each Monday evening.  A committee headed by Brian  Leckie had their opening  "Men's Twilight Golf on  Wednesday, May 1. Some 25  golfers enjoyed the first  organization evening.  The committee is proposing a  number of changes in the format and will be posting the new  rules on the bulletin board.  Next Wednesday, May 8, there  will be a steak cookout following golf. Bring your own steaks  - salad, baked potato, etc. will  be provided for a nominal cost.  Seventy-two seniors played a  Scotch Pinehurst Round on  Thursday morning May 2 with  the following results. The first  team of two with a net 28 was  J.C. Ross and Ole Johansen.  Second with 28 !4 net were  George Grant and Guy Lewall,  followed by Jim Gilchrist and  Keith Wright at 28Vi.  On Tuesday, April 30 the  ladies played their first of the  season Pin Rounds with ideal  weather prevailing. Connie  Grpjit won low gross with a  gross score of 87. First flight  winners were Jean Dean with a  net 71 and second with another  71 was Mary Horn. Second  flight was led by Vi Gibbons at  75 net and second, also with a  75, was Vera Munroe. Third  flight winners were Verla Hob-  son at 66 net and Marg Hunter  with 70. Thirty-two players  qualified for the Helen Milburn  Match Play Tournament.  Support  Scouts  The scouting movement on  the Sunshine Coast will hold  their annual Hikathon in  Pender Harbour's Lion's Park  on Saturday, May 11 between  10 and noon.  This year the scouts will support the community with a  donation to St. Mary's Hospital  in memory of Reverand E.J.  "Ted" Dinsley, a long time  scouter.  Tax deductible donations  made to the "Boy Scouts 1985  Hikathon" may be mailed to  Box 891, Sechelt.  The Vancouver Meralomas  defeated a somewhat puzzled  and very frustrated Gibsons'  third division side in the league  championship Saturday, April  27 at Jericho Beach.  The score of 13-6 in Lomas'  favour was one of the few  defeats the blue shirted locals  have suffered this year. It was a  loss we'll all remember.  Meralomas scored first off a  five yard scrum in which an  overlapping three line rush proved too much for the surprised  Gibsons backs. This score was  the only try of the game, the rest  was a defensive battle that  seemed to continue into an eternity.  Gibsons pressured the opposition's goal line strongly in  the remainder of the first half  but fell short after coughing up  poor passes and generally choking on any offensive thrust.  Scrum half Dave Rainer kicked one field goal as did the  Lomas, leaving the half time  score at 7-3.  Injuries to prop forward Rick  Lawson   and   stand-off   Jay  Pomfret also hampered Gibsons* second half depth.  Lomas applied constant pres  sure in both scrum and back  play. Penalties to Gibsons for  unnecessary late hits caused two  extra field goal kicks for the  Meralomas.  Rainer hit Gibsons' final  three pointer off a 25 yard field  goal awarded from a Lomas off  side penalty.  Gibsons, who left third division in 1979 from a lack of  quality players, dropped to  fourth division where they remained for four years. In those  four years they rose to defeat  the Meralomas in two fourth  division finals. The club was  elevated to third division again  in the fall of 1983.  From 1983, under the leadership of new coach John Sutherland, the team went from a fifth  spot position to a second place  finish in the 1984-85 season.  The club has grown to a two  team side at present and continues to show great promise.  Congratulations to John and  his players for a job well done  and the best of luck for your  spring tour to California.  Players are reminded that  practices will resume Tuesday,  May 7 at Elphinstone field at  5:30 p.m.  Notice for riders  Equestrian competitors  wishing to take partjn the B.C.  Summer Games please note ihe  TDTAt DEPOSIT PBDItClTOr...  ANOIHER GOOD REASON WHY  ���/  KEEP THBR MONEY  IN CREDIT UNIONS.  following.  Age 13 (as of August 1,1985)  and up - residing in Zone 5  (Vancouver, North and West  Vancouver, Gibsons, Sechelt,  Squamish, Bowen Island) who  are interested in trying out for a  position on the Zone 5  Equestrian Team must compete  in Zone Playoffs as shown  below:  Hunter/Jumper Div: June  14, 15, 16 - Southlands riding  Club, Vancouver.  Western Division: May 12 -  Korral Riding Academy, North  Vancouver. May 25 - Bowen  Island.  Please contact Brenda Soeder  929-5208 for more information.  Pictured above are just a few of the award winners for the Sunshine  Coast Minor Hockey Association's 1984-85 season. The association,  which fields approximately 200 players in 14 teams has just completed its tenth year of play. In addition to Esso Medallions, which  were given to the most sportsmanlike, valuable, and improved players  on each team, important trophy awards were given for: Most Sportsmanlike Team - Trail Bay Sports; Coach of the Year -Bill Squires;  Mom of the Year - Brenda Siegert; Plourde Trophy (outstanding contribution by an adult) - Archie Mclntyre; and the Tom Robillard  Trophy (outstanding contribution by a youth) - Bill Stockwell.  SOUTH COAST  Almost a million British Columbians  enjoy the peace of mind that comes with  saving at their credit union. No matter  how much or how little they have on  deposit, they know every single dollar is  guaranteed. '  whether you belong to a credit union with  a small membership or one with thousands of members, you can benefit from  the many competitive services of a large  financial system.  means  SERVICE  Guarantee Fund  The Provincial Credit Union Guarantee  Fund guarantees ail the deposits,  credited interest, non-equity shares and  credited dividends, of all members, in  every credit union in B.C. This unlimited  protection and guarantee is unique  in Canada, and makes credit  unions one of the safest  places where anyone  can save.  PROVINCIA1  CRIDIT UNION  GUARANTHIUND  Strict Legislation  Credit Unions are controlled by strict provincial  legislation encompassed in the  B.C. Credit Union Act. Their operations are regulated by the Superintendent of Credit Unions through the Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs.  System and Scope  Each credit union is owned by the  members it serves. Credit unions in turn  own a central organization through  which they pool their financial resources.  This central facility also provides technical and administrative support. So  Size and Strength  Membership in credit unions has increased over two and a half times in the  last decade. There are now over 300  credit union locations throughout the  province, serving nearly one million  British Columbians.   Assets have risen  to over $6 billion! The strength of  credit unions lies in investing  close to home right here  in British Columbia.  ���AU DEPOSITS       A ��� Your d0,lars work  GUARANTEED* ^��|| for you and your  -hw*3s����, *wr" community  ^gf<%^ppgp>' Service and Convenience  1S1I1P ��ver *ne years, credit  unions have responded to their  members' needs by pioneering such  innovative services as daily interest  savings, bi-weekly mortgages, and  extended Saturday hours. They offer a  wide variety of savings plans geared to  paying members generous interest, loans  at competitive rates, full service chequing  accounts and many more conveniences.  Look for a credit union where you live or  work, and join in for all the right reasons.  For further information contact our offices at  Brakes    *  I.C.B.C. Repairs  ��� Major Engine Overhauls  ��� Tune-Ups    ���Transmissions  * Plus more, more, more!  SPRING ENGINE  TUNE-UP SPECIAL  mrmtmpwmi^ ���.  1  4 Of I  MS*:  &Ofi*  8���yl.  *62*5  chedi air at&Otal J(^��l*Kgt pt&m mf'^wfamr-. inl^b^i-v^th <M system,  2 HD. A.W. SHOCKS  *57  95    Installed  Most Cars & Trucks  (Does not include MacPherson struts)  We have more IN-STORE "SPECIALS"  At our Service & Parts outlet  Bring your car in for service today!  Sunshine Coast Credit Union  Head Office  Teredo Square, Sechelt  885-3255  HOURS  10-5   Tues.-Thurs.  10-6    Friday  10-2    Saturday  CLOSED MONDAY  Qlbsons Office  Cedar Plaza, Gibsons  880-8121  8853281 Coast News, May 6,1985  17.  =j-r m>n>*S�����*�� ���.���     ������-������ IW>-l^">~^MMHHeenaBHBaHrHiiewaaeaBiaBHae��B*BH^^  The YBC Bowling League wrapped up its 1984-85 season with these PeeWees, Bantams  receiving trophies at Gibsons Lanes last Saturday.  Minor baseball  and Juniors  -Brad Btraon photo  The first week of the schedule  brought some pleasant surprises  in Gibsons minor baseball.  InN Colt League action, Gibsons! legion Branch 109 and  Timbejrmart played a tight  defensive game and allowed  Sean Vanstrepen and Dan Hur-  ren to duel from the mound.  Vanstrepen and his Legion  team-mates extracted a 2-1 victory from Hurren and the  Timbermart crew,        '  In Pony League action, two  strong pitching performances  by Kenny Fujimori and Trevor  Anderson led the Flying Tigers  to two victories and the top of  the division.    )  Anderson   starred   on   ttye  mound with 20 strike-outs in  seven innings and gave up only  one hit, to Shane Howe, in a  11-1 victory over Esso.  The opening game of the  season in Pender Harbour saw  Yarmola defeat theHarbourites  15-3 in extra innings. Torin Lee  hit a two run single in the top of  the" eighth inning to win it for  Yarmola.  Action continues on all fronts  this week, ���  STANDINGS AS OF MAY 3:  dOLT W WL      PCT   GBI  Gibsons  Legion 109 1-0     1.000  Timbermdrt 1-1       .500  Pender    [  Harbour   \ 0-1       .000  BRONCO   \    W      L      PCT  Yarmola       I      2      0     1.000  Vi  1  GBL  I  i  J    I  Expand the beauty  of any room  O^O*  MIRRORED  DOORS  2' Bifold  2'6" Bifold  3' Bifold  ���^Bifold" -;  Reg.  $114.  $131.  $144.  $212.  Sale  $ 98.  $109.  $121.  U9%  SLIDING  MIRROR DOORS  4'Sliders       $170. $155.  5' Sliders       $204. $182.  6- Sliders       $299. $202.  m  LiEtil LLuh-h-  Super Valu  Kerns  Pender  Harbour  Kens L.  Dollar  PONY  Flying  Tigers  GBS  Esso  MOSQUITO  Gibsons ,  Realty    ,  Kiwanis  RCMP  Kinsmen-.  I Elson  Glass     '  TEE  BALL  Gibsons  B. AT.  Saans  Eiphi Rec  Bob Hobbs  /Fletchers  Howe ���  Sounders  Rent-A-  Wreck  Pharmasave  I  0  w  2  1  0  w  2  1  1  0  0  w  %  2  1  1  0  0  0  1  1  1  2  I  0  1  2  L  0  0  1  1  2  L  0  0  1  1  1  1  2  .500  .500  .500  .000  PCT  1.000  .500  .000  PCT  1.000  1.000  .500  .000  .000  t  PCT  1.000  1.000  .500  .500.  .000  .000  .000  2  GBL  1  2  GBL  Vi  1  IVi  2  GBL  1  1  1  IVi  2  A-F  E-M  C-E  .P-P  C-F  F-F  S-F  A-F  M  9:00  10:00  New Aquatic Workout  No Sweat - Join  Us  -Get    Wet    Sundays  Drop-In   11:30 -  1:00  Cost $2.50  Do It For  Stamina  T W T F  9:00 9:00  10:00  6:30 6:00 7:00  1:00 1:00  1:00 1:00  10:00 10:00  9:15  (Aqua-Fit) Moderate Deck & Pool  Exercises A.M  E-M ('Ease Me In') A Place To Start. A.M.  C-E  (Co-Ed) Go For It. P.M.  P-P  (Pre/Post Natal) Self Paced, Adapted  To Your Needs. P.M.  C-F  (Combined Fitness) Moderate to  Intense. P.M.  F-F   (Fit & Fifty +) Seniors Fitness  Fun. A.M.  S-F  (Special Fitness) General Exercises  for Arthritics. A.M.  1 Month Pass $15.00  (F-F or P-P) $12.00  3 Month Pass ��� $37.00  GIBSONS SWIMMING POOL  886-9415  National Forest Week  May 5-11,1985  Hwy. 101 & Pratt Rd., Gibsons 886-7359  Canoe  As a renewal of last season's  club activities an hour or two  paddle around Trail Islands  from the bottom of Wakefield  Road at 4 p.m. Saturday, May  II, is planned.  Tentative modest eating arrangements are being made for  6 p.m. at the Wakefield Inn,  and a short meeting will be held  at the Wakefield Tennis Club  immediately afterward to  discuss possible outings for the  early part of the season.  If you were involved last  season you will be contacted  concerning this get-together.  Otherwise, for anyone else interested, please call John  Johnson, 885-9450, or Vince  Bracewell, 885-7259, for further  information.  ��� AUTOMOTIVE ���  NEED TIRES?      Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  TIRE A SUSPENSION  CENTRE  886-2700      886-8167  Hwy. 101, just West of Gibsons  ��� CLEANING SERVICES ���  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  .   Port Mellon to Ole's Cove  Commercial Containers Available  885-9973 886-29387  ��� CONTRACTING ���  * AUTOMOTIVE ���  Q(l||Ue5.9K AUTOMOTIVE  REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES  "The Rad Shop"  COLLISION REPAIRS 886-7919  B.C.A.A.   Approved Hwy 101. Gibson-. ���  ��� CONTRACTING ���  ROOFING  FREE  ESTIMATES  Specializing in all types of  commercial 8k residential roofing  886-2087 eves  ALL WORK  GUARANTEED  ��� .'.'"P*?  ���-ifzo  s3ne set of men's right-handed golf  tlubs. 886-8634. #18  15.  Free  )  Why wait for spring? Do it now.  Dead car removal. Free! Garry's  Crane. 886-7028. TFN  MATTRESSES  New & Used  HIDE-A-BEDS  New & Used  Monthly Paymtnts AvaHtbk  On Approval Credit  -  Open Tues. to Sat.  10 to 5  Inlit Ave. B85-3713  V. Block North ol Sntitlt Pott Otflct  K*f**   ��� MISC SERVICES ���  CHAINSAWS^  SALES & SERVICE  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER &  CHAINSAW LTD.  V   HWY. 101 & PRATT RD.   886-2912 J  r ��� \  ��� MISC SERVICES ���  ROLAND'S  HOME IMPROVEMENTS ltd.  ��� 5" continuous  aluminum gutters  ��� Vinyl siding  ��� Soffits & Fascias  ��� Built-in vacuum systems  V  Sat./Sun. May 11/12 1248  Cochrane Rd. Gibs. 10-3. Moving! Freezer, tools, some furn.  #18  Viulti family. Yacht Rd. off  Snodgrass, Selma Park. 10 to 2,  May 11. #18  Moving sale Sat. May 11, 11-3,  Yacht Rd. near Snodgrass. Tools,  household & kitchen items,  books, toys. #18  18.  for Sale  885-3562  Sunshine  POOL MAINTENANCE  & Supplies  ��� Parts & Accessories  ��� Sales & Service  ��� Water Analysis  HOT TVBS  Reg. Dickson 885-2661  O :   SUNSHINE KITCHENS  - CABINETS -  886-9411  Showroom: Pratt Rd. 6 Hwy. 101  Open: Sat. 10-4 or anytime by app't. j  ^���BONNIEBROOK INDUSTRIES���A  Hedging cedars, 3 varieties.  Direct from grower. 