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Sunshine Coast News Jun 6, 1983

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 .1  LEGISLATIVE LIBRARY     84 2  Parliament Buildings  l'-*oria, B.C.  1X4  ^)n VIC claims  Skelly claims unfair  treatment of fishermen  Norman Tait and Earl Carter began work last week on a dugout canoe on Marine Drive in Gibsons...  �� The plight of West Coast  fishermen: was ignored by both  Liberals and Conservatives iri  ^the House of ^Commons last  ^ week as debate oh amendments.,  ���to   the   Unemployment   Insurance Act began, MP Ray  7Skelly told; the Coast News.  v    Skelly,.member of parlia-  - vinent for this area, and the New  ^Democratic :o Party's,  fisheries  <�� critic,   was   most   concerned  <* because an "agreement" bet-'  j^ween Liberal and Conservative  v^MPs to "deal expeditiously"  i with amendments to the act  ^ meant that only amendments  t put forth by the government  f would  be considered: .'These  ' amendments, under Bill C156,  ' recommended the granting of  . maternity   benefits   to   both  . natural and adoptive parents X  Rafter the arrival df a child, and  .^were supported by all parties.  >_    New Democrats tried to put  forth   amendments   which  would eliminate the restrictive  measures presently applied only to fishermen and grant them  '"equitable access1' to. U.I.  benefits.  The only self-employed  group to be eligible to contribute to and: apply for  unemployment benefits, due to  the fact that they can only ply  their trade during seasons and  for periods of time regulated by  government, fishermen are also  the only, group which can make  contributions only between  May 15 and November 15 of  any year. They can collect  benefits only from November  15 to May 15.  xx If, due to limited openings,  mechanical problems, illness or  whatever, a fisherman does hot  fish enough weeks to be eligible  for benefits, U.I. credit gained  from working at other jobs  during the year is not applied to  his total contributions. If he is  artist  by Lynn Lindsay  ...By week's end the canoe was.taking obvious shape. See adjacent story.  ���Photos by George Matthews and Lynn Lindsay i  * Renowned Canadian artist,  ' Norman Tai^, is iri; Gibsons this  4 week on a prOjject which will  , transform a jredcedar log into a  - 16-foot Northern-style canoe.  Tait, a NisHga; Indian; and  f Vancouver resident, is internationally known for his artistry  in sculpture and carving. Upon  completion of the Gibsons pro-  , ject, the^ canoe will Jbe shipped  s to Ottawa where it will be used  vJUs thei mediUm^i^11* exhibit;  "une 24rtP^fism^T^t!s:  ^ design and carving[skills.    ; xx'  Gibsons resident Earl Garter  is assisting Tait to layout the  design from a model; cutting  and finishing-the deck, bow  and sternp and finally aligning  and hollowing out the canoe.  Tait    and    Carter    have  previously worked together on  a canoe at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of  '., British Columbia.  I     Carter's expertise  and  the  ! desirable  working  conditions  in Gibsons, .brought Tait here  to build his third canoe. It is expected to be ready on June 12  for shipment to Ottawa.  ��� injured or ill during the fishing  season (May 15-November 15),  even if. he has worked enough  weeks to be eligible for  benefits, he cannot collect  them.  Amendments   proposed   by  the NDP would see all benefits ;  contributed  by   fishermen  at.-  any time during the year totall- -  ed to determine eligibility, and -  would   allow   fishermen   to  qualify for benefits at any time  as well. As with other workers,  with sufficient weeks of contributions they would be eligible for benefits if injured or ill.  Another  NDP  criticism  is";  that   the  Unemployment   Insurance Commission does not.  specifically train its officers to v>  deal with the complex claims of :  fishermen. With most applications      coming      around  November 15, there is suddenly   ;  a huge backlog of applications   '  and  it  takes  weeks   for  the  claims to be processed.  Both Conservatives and  Liberals shot down NDP attempts to introduce these  amendments, saying they could  be introduced at a later date.  However, Skelly claims debate  on the Unemployment Insurance Act will not come up  again in this season.  30,000 salmon  swim to freedom  Schools in confusion  by Maryanne West  Schoql District No. 46 is still  waiting for a decision from the  arbitration commissioner, Ed  Peck, as to whether the  teachers' three per cent salary  increase has been approved or  not; leaving the whole system,  teachers, trustees and administration in a state of confusion and frustration.  : If the three per cent salary  increase is approved, this  district will be short some  $330,000. Even a zero per cent  increase in staff salaries will  leave the district $90,000 short.  At a special meeting last  Monday trustees decided that  before wrestling with the problems of lay-offs and cutbacks  they'd do everything possible  to try to obtain further funding.  They have" asked for a  budget review at the earliest  possible date and all trustees  expressed a willingness to take  time off to go to Victoria if  allowed enough notice.  Secretary-treasurer Roy  Mills met with Jack Fleming,  an assistant to the finance  director of the ministry of  education last month and again  pointed out that the government's finance formula is not  achieving the government's  stated aim, the so-called zero  option; in short no loss of jobs,  but no salary increase;  What has happened is that  districts which have a falling  enrolment such as Powell River  and Howe Sound, have enough  money alloted them to maintain staff levels and ialso pay  three per cent salary increases  while growing districts like ours  will face a deficit even with no  salary increase. Fleming agreed  thatx Mills has some valid points  but that there is no way the formula .can be changed this year.  The best we can hope for is  that, the government will  honour its riiuch publicized intention not to jeopardize jobs  or programmes arid will allow  this district a budget overrun.  The board will make as strong  a case as possible to' be able to  pay the staff the three per cent.  Details   of   the   options  available to the board, if the  budget cannot be revised or can  only be revised to a zero option, are to be made available  to the teachers association,  CUPE and the newspapers.  Danger of deer  for motorists  Sechelt RCMP has warned  motorists of an increasing  number of motor vehicle accidents involving deer on the  roads in the area.  During the past two weeks at  least five incidents of deer being killed by motor vehicles  have been reported. This week  a deer was hit on Highway 101  at Norwest Bay Road. Later in  the week, on June 3, another  deer was killed at Trout Lake  near Halfmoon Bay.  Police warn that cars hitting  deer or other animals can pose  a serious threat to motorists, as  often the animal will crash into  the windshield after being  struck.  Motorists are advised to use  extreme caution at all times  while driving on local  highways, particularly in the  twilight hours.  Police boat burns  At approximately 3"aim. on May 28,.a fire occurred on a  boat moored at the Omega Restaurant's wharf. The boat, a  20' Double Eagle, belonged to the Gibsons RCMP.  Fire investigators haye determined the fire to have been  deliberately started and that an accelerant had been used.  The fire, which started in the stern, completely gutted the  boat causing $30,000 in damages. It is believed however that  the motor and the leg might be salvageable.  The blaze also slightly damaged the Alibi Wahob and a  boat belonging to Mo Girard. Sortie minor damage was also  sustained by the Omega Restaurant's wharf.  Wharf entertainment  Next week at the Market on the,Wharf, the Centennial  '86 Society will present singer Hahle Gerow accompanied by  Jerome Travis and Bud Schachte.  Merchandise, crafts and food will be on hand to buy so  'Come On Down' to the wharf this Sunday.  Area F meets  The Area F (Langdale-Port Mellon-Gambier) planning  committee meeting will be held tonight, Monday, June 6,  at Langdale Elementary School at 7:30 p.m.  , Guest speaker will be Jim Gurney, vice-chairman of the  regional board. All area residents are invited to attend.  More  than  40  people  including   government   fisheries  K ejcper^an^  ���Secheltiridiari-^Sana" observed^  :the release of 30,000, one-year  old salmon Saturday, at the Indian Band hatchery in Porpoise  Bay.  This release, which included  more than 14,000 Chinook and  16,000 Coho follows the release  of more than 40,000 salmon  last month.  ' Hatchery manager Bob Baptiste told the Coast News that  the salmon released Saturday  will stay in the area for about  two weeks before heading out  to sea. They will return in one  to two years.  Mr. Baptiste said that fish  released from the Sechelt hatchery have been reported  caught as far away as northern  California. When they return  they will lay eggs in one of the  three streams adjacent to the  hatchery.  At Saturday's release, the  first enclosure containing more  than 5,000 young salmon was  opened by the crew, but the  fish Continued swimming in, the.  .- sarrie pfttern1 for more^  "������ a hour, despite the fact that'  without the enclosing nets they  were free to swim away.  There appeared to be a conditioned pattern from the large  school that kept them swimming in a clockwise formation  where the net used to be.  After a time some of the  young people present threw:  food outside the swimming cir-:  cle and, gradually, the school  began to disperse. Biologists  present were intrigued and said  they had never before observed  the phenomenon.  The economic benefits of the  Sechelt hatchery are thought to  be considerable, providing  salmon for the sports fishery!  both in the Inlet and outside.  It was noted at a recent  meeting of the Sunshine Coast  economic commission that the  value of one fish caught by the  sports fishery in B.C. may be  as high as $200.  Area E also  The last meeting of the Elphinstone Electors' Association  to be held before September will be held on Wednesday,  June 8, in Cedar Grove School at 8 p.m.  The association of residents of regional area E (Gower  Point-Pratt Road) will discuss subdivision in the area, water  supply, the controversial K-zoning, settlement plan, assess  ment, and parks. .  Bob Baptiste, manager of the Sechelt Indian Band hatchery in Porpoise Bay, demonstrates for camera how lively his year old salmon  are during feeding time. Minutes later the salmon were released into  the bay as part of the band's continuing salmon enhancement programme, ���(ienrge Matthews pholo .1  LEGISLATIVE LIBRARY     84 2  Parliament Buildings  l'-*oria, B.C.  1X4  ^)n VIC claims  Skelly claims unfair  treatment of fishermen  Norman Tait and Earl Carter began work last week on a dugout canoe on Marine Drive in Gibsons...  �� The plight of West Coast  fishermen; was ignored by both  Liberals and Conservatives iri  ^the House of ;.Coriim6ns last  ^ week as debate oh amendments.,  to   the   Unemployment   Insurance Act began, MP Ray  7Skelly told; the Coast News.  v    Skelly,; meriiber of parlia-  - vment for this area, and the New  ^Democratic;: Party's   fisheries  <�� critic,   was   most   concerned  <* because an "agreement" bet-'  j^ween Liberal and Conservative  v^MPs to "deal expeditiously"  i with amendments to the act  ^ meant that only amendments  t put forth by the government  f would  be considered: .'These  ' amendments, under Bill C156,  ' recommended the granting of  . maternity   benefits   to   both  . natural and adoptive parents X  Rafter the arrival tif a child, and  .^were supported by all parties.  >_    New Democrats tried to put  forth   amendments   which  would eliminate the restrictive  measures presently applied only to fishermen and grant them  '"equitable access1' to. U.I.  benefits.  The only self-employed  group to be eligible to contribute to and: apply for  unemployment benefits, due to  the fact that they can only ply  their trade during seasons and  for periods of time regulated by  government, fishermen are also  the only, group which can make  contributions only between  May 15 and November 15 of  any year. They can collect  benefits only from November  15 to May 15.  xx If, due to limited openings,  mechanical problems, illness or  whatever, a fisherman does riot  fish enough weeks to be eligible  for benefits, U.l. credit gained  from working at other jobs  during the year is not applied to  his total contributions. If he is  artist  by Lynri Lindsay  ...By week's end the canoe was.taking obvious shape. See adjacent story.  ���Photos by George Matthews and Lynn Lindsay i  * Renowned Canadian artist,  ' Norman Tai^, is iri; Gibsons this  4 week on a prOjject which will  , transform a jredcedar log into a  - 16-foot Northern-style canoe.  Tait, a Nishga. Indian; and  f Vancouver resident, is internationally known for his artistry  in sculpture and carving. Upon  completion of the Gibsons pro-  , ject, the^ canpe will Jbe: shipped  s to Ottawa where it will be used  vJUs thei mediUm^i^11* exhibit;  ^lune 24rtP^fism^T^t!s:  ^ design and carving[skills.    ; xx'  Gibsons resident Earl Garter  is assisting Tait to layout the  design from a model; cutting  and finishing-the deck, bow  and sternp and finally aligning  and hollowing out the canoe.  Tait    and    Carter    have  previously worked together on  a canoe at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of  '., British Columbia.  I     Carter's expertise  and  the  ! desirable  working  conditions  in Gibsons, .brought Tait here  to build his third canoe. It is expected to be ready on June 12  for shipment to Ottawa.  ��� injured or ill during the fishing  season (May 15-November 15),  even if. he has worked enough  weeks to be eligible for  benefits, he cannot collect  them.  Amendments   proposed   by  the NDP would see all benefits ;  contributed  by   fishermen  at.-  any time during the year totall- -  ed to determine eligibility, and -  would   allow   fishermen   to  qualify for benefits at any time  as well. As with other workers,  with sufficient weeks of contributions they would be eligible for benefits if injured or ill.  Another  NDP  criticism  is;  that   the  Unemployment   Insurance Commission does not.  specifically train its officers to v;  deal with the complex claims of :  fishermen. With most applications      coming      around  November 15, there is suddenly   ;  a huge backlog of applications   '  and  it  takes  weeks   for  the  claims to be processed.  Both Conservatives and  Liberals shot down NDP attempts to introduce these  amendments, saying they could  be introduced at a later date.  However, Skelly claims debate  on the Unemployment Insurance Act will not come up  again in this season.  30,000 salmon  swim to freedom  Schools in confusion  by Maryanne West  Schoql District No. 46 is still  waiting for a decision from the  arbitration commissioner, Ed  Peck, as to whether the  teachers' three per cent salary  increase has been approved or  not; leaving the whole system,  teachers, trustees and administration in a state of confusion and frustration.  : If the three per cent salary  increase is approved, this  district will be short some  $330,000. Even a zero per cent  increase in staff salaries will  leave the district $90,000 short.  At a special meeting last  Monday trustees decided that  before wrestling with the problems of lay-offs and cutbacks  they'd do everything possible  to try to obtain further funding.  They have" asked for a  budget review at the earliest  possible date and all trustees  expressed a willingness to take  time off to go to Victoria if  allowed enough notice.  Secretary-treasurer Roy  Mills met with Jack Fleming,  an assistant to the finance  director of the ministry of  education last month and again  pointed out that the government's finance formula is not  achieving the government's  stated aim, the so-called zero  option; in short no loss of jobs,  but no salary increase;  What has happened is that  districts which have a falling  enrolment such as Powell River  and Howe Sound, have enough  money alloted them to maintain staff levels and also pay  three per cent salary increases  while growing districts like ours  will face a deficit even with ho  salary increase. Fleming agreed  thatx Mills has some valid points  but that there is no way the formula .can be changed this year.  The best we can hope for is  that, the government will  honour its riiuch publicized intention not to jeopardize jobs  or programmes arid will allow  this district a budget overrun.  The board will make as strong  a case as possible to' be able to  pay the staff the three per cent.  Details   of   the   options  available to the board, if the  budget cannot be revised or can  only be revised to a zero option, are to be made available  to the teachers association,  CUPE and the newspapers.  Danger of deer  for motorists  Sechelt RCMP has warned  motorists of an increasing  number of motor vehicle accidents involving deer on the  roads in the area.  During the past two weeks at  least five incidents of deer being killed by motor vehicles  have been reported. This week  a deer was hit on Highway 101  at Norwest Bay Road. Later in  the week, on June 3, another  deer was killed at Trout Lake  near Halfmoon Bay.  Police warn that cars hitting  deer or other animals can pose  a serious threat to motorists, as  often the animal will crash into  the windshield after being  struck.  Motorists are advised to use  extreme caution at all times  while driving on local  highways, particularly in the  twilight hours.  Police boat burns  At approximately 3 aim. on May 28,.a fire occurred on a  boat moored at the Omega Restaurant's wharf. The boat, a  20' Double Eagle, belonged to the Gibsons RCMP.  Fire investigators haye determined the fire to have been  deliberately started and that an accelerant had been used.  The fire, which started in the stern, completely gutted the  boat causing $30,000 in damages. It is believed however that  the motor and the leg might be salvageable.  The blaze also slightly damaged the Alibi Wahob and a  boat belonging to Mo Girard. Sortie minor damage was also  sustained by the Omega Restaurant's wharf.  Wharf entertainment  Next week at the Market on the,Wharf, the Centennial  '86 Society will present singer Hahle Gerow accompanied by  Jerome Travis and Bud Schachte.  Merchandise, crafts and food will be on hand to buy so  'Come On Down' to the wharf this Sunday.  Area F meets  The Area F (Langdale-Port Mellon-Gambier) planning  committee meeting will be held tonight, Monday, June 6,  at Langdale Elementary School at 7:30 p.m.  , Guest speaker will be Jim Gurney, vice-chairman of the  regional board. All area residents are invited to attend.  More than  40  people  including   government   fisheries  K ejcper^an^  ���Secheit ta^  the release of 30,000,: one-year  old salmon Saturday, at the Indian Band hatchery in Porpoise  Bay.  This release, which included  more than 14,000 Chinook and  16,000 Coho follows the release  of more than 40,000 salmon  last month.  ' Hatchery manager Bob Baptiste told the Coast News that  the salmon released Saturday  will stay in the area for about  two weeks before heading out  to sea. They will return in one  to two years.  Mr. Baptiste said that fish  released from the Sechelt hatchery have been reported  caught as far away as northern  California. When they return  they will lay eggs in one of the  three streams adjacent to the  hatchery.  At Saturday's release, the  first enclosure containing more  than 5,000 young salmon was  opened by the crew, but the  fish continued swimming in, the.  .- sarrie pfttern1 for ritore^  "������ a hour, despite the fact that'  without the enclosing nets they  were free to swim away.  There appeared to be a conditioned pattern from the large  school that kept them swimming in a clockwise formation  where the net used to be.  After a time some of the  young people present threw:  food outside the swimming cir-:  cle and, gradually, the school  began to disperse. Biologists  present were intrigued and said  they had never before observed  the phenomenon.  The economic benefits of the  Sechelt hatchery are thought to  be considerable, providing  salmon for the sports fishery  both in the Inlet and outside.  It was noted at a recent  meeting of the Sunshine Coast  economic commission that the  value of one fish caught by the  sports fishery in B.C. may be  as high as $200.  Area E also  The last meeting of the Elphinstone Electors' Association  to be held before September will be held on Wednesday,  June 8, in Cedar Grove School at 8 p.m.  The association of residents of regional area E (Gower  Point-Pratt Road) will discuss subdivision in the area, water  supply, the controversial K-zoning, settlement plan, assess  ment, and parks. .  Bob Baptiste, manager of the Sechelt Indian Band hatchery in Porpoise Bay, demonstrates for camera how lively his year old salmon  are during feeding time. Minutes later the salmon were released into  the bay as part of the band's continuing salmon enhancement programme, ���(^orge Matthews pholo Coast News, June 6,1983  If it can be said that the ad hoc Tourism Development  Subcommittee of the Economic Development Commission has failed to excite public interest in its proposal to  create a community development corporation, it is certainly not from lack of effort.  For six months, information about the corporation's  role in developing a tourism industry infrastructure has  been in the newspaper. The committee has advertised  for, and held three public meetings seeking community  support.  At no time has anyone voiced any criticism whatever  concerning the formation of the corporation. As one  member of the committee said recently, "We will get  support once we can show people what the corporation  can do, so let's get on with it."  And get on with it is clearly what the committee is going to do. Every organization in the community has the  opportunity over the next five weeks, to nominate a candidate to sit on the development society, to help make  policy for the corporation.  The tourism committee, which will serve as  nominating committee, has wisely set as its primary goal  in selection, the need for representation from all parts  of the community, the hospitality industry, the fishing  industry, senior citizens, chambers of commerce,  hopefully the Sechelt Indian Band, and any other group,  with an interest in guiding the proposed corporation.  If, after the various attempts to inform the public on  the corporation's role in local economic development,  there is a sudden outcry from organizations in the area,  it will certainly be unjustified.  