1 gallon size.  Min. order 25, $3 each with fertilizer or $4 planted. Free delivery  locally. B&B Farms, Roberts Crk.  885-5033. TFN  Septic tank pumping  Septic tank sales  ��� Portable toilet rental  ��� Crane truck rental  V.  886-7064  Days or Eves.  (5)  886-7359 |Vj^  Conversion   Windows,   Glass,  Auto   &   Marine Glass, Aluminum Windows  & Screens, _ . Mirrors  >V  Serving the Sunshine Coast  for 14 years  Hwy 101 & Pratt Rd.  a I iwi     i-t  jr^caio  J   W.A. Simpkins Masonry  GIBSONS TAX  SERVICE A. Jack  Income Tax Preparation  All business strictly confidential  VJL767 Martin Rd. Gibsons      888-7272  SPECIALIZING IN FIREPLACES  ��� Brick ��� Block ��� Stone  T & S Soil  Mushroom manure $30 per yard  $25 for seniors. Cheaper by the  truckload. Call after 6.885-5669.  TFN  Heavy duty press bench with leg  lift and vinyl weights. Phone  886-3080. #18  1 used 90,000 BTU oil furn.  operating cond. make Olsen; 1  Shell hot water oil fired water  tank. Near new cond.; Gulf hot  water oil fired water tank.  Operating cond.; 1 spare burner.  Everything $300. 985-1938. #18  8 Ft.  Satellite  System  $988  Green Onion  Earth Station  Cedar Plaza, Gibsons  884-5240/886-7414  Rupert: The Daily Express Annual. Still a favourite, still only  $6.95 hardcover. The Bookstore,  Cowrie St., Sechelt, 885-2527.  #18  Well jetpump 30 gal. near new  tank $170. Rucksack  w/backframe $30. 885-9883.  #18  Rototiller, good condition $200  OBO. 886-8487 after 6 p.m. #18  73 25' Class A Ford Champion  motorhome all options $13,000 or  trade for boat; 10x50 M/H on pad  $2500; 13' F/B boat on trailer  $400; 76 35 HP Evinrude man.  L.S. $400; Hussmann freezer  cooler $200; Milner 4 dr. upright  fridge $300; Victor cash reg.  $125; lighted sign with letters  $125; OBO. View at trailer #4  Harry Rd. Bonniebrook.        #18  Moped, 135 MPG. sped lie. not  req. Best offer 886-8829 or  886-8313. #18  PEAT MOSS  Special  $7����  4 cu. ft.  Complete Selection of  Bedding Plants  Perennials  Fruit Trees  Ornamentals  HANGING BASKETS  HOUSE PLANTS  i  Mother's Day  SPECIAL  Buy a "MUM"  for your MOM  4" Chrysanthemums  $1.00  QuaCtfe) Faxftt  Pratt Rd��� Gibsons  886-7527  Zenith dryer and Inglis spindry  washer $75 each. Both working.  886-8757. #18  Artists & crafts people. Let the  world enjoy your talent during  Timber Days in Sechelt. Put on  your Hertiage costume & bring  your wares to the street. Sat.  May 18th. Contact 885-5858 for  help or info on setting up.  #18  6 foot sliding glass door br. s.  glaze $100; Queen water bed  $75; down parka $10; 2 ft. d.  glaze br. window $20; OBO on  all. 886-7666. Fender telecaster  1975 $600; amp $50; file cab.  $30; car bed $10.886-8793. #18  Horse manure $20 a load.  U-pickup. 885-9969. TFN  21 cu. ft. freezer $150; 1954  Chev 6 yd. dumptruck, runs well  $900.885-3835. #20  Oliver model 55 tractor with front  end loader $1650. Eves.  885-9245. #20  Fridge for sale $125; stove for  sale $200. Phone 886-2684. #18  2 goats freshen June $100. 5  hens free. 1980 3A T pickup, gd.  cond. $5495.886-8128.       #20  TOMATO PLANTS  U-Girl V.F.N. Beefsteak (62 day)  & other varieties. Ready approx.  May 15. Call Kay Zantolas.  885-5556. #18  (i9.  Autos   J  59 Corvette, a car lover's dream.  Best offer to $13,500. 886-2227  after 5. #18  76 Renault 12 TL. Needs repairs,  great for parts, good tires. $250.  886-7529. #18  76 Honda Civic CVCC, 5 sp. std.  Asking $650 OBO. Ph. 886-2970  evenings after 5. #18  1970 El Camino SS 396, very  nice shape. $7500. 886-2354.  #18  1977 Honda Civic htchbek., 4  spd. std. New radials, reas.  cond. $900. 886-9393 aft. 5.  #19  Honda Trail 70, runs great. No  1st gear $100 OBO. Truck  canopy, ins., fine cond., Gem  Top std. 6"x8' $275 OBO.  886-3768. #18  1975 Dodge Sportsman 318 windowed maxi-van. PS/PB, 70,000  miles. $1800. 886-2567.      #18  iuma-ui  1981 Nomad Tandem 24 ft.  Trailer. Completely self-contained  1972 Kustom Koach 22 ft. Trailer  Self-contained  1985 (New) Get Away  Camperized Van  Completely Equipped  1981 Volks. Westfalia  Camperized Van  Dealer #5792  Toll Free 684-6924  Local 885-5131  #17  79 Chev Custom Camper van.  45,000 mi., PS/PB, auto, 350,  new paint, exc. mech. Loaded,  offers. 886-7207. #20  62 Nova SW 6 cyl.. auto, $200.  67 Cortina 4 cyl., auto, $150  OBO. Both running. 886-9480.  #20  77 Royal Monaco Brougham  Fully Loaded  Every conceivable option, too  many to list; 6 SBR/trs., 2 studded snows on rims. Very good  cond., very clean, only 40,000  mi. $3250 OBO. Must see.  885-3479. TFN  1970 Plymouth Valiant. New  tires, gd. working cond. $400.  886-7048. #20  1980 Mazda RX7 $6500. Needs  some work. New paint.  886-7043.886-8381. #18  84 GMC % ton. H.D.. PU, 350.  V8, auto trans., PS/PB. cruise,  tilt, camper special, towing pkg.,  alum. run. bds., FB canopy  $13,750.886-7075. #20  1974 Toyota Corolla. Exc. body,  good eng., needs some brake  work. $1100.886-8704.      #18  62 Ford Falcon. 6 cyl., 3 sp.,  clean inside & out. Runs well,  must sell. $650.885-5301.   #18  1977 - 250 - Ford. 400 CID  rebuilt engine. New high speed  diff., sew brakes, 5 new tires all  with 2500 miles. No rust. $3500.  Call 883-1177. #20  1983 Datsun Hustler 4x4 good  cond. Rollbar, lifetime rust proof  $7500. 886-7312 days,  886-3730 eves. #19  1972 Ford farm tractor c/w front-  end bucket, rototiller, rake,  cultivator. Offers. 885-3307. #19  1976 Ford Supercab. Gd. cond.  51,000 mi. $2600; Ford canopy  (8'box) $375 886-9683.      #19  72 Ford % ton. 360-2 BBL at.  80,500 mi. Some rust, $600  OBO. Hood & 2 frt. fenders for 72  Ford. Best offer. 883-9494.  #19  78 Ford wind, van exc. cond. V8<-  PS/PB, auto, ptly. camperized.  $3800 or trade for sm. 4 dr. car  same val. 886-8545. #19 X>(\  Mf)  16.  Coast News, May 6, 1985  en3s fasthaii  This year's league will have  five teams, down one from last  year.  Kenmac and the Cowboys  have folded. One new team has  joined, Gilligans, and with Wee  Pee Peers pitching for them  they are sure to be battling for  top spot.  Another early favourite is  G.B.S. Some former Kenmac  and Cowboys players have added punch to the GBS lineup.  Elphi Old Boys will have a new  look, only six players remain  from the 14 who won last year's  league playoffs.  Weldwood and the Bluenosers found out the league and  little is known of either yet.  League play starts this week.  FASTBALL SLATE  Monday, May 6  Tuesday, May 7  Wednesday, May 8  Thursday, May 9  Sunday, May 12  Sunday, May 12  Monday, May 13  Bluenosers vs Gilligans at Hackett  Elphi vs G.B.S. at Brothers  Bluenosers vs Weldwood at Hackett  Gilligans vs G.B.S, at Brothers  Weldwood vs Gilligans at Hackett  Bluenosers vs Elphi at Brothers  Elphi vs Gilligans at Hackett  Gibsons first 15 take on Vancouver's Meralomas in league finals at  JeriCnO BeaCh. ���Daw Sutteriamt photo  From the fairway  by Alex Warner  *���-  -���*������- *"���-'% ^>^ **'v. ^ a *���*  Diesel Engine Rebuilding  Industrial Parts  Hwy 101,  Madeira Park  883-2616  Wm^,..���,u,m^^  W.y,.WMMMi!lJIW!vg8a  COAST   O  TRACTOR  INDUSTRIAL &  FORESTRY EQUIPMENT  Coquitlam, B.C.  Toll Free   112-800-242-1988  SALES REPRESENTATIVES  Archie Morrison  Res. 939-4230  Ian Davis  941-3245  TIDE   TABLES  a\  Tue. May 7  0105   10.8  0545   14.1  1310    .9  2045   15.4  Wed. May 8  0205 11.2  0630 13.5  1355 1.5  2150 15.3  Thur. May 9  0315 11.4  0705 12.7  1445 2.5  2250   15.1  Fri. May 10  0455   11.2  0755   11.8  1540   3.6  2350   14.9  Sat. May 11  0630   10.5  0910   10.9  1640  4.8  Sun. May 12  0045 14.8  0745 9.5  1100 10.2  1745 5.9  Mon. May 13  0130 14.7  0830 8.5  1300 10.3  1855    6.8  Reference: Point Atkinson  Pacific Standard Time  Tor Skookumchuk Narrows add  I hr. 45 min., plus 5 min. for  each ft. of rise, and 7 min.  for each fl. or rail.  The first of the 1985 "Mixed  Twilight Golf evenings was  organized on Monday, April 29  starting at 5 p.m. The Receveurs  (Herb and Doris) and the  Knights (Bob and Elinor) are  the convenors. Come and enjoy  an evening of fun golf and  relaxing company, each Monday evening.  A committee headed by Brian  Leckie had their opening  "Men's Twilight Golf on  Wednesday, May 1. Some 25  golfers enjoyed the first  organization evening.  The committee is proposing a  number of changes in the format and will be posting the new  rules on the bulletin board.  Next Wednesday, May 8, there  will be a steak cookout following golf. Bring your own steaks  - salad, baked potato, etc. will  be provided for a nominal cost.  Seventy-two seniors-played a  Scotch Pinehurst Round on  Thursday morning May 2 with  the following results. The first  team of two with a net 28 was  J.C. Ross and Ole Johansen.  Second with 2814 net were  George Grant and Guy Lewall,  followed by Jim Gilchrist and  Keith Wright at 28Vi.  On Tuesday, April 30 the  ladies played their first of the  season Pin Rounds with ideal  weather prevailing. Connie  Grant won low gross with a  gross score of 87. First flight  winners were Jean Dean with a  net 71 and second with another  71 was Mary Horn. Second  flight was led by Vi Gibbons at  75 net and second, also with a  75, was Vera Munroe. Third  flight winners were Verla Hob-  son at 66 net and Marg Hunter  with 70. Thirty-two players  qualified for the Helen Milburn  Match Play Tournament.  Support  Scouts  The scouting movement on  the Sunshine Coast will hold  their annual Hikathon in  Pender Harbour's Lion's Park  on Saturday, May 11 between  10 and noon.  This year the scouts will support the community with a  donation to St. Mary's Hospital  in memory of Reverand E.J.  "Ted" Dinsley, a long time  scouter.  Tax deductible donations  made to the "Boy Scouts 1985  Hikathon" may be mailed to  Box 891, Sechelt.  The Vancouver Meralomas  defeated a somewhat puzzled  and very frustrated Gibsons'  third division side in the league  championship Saturday, April  27 at Jericho Beach.  The score of 13-6 in Lomas'  favour was one of the few  defeats the blue shirted locals  have suffered this year. It was a  loss we'll all remember.  Meralomas scored first off a  five yard scrum in which an  overlapping three line rush proved too much for the surprised  Gibsons backs. This score was  the only try of the game, the rest  was a defensive battle that  seemed to continue into an eternity.  Gibsons pressured the opposition's goal line strongly in  the remainder of the first half  but fell short after coughing up  poor passes and generally choking on any offensive thrust.  Scrum half Dave Rainer kicked one field goal as did the  Lomas, leaving the half time  score at 7-3.  Injuries to prop forward Rick  Lawson and stand-off Jay  Pomfret also hampered Gibsons' second half depth.  Lomas applied constant pres  sure in both scrum and back  play. Penalties to Gibsons for  unnecessary late hits caused two  extra field goal kicks for the  Meralomas.  Rainer hit Gibsons' final  three pointer off a 25 yard field  goal awarded from a Lomas off  side penalty.  Gibsons, who left third division in 1979 from a lack of  quality players, dropped to  fourth division where they remained for four years. In those  four years they rose to defeat  the Meralomas in two fourth  division finals. The club was  elevated to third division again  in the fall of 1983.  From 1983, under the leadership of new coach John Sutherland, the team went from a fifth  spot position to a second place  finish in the 1984-85 season.  The club has grown to a two  team side at present and continues to show great promise.  Congratulations to John and  his players for a job well done  and the best of luck for your  spring tour to California.  Players are reminded that  practices will resume Tuesday,  May 7 at Elphinstone field at  5:30 p.m.  Notice for riders  Equestrian competitors  wishing to take partjn the B>C.  Summer Games please note the  TOTAL DEPOSIT PROTECTION.  KEEP THAR MONEY  IN CREDIT UNUNS.  following.  Age 13 (as of August 1,1985)  and up - residing in Zone 5  (Vancouver, North and West  Vancouver, Gibsons, Sechelt,  Squamish, Bowen Island) who  are interested in trying out.for a  position on the Zone 5  Equestrian Team must compete  in Zone Playoffs as shown  below:  Hunter/Jumper Div: June  14, 15, 16 - Southlands riding  Club, Vancouver.  Western Division: May 12 -  Korral Riding Academy, North  Vancouver. May 25 - Bowen  Island.  Please contact Brenda Soeder  929-5208 for more information.  Pictured above are just a few of the award winners for the Sunshine  Coast Minor Hockey Association's 1984415 season. The association,  which fields approximately 200 players in 14 teams has just completed its tenth year of play. In addition to Esso Medallions, which  were given to the most sportsmanlike, valuable, and improved players  on each team, important trophy awards were given for: Most Sportsmanlike Team - Trail Bay Sports; Coach of the Year -Bill Squires:  Mom of the Year - Brenda Siegert; Plourde Trophy (outstanding contribution by an adult) - Archie Mclntyre; and the Tom Robillard  Trophy (outstanding contribution by a youth) - Bill Stockwell.  Almost a million British Columbians  enjoy the peace of mind that comes with  saving at their credit union. No matter  how much or how little they have on  deposit, they know every single dollar is  guaranteed. '  Guarantee Fund  The Provincial Credit Union Guarantee  Fund guarantees all the deposits,  credited interest, nonequity shares and  credited dividends, of all members, in  every credit union in B.C. This unlimited  protection and guarantee is unique  in Canada, and makes credit  unions one of the safest  places where anyone  can save.  PROVINCIAl  CRtDIT UNION  GUARANT' I IUND  Strict Legislation  Credit Unions are controlled by strict provincial  legislation encompassed in the  B.C. Credit Union Act. Their operations are regulated by the Superintendent of Credit Unions through the Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs.  System and Scope  Each credit union is owned by the  members it serves. Credit unions in turn  own a central organization through  which they pool their financial resources.  This central facility also provides technical and administrative support. So  whether you belong to a credit union with  a small membership or one with thousands of members, you can benefit from  the many competitive services of a large  financial system.  Size and Strength  Membership in credit unions has increased over two and a half times in the  last decade. There are now over 300  credit union locations throughout the  province, serving nearly one million  British Columbians.   Assets have risen  to over $6 billion! The strength of  credit unions lies in investing  close to home right here  in British Columbia.  ���All DEPOSITS     Jk ��� Your dollars work  GUARANTEED* Jm for you and your  0,. community.  Service and Convenience  Over the years, credit  unions have responded to their  members' needs by pioneering such  innovative services as daily interest  savings, bi-weekly mortgages, and  extended Saturday hours. They offer a  wide variety of savings plans geared to  paying members generous interest, loans  at competitive rates, full service chequing  accounts and many more conveniences.  Look for a credit union where you live or  work, and join in for all the right reasons.  SOUTH COAST  means  SERVICE  Brakes    ���  I.C.B.C. Repairs  ��� Major Engine Overhauls  ��� Tune-Ups    * Transmissions  ��� Plus more, more, more!  V  SPRING ENGINE  TUNE-UP SPECIAL  1  n^��w  mmm*m9mm9i��*   v.  For further information contact our offices at  4^45*5-'. ���;icyt.*55^,"' ;-��cyi:*62��5  We *W %J*ee $gr^}&.g��; a#��* Idte And ���<3 *mto&mt $dim i&tWm w& timing}  check iur *r*d M! frit**; Check fJOiftt> ant mnO&tm Hvmotfds wftrt old system,  mUtmitmmm  2 HD.A.W. SHOCKS  $5795  Installed  Most Cars & Trucks  (Does not include MacPherson struts)  We have more IN-STORE "SPECIALS"  At our Service & Parts outlet  Bring your car in for service today!  Sunshine Coast Credit Union  Head Office  Teredo Square, Sechelt  885-3255  HOURS  10-5   Tues.-Thurs.  10-6    Friday  10-2   Saturday  CLOSED MONDAY  Gibsons Office  Cedar Plaza, Gibsons  886-8121 Coast News, May 6,1985  17.  The YBC Bowling League wrapped up its 1984-85 season with these PeeWees, Bantams and Juniors  receiving trophies at Gibsons Lanes last Saturday. -Br��d Btmo*. photo  Minor baseball  The first week of the schedule  brought some pleasant surprises  in Gibsons minor baseball.  InN Colt League action, Gibsons! Legion Branch 109 and  Timbejmart played a tight  defensive game and allowed  Sean Vanstrepen and Dan Hur-  ren to duel from the mbund.  Vanstrepen and his Legion  team-mates extracted a 2-1 victory from Hurren and the  Timbermart crew,        '  In Pony League action, two  strong pitching performances  by Kenny Fujimori and Trevor  Anderson led the Flying Tigers  to two victories and the top of  the division.    ]  Anderson   starred   on   ttye  mound with 20 strike-outs in  seven innings and gave up only  one hit, to Shane Howe, in a  ���11-1 victory over Esso.  The opening game of the  season in Pender Harbour saw  Yarmola defeat theHarbourites  15-3 in extra innings. Torin Lee  hit a two run single in the top of  the" eighth inning to win it for  Yarmola.'  Action continues on all fronts  this week. ���  STANDINGS AS OF MAY 3:  cbLT  Gibsons  Legion 109  Timbermdrt  Pender    l  Harbour  BRONCO  YsrmoU  WWL      PCT   GBL  1  W  2  1-0  1-1  0-1  L  0  1.000  .500  .000  PCT  1.000  1  GBL  I  Expand the beauty  off any room-  MIRRORED  DOORS  Reg.       Sale  2' Bifold $H4. $  98.  2'6" Bifold   $131. $109.  3'Bifold $144. $121.  ;4KBIfoldr r$W2;:--r;:*J��$47-  SLIDING  MIRROR DOORS  4' Sliders  5' Sliders  6' Sliders  $170.  $204.  $299.  $155.  $182.  $202.  ULt-LH LLut-b-  Hwy. 101 & Pratt Rd., Gibsons 886-7359  Super Valu  Kerns  Pender  Harbour  Kens L.  Dollar  PONY  Flying  Tigers  GBS  Esso  MOSQUITO  Gibsons  Realty    ,  Kiwanis  RCMP  Kinsmen \  Elson  Glass     ���  TEE ,  BALL      '  Gibsons  B. &T.  Saans  Elphi Rec  Bob Hobbs  /Fletchers  Howe  ���  Sounders  Rent-A-:  Wreck  Pharmasave  0  W  I  2 0  1 1  0 2  W L  2  1  1  0  0  w  %  2  1  1  0  0  0  0  0  1  1  2  L  0  0  1  1  1  1  2  .500  .500  .500  .000  PCT  1.000  .500  .000  PCT  1.000  1.000  .500  .000  .000  PCT  1.000  1.000  .500  .500.  .000  .000  .000  2  GBL  1  2  GBL  Vi  1  IVi  2  GBL  1  ���  1  Wi  IVi  2  Oanoe  As a renewal of last season's  club activities an hour or two  paddle around Trail Islands  from the bottom of Wakefield  Road at 4 p.m. Saturday, May  11, is planned.  Tentative modest eating arrangements are being made for  6 p.m. at the Wakefield Inn,  and a short meeting will be held  at the Wakefield Tennis Club  immediately afterward to  discuss possible outings for the  early part of the season.  If you were involved last  season you will be contacted  concerning this get-together.  Otherwise, for anyone else interested, please call John  Johnson, 885-9450, or Vince  Bracewell, 885-7259, for further  information.  'ib&oms Aquatic Fitness  No Sweat  -Get   Wet  Us  Sundays  Drop-In   11:30  -  1:00  Cost $2.50  Do It For  Stamina  New Aquatic Workout  Join  M T W T F  A-F 9:00                    9:00                         9:00  E-M 10:00                   10:00  C-E 6:30                         6:00         7:00  P-P 1:00                         1:00  C-F 1:00                         1:00  F-F 10:00                                       10:00  S-F 9:15  A-F  (Aqua-Fit) Moderate Deck & Pool  Exercises. A.M.  E-M ('Ease Me In') A Place To Start. A.M.  C-E  (Co-Ed) Go For It. P.M.  P-P  (Pre/Post Natal) Self Paced, Adapted  To Your Needs. P.M.  C-F  (Combined Fitness) Moderate to  Intense. P.M.  F-F   (Fit & Fifty +) Seniors Fitness  Fun. A.M.  S-F   (Special Fitness) General Exercises  for Arthritics. A.M.  1 Month Pass $15.00  (F-F or P-P) $12.00  3 Month Pass ��� $37.00  GIBSONS SWIMMING POOL  886-9415  National Forest Week  May 5-11,1985  ��� AUTOMOTIVE ���  NEED TIRES?      Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  TIRE & SUSPENSION  CENTRE  886-2700      886-8167  Hwy. 101. just West of Gibsons  ��� CLEANING SERVICES ���  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  , Port Mellon to Ole's Cove  Commercial Containers Available  885-9973    886-2938 J  * AUTOMOTIVE  OOHtieftOK AUTOMOTIVE  REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES  "The Rad Shop"  COLLISION REPAIRS 886-7919  B.C.A.A.   Approved Hwy 101. Gibson;.  ��� CONTRACTING ���  ROOFING  FREE  ESTIMATES  Specializing in all types of  commercial & residential roofing  ����� a.��   Mafia** ALL WORK  ooO'ZUoreves,   guaranteed  ��� CONTRACTING ���  r  ��� MISC SERVICES ���  ��� MISC SERVICES ���  CHAINSAWS  SALES & SERVICE  KELLY'S LAWNMOWER &  CHAINSAW LTD.  V   HWY. 101 & PRATT RD.   886-2912  ^  r  Sunshine  POOL MAINTENANCE  & Supplies  ��� Parts & Accessories  ��� Sales & Service  ��� Water Analysis  HOT TUBS  Reg. Dickson 885-2661  V    ROLAND'S  HOME IMPROVEMENTS ltd.  ��� 5" continuous  aluminum gutters  ��� Vinyl siding  ��� Soffits & Fascias  ��� Built-in vacuum systems  V.  886-7359  Conversion   Windows,   Glass,  Auto   &   Marine  Glass, Aluminum Windows  & Screens,                                    ��� ,         Mirrors  V Hwy 101 & Pratt Rd.   J  (      GIBSONS TAX  SERVICE        A. Jack  Income Tax Preparation  All business strictly confidential  \1767 Martin Rd. Gibsons      886-7Z7ZJ  885-3562  SUNSHINE KITCHENS  - CABINETS ���  886-9411  Showroom: Pratt Rd. 4 Hwy. 101  Open: Slit. 10 4 or anytime by app't. >  BONNIEBROOK INDUSTRIES-  Septic tank pumping  Septic tank sales  ��� Portable toilet rental  ��� Crane truck rental  886-7064  Days or Eves.  Serving the Sunshine Coast  for 14 years  .A. Simpkins Masonry  SPECIALIZING IN FIREPLACES  ��� Brick ��� Block ��� Stone 18.  Coast News, May 6,1985  r��  Youth Conference sponsored by the  "Baha'i Youth Movement9'  In response to  U.N. "International Year of the Youth"  Speakers: Duane Varan  Saturday, May 18  9:30 am - 4 pm Elphinstone Lunch Room  7-11 pm Marine Room, Gibsons  Sunday: Service Projects  Hartleys  auto  body  Monday - Friday 8:00 - 5:00  Saturday 10:00 - Noon  - recommended by South Coast Ford -  885-9877  Home Phone 885-5085  *  I.C.B.C. Claims *  Wharf Rd., Sechelt - across from South Coast Ford  FOR SALE  BY TENDER  One 1978 G.M.C. Cab and Chasis on an "as is,  where is" basis. The vehicle may be inspected at  the Sechelt Sewer Treatment Plant, Trail Avenue,  during regular business hours. Sealed tenders  marked "Bid on 1978 G.M.C." will be received by  the undersigned up to 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday,  May 22,1985 and will be opened in the Regional  District offices at that time. The highest or any  tender will not necessarily be accepted. Payment  shall be by cash or certified cheque.  L. Jardine  Secretary-Treasurer ro;  Parasail - coloured sail, silver feoaf  Editor:  As the "representative of  parasail" who did not attend  the meeting on foreshore  utilization held in Davis Bay  because he was not informed of  it, perhaps I can briefly explain  what I had in mind.  The parasail is simply a colourful parachute designed to  rise into the air when drawn  along the horizontal, in this case  by a boat. It presumably gives  the rider some of the sensation  of soaring and a fresh perspective of the scenery. A pleasant  diversion.  A friend of mine put together  his need for work with the obvious "slow bell" status of my  log-salvage operation and sug-  Trustees applauded  Editor:  I would like to publicly congratulate both Trustee Donald  Fairweather and Trustee Jamie  Stephen for the stand they have  taken against the high-handed  dictates of the ministry of  education.  As Trustee Fairweather so  aptly put it in his press statement, 'both education and  democracy in this province are  in great peril'.  Our government has put  megaprojects before the real  needs of the people of British  Columbia. The $500,000 spent  on the party to officially open a  pavillion at Expo one year  ahead of schedule, would have  more than made up the deficit  caused by the 'needs' budget  our trustees submitted for the  1985-86 school year.  The Social Credit government in Victoria has gotten out  of touch with the people they  are supposed to be representing.  What must we do to make them  listen?  Dale Burns  Sechelt  . ���. and criticized  Editor:  I do not find the.resignation  of elected officials an act of  nobility or of common sense.  There are three reasons for an  elected person to resign: for  health; the constituents requested it; employment in  another area. In any case, the  prospective resignation should  be discussed with those people  who worked so hard to elect the  member. Otherwise, I see such  an act as an abrogation of civic  responsibility.  Good leaders and spokespeo-  ple are needed today. To leave  the field is a victory for those  who do not believe in the  democratic way. I doubt the effectiveness of personal statements ending in resignation. Of  course, one must be true to  principles and personal integrity. But staying on the field and  exercising these at every turn,  has much more value because  the dissenter is present to remind us continually of these  principles.  It is not an easy time to be an  elected official.  Helen Roy  Roberts Creek  Chamber grateful  Editor:  The Gibsons and District  Chamber of Commerce wishes  to express their sincere appreciation to the Gibsons Volunteer  Fire Department. Their prompt  attention in extinguishing the recent fire at the Gibsons Marina  ���41^. prevented "signif-i;  4s mage   to   a"  welcome new business in the  community. We wish to express  our gratitude to the many  volunteers who devote much  time and energy to the community through their involvement with the fire department.  We also take this opportunity  to advise that we deplore such  acts of vandalism that result in  such damage and cost to the  community.  Sheila Kitson  President  Donation  sought  Editor:  Art and Beth Shaw have been  charged under Section 113 of  the School Act. Amy, 9 and  Emily, 9 have chosen not to attend school.  Their parents, Art and Beth,  support the children's right to  choose as they support their  daughter Robyn's choice to attend grade seven at Sechelt  elementary.  It you are willing to help this  family in their fight for the  children's rights please send  donations to Books and Stuff in  the mall in Sechelt.  Ghislaine Gerreau  Sechelt  MS Week  Editor:  The annual Multiple Sclerosis  Awareness Week in Canada  takes place this year from May 6  to 12. On Mother's Day  weekend in your community,  volunteers for MS will be giving  out hundreds of carnations in  return for donations.  Funds raised through the carnation campaign will support  MS research at the University of  B.C., and services to people  who have MS in your area.  We hope you will assist the  1985 campaign organizers by  letting your readers know about  MS and the carnation drive.  Thank you for your support  in bringing this national campaign and the local efforts to  the community's attention.  Sue Myrick  Project Co-ordinator  Gratitude  Editor:  I would like to express my  gratitude to whoever it was,  who, coming off the mid-day  ferry on April 18 on the Upper  Levels highway, drew our attention to a back tire which was  losing pressure.  It had picked up a nail and  we were able to get off the  freeway and get it fixed without  difficulty because of your  thoughtfulness. Thank you  good neighbours.  Maryanne West  gested the parasail idea as a  modest move into the tourist industry. I floated his suggestion  in conversation with a number  of friends and had that rarest of  experience: They all thought it a  good idea. The feeling was that  it would complement and not  drastically alter summer activities on the beach.  