The proposed corporation offers the opportunity for  local citizens to take conimand of local economic  development. With this worthwhile goal in mind, the  committee certainly seems justified in taking the bull by  the horns and finishing the job it began last year.  Overreaction  feared  There is a very real danger that the province of British  Columbia is about to embark on an economic path which  will prove disastrous.  The belated revelation that the provincial deficit may  reach as much as $3 billion is staggering enough but it is  possible that a frenzied reaction to that deficit by the  government will do untold damage to the citizens of this  province.  To begin with, it is true that government spending has  got out of control; it is true that the populace has little  sympathy with the screams of outrage that are emanating  from government employees, even when those employees  are teachers and any major surgery which is not  thoughfully undertaken may gravely affect the training  of our young, in which all hope of a competitive future  lies.  This is a grave matter but if by restraint the government means that it will commandeer more money from  the taxpayers for its own uses nothing but ill can come of  it.  ...from the files of the COAST NEWS  5 YEARS AGO  During the past few  weeks there has been a  certain amount of public  outcry over the condition  of Seaview Cemetery. As  a result of its unkempt  condition, a volunteer  worker will approach the  regional board to offer  her assistance in cleaning up the area.  10 YEARS AGO  May of 1973 has  become a record month  in building construction  on the Sunshine Coast.  Total building permits for  the month were valued at  $969,700, according to  the regional board's  building inspector.  15 YEARS AGO  Gibsons and District  Chamber of Commerce is  still working on the proposed B.C. Offshore Racing Association power  boat race and display for  June 23 in which some 25  to 35 craft will cross from  Sunset Beach in Vancouver to Gibsons.  20 YEARS AGO  A permit for a $16,000  store building at the  cenotaph corner in  Sechelt was issued by  the municipal council at  its meeting on Wednesday night of last week.  The permit was taken out  by Gunnar Wigard.  25 YEARS AGO  Improved long  distance   facilities   for  Sechelt Peninsula will be  provided   this   summer  when    a    new    radio  telephone system is put  into   service   between  Vancouver and Gibsons.  30 YEARS AGO  At   last   week's   all-  candidates meeting both  Liberal   and   NDP   candidates   in   this  week's  provincial      election  deplored     the    two-  pronged Social Credit attack on the teachers of  the province and  upon  the teaching curriculum,  particularly  since  there  was no proper investigation   before  the   attack  was launched.  35 YEARS AGO  An emergency flood  fund committee was set  up in Sechelt last week to  help provide monetary  relief for flood victims in  the Fraser Valley, under  the auspices of the  Sechelt Board of Trade,  the Red Cross and the  VON in the district.  TbtLSl!,shine iilff Iff!  \  Editorial Dspartmont  John Burnside     George Matthews  Judith Wilson  Accounts D��patrtm��nt  MM. Vaughan  Circulation   Stephen Carroll  Advertising Ds-psrtmsnt  J. Fred Duncan       Jane McOuat  Production Dspartmsnt  Lynn Lindsay  Jack Bischke  Copy  Lise Sheridan  Gerry Walker  John Storey  Fran Berger  ttlng  Connie Hawke  Zandra Jackson  J  Musings  John Burnside  Richard Bedford Bennett (left) and Sir George Perley standing on The Boulevard, Sechelt, circa 1930.  Together with Major-General A.D. McRae they held a Conservative campaign meeting in the Union  Steamship Company's dance pavilion, which stood just east of today's Parthenon: Thomas John  Cook introduced the distinguiMed guests to the residents and holiday-makers, for it was summertime  despite the three piece suits. (Bennett was chosen leader of the Conservatives in 1927 and had the  misfortune to be Prime Minister of Canada during the depression years 1930-1935. The Bennett  Buggy* named for him, was anjautomobile drawn by horses after the motor was removed because the  owner could no longer affordjgas, oil or license. General McRae was MP for Vancouver 1926-1930,  Conservative party campaign ipjianager in the 1930 general election, and was summoned to the Senate  in 1931. Sir George became att MP in 1904, served as High Commissioner for Canada in London  1914-1922, and was a cabinet minister in the governments of three prime ministers: Borden, Meighen  and Bennett. As senior privy councillor he was repeatedly acting prime minister. Photo courtesy of  lean Cook Whit taker, who was introduced to the great man when she was young in Sechelt. Caption  by Helen Dawe. *��  with the stability of just a  generation before. One could  speculate endlessly about the  gains and the losses of the  uprooted lifestyle and perhaps  there will be time.  .'Forthe moment, however, it  is strangely warming to know  that as I write this my sister is  wandering around the lower  village of Gibsons in the company of my brother; that her  life is again touching that portion of my life which is not just  Burnside on vacation; that last  night she slept in my home and  broke bread with me in my  house for the first time ever.  The news from Scotland is  not all good: the aunts and  uncles of my childhood grow  old and pass away; the  nephews and nieces that I  scarcely know grow to  adulthood, get engaged and  prepare for the next generation  that I may never know at all.  The mother of us three is old  and ailing back there in  Scotland.  But time and mortality are  what they ever were and it is in  the reunion of the living that I  presently move and strangely  and warmly exhilarating do I  find it. Welcome to Canada,  little sister.  The Sunshine Coast News is a co-operative, locally  owned newspaper, published at Gibsons. B.C. every Monday by Glassford Press Ltd.. Box 460. Gibsons. B.C.  VON 1VO Tel. 886-2622 or 886-7817.  Second Class Mail Registration No. 4702  My little sister, Pearl, arrived  on the Sunshine Coast last  week for her first visit to  Canada. She is, of course, now  a grown woman with teenage  children but once a little sister  always a little sister.  My brother, a more frequent  visitor here, was on hand from  Kelowna to greet her with me  and someone subsequently asked how long it was since the  three of us had been together. I  flipped over the decades like  the pages of a book.  The Seventies: in personal  terms, the end of a teaching  career which had spanned 15  years and the beginning of the  demanding disciplines of journalism and running a business;  of ending a marriage and the  subsequent sense of drift  before finding and consolidating one's life in a new  relationship. Two visits to  Scotland to see, among others,  the sister and many visits with  brother resident in Canada but  no connection of all three.  The Sixties: the beginning of  the teaching career and the  marriage; the fathering of three  children born in Montreal,  Dawson City, and Fernie; a  decade of spasmodic wandering that included, again, two  visits to Scotland but again no  occasion when all three siblings  were together.  The Fifties: the high school  years and immigration to  Canada; employment in the  Canadian National Railway for  five years and seven years of  night time studies for a degree  and a year of teacher training ���  all in Montreal. And there it  was. The last time my brother,  sister and myself were together  in one place was just prior to  my brother's leaving Scotland  for Canada in 1952. I was 14  and my sister seven.  1952: more than three  decades ago. Winston Churchill was Prime Minister of  Great Britain. I don't know for  sure but I suspect it was Louis  St. Laurent in Ottawa. W.A.C.  Bennett had not yet come to  power in British Columbia.  The Korean War was raging  and the Cold War was in its  first manifestation.  My father was just a few  months dead, my mother  working, and I was in some  measure responsible for the  care and feeding of said little  sister. It seems like a very long  time ago.  One could fall to brooding  about the dislocations attendant upon emigration from the  land of one's birth; about the  families scattered all over the  globe with but the most tenous  apparent connections one to  the other and contrast that  dislocation and vagabondage  No Man Is  An Hand  No man is an Hand, intire of it selfe; every man  is apeece of the Continent, apart ofthemaine; if a  Clod bee washed away by the Sea, Europe is the lesse,  as well as if a Promontorie were, as well as if a Mannor  of thy friends or of thine owne were; any mans death  diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankinde;  And therefore never send to know for whom the  bell tolls; It tolls for thee.  John Donne  VJ  .r.  ;��  Anyone who read this page 1  last   week   will   recall   being  greeted with some bleak and  despairing commentary on bur y  prospects for survival in this ;;  nuclear age. ���-'  I mentioned last week a few  moments of despair that I felt ���'���  one morning a couple of weeks  ago, and the editor commented *  on a couple of dire predictions  made by people who  know ht  what they're talking about.       "*���  All in all, however, it should X  be noted that this sense of ter- 'A  tot regarding the possibility of  nuclear disaster does not. normally engage our every waking  *  moment.   Normally,   both  Burnside and I are caught up in  the  normal   little  terrors  of  everyone else: "will the lawn be  cut   before   it   overruns   the  house?; will the banker tell me  about the overdraught?; will  the car run out of gas'before I  get to work?  Gratefully, being caught up  in the world is quite enough to  terrorize the average person  without the need to dwell on  the prospect of nuclear annihilation.  In response to last week's  grim outlook, I received a kind  and thoughtful personal note  from a local lady who offered  the advice that the only way to  find peace of mind in today's  world is to accept Jesus Christ  as a personal saviour.  The writer's intentions were  genuine enough: "No, I am not  some weird, religious nut," she  wrote, "merely a Christian  who has found joy and peace  and would love to have you  sharing it." Needless to say I  was touched by the lady's personal concern.  However, I was bothered by  the notion that giving one's self  up to Jesus is all the personal  responsibility we have in this  regard.  I'm afraid that the God I occasionally commune with  would be a bit disappointed if I  didn't try to do something to  help my family, my friends and  my neighbours and my fellow  citizens of the world in trying  to make sure that we aren't incinerated in the near future.;  Not that indulgent self-pity,  or general whimpering about  the state of the world is going  to do any good,, but as I saidl  before, my momentary sense of j r  despair of a couple of weeks  ago.is not a chronic condition.  The peace of mind found by  my concerned reader can also  be found in joining with others  to act against the forces that  would put us on the brink of  horror. A simple act of walking  with 80,000 others a couple of  months ago at the Walk For  Peace, offered a brief sense of  peace and purpose.  Reading the letter from  Frank Fuller's friend in the  . Ukraine, in last week's paper,  gave me a fleeting sense that I  wasn't alone in being appalled  by the threat of nuclear war ���  If I ever get into what ever  heaven there may be, I would  like to think I got there because  I earned it by, in some small  way, taking responsibility for  myself and others in speaking  out against those who "would  destroy us all.  My Christian lady, bless her  soul, suggested that since we  were all going to croak eventually anyway, the best thingto  do would be to spend our time  setting things right with the  Lord and forget about getting,  mixed up with the trivial details  of the world of the living.     ���  While   many   Christians  believe this to be true, many  millions more don't. There are  many   heroic   priests,   nuns,  ministers and lay-persons who,  while accepting Jesus Christ as  their   personal   saviour,   still  struggle for peace in the world.  Some have been jailed or even  killed  for  their efforts,  but  Christians are no strangers to  punishment for standing up for  their beliefs. In fact, wheri I  was a kid that's what I thought  Christians did���stand up for  others despite personal danger.  I'm not a Christian myself,  but I have a great admiration  for those Christians who take  responsibility for others and I  don't particularly see anything   $  contradictory in believing in    ��  life ever after while trying to    *J  make things better here and    ��  now. '"'��������  I thank my Christian friend *;'  for her thoughts and wishes, 7.  but I'm afraid until those occa- I;  sional   attacks   of   despair ��;  become chronic, I'll just keep t;  on the way I have and hope *j  that in some small way, those ��j  of us still wrapped up in the *.'  business of living will be able to -f  protect   the   earth   for   our <  children and our neighbours; 4  I  ���1  ���IS  4  *i -  ��-,  r,  1  :t i  Coast News, June 6,1983  3.  Editor's Note: A copy of the  following letter was received by  this office.  May 24, 1983  Rt. Hon. Pierre Trudeau,  P.C. MP.  Prime Minister of Canada  House of Commons  Ottawa, Ontario  K1A0A6  Re: May 10th Open Letter  to Canadians  Dear Mr. Prime Minister:  Thank you for your letter  published in the Canadian  press on May 10th.  As a preamble let us state  that  we  disagree with  your  preamble.   You   imply   that  democracy is great, but when  stacked   up   against   Soviet  totalitarianism   it   somehow  changes   complexion   and  becomes an imperfect forum of  thought and action. How can  we be vulnerable as a nation if  we encourage, use and treat  our   freedoms  with  respect?  What does concern us is that in  the    guise    of    fighting  totalitarianism, democracy will  be subverted by those in power  who seek to discredit honest  dissent,   utter   unthinking  rhetoric, misuse the right of  secrecy (especially in foreign.  policy decisions), and attempt  to manipulate the media with  half-truths. '  Throughout your letter you  have misrepresented the disarmament movement. You have  asserted:    1)   that   we   feel  powerless   to   influence   the  USSR   and   have   convinced  ourselves that it is useless to denounce   their   SS-20   missile  deployments; 2) that a major  thrust   of  the   movement   is  unilateral disarmament of the  West;  3)  that  we are anti-  American, yet are eager to take  refuge under the American umbrella; 4) that we are picturing  the Soviet Union as an innocent target and not as the aggressor; and 5) that we are  somewhat simplistic and are ignoring the real, complex, and  often immoral world. All your  assertions  are  blatantly  and  slanderously false.  You are surprised that we are  opposed > to ;new nuclear  weapons such as the Pershing  11 and the Cruise and yet have  remained relatively silent about  Soviet deployment of the  SS-20s; What is surprising to us  is that a man with your intellect  didn't recognize this seeming  incongruity as one of the keys  Pnwtnc* of British Cotanbia  ATTENTION  COMMISSIONERS  FOR TAKING  AFFIDAVITS  All appointments made  prior to October 1, 1982,  will be cancelled.  October 1, 1983. Applications and guidelines  for renewing appointments are available at  any government agency  or court registry, or:..,  Court Services  Headquarters  6th Floor, Law Courts  850 Burdett Avenue  Victoria, B.C. V8W1B4  Telephone: 387-1521   ���  to the whole peace movement.  The SS-20 is a deplorable  weapon, but it is not a  destabilizing one. We do hot  see the SS-20 as a qualitative  change in the nuclear arms face  and we do not see it as upsetting the existing deterrent value  of weapons already in Europe.  Since the SS-20 is basically an  improved version of the SS-4  and SS-5, and was deployed  without any accompanying  Soviet pronouncements about  fighting limited nuclear wars,  we do hot see it as an escalation  into the dangerous counter-  force (pre-emptive first strike)  concept;  Your know full well that  unilateral disarmament of the  West is not a goal of the peace  movement. What is sought is a  significant  unilateral gesture,  accompanied by an advance  signal to the Soviets that a  reciprocated   response  is   required. The West (U.S.) has'  always led the nuclear arms  race with the Soviets always  seeking to catch up. Therefore,  a move or series of reciprocated  moves should be initiated by  us. Since there have never been  any real achievements or even  significant efforts by the superpowers to end the arms race,  this is one way of stepping back  from the open confrontations  seen before us.  We are afraid of both superpowers, their illusory quest for  nuclear superiority, and their  hostile rhetoric. Great as this  fear is, the disarmament ranks  have grown in number because  of another fear���a fear that  technology   is   fuelling   an  unstoppable arms race. The attainment and threatened attainment of futuristic computerized counterforce weapons does  not make us feel secure. It is  not anit-American to want to  freeze such developments. We  are not eager to run under that  curious American umbrella  which is no longer keeping us  dry but which is (because of  new weapon developments) attracting a storm of hurricane  proportions.  We are not ignoring the real  world. It is not simplistic when  dealing with a complex and  often immoral world to demand of our leaders decisions  that do not further contribute  to an immoral situation.  As a respected middle  power, we in Canada are in a  position to demonstrate to all  nuclear weapons powers that  we seek to disassociate  ourselves from the sUly and illogical position of building up-  one's nuclear arsenals as a  pressure for reductions in these  same arsenals.  By refusing to test the Cruise  guidance, system, our nation  will be put on the only moral  track towards peace. The suffocation strategy will have  begun where it was born and a  voice, just maybe, will now be  heard and acted upon. Risk  peace, not war. To remain  steadfast to a NATO doctrine  and U.S. policies which will  only result in weapons proliferation is a foolish weakness  that is unacceptable. It is not a  weakness to propose a halt to  the   arms   race   and   initiate  Much good remains  Editor,  The column "Slings and Arrows", George Matthews, May  30, 1983 encourages reflection.  He is right you know: the fear,  the horror, the unthinkable insanity of death, torture, crying  and  suffering  brought  upon  ourselves, by ourselves through  nuclear holocaust. We can all  empathize with his feelings and  share his sense of frustration  and futility when confronting  this potential catastrtQphe.>5..,;> t  But perhaps it-is at this very1  moment when we seem to be  tottering on the brink of annihilation that we can create  the   necessary   impetus   to  seriously examine our situation  and evaluate our alternatives.  Perhaps this seemingly unappeasable fear can persuade us  to work towards meaningful  changes in our attitudes and in  our lives.  It is not a time for despair.  On the contrary: citizens are  speaking up, individuals are  beginning to reflect and to  recognize the complete unac-  ceptability of our present position. Governments throughout  the world are realizing that they  can no longer proceed with  their plans for mayhem and  destruction, and that the unquestioning and uncriticizing  vacuum of apathy no longer  exists.  As intelligent inquiry reveals  the extent and scope of the horror we have fashioned there  rises  an equally strong  and  Covering  the Coverage  by Jim Ansell  Optional Loss Settlement Clause  It is an unwritten law in insurance that you cannot  profit from an insurance claim.  Replacement Cost Coverage seems to be a direct contradiction to this law in as much as you can claim for  values much higher than an object is really worth.  To get around this contradiction, the Optional Loss  Settlement Clause was developed. It simply states that if  you want to cash out on a claim, you will receive the actual cash value, or depreciated value, of the object  claimed.  However, IF YOU CHOOSE to have the object  REPAIRED or REPLACED you'll receive the full cost  of repairs or new replacement with no consideration for  depreciation.  Whenever possible choose to repair or replace in the  event of a claim. Your settlement will be much better.  Sunshine Coast Insurance Agencies Ltd.  Box 375, Cowrie Street,  Credit Union Building  Sechelt, B.C., VON 3A0  _229i Adv't.  growing sentiment of public  awareness and incredulity that  political leaders would so play  and gamble with the lives of all  humanity. Coupled with this  growing concern is the increasing desire to stop this mad race  towards extinction and an acceptance of the necessity for individual participation and involvement in the process of  shaping and creating policies  . which will lead to the nurturing  .^gnd;^preservationjoi^l;, forms  of life on this planet.  There can be only one an-i  tidote to the poisons of fear  and futility. That is the  recognition that there exists  much good and beauty in this  world that can best be preserved by working and living in  ways conducive to creating a  peaceful and just society.  Michael Burns  Grateful  Editor,  As campaign chairman I  wish to make it known how  pleased and grateful I am to all  the kind people who donated  and my co-workers for the excellent effort in making this  year's campaign on behalf of  the Heart Fund such a success.  The total sum donated  amounted to $13,059.73, approximately the same as for last  year���an excellent effort considering the economic circumstances.  My profound thanks to all  concerned.  Jean Longley  Campaign chairman.  Skookum  Mark Guignard  My cuitoiMrs Imp me so busy...  I'm busier than a 'weedeater' at a  grass skirt party.   1971 SUPER BEETLE  4 cvl.. 4 spd., radio, runs great, was $p9S  SKOOKUM  DEAL ������  S1,800  1971 MERCURY  MONTEGO' STN. WAGON  Full powtif Includlpg air,  SKOOKUM   ^S $1^85 ,  DEAL  $900  Financing at Bank Rata*  on Approved CradH.  HOT LINE 885-7512  Skookum Auto  V Dealer 7381 Seeh8lt j  measures that may lead to that  end.  Yours truly in peace,  The Sunshine Coast  Peace Committee  prepared by David J. Moul  cc. This open letter will be sent  to newspapers and Members of  Parliament and other interested  groups.  Finlayson  thanked  Editor,  May I, through your columns, congratulate and thank  R.T. Finlayson for his timely  letter on a citizen's duty.  All "old soldiers" loathe and  dread war and we who have lived through two of them know  now that they are made by  power hungy megalomaniacs  rwho don't do any of the  ���fighting. And the people suffer.  ���'t>-We have also learned that  the price of prevention forced  on us is preparation which  discourages the adventurers  and that while the nuclear  threat is terrifyingly real, it is  by no means the whole story.  With respect, Mr. Editor, I  suggest you look at the  statements on the subject made  in the last few days by the retiring head of NATO and Mr.  Carl Weinberger of the U.S.  government.  Truly, "They bear no scars  who never felt the wound." We  would do well to heed the  generation that twice in a  lifetime felt the wound and has  the scars to prove it���the result  of just such idealistic  negligence as we see now.  Yours truly  E.G. Symonds  FAMOUS  ASBORD  & Sundpv  "^ $10.95  Kids $5.50)  .883-2269  Bar% 7 om. - 8 >��.  | Is your car begging  for a second chance?  Fully equipped  for all body and  paint repairs  Brian's Auto Body  & Painting Ltd.  Beautiful bodies are our business     885-9844  Box 605,  Sechelt  PIANTSALE  8" Hanging Plants $8.95  6" Hanging Plants $6.95  4" Tropicals >J.59  21/2" Tropicals $.69  Large Tropicals all at Special Prices  Wicker 20% off marked prices  886-2818  '       Lower Gibsons  Open 7 Days  A Week  PRICES EFFECTIVE: wed., june 8 - sat., June h  PEOPLE  COME FIRSTAT  <3>  TABLERITE MEATS  MACARONI &  CHEESE DINNER...    225 g 2/. 85  Duncan Hines  CAKE MIXES........   .19 oz. 1.19  Quench  DRINK CRYSTALS 6i3g 2.89  3x3.25oz. -J39  COCA COLA 21 1.89  Plus Deposit  Best Foods  MAYONNAISE     11 2.99  New Butter Flavoured or Regular Crisco  SHORTENING. ....... 11b. .99  Mazda _  CORN OIL . 11 2.29  Delta - Long Grain  RICE   907g 1.59  Salada Orange Pekoe  TEA BAGS 60s 1.99  Kraft  CHEEZWHIZ SOOgm 2.99  SNACKBREAD  CRACKERS        200 g 1.49  Kal Kan  CAT FOOD 6 oz 3/1.00  Scottie  FACIAL TISSUE 200 s .99  Cashmere  BATHROOM ft  TISSUE Limit 5 per customer . .4s  1.29  Viva  TOWELS Limit 3 per customer .2s  1.09  I.G.A. - Heavy Gauge _  GARBAGE BAGS... 10s .99  Canada Grade A Tablerite Beef  BLADE CHUCK  SHOULDER  STEAK  (lb. $1.49)   kg 3.29  CROSS RIB  ROAST ....(lb. $1.99)   kg 4.39  Fletcher's  SMOKED DINNER  HAM (lb. $2.89)   kg 6.37  Tablerite - Pure, Previously Frozen  PORK or BREAKFAST  SAUSAGE (lb. $1.69)   kg 3.73  Tablerite - Sliced  SIDE BACON SOOgpkge. 2.59  PRODUCE  Chiquita .  BANANAS (ib. .49) kg 1.08  Locally Grown  HOTHOUSE  TOMATOES... (ib..99) kg 2.18  Locally Grown - Long  ENGLISH  CUCUMBERS each .69  FROZEN FOODS  Swanson's e  T.V. DINNERS 11.5 oz. 1.69  McCain  APPLE JUICE .12.5 oz. .99  Minute Maid  ORANGE JUICE...:...12.5oz. 1.19  PENDER  HARBOUR  POOL  Crf*LipniJ|_F  Many lessons & specialized sessions are offered. Please phone 883-2612, for more information  Early Bird Swim  .   Public Swim  Public Swim  Public Swim  Public Swim  M W F 800 - 9 00 a.m. Public Swim      Sat. & Sun. 6:30 ��� 8:30 p.m.  MTWT.F. 12:00- 1:00p.m. FarnilySwIm Sun.2:00 -4:00p.m.  "   "sat.2:00-4:00p.m.'- AdullsOnly M.T.W.T. 8:00-9:30 p.m.  MT WTF 630 -800 p.m. Adults'n Teens        Friday 8:00-9:30 p.m.  Sat.2:00-4:00p.m. LadlosSwim T. &T. 1:00-2:00 p.m.  PENDER HARBOUR CENTRE  Madeira Park ��� 883-9100.  m Ruane I  Limit Qinnlttiss.  r> ���  Xf X  fiX  ;? 4.  Coast News, June 6,1983  Fish market folks back home  Mary, Doug and Cathy Solomon are back from the South Pacific.  See adjacent StOry. ���John Burnside photo  Gwen in Gibsons  Debbie dazzles again  by Gwen Robertson, 886-3780  Debbie Middleton has, once  again, brought honour to our  town. With jazz and with her  own tap and song and dance  routines, she came in first in  the Senior Musical Theatre  category at the Coquitlam  District Music Festival (you  may recall that Debbie had  been selected to be the senior  competitor in the provincial  championships). Well, Debbie  came through and was also  chosen as one of three dancers  to perform at the banquet  afterwards. Congratulations,  Debbie, and many thanks.  Nikki Weber and the Halfmoon Bay Hams made another  appearance at the Alano Club  in Gibsons on Saturday, bringing joy and laughter with them.  An evening with Nikki and  company always brings a lift to  one's spirits and there is such  variety there is always  something to please everyone's  taste.  The Men's Gold Night for  Gibsons Sea Cavalcade was a  huge success. From all accounts, everyone had a great  time. Many, many thanks to  the organizers and a very  special thank you to George  Giannakos for all his help and  for the ajse- of the Oniega-:-  Restaurant for the occasion.  Ladies next!!  Gibsons Centennial Market  on the wharf is assured of  entertainment every Sunday  during June.  Crafts people will welcome  the new rate structure $5 plus  10 per cent of gross. This will  include all handmade or home  grown by the seller.  Good ' attendance is anticipated so Come On Down to  the wharf on Sunday.  Roberts Creek  by John Burnside  Familiar faces back in Gibsons after an eight-month  absence are those of Doug and  Mary Solomon and their  daughter Cathy of Gibsons  Fish Market. The Solomons  have returned from cruismg^he  islands of the South Pacific  aboard their 32-foot sloop Sundance Kid. " :'":T-  The fourth Solomon,  sixteen-year old Doug, is still in  the South Pacific looking after  the Sundance Kid at anchor in  the Society Islands. Ah, grim-  faced duty.  Besides the legendary charnis  of the South Pacific Islands,  the Solomons found the might-  ly   Pacific  in   a  mettlesome  mood.   Seventeen   hurricanes  have   been   reported   in   the  South Pacific since 1880 anci  seven of those took place in the  last year. The Solomons met lip  with five of those during their  voyage.  When they left Gibsons at  the end of October enroute to  the Tuamoto Archipelago in  French     Polynesia,     the  Solomons' charted their course  south to Cabo San Lucas at the  tip of Mexico's Bahai Peninsula.    There   they   spent  Christmas in the company of  approximately twenty-five people from the Sunshine Coast  with equal good sense.  Their  pleasant sojourn   at  Cabo San  Lucas culminated  with a grand picnic on the  beach.  "There   were   over   300  yachties   participating,"   says  Mary Solomon, "and we dined  in grand style on roast pigs and  marlin."      , '<X  From Cabo San Lucas trfe  Sundance Kid set sail for the  Marquesas Islands and on this  leg   the   Pacific   treated   the  wanderers to a taste of the fabled doldrums.  For 800 miles  there were no south-east trade  winds and the journey to the  Marquesas   took   twenty-five  days.   .. ,Xj  Once in the Marquesas the  winds    arrived    with..-. .a  vengeance. Four separate hurricanes lashed the islands during the two .'.months, that-the  Solomons sheltered there w^t-  ? h& for> the^depi^sWin 'toifnwe  on. ... ..... ������-.;. .X"^y.  ���        M '  The   turbulent;.' we.ath%<"  however, did not prevent t|e  Solomons   from   appreciating  their surroundings; f  "We found Polynesia very  volcanic and lush," says Mary.  "There were signs that there  had been a large population  there at one time. There wa^,  for example, a beautiful stone  road on one island which led to  a valley where only eight people  lived. We were told that once  PORT MELLON TO EGMONT  including  GIBSONS  SECHELT  PENDER   HARBOUR  Published ky  DOMINION MAP LIMITED  541 Howe Street     Vancouver B.C  PHONE:   684-4341  SUNSHINE COAST  HDP  Bookstore  Lower  Gibsons'  886-7744  Special Legion meeting  by Jeanie Norton, 886-9609  The Legion's general  meeting this Wednesday will be  rather special. There'll be  presentation of bars and  medals to past officers, election  of a new executive officer, and  initiation of new members.  Also, this is the last meeting  until September as there are no  general meetings in July and  August. Meeting starts at 8  p.m. for life, ordinary, and  associate members.  SMOKE-FREE  Imagine playing bingo in a  smoke-free room! The  downstairs room at the legion  is working out very well on  Information and assistance  i  in applying for the  following government programes is available at the  Sunshine Coast Regional District - Judy Gates,  885-2261, 1:00-5:00 p.m., Monday - Friday.  Homeowners and Landlords  CHIP - Canada Home Insulation Program  CHRP - Canada Home Renovation Plan  RRAP - Residential Rehabilitation Program  COSP - Canada Oil Substitution Program  Business and Non-Profit Groups  NEED  Non-profit Groups  Community Recovery Program  Renters  SAFER - Shelter Aid for the Elderly Renter  Thursday nights. The new  sound system is great and nonsmoking players can play in  comfort.  Early bird bingo starts at 7  p.m. and regular bingo at 8  p.m. Thursdays at the Roberts  Creek legion.  FACILITY MEETING  The facility committee for  the new hall/gymnasium is  meeting Wednesday at 4:15  p.m. at Roberts Creek school  and the public is welcome to attend. There will be a general  discussion of "Kraus Hall" including booking procedures.  LAST ASSOCIATION  A reminder that next week's  community association meeting  is the last until the fall. Meeting  is at 8 p.m.'at the old community hall next Wednesday,  June 15.  PARENTS RACE  Sports Day is this Friday,  June 10, at Roberts Creek  elementary. There'll be lots of  races for parents at noon so do  come out whether you're willing to run or just cheer.  LATE FLASH  In front of witnesses last  Saturday, Allen Young agreed  to enter the Mr. Roberts Creek  contest.  Better get your act together  guys, Allen's got some big  plans for his.  II  Gibsons  Public Library  Hours:  Tuesday 2-4 p.m.  Wednesday 10:30-4 p.m.  Thursday 2-4 p.m.  7-9 p.m.  Saturday 2-4 p.m.  there had been 1,800 in the  valley."  The Solomons were entranced with both the flora and the  fauna. On their sheltering  Island of Fatu Hiva they/saw  wild goats, horses and pigs and  in one bay, because of the torrential rains which accompanied the four hurricanes  Doug counted 35 major waterfalls.  From the Marquesas it was  just   a  five-day   sail  to   the  Tuamotus and there, on the  island   of   Ahe,   they   encountered their final hurricane.  Ahe is a coral atoll with a  maximum height of seven feet.  As the winds gusted as high as  an estimated 100 miles per hour  and sustained velocities of 65  miles per hour for three days,  ninety per cent of the houses  blew   away   and, trees   blew  down. The native population  took refuge in the island's only  stone house,  the community  centre known as the 'mairie'.  Inside the mairie the level of  the water rose at one point to  chest height with babies being  held up above the level of the  rising water. At that point the  entire population was about to  take to their boats when the  water began to recede.  Meanwhile the howling  winds and rain stripped the  paint from the Sundance Kid  and she was kept in place only  with the aid of local people  who dove down to reset the anchors.  When the storm abated the  Solomons enjoyed the  marvellous diving and fishing  with spear guns. "Half an hour  and you could catch your dinner," remembers Mary  Solomon "but in the process  you had to keep a close eye on  the shark population."  From Ahe the route led to  storied Papeete where the  Solomons found that almost  every second boat was flying a  Canadian flag.  As one would expect from  the proprietors of Gibsons Fish  Market, the Solomons enjoyed  the seafood which abounds in  the area. Mary speaks lovingly  of the crabs and giant clams,  lobster, shrimp, fitch wahoo  -described as a large silvery  blue mackerel - and Polynesian  poissant cru which Mary  describes as raw fish marinated  in lemon juice and coconut  milk which is 'absolutely  delicious'.  Leaving son Doug guarding  the Sundance Kid.the rest of  the family flew back to Gibsons last month and can again  be found in the Fish Market  selling fish and swapping yams  with other sea-going Sunshine  Coasters..  . .   'Drop Off your i' .  coast nevifs  CLASSIFIEDS  ...''..'. '      '    at   ,''���������.   '  Emma's  ��������� *"����  until noon Saturday  ���A FH^ndly P��opl�� PI��C'  "  Are Here!  New Colours  New Designs  Old Prices  Come & see for  yourself!  af  , ^0 UKBljff ',  886-2818  Lower Gibsons  Open. 7 Days A Week  7  THE WOOD SHOP  All types of Custom  Cabinets, Bookcases, Windows   etc.  FREE ESTIMATES  Professional  Workmanship 885-3307  Let us pave your  driveway or play area!  B4A. Blacktop: have been, paving  driveways and home recreational areas  for twenty-seven years. It is quite likely  that some of the better paving around  homes that you have seen was done by  us. If you have a pavirig job in mind, let us  , quote on it. You'll discover, as many have  before that B.A. Quality costs no more.  Sometimes it even costs a little less.  B.A. can" JETSEAL" your new or existing  blacktop driveway to protect it from oil or  gas spills.  FREE ESTIMATES ON  PAVING OF  INDUSTRIAL SITES  ROADS  PARKING AREAS  TENNIS COURTS  BOAT RAMPS  Also grading, gravel sales  soil cement, drainage  & curbs.  B.A. BLACKTOP  Porpoise Bay Road, Sechelt, B.C.  885-5151  A local jinn, employing local people"  "Quality service since 1956 "  BUUXHS AMALGAMATED  MEMBER     jSITJa  CONSTR. ASSN  :  i  i m  The biggest and best?  I   Sea Cavalcade, Gibsons' an-  jnual celebration of summer, is  Jlfast approaching and under the  ^capable  leadership  of  Gwen  Robertson promises to be "bigger arid better than ever". This  sis the time when co-ordinators  3are being sought for various  'events. If you have some leisure  *time in the next month and  jjwould like a rewarding involve-  ?ment with your community's  gsurnmer   festival,   why   not  ^volunteer?  J   Events   which   require   an  forganizer   include   the   "Mr.  ^Beachcomber"   pageant,   the  Jrelay race from Egmont to Gibsons,   the   food   and   crafts  ^booths, the soapbox derby and  jSpeople-oriented water sports. If  Syou are interested in volunteering your services you can contact Gwen at 886-3780.  IF " This   year's   theme,   "The  i Beachcombers" was chosen to  $ honour   both   those    who  % beachcomb   and   those   who  g have   made   this   business  % associated worldwide with the  | name of Gibsons through the  I CBC   series   "The   Beach-combers". Candidates, as well  *k as   co-ordinator,   are   being  bought for the "Mr. Beachcomber"  contest  which  will  ^highlight  the  theme  of  the  ^festival.  '��>. Among the winner's onerous  jfduties will be acting as  , jchonourary marshall of the  nparade which is being organiz-  ��ed, as usual, by the Kinsmen  J'under the direction of Haig  I Maxwell. Registration forms  J/for participants in the parade  twill be printed shortly.  �� The Queen Pageant will be a  ^highlight of the festival. A  ^.number of young ladies of the  �� community have agreed to be  �� participants and more would  ��be welcomed. Would-be entrants and sponsors can contact  Hthe organizer, Jennifer Dixon,  Kat 886-8333.  |l I The CBC will be lending its  in-  the  their usual contribution to the  success of Sea Cavalcade. They  will be organizing the war of  hoses, the tug-of-war, the  children's water sports and the  Keats Island to Gibsons swim,  as well as participating in the  parade.  A new event, which will bring participants of international calibre to the Sunshine  Coast, is the Egmont to .Gibsons marathon. International  long distance runner Al Howie  is organizing the race and he  will also participate. He has  already recruited half a dozen  international runners to complete and is at present in eastern  Canada recruiting more participants.  In conjunction with the  marathon,   Sea   Cavalcade  organizers would like to sponsor a relay race. A co-ordinator  is needed for what could be one  of the big events of the festival.  A co-ordinator is required  for "special event" water  sports which would include  such competitions as a tug-of-  war on rafts, walk on water  race, mattress races and other  "people oriented" water  sports. Someone is also needed  to organize the food and crafts  booths ori the wharf.  Sea Cavalcade will run July  29, 30 and 31 and the time to  begin orgainizing a successful  event is now. All those who are  interested are invited to a  meeting at Gwen Robertson's  home on June 14 at 7:30 p.m.  on the corner, of Gower Point  Road and Kelly Street.  Grads giving  by Judith Wilson  The graduating students of  Elphinstone high school showed last Saturday night that they  are willing to work hard to give  a gift to the community in  which they have grown up.  The grads and their parents,  under the direction of Renee  Fountain, a French, teacher at  the high school, organized a  Hard Times Benefit dinner and  dance at the Gibson's Legion.  As a result of a successful evening the grads will be able to  make a presentation of approximately $500 to the local food  bank. The presentation will  take place on June 27 at the  graduation ceremonies.  Special praise was given by  Miss Fountain to Mr. Bernie  Mulligan for organizing the  grade 12 parents, to Mr. T.  Connor for organizing the bar,  and to Mrs. B.' Lymer and  Wendy Rottuff for the food;  preparation, and presentation.  Wendy, a grade 12 student,  organized the entire dinner including ordering, pick up and  delivery, and cooking of the  food.  The prganizers were grateful  for vice-principal Dave  Stigant's.help in setting up for  the event in the legion.  Merchants in the Sunnycrest  Mall supported the enterprize  by donating door prizes^  "The grads and their parents  are really keen to support the  community,'' said Miss Fountain, "The grads are keen to do  work for ��� others than  themselves."  Chatelech scholarships  �� support  in   many  ways,  �� eluding   stage  managing  *; popular boat blow-up in the  'fharbour. Nikki Weber will be  ^organizing  the  entertainment  ttpn the wharf, including the annual talent contest. So polish  ^up your act and tetjher know  maVyou%ould lilte to perrorriir  John Woods is in charge of  several   evenings ���> of comedy  theatre, x'-y'     '���'":���;'; -      ;#���������'���"���  Events at Dugal Park will include children's sports,  organized by Kathy Love, and  entertainment for children coordinated by Elaine Middleton.  kathy needs a co-ordinator for  the proposed soapbox, derby  which would be a new event for  children. She can be contacted  at 886-9261. The horseshoe  tournament will also be in the  park, run by Rob Hagar.  The firemen will be making  Despite the harsh economic  climate currently affecting the  Coast, the first graduating class  of Chatelech Secondary School  will benefit from the generosity  of local merchants and service  organizations which have,  donated over $4,000 for  scholarships and bursaries and  trophies.  School principal June  Mayriard, who praised local  groups for their generosity  towards this year's graduates,  told the Coast News that the  following scholarships, bursaries and trophies have been  made available:  1983   Scholarships:   (Awarded   for  . Academic excellence.)  1. Trail Bay Merchants Association:  Top Academic Student - $500  2. Shop Easy No. 5: business and Commerce - $500  3. District   Scholarship:   Vocational  -$500    .  1983 Bursaries: (Based on need.)  1. Sunshine Coast Credit Union - $250  2. Auxiliary to St. Mary's Hospital  -$600 (Students pursuing education in  nursing, lab technology, rehab  medicine. Applicants from all three  secondary schools may apply.)  3. Business & Professional Women's  Club - $450 (Open to female students  from all three secondary schools.)  4. Sechelt Lions Club - $500  5. Auxiliary to Royal Canadian Legion  No. 140 - 2/$2Wiw(Poir vocational  students farthering their education.)  6. Swanson's Ready-Mix Ltd. - $100  Trophies:  Trail Bay Merchants Association - Ag  gregate Trophy"  Trail   Bay   Developments   Ltd.   -  Academic Award  Sechelt   Indian   Band   -   Inspection  Recognition (For a student.who has  overcome adversity.)  Morgan Thompson will present a  large plaque with the names of all  graduates engraved on it.  et those  Estimate Sheets'  out of your  Glove Compartment  and into  ��  Walfy can't fix it  without them!  Sunshine Coast Hwy., Gibsons  'it* -A  ���7133  Coast News, June 6,1983  Quality Meats  FRESH WHOLE UTILITY GRADE  Prices Effective:  Tues.-Sat., June 7th ��� June 11th  ' ',   "Xi  r  Xr  frying  chicken        kg2.18,b.99  FRESH BONE IN  ��� It  rk butt  roast k9 3.06*1.39  PREVIOUSLY FROZEN  pork side  spareribs    kg 4.17 ,b 1.89  BULK  beef  burgers  kg  3.73  3!>  1  B:  KENT BRAND  ��� !���  sausage  kg  2.82 b 1.28  Oven-Fresh  french  bread  Oven-Fresh  1.59  397 gm pkg.  glazed donuts  pk of 4  .99  Oven-Fresh  cinnamon  buns pk of 6 1.59  Oven-Fresh  cheese 'n' onion  buns Pk of e 1.35  ! .1?  4  Grocery Value]  1  3  Foremost Gr. A  large eggs  1.21  Golden Grove Reconstituted  apple juice  Regular or Sugar Free  7 up or pepsi  I litre  .79  2 litre bottle  + Deposit  Kraft  parkay  margarine  1.3$ kg/3 lbs.  Super-Valu Mild, Medium or Old  Cheddar  cheese 10% OFF  Reg. Price  Family Style  ice  cream    4utre cm 3.o9  All Flavors  Hi Dry  "'"    LXx  ���',���  tOWelS      2 roll pack    ��� .09  Mazola  2.39 1  C6rn Oil  1 litre bottie 2.39  Best Foods  m ayon a ise 1 litre 2-69  Aylmer     ���':  tomato or vegetable  9/ 7Q  SOUp .283rnii;tm XA,m i ^7 6.  Coast News, June 6,1983  Sechelt Scenario  by Peggy Connor, 885-9347  SECHELT MAY QUEEN AT  NEW WESTMINSTER  Sechelt May Queen Nicole  Anderson and her party were  all received in New Westminster. Bonnie and Rick  Semotiuk escorted the group to  take part in the Hyack parade  in New Westminster. The  report back front the Royal  Towers Hotel where they  stayed was they were the best  behaved young people they had  had.'' .-,;'.;..-.': -XX'.,.: X:   :yy  230 WINED & DINED  Another good turnout for  the annual spring luncheon put  on by the St. Mary's Hospital  Auxiliary, Sechelt Branch,  which was held on June 2 at the  Senior Citizens Hall in Sechelt.  A lot of women got together  to make this event possible finding this is a great way to meet  other members arid fine for  public relations.  PICNIC FOR AUXILIARY  All- members of St. Mary's  Hospital Auxiliary are reminded to come to the annual picnic  hosted this year by Port Mellon  branch and held at Camp  Olave in Roberts Creek.  Wednesday, June 8, is the date  starting at 11 a.m. Bring your  own lunch, tea and coffee supplied, y ,  JUNE MEETING OF  SECHELT BRANCH  Windup meeting,for Sechelt  branch of St. Mary's Hospital;  until September is oh this  Thursday, June 9 at St. Hilda's;  Church Hall starting at 1:30  p.m. Newcomers welcome.  Porpoise Bay in the tranquillity of a Sunday morning.  Halfmoon Bay Happenings  ���John Burnside photo  A surprise for columnist  by Ruth Forrester 885-2418  A LOVELY SURPRISE  I just have to start this  week's column by telling you  about something really nice  that happened this week. Like  hundreds of people I had  bought some tickets for the  beautiful quilt which was being  raffled by the Sechelt branch of  the hospital auxiliary.  