My research seemed to indicate that I needed no-one's  approval, legally speaking. I  could operate from Davis Bay  wharf towards Selma Park Hill.  But it would be safer to work  from the spit with its greater  clearance from both highway  and power lines. And I realized  that by seeking approval from  the Regional Board to operate  in their foreshore lease the suggestion would become public  and the people of Davis Bay  could react to it. Theirs is the  crucial opinion. I very much  like the coast the way it is  myself.  So if the folks of Davis Bay  feel that one silver beachcomber  boat pulling a coloured sail  against the sky is a foot in the  door for rampant development  in their community, I gladly  withdraw the proposal.  I'll be at tonight's meeting at  the Regional Board offices and  will be pleased to discuss this  matter with anyone there.  John Marian  Check child's health  Child Health Conferences  will be held in Gibsons on May  14,21 and 28 from 1:15 to 3:15  p.m.; in Sechelt on May 8, 15,  22 and 29 from 1:30 to 3:30  p.m.; and in Pender Harbour  on May 7 from 1:30 to 3:15  p.m. and May 14 from 10:15 to  11:30 a.m.  There will be a Measles Clinic  in Gibsons on May 7, from 10  to 10:50 a.m. and from 1:30 to  3:20 p.m.  The Travellers' Clinic and TB  testing will take place in Gibsons on May 14 from 3:30 to  4:15 p.m. and in Sechelt on  May 22 from 3:30 to 3:45 p.m.  Appointments for all conferences and clinics for Gibsons  and Sechelt must be made by  calling 886-8131. For appointments in Pender Harbour,  please call 883-2764.  Prenatal classes will be held  in Gibsons on Thursdays, from  7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Contact the  Health Unit for registration information. Register as early as  possible for prenatal classes;  they are being filled quickly.  A Drop-In Baby Group is  now being conducted in Gib  sons; drop in to meet new  parents and to discuss common  concerns. These take place on  Tuesdays, from 1:30 to 2:30  p.m.  The Health Unit is located at  1538 South Fletcher Road in  Gibsons. There is no fee for any  of these services.  Poster  contest  The~ Timber Days poster  competition has been extended  one more week. Posters must  now be brought to the Arts  Centre, Trail and Medusa,  Sechelt or the Hunter Gallery,  lower Gibsons, not later than  Saturday, May 11.  Open to any student enrolled  in a school on the Sunshine  Coast the first prize is a  helicopter ride during Timber  Days with many follow-up  prizes. Phone 885-5412 or  886-7592 for further information.  * British Columbia  Forest Products Limited  Road Construction  Phase Contract  The Narrows Inlet Logging Division is inviting  bids for a phase contract in road construction.  All interested parties must have a first line  rock drill, a minimum size D-8 Cat, and supply  crew transportation.  For further information contact  Terry Francis  885-2989 after 6 p.m.  LOCAL MOVING  For all local  moving, or  for help  with moving  awkward,  heavy items,  Call the Moving Specialists  Member of  4ALLIED...  The Careful Movers  LEN WRAYS TRANSFER LTD.  Custom Packing, Storage, Local & Long Distance Moving  HWY. 101. GIBSONS  Pemlor Harbour customers 0f|C99CfSJ|  please call collpr.l <   OQU'CuW  ���lonsered 450  r.<vtrfi  lonsered  For you, the part-time user, who insist  upon a power-to-weight ratio above the    o_,_ * ���    ._.  average frOLIn&  Come in, try it, and convince yourself! ��  SPECIAL Includes 16" Bar)      \0���W*&  ���JB9Wm��9VMKI&KB9VKKMMnBSaUBBKKBB^UBnnmimKmWmWBBBMmUUBKBKfMr~  APs Power Plus Service  Inlet Ave. (across from Post Office) Sechelt  S85-40K) Coast News, May 6,1985  19.  f.  2.  J.  4.  5.  6.  7.  a.  to.  it.  12.  13.  14.  IS.  16.  Hemes & Froperty  Births   ���  ObltuaHes  In Memor tam  Tfeaitjk You  Personal  Announcements  Wedding* &  Engagements  tost    , *  Found  rets t. livestock:  IWttfie *   c.*:  Travel  Wanted i-,' ^  ftee- ' ������>' ;", {'  Garage Sales  f*.,ftwt��r;&'?rade '-^/'  is, for$�����-';''- ^ ;*//.  19/**��*/>:>���-" ^  ���30, Ca*fqpkst4,,,>< 'V.'^j  a��t. MdMariitftMMti'''--,/.  5t$. 'WMot*j��!Sef^-'    ,~  ISt> led^lreaWatt' ;  29. WorttWarned rr-*���  //^.OjlpeSiiWltftitt ^  f\  ^MAjLtifal'', <>,_"��' .v-V"^  .< 'Il, rltCt. V��*Ot��  ..<*'���_���  Coast News Classifieds  On the  Sunshine Coast  First in Convenience &  First in Service  Drop off  your Classifieds  at any one of our  Friendly People  Places  on the Sunshine Coast  ���IN PENDER HARBOUk  Taylor's Garden  Bay Store  883-2253  Centre Hardware  & Gifts  883-9914  IN HALFMOON BAY ���  B & J Store  885-9435   " IK SECHEH ���������"���  Books & Stuff  885-2625  , Davis Bay  Peninsula  Market  885-9721  ' ROBERTS CRUK'  Seaview Market  885-3400  ��� ���    IN GIBSONS  Adventure  Electronics  886-7215  Lower VilIII*'  Coast News  886-2622  c  Homes  & Property  3 bdrm., 4Vz yrs. young rancher  in Gib. bay area. Carpeted, FP, &  C/Port. Walking distance to  stores, beach, boat launch & new  marina. 886-8076 or  owner 467-6537. TFN  Granthams view home only  $33,000. Owner helps financing.  886-7840. #20  For sale or rent. 2800 s.f. near  new home upper central Gib.  $75,000. 886-9777 or 590-1289.  #20  View home in beautiful W.S.  Quiet cul-de-sac, brd. crh., 4  bcrrn., 2 baths, LR, fam. r.n.,  fin. bsmt. FP. On 9/10 ac.  $79,000.885-3147. #20  MUST SELL  Woodcreek Park  Lot 5. Potential view.  886-9453  #19  Excellent serviced lot. Approx. %  acre western view, Gower Point  Road. 988-0270 or write Box 146  c/o Coast News Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. #19  Roberts Crk. Beach Ave. Semi  W/F, exc. view Va acre-landscaped. 8 yrs. old, 3 bdrm.  1400+ main, fin. bsmt. H/W  floor in DR. By owner $97,000.  885-9297. #19  REYNOLDS: Jim & Karen are  pleased to announce the birth of  Racine Michelle Fay born on April  27, 8 Ib. 2 oz. Proud grandparents are Freeman & Virginia  Reynolds and Mike and Fay  Negraiff. We wish to thank Dr.  Lehman and nurses and brother  Jerry and his wife for their support. #18  c  Obituaries  D  D0LMAGE: Mary Stewart, in St.  Mary's Hospital, Sechelt, May 2,  in her 67th year. Survived by her  family; husband Bill, sons Bill  and John, and daughters, Susan  and Masi and Wendy Butterfield.  Also nine grandchildren. No service by request. In lieu of flowers,  donations to the Cancer Society  would be appreciated. Arrangements through the  Memorial Society of B.C. and  First Memorial Services Limited.  #18  "In Memory" donations to B.C.  Heart Fund, Box 1525, Gibsons  gratefully received. Card will be  sent to bereaved with donor's  name. Envelopes are available at  your bank, #18  ft I JilaHBiJHHB^  fS imnii'liitil Witt  ^afA*^ate^*MP*gl'rV ^^JpWWW ^an��w^^aw  ��9 ^aa^l^k|^M^mAt^a^|^a|^a^  ^Wwi|WWaPw^"^a^w��sjf  The Sunshine Coast News  reserves the right to classify  advertisements under appropriate headings and  determine page location.  The Sunshine Coast- News  also reserves the right to  revise or reject any advertising which in the opinion of  the Publisher is in questionable taste. In the event  that any advertisement is rejected the sum paid for the  advertisement will be  refunded.      Minimum ��4" par 3 Una Insertion.  Each additional line 'I". Use our economical last  weak trae rata. Pre-pay your ad for 2 weeks & get  the third week FREE.  THE FOLLOWING CLASSIFICATIONS ARE FREE  Birth Announcements, Lost and Found.  No billing or telephone orders are accepted except  from customers who have accounts with us.  Cash, chaqu*> or monay orders  must accompany all classified advertising.  NOON SATURDAY  AiO-PtUaV  Please mail to  COAST NEWS Classified. Box 460. Gibsons. B.C. VON 1V0  Or bring in person to one of our  ���   friendly People Places listed above  I     Minimum *4M par 3 Una Insertion.  I  I  l-s[  9 >8  I  I  L  D                                                 J  c                                 n  c                           m       n  C                                                =T  C                                                =D  All  rnz        in     zc   in   m  CLASSIFICATION: e.q. For Sale. For Rent. etc.  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  J  Thank You  Hi   J  Donald & Brenda would like to  thank all their friends & family for  making their 25th anniversary an  unforgettable & joyous event.  Special hugs to our kids, Derald  & Cindy, Brian & Denise, Gail &  Tim who made it all happen. #18  t  Personal  Sunshine Coast Transition  House. 24 hour crisis line  885-2944. A safe place for  women & children in crisis. Help  for victims of family violence,  rape or sexual assault. #18  Regressions, rune stone, tarot &  psychometry readings. For appointment call The Bookstore  885-2527. #18  COAST NEWS  has an office in  The Bookstore  Cowrie St., Sechelt  885-3930  Alcoholics Anonymous,  883-9903, 885-2896. 886-7272,  886-2954. TFN  Channa Dahling don't be  chicken. My papaya doesn't  know about May 25 at the Arts  Centre. Little Chapati. #18  At Rubi-Lyns you can get your  shape reshaped and look good,  feel great and be ready for summer. Come in for complimentary  tan or slim. For 1/2 hour free  phone 885-7661 or 885-5797.  #20  f7        )  I Announcements I  Odds & Sods will close as of Sat.  Apr. 27th. Moving to new location in lower Gibsons across the  street from the Landing General  Store & the Harbour Cafe. Watch  for our opening early in May. #19  Don't miss the excellent East Indian dinner followed by Punjabi  folk dancers. May 25, Sechelt  Arts Centre. Tickets: Hunter  Gallery, Seaview Market, Arts  Centre. #19  If someone in your family has a  drinking problem you can see  what it's doing to them. Can you  see what it's doing to you? Al  Anon can help. Phone 886-9826  or 886-8228. TFN  SECHELT INN IS  GOING SMORGASBORD  Every Fri. & Sat. night 5 p.m.-9  p.m. starting May 10-11. Featuring prime rib every Fri. night. 1  complimentary cheer for adults  on opening nights. Adults $7.95.  Children under 10 $3.95.      #18  [8.  Weddings  Engagements  *>  Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Maurice  Spence are pleased to announce  the forthcoming marriage of their  daughter Shirley to Mr. Thomas  David Gilchrist on Sat. June 1,  1985 at the United Church, Gibsons. #18  Phone us today about our  beautiful selection of personalized  wedding invitations, napkins,  matches, stationery, and more!  Jeannie's Gifts & Gems.  886-2023. TFN  c  Lost  J  2 scarves April 1 near Gibsons  P.O. Signed "Jo Forrest".  Reward. 886-8704. #18  Fluffy orange cat with white  chest. Missed by owners. Any information please phone  885-9286. #18  (  10.  Found  Older female Red Setter, poss.  pregnant found Wed. at Glen Rd.  & Beach near Bals Lane. Wearing  collar & rope. Ph. 886-9443.  #19  2-8 wk. old puppies. 1 male, 1  female (black) at Cedar Grove  elem. Mon. Apr. 29. Please call  885-5458 or 885-4484. They will  go to SPCA on May 6 in W. Vancouver if home not found.     #18  COAST NEWS  has an office in  The Bookstore  Cowrie St., Sechelt  885-3930  Drop in - or give us a call!  Purebred Rl Red chicks $2. Goat  kids $40.886-2659. #19  Help! We are 7 wk. old Sheep/  Lab pups. We need homes soon  or else! Free. 886-8340.       #19  Togenburg kids for sale and milk.  886-9290. #19  WHITE KITTEN  Will the lady who took the white  kitten from Selma Park on Fri.  Apr. 26 please phone 885-9820  or 885-5851 as the kitten needs  medication. #19  2 female Siamese kittens 3 mos.  old $65. 886-8656. #18  New & used tack. Eng. & West.,  2 yr. filly, reg. "A horse. Call Colleen 886-2753. #18  Sable & white Reg. Sheltie puppies avail, now. 885-2550.    #19  Nubian cross goat kids $25.  885-2819. #18  For sale P.B. Sealpoint Siamese,  litter trained. $70. Ready to go 2  wks. 885-3831. #20  f  12.  Music  J  PIANO  TUNING  Ken Dalgleish  886-2843  r  Wanted  )  1 to 2 acres or bldg. site, Rbts.  Ck. area. Write to G.E. Robinson  1618 Graveley St., Vane, B.C.  V5L3A7. #19  Looking for 2 acres on Coast, pref.  Rbts. Crk. area. $10,000 cash.  Box 673, Gibsons. #18  Quality used children's & infant's  clothing, toys, furniture & equipment. Ph. 886-8229 or 886-2177.  #18  Room & board wanted by mid June  in Sechelt area. Call collect  858-6617. #20  One set of men's right-handed golf  clubs. 886-8634. #18  f"    -)  Why wait for spring? Do it now.  Dead car removal. Free! Garry's  Crane, 886-7028. TFN  Sat./Sun. May 11/12 1248  Cochrane Rd. Gibs. 10-3. Moving! Freezer, tools, some furn.  #18  Multi family. Yacht Rd. off  Snodgrass, Selma Park. 10 to 2,  May 11. #18  Moving sale Sat. May 11, 11-3,  Yacht Rd. near Snodgrass. Tools,  household & kitchen items,  books, toys. #18  ��  For Sale  Hedging cedars, 3 varieties.  Direct from grower. 1 gallon size.  Min. order 25, $3 each with fertilizer or $4 planted. Free delivery  locally. B&B Farms, Roberts Crk.  885-5033. TFN  T&SSoH  Mushroom manure $30 per yard  $25 for seniors. Cheaper by the  truckload. Call after 6. 885-5669.  TFN  Heavy duty press bench with leg  lift and vinyl weights. Phone  886-3080. #18  1 used 90,000 BTU oil furn.  operating cond. make Olsen; 1  Shell hot water oil fired water  tank. Near new cond.; Gulf hot  water oil fired water tank.  Operating cond.; 1 spare burner.  Everything $300. 985-1938. #18  8 Ft.  Satellite  System  $988  Green Onion  Earth Station  Cedar Plaza, Gibsons  884-5240/886-7414  c  For Sale  FOAM  Is your mattress  surface too hard?  TRY OUR SUPER TOPPERS.  Full line of mattresses,  pillows, bolsters, chips, etc.  SPECIALS ON OFF CUTS.  All supplies for the  do-it-yourselfer or  we'll do the job for you.  W.W. Upholstery  and Boat Tops Ltd.  886-7310  Your complete upholstery centre  Thriving natural & bulk foods  store in Gibsons. Estab. clientele.  Serious parties call 886-7974  before 5 & 886-2937 after 5. #18  Multicycle Inglis auto washer  $295. Guaranteed & delivered.  883-2648.      TFN  Sylvan Hill Stables is now open  on a limited basis. For reservations call 886-2001. #18  Rhododendrons and Azaleas.  