You can imagine my delight  and surprise when I attended  the lunch on Thursday to learn  that I had won. For the first  time in my life I won  something, and it was such a  special something.  I don't know who the lady  was who made it, but whoever  she is, I'd like her to know just  how very beautiful it is and  how delighted yours truly is to  have given it a home.  COUNTRY FAIR  It's not too early to start  thinking and planning for the  Halfmoon Bay Country Fair  which is due to take place at  Connor Park on Saturday, July 23.  The committee have already  made out a list of events and  attractions which should make  for a great day out for folks of  all ages. There will be a three  and. a half mile race to start  things off, volleyball, a cat  show, smile contest and work is  already underway preparing a  horseshoe pitch. There will be  lots of games for children and  it is all free.  If you are planning to set up  a table of goods for sale you  % WANTED I  Used Furniture  and What Have You  AL'S  USED FURNITURE  \V> buv'Bwr Builh's  886-2812  should contact Donna Perry at  885-3742 in the evening.  LE QUARTETTE AT  LORD JIM'S  Those of you who enjoy an  evening of really good professional entertainment should  plan to be at Lord Jim's Lodge  on Saturday, June' 11, when  four young singers from North  Vancouver will present a couple of floor shows. This group  have made several appearances  here on the coast and are well  worth hearing.  Their program consists  mainly of songs /rom the forties onwards and they are a  smooth highly skilled group.  It is hoped too that Dierdre  Hartwell may make a guest appearance with Le Quartette,  and she is always a big attraction even bv herself.  A SUNSHINE WEDDING  The sun shone brightly on a  happy young couple when they  exchanged wedding vows in the  garden of the Steele residence  at Brooks Cove on Saturday,  May 29. Fraser Kirk Steele son  of Andrew and Allison Steele  was married to Brenda Allen,  from Nanaimo in a very  beautiful ceremony performed  by Reverend Fred Napora.  Some forty guests gathered  to wish happiness to the young  couple who will take up  residence in Nanoose. Friends  arid relatives came from  England, Edmonton, Kelowna  and Victoria to wish them well.  FLEA MARKET  So far there has not been too  great a response to the offer of  tables from which to sell your  goods at the Welcome Beach  Community Flea Market  scheduled for June 18. Better  do it now to make sure that the  whole affair is a great success.  Give the Vorleys a call at  885-9032. They will give you all  the details.  Don't forget that if you have  any club events or news items  i Lot  Oil Sale  June is Oil Month  Come in arid buy any type of Oil,  by the Case, for  io%  Above Costl  Including Outboard and  2 cycle in Resealable Containers  Offer good from  June 6th  'til June 3Gth  at  D & D Service Station,  HWY. 101 SECHELT  (Next to St. Mary's Hospital)  885-7543  Gulf and Design is a registered trademark of  Gulf Oii eorporation/Gulf Canada Limited^  registered user.  LTD,  you would care to pass along  that I would be happy to hear  from you.  Sat., June 11  at 8 p.m. - 10 p.m. - 12 midnight  Reservations Requested  885-2232  Special:  Alaska Black Cod  Dinner ��9.25  Opening  -AL       Wednesday, lune 8 *L    ^  %.  John Shaske  BSc (Pharm.)  Wednesday, |  HOWE SOUND  PHARMACY  (Formerly Gibsons  Clinic Pharmacy)  We are proud to announce the opening of our  new pharmacy, located in the Medical-Dental  Building on Highway 101, Gibsons.  Your prescription records are still available  here! Come iri and see us, well take care of you!  Frank Thlrsk  BSc (Pharm.)  In addition to all of your prescription needs, we will be offering a full ������� of. medical-surgical supplies  including first aid, ostomy, colostomy, support aids, canes, cratches, etc., at prices that are competitive  with Vancouver pharmacies. (Any non-stocked items will be available within 24 hours.)  Our new hours will be Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m.  well as other times when the Medical Centre is open.  5:30 p.m., Saturday, 9:30 a.m. -12 noon, as  JOIN US  Wednesday, June 8  ! Free Coffee & Cookies!!  Film  Processing  I  I  ���1  t  'k  1  We Perform PenrJef People *iii Places  Coast News, June 6,1983  by Jane McOuat, 883-9342  BELTING UP  There's a lot of kids out  there this week bugging their  parents   about   wearing   seat  belts. As a part of their traffic  safety study at Madeira Park  Elementary,    the   kids   went  down to the post office and  IGA parking lot to observe the  seat belt habits of the local  populace. Although it is law to  wear seat belts in British Col-  imbia,   these  young  citizens  saw that 70 per cent of the peo-  )le who are; guiding and in-  luencing   them   as   growing  humans don't wear seat belts!  The kids have seen the films  ibout just how impact throws  jodies and objects around the  jpar, so they naturally find it  difficult  to   understand   why  everyone doesn't wear them.  : Of course there are those  people who strongly object to  wearing, them and illegal or not  that is their prerogative. For  the majority it is just laziness  and a "that won't happen to  me" attitude.  Parents want the schools to  educate their children, but will  the parents be willing by their  actions to reinforce what the  kids are learning? Whether it's  booze, telling the truth, or  wearing seat belts, the kids will  follow the parents footsteps.  How do your foot steps look?  PARENTING  On Wednesday night, June 8  at 7:30 p.m. in the elementary  school, there will be another  session in the Parenting of  Teenagers.  This next session  i;  will deal with what influences a  child to be a good student, enjoy or at least be interested in  school. For more information  phone the school at 883-2373.  GUIDES, BROWNIES,CUBS  The harbour is really lucky  to have such active Guide,  Brownie and Cub groups. As a  small example, the Guides went  on a backyard camp to Whit-  takers on May 28. Of course  they had a good time, camp-  fire, wienie and marshmallows,  sing songs etc.  On the last day of Brownies,  the girls went "out" for dinner  to Frances Take Out. They all  thought the food was great! On  Jurie 4 the Coast (Hinechin  District) sponsored "Hands  Across the Inlet" attracting  350-300 people at Lions Park.  jThey all got to know each other  land basically had fun all day.  f On June 28 Suzanne Wilson  will receive the highest Guiding  honour, the AIL Round Cord.  She has been working three  years for this so it will be an  important day to her. Congratulations Suzanne!  SPORTS DAY  It's Sports Day at the high  school on Tuesday. The kids  will start the day off right with  a Pancake Breakfast at 7:30  a.m., then it's off to a busy day  on the field. We'll have results  next week.  ORIENTATION  Parents of upcoming grade  eight students are invited to the  high school for orientation on  June 9 at 7:30 p.m. Call the  school 31,883-2727 for more information.  CAR WASH  Let your car go dirty until  June 18, then you can help out  the Variety Club Telethon. The  second floor staff and friends  of St. Mary's Hospital will be  holding a car wash in front of  our Credit Union on Saturday,  June 18, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. as a  start   to   raising   $5,000   for  Telethon 1984. Not only is it  good to get your car washed,  but if and when you need them  it's nice to know a face or two  who might be looking after you  in the hospital. It sure is dusty  . on   my   road,   but   I'll   steel  myself to wait until then for a.  wash. Right after I get the car  washed I'll have to run up to  St.  Andrews  Church  as the  ladies of the Pender Harbour  Women's Church Group are-,  -holding- a Rummage and Yard  Sale there, also on June 18 at ^  10 a.m.  TOURISM  Pender   Harbour   Tourist  Association geared up on the  weekend and helped host 30  young people from Southwest \  Tourism. These are the people  who man the tourist booths all  over the lower mainland, and .  who offer their grand tour of  the coast from Powell River to  Gibsons helping send  multitudes of tourists our way. After  dinner at Ruby Lake and a full  harbour tour by boat they'll  probably be quite impressed.  HAPPY DAYS  A bit of the latest on Happy  Days. A trio called Binke  Mountain will entertain at the  barbeque and possibly Andio  Tapio  and  Art  Bishop  too.  Agnes Carte  r, in memoriam  Agnes Carter,who died in St.  Mary's Hospital last Friday,  was a Sunshine Coast oldtimer  even though she and her husband Lloyd had just recently  moved from Williams Lake to  Egmont to live beside Billy and  Iris Griffith, her only daughter.  Born Agnes Curran on Vancouver Island in 1909, she grew  up on nearby Lasqueti Island.  When The Lasqueti Island  Story by Elda Mason was  published in 1976, Agnes wrote  its introduction. She. and heir  first husband Vic Hill were  among those who built the  original St. Mary's Hospital at  Garden Bay.  The fishing industry was  Agnes' life for forty years.  Beginning with rowboat-  fishing, she ran her own small  trolling boat for awhile in the.  1920's. For twenty-five years  she fished the coast with her  husband north as far as the  Queen Charlotte Islands,  sometimes trapping and hand-  logging in the winter. She was  active in politics and cooperatives, a founding member.  of Gulf and Fraser Fishermen's  Credit Union.  Trouble always brought out  Agnes' fighting spirit. The last  years of her husband Vic's life  he spent in a wheelchair,  unable to use arms or legs.  Nevertheless with Agnes' hands  he wrote a book of fishing  history. Every summer found  Agnes and her family tenting in  the Sierras or elsewhere,  wheelchair and all.  On becoming Mrs. Lloyd  Carter in 1975 i Agnes entered a  new and happy phase..The couple became globe-trotters and  (not surprisingly) sports  fishermen. Agnes had suddenly  aquired a loving family and  many staunch friends in the  Cariboo.  People and flowers, music,  messages, and even singsongs  and parties filled Agnes' room  during her two-month stay at  Cariboo Memorial Hospital  and her final two months at St.  Mary's. Her valiant battle  against cancer was wearison  but not painful. A favourite  with the hospital staff,; she  often expressed happy amazement at the loving kindness  shown to her by everyone.  Agnes died in physical and  mental peace, survived by  Lloyd; daughter Iris and hen  husband Billy Griffith and  grandchildren Maureen, Elaine  and John; brothers Victor and  Tom Curran of New Westminster; and her "new" family, the Hugo Stahls and the  ,. Glen Carters of Williams Lake.  Chiefly because "all her people" ��� live s6c>far%pari, Agnes  thought it best td have no  memorial service. Instead,  while living she had felt each  loving thought- directed her  way. In place of flowers Agnes  suggested that, the Pender Harbour- and Egmont Bursary  Fund, Box 340, Madeira Park,  VON 2H0, a non-registered  charity, be remembered.  Care grants given  MP Ray Skelly announced  today that both the Meals on  Wheels of the Sunshine Coast  Community Services Committee, and the /Greene Court  Drop-in Centre Committee,  have been awarded grants of  $5,965 and $6,774 respectively  under the New Horizons Program of Health and Welfare  Canada.  The Meals on Wheels of the  SCCSC requested a grant to expand its programme to three  days a week; senior volunteers  will deliver hot, nutritious  meals to elderly people in the  areas from Langdale to Halfmoon Bay. A total of 76,  volunteers are directly involved.  The Greene Court Drop-in  Centre Committee also of  Sechelt, applied for a grant to  set up a centre where the people  from Greene Court and the  surrounding community can  come together to visit and enjoy themselves.  Greene Court is composed of  a. collection of small cottages  with an intermediate care facility being added later this year.  There are also plans to build an  extended care unit.  Fifty volunteers are directly  involved in this project with a  potential for another 50 in the  near future. ,  The New Horizons Program  was developed in 1972 to encourage retired citizens to  become more involved in community activities. As a result of  this programme a large number  of groups of senior citizens  throughout Canada are engaged in a variety of activities  suited to their particular interests and skills.  Dad Deserves  The Best,  AStinl�� FS-61 brushcutter... the ideal  Father's Day gift. It'll make life easier by  making a tough job more like fun. Only  top quality's good enough for Dad.  v And only Stihl has that quality.  RENTALS-SALES-SERVICE   4jt  mMM. 883-9114.**  ��  Lots of folks know and enjoy  Art and Avely. Binke Mountain is easy listening, so you can  calm down after the days  events.  COUPONS  If you still have a copy of  last week's paper have another  perusal of the coupons. Quite a  '"few were good for an extended  period of time. Eight dollars  off any dress at Cactus Flower  was a greatvone, so was half  price on the Harbour Video  Machine rentals, $1 off dinner  at Ruby Lake, etc. etc.  CONDOLENCES  Our condolences to Iris Griffiths and her family after, the  passing on of Iris's mother, the  well known and liked pioneer  Agnes Carter.  TOOL & EQUIPMENT RENTALS  SALES & SERVICE �� SMALL ENGINE SPECIALISTS  Pender Harbour  883-9114  PENDER HARBOUR  &LJG8Mwi��ftnr  Electronic Wheel Balancing  Wheel Alignment on All Makes  Shocks, Springs, Axle Straightening  All Suspension Repairs     883-2221  i  �����  iiH  ���   9. '-\  i  H ���!  r fy.\  <:'!  'i  Notice Board  .y"  S  ^f  Sponsored as a public  service by the  Sunshine Coast News  John R. Goodwin, C.A.  Phone 24 hrs. 885-2456  Vancouver 669-3022  Note: Early announcements will be run once, then  must be re-submitted to run again, no more than one  month prior to the event.  (  . -35ri}'  Wednesday  Coming Events  Regular Events  Monday  Elphinstone Pioneer Museumin Gibsons is now open Monday through  . Sunday between 10 am-4 pm  : Pender Harbour & District Wildlife Society. Regular monthly meetings  will now be held on the 4th Monday of each month.  1st Gibsons Guide Co. meets on Mondays 6:45 pm-8:30 pm at United  Church Hall, Glassford Rd., Lower Gibsons. Girls 9-12 welcome.  Roberts Creek Hospital Auxiliary: Second Monday of each month, 11 at  Roberts Creek Legion. / ���  The Sunshine Coast Dressing Society meets every 4th Monday to make  non-cancer dressings for the Coast Garibaldi Health Unit. 10 am-2 pm.  Volunteers���men and women needed.  Roberts Creek New Horizons meet at the Community Hall each Monday 1:30-3:30 pm. All welcome.  Senior Men's Volleyball commencing Monday the 13th of September,  Elphinstone gym 8 pm.  Social Bingo - 2nd & 3rd Mondays, 2 pm at Harmony Hall, Gibsons.  Monday - O.A.P.O. #38 Regular Meeting: First Monday of each month, 2  pm at Harmony Hall, Gibsons.  Sunshine Pottery Guild Meetings: 2nd Monday of every month 7:30 p.m.  at the Craft Studio, corner of North Road and Hwy. 101, 885-3145.  Gibsons |udo Club St. Nov. 8. Every Mon. & Thurs. at 6:30 pm Cedar Grove  School Gym;���'Adults''& children from age 9. 886-7759.  |g���'-ffffTuesday -f-���"    ' '\:Z' '  The,Women's Aglow Fellowship's regular meeting is held in Harmony  Hail, on Harmony Lane, Gibsons, at 11:30 am every 3rd Tuesday. Lunch  served, information phone 886-9774 or 886-9567.  Sunshine Coast Arts Councllregular meeting 4th Tuesday of every  month at 7:30 pm at the Arts Centre in Sechelt.  Sechelt Crib Club every Tuesday night at 8 pm, Sechelt Legion.  Al-Anon Meetings every Tuesday .night at 8 pm, St. Adians Hall, Hall  .. Rd., Roberts Creek. Information call 886-9059 or 886-9041.  ' Sunshine Coast Navy League of Canada Cadets and Wrenettes, ages  ,.10 to 14, will meet Tuesday nights 7-9 pm, United Church Hall, Gibsons.  New recruits welcome.  Sechelt Garden Club meet first Wednesday^ each month 7:30 pm St.  Hilda's Hall. Except Jan., July and August..  Kiwanis Care Centre Auxiliary Gibsons meets every 3rd Wednesday  each month 8 pm at the Care Centre.  Timber Trails Riding Club 1st Wednesday of the month'7:30 pm Davis  Bay .Elementary School.  Gibsons Tops Meeting every Wednesday at 6:30 pm In the Marine  Room under the.Gibsons Library. 886-2906 or 886-2819.  Sunshine Lapidary & Craft Club meets 1st Wednesday every month at  7:30 pm. Information 886-2873 or 886-9204.  Pender Harbour Auxiliary to St. Mary's Hospital meets 2nd Wednesday  of every month 1:30 pm at St. Andrew's Church Hall, Hwy 101. New  members welcome.  Port Mellon Hospital Auxiliary second Wednesday of every month 1:30  pm. 886-7937.  Gibsons Badminton Club Wednesdays, 8-10 pm Elphinstone Gym.  Sept. 22 to April, 1983. 886-2467.  I1  Thursday  Roberts Creek Legion Bingo every Thursday. Early Bird, Bonanza, also  Meat Draws. Doors open at 6 pm. Everyone welcome.  The Bargain Barn of the Pender Harbour Health Clinic Auxiliary is open  on Thursday afternoons from 1-3:30 pm.  Al-Anon Meeting every Thursday in Gibsons at 8 pm. Information call  886-9569 or 886-9037.  The Kinsmen Club of Gibsons & District welcomes young men 21-40"  years. Meetings 1st & 3rd Thursdays 8 pm Kinsmen Hall, Dougal Park,  Gibsons. Call 885-2412.  Gibsons & District Chamber of Commerce general meeting on last  Thursday of every month, 8 pm. Marine Room.  Western Weight Controllers Branch 154 meet every Thursday 1-3 pm at  United Church Fellowship Room. New members welcome. For more information call 886-7378.  O.A.P.O. #38 Public Bingo every Thursday 7:45 pm sharp at Harmony  Hall, Gibsons.  Friday  Tot Lot at Gibsons United Church 9:30-11:30 am. Children up to 3 yrs  welcome. Information call 886-8050.  Sechelt Totel Club Bingo every Friday, Sechelt Indian Band Hall. Doors  open 5:30. Early Birds 7 pm. Bonanza 7:30 pm. Regular Bingo 8 pm.  . 100# payout on Bonanza end of each month. Everyone Welcome.  Thrift Shop every Friday. 1-3 pm. Thrift Shop, Gibsons United Church  basement.  Wilson Creek Community Reading Centre noon to 4 pm. 885-2709.  Ladies Basketball Elphinstone gym 7-9 pm.    .  O.A.P.O. #38 Fun Night every Friday at 7:30 pm. Pot Luck Supptr last  Friday of every month at 6 pm at Harmony Hall, Gibsons.  Coffee Party/Story Hour: First Friday of each month at the Wilson ,  Creek Hall 10:30 am. 885-2752.  Bridge at Wilson Creek Hall: 2nd & 4th Friday of each month 1:00 pm.  .885-3510.  m  v.f t  Saturday  Full Gospet Business Men's Fellowship. Breakfast meeting every 1st  Saturday of the month 8 am. Ladies also welcome. Call 886-9774,  886-8026. Praise the Lord.  Wilson Creek Community Reading Centre 1-4 pm. 885-2709.  The Bargain Barn of the Pender Harbour Health Clinic Auxiliary is open  on Saturday from 1-3:30 pm.  'li  ���Kirv  6>  ���I Michelin is offering a  ���I   cash rebate with the  se of 4 tires.  Owning the superior quality of  MICHELIN tires was never so advantageous. And the MICHELIN $50 rebate  offer makes all the difference...  Bib-Bib-Bib Hurray!  To qualify for your $50 rebate, just buy 4  MICHELIN tires from your participating  dealer and we'll send you a cheque for  $50.  But you'd better Bib-Bib Hurry... this  offer is valid for a limited time only.  This offer applies only to Passenger car tires and while rebate  coupons last.  See your participating dealer for details.  fv  886-8167  VISA  Tire, Suspension & Brake Centre  Hwy. 101,1 Mile West of Gibsons  886-2700  THE WORLD'S LARGEST SELLING CHAW SAW  makes all the difference fan  :<>������  )  i  4  '���*  '���*  ���*  '���<  '���4  '�����  \  V  "<  4'  1  ���if-  1  i  I  i 8.  Coast News, June 6,1983  ma _^"-"^ ��� ��� -     >      >S'        ':������   " *K \ ���        if' l^ ..^  iUv     />&���*    r^V"^   \X\\\   V\/   N  ��m\A k*-.1^ v.si Wit'A   e=s  V��*Vfe.V��e      \'.'- i     "   ����� ���    ^-.^.-'        V      *��-,;".  .        1 X5V-V---��-i X:.#j4  IP-"'   ,    %J \ ������.'������ \   r^^-Af-^*   \       ^i?\  Day by Day       Item by Item  We do more for you in providing Variety, Quality  & Friendly Service.  WE RESERVE THE RIGHT  TO LIMIT QUANTITIES  Gower Point Rd., Gibsons  886-2257  FREE DELIVERY TO THE WHARF  rlcSays 'til 7  en Sundays  10 a.m. - 5 p.m.  Chiquita ^     j***  BANANAS$1.08  y  'J'" I'W'L1  < = >  Homegrown  HOTHOUSE  TOMATOES  2.25  Imperial - Soft  margarine W7 g,,��  Palm - Old Fashioned  ice cream   m** 1.69  2 litre   ���������!  Local  HEAD LETTUCE  Homegrown  RADISHES an,  GREEN ONIONS  each  .39  2/. 49  S'  4?  '���Jr*^  '^m  \  BKj  G��A  Our Own Freshly Baked  brownies  ..1J9  Large  wheat  rolls  ....184 gm  3/. 99  .69  *<*%f*r  jk^j  12  1.49  KaiKan  cat food  Campflre  marshmallows  Bee Cee - Liquid olr Creamed  honey      .500 9m 1.69  Dial  soap as 1.98  White, Gold, Almond, Sky Blue  Palmolive  liquid!  detergent     ,,r 2.89  ^d:  12 - 850ml Any Flavour     24 - 300 ml Any Flavour  $5.99 + Deposit $5.49 + Deposit  (ix<Xvj*J  1  L^     ^f    :  ���*      *'l    ri,  ^tfypfi-BlueLalgel  y^,trmx   x  if  Vt  i  :.\;11 litre  1.19  Sure & Natural  max! shields 3 4.09  Wcfch's  grape juice  ,r 1.39  French's - Prepared  mustard      soo���/ .88  Peek Frean  biscuits    6oo Sm 1.99  Digestive or Shortcake  Ragu  spaghetti  SaUCe.;.-,....^ ^..398ml .��l��l  ^ ^Kua-^^^i^ '^���^���"^^ ��� ">      Po*?%"  _  ���"!%.  Robin Hood _  5RQi  Anyone who read last week's column will know that I am directly  responsible for the changing weather pattern this past week. I nonchalantly cast my clouts before May was out. Should have known better! I wasn't In the least consoled that my garden really needed the  rain���after all. the grass grew twice as fast. My sunburnt nose grew  paler by the hour. "This will not do," I shrieked, "we must have sun."  But the nearest i could get was to produce a Mediterranean style meal.  C'est la vie. I guessl  Walnut Salad  1 medium head lettuce 2 apples, chopped  2 cups chopped celery Vi cup walnuts, chopped  4 medium tomatoes, chopped  Vinaigrette Dressing  1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 2 tablespoons whipping cream  5 tablespoons olive oil ^ g, pepper to taste  Whisk the oil into the vinegar and quickly stir in the cream and  seasoning. Add to the salad and chill for one hour before serving.  Seafood Spaghetti  ' 1 Spanish onion, chopped  2 cloves garlic, chopped  2 tablespoons oil  1 14 oz. can tomatoes  salt &. pepper to taste  2 teaspoons brown sugar  Vi teaspoon oregano  2 cups prawns  1 can tuna, chunked  4 anchovy fillets, rinsed and chopped  Vi cup white wine  4 tablespoons finely chopped parsley  1 tablespoon butter  1 Ib. spaghetti  Vanilla Ice Cream with  Labagllone Sauce  3 egg yolks  1 tablespoon sugar  4 tablespoons sherry       \ j  1 Vi tablespoons brandy  i��  1. Saute the onion and garlic In oil until transparent.  2. Add the tomatoes, salt, pepper, sugar and oregano and simmer uncovered for 20 minutes.  3. Add sea food, wine and parsley and simmer for a further 10 minutes.  4. Cook the spaghetti In rapidly boiling water for 8-10 minutes. Drain  and place' in a large serving dish. Pour the seafood sauce over, top  with the butter and serve Immediately.  