Locally grown. Davis Bay.  Weekends. 886-2062. #18  CEDAR SHAKES  Hand split. Grades No. 1 & No. 2.  Good prices. Phone 885-5669  after 4:30. TFN  MUSHROOM MANURE  $27 per yard delivered.  885-2867  #18  5 HP rototiller $400. New 4x4  front end $500.16' Frontiersman  canoe $300. Chryco auto  transmission $200. Homelite  Super 2 chainsaw, 14" $100.  886-3940. #19  Muscovie Ducks $2.50  Straw $3.50 885-9357  Mulch $2.50  TFN  CLAHOLM  FURNITURE  SOFAS New & Used  APPLIANCES  New & Used  TELEVISIONS  New & Used  MATTRESSES  New & Used  HIDE-A-BEDS   New & Used  Monthly Paymtnts Anllibb  On Approved Credit  Open Tues. to Sat.  10 to 5  Inlet Ave. B85-3713  V> Block North ot Sechelt Poet Office  Rupert: The Daily Express Annual. Still a favourite, still only  $6.95 hardcover. The Bookstore,  Cowrie St., Sechelt, 885-2527.  #18  Well jetpump 30 gal. near new  tank $170. Rucksack  w/backframe $30. 885-9883.  #18  Rototiller, good condition $200  OBO. 886-8487 after 6 p.m. #18  73 25' Class A Ford Champion  motorhome all options $13,000 or  trade for boat; 10x50 M/H on pad  $2500; 13' F/B boat on trailer  $400; 76 35 HP Evinrude man.  L.S. $400; Hussmann freezer  cooler $200; Milner 4 dr. upright  fridge $300; Victor cash reg.  $125; lighted sign with letters  $125; OBO. View at trailer #4  Harry Rd. Bonniebrook.       #18  Moped, 135 MPG. sped lie. not  req. Best offer 886-8829 or  886-8313. #18  ��t PEAT MOSS  Special  4cu. ft.    I  Complete Selection of  Bedding Plants  Perennials  Fruit Trees  Ornamentals  HANGING BASKETS  HOUSE PLANTS  Mother's Day  SPECIAL  -Kids!���  Buy a "MUM"  for your MOM  4" Chrysanthemums  $1.00  QwSihj fam  & Golden Sup^Jy |  Pratt Rd., Gibsons  886-7527  fiy** **���*��������*����� **�����������������  For Sale  Apt. size piano-Sherlock & Manning. Exc. tone & keys $1200. 78  VW Rabbit fully maint. Winter &  summer radials $3900 or trade  for older 4X4 PU & cash. Large  dog or goat house, best offer.  886-8572 aft. 5 p.m. #18  Westinghouse stove,  McLary auto washer  both in need of repair  $75 or best offer. 886-2401.   #19  GREENHOUSE GLASS  3 mil tempered, 28x76, $12.50  per sheet. 20% off bulk buys.  886-8092. #19  351 Windsor engine & 3 spd. aut.  tran. $225. 3 wk. guarantee.  886-2987. #19  Washer spinner excellent condition $175.885-2898. #19  ........... Re��! One*���������������������:  j   VIDEO   |  : Weddings, Anniversaries |  | any special events. |  |       Editing, titles, etc.      |  885-5505  Viking 16 cu.ft. frost free fridge &  self cleaning stove. $200 ea.  885-9272. #19  Brute lawnmower. Regular price  $326.50. Less than 8 hrs. use  $225 firm. Like new. 885-7738.  #19  Sacrifice! Only $550! Merritt light  oak kitchen cabinets 9 feet-top &  bottom, like new. 885-9321. #19  Portable 3-way Dometic fridge.  OK in car-tent, boat, etc. $350.  886-8668. #18  Colour TV RCA 19". Works well,  $150,886-9408. #18  Stihl 090 $250. Evenings  886-7880. #18  Recond. lawnmowers, elect, and  gas, alum, storm/screen door  w/grill, alum, truck canopy. Ph.  886-9590. #20  1978 Ford canopy. Fibreglass  c/w sliding frt. window. $500  OBO. Ph. 885-9601. #20  1972 Toyota Celica. Good for  parts or as is. $100 OBO.  883-2244. #20  Zenith dryer and Inglis spindry  washer $75 each. Both working.  886-8757. #18  Artists & crafts people. Let the  world enjoy your talent during  Timber Days in Sechelt. Put on  your Hertiage costume & bring  your wares to the street. Sat.  May 18th. Contact 885-5858 for  help or info on setting up.  #18  6 foot sliding glass door br. s.  glaze $100; Queen water bed  $75; down parka $10; 2 ft. d.  glaze br. window $20; OBO on  all. 886-7666. Fender telecaster  1975 $600; amp $50; file cab.  $30; car bed $10.886-8793. #18  Horse manure $20 a load.  U-pickup. 885-9969. TFN  21 cu. ft. freezer $150; 1954  Chev 6 yd. dumptruck, runs well  $900.885-3835. #20  Oliver model 55 tractor with front  end loader $1650. Eves.  885-9245. #20  Fridge for sale $125; stove for  sale $200. Phone 886-2684. #18  2 goats freshen June $100. 5  hens free. 1980 % T pickup, gd.  cond. $5495. 886-8128.       #20  TOMATO PLANTS  U-Girl V.F.N. Beefsteak (62 day)  & other varieties. Ready approx.  May 15. Call Kay Zantolas.  885-5556. #18  Ci9.  Autos  59 Corvette, a car lover's dream.  Best offer to $13,500. 886-2227  after 5. #18  76 Renault 12 TL. Needs repairs,  great for parts, good tires. $250.  886-7529. #18  76 Honda Civic CVCC, 5 sp. std.  Asking $650 OBO. Ph. 886-2970  evenings after 5. #18  1970 El Camino SS 396, very  nice shape. $7500. 886-2354.  #18  1977 Honda Civic htchbek., 4  spd. std. New radials, reas.  cond. $900. 886-9393 aft. 5.  #19  Honda Trail 70, runs great. No  1st gear $100 OBO. Truck  canopy, ins., fine cond.. Gem  Top std. 6'x8' $275 OBO.  886-3768. #18  1975 Dodge Sportsman 318 windowed maxi-van. PS/PB, 70,000  miles. $1800. 886-2567.      #18  SUNSHINE MOTORS LTD.  USED CARS  1984 Buick Skylark  2 dr. cpe. V6, AT, PS/PB. radio  1984 Olds Cutlass Ciera  2 dr. cpe. Every option  1984 Buick Skylark  4 dr. V6, AT. PS/PB, radio,  air cond.  1984 Buick Regal  4 door, V8. AT, PS/PB. radio,  air cond.  1984 Pont. Sunbird 2000  4 dr. 4 cyl..AT. PS/PB. radio?  1984 Olds Firenze  4 dr. 4 cyl. AT, PS/PB, radio  1984 Pont. Acadian  4 dr. 4 cyl., AT, radio (2 in stock)  1983 Buick Skylark  4 dr. V6. AT, PS/PB. radio,  air cond.  1982 Volks. Scirocco  2 dr. cpe. 5 spd.  1981 Olds Cutlass Wgn.  4 dr. V8. AT, PS/PB. cassette  1981 Suburu 4x4 Stn. Wgn.  6 cyl. AT  1980 Ford Grenada  2 dr. 6 cyl.. AT, PS/PB. radio  1978 Ford Grenada  4 dr. stn. wgn. V8. AT.  PS/PB, cassette  1978 Horizon  4dr. 4 cyl., 4spd. PS/PB, radio  1976 Datsun 280Z  2 dr. stn. trans.  1976 Chevette  2 dr.. H/back, 4 cyl., 4 spd.  TRUCKS  1981 Chev % Ton 4x4  High Rider PU  1981 Volks. Westfalia  Camper Van  1981 Dodge Club Cab 4x4 PU  Std. trans., PS/PB  1980 GMC Vz Ton PU  Diesel, PS/PB, auto, radio  1980 Ford Vz Ton  6 cyl. auto  1979 Ford Vi Ton & Canopy  V8, auto, PS/PB, cassette  1979 Ford % Ton 4x4  High Rider PU  1975 Dodge Window Van  6 cyl. AT, PS/PB, radio  RECREATION VEHICLES  1981 Nomad Tandem 24 ft.  Trailer. Completely self-contained  1972 Kustom Koach 22 ft. Trailer  Self-contained  1985 (New) Get Away  Camperized Van  Completely Equipped  1981 Volks. Westfalia  Camperized Van  Dealer #5792  Toll Free 684-6924  Local 885-5131  #17  79 Chev Custom Camper van.  45,000 mi., PS/PB, auto. 350.  new paint, exc. mech. Loaded,  offers. 886-7207. #20  62 Nova SW 6 cyl., auto, $200.  67 Cortina 4 cyl.. auto, $150  OBO. Both running. 886-9480.  #20  77 Royal Monaco Brougham  Fully Loaded  Every conceivable option, too  many to list; 6 SBR/trs., 2 studded snows on rims. Very good  cond., very clean, only 40,000  mi. $3250 OBO. Must see.  885-3479. TFN  1970 Plymouth Valiant. New  tires, gd. working cond. $400.  886-7048. #20  1980 Mazda RX7 $6500. Needs  some work. New paint.  886-7043.886-8381. #18  84 GMC % ton, H.D.. PU, 350,  V8, auto trans., PS/PB. cruise,  tilt, camper special, towing pkg.,  alum. run. bds., FB canopy  $13,750.886-7075. #20  1974 Toyota Corolla. Exc. body,  good eng., needs some brake  work. $1100.886-8704.      #18  62 Ford Falcon. 6 cyl., 3 sp.,  clean inside & out. Runs well,  must sell. $650. 885-5301.   #18  1977 - 250 - Ford, 400 CID  rebuilt engine. New high speed  diff., sew brakes, 5 new tires all  with 2500 miles. No rust. $3500.  Call 883-1177. #20  1983 Datsun Hustler 4x4 good  cond. Rollbar, lifetime rust proof  $7500. 886-7312 days.  886-3730 eves. #19  1972 Ford farm tractor c/w front-  end bucket, rototiller, rake,  cultivator. Offers. 885-3307. #19  1976 Ford Supercab. Gd. cond.  51,000 mi. $2600; Ford canopy  (8'box) $375 886-9683.      #19  72 Ford % ton. 360-2 BBL at.  80,500 mi. Some rust, $600  OBO. Hood & 2 frt. fenders for 72  Ford. Best offer. 883-9494.  #19  78 Ford wind, van exc. cond. V8.-  PS/PB, auto, ptly. camperized.  $3800 or trade for sm. 4 dr. car  same val. 886-8545. #19 ;Bus-64 pass. $1500 OBO will  I take trade in; 70 Cougar convert.  ' $500 OBO. 886-8287. #19  Coast News, May 6,1985  ��� 1975 GMC motorhome van. Excellent condition. Furnace, swivel  Wecliner   seats.   7100   miles.  $2650.885-7738. #19  1978 Honda Civic, standard,  i 73,000 km. Asking $2495.  'Phone 885-3376. #19  Sunshine Special. Vintage 1965  Impala   SS   convertible.   327,  -PS/PB/PW, & top, 2 speed auto.  ���Radials. good shape $6000 OBO.  &85-4705.      #18  $976 Granada Gia 4 dr. sdn. 6  *��cyl. automatic, power steering,  ��6ower brakes. 62,000 miles. Im-  Snaculate condition inside & out  #nd no rust. $3165. D. 5848.  **886-7919 or evenings 886-7271.  #18  Sj977 Maverick 4 dr. sdn. 6  Cylinder automatic, power steer-  prig, power brakes. Very clean inside & out. One owner, 61,000  Spiles. $2865. D. 5848.  ��886-7919 or 886-7271 eveings.  #18  v��_ .   ���3974 Maverick 2 dr. sedan 6 cyl.  Automatic, power steering, reclining bucket seats, very good condition, 71,000 miles. $1765. D.  $848. 886-7919 or 886-7271  Evenings. #18  >   ���Tj976 Honda Civic.  Automatic,  t'flice clean car and runs well.  ^2265. D. 5848. 886-7919 or  ���$86-7271 evenings. #18  Lease  All  Makes  All  Models  ��� ��� ���  TOYOTA  NISSAN  HYUNDAI  CHRYSLER  VOLVO  BMW  MERCEDES  PORSCHE  ��� ��� ���  Let us quote  on your lease  requirements.  Call  Harvie McCracken  today.  SOUTH COAST  LEASING  885-3281  pQ Torino 8 pass.' SW.  ��PS/PB/AC/4 way stereo $2000.  !;72 Ford SW runs well $500. Blue  !*sofa & chair $200. 886-9248.  $ #18  t   j,1976 Chev % ton van. 7 pass.  >350 V8, auto, PS/PB, body rusty, mech. good. $1100 OBO. Ph.  2885-4756. #19  ��   ,1974 LTD, 2 dr. HT, PS/PB.  .���Reliable trans. $1000. 885-9272.  ! #19  COAST NEWS  has an office in  The Bookstore  Cowrie St., Sechelt  885-3930  Drop in - or give us a call!  *  20.  Campers  20' Winnebago motorhome for  sale. Excellent condition.  885-5995. TFN  Okanogan fifs import full size  P/P, jacks, furn., ice box. $1500  OBO. 886-9777. #20  8 ft. Vanguard camper. $350  OBO. 886-8230. #18  23 ft. Frontier Mini. 56,000 km.  $22,000,885-5491.  #18  Sailboat 16' wooden sloop,  w/sails & motor. 886-2637 or  885-3621. #19  14'/2* alum. Starcraft with 20 HP  1981 Johnson outboard and  trailer. Anchor, rope, oars, rod  holders incl. $1200 firm.  886-2264 ask for George.     #19  Borg Warner 71 direct drive  transmission. Just rebuilt $375.  Also bell housing to fit Chev $75.  886-2929 or 886-8217.        #19  Boat tops, seats, windshields  -custom made and repairs. Boat  hauling. W.W. Upholstery and  Boat Tops Ltd. 886-7310.     TFN  HIGGS MARINE  SURVEYS LTD  Insurance Claims  Condition and Valuation  Survoys   .  Phone 885-9425  or 885-3643  21.  Mariine  Venture 21 ft. sailboat.  Fibreglass, 6 HP Evinrude trailer,  3 sails, complete $8000.  883-2631. #18  12 ft. fibreglass sailboat c/w rigging $750. 885-5491. #18  11' alum, boat 6 HP Johnson,  oars, lifes., tank $750. Rub. raft  F.2 pad. pump $30. 885-9883.  #18  21' Sunrunner. 200 HP 0/B,  exc. shape (loaded), Roadrunner  trailer $10,500. Also 9.8 HP  Merc 0/B & tank $500.  886-7854. #18  82 20HP long-shaft Merc OB with  controls & extra prop. Low hours.  $600 firm. 886-7283. #18  18.5 Henston cabin cruiser.  Comp. rebuilt volvo & stern drive.  $2000.885-2418. #20  Miniature yacht. 13 ft. twin keel  "Voyageur". Complete with  trailer, sails & Seagull motor.  885-3523. #20  14' aluminium boat. 25 HP  Johnson & trailer 51200. Make  me an offer. 886-9761.        #20  Beautiful seaworthy 20' fishboat.  40 Johnson. $950 OBO.  885-4669. #18  Crown 18' sailboat, 6 HP outboard $4000. 885-2828 after 8  p.rru     #18  22.  Mobile Homes  2 bdrm. duplex Gibsons area, incl. 4 appls.. ht., Igt., & cbl.  Avail. May 15. $400/mo. Sorry  no pets. Ph. 886-7309 after 5  p.m. #18  WAREHOUSE  SHOP SPACE  750 to 2000 sq. ft.  ��� High Ceilings  ��� Large O.H. Doors  ��� Heavy Wiring  Reas. Rates  Call  886-2663  Anytime  Ritz Motel 1 bdrm. rooms for  rent. Daily or weekly rates.  886-2401. #19  Avail. May 1. Clean, spacious  apt./suite. Lr. fam. rm.,  bathrm., kit. on main fl. 3  bdrms., lg. sundeck upstrs.  Lower Gibsons, 4 plex. $340  mth. Ref. 921-7788 after 4 p.m.  TFN  "WE PAY,  YOU  WATCH"  As an added bonus all of  our apartments come  complete with free Pay TV  service. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom  apartments. Available at  reasonable rates.  Phone today.  PAY TV  AT  HARBOUR  HEIGHTS  886-9050  Mobile home space available.  Sunshine Coast Mobile Home  Park. 886-9826. TFN  81 mobile home 14x70. 3 bdrm.,  1 'A baths, 2 sheds, veg & flower  garden on nicely landscaped pad.  $22,000,885-7401. #20  1980 Manco mobile home on  quiet lot. 3 bedrooms, appliances, family room. After 6.  885-2686. #19  I     M  Vjf'i;':  Motorcycles  1981 Honda Silverwing 500 cc.  Fully dressed. Stereo. $2800  OBO. 886-9006 eves. #18  78 Yamaha 650 Special. Good  cond., backrest & skid bars,  helmet $850.885-3337.       #18  Honda Big Red ATC 1983. Exc.  cond. with trailer $1800. Phone  885-2109. #19  1981 Honda CB650 very good  condition $1395. Will consider  trade 886-2929 or 886-8217.  #19  1976 Harley Davidson 1000cc  $3500.885-5941. #19  1980 Honda XL 500. 2200 km,  excellent condition, helmet and  manual. Call 885-4452.        #20  1980 Yamaha 650 maxim. Exquisite cond., new tires,  mechanically and cosmetically  perfect. Priced for quick sale.  $1300. Phone 886-3040.      #20  ME4.  Iwai  D  Wanted to Rent  Young family with small dog  seeks 3 bdrm. house with stove  & fridge in Gibsons area. Exc.  refs. Rent $400-$450. Ph.  886-8604. #19  Wanted by July 1. 3-4 bdrm.  house in Gib. area. Long term  lease or would consider rent to  purch. Exc. ref. 886-8631.    #20  Vane, professional with small  family wishes to rent furnished  cottage for 2-4 wks. July/Aug.  Prefer easy beach access. Ph.  Ross collect 738-7619. #18  c  for Rent  Furn. 1 bdrm. bsmt. ste. newly  renovated, priv. entr. self-  contained, W/W, cable,  wash/dry, etc. Suit quiet clean  N/S. $265/mo. 886-2694.   #18  Rural Gibsons. 2 bdrm. house  trailer. Newly painted & carpeted,  elc. range, fridge, & elc. heat,  curtained. $275/mo. 886-7906.  #18  2 bdrm. suite. Clean, lge., Gibsons harbour view. $375. No  pets, refs. req. 886-7175.    #18  INDUSTRIAL  BUILDING  1,500 sq. ft.  220 Volt Service  Seamount  Industrial Park  Phone Barry or Keith     ! >  886-8141a||||[ \  1 bdrm. acreage in Roberts  Creek. Ref. req. $290/mo.  886-8295. #19  2 bdrm. suite lower Gibsons area.  Avail, immed. $250/month.  References pise. 921-7788 aft. 6  p.m. TFN  Office space for rent, 2nd floor  above Gibsons Building Supplies.  886-8141. TFN  Community Hall for rent in  Roberts Creek. Phone Debbie,  886-3994, 7-10 p.m. TFN  Warehouse-shop space. 1025 sq.  ft., high ceiling, large overhead  doors. Industrial Way, Gibsons  (near Shell station). 886-8226.  #19  Mobile home space. PonderoSu  Pines, adults only. Free est. on  reloc. 885-5995. TFN  4 bdrm., dbl. garage & carport,  Viz bath. On 5 acres. Gibsons.  $475/mo. 886-8006. #18  2 bdrm. apt. No children, no  pets. Fr. & st. incl. Avail. 1st  May. 886-2801. #20  Nice clean 1 bdrm. apt. in quiet  res. area close to shopping centre. $250/mo. Ref. please. Avail.  Jun 1.886-8212. #20  Cozy part. furn. 3 bdrm. cottage.  Wood heat, private yard, garden,  waterfront, Oyster Bay. Reas.  883-9101. #18  2 bdrm. duplex on North Rd. 1 Vz  baths, util., garage w/stor. Close  to schools & mall. Avail. June 1.  $350. Ph. 886-7625. #20  3 bdrm. trailer. Airtight.  $350/mo. Sorry no pets.  886-2726. #20  2 bdrm. trailer $300/mo. Hydro  incl. Sorry no kids or pets.  886-2726. #20  3 bdrm. hse. nice view. Lwr. Gibsons, 5 apis. Ref. req. $500.  886-7037. #20  3 yr. old 3 bedrooms, 2 baths.  Good barn on Vs acre. Stove &  fridge incl. $450/mo. 885-9047.  #18  Trailer rental-Birch Bay by week,  month, etc. After 6 p.m.  271-4820. #20  4 bdrm. house, 5 acres Reed Rd.  Gibsons. $450 per month, 1 year  lease. Avail. July 1st. Ref.  886-8263. #20  Rural Gibsons. 2 bdrm. house  trailer. Newly painted & carpeted,  elc. range, fridge, & elc. heat,  curtained. $275/mo. 886-7906.  #18  2 bdrm. mobile home  $275/month. Sorry no dogs.  886-9581. #19  THE MANSE TOWNHOUSE  IS TAKING RENTAL  APPLICATIONS  D modem two bedroom  townhouse  ��� one and a half baths  n fully carpeted  D five appliances including  dishwasher, washer  and dryer  TJ private sundeck  D enclosed garage  D family oriented  ��� close to Sunnycrest Mall,  schools, tennis court &  jogging field  U good references required  G $425 per month  D call Peter   886-9997  evenings  27.  Help Wanted  Reliable, mature baoysitter  wanted for 2 children in my  home. Some days & nights. Must  have own transport and ref.  885-7024. #19  MHR Social Worker '  Aux. Casual On-Call  Min.   qualifications    BSW  preferably MSW with 3 years  child protection experience.  Responsible for child Protection  Mandate:   investigate   child  physical and sexual abuse cases,  apprehend children, court work,  family and individual counselling,  report writing.  Only those with Protection experience please apply. Submit  applications to MHR, Box 890,  Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0 by May  17,1985. #19  Musicians. Help Sechelt  celebrate Timber Days. Put on  your Heritage costume, play/  sing/dance & have fun. Pass the  hat to merchants & visitors. Sat.  May 18. Phone 885-5858 for info  or just come. #18  Experienced man with axeadze  and chainsaw for part time work.  Also part time helper wanted.  State experience by mail to D.C.  Carter, RR 4, Gower Pt. Road,  Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0.       #19  Part-time waitress with bar exp.  Inquire in person bet. 3-5 at Jade  Palace. #18  Experienced carpenter needed to  work P.H. area. Must be able to  produce without supervision.  885-5448. #18  Serendipity Playschool Pender  Harbour is now accepting applications for the permanent/  part-time position of nursery  school teacher. Begin Sept.  1985. Certification required.  Please send resume c/o Meg  Hunsche, Box 321, Madeira  Park, B.C. VON 2H0. #20  Drywall, painting, carpentry,  finishing work. $8 per hour. Ref.  885-7609. #19  FOR EXPLOSIVE REQUIREMENTS  Dynamite, electric or regular  caps, B line E cord and safety  fuse. Contact Gwen Nimmo,  Cemetery Road, Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound Farmer  Institute. TFN  5 ton truck for hire. Very low  rates with 1 ton powerlift tailgate.  Moving, etc. T. Dawe 885-7518.  #18  Housecleaning. Fast, efficient &  thorough. Excellent references.  885-3618. #18  Will do garden rototilling.  Reasonable, call eves. 886-8487.  WOODEN  BOAT  BUILDER  To repair and restore  12 ft. clinker type boat.  Ph. 886-8708 eves.  (  28.  Work Wanted  TERRY fttcBRlDE  General Contractor  %  886-7289  New   Homes   -   Renovation*^;  -Additions '</���  Tractor to do custom work,  rototilling, plowing also has sm.  backhoe. Phone aft. 6:30 p.m.  886-9959. #18  MUBILE HOME MAINT.  Gutters, skirting, additions,  roofs. Anything to do with mob.  homes. 885-5995. TFN  Landscaping and garden  maintenance, ornamentals,  shaped hedges trimmed, fruit  trees pruned and sprayed. Phone  886-9294 after 6 p.m. TFN  Garden rototilling at its best the  Troy Bilt way. 885-3145.      #20  Drywall taping, texturing,  repairs, renovations. Free  estimates. 886-7484.      .    #19  Falling, selective logging,  slashing. Tidy work, reasonable  rates. T. Dawe 885-7518.     #18  TREE TOPPING  Tree removal, limbing & falling.  Hydro cert, insured & lowest  rates. Jeff Collins 886-8225. #19  Thorough housecleaning $6/hr.  Phone after 5.886-3681.      #19  QUALITY BUILDER  Additions, alterations, new  homes. Free est. & design. 25  yrs exp. Tom Constable  886-9316. #19  Typing services. Don't have a  typewriter? Can't type? Let me  help you both professional and  personal. Call 886-7072 Lauren.  #20  17 year old girl willing to babysit  in own home days or nights.  Phone 886-9767, 5-7 evenings.  #18  Call Garry's Crane for sod, paving stones, RR ties, yellow cedar  4x4's, dead cars & crane jobs.  886-7028. TFN  28.  Work Wanted  Exp. plumber needs work. Old or  new jobs. Reas. rates. 886-9149.  #18  Interior, exterior painting, paper  hanging. Quality work, realistic  prices. Bill Hook 886-9526.   #19  HOUSE PAINTING  Interior and Exterior  Call 886-7619  #22  PEERLESS TREE  SERVICES LTD.  Topping-Limbing-Danger tree  removal. Insured, guaranteed  work. Free estimates. 885-2109.  TFN  Hardwood floors resanded and  finished. Work guaranteed. Free  est. Phone 885-5072. TFN  31.  c  ?��^     Business  Opportunities  Catering bus with all licences.  Full equip, in stainless steel  quality. $9,999 OBO. Open for  trade. 886-7840. #18  DEC-K-ING, installers and suppliers of vinyl for sundecks and  patios has an opening available  for a Dealer to cover the Sunshine  Coast area. Small investment required. Must be credit worthy.  Please reply to: DEC-K-ING,  16082 9th Avenue, White Rock,  B.C. V4A 1A6. #18  Thriving natural & bulk foods  store in Gibsons. Estab. clientele.  Serious parties call 886-7974  before 5 & 886-2937 after 5. #18  Notice of Application for Change  of Name: Notice is hereby given  that an application will be made to  the Director of Vital Statistics for a  change of name pursuant to the  provisions of the "Name Act" by  me Sjoerdje Shirley Woudstra to  Sjoerdje Saya Woods. Dated this  1st of May, A.D. 1985. #18  32.  B.C. & Yukon  1977 Int. 4300 tractor. WHteock  40 ton Lowboy. 1981 Ddoge one  ton Grout truck. 1980 GMC 4x4  crewcab. 1981 Chev 4x4 ere wcab.  1980 GMC 4x4 pickup. 1981 Chev  4x4 crewcab. New 4" water pump  c/w Wisconson 65 hp. motor. Call  Columbia River Steel 837-9281  days, 837-5479 evenings.     #18  Bellingham, Washington motels.  Coachman Inn & Park Motel.  Canadian money at par weekends,  $42 including tax. Through May  12, 1985. (206)671-9000 or Vancouver, B.C. (604)224-6266. #18  in. Fully IBM compatible. 256 K.  Two drive. Serial & parallel out.  Colour board. Amb/grn. monitor.  $2,495. Best prices on IBM.  Phone for quotes. Dealer inquiries  also welcome. Computers 'n Stuff.  581-1615. #18  DC  NOTICE OF INTENTION  TO APPLY FOR A  DISPOSITION OF  CROWN LAND  In the Land Recording  District of Vancouver and  situated in Agamemnon  Channel.  TAKE NOTICE THAT HIGGS  MARINE SERVICES LTD. of  Sechelt, British Columbia,  occupation Marine Towing,  intends to apply for a Log  Storage Lease of the following described lands:  Commencing at a post  planted at the described  point on the site plan running north for 1600 feet,  thence west for 200 feet  back along shoreline for  1600 feet and thence east  for 200 feet, and containing  2.973 hectares more or less.  The purpose for which the  disposition is required is for  log storage.  File No. 2402010  Dated: April 9, 1985  Comments concerning this  application may be made to  the office of the District Land  Manager, 4240 Manor  Street, Burnaby, B.C. V5G  1B2.  32.  B.C. & Yukon  ,onj  Where can you lease a truck for  only $119.97 per month? Call  Dave Hinton collect at 294-9111 or  toll-free at Zenith 2200. After 6  p.m. call collect 590-4589. DL.  5674. TFN  Australia/New Zealand travel  plans? Now you can call free to  ANZA Travel - the Down Under experts. Lowest fares, best planned  trip. 112-800-972-6928.       TFN  10x10' greenhouse kit $149, or  complete mist and drip irrigation  kit $199. Western Water Farms,,  1244 Seymour Street, Vancouver, I  B.C. V6B 3N9. (604)682-6636.  TFN  NOTICE OF INTENTION  TO APPLY FOR A  DISPOSITION OF  CROWN LAND  In Land Recording District of  Lower Mainland Region and  situated New Westminster  District near Egmont.  Take notice that Ward Grif-  fioen, Operations Manager of  Seastar Resource Corporation, occupation Fish  Farmer, intends to appjy for  a Licence of Occupation on  the following described  lands:  Lot #3224 Group Plan I New  Westminster District loc-  cated near Egmont Plan  13217 containing 4.1 ha.  The purpose for which the  disposition is required is  Salmon and Trout Farming.  Comments concerning this  application may be made to  the Senior Land Officer  Ministry Lands, Parks and  Housing 4240 Manor Street,  Burnaby, B.C. V5G1B2. File  #2401984 phone 438-5344.  Ward Griffioen,  Operations Manager  Seastar Resource  Corporation  Dated March 30, 1985  Forage seed discounted during  April 5%. Contact Hannas Seeds,  Lacombe. Alberta. Phone (403)  782-6671. Shop and compare.#17  CVi. \  I       B.C. & YukonJ  Final spring notification. Super  strong ripstop woven greenhouse  polyethylene. 9.5 mils. Minimum  two years longevity. Resists  hailstones, windstorms,  snowstorms, punctures, yellowing, cracking. Waterproof. Ten  feet wide. Any length. Free Canadian postal delivery if prepaid. 18'  square foot. 16' square foot over  200 square feet. 14' square foot  over 500 square feet. (Greater  widths additional costs). Sample,  brochure: send two stamps or  dollar. Greenhouse Sales, Box  1450CN, Altona, Manitoba, ROG  OBO, (204)327-5540. #18  Hong Kong or Taiwan trade directory. 300 manufacturers, 64 illustrated pages, giving you ten  thousand products at prime  prices. Deal direct with the  Fabulous Orient, home of low  prices. Send SASE for free information. Cascade, Box 2082,  Kelowna V1X4K5. #18  "Self-Divorce for B.C." Why pay  more when it's "uncontested"?  Guar, results, saves $100's. Free  .info anytime. Ph..Canadian Para  Legal Concern Ltd: (1973) (604)  683-4024. TFN  BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING  These Ads appear in the more than 70 Newspapers of the B.C. and Yukon Community Newspapers Association and  reach 690.000 homes and a potential 1.8 million readers.  $109. for 25 words  ($3. per each additional word)  Call the COAST NEWS at 885*3930 to place one.  AUTOMOTIVE  Where can you lease a truck  for only $119.97 per month?  Call Dave Hinton collect at  294-0111 or toll-free at Zen-  nith 2200. After 6 p.m. call  collect 590-4589. DL.5674.  FORD TRUCKS...New and  used Ford pickups, vans and  Broncos. Gas or diesel.  Make your next truck purchase or lease a Vancouver  event. Buy from us, we'll  pay your overnight suite at  the Sheridan Plaza. For information call collect, the  truck people, 872-7411. We  are Vancouver's downtown  Ford truck headquarters.  D6102. ���  Tensen two speed winches.  Dealer and individual inquiries invited. Mountain  Off Road, 1740 Everett  Street,   Abbotsford,   B.C.  V2S 4N4. 853-4197.   BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES   18 run boarding kennel,  south Cariboo. Solid small  business. Includes 70' trailer, large add-on, and barn.  Great location situated on  61/2acres. Call 395-3771.  1978 International COE.  8V92T rebuilt June 1984.  RT12509 transmission.  44,000 rear ends. A/C. Winter front. Job available to  qualified applicant. $27,500  O.B.O. 395-4501. .__  FOR SALE: 24 pad mobile  home park, town water &  sewer, underground wiring.  Fully occupied long term  tenants. $120,000. Lots  33/120 from $500. to $2,500.  Phone 842-6054 New Hazel-  ton, B.C.   1979 digging Dutchman tree  mover. Fully equipped and  mounted on a 1974 three ton  International. Phone evenings after 6  p.m.,  Salmon  Arm. 832-3662.   Radio Shack Franchise. Located in mall in Smithers,  B.C. Good lease. Great location. Phone 847-4485.  George Wall, Box 70, Smith-  ers, B.C. VOJ 2N0.   POSTCARDS - Copyrights  and stock of approx. 500  different views from Western Canada. Either total or  individual tourist areas.  Write Box 465, Station "A",  Vancouver V6C 2N2.   SOLAR SPAN Manufacturing Ltd. has developed a  revolutionary system that  heats your hot water, your  residence and swimming  pool with a minimum of 40%  energy cost saving. We design systems for industrial &  commercial buildings.  Grants available for all Installations. Dealerships required immediately. For  info, call Mr. Nicholas 596-  9555.   