1. In the top of a double boiler, combine the egg yolks and sugar. Keep  the water in the base of the double boiler Just below boiling point.  Whisk until the mixture coats the back of a spoon.  2. Remove from heat, stir In sherry and brandy and serve poured over  ice cream. Eat immediately.  Perhaps the sun will return, queln sabel  Nest Lewis  T*BP BooKstore  isi  886-7744  Co'ntr Ol School &  Gower Pomi Roads  Envelopes  Stationary  &  Assorted  Office Supplies  Crane, American Standard  Kohjer and Steal Queen Kll  PLUMBING  FIXTURES!  ^Serving the-  Sunshjne C?ast_  Seaside Plumbing Ltd.  886-7017  ^ i<  ALL SPORTS  REAL WIN  BntRMil  Sttap  *46.19  _   -1 886-9303  Now Open!  Howe Sound  - waanmmmmimwmmmaa  Pliar Bnacy  | (See our advertisement |  jn this paper.)  m^  irt  &v  L^  Fill Out & Clip  2.   Attach Your Sales Slip  3.   Return to Ken's Lucky Dollar  Draw to be made 5 p.m. every Sunday.  .*'  e^  Name.  Tel. No..  Postal Address.  .$59y$r^ Coast News, June 6,1983  ���ssa  w9  1A  Grade r\   Beef  CHUCK BLADE  STEAK Bone-in. ....  Canada Grade m\ Beef  CROSS RIB  KUAS I   Bone-in   37 *��� $1  Fletcher's - Cou l/2S . .^'      ;^        *%������  COTTAGE ROLLS $5.18 ��� $2.35  Fletcher's - #1  BACON  Value Pak  .500 gm each  HAM  Sliced.... ...175gm each  $1.09  Honey Dew  orange or  grape drinks 1  Frozo - Choice  green peas j*, 1  .19  .49  .99  Packets 50s  sugar twin    4o 3m  Monarch Chicken Magic jmam  sauce mix   2iogm -99  Sweet & Sour, B.B.Q., Honey Garlic  Del Monte  pudding  Assorted Flavours  Nabisco Cereal  shreddies 6759m 1.79  ������rv^-fjiy^rf^f ���*��� p  Steinfield's  ������������������*���  .1 litres m  Baby Dill, Bread & Butter ~  1.79  Pam  Q  .vegetable  1.891 spray        3699m 2.95  RUBBER  GLOVES  BY Barum  ��� Non Slip Grip  Easy on - Easy off  ��� Lined Latex Gloves  ��� Large, medium, small  Reg. Price $1.79  SPECIAL  PURCHASE PRICE  S1.39  Dream Whip I Easy Off - Spray  dessert colovert  topping i7ogm 1.691 cleaner     400 am 1.95  _^  RED    '  i 1  Huntfs  .398 nil  i.��*  Urliole or Stewed * r_,s  <���. -f s  V   a, ��-  M.  in ���>  Carnation  mate.: :.v\,...-. .-��� m*�� *����  #  FACE CLOTHS  &TEA  TOWELS  ��� Cream coloured  face cloths  ��� Assorted coloured  towels  Reg. Price .99  SPECIAL  PURCHASE PRICE  ��� ���*.    '   f ** *���''   V.. *- ��� i  I*   1- f  -111  suet) TALK  ^,1  v  It's only the season that these two things have in common, thank goodness!  But it is a time to remind everyone that we have a full  stock of the various RAID bug destroyers. Restock now,  'cause for sure a variety of this material will be needed  soon, if not now.  Liz asked me to tell everyone that she now has canning  supplies, Including jelly jars, in stock.  It is our nature, It seems, always to wait until the last  moment to stock up on this important item. Important,  yes, because when the fruit is ripe, or your vegetable crop  Is ready to be harvested, you will need the supplies right  now, not next week.  Last year we had quite some difficulty to keep up supply with demand and so did every other retailer. Because  of the economy, many more people are growing and canning their own food stuffs.  You should know that wholesalers, because of the  large storage capacity needed, and the very seasonal  sales period, are reluctant to gamble on their purchasing.  To be sure that your needs are adequately supplied,  please check your stock of all types, lids, rings, jars, etc.,  and book your order with Liz NOW. This way we can better service your needs and that of ail those who may not  heed this warning.  So Temember, bugs, flies and canning have one thing in  common���It's the season!  Buy now.  REAL WIN  KtiLcDo"  Winner  #147  Walkey  S50 Grbfeery Draw Winner  'MARK]  Open 7 days a week  9-7-  It's  ft ���   week  Red Snappa Fillets  Ling Cod Steaks  Smoked Ling Cod  All $1.99 Ib. this weekl  ,8<B-78*  Licensed  888-9021  Cool  Salad Bar  for  Lunch  Landing Beauty &  1 Barber Shop  OPEN - 6 DAYS A WEEK  2 Barbers  &  3 Hairdressers  to serve you.  886-3010      J  VarietP  Deli and Health  886-2936 10.  Coast News, June 6,1983  Sculptor Jim Krieger's white marble piece "Maenad", currently  on display at the Arts Centre, will become part of the juried show  "Images and Objects", opening June 28 in Robson Square, Vancouver. ���Fran Berger photo  Centre shows marbles  Jim Krieger's second one-  man exhibition of sculpture at  the-Arts Centre, Sechelt contains work done during the past  two years. The artist continues  his fascination with Greek  myth and sculpture in many of  the pieces, combining it with  contemporary abstraction. A  fine example of this is  "Maenad", (see photo) an  elegant half-abstract torso in  white marble reminiscent of the  famous Winged Victory of  Samothrace.  Whether he works in white  Italian marble, grey Georgian  marble   or   black   Texada  limestone, Krieger manages to  make subject and material  complement each other  perfectly, letting the more brittle limestone dictate massive  and simpler designs while he  takes full advantage of the  malleability of marble to create  his sinuously curved torsos.  This tranquil and powerful  exhibition is on view until June  19. Please note that opening  hours at the Arts Centre during  June, July and August will be  Tuesday thru Saturday: 10  a.m. to 5 p.m., Sundays: 1 to 4  p.m.  "Where friends meet"  firie foocls ? Ifriendlvr j^aSres     ":wr.  ���. ',...- ;? t. X:^X>XX ""���'  TEREDO SQUARE, SECHELT  Wine. Beer Licensed      ESPRESSO BAR  885-9962  Make Your Own  Brew  $-��   50  For as little as   ��.���     a dozen...  ^��tf**��^  ial  Capper Rental 85.00/day  Lower Village  (A  JO  ��  2  o  3 MOVIES  NO CHARGE  with a three or four day VCR rental  3 day rate $25.00*  4 day rate $35.00*  A  * Deposit required      %  OVER 475 MOVIE TITLES  NOW AVAILABLE  Hoitie  Furnishings  ft  o  5  ��  5"  KERN'S  Jahen is doing her star-gazing somewhere in the wilds of B.C.  after tree planting. Her column will resume after we succeed in re-'  establishing contact.   ;\ .'."������':  GIBSONS  Tuesday, June 7  SECHELT  Thursday, June 9  Starting at 7p.m. 7.7  We begin our programming  this week with a two minute  video tape of visuals and music  which we are sending as a part  of our report to the CRTC on  our 1982/83 year of operation.  With this montage of visuals,  edited by Rick Buckmaster and  Clint Mahlman, we are also  sending a scrapbook of our  shows and events made from  our co-operative work with the  Sunshine Coast News.  Part 1. Canadian Producer Series (part 2)  Former graduate of  Elphinstone, Colleen Bostwick,  talked with host Fran Berger  about a film she produced on  the Depression in B.C. Colleen  discusses the steps taken 10  raise the money, the research  and resource gathering  necessary, and the people she  interviewed to create this film.  Colleen provided Coast 10  with a copy pf the film which  we are pleased to play. Called  "Twenty Cents a Day" this  documentary highlights life  and events during the 1930's  and features original photographs and film footage never  before seen, of the relief camps  in B.C.  This film is presently being  used in B.C. schools as part of  the Canadian Studies Courses.  Part 2. Canadian Authors  Series (part 2)  Silver Donald Cameron,  writer and journalist was in our  studio. Host, Vicki* Hawken,  asked him about his life, his  works, and his plans for the  future.  Note: We have received  many requests to show the  highlights of our Centennial  '86 Telethon. We do plan to  edit the events and hope to  have it ready for next week.  Most of the many requests  have been to see Jackson  Davies calling "Bingo".  Thanks!  Forge writers meet  by Marion St. Denis  The "works" at the Forge  are beginning to take shape as  the Suncoast Writers' plan a  major literary event to coincide  with the third birthday of the  Sunshine Coast Arts Centre on  the weekend of August 5, 6 and  7.  Enthusiasm and excitement  mount as commitments are  received from such well known  Canadian authors as Jack  Hodgins, winner of the  Governor-General's Fiction  Award for "The Resurrection  of Joseph Bourne" and author  of "Spit Delaney's Island" and  "The Invention of The World"  and thriller writer Crawford  Killian, author of international.,  best sellers "Tsunami"  (200,000 copies sold) and "Ice-  quake".  We hope to provide stimula-  Navy League  The Sunshine Coast branch  of the Navy League of Canada  will hold its annual inspection  at the Gibsons Winter Club  beginning at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 7.  Inspection will be carried put  by Captain A.D. McPhee,  RCN (Ret.). Master of  Ceremonies will be Mr. Jack  Copland. Prayers will be  delivered by Reverend A.G.  Reid, Lt. Col. (Ret,).  Christian  Science  News  The local Christian Science  church at Sechelt will be joining with other branch churches  around the world in sharing  this denomination's annual  meeting season through a unique collaboration.  Instead of local Christian  Scientists travelling to Boston  for the June 6 meeting of The  Mother Church, the First  Church of Christ, Scientist, a  special video taped discussion  will be travelling to them.  The hour-long commentary  was prepared earlier this year at  the denomination's international headquarters. It focuses  on the church's wide-ranging  efforts to meet the challenges  of what it judges to be intensely  materialistic times through a  revitalized commitment to  spiritual values and Bible  precepts.  Harvey W. Wood, 1983-84  chairman of the Christian  Science board of directors, said  he finds "an encouraging and  growing commitment on the  part of Christian Scientists to  let their lives more than their  words be the proof of what  Christian Science is."  ,".y':     ���tues:.-Satvv.9.S;3p|:FrL.;;iii:.!6\p.rai:;   .  .'..'*���       \ ' In-s.tore financing available O.A-C-'  Seaview���Place-, Gibsons 886-9733  S!ncla!rB8S5-932?  tion for a wide range of  readers' and writers' tastes and  attract not only our Coast  residents, but tourists and  visitors to the area too.  The next meeting is June 8,  1983, at 7:30 p.m. at the Arts  Centre when Rose and Diane  Nicholson will present  "Readers, Writers and  Booksellers". A video-taped  interview with Margaret  Laurence will also be shown.  Join us. New members are  welcome. Annual fee is $10.  Members & Guests Welcome  >  . �����  ���������������*  yv,  : .-%.  ���:���.*  :���*  %  ���*  ���������*  1  "a  i  -1*  ������%  ���**  . -.���*  ������*  ��� %  ������:%  '���'%  -*  %  I  ������M  ��� >i  ,*v  xn  -.3  ������*  '������;���  ';��  ���:.;*  ���x<  ;i  . 'mi  :*  ���j#  ������:#  ' '**  &  xm  '*;  ;*  :m  ���K  'A  -���'if  -��?  ���%1  ������������*.  x&  $  X*%  .#r*  ������ �����  x*Z  '���'i*T  ���m Hi  BaBaB3BEaa��HB��aB��BjB��B  Coast News, June 6,1983  L"*'$  $  /���>*>..  ,Uv*  "*:*  ���'* * '^������'  fi��i  '��|"V  ���V^*,��V'*,J&  8b#  ���V:*-  *���*.  **  "���fa  SAVE $6.00  .'���.���'-;   Off 0tir'Regular Price  a Gallon on General Paint  Premium Quality Interior & Exterior Finishes!  ��� Breeze Eggshell Latex Interior  (White & Bone only)    .  ��� Wood Craft Solid Colour Stain  * Wood Craft Semi Transparent Stain  ��� Wood Craft Semi Transparent Deck Stain  * Wood Craft Latex Solid Colour Stain  ��� Semi Gloss Latex Interior  (White and Pastels only)  ��� General Paint Exterior Alkyd Flat  * General Paint Exterior Alkyd  House and Trim Gloss  ��� Breeze Latex Exterior Flat  * Breeze Latex Exterior Semi Gloss  �����& ��� ��� ��� ��� ������*wSvXvv..v/j;  f��     .r*  VxT-te-t-^i  WUNT  i'xMkMkoM, miw^  GENERAL PAINT  EXTERIOR ALKYD  HOUSE & TRIM GLOSS  Sale $22.75  *K��NiMK fatten        -    ACftYfflC  BREEZE LATEX  EXTERIOR SEMI GLOSS  Reg. $25.99  . '  $19.99  ,.��^���������"  ��**��*�����  ��uwr  1  JXTEX  flat  WE WW  ���ji^i.ifio-ozn-  -�����������S:js>.v....VAS���  ijfflii  EXTERIOR FLAT  BREEZE LATEX  Reg. $25.99  Sale $19.99  <<*-,  SEMI  TRANSPARENT  DECK STAIN  Reg. $24.99  $18.99  ���i.��fe;p;:  SJ&-  breeze)  LATEX M  front ��*��  BREEZE  EGGSHELL  LATEX INTERIOR  (White & Bone only)  Reg. $24.50  Sale$18.50  ��� <v.'  >;  Semi-Glbs&  UATEX  KHire M010  J55L 160 ��'P  SEMI  GLOSS  LATEX INTERIOR  (White and Pastels only)  Reg. $24.50 ,  Sale $18.50  WOODCRAFT  SOLID COLOUR  STAIN  .-������-: Reg. $24.99  Sale $18,  ���    ; '   ">. ���  '\ ������*������* ������  ���������/* -v  * r'  ��;���-  ��  '    '*  '*,'  ;*��� 12.  Goast News, June 6,1983  ^^yxxx^rxpx^i  'f  , -    S,*XX/Sy/^'J*��si&  '** "J > ������    '" W** *>$* ^<  .y "*���' -y ffyX'xirXt&'X.  ,^'X'X   4X'X~z&%&&J3,  . > r'i *����&'.'���  "%ikr���^ ���������**���**  ���A  ."��  *      .4     p  &^rV  .Look closely, you will see that this is a swing and a miss.  :." '������ ���* . ? ���   ^   "::*- '������'^>>��^\H^  .���.    .   ���. . .    ���;���  -..*. *y ....... ,.- ,��a . ���^?' ..  . .whilst here the ball is heading for the fences.      -George Matthews photo  Cops handcuff GBS  ��   RCMP  Cowboys won  lien's  the  fastball league tourna-  ^nent on the weekend of May  ^8 and 29, with a convincing  ��l2-4 win over GBS in the final  fjgame. Rick Eckles was the win-  ^.ning pitcher and good offensive  fplay all around by the  C Cowboys.  ;v Of the seven teams entered,  ; GBS came second overall losing only one game. Power hitting by Dave Lamb and Robbie  i'Williams, kept them ahead of  l^the Cedars Inn who placed  'third. Alex Skytte pitched well  1 all weekend and strong hitting  ,evby Kenny Johnson helped GBS  p^.take the consolation final over  ^fourth place Kenmac. Kenmac  ^snapped their 3 game losing  'streak with a 14-2 win over  ; West Sechelt. Cleanup batter,  ���Ken Bland, went 3 for 4 and  steady pitching by Lowell Pearl  put them over the top;  In league play GBS revenged  their loss to the Cowboys with  a 6-5 win, Dave Lamb batting  in the winning run in the bottom of the seventh.  In other action, Kenmac.beat  West Sechelt 5-3. Lowell Pearl  was the winning pitcher.  League standing is as follows:  Wins Losses   Pts  Kenmac  ���3  1  6  Cedars  3  1  6  Weldwood  2  1  .   4  GBS  2  2  4  RCMP  1  2  2  Blue Nosers  1  3  2  WSI  0  3  0  THE TIMELESS  WAY OF  BUILDING  L.      Christopher Alexander  PATTERN      -^  LANGUAGE    ^  Towns ��� Buildings ��� Construction  Christopher Alexander  & Associates  (CG)  (Chat)  (CG)  (L)  (L)  The schedule of games for  the week is as follows:  Monday, June 6  RCMP        vs   Cedars  GBS vs   WSI  Tuesday, June 7  Weldwood  vs   Kenmac  Wednesday, June 8  RCMP        vs   Kenmac ,  Thursday, June 9  WSI vs   Blue Nosers  Sunday, June 12  WSI vs   Weldwood   (Hac 1)  GBS vs   Blue Nosers     (RC)  Monday, June 13  Cedars        vs   Kenmac  Hackett #1 - Hac 1  Hackett #Z - Hac 2  Cedar Grove - CG  Langdale - L    ~  Wilson Creek - WC  Chatelech - Chat''  Roberts Creek - RC  (CG)  Gramma's Blues brought the  trophy home to the Sunshine  Coast last weekend at a Powell  River Tournament involving  eleven ladies' softball teams.  On Saturday Gramma's  played Coast Paving and won  10 to 3. Action began on Sunday with a win over Comox II  to 6.  Gramma's Blues went on to  play C&M Sports in the semifinals and were victorious with  a 6 to 5 score. The two teams  met again in the finals and after  one overtime inning Gramma's  emerged the victors, winning 15  to 14. Gramma's Blues was the  only undefeated team at the  tournament.  Other teams who attended  from the Sunshine Coast were  Sunshine GM, Wakefield and  Trail Bay Sports.  The most valuable player  award was presented to Edna  Naylor, who was unanimously  chosen. Edna, who plays centre  field, Laura, Nestman, third  base, and Carol Parrell, shortstop, of Gramma's Blues, were  selected for the Powell River  Ladies' Allstar Softball Team.  Chinook  Swim  The victorious Grammas Blues are pictured after sweeping a recent tournament in Powell River.  Minor  results  Tadpole  Club  Chinook Swim Team was  out in full force Friday night,  June 3, to support the club in  their annual swim-a-thon. The  goal was to finish 200 lengths  or two hours which ever came  ��� first.- .������..':�����%:'.  Dana Hartman, our newest7'  swimmer, did 30 lengths in 24  minutes.   Steve   Illingworth  ' completed 137 lengths. Other  participants were, in order of  completion: Kirk Illingworth, 1  hour 3 minutes; Tina Clark, 1  hour 4 minutes; David Reeves,  1  hour 6 minutes;  Matthew  Graham,  1  hour 6 minutes;  Erica   Renouf,   1   hour   8.:  minutes; Ferla Packer, 1 hour 9,  minutes; Brad Gregorchuck, 1;-;  hour 20 minutes; Jim Miller, kX  hour 29 minutes; Eric Miller,:;i$yy  hour 31 minutes; Julie Reeves|%;  1   hriurv 37   minutes;   Farle|^|^  Graham7 1 hour 42 minutes.;^|.:|7-  This  will  be  the  wind-upl^v  event   held   here   this . year;��rx:  although there are. more meets;;  yet to be swum including one in!  Vernon. :?  Also, on the long weekend:X  we had one swimmer, David ���.  Reeves, compete at the Hyack  Invitational meet. This was aX  very large meet with competition   from   as   far   away   as :  Kitimat, Ontario and Oregon  and we are pleased to say that  Daivd made a very good show- ���  ing for our club. His times were  as  follows:   100  free 1:19.51'^  (12th);    100   breast   1:48.07  (12th); 50 back 44.86 (15th); 50  breast  49.92  (14th);   50 free  37.76 (19th); 100 back 1:37.93  (18th).  Results from Comox Glacier  Invitational May 28: 13/14 girls  relay 200 meters Pender Harbour Seals  ���combined with Chinooks 2:23.8; 100  breast Ferla Packer, 2:02.1; 200 breast  Erica Renouf, 1:47.5, Tina Clark,  1:38.0; 50 free Ferla Packer, 38.7; 100  free Tina Clark, 1:16.5, Erica Renouf,  1:22.1; 100 back Ferla Packer, 1:34.9,  Tina Clark, 1:26.8, Erica Renouf,  1:31.3  This has proven to be a very  productive and encouraging  year for all swimmers and we  would like to invite more  young people to take part and  to take advantage of our Esso  Swim Canada Program. This  provides excellent instruction  in competitive swimming.  Magus Kennel  Saan's Lions  44  Pups  28  Saan's Lions  24  Bears  19  Cubs  39  Colts  29  Tigers  23  Saan's Lions  20  Tigers  37  Colts  25  Mosquito  Gibsons  Building  Wiggy's  Supplies  17  Wharfers  Gibsons  11  10 1  Building  Contracting  18  Supplies  6  Gibsons  Building  Kingo  Supplies.  13  Diesel  Gibsons  10  101  Building  *  Contracting  13  Supplies  13  Gibsons  Building  Lambert  Supplies  16  Electric  6  Bronco  Swanson's  Elson's  Redi  Glass  11  Mix  9  Super  Kern's  Valu  26  Electronics  7  Swanson's Redi  Kern's  Mix  16  Electronic  8  Peninsula  Elson's  Market''���'���';:"���;���'���������!.���  12  Glass  ���V7:  Super,;1��^w-^;��l'ii:S  Stockwell  yau?.;;-";^.!:  ;2p  Stompers  >*  Pony  Superior  Coast Cable  Electric  14  Vision  5  Ken's Lucky  Coast Cable  Dollar  20  Vision  11  The Sunshine Coast  Health Foundation  has an interesting and informative .brochure  ready to mail to you. For your copy, simply  phone your name and mailing address to:  885-9600  CHAINSAW  LUMBERING  Will Malloff  Evergreen Pacific  CRUISING  ATLAS  Pacific Yachting  CRUISING  GUIDE  VOL. I GULF ISLANDS  | VOL. II DESOLATION SOUND I  VOL. Ill SUNSHINE COAST  PENINSULA  MARKET  k:  HDP  Bookstore  Lower  Gibsons1  Groceries  Sundries  Fishing Tackle  Tlmex Watches  ) Open  9 a.m. - 9 p.m.  7 Days a Week  Davis Bay, B.C.  885-9721  tide Tables  S86-7744,  Tues., June 7  Fri.; June 10  0155     14.2  0325     14.2  Mon.June 13 f  0855       5.0  1045       1.1  0100        11.5 )  1535     12.1  1810     14.8  0515        13.9 (  -   2040       9.4  2315     11.2  1250            .2 1  Wed., June 8  Sat., June 11  2040        15.81  0220  - 14.1  0935       3.6  1640     13.1  0350     14.2  1120         .3  1900     15.4  Reference:/  2130     10.1  Sun., June 12  Pt.             )  Thurs., June 9  0010     11.4  Atkinson   (  0250     14.1  1010      2.1  1720     14.1  2215     10.7  0430     14.1  1200     -a  1950     15.7  Pacific      I  Standard  )]  Time       \|  )&I Baby  Powder  400 gm  $2.59  Makivol 12  Tonic   350 ml 7  $3.49  DIOVOl Liquid  350 ml  DloVOl tabs  50s  $2.89  Tylenol Extra  Strength tabs  100s  $439  Member: Independent Pharmacists Inc.  Foi Daylight Saving Time ADD 1 HOIW  Metantucll  Natural Source  Laxative  340 g  $339  Neo Cttran  Adult for Colds  10s  $ 1.89  Squibb  Vitamin E  400 IU 100s  Natural Source  $5.99  r��� .-���������-i  I   this coupon is. I  a  o  V  w  i  worth  75'  off your  favourite  toothbrush  Maxwell's PharmacjH  Open Seven Days A Week  Fridays'til 7:00 p.m.  Sundays: Noon to 5:00 p.m.  pi  R.R. #2, Cedar Pl^za, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0 ���' Phone 886-8158, ti^0^^^dM^^it0i^J^^^^^^^^^.  Coast News, June 6,1983  ��M\  Sunday, June 12/83  The Sunshine Coast Cadet Corps in an outing in late April practiced survival skills including emergency  first aid, radio communication, canoeing and water safety. Here, Dominic Brooks, oneof 35 cadets  from the area to participate, gingerly enters his canoe. The Cadets practiced at Richardson Lake (thanks  to Bill Davis of the Forestry Service) in an area soon to become a Forestry recreation site. Sponsor for the  exercise was the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 140. -joe Brooks photo  Poors open from  lO a.m. to 4 p.m.  Lions club will be serving  a Pancake Breakfast from  8 a.m. - 11 a.m.  ���| ���  %'  $.  1  From the Fairway  by Ernie Hume  On Ladies Day, May 31, the  9-hole section of the Ladies  Day held a three-person .team  event. Ev Cooper, Hilda Clancy, and Lou Bayer scored a low  net 20.5 to capture first place.  The team of Ev Brock,'Verla  Hobson and Elsie Cupit took  13 putts for the nine hole circuit.  On the 18-hole pin round  Connie Grant continued her  excellent golf with a low gross  80.  - In the first flight the winner  was Marg Arbuckle with a low  net 65. Runner-up was Jean  Dean shooting a low net 66. Second flight winner was Jay  Townsend with a 68.s Helen  Milburn was runner-up with a  71. Doris Receiver used 30  putts for the low putt competition.  Monday's   Mixed   Twilight  used   a  very   unique  scoring  system. On the first hole no  talking was permitted at the  risk   of   a   penalty.   Brigette  Reich, Al Dean, Isobel Cowley  and George Cooper must have  overcome any attempt at conversation and posted a 18.25  .low net score. The lot putt prize  lyvent  to  Doris  Receiver^;Ed  ^ihkerton, Hazel Wrightl anB \  .Ron Oram taking only -nine  putts for the nine holes.  Our ladies second team competed against the Squamish  ladies last Wednesday and once  again came out on top in a  18-hole tournament by a score  of 41 Vi to 30Vi. It appears our  ladies second and third teams  are continuing their winning  ways as they did last year in  defeating all competitioa in the  lower mainland zones.  Thursday seniors played a  straight low net tournament.  The first flight winner was Jack  Hendy shooting a low net 30Vi.  Second flight winner was Ernie  Hume with a low net 30 (first  time this year).  Tom Held took first place in  the third flight scoring a 30.  These straight gross and low  net tournaments are fun once  in a while, but do not meet the  intent of the seniors day, when  players are segregated to flights  according to their individual  handicaps. It was requested at  the organization of the seniors  day that the events used for the  days' fun, were to try to have  all the fellows mix with each  other, from good golfers to  duffers so that a poor golfer  could play with a low han-  dicapper once in a while, thus  enjoy each others company as  well as getting some pointers in  this game of golf on our  regular Thursday well organized fun day.  A good contingent of senior  men golfers from the Sunshine  Coast have entered the Senior  Men's Provincial Tournament  to be held at Williams Lake  and 108 golf courses next week. .  Let's have a winner fellows!  Gibsons  *s0ihixx Wednesday; afterhpor^  theiPalmbr^Junior Secondary  Band from Richmond put on a  concert for the staff and  students of the school.  A microcomputer workshop  for primary teachers was conducted by Mr. Cotter on  Thursday morning. Teachers  were given an overview of the  computer and its application in  the classroom, as well as an opportunity to work with programs available in this district.  Because of the rain on Friday, the kindergarten, grade 1  & 2's sports day has been  postponed until Tuesday, June  7, weather permitting.  Church  Services  THE UNITED CHURCH  OF CANADA  Sunday Worship Services  ST. JOHN'S  Davis Bay - 9:30 am  GIBSONS  Glassford Rd - 11:15 am  Sundav School - 9:30 am  Rev. Alex G. Reid  Church Telephone  886-2333  ST. BARTHOLOMEW &  ST. AIDAN  ANGLICAN CHURCHES  Parish Family Eucharist  10:00 am  St. Bartholomew, Gibsons  12:00  St. Aidan, Roberts Creek  SEVENTH-DAY  ADVENTIST CHURCH  Sabbath School Saturday  9:30 am  Hour of Worship Sat. 11 am  Browning Rd. & Hwy 101  ,     Pastor: J. Popowich  Everyone Welcome  For information phone:  885-9750 or 883-2736  GRACE REFORMED  COMMUNITY CHURCH  Sechelt Elementary School  11:00 am 885-5635  CALVARY  BAPTIST CHURCH  ���   Park Rd., Gibsons  Pastor: Harold Andrews  Res: 886-9163  Church: 886-2611  Sunday School 9:30 am  Morning Service 11:00 am  Gospel Service 7:00 pm  Prayer & Bible Study    '  Thursday 7:00 pm  GIBSONS PENTECOSTAL  CHURCH  ���   Cedar Grove School  Chaster Road, Gibsons  Senior Pastor: Ted Boodle  George Marshall,  Visitation Minister  Sunday School 9:30 am  Morning Worship 11:00 am  Evening Fellowship 7:00 p.m.  Home Bible Study  Phone 886-9482 or  886-7107  Affiliated with the  Pentecostal Assemblies  of Canada     ' ,  GLAD TIDINGS  TABERNACLE  Gower Point Road  Phone:886-2660  Worship Service 10 am  Evening Fellowship 6:00 pm  Wednesday School 7:00 pm  Pastor: Dave Shinness  CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY SERVICES  Sunday Service & Sunday School 11:30 am  Wednesday'8:00 p.m'.  In United Church Building, Davis Bay  885-2506 or 886-7882  WORKWEN? WORLDS  ���/m  kx  fMX  ?���*��� ���  i?4  m  k  '--,;*..   ;���;  QUALITY  SHIRT  11  ��� Mi  #  :!*?' I  I*7!:!  T  Ji  W<  7/7  '/  y  U'A  BUY ONE SHIRT  AT OUR LOW REG.  PRICE OF $8.98  GET THE SECOND  SHIRT FOR JUST 1<P  ALL 4 STYLES  COME IN SEVERAL  GREAT COLOUR  COMBOS!  ��� BASEBALL STYLE  ��� CREW NECK SHORT SLEEVE  ��� V-NECK SHORT SLEEVE  ��� ALL 50/50 POLY COTTON  EXAMPLE:  Buy 1st Shirt    0.98  2nd Shirt .01  ������ ���-."���**: *l  #1  V >1  *v  V  *&\\  V  /l  2$Q99  SHIRTSO  THAT'S  LESS THAN  *4.50  PER SHIRT!  ���'���I  n  'It'  n  NO NAME JEANS ��� NO NONSENSE PRICE!  1ST QUALITY MEN'S  ��� BOOT GUT STYLING      "I  ��� GREAT FIT AND LOOKS  ��� BRAND NAME LOOKS ��� NO NAME PRICE  ���; 100% PREWASHED COTTON W28-38  e- WORK WEN?  /uVW^RLD)  X���WE'RE WORKlNGTOr^  Sale  fmasiei ctiatgel  VISA  PAIR  Cowrie Stv  Sechelt  885-58S8  1  I  SI  w  % 14.  Coast News, June 6,1983  iil^iBSiflPSi^w  by Maryanne West  Someone wrote in a letter to  the Sun that those who took  part in last month's Peace  March would only gain real  credibility when they stopped  using the march and similar  demonstrations to advertise  their way of life, political persuasions or other biases.  The writer has a point which  is well taken, the purpose of the  march is to be counted in your  opposition to the arms race and  nuclear weapons in particular  and most banners proclaim the  many facets of this issue.  However, for me, part of the  fascination of the exercise and  the pleasure in being a part of it  is in this coming together of  people of all political persuasions, from all walks of life,  people of different ethnic  backgrounds and people with  widely differing lifestyles.  We were unable to find the  Sunshine Coast group in Kit-  silano Park before the start of  the march because of the  throng, so we waited on the  sidewalk on Cornwall Street  for them to come past.  I have to admit we amused  ourselves with friendly comment about the groups passing  before us. One said she didn't  want to walk with the communists, another didn't want to  be seen with any of the union  groups and we none of us were  suitably attired to be accepted  by the punks and other alternative lifestylists.  All these scruples dissolved,  however, when, tired of  waiting for our group to show  up, we took the plunge and  joined the marchers. Finding  the pace too slow for comfort  we just kept going and so  found ourselves along the way  temporarily a part of many  groups as disparate as Lesbians  for   Peace,    Jews   against  Zionism, several Christian  denominations, Social Credit  candidates, a Hindu Temple  and even happily singing  "solidarity for ever" with the  boilermakers union!  On what other occasion  would such diverse groups get  together in friendship and walk  amicably together?  Let's face it, even if the  world's leaders agreed overnight to beat all their military  hardware   into   whatever  the  20th century equivalent of a  ploughshare may be, it's not  going to bring us peace.  Freedom from the fear of mass  annihilation maybe, but peace  will depend upon our individual willingness to allow  the other guy the freedom to be  different.  In this context the banners  are indeed relevant to the Peace  March. They are in a real way  what it is all about.  Parents group meets  Being a parent is the most  difficult job we can ask' of  ourselves. For many parents,  the pressures of daily living  create stress, anger and unhap-  piness.  If you find that you are left  feeling angry, frustrated and  alone, it may help to reach out  to fellow parents who understand . Parents Helping Parents  is what Parents In Crisis is all  about. We are a self-help group  designed to share problem-  solving techniques and promote happier parenting. We  meet every week. New  members welcome. Phone  Barb at 885-2790, Connie at  886-9232, or Betty-Anne at  886-3802.  AUTOPLAN  INFORMATION  SUBJECT'  POLICYHOLDER PREMIUMS.  a  I  ���.��  ���M  M  Put your  Insurance Corporation  to the test:  i  How do Autoplan Premiums  compare with the rest  of Canada?  Among the lowest. Take a look at the results  of a report that rated ICBC against 4 of the  largest national insurance companies  in Canada.  Four Year Claim-Free Record in B.C.  Five Year Claim-Free Record in Other Cities.  No Under Age 25 Driver.  1979 DATSUN 510 SEDAN  Toronto   Montreal Vancouver  ICBC  Commercial Union  Fireman's Fund  Royal Insurance  Zurich Insurance  $435  439  425  446  $562  497  553  563  $395  Edmonton Ottawa     Halifax     Victoria  ICBC  Commercial Union $421 $353 $318  Fireman's Fund 374 378 299  Royal Insurance 366 370 337  Zurich Insurance 354 399 308  $324  SAME CLAIM RECORD AND DRIVER AS ABOVE  1982 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC SEDAN  Toronto   Montreal Vancouver  ICBC  Commercial Union  Fireman's Fund  Royal Insurance  Zurich Insurance  $457  $476 $634  476 556  507 644  486   619  Edmonton Ottawa Halifax    Victoria  ICBC $375  Commercial Union $463 $390 $356  Fireman's Fund 413 435 337  Royal Insurance 451 429 395  Zurich Insurance 390 439 342  The coverage Is $500,000 Liability limit, $250 deductible  Collision coverage ($200 in B.C.) and $50 deductible  Comprehensive coverage. The premiums quoted for Montreal  include the $95 compulsory premium paid to the Government  auto insurance plan in Quebec. The vehicles are driven for  "Pleasure" only.  Tills survey was conducted by a recognized management  consulting firm on behalf of I.C.B.C.  The four insurance companies selected do business nationally  and account for almost 20% of all auto insurance in Canada  amounting to about $580 million in premiums annually.  What happens to  policyholders' premiums  until they're paid out?  The'mopey isplaced j in short and medium  term investments.     -. ;q   : ���  In 1982 our investment income in effect,  reduced premiums by an average of $62  per policy.  Naturally, we maintain a B.C. first policy for  all our investments. And all are 100% Canadian.  Does age and sex  influence car insurance  in B.C.?  No. ICBC was one of the first Canadian  insurance companies to eliminate age, sex, and  marital status from auto insurance rates.  Territory, also, is being eliminated as a  rating factor.  The cost of car insurance  is a two-way street.  Insurance is the way Individuals can be sure  that if they are responsible for an accident, the  financial cost won't be overwhelming.  Together, all policyholders share the cost of  risk by pooling their premium payments into one  fund to pay out claims.  ICBC is expected to operate on a  break-even basis, without profit or loss, and our  total income must be enough to cover the cost of  claims and expenses.  Where ICBC is able to control costs, our  record is very good. We have the lowest  administrative expense ratio of any insurance  company in Canada.  Last year, there were 476,000 Autoplan  claims. 95c of every premium dollar collected  was paid out in claims.  Now, more than ever, with the new  Claim-Rated Scale, driving habits will be  reflected in the cost of car insurance.  When it comes to traffic safety, ICBC  is actively working on a wide range of programs  in communities throughout the province. ICBC is  involved with health authorities, CounterAttack,  law enforcement agencies, the workplace,  schools ��� from kindergarten through to  secondary���and especially you. Only one life  saved as a result of these efforts would be  just reward.  At your Insurance Corporation we're working  to save more than just your money.  If you'd like to know more about the Insurance  Corporation, write for your free copy of our Report  to Policyholders: The Insurance Corporation of  B.C., 1055 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, B.C.  V6E3R4.  ���.,!  I]  I  Together we can drive the cost of car insurance down.  ��� INSURANCE  CORPORATION  OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  atfSUMNGASMW&C  Sunshine Coast  Insurance Agencies Ltd  885-2291  Credit Union Building  Cowrie St., Sechelt  J itiyiffriftirajMrqj^^ j. ��-  Coast News, June 6,1983  I  k  |  !;!  I]  ii  1  1  SSrths ^\  Obituaries ��  in M��emoriasn       I  Thanks j  Personal -  Announcements  Lost  Found  Free  I0t P��t*fi, livestock  ;*4i Music  I a. W*nted to Rent  13. For Rent  i 4. Help Wanted  15, Business  ,. Opportunities  16. Work Wanted  47. Child Care  18. Wanted  f 9. For Sale  20. Automobiles   '  21. Motorcycles  22. Campers &.  r;v.v " ���������  23. Mobile Homes  24. Marine  25. Travel  26. B.C. &. Yukon  Classifieds  27. Legal  28. Realtor  29. Barters.  ^';;" Trade'' "-''"    " ' j;  DEAR  CLASSIFIED  CUSTOMERS  Not only are Coast News  Classifieds effective, read  by 9 out of 10 readers,  BUT-  Each week you get three  chances to WIN our draw  and run yout next  Classified Ad  up to 8 lines,  FREE  '       for  3 WEEKS  Winners of this week's  Coast News  Classified Draw are:  886-7028  885-5395  885-2971  fyiargaret Fogg and Peter  Landry are pleased to an-:  nbunce the arrival of their  daughter, Megan Andrea  Landry Fogg, born at  home May 10, 1983. A  sister for Michaelle, Teri,  Leslie, Andrea, and Matthew Landry. Thanks to  Wendy Clemens and Liz-  zte Mead for their gentle  help welcoming Megan into the world. #23  Joe & Edna Bellerive proudly announce the birth of  a granddaughter, Leah  Danielle,-to Callan & Jennifer Bellerive, at Burnaby  General Hospital on May  28. Maternal grandparents, Art & Leona  Jones of Burnaby.        #23  Arnadeu and Debbie  Amaral are happy to announce the birth of .their  second child, a boy,  Dustin Miguel, born May  27, 1983 at 9:35 p.m.,  weighing 6 lbs., 10 oz.  Many thanks to Doctors  Cairns and Farrer and the  nursing staff at St. Mary's  Hospital. #23  Warner ��� Steve and  Margaret are thrilled to announce the arrival of  Stephannie Mary Beth,  born May 7 at St. Mary's,  10 lbs., 3'A oz. Proud  grandparents are Ken and  Mary Richardson of  Madeira Park and Beth  and Tim Warner of North  Vancouver. Special thanks  to Brenda Gray and all the  nurses at St. Mary's and  cheers to Dr. Cairns. Bottoms up. #23  Brummel; passed . away  May 29, 1983, Ray Brum-  mell, late of Gibsons. Survived H3y-Vhis loving wife,  Besjsje.,./Winnifred . Brum-  meli; daughter Pearl and  husband Ray Erickson,  100 Mile House; grandchildren, Doreen, James,  Pamela, Kelly, Lynn and  Jacqueline Davey of Victoria; sister-in-law Mrs. D.  Hamilton, Vancouver. Service was held Tuesday,  May 31- iirthe Chapel of  Devlin Funeral Home, Gibsons. Archdeacon J. Whittles officiated. Cremation.  Remembrance donations  to'St. Mary's hospital appreciated.- "^" #23  Carter; Agnes, iate of Egmont and Williams Lake,  died   peacefully  June  3,  1983, aged 74 years. Survived  by  husband  Lloyd  Carter; one daughter Iris  Griffith and grandchildren  Maureen, Elaine and John,  all   of   Egmont;   brothers  Victor and Tom Curran of  New Westminster; Lloyd's  daughter   Barbara   Stahl  and  grandchildren  Mark,  Janet,     Joanne     and  Christopher;  Lloyd's  son  Glen   Carter  and   grandchildren Ryan, Scott, and  Geoffrey, all of Williams  Lake. Cremation. By Mrs.  Carter's request there will  be no service. In place of  flowers,   she   suggested  that the Pender Harbour  and   Egmont   Bursary  Fund,   Box 340,  Madeira  Park, B.C. VON 2H0, a non-  registered   charity,   be  remembered. #23  Len and Michael MacDonald wish to thank all  the friends who rallied  round to bring them  strength at the time of the  loss of a dear wife and  mother, Edith. Special  thanks to Doctor Hobsoh,  Father Angelo de Pompa,  home care nurses Grace  Davis and Alice Horsman,  and to homemaker Iris  Soljs de Ovando, who, by  their special efforts, made  Edith's last few months so  much more bearable.   #23  V;. ' ��� '       -  *        ,'.'    ,    %, '  J.M. Thank you for a  wonderful time at the  Ruby Lake Smorgasbord  Saturday and Sunday  evening. The food was  great too! H.S. #23  Math and language arts  tutor available for elementary K and jr. secondary  students. Attractive rate,  my home, or yours.  886-9498.; #23  Parenting is Stressful!  Are you having problems  coping? Join us at Parents  in Crisis. Non-professional, understanding support  group meets weekly. Confidential. Phone Connie,  886-9232, Barb, 885-2790  or Betty-Ann, 886-3802.  TFN  If someone in your family  has a drinking problem  you can see what it's doing to them. Can you see  what it is doing to you? Al  Anon can help. Phone  886-9037 or 886-8228. TFN  TRANSCENDENTAL  MEDITATION  886-3911  TFN  Bed and breakfast  available. Close to beach.  Semi-private baths. Ph.  886-9232. TFN  50th Anniversary  The family of Ada & Bill  Farnham will be holding  an open house on June 11  to celebrate their parents  50th Anniversary. Time:  3-5 p.m. Place: Pearl &  Gord's. Third house, left  hand side of Henry Rd.AII  their friends are cordially  invited to drop in and help  them celebrate. (In case of  rain, it will be held in the  R.C.L. #109 Hall.) #23  Anyone witnessing the  ultra light aircraft coming  down in Gibsons Bay May  13 please call John Gileo  886-7146.' #23  We Are Pleased To  Announce  JOY WALKEY  Will Now Be Grooming  Dogs At  CASTLEROCK KENNELS  885-2505 for appt.  #24  (  1 right foot soccer shoe on  south Fletcher or School  Rd. hill, Thursday, around  4 p.m. Phone Fred,  886-3757. #23  Child's pet orange & white  2 yr old neutered male cat,  white flea collar. YMCA  Rd. Langdale. Sadly missed. Missing 2 weeks. Any  information please call  086-3812 or 886-7736.   #24  Farm fresh free kittens.  2M blk&wht. IM grey.lF  blk. 7 wks old 886-2311 .#24  2 ginger kittens - males - 7  weeks old. Cute & well-  behaved. To good homes  only. 886-2440. #23  3 free gerbil & cage.  885-7907. #23  3 yr old bay thoroughbred  filly 15.2. Also 7 yr old  Arab bay gelding 14.2.  885-2323 or 885-9969.   #24  I yr old heifers & bulls $350  each. 886-2311. #24  12  Wanted  to Rent  Furn. home for family of 4  for August. Will care for  your,home while you are  away. Good refs. Prefer  R.C. area and beach access. Call collect  985-0169. r~#24|  Working woman having  baby in July requires small  home or cottage in  Roberts Creek. 885-2971.  #25  Mature, reliable couple  ���with child wld. like to rent  a 2 bdrm. home between  Langdale & Roberts Crk.  Prefer a location  reasonably close to beach  & school. Occupancy July  1-15. Pis. call Liz collect at  112 980-2976 after 6 p.m.  #25  Store space for rent. 1,700  sq. ft, of floor area in  Madeira Park. Could be  divided in two. Phone  Steve, 883-9551. TFN  Waterfront 1 bdrm. house.  Pender Harbour. Laundry,  f r. & st. $300/mo. 883-9342.  ���   TFN-  | (arbour  Spacious 1, 2, & 3  Dedroom suites available immediately -in  family building. Small  pets considered. Heat,  calMe & storage space  included.  886-9557  2 bedroom house, central  Gibsons, and attractive 2  bedroom cottage, Roberts  Creek, suit couple with no  dogs. 886-8284. Both $350.  #25  Spac. 2 bdrm. ste., view,  Ige. mbdrm. Clean, fresh  paint. Kids, smokers, OK.  $275,886-9326. #23  1 bdrm. apt., semi-furn. Ht.  & light incl. Wilson Creek  area. $335. Ph. 886-7042  after 6. #25  Cozy 5 room cottage,  washer, 2 storage sheds,  on Vz acre, Welcome  Woods. Refs. req. $400  p.mo. 435-9181 evenings.  1 bdrm. for rent, Gibsons.  Month of June. $50 a  week. Ph. 886-8064.      #23)  Guitar, Flute, Recorder  Lessons  885-7951.  #25  5 pee. set Ludwig drums 5  Zild. Cymbals/hardware &  cases. Offers or trades.  Ph. 886-2160, Brad.       #23  3 bdrm. WF house, Pender  Hbr. Incredible view, laundry facil. Dock 1 blk. away.  Wood floors, high ceilings.' For August 1.  883-9342. TFN  3 bdrm. view apt. Central.  Adults only. 886-8107,  Rita. #23  ��-   ���   ���-���'���     ' ������������   i ��� ���   ���"���  2 bdrm. home, Abbs Rd.  Gibsons. Avail July 1/83.  Call 885-3916 or 886-9906  after 6. #24  Langdale 2 bdrm finished  bsmt. house. Elec-wood  ht. 2-4 appliances.  886-9290. #24  Available July 1, Granthams, beach level, furnished cottage, ideally  dramatic for one person  with reliable references.  $350.886-8284. #25  Mobile home space.  Suitable for 12 wide - No  dogs. References re-,  quired. Sunshine Coast  Trailer Park, Gibsons. Ph  886-9826. TFN  Attractive two bedroom  apartment-fireplace, new  appliances, sundeck-  Gibsons area. Tel*.  922-7818 or 922-2556.   #24  HARBOUR VIEW, 2 bdrm.,  view, fireplace. Mature  adults. No pets. $475.  886-7204,886-8107;       #25  2 bedroom double wide,~2  baths, 4 apiiahces,  Roberts Creek area. Ref.  req. Available immediately. 886-7152 or 929-6740!  #25  Small 2 bedroom cottage.  View, oil heat. Gower Pt.  Road. 886-9147,8313.   #25  Animal Lovers Paradise. 9  private acres, includes  modern 2 bdrm. home,  kennels, barns, creek,  meadows, woods &  garden. On Reed Rd. in  Gibsons. $650 on monthly  basis. Purchase also  poss. Ph. 988-4782.       #25  2 bdrm.,apt., upstairs, outside ent. heated. Ph.  886-9862 or 886-7660.    #23  Furnished   one   bedroom  suite/no' pets,"waterfront. '  Ph. 886-2479. #23  Three bedroom double  wide traitor. 2 baths.  Roberts Creek. $400 per.  mon. 886-9409. #23  Two bedroom waterfront  cottage/ unfurnished.  Sorry, no dogs. Available  now. 886-7377. #23  1 bdrm. cottage,  $350/mon. incl. fr., st.,  cble., T.V., util. No pets.  Avail, imm. 886-2401.    #23  Comm. premises for rent  immed. 1,000-1,800 sq. ft.  Lease basis. Phone  886-8138 or 886-2141. TFN  Community Hall for rent in  Roberts Creek. Phone  Sue, 885-2972. TFN  PENDER HARBOUR  New 2 bed. view apartment: Stove, frig., wash.,  dryer. Wood heat, wall to  wall. Ref. required.  883-9923. #23  Small engine repair, lawn  mowers, power saws, etc.  Briggs & Stratton,  qualified mechanic,  reasonable rates. 886-2812  between 9-5. #23  Want your grass cut,  garden dug or weeded,  firewood cut or split, etc.?  Hire a student. Call Peter,  886-9843. #23  Carpenter - odd jobs,  renovations, chain saw  work. 885-2964, Jim.     #23  Like to do yardwork? I do!  Just call Stuart at  885-3985 and I'll be right  oyer. #23  Fowler Const.  Framing & foundations.  Renovations & additions..  Siding, sundecks, kitchen  cabinets & plumbing.  Complete house const.  886-7309. #25  Drywall! Boarding & Taping, Renovations,  Sundecks, Fences, etc.  885-5046. #23  Pat Korch Const.  Custom framing & foundations. Renovations & additions. Design & drafting.  A Complete Building  Service  886-7280  TFN  Reliable exp. carpenter  framing to finishing; sml  plumbing & electrical  work. 885-3847. . #24  The painters int. ext. quali-.  ,ty    work    at    a    very  ^reasonable   price.   Call  Mike 886-9904. #24  Renovations-Additions  23 yrs experience   '  Dave 886-2311 #24  Qualified Painter  Reasonable   Rates.   886-  9749. TFN  c?��0��44 & "TKtUen  X.   17 YEARS EXPERIENCE  COMMERCIAL*  RESIDENTIAL ,  r~885-2923      885-3681  ._  FOR EXPLOSIVE  REQUIREMENTS  Dynamite, electric or  regular caps, B line E cord  and safety fuse. Contact  gwen Nimmo, Cemetery  Road, Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound  Farmer Institute.        TFN  zT>e4i$K.  DRAFTING  m6-7442i  ffeffi Wanted  -' 'V,   1  itecl J  Immediate, full-time position. Available for exp. or  seasoned cook Apply  Tues., 2-4 p.m., Great  Canadian Taco Factory,  #101, Cedars Plaza.      #23  Thinking of starting your  own business? 18x8 ft.  trailer, swing up doors on  all sides - owner will  finance. Steve 883-9551.  TFN  16  Work Wanted  DRYWALL?  Reasonable rates, 15 yrs.  exp., ref., prof, workmanship guaranteed. Free  estimates. Joe, 886-8583.  #23  Quality built homes and  cedar siding specialists.  References and free  estimates. Phone 885-3412  after 6. #23  Job wanted falling, also  can run skidder & winder.  T. Dawe, Box 26, Garden  Bay. 885-7518 (note new  ph.no.) #25  Landscaping and garden  maintenance, ornamentals, shaped hedges trimmed, fruit trees pruned  and sprayed. Phone  886-9294 after 6 p.m.   