Complete Deli & Sandwich  shop equipment. Everything  you need to open your own  business for only $18,000.  For detailed list phone: 112  (604)567-2665.      BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES   TRAVEL AGENCY. Interested in owning your own travel  agency? Franchises available with UNIGLOBE, the  largest retail travel franchise  organization in North America. Start up assistance, advertising, market support,  ongoing business development & complete training.  No travel background necessary. Call Uniglobe Travel  (Canada), Richmond, B.C.  (604)270-2241.      EDUCATIONAL   FREE Career Guide describes 200 learn-at-home  correspondence Diploma  Courses: Accounting, Art,  Bookkeeping, Business  Management, Clerk Typist,  Secretary, Journalism, Television Servicing, Travel.  Granton (1A), 1055 West  Georgia, #2002, Vancouver.  (604)685-8923.   TRAIN to be an Optician by  correspondence; six month  course with practical training at our Vancouver facility.  Morse College of Optics,  1439 Kingsway, Vancouver,  V5N 2R6. 876-8489.   EQUIPMENT &  MACHINERY   1977 Miller Asphalt spreader box c/w electric hydraulics. $4,000. Buffalo-Springfield 5-8 ton asphalt roller,  $1,200. Screen assembly and  extensions to 16' to fit Barber Green SA40 or SA41  paver. Will sell extensions  separately. Evenings phone  Ken 112(604)352-7333.  830 John Deere Self Propelled Swather 12' cut. Good,  condition.  Call 112(604)858-  6095.   1980 Western Star conventional 42" sleeper, 240"  W.B., two speed, Eaton rear  ends. NTC 400 big CAMIII,  R.T.O. 14613 trans. Approx.  $95,000 on re-con engine.  C/w job grossinq $10,000  plus per month. Asking  $55,000. O.B.O. Phone 791-  5589.   FOR SALE MISC.   LIGHTING FIXTURES.  Western Canada's largest  display. Wholesale and retail. Free Catalogues available. Norburn Lighting Centre Inc., 4600 East Hastings  Street, Burnaby, B.C. V5C  2K5. Phone 112-299-0666.  TWO FOR ONE Beef Sale.  Introductory offer. Purchase  any side or hind beef order  and a beef rib section and  receive: Bonus #1 - a 100 Ib.  side of pork order FREE.  Bonus #2 - Every order  receives 50 lbs. fancy sausage made from part of your  trimmings. Black Angus  Beef Corp. Serving all of  B.C. Call Toll-free 112-800-  242-0637 or call 438-5357.  Three FMC Skidders, one  ���completely rebuilt, two verv  aood shape. Phone (604)248-  9432 or (604)723-8502.  FOR SALE MISC.  HELP WANTED  REAL ESTATE  one call does it all  25 WORDS $109  885-3930   WOOD AND METAL  WORKING MACHINES.  Quality Tools, lowest prices.  Bandsaws, table saws, jointers, planers, metal/wood  lathes, many more. Free  Catalogue: Busy Bee Machine Tools, 2444 Douglas  Road, Burnaby, B.C. V5C  5B3. Phone 112(604)298-  1754.   Stretch your food dollar with  100% replacement guaranteed bulk food service. Free  province wide delivery, A1  meats & brand name products. Fight inflation now by  calling collect. Canadian  Custom PAK Foods Ltd. 0-  294-1744.   New! The Canadian Honey  Recipe Book. 84 practical  recipes and information in  attractive 41-page booklet.  Cost: $1.25 plus $.75 for  postage and handling. Prepay by cheque or money  order. Order from: Telkwa  Apiaries, Box 290, Telkwa,  B.C. VOJ 2X0.   1982 Custom built Rock Box  including rock scoop and  tailgate. 1975 white 350  Cummins. New style hood  with   gravel   or   rock   box.  112(604)894-6862.   ADULTS XXX VIDEO  TAPES. Highest quality.  Special $39.95 each, three  for $99. Send for title list:  Night Time Video, 2903 A -  31   St.,   Vernon,   B.C.   V1T  5H6.   CAKE DECORATORS ONE  DAY ONLY SUPER SALE.  Decorator books, Wilton party pans, booking orders  only. Saturday, May 11, 10  a.m. - 6 p.m. CAKES FOR  KIDS. 7595 Kingsway, 3ur-  naby. V3N 3C5. 521-1515.  MILITARY GUNS and tons  of parts, accessories, surplus, bayonets, slings, badges, medals, swords, bankrupt stock, aircraft prints  and more. Catalogue $1.  CAN AM, Fruitland, Ont.  LOR 1L0. (416)643-4357.  Movie lovers, let ESSEX  entertain you in the privacy  of your own home. Quality  video, reasonable prices. 1-  800-66-ESSEX. Write Essex,  13381 - 72nd Ave., Surrey,  B.C. V3W 2N5.   250 STANDARD BUSINESS  CARDS. Black printing on  white, $15., or 500 only $23.  Mail copies (no Money).  Will promptly mail your orders Collect: Cards & Labels, Box 1605, Aldergrove,  B.C. VOX 1AO.   GARDENING   SPRING GARDENING.  Everything to start: seeds,  nutrients, heating, lighting,  germination kits, greenhouses, solar openers. Metal  Halides at best prices in  Canada. Send $2. for catalogue and price list to: Western Water Farms, 1244 Seymour   St.,   Vancouver   V6B  3N9. (604)682-6636.   10' x 10' Greenhouse Kit  $149., or with complete mist  and drip irrigation kit $199.  Western Water Farms, 1244  Seymour Street, Vancouver,  B.C. V6B 3N9. (604)682-  6636.   School District No.50 (Queen  Charlotte). Accountant position. Applications are being  invited for the position of  Accountant. This position is  responsible to the Secretary  Treasurer for the accounting  functions of the district. Applicants should hold or be  working towards CGA or  RIA certification. Accounting & payroll are processed  on a digital PDP 11 computer system and experience &  background in computers is  absolutely essential. Commencing salary has been  established at $29,400 per  annum. Duties to commence  at the earliest possible date.  Written applications with resume & recommendations  must be received no later  than 1700 hrs. May 20, 1985,  and should be forwarded to:  D.J. Karlson (Mrs.), School  District No.50 (Queen Charlotte), P.O.Box 69, Queen  Charlotte, B.C. VOT ISO.  Phone 559-8471.   NOTICES  Fish Derby - May long  weekend at Big Lake, B.C.  (near Williams Lake). $500.  1st prize, $1,000 total prizes.  Pre-register Big Lake Store,  Gen. Del., 243-2333.   RADVILLE - LAURIER 75th  HOMECOMING CELEBRATION - July 5, 6 and 7,  1985. Various activities  planned for three days. For  information contact: Homecoming Committee, Box 7,  Radville, Sask. SOC 2G0.  PERSONALS   DATES GALORE. For all  ages and unattached. Thousands of memtfers anxious to  meet you. Prestige Acquaintances. Call Toll Free 112-  800-263-6673. Hours: 9 a.m.  - 7 p.m.   PETS AND LIVESTOCK  CHICKS: Brown egg layers,  Leghorns, meat birds. Order  early, ship anywhere. Napier  Chick Sales, 6743 - 216  Street, Box 59, Milner, B.C.  VOX 1T0. 534-7222.   Registered Norwegian Elk-  hounds. Show and pet. Quality. Health and temperment  guaranteed. Ready to go.  Tatooed. (604)832-6557.  Registered quarter horses.  AQHA Gelding, winning in  QH & open shows. 1984  English & Western winner,  Reno, Cow Palace, shown by  youth. Excellent youth or  Amateur horse. $5,500. K.  Clarke, RR#3., Hayhill Site,  Quesnel. 249-5450.   REAL ESTATE   Timber and agricultural raw  acreages. From four to  seventy-five acre to choose  from. Mid Vancouver Island.  Ballenas Realty, P.O. Box  460, Parksville, B.C. VOR  2S0.   Fantastically beautiful Bulk-  ley Valley Ranch near Smithers, B.C. 500 acres deeded,  plus choice summer range.  Two houses, three barns,  three creeks, 200 acres hay-  land, $300,000. (604)846-  5626 after 4 p.m.   RANCH FOR SALE. 870  acres deeded - 100 acres in  upland hayfields - 40 acres  rough cleared. Creek  through property. Range  permit. 15 miles from 100  Mile House on paved road.  Public school near. 1200 sq.  foot three bedroom home.  Asking $350,000. Phone 397-  2235.   Five bdrm full bsmt. home  on 100' x 70' Indscpd lot.  Three blocks schools & rec.  fac. Three mins. downtown  & Shuswap Lake. B.I. D/W;  Chalmers s/c oven. Jenair.  $85,000. O.B.O. View by  appointment. Box 1353, Salmon Arm, B.C. VOE 2T0.  (604)832-2236, (604)832-  6518.   Double wide "Bendix" mobile home, 1974, 22' x 48',  three bedrooms, IVi baths,  large LR/DR, one owner,  excellent condition, $23,000.  40 miles east of Calgary-  Trans Canada. Phone (403)  934-5363.   Mobile Home Pads in Cultus  Lake near Chilliwack, some  with natural Gas. Adult and  Family areas, close to school  and Lake, Waterslides, Riding Stables, Golf. 112(604)  858-3196. Relocation assis-  tance available.          SERVICES   Dealing with ICBC on Personal Injury Claims? W.  Carey Linde, BA LLB, Barrister and Solicitor, 1650  Duranleau, VANCOUVER,  B.C. V6K 3S4. Phone Collect  0-684-7798 for Free How to  Information: ICBC Claims  and Awards. Member: Trail  Lawyers Association of Bri-  tish Columbia.   TRAVEL   AUSTRALIA/NEW ZEALAND travel plans? Now you  can call free to ANZA Travel  - the Down Under experts.  Lowest fares, best planned  trip. 112-800-972-6928.  Sailing vacations from Vancouver. Cruise 'N Learn,  bareboat charters. Plan your  summer sailing now. The Jib  Set Sailing Centre, 1020  Beach Ave., Vancouver.  B.C. V6E 1T7. (604)689-  1477.   Summer Horse Camp. Reg- '  ister Now. Circle "J"  Square Ranch. An exciting  well supervised program.  For application forms call  791-5545 or 112-800-452-  5126. 100 Mile House.   Looking for fulfilling excitement? Come volunteer your  services at Circle "J"  Square Ranch. An interdenominational program includes horsemanship and  motorcycles. 791-5545 or  112-800-452-5126.   WANTED  Used printing equipment  needed. Print shop requires  guillotine paper cutter, numbering machine, perforator,  folder in good condition. Box  126, Whistler, B.C. VON 1B0  or (604)932-5131. Coast News, May 6,1985  Continued from page 1  anyone wants to donate to us  the contribution will be partially  tax deductible."  The funds are needed to complete the pole and landscaping  of the Native botanical garden  which will contain almost 50  varieties of traditionally- used  native plants.  It is hoped that the 42 foot  pole, being carved by Indian ar  tist Norman Tate, will be raised  on July 15, and that the  building will open August 5.  The grand opening will take  place at a yet to be determined  date in October.  Drop off your  COAST NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  . at  Books ����� Stuff  Sechelt  until noon Saturday  "A FrtofMfty fopto tKaMUB**  t  21  ���j  PERMIT HUHSER 216-3-25/87  Notice is given pursuant to section 25 of the  Pesticide Control Act regulations, that Peat Mar??  wick Limited. Trustee for L & K Lumber Ltd. wilt.^  undertake a ttsrMcSdt trutresst sppfcathn on  F. L. A19229 C.P. 11, Block F near Kteindate'fof'  the Pender Harbour Area. The herbicide Round-**  up (glyphos3te, P.C.P. Act Reg. No. 13644) mrilr-  be used on 36.0 hectares using ground appHca~9  Hon equipment. ��� !0J  The treatment objective is to remove competing<?  brush from a conifer plantation to initiate conifer  release. ..- ;r  The application will take place between July 1, ���  1985 wid AuguJt-31. 1S��7.  Maps and information of ths treatment area may"'  be viewed at the office of L & K Lumber Ltd. Foot -  of Philip Ave.. P.O. BOX 86219. North Van-'?,  eouver. B.C. V7L4K2 Phone: 988-2181. ���;  The Gibsons Building Supplies Iruck brings some of the fir rafters for use in construction of the Native  Education Centre long house in Vancouver. -i,��� smith Pb��t..  Chamber gains members  Memberships have been adding up for the Gibsons and  District Chamber of Commerce  as a result of its membership  drive instituted last month.  At the beginning of last week,  membership stood at 56, The  sixtieth and most recent  member to join is the Harbour  Cafe in the lower village,  operated by Marianne Daem  and her partner Jean Howden.  They took over the old Heron  Cafe location early this year and  before opening for business,  completely remodelled the  premises. Already, the cafe is  becoming noted for its' low-cost  home cooking and friendly service.  Credit  Unions aid  Fonyo  Credit Unions in British Columbia are participating in Steve  Fonyo's "Journey For Lives"  by accepting donations to this  worthy cause. Donations which  may be made at most branches  of Credit Unions in the province, will be forwarded to the  Canadian Cancer Society. The  Canadian Cancer Society will  issue official tax receipts to the  donors.  Phil Dubois of Fairview Road,  Gibsons, snapped this picture of  an albino robin when it came to  pay a visit last April 16.  ���I'hilip Dubois prtoK)  Police  news  A reminder to motorists that  all studded tires must be removed as of May 1, 1985. Fine for  failing to comply is $35  GIBSONS RCMP  A Gibsons man was charged  with impaired driving on April  28 after he was observed by  police at 3:03 a.m. leaving the  Gibsons Legion area and  displaying signs of impairment.  On May 1, two outboard  motors and assorted fishing  equipment were stolen from the  outside of a Leek Road  residence. Total value of the  goods taken amounted to $600.  Police require the assistance  of the public in locating a small  pick-up with wooden side  panels which accidently spilt  some paint on Highway 101 on  April 23 around 8 a.m. while  travelling to Langdale Ferry  Terminal from Earls Cove Ferry  Terminal. If you witnessed this  incident please contact the Gibsons RCMP as soon as possible.  SECHELT RCMP  A Honda motor and a marine  battery were reported stolen  from a boat moored in Madeira  Park on April 30; the motor  and battery are valued at $1600.  On May 1, an outboard  motor valued at $1000 was  taken from a boat docked at  Coho Marina.  The chamber is planning a  social gathering for members  next Tuesday, May 14 at 7:30  p.m. in the Marine Room under  the library. The event, open to  members and guests, is to be a  wine and cheese party, sponsored by the Mark Anthony  Group, wine merchants.  Verna Sim, the chamber  manager would like anyone invested in becoming a member  to come and meet the others.  Please let her know by calling  her at the chamber office at  886-2325 between the hours of  10 and 2 p.m.  The chamber also would like  to remind everybody that the  Salmon Shark Derby is taking  place this month on May 18 and  19. Tickets can be purchased at  the Gibsons Marina.  