TFN  CLEMENT  SAWING SERVICE  Portable sawmilling for  even one tree. Bevel siding  a specialty. We also buy or  trade for cedar. 886-8218.  #23  Moppets  Have your home spring  cleaned - monthly - weekly. Carpets - windows.  886-7013,886-8571.       #25  PEERLESS TREE  SERVICES LTD.  Topping - Limbing -Danger  Tree Removal. Insured,  guaranteed work. Free  Cabins built - roofs - decks"  - basements finished - fire  rated vinyl board - steel  studs - ceilings - one piece  tub enclosures. 886-2737.  #23  TIMBER JACK SKIDDER &  OPERATOR. 886-2459. #25  Typing. Phone 886-2622,  886-7817, Wed.-Thurs.-Fri.  For pruning, fencing, hauling away, low maintenance gardens or any of  your gardening needs, call  Matt Small, 886-8242.   #23  Light moving, clean-ups,  etc. Gibsons, Sechelt  area. Norm 886-9503.  #24  Silkscreen  T-Shirts - Posters  Stickers - Banners  Complete Graphics Service  885-7493  Foundations, framing,  renovations, siding,  finishing. Jim Budd,  886-8771. ^ TFN  Hardwood Floors resand-  ed and finished. Work  .guaranteed. Free est.  Phone 885-5072. TFN  \.*    ?y~{s.   .. t;.  mi imn mn inimii  Set of used log tongs  Free junk car removal.  Garry's Crane Service.  886-7028. #25  Motocross bike. Good  condition. 886-7982.     #23  Cabin cruiser to rent for 3  weeks in August. Must  sleep 4, be very reliable.  883-9918, Greg. #23  LOGS WANTED  Top Prices Paid for  Fir-Hemlock-Cedar  L&K LUMBER Ltd.  Phone 886-7033  Sorting grounds,  Twin Creek  TFN  Dishwasher in good shape  for very little cash or free.  883-9342. TFN  Yard Sale Sat, June 11, 9  a.m. by Sunshine Coast  Lapidary Club. All proceeds to. Centennial '86  rec. centre. On Fairview  Rd. off Pratt. Follow signs.  #23  20'.' colour television, fair  condition, $115. Phone  886-7041. #23  ���~ SCREENED"���  TOPSOIL  8220."  Pick-up Truck Load  886-9739 886-3889  70+ sq. yds. used carpet  (purple shag), exc. cond.,  $350. Red lamps, $100.  Built-in dishwasher, $100.  Port, dishwasher, $300.  Cord organ, $150. Chesterfield & chair, $300. Phone  886-2990. #23  Std. size white bathtub,  R.H. drain, near new. Offers. 883-2778.  #23  13 acres Texada, excellent  location, subdividable,  $59,000. G. Boyle, Gen.  Del., Prince Rupert V8J  3P3. #24  Rich, black Delta loam, 20  yds. delivered, $400.  574-7242. TFN  New ladies "Beachcomber" bicycle. Cost  $217, will sell for $160.  Men's 5 spd. CCM "Elite".  Good cond. $85. Phone  886-7853. #23  24" Moffat range in good  cond. 24" hood also. $150.  886-9096. #23  Multicycle Inglis auto  washer $295. Guaranteed  & delivered. 883-2648. TFN  GSW piston pump, $200;  adjustable drawing board,  $50; wood burning stove,  $100,885-7209. #23  Ladies good quality  clothing, slightly used, excellent condition, size 10  (small). 886-9352. #23  Viking 8 hp garden tractor,  elec. start, lights, 36 in.  mower, A1.886-7260.    #25  Oil stove, space heater,  HW tank, 2 drums & stand-  Trades or? 886-7300, 2344.  #23  9" radial arm saw/access.  T.V. antenna, 19'  mast/ampl. 886-7932 after  6 p.m. #23  Oak,' antique, roll top  desk, $1,400. Various sized wooden windows,  cheap. Juke box, rebuilt,  circa '60s, complete  records, $1,500. 886-9200.  #23  Garden shed 290cm x 260  cm x 160 cm. 8*x2"x4s"  rough @ 25* ea. 10'x6"x6"  cedar $10 ea. (2.40 per ft.)  Van table $20. Ph.  886-9335 after 5 p.m.    #25  Hoover port, washing  machine. Exc. cond: $175  Obo. 886-8293. #25  Ikea cabinet, 3*x6',  Norwegian pine. Glass  doors. 885-5046. #23  Bricks, lumber, desk, oak  table & chairs, Ig. fish  tank, highchairs, bass,  net, car seat, plant stand,  stroller, port. 8 track,  dresser, lawn furniture  (wood), child's rocking  chair. 886-7819. #23  Two 3-piece bdrm. suties.  Household fridge, good  cond. 886-2189. #23  King size waterbed, $75.  Sthil 090 36" roller tip  chainsaw & Alaskan mill,  both like new, $750. Burning fan, Briggs & Stratton  powered, A1, $250.  885-5395 after 5 p.m.     #23  Blk. leather recliner, $50.  20 gal. aquarium w/ac-  cessories, $130. Ph.  886-7287.      _" #23  Sale of Branch 109 Legion  furniture pending. Bids  will be asked. #23  Bushnell 22 scope 3T08.  Redfield 4x wide view.  Texas 12 guage reloader. 2  L15 95%, $50. 2 L15 80%,  $40,886-7013. #25  Crane tub, sink & toilet.  Beige clr. Exc. cond. $250.  Ph. 886-9039 #24  NICE GREEN HAY  Just made $4 disc, for  quantity. Phone evs.  885-9357. #TFN  Quality dining room suite.  $3600 or best offer.  886-3921. #24  Automobiles i  1969 Gran Prix. 886-9751.  Excellent part car or drive  away for $200 obo.       #23  '74 Plymouth Satellite 318  auto. New starter & batt.  Recent tune up. $700.  886-3708. #23  '69 International 304 Vz  ton P.U. truck, Posi-trk.,  minor repairs. $150.  886-9843. #25  '69 Chev 4x4 P.U., 4 speed;  no rust. $2,300. 886-8226.  #25  T&C AUTO WRECKING  Stewart Rd. off North Rd.,  now open Mon. to Sat., 9  to 5. Ph. 886-2617.       TFN  1971 Ford Courier P.U.  Needs head gasket. Have  all papers. $350 obo.  886-7859. #25  1977 3A ton Ford pick-up;  truck with canopy. $3,200.  Steve 883-9551. TFN  MGB, red, good shape,  good top, tires, etc. Motor  needs work. $3,000 obo.  883-9342. TFN  1971 Mazda B1800 pick-t  up. $800. Ph. 886-8258?  Tom.  #24{  "v  V  1973 LTD wgn. 400, auto.,  PW/PB, air, tilt, runs good,  needs body work. $550  Obo. 886-9047. #23  '80 Ford F150 4x4 Explorer  model. Exc. cond. with 18  ft. Scamper trailer.  885-3302. #23  '78 Datsun P/U deluxe cab.  Canopy. Only 30,000  miles. $3200. 885-5307.  #24  K&C Auto Wrecking,  Stewart Rd. off North Rd.,  now open Mon. to Sat. 9 to  5.,ph 886-2617. TFN  '62 Jeep P.U. 4x4. Good  running condition. $585.  883-2406.. #25  This Week Only  '75 Pontiac  Astre  New Battery - Running Condition  886-7888 Days     886-8724 Eves.  MINI ��� SAT  Incl. 7* dish  all electronics & cable,  $2,995.  Green Onion Stereo  Port Mellon, 884-5240.  1973 Chev pick-up, good  running condition. $1,200  obo. 886-3958. #23  1978 Honda Civic, good  cond. in & out. Red with  white pinstriping. $2,700  obo. 886-9733, 886-7726.  #23  '65 GMC camperized  school bus. New motor,  new tires. For sale or trade  for van or pick-up.  886-7292. #23  Barter & Trade  }  CB-SSB radios - base &  mobile - ideal for boats.  Excellent prices. Ph.  886-9498. #23  s  ���A  &  Look At Finning's  USED EQUIPMENT SPECIALS!!!  FT-2422-1977 Cat 08K Track-type Tractor w/double tilt angledozer, winch, R.O.P.S. U/C @ 65%, 24  extreme service shoes. Sealed and Lubricated Track.  Certified BUV 30 day 30/70 participating warranty  Port Hardy  $135,000  id and Lubricated  $130,000  FT-1304-1975 Cat D8K Track-type Tractor w/A-dozer, R.O.P.S. U/C @ 60%. Sealed and Lubricated  SXMn("0r' 60day60/40Part.c.patin8warran,y  Certified Buy, Langley  FT-2429-1978 Cat D7G Track-type Tractor w/double tilt angledozer, ripper, R.O.P.S. U/C �� 50%, 20"  extreme service shoes. Sealed and Lubricated Track. ct\f\  Fair Buy, Vancouver $106,500  FT-3108-1973 Cat 955 TraCk-typ8 Loader w/G.P. bucket, R.O.P.S. U/C needs some work. Operable  condition.  As !S- Vancouver  $16,250  FT-1658-1977 Cat 966C Wheel Loader w/grapple, R.O.P.S. Tires 23.5 x 25 - @ 75%. Good condition.  Certified Buy, 60 day 60/40 participating warranty   $107,000  FR-3074-1080 Cat 950 Wheal Loader w/g.p. bucket, ao.p.s. Tires 20.5 x 25 -16 pr @ 75%. low  efiinrt ���>,��, 90 day 90/10 participating warranty  beiBCI Buy, Campbell River  FT-1812-1975 Timberiack 380 Skidder w/winch. Tires 23.1 x 26 @ 10-30%.  $99,500  As Is,  Plus many more  to choose from!  FINNING  Erm-^immmm:��mm  Caitrpiiur. Ot and B an Titdtmwtt ol Cuorao Tnctc Co.  Nelson  Mike  Walker  $22,500  Call now!!!  Vancouver (Bus) (604)872-4444  Langley (Bus) (604) 533-1244  Langley (Res)      (604)533-2373  3  \r  ���^  I  <1  i  "4  ;  >  *  -4  "4  ,'  *  >  3  if  *  ��-  *  t  <*  <*  !  5  *  $>  ��5  >  *  >.  1  .",  1  1  li  a,  ��  ���3  4  I  ^  :a  %  B  t-  ��,*  I  \  I  $  1  *  ���'i  i  *  i  ���i  l*  *  j  ���t  *  *  >  -*  ?  4  *  *  i  0  m  j  !  'i  1 MWWWWWWH^MfWTIMflllTr-fprTiwinT-ip -ytTfTITT���TTTllirjmT.njUnjiin 114,1,  16.  Coast News, June 6,1983  1980 CT '70 Honda mini-  bike, $350. 1977 Honda  250 XL, $475. 1975 Honda  360-T, $550. 885-5395 after  5. #23  1969 Triumph Hardtaii.  Nice con. $1500 or trade  for sm. truck. 886-8583.  #22  1980 Suzuki GS 400, 8  valve, as new condition,  asking $1,500. Phone  886-7041. #23  Late 81 750 Virago. Newj  back tire, two helmets &  gloves. Eighty dollar tune  up just done on it. Runs  excellently. $1900.  886-9682. #24  ;-22|^E^��^b^|  27' Travelaire trailer.  $5000 firm. 886-7355.    #24  23' motorhome for rent by  day, week, or month. Bunk  beds, sleeps 7. 886-9411.  TFN  Slumber Queen canopy for  import P.U., $200.  Equalizer tr. hitch, $100.  885-5976. #23  18 ft. Holidaire, like new.  Fridge, stove, oven,  heater, toilet. Sleeps 5.  $3,650 to view on  Redrooffs. Call Burnaby,  434-3582. #23  For Sale: Modern, well  established beauty salon,  excellent clientele. Central location Chetwynd,  B.C. en route to Tumbler  Ridge. Information phone  788-9485, Box 270, Chetwynd, B.C. V0C1J0.      #24  Satellite   Systems   Ltd.,  5330 Imperial, Burnaby,  B.C. V5J 1E6. Complete  satellite packages from  $1995. Financing  available, no down payment OAC. $59 per month.  Dealer inquiries welcome.  Open 7 days a week for  your convenience. Phone  430-4040. TFN  For sale sealed bid auction. Cessna 172H TTSN  -3592 TTS0 - 217 STOL 180  hp conversion. New  upholstery. For information phone 249-5358. Post  bid Shkuratoff Pearce  Murrey, 531 Reid, Quesnel,  B.C. V2J 2M8. #23  7.42 acres of subdividable  land. Includes 5 bedroom  house, workshop, other  buildings. Within town of  Ladysmith. Clear title.  Phone 245-2034. Box 573,  Ladysmith, B.C. V0R 2E0.  #23  23  Mobile Homes  3  1976 Deluxe 12x68 Premier  mobile home. Features include up-step livingroom,  500 sq. ft. sundeck, fridge,  stove, drapes. Set up in  Trailer Park. $18,000.  886-9879. #23  26 ft. trailer on pad at  Headwater Marina,  Pender Harbour. 3 mo.  free pad rental. Only  $4,600.883-2406. #23  For Sale. 52' double wide,  five years old. Good cond.  Three. bedroom - 2 bath.  Can -remain set up or-  move,"$28,000; 886-9409. "  #23  Mobile home space.  Suitable for 12 wide. No  dogs. References required. Sunshine Coast  Trailer Park, Gibsons. Ph.  886-9826. TFN  (r  Marine  )  HIGGS MARINE  SURVEYS LTD  Insurance Claims  Condition and Valuation  Surveys  Phone 885-9425  800 acre ranch. Offers to  $350,000. Owner will hold  second mortgage of  $100,000 at 6 per cent. All  trades considered. Phone  567-4249. #23  Ten acres treed country  property. Incredible view  over Nicola Valley (some  clearing). $59,000. Reply  Box 2421, c/o North Shore  News, 1159 Lonsdale,  North Vancouver, B.C.  V7M 2H4. #23  Take-out drive-in  restaurant.Open 6 mos./yr.  $100,000 gross. Some  financing available. The  Hut, Box 935, Nakusp,  B.C. V0G 1R0. Phone  265-4655. #23  industrial woodworking  machinery at cost, less  electrics. 24"-32" band-  saws $1,950-2,400;  24"-16''-12" planers  $4,300.3;B50-2y80Q;:iil2''  jointecS;!^9^5;24Pp;s^ V*V'  shapers $1,950. Many  more at inventory cost.  Omnitrade Machinery, 65  East 3rd Avenue, Vancouver V5Y 1C5, phone  873-5281. #23  1977 Ford F-700 Septic  Tank Truck, good condition with good rubber and j  only 43,000 miles. $17,000.  For more information call  846-5319. #23  1972 Hough 65 wheel  loader, C160 Cummins  power, 3 yd. GP bucket,  well maintained, very  good condition. $20,000.  Phone 392-4615. #23  26.  B.C. Sp Ymkozi  Classifieds  Constructing   a   250-pad  senior co-op mobile park  on reserve at Aldergrove,  B.C. 40 year lease.  Members pay their share  of construction (approx.  $8,000). Pad rent starts  $60/rno. Purchase own  unit. Qualifications:  Veterans over 50, seniors  over 60. Meetings 2nd and  4th Thursdays, 7 p.m. at  27080 Fraser Hwy.,  Aldergrove. Occupancy  about August. Legion Coop Housing, 856-6100 or  856-7570, Box 1683,  Aldergrove, B.C. VOX 1A0.  #23  Sheridan Lake in Cariboo.  1.45 acres waterfront  lease. 640 square feet insulated, finished cabin.  $30,000. Phone 988-3924  or write 316-1445 Chesterfield Avenue, North Vancouver V7M2N3. #23  Comox Valley. 6 acres, tall  timber, 2 bedroom house,  4 miles from Courtenay.  $15,000 down, $64,900 full  price, terms arranged.  Phone 338-6297. Box 51,  Royston, B.C. V0R 2V0.  #23  Trace your family tree. Instruction booklet, wall  chart suitable for framing,  30 work charts, now selling $7.50. Includes sales  tax and postage. Order  now for Fathers' Day.  Vista Marketing Inc., 1053  McNaughton, North Vancouver V7P1J7. #23  New, natural,  diatomt.ceous dust kills  garden/household insects. No toxic residue,  safe for people, pets. For  product, applicator, inforr  mation, $10 to P.O. Box  2580, Vancouver, B.C. V6B  3W8. #23  Extra Income. An exciting  young Sportswear Company requires distributors.  Set your own hours. Part-  time and full-time. Phone  403 437-0196. #23  Can we be useful to someone? English, single  mother and 9 year old son  seek live-in position.  Housekeeper, nanny, etc.  Excellent references. C/O  Box 2434, North Shore  News, 1139 Lonsdale,  North Vancouver, B C  V7M2H4. #23  Exciting careers as a  Travel Agent or Tour Director await you! Professionally prepared correspondence courses with  voiced instruction. Travel  Training Centre, 2-1583  Pemberton, North Vancouver V7P2S3. #23  500 name and address  tables $5, printed in our  shop. Popular Press,  General Delivery, 2737  Heald Rd., Shawnigan  Lake, B.C. V0R 2N0.  Please send payment with  order. #24  1979 Langsap aluminum  pully90% radial tires and  brakes, excellent condition, $13,500. Phone  397-2589. #23  Wood Windows, Doors,  Skylites. Largest selection, lowest prices. Walker  Door. Vancouver 266-1101,  North Vancouver 985-  9714, Richmond 273-6829,  Kamloops 374-3566, Nanaimo 758-7375, Winlaw  226-7343, Lillooet 256-  7501, Whitehorse 667-  7332. TFN  Earn extra money part-  time as a Regal sales  representative. Our gift  catalogue is all you need.  Write: Regal, 939 Eglinton  Avenue E., Dept. 444,  Toronto, Ontario M4G 2L6.  #23  Lighting Fixtures.  Western Canada's largest  display. Wholesale and  retail. Free catalogues  available. Norburn  Lighting Centre Inc., 4600  East Hastings Street, Burnaby, B.C. V5C 2K5. Phone  299-0666. TFN  Butcher     apprentice,  mature,, reliable, personable. Highest class  grades, references.  Available now. Will  relocate with family immediately. Extensive past  management experience.  Collect, 372-0502 after 6  p.m. #23  1980 Neil's Pony-Pup used  3 months, in good condition. Phone 747-2986 after  6 p.m. #23  Caretaker required: Com-,  munity HaH--20-miles--fronr-'  Williams Lake^Trailer pad,  supplied in exchange for  light duties. Existing  trailer for sale or bring  your own. Phone 296-4486.  #23  Skating coach needed. Ex-,  cellent retainer, 7 months,  September-April. Badge  level to gold. Apply  Whitehorse F.S.C., 8  Kluhini Crescent,  Whitehorse,   Yukon   Y1A  3P3. Phone 403 667-7185.  #23  Diesel Economy Ford  pickups. All sizes, Ford  mediums, Ford heavies,  logging and highway  units, all in stock. Zephyr  Ford Truck Centre, 6150  Lougheed Highway, iBur-  naby. 294-0111, Zenith  2200. #23  22' K&C 215 hp 302 270  Volvo leg command  bridge, dual controls,  galley package, sounder,  dinghy, sleeps 5. Well  kept. Asking $10,500.  886-3722 after 6 p.m.     #25  15.6 thermoglass boat &  trailer, sleeper seats, 50  hp Merc. A1 cond. $2,500  obo. 885-3987. #25  Diver salvager - dock work,  anchors, or? 19 ft. boat, 28  Ib. gal. B.0.886-2737.   #23  20 hp Merc, prop., rebuilt,  not used, $30. 886-7283.  #23  22' K&C hardtop.with canvass back. $7,000.  886-2124. #23  30 ft. aluminum hull and  cabin. Best offer takes.  Gordle, 883-9903. #24  GMC (Jimie) Diesel motor.  New Piston, rebuilt elec.  transmission. 885-2497.  #24  Shop-built portable  sawmill. Fully hydraulic,  mounted on 40' Highboy.  C/W 671 GM power unit,  able to cut up to 35' long  timbers. Conventional 20'  carriage. $45,000. Phone  593-4538. #23  Lucrative   opportunity.  Cedar Shake mill. Sale^or  rent includes all equip?  ment, home 3 acres.  $48,000. Owner will train.  Write *68 Centennial  Square, Williams Lake,  B.C, Phone 392-7871.    #23  50 bred cows with calves.  Halter trained, bloodlines  from hereford sires. Four  Square Modern-Tone 42M,  Four Square Leonard 25L  L.R.D. Wetmore Beamish  6 B, Bannermode  Lionheart 6B, Junior Lab  23Z. Revenue Canada  Audit,   must. sell.. Phone  992-2294. #23  .; ������--ii ;.ii^., I  Professional' driver Train?  ing for :,cia*gV;bne, two o|  three license with air  brake endorsement!  Cowichan School of  Motoring, Duncan, Vancouver, Island. Phone  748-1241 days, 748-9640  evenings. #23  Luxurious houseboats for  rent. May1-Oct. 31 on the  fabulous Shuswap Lakes,  Sicamous, B.C. The possi;  ble dream! Reasonable  rates. Phone 836-2202,  Houseboat Holidays Inter:  national. #25  Paddle Fans The original  fan store. Wholesale and  Retail. Free Catalogues;-  Ocean Pacific Fan Gllery  Inc.: 4600 East Hastings  Street, Burnaby, B.C. V5C7  2K5. Phone 112-299-0666.   ��� TFN  c  Property  170' prime level WF in  Roberts Creek, 2,700 sq.  ft. home on 11/3 acres.  Guest cabin, ponds &  creek. 180 degree view,  right on the ocean.  $235,000 firm. 886-8656.  #23  5Vi acres - 2 bdrm. with  FPS Part, cleared & fenced  with Ig. pond. Bordered by  roads on 3 sides. Just off  Pratt Rd. V/z mi. from Gibsons. $89,500 firm.  886-8656. #231  :-jt**m'--, Jk -*m.m*.maamm.ammwmm.   j* mfmM.mmmmm*mimmmmm.m^iiaL. ���  GmmMk99irmmO ADVKraTlSlNCi  Serviced, cleared, view lot-  in Creekside. $17,900.  886-9411. TFN  Bargain: Owner sale.  Quality 4 bdrm 2,000 sq.ft.  home in West Sechelt,  family room, den, 2 FP's, 2  baths, partial view, landscaped, near school. First  on .right,on, Norvan off  Ma��on$86,'90b. 885-5740?  #24  Unique 3 bdrm home in  desirable area in Lower  Gibsons, cedar finishing  inside & out, double lot,  totally fenced, self-  contained guest cottage,  Ige garden & sundecks,  five fruit trees, full landscaped & across street  from beach access. Offers  to $120,000. Ph 886-8373.  #24  1978 12x68 Glen River  mobile home, 816 sq. ft.  with 300 sq. ft. sundeck on  over Vi acre on Cooper Rd.  nr. Southwood. Southern  exposure, nicely cleared,  landscaped, circular  driveway. $45,000.  885-3604. #24  4 bdrm., 6 year old home,  close to everything,  $52,500. Ph. 886-7120.   #25  Ocean view, Irg., clrd.,  serv. lot, Davis Bay.  $45,900,885-2838.   .      #23  GIBSONS RCMP  On the 27th: A residence on  Truman Road was broken into  and a mickey of scotch and  some brandy taken.  On   the   28th:   A  dashboard  clock,  a spotlight and some,  cigarettes were taken from a  locked vehicle parked at the  Sunshine Lodge Motel lot.  On the 30th: A boat was found  abandoned at the Granthams  Landing Government Wharf.  The boat, about 13-14' is made  of plywood and has a Scoot  motor.   Quote   file   83/15?!  when claiming.  Police received a report of  overdue hikers from Gambier  Island. The group, consisting  of 10 children and two adults  was due to arrive at Mt. Ar-  taban from Firbon at 6 p.m. in  the evening. Two teachers were  sent to look for the group when  it failed to arrive at their  destination and the RCMP was  called when the teachers returned from their search at 8:30  p.m.  Search and Rescue joined in  the search and a hovercraft was  sent from Vancouver to assist.  The group was found around 3  o'clock in the morning, on the  beach where they had built a  fire.  The group of children, aged  12 to 13 years old and the two  adults, a nurse and an experienced camper were all in  excellent condition and were  well equipped to deal with the  eventuality of losing their way  in the many trails and roads of  Gambier Island.  SECHELT RCMP  On the 26th: A grey tool box  containing $200 worth of tools  was left beside the road near  the Roberts Creek Campground. The owner inadvertently left the tools  behind after changing a tire.  When he returned to get his  tools, they were missing.  Anyone knowing the whereabouts of the missing items  should contact Sechelt RCMP.  On the 27th: A break and entry  was reported at a residence on  Sechelt Indian Band property  in Porpoise Bay.  There was a report of gas being syphoned from a vehicle  parked at a residence in the  Pender Harbour area.  Oh the 29th: For the second" ;  week in a row there was a  report of lights being smashed  at the B.C. Telephone facility  at Madeira Park. The damage  is estimated at $300.  There was a report of $250  worth of rods and reels stolen  from a residence on Redrooffs ,  Road.  A 12 foot Columbia fibre-  glass   boat,   licence   number  13K66336, was reported stolen  from the government wharf in  Madeira Park. The boat, with  light green interior and white  exterior, is valued at $1,000.  On   the  30th:  There  was  a  report of a dog attacking three  people walking in the Field  Road area. Sechelt RCMP said  that   under   the   Domestic  Animal Act a letter has been  sent to the owner advising that  if another attack occurs within  the next year, the animal may  be destroyed.  There was a report of willful  .   damage to a vehicle- parked at  Elphinstone   high   school.  On the 31st: A cash box was  reported   stolen   from   the  Sechelt bus depot following a  break and entry.  A 16 foot orange canoe was  stolen from the beach at  Tuwanek.  A 16 foot red and white boat  was reported stolen from Gunboat Bay in Madeira Park.  On the 1st: There was a report  of vandalism to a trailer at  Samron and Mason Roads in  West Sechelt.  A 14 foot boat with a 25 hp  outboard motor was reported  stolen from Lowe's Marina in  Madeira Park. Police have a  suspect in the case.  There was a report of a  goose being shot in the east  Porpoise Bay area. Shots were  heard coming from a cabin in  the area followed by sounds of  the goose in distress. After  police investigated, charges of  dangerous use of a firearm and  use of an offensive weapon  dangerous to the public peace  were laid against a. Sechelt  man.  A .22 calibre rifle was  reported to have been used.  The goose was killed in the incident.  On the 3rd: A disturbance in  front of the liquor store at the  Trail Bay Centre was reported  at    11:45   a.m.    Police   ap-      '<  prehended a suspect.  Vandalism to the Secheit  Medrcal Clinic was reported to  ?have occured ���������overnight. Vandals apparently burned obscene  words into the door of the  clinic.  Power Squadron  by Burt Hobbs  The coveted Bovey Marine  Trophy was presented to Commander Harry Lomax at the  Pacific Mainland District  Canadian Power Squadron annual general meeting in Vancouver, for the second year in a  row. This trophy is presented  to the squadron that has the  highest improvement in exam  results for the boating course.  Sixteen other squadrons completed.  