No to Star Wars  No Canadian Participation  >ngratulating themselves on each receiving $150 from the Gibsons  RCMP Detachment are Coach (also Constable) Gary Groenke of  S.C. Minor Football and Murray Wilson of the Gibsons Minor  Baseball. Gibsons RCMP, represented here by Constable Chuck  Clark also donated $200 to Elphinstone secondary to help in computer instruction. The funds were raised from this winter's RCM P  Winter Fishing Derby. -BradB.ns.HipiM.il.  Crime of the Week  Sometime between 9 a.m. on  Tuesday March 5 and 9 a.m; on  Wednesday, March 6 someone  broke into a pump house  located on the Lower Road,  near Leek Road in the Roberts  Creek area and stole a chart  recorder valued at $1,000.  The lock was pried off the  pumphouse door and the culprit  proceeded inside to where the  chart recorder was mounted on  a wall.  The thief took special care to  disconnect the wires and place  connectors on the ends to prevent electrocution.  The chart recorder was then  removed from its mounts and  taken from the pumphouse,  placed in the thief's vehicle  which was then driven away in  an undetermined direction.  The chart recorder is describ-:  ed as a Honeywell, model no.  AR100; it is 15 inches square  with a white face and a circular  graph in the centre. It is  specifically used to measure the  flow of water through the pumphouse pipes.  Someone knows something  about this crime and we want to  hear from you! If you have information about this crime or  any other crime call Crime  Stoppers (at 886-TIPS). You do  not have to give your name and  the calls are not traced.  The Crime of the Week is  aired on Channel 10, Monday  to Friday at 12:30 and 3:30 p.m.  and Wednesday and Thursday  at 7 and 8 p.m.  The Reagan Administration has given Canada,  all NATO countries and Japan, 60 days to  declare support for the U.S. Star Wars.  Canadians want no part of Reagan's Star  Wars that will lock our country once and for all  into the U.S. first-strike nuclear war strategy.  Star Wars do not spell peace and security for  the world.  Star Wars (.Strategic Defense Iniliative) is  not defensive. Its concept of a shield against  "enemy" weapons is part of the insane U.S.  plan for a first-strike with nuclear weapons in  an unwinnable nuclear war ��� with Canada  likely to be a "no man's land" of total  desolation.  The U.S. nuclear war hawks' Star Wars  program is a deadly escalation into space of the  arms race. A U.S. move to militarize space and  practise nuclear blackmail, as it did in the late  forties, will obviously be countered by the  Soviet Union, which opposes the  militarization of space.  Star Wars most dangerously increases the  threat of nuclear war and humankind's  annihilation.  Once commenced, the militarization of  space could lead to an uncontrollable arms  race.  There is no time to be lost!  Prime Minister Mulroney says Canadian  iny'Qlvs?rnent in Stjjr Wars will create jobs. ,  Canadians ask: |Why Star Wars to create  jobs?  Arms spending is a net destroyer of jobs.  ���^Peacetime construction is the way for job  creation. Diversion of arms spending to  socially useful projects is the way.to create  jobs! The Government is using jobs as bait to  get Canadians to support Reagan's Star Wars  program and Canada's participation in it.  Reagan says Star Wars is only a research  program.  It is not! Canadians know that the Manhattan  Project was "only research", at first. It ended  40 years ago with the U.S. atomic bombing of  Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  Canadians say: We want peace and security  for our country and people, peace and security  for the world.  Canadians of all walks of life ��� Now is the  time to tell Mulroney. to tell Reagan:  ��� No to Star Wars!  ��� No Canadian involvement in the U.S. Star  Wars!  ��� The Geneva negotiations between the USA  and the Soviet Union must succeed in  preventing an arms race in space and ending  it on earth!  ��� Canada demands that the U.S.  Administration respond positively to the  April 7 unilateral moratorium on Soviet  missile deployment announced by the  USSR's Mikhael Gorbachev.  Full support for the Geneva negotiations to  succeed on the basis of last January's -  USA-USSR agreement that the questions of  space weapons, strategic and intermediate  nuclear weapons must all be considered and'  resolved ��� in their interrelationship!  Let our voice be heard!  There is still time!  Sunshine Coast Club - Communist Party of Canada  P.O. Box 302, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1VO  Re.v.lution adopted by ihe 26th Coimntion, Communist I'artv or Canada  April 5-8, 1985, Toronto  Ksucd by the Central Ku-rutite Committee, CoinmuniM I'artv or Canada  24 Cecil Street, Toronto M5T IN2. (416) 979-2109  Green Onion Earth Station  886-7414  Port Mellon  884-5240  Movies, movies,  and much, much more...  Satellite TV opens up a galaxy of entertainment  for you and your family���news, music, sports and  educational programming. And it costs less  than you might think.  Ca|l or visit us today for more information  and a live Satellite TV demonstration.  Plug into a new world of  television entertainment!  8 ft. system  Phone for a FREE Booklet  "TUNING IN TO  SATELLITE T.V."  Other Systems to $600000  INCLUDES:  ��� 8 ft. Spun Aluminum Dish  ��� Polar Mount  ��� Polar Rotor If  ��� 120�� Low Noise Amplifier  ��� Down Converter  ��� Satellite Receiver  (Block Down Converted) 22.  Coast News, May 6,1985  f{?V>  Birr ell says  Guess Where  The usual prize of $5 will be awarded to the first entry which correctly locates the above. Send your entries to reach the Coast News, Box  460, Gibsons, this week. Last week's winner was T.L. Haikonen,  R.R. 1, Sechelt, who correctly located the small cart used as a flower  container at Joppe's Antique Shop, Binnacle Road, Sechelt.  Sechelt s still upbeat  about independence  A visit to Ottawa last week  endorsed the good feelings the  Sechelt Indian Band has about  its push towards self-  government, said Chief Stan  Dixon, in a conversation with  the Coast News.  "It's made us feel a lot  better," Dixon said, "We have  about 83 per cent of the Act  finalized now, with only 17 per  cent to go. It makes us feel as  though we're getting  somewhere.  All-party support for the  legislation is a further encouragement as are the attitudes  of the departments of justice  and finance. The process is taking a great deal of time, but, as  Dixon points out, the Indian  people have been waiting for a  hundred years, so another few  months is neither here nor  there.  Lawyers from the federal  government have been meeting  again with lawyers from the  Band in order to further clarify  the SIB Act, so that nothing will  impede its swift progress  through cabinet and parliament  when the time comes.  "They're not arguing with  us," said Dixon, "now they  want to put their heads together  to make it work for us. We are  trying to work together with the  federal government to make it  so that Sechelt can be a  beneficial resource to the nation."  Total agreement over financing and land rights still has to be  reached, but Dixon is optimistic. "If we don't reach  agreement it will be a bad  thing," he said. "They will have  lost their credibility."  In the meantime the chief and  counsellors are working  towards establishing a new attitude on the Sechelt reserve;  self-esteem and self-help are  priorities and it seems to be  working, according to Dixon.  Vandalism is down on the  reserve, and many of the  younger band members are now  starting to develop an interest in  the workings of the band, he  said.  "We want our people to learn  how to earn what we get," Dixon explained, "as long as you're  given things, you never learn  how to respect them. This going  for self-government has made a  lot of our people stop and think  about how their behaviour  reflects on the Band as a whole,  and that's a good thing."  May is Cystic  Fibrosis month  Cystic fibrosis is second only  to cancer in taking the lives of  Canadian children, striking at  one in every 1800 births. One in  every 20 Canadians carries the  gene for this hereditary disease.  Still with no known cure or  means of detection, it kills by  attacking primarily the lungs  and digestive system of its victims.  May is cystic fibrosis month.  Up an down the Coast, coin  containers have been placed in  stores by the local chapter of the  Canadian Cystic Fibrosis  Foundation in a fund raising effort to finance further research  and support CF clinics.  The local chapter, headed by  Mrs. Elva Dinn, whose granddaughter is afflicted with the  disease, has already had help  from the Halfmoon Bay Hams,  who raised over $400 with their  recent benefit dance.  Anyone wishing further information can contact Mrs.  Dinn at 885-2361.  Fussy?  wayne ross  Excavating  Septic Fields  Water Lines  Landscaping  Ditching  Wells  22 Years Of Experience Working For You  10% Discount  To SENIORS  FREE  -5617     ESTIMATES  "FOR ALL YOUR BACKHOE NEEDS'  ^e Coast Commumty Servjce  Former NDP leadership candidate Margaret Birrell visited  the Coast last month and told  NDP members at a meeting in  Chatelech secondary school that  the party had to decide whether  it was going to be just an electoral machine or a broad social  movement.  It was the same message that  Birrell brought with her to the  Coast during the leadership  campaign and so impressed  local members of her party that  she was the choice of local  delegates for leader of the party  at the convention subsequently  won by Bob Skelly.  What makes the Birrell pitch  for a broad-based social  political movement impressive is  perhaps the fact that she is  without question one of the  foremost experts that the NDP  has in the business of running  elections. Her skills in electoral  organization have been utilized  in recent months by MLA Bob  Williams in his campaign for  Dave Barrett's old seat in Vancouver East; by Margaret Mitchell in the federal election; and  by the COPE slate in the recent  municipal elections.  Despite her impressive record  of successful activity in the  business of getting people  elected to office, Birrell calls for  a more democratic structuring  of the NDP organization as the  surest long-term route to  political success.  "You've got the electoral  machinery and the legislature,"  said Birrell. "All the decisions  are made at the top. Members  are restricted to raising funds to  get people elected. Any dissent  or disagreement is regarded as  party disloyalty. It's very  unhealthy."  "The CCF began as a broad  political movement and that's  what we should still be. Decisions should be reached at the  grassroots level and power  should be delegated to representatives very cautiously.  "I believe in a broad social  and political movement. When  the CCF party was formed people were looking for a solution  to the ruthlessness /. of  capitalism. But power didn't  come quickly enough so we  moved away from building. a  broader base, looking for a  quick political fix and it hasn't  worked."  Charging that the NDP has  been run in recent years by a  'centrist group looking for safe  issues', Birrell said that the  NDP is not offering a clear  policy alternative.  "We should be looking at the  structure and attitudes within  the party," said Birrell. "Right  now, both the structure and the  attitudes are undemocratic. If  we   do   not   turn   the   social  democratic party into a broad-  based political movement the  forces of the right will keep winning.  "If we openly admit what we  think is wrong and work collectively to find solutions, then we  build a stronger base for the  future."  C,^  's ***;  ety  Invites all members, former members, directors, staff and public to its  ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING  7:30 p.m. - 29 May, 1985  Roberts Creek Elementary School  Open  7 days  a week  9-6  886-9889  MojIerCorti  OWNED & OPERATED BY DICK & SHIRLEY BOWERS  Come join us for  MOTHER'S DAY  May 11 & 12  A FREE PLANT for every Mom!  \t��*  Potted  Miniature  Roses  (while supplies last)  %  ********  WEDDING  FLOWERS  Fresh or Silk  We're easy to find  and well worth it  Special  Mother's Day  WICKER  BASKETS  NORTH RD.  REED RD.  ~\  TO FERRY  886-9889     CHAMBERLIN rd. off north road   Lj2^  SPECTRUM^  the sporty  small car that's got it all.  A last, a small car that delivers sporty performance, North American style room  and one of the best fuel economy ratings for a 4-door sedan ever reported by  Transport Canada.  The car? Chevrolet's new Spectrum.   The secret? An engine designed to  optimize performance with economy, powering a vehicle built around sophisticated  concepts in a computer-aided design.  From the outside, Spectrum looks sleek and contemporary,  with flush mounted windshield, aircraft-like doors and wraparound bumpers that slip gracefully through the wind.  Inside Spectrum, four six-footers ride in room and comfort.  Careful attention to spring rates-.and shock absorber tuning  contributes to their smooth, stable ride.  And from the driver's seat? Spectrum is quick and  responsive, thanks to a carefully matched power-to-weight  ratio, rack-and-pinion steering, MacPherson-strut front  suspension, power front disc brakes and front-wheel drive  design.  At General Motors, a lot of new thinking has  gone into our products. New thinking aimed  at completely satisfying you, the customer.  Our designers and engineers are making  history in aerodynamic design, computer-  aided technology, fuel efficiency and safety.  As further proof of our goal of totally  satisfying you at GM dealerships we are  implementing a "Commitment to  Excellence" Delivery Procedure.  The program includes a thorough new-  vehicle inspection by both the service  technician and the salesperson; a full tank  of fuel; plus a follow-up survey based on  your impression of the delivery process.  With a commitment like that, you've got a  lot ot excellent reasons to "Look at GM  Today".

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