The boating course is  available to everyone and encompasses instruction in chart  reading, compass use, safety  afloat, aids to navigation, rules  and regulations for boating,  etc., which prepares a skipper  to better cope with conditions  on our coastal waters, whether  the boat is a dinghy or a big  power cruiser.  Classes for the boating  course were conducted in Gibsons by instructor Dave  Smethurst, in Sechelt by instructor Oskar Freisen and in  Pender by instructor Ron  Breadner. Classes will be  available to the public again  this fall, time and places will be  announced.  Drnp off your  COAST  NEWS  CLASSIFIEDS  .1!  Books & Stuff  ���A FrH*r><ily P��opl* PI��C��"  The Sunshine Coast News  reserves the right to classify  advertisements under appropriate headings and determine page location. The .Sunshine Coast News also  reserves the right to revise or  reject any advertising which in  the opinion of the Publisher is  in questionable taste. In the  event that any advertisement  is rejected, the sum paid for  the   advertisement   will   be  Minimum S4.00 per 3 line insertion. Each  additional line $1 00 Use our economical 3  weeks for the price of 2 rate. Pre-pay your ad  for 2 weeks & get the third week FREE  THE FOLLOWING CLASSIFICATIONS  ARE FREE  Birth Announcements. Lost and Found  No billing or telephone orders are accepted except  from customers who have accounts with us.  Cash, cheques or money orders  must accompany all classified advertising  NOON SATURDAY  Coast News Classifieds  i  i  i  i  I   re(unded \\*:tmi9^wmm&09mm*.xr ������  tv,%���'?'������* ��     Mini ii ,, p in ip^< v-:-;,; -X\'i":- -yX'--<  -o^a* v ~>; . >%. ;   I  LwHMnHM��amMiiiiHMHn.n.nJ  f  Please mail to: \  Please  COAST NEWS Classified. Box 460. Gibsons, B.C. VON 1V0  or bring in person to:  The COAST NEWS Office in Gibsons  CAMPBELL'S SHOES or B0QKS & STUFF in Sechelt  MADEIRA PARK PHARMACY in Madeira Park  NO. OF ISSUES  0  26,  , B.C. & Yukon I  I      Classifieds  Moving and storage  business on Vancouver  Island, H-plate license  covers B.C. Fully equipped, 1973 International  5-ton truck with 24-foot  box. Paul Roy, 248-5021.  #23  I  B  I  I  I  I  L -. J.     II             II      ��� I  E             X  e                             m-zcu  e  E                                      IE       H  E                                      X  i    11        rr      ir r r."]  CLASSIFICATION: e.g. For Sale, For Rent, etc.  I  1  I  i  I  I  1  I  1  1  I  1  I  On the  nshine Coast  First in Convenience &  First in Service  PTMEPWRr^'���MS?  !:���:���:���:���  J  In Roberts Creek you can drop off your Coast News  Classifieds at Seaview Market in the heart of the Creek,  another Friendly People Place. Deadline is 12:40 p.m. Saturday.  DROP OFF  YOUR CLASSIFIEDS  mmm pender harbour mm  Taylor's Garden  Bay Store  883-2X53  Madeira Park  Pharmacy  883-9414  mm in halfmoon bay mmm  B & J Store  885-9435  mmmm in sechelt mmmm  Books & Stuff  885-2625  Emma's  885-9345  mmm in Roberts creek mmm  Seaview Market  885-3400  mmmm in gibsons mxmmm  Adventure  Electronics  ���P  ���John Burnside Pholo  ������IIMIIjJIIIIIIMIIIMIM  88&-7SI5  mm& Lower Village ism  Coast News  886-2032  n\  P.  SI  h &45&��&2iAp@&&&^  ����"��I*ii>w**^*&^^  jfiTgaiSWairffmirrwrrri'i  W1iiI����"IW'"lW ���  i-  f*l  I1  Coast News, June 6,1983  17.  Peter J.G. Bentley, president  and chief executive officer of  Canfor Corporation, has announced that the privately  owned company is filing a  preliminary prospectus with the  regulatory agencies in all provinces of Canada for an initial  public offering of common  shares.  Canfor Corporation is the  parent company of Canadian  Forest Products Ltd. and its affiliates. The Vancouver based  group is a major Canadian integrated forest products  organization with approximately 6,500 employees. Canfor has extensive woodlands as  well as manufacturing facilities  in British Columbia and Northern Alberta, and wholesale  building materials distribution  centres across Canada and in  the United States. It produces  and markets lumber, pulp,  kraft paper, plywood, hard-  board, shingles and shakes.  Canfor also owns approximately 44 per cent of the common shares of Versatile Corporation, a Vancouver based  industrial enterprise, and approximately 46 per cent of the  common shares of Yorkshire  Trust Company, a British Columbia financial institution  which also operates in Alberta.  In a letter released today to  company employees, Bentley  stated that going public "is in  the best interests of the company and all its employees"  since it allows the company to  "strengthen its balance sheet so  it is better able to meet the  challenges of the future' *.  Bentley said the size of the  offering has not been settled  but the Prentice-Bentley family, which founded the comp-  nay, will retain majority.control of Canfor Corporation.  He indicated that he expects the  offering to be cleared for sale  by regulatory authorities  towards the end of June.  The public offering is of  treasury shares and the net proceeds-will go to Canfor Corporation to reduce its bank  debt. "None of the proceeds  will go to the owners of the  company," stated Bentley, and  added, "In fact, some of the  debt owed by the company to  the present owners has been  converted into common  shares."  The issue will be offered  through a group of investment  dealers headed by WoodGun-  dy Limited, McLeod Young  Weir Limited and Pemberton  Houston Willoughby.. Incorporated and is anticipated to be  in the $100 million plus range.  by George Matthews  The Tourism Development  Committee of the Sunshine  Coast Economic Development  Committee will vigorously pursue its primary objective of  establishing a community  development corporation on  the Coast.  The decision to forge ahead  with creating the corporation  was taken at last Thursday's  committee meeting. Despite  disappointing turnouts of three  recent public meetings., the  committee, under the chairmanship of Richard Tomkies,  decided to contact all of the  nearly 300 clubs, organizations, and governing groups on  the Coast by letter, asking each  organization to nominate a  candidate to sit on the policy  making Sunshine Coast Community Development Society,  whose responsibility it will be  to appoint directors to the  board of the Community Investment Corporation.  The directors of the new corporation will take on the task  of lobbying for available  government funding to build  corporate equity to as much as  a million dollars a year over the  next three years. The capital  raised will be used tp invest in  local businesses which in some  way help build the tourism industry infrastructure.  The committee believes that  based on the experience of the  Nanaimo Community Development Corporation, the new  board will be able to put  together a substantial sum of  equity capital to help  businessmen who might otherwise find raising capital difficult.  Another responsibility of the  board, when.it is appointed,  will be to help businessmen put  together financial proposals for  presentation to banks and  other loan agencies.  Committee chairman  Tomkies will prepare the letters  to be sent out next week. It is  hoped that nominations for the  society will be received by July  15. The nominating committee,  composed   of   the   ad   hoc  tourism committee, will select  12 candidates from as wide a  representation of the area as  possible and this society will  then take over the job of selecting and appointing directors.  If the procedure follows projected time lines, the new board  could be in place as early as this  fall. Then it will be up to board  members to raise the capital required for the corporation to  operate.  Economic Commissioner  Oddvin Vedo told the committee that he has received calls  and enquiries already from  people interested in taking advantage of corporation funding. He pointed out, however,  that the task of raising funds  from the more than 250  government programmes  available will take time and effort and this process must be  completed before the corporation can function.  Vedo also pointed out that  the potential business  generated by Expo '86 will provide considerable incentive for  the new corporation to get  under way quickly.  Nominations to the Community Development Society  must be submitted in writing,  with curricula vitae to the of-  ,fice of the economic commission, at the Sunshine Coast  regional district, Royal Terraces, Wharf Street in Sechelt,  byJuly ,15.  Chamber elects executive  The revitalized Gibsons and  District Chamber of Commerce under newly elected  president, Peter Philpotts, has  elected a new board of directors and is looking forward to  six months of intensive activity.  The previous board has  disbanded as a result of the  resignation of former president  Anthony Faye, whose commitments at the University of  British Columbia prevented  him from continuing.  The new board, which has  set as its primary objective the  acquisition of lower Gibsons  property for a new information  centre, will consist of:,president, Peter Philpotts; vice-  president, Russell Crum;  secretary, Jon McRae;  treasurer, Susan McRae; directors, Andy Maragos, Lynda  Hickman, Ken Goddard,  Harry Cargo, George Giannakos, Don Poisson, Hugh  Jones, Rita Hummel, George  Matthews.  The Sunshine Coast Credit Union announces the appointment ot  Margaret Johnson as Branch Manager for the Gibsons Branch of the  Credit Union. Margaret was previously in charge of Loan Administration for the branch. Her past experience included Branch  Loan Supervision with Van City Savings Credit Union.  Sunshine Coast Credit Union  HEAD OFFICE.- BOX 375, COWRIE STREET,  SECHELT. B.C. VON 3A0  TELEPHONE 885-3255  GIBSONS BRANCH ��� CEDAR PLAZA, BOX 715  GIBSONS, B.C.  TELEPHONE 886-8121  CONTRACTING  Sunshine Coast  APPLIANCES  LOG HAULING  INDUSTRIAL MECHANICAL  Services  j. Malyea Contracting  886-9457  Business Directory  r  EXCAVATING  EXCAVATING  D&R  CEDAR FENCING & SIDING  (Free Estimates)  DAVE     886-7371    886-8585  >-   ��� ��� :   r RAY HANSEN TRUCKING ^  /������������"������ ���: &''GipKlfNACTfKiKS:iifb.  ' .  >X!W'X  Gravel, Clearing & Excavating,  Septic Systems, All Types of Gravel  883-9222 885-5260  (to PEARSON  SEKVNQ YOU S#iC�� 1B&0  ROADS  \>**��  CV  B@*  BASEMENTS  Uuntl  PEARSON  885-9580  HAROLD LAND CUEARMO tort.  Backhoe & Cat  Custom clearing, septic tanks,  power poles, water lines, roads.  Free estimates.  886-9875 886-3907 eves.  JOHN HIND-SMITH  REFRIGERATION & MAJOR APPLIANCE SERVICE  Port Mellon to Pender Harbour  Res. 886-9949  r* ELECTRO LUX CANADA  ��� 4724 Marine Ave.,  Powell River, B.C.   locally MimrfJctuitd  Govttnmtnt Approved  ��concrete septic Tonus  ���Distribution Boxes "<   ���'  *Pump Tanks, Curbs, Patio Blocks  "Other pre-cast products  Bonniebrook Industries Ltd.  Crane Service  ��� 8 ton ��� high lift  886-7064  f   General Building Contractor  CONSTRUCTION    LTD.  Residential ��� Commercial  Complete Construction Management  18 Years Experience   ^  Foundations ��� Framing  Finishing ��� Cabinets  SEA-VIEW PLACE  R.R. #1 - GIBSONS, B.C  VON 1V0  886-2743  Andrew ���  886-7022  David-  886-7511  Concrete  Commercial ��� Residential  & Industrial  Placing & Finishing  Ffrt CONTRACTORS  ���     U'J\    v,     ,<���     /������ .���  :i; ,���  ,Y.;;t ������ "���������-.'  Landclearing, road building, logging,..  tree -removal, excavations & graveli     v  ^8 Yd. Truck    886-9872 after 5 p.m ^  H. WRAY CONTRACTING  ���Backhoe & 4 Whd. Dump Truck  ���Water, sewer & septic systems  ���Sand, Gravel & Excavations  ^ 886-94^9      anytime j  '       BULLDOZING  LAND CLEARING  \Porhn Bosch 88S-2544j  MISC.    SERVICES  r  Please call 4o5-2693 for Service.  Now serving the Sechelt Peninsula  (or bags, filters, repair service & demonstrations^  HEATING  QsiLv. Swanson's  EXCAVATING LTD  for our John Deere Excavator  ���   and Case Backhoes  885-9666 885-5333  JF.UI. EXCAVATING LTD.  ��� septic Flews ��� Excavations ��� Clearing ���  LIQUID  GAS LTD  Hwy. 101   Sechel  -Hospital and Forest  Mon.-Fri.   8 a.m  m j   ��   i  I  between  St. Marys I CANADIAN!  I Ranger's Hut. ImmUmmJ  5 p.m.  885-2360  Reed Rd.  800-0071  Gibsons  FLOOR    COVERING   \  CARPET-CABINET-CERAMIC CENTRE  r.      Wayne Ross  Excavating Ltd.  For all your Backhoe Needs  Roberts Creek Eves. 885-5617  MISC.    SERVICES  ROLAND'S  HOME IMPROVEMENTS LTD.  Gibsons  Behind Windsor Plywood  Seabird ***-*74* A  TP��f%��f^W;       Residential &  \\ \j\jMm*    Commercial  RENTALS  GIBSONS TAX SERVICE  886-7272   anytime      886-7272  Basic Return  $12.00  A. Jack  1767 Martin Road  Open Thurs. - Sat. io a.m. - s p.m.  Howe Sound Distributors Ltd.  North Road. Gibsons. B.C.      886-2765 J  '\1 Years Experience Commercial And Residential^  "~ 805-2023     805-3001  fKEN DE VRIES & SON    )  LTD. FLOOR COVERINGS  Carpets - Tiles- Linoleums - Drapes     J  Hwy. 101, Gibsons   Cowrie St., Sechelt jJflflO,  886-7112 885-3424 |0^F*OV  '/  ��� 5" Continuous aluminum gutters  ��� Aluminum soffits & fascias  ��� Built-in vacuum systems 885-3562  AUTOMOTIVE  NEED TIRES?      Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  TIRE & SUSPENSION  CENTRE  006-2700     006-0167  Hwy. 101, just West of Gibsons  HB^StiropealT  Motors    005-9466  c British; Japanese & Domestic Service & Parts >  Crane  Service  Tandem Truck  6 Ton Crane  16' Deck or 40' Trailer  886-7028    Garry Mundell  24 Hour  LOW BED SERVICE  Peninsula Transport Services Ltd.  886-2284   886-3829  CLEANING    SERVICES  CXe  S&VtfMt*  Gibsons  Telephone  Answering  Service  Service  Is our  886-7311 or  For Information call     886-7568  only  %fjmv&  0g AUTOMOTIVE  886-7919  Parts ��� Sales ��� Service  REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES  "The Rad Shop"        COLLISION REPAIRS  Hwy 101, Gibsons B.C.A.A.   Approved  Economy ruts parts Ltd.  a  Automobile. Industrial and  Body Shop Supplies  Sechelt  88 S-SIS I  SANDY'S  COLLISION   REPAIRS  ���ICBC Repairs  -Fibregiass Repairs  ���Painting & Auto Glass       * 9$tn*  ���Free Estimate OOt}>COUO  kKUIndale, P��nd��r Harbour   Ft.R.iM, OardTi Bay, B.C. VON 180  TREE TOPPING  VIEW DEVELOPMENTS LTD.  Clean up your wooded areas.  Remove lower limbs for VIEW.  Top tall trees adjacacent to building  886-7850   Marv yolen    886-9597  STEVE HOFLEY  Natural & Cultured Stone Facings  House Fronts, Fireplaces   and Feature Walls  ALL WORK CONDITIONALLY GUARANTF-EP  Complete landscaping &  garden maintenance service Bango*  ^     ' Fencing of all kinds 885-5033^  "~     Village Tile Co.       "*  CERAMIC TILE SALES AND INSTALLATIONS  Stocking Some Tile and Material  1212 Cowrie St.  ,      , ���    p^ne  I Sechelt, B.C.     Joe Jacques   885-3611J  SEASIDE RENTALS  ��� i"r\   Domestic Industrial Equipment j  ��� I Uv and track Rentals   2 locations  Sechelt  Inlet Avenue     Gibsons to serve you\  V 885-2848        Hwy. 101 & Pratt 886-2848         mrtt  tumor      .  Bob Ddll    curat moistenamm   lljf-9038  .__;__ - .  nT.        C-Z^N    THE CLEANING OF OIL & *  Itien/no-DOge)     wood heating units  Harbour Chimney Cleaning  Serving the Sunshine Coast 885-5225  ELECTRICAL  COMMERCIAL ART  MISC     SERVICES  ^  886-34S*  Quality Farm 6 Garden Supply ltd.  i  \  Li  886-7359  Conversion   Windows,   Glass,  Auto & Marine Glass, Aluminum Windows  & Screens, .. _ Mirrors  Hwy 101 & Pratt Rd.  J  V  ^*OlWi  SUNSHINE KITCHENS  ��� CABINETS-  886-9411  Showrooms Pratt Rd.�� Hwy 101  Open Sat. 10-6 or anytime by appt,  * Feed * Fencing  * Pet Food    * Fertilizer  886-7527   Pratt Rd  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  . Port Mellon to Ole's Cove  Commercial Containers Available  885-9973  886-2938,  !��� I  m  !    !r  :   t  !   f  i   ^  II.  i'.  I     II  * 18.
Coast News, June 6,1983
In Sechelt
A desire for clarification of
Liquor Control Board licensing
regulations and practices led
Sechelt council members to
meet, recently with members of
the LCB.
Council has been petitioned
of late to speak in support of a
'class D neighbourhood pub
license application - which,
along with two prior class D
applications, has been held in
abeyance because there has
already   been   pre-clearance
granted for a class A hotel
lounge license to Suncove
Resorts Ltd. (Royal Reach) at
Porpoise Bay. Such a class- A
license has precedence over all
other license applications
within a one-mile radius.
Suncove Resorts owner
Henry Hall explained to the
Coast News that such "protection" is granted to class A hotel
lounge licenses because of the
magnitude of the investment
required to meet its conditions.
sfr^
Guess Where
The usual prize of $5 will be awarded to (he first person whose
name is drawn correctly identifying the location of the above.
Send entries to the Coast News, Box 460, Gibsons in time to reach
the newspaper by Saturday of this week. This week's winner is
Leona Leslie, Box 37, Sechelt, who correctly located "The Happy
Mermaid" sign on East Porpoise Bay Road
On the
Seafood Platter
by Chak-chak
The town of Gibsons and its
satellite communities are very
much involved with things
maritime. The geography and
the natural resources of the
area demand this involvement.
So it is only natural that relaxation and entertainment takes
the form of sea-oriented ac-
tivites. I refer, of course,'to the
annual Sea Cavalcade celebrations.
At this point you may well
ask what has all this to do with
the month of June when the
Sea Cavalcade happens later in
the summer. Well, it takes
planning and preparation to
stage this sort of event. This
year's Sea Cavalcade committee; Bob Lambert, Ken Crosby, •
Kevin Ryan, Dianne Strom and
George Giannakos, have been
doing just that and a big part
of this activity is providing the
funding for the various activities that take place on the?
big weekend.
This year they sold memberships in the "Gold Club" for
$50 per man (no ladies) with
the annual meeting taking place
last Wednesday, June 1, at the
Omega Restaurant with
cocktails, gourmet dinner and
entertainment. Your membership gold coin card had a
number which was put in a
plastic capsule that went into a
barrel from which prizes were
drawn - gold nugget necklaces,
the main prize value $1,700.
Andy Maragos of Andy's
Restaurant was the big winner.
Omega's George Giannakos
and his boys provided a great
steak and lobster dinner to a
packed crowd of diners. Old
Chak-chak being a mari-
vegetarian shared his steak with
two table partners.
Quite a number of local
fellows helped out doing
various jobs during the evening
with Bernie Mulligan acting as
master of ceremonies. A very
talented and energetic belly
dancer kept the boys busy trying to find places to put their
dollar bills in her costume. This
was followed by another lady
-entertainer.
We hope that the annual
meeting of the Gold Club was
successful in providing the
funds to stage a good Sea
Cavalcade for 1983. Sea you.
Bonniebrook lodge Restaurant
introduce^
SMORGASBORD
every Saturday
5-10 p.m.
"i
\" $&>Hof ix^M^'y^' y
"-X    \*"?   ; ^-,jw >"'XX
€^»^%',S«laa' ftf*' , dft&gfr "f-m Wt)^llW:r;'
Opart for Brtakfait taneh an* Dtorwr
Fully Licensed
Sandfly Branch 10 a.m. - 2}.m.
^\tbtoo& ^
EeStaurant
& Cvatlcr £arfc
General Store Now Open
Gower Point Rd.
Managers: Sheila & Lloyd Field
886-2723
Gibsons
"Why would anyone invest
$2 million building a hotel
complex with a liquor lounge if
someone could spend $150,000
on a neighbourhood pub with
exactly the same drinking
privileges, two blocks down the
road?"
In several recent council
meetings alderman Robert
Allen expressed concern that
construction projects which
were ready to proceed the
minute LCB approval was
granted (i. e. neighbourhood
pubs), were being held up by
Mr. Hall's pre-clearance, and
work did not seem to be progressing on his site.
"We need to expand our tax
base," said Allen. "We can't
get any more revenue from
property taxes, and need to
build up bur industrial base.
Mr. Hall's license is holding up
other licenses in the community
and I'd like it cancelled."
Allen moved at the May 18
council meeting that council go
on record as approving the application for a neighbourhood
pub on Block 7 on Teredo
Street, but as there was no
jseconder the motion died.
Council has stated its intention
to remain neutral in such matters, and Mayor Kolibas is emphatic that council cannot take
sides in private business matters.
Mr. Hall stressed that work
on his project has been proceeding in strict accordance
with the requirements of both
the LCB and the development
permit which was granted to
him by Sechelt council in April
of 1981. He has four years
from the date of his first
building' permit in December
1981, to complete his total project, which includes
townhouses, a hotel with
lounge, and a marina complex.
So far, nine townhouses have
been built plus $360,000 spent
on underground services for
the hotel, and civic requirements of streets, lighting,
parking lots and curbs are
already in place.
"If council wants to expand
its tax base, nothing is going to
do it more than Royal Reach,"
claimed Hall.
A former alderman, Hall
was emphatic that council
should follow provincial LCB
guidelines regarding liquor
license applications, and not
get involved in granting unnecessary pre-approvals.
"Favouritism has no place on
council," he said.
He also claims that his site is
the ony one which conforms to
LCB guidelines regarding
distance from major highways
and proximity to schools.
Quality, used lumber, bricks, windows, lights, plumbing, etc.
P&IS usEP BU1L,©1WG Rff ATERIALS
11947 Tannery Rd., Surrey
MONDAY-SATURDAY SSO-13M
We also buy used building materials
Olivetti
Element
Typewriters?
Have   you   ever  thought
what electronic typewriters can do for you?
Over 25,000 Canadians    have    and
bought Olivetti.
Thousands of
users have replaced the golf ball with the super quiet daisy wheel as   ,
early as 3 years ago. Now they are buying the first electronic typewriters of the second generation.
Don't you think you should start thinking about it too?
ixtpfoch
Office Electronics and Office Supplies
Wharf Street, Sechelt 885-3735
FREE Delivery to Gibsons Available
©
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*On Approved Credit
a Down Payment may be
required.
Buy ANY ITEM in the store
(Valued at $100.00 or more)
DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE
with payments spread over one year, and pay
NO
INTERE
• No Payment for 45 Days from Date of Purchase
©
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&
$$
*&
If you buy. a.
Price
+ Tax
*899.00
.    53:94
Total Cost
$952.94
Total Cost Spread Over 12 Months
*952.94 * 12 = $79.42/month
Therefore you pay a Monthly Payment of *79.42
for 12 months
NO INTEREST CHARGE!
©
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Open Tues-Sat;'
9-5:30; Fri   'til 6 pm.
§5
Seaview Pl£ce. Gibsons>
886-9733
HOME
FURHISHIHGS
©
yyw
QQQQQQQQuijQu ©

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