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Sunshine Coast News Sep 13, 1977

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Array :v'&x~xx<-^��i<-.  ?/.������&-'- ���X'Xr-: ���.  I     U ixhl     i-.^V7  \ >'���.'?"���-��� '���<  .bV��JL^<7<��  :���:; s.  Victor f~.^K  /Sunshine  jlished at Gibsons, B.C.  *&% per copy on newsstands  Serving the Sunshine Coast since 1945  Volume 30, Number 37  September 13,1977.  on  ���:.?z?f-"XJ��- '-���< -  Airport controversy reaches  point  A deputation from C.A.R.E. (Citizens Against the Rape of  the Environment) headed by Mr. Lee, a one time flyer himself,  of Selma Park, presented a brief to the Sechelt Council challenging the lease of VA acres of land at the Wilson Creek airport  to the Aero Club.  decide what was newsworthy and  what was not.    On looking over  the flight log at the airport, he  had  found   it  to  be   inaccurate  and not up to date.    He asked  council if there was to be any  Mr. Lee's contention was that low flying aircraft are a public changes in the lease due to ex-  nuisance and before a lease agreement was signed stipulation pressed public opinion.  should be included to halt planes flying under regulation height.      Dr.  Berman  accused  council  ; It was felt by C.A.R.E. that insufficient public input had been of passing the buck stating that  received and they would like to discuss the terms set down in both governing bodies were our  the lease before final signing.  The lease had been brought to elected representatives and that  ^the.notice'of the group accidentally while investigating aircraft  noise, and it wasthe consensus of opinion that the public had  not been informed about the negotiations/From publications  distributed by Environment Canada, Mr. Lee explained the  health hazard caused by the noise of low flying planes over built a'n"d in his opjniont without proper  up areas. His experience with the matter to date had been a control this constituted a safety  constant case of passing the buck from one group or govern- hazard.  ment body to another, he said. Alderman Leitner is the coun- Alderman Frank Leitner told  cil's representative in the matter. Council represents the public the delegation that seaplanes in  and the feeling of the group was that the buck-passing should Porpoise Bay were responsible  stopthere.     '7  members of the electorate should  not be asked to go through other  channels. He had counted as  many as 40 aircraft flying over  his bouse in the period of an hour  Two other members of. C.A.R.E. were Dr. Lome Berman  and the Vice Principal of Chate-  letch Junior High, Jack Pope.  In Mr. Pope's" opinion, if the  two   publicly   elected    councils  saw fit to lease VA acres to an  association for a minimal $1 per  year, then there should. be a  Stipulation that the club show  some respect for the people who  have granted them this land. He  felt that the onus was on the  councils involved to keep the  public informed, rather than  relying, on" the   newspapers   to  for a lot of the noise and he  sympathised with the people in  that area. As far as he was concerned there would be no changes. The lease was a good one,  he said, and he would stand firm  oh it. The leasing of the land  had nothing to do with the airstrip. He said he had been on the  airport committee for three years  This 28-foot Bayliner burst into flames on Sunday,  September 4th while tied to the gas wharf at  Irvines Landing Marina. Mrs. Pauline Green cut  the ropes, that tied it to the wharf and pushed it  Gibsons hears proposal  out. It was then towed sately into the middle ot  the channel by a local boat. There were no injuries. Proprietor of the marina, Maurice Green,  got this dramatic picture with a polaroid camera.  Coast News takes  to the &ir  by Ian Corrance  Commodore Ian Morrow of the Navy League of Canada  presented plans to Gibsons council at their regular meeting held  on Tuesday, September 6th, of a projected building proposed .        ,     .       ^     ,��� ���,;+u  ���  *���     _u      ���/ u u-  a 4.x.          i-         ii.     u- u          u   ��� ��� -1" order to come  up  with  a  for the site behind the curling club which would serve as a dear  idea   of  the   probiem   on  home for the Navy League youth programs as well as a general both   sides   of  the   controversy  centre for youth activities in Gibsons.    In conversation with over the signing of the aero club  the Coast^N^^^ retired man wii^'con^  that ideally the building should be as versatile and flexible as; Johnson^ a^ member^|the'club^   siderable     flying     experience,  possible so that it could be in use as much as sixteen hours He invited me to go flying with   a  doctor,   and   a  vice-principal  regarding small  airportsj     Unfortunately when I explained ^l*e  situation to him, his firstscorn-^  ment was, "probably a bunch of  old ladies."   It was explained, to*?  a day. ��� ."'. .7   '  Council responded favourably to Commodore Morrow's  initiative, agreeing to set aside the fifteen acre site contiguous  to the curling club and the swimming pool for the project con-,  ditional on the Navy League's proving financial capability for  the proposed project. Commodore Morrow said he would be  approaching local service clubs and community organizations  for support for the proposed hall.  In  other   council   business   it     carried without division.  was agreed that the water referendum concerning the link-up  with the Regional water system  which was deemed necessary by  the Department of Municipal  Affairs should be held in conjunction with the Municipal  Elections on Saturday, November  19th, 1977. It was further moved  by Alderman Ted Hume and  seconded by Alderman Lorraine  Goddard that the planning meeting of the village council slated  for Monday, - September 12,  should set aside some time for  an examination of the Dayton  and Knight water recommenda-1  tions and that at that planning  meeting a date and place for an  October public meeting can be  determined.       Hume's    motion  In committee reports Alderman  Hume recommended that streetlights be installed on Poplar  Lane in his Public Works Committee report. Alderman Goddard as a report from the Recreation Committee read a statement which pointed out that the  Village of Gibsons had been  making decisions since before  the inception of the Regional  District. She was referring to  the proposed joint recreation  function.  By-law No. 307, cited as  "Minimum Maintenance Standards By-Law No. 307, 1977"  received its second reading. The  requisite motion was made by  Alderman Metzler and seconded  by Alderman Goddard.  him and he could show his side  of the argument.  At the airport Dr. .Farrar was  about to go to Vancouver. Feeling that the flight would give me  more information than flying a  circuit, I accepted his invitation  to go with him.  We took off towards Sechelt  and when airborne angled at  45 degrees inland and began to  climb.  By the time we were passing  Selma Park, well inland, the  plane was at 700 feet. The  flight continued in a straight line  to Sechelt, where on making a  left hand turn over the village  it was at 1,000 feet. After passing  Sechelt out over the water, we  continued to climb until we  reached an altitude of 3,000 feet -  a bit higher than the average  pilot would fly.  Dr. Farrar landed at the south  end of Vancouver airport.     He  did not constitute a  ''bunch of  old ladies." ;  On the flight back to Wilson  Creek we passed Gower Point on  the water side at 3,100 feet, at  Roberts Creek we started inland  and decended to 2,500 feet. Over  Wilson Creek we had reached.'  2,000 feet, MOT regulation require that-on a non-controlled  airport a plane must fly over the  entire runway at right angles to  it at not less than a height of  1,000 feet. To demonstrate the  feasibility of this, Dr. Farrar  stayed up at 1,800 ? feet, 800  higher, than necessary. .Once  over the strip he began his  approach which consisted of  heading out over the sea, making  a left hand turn, down to Mission  Point, another left hand turn till  even with the runway and the  final turn to come in and land  from the south. At; Chapman  Road   the   altitude   was    1,500  This is the instrument panel of the plane in which Coast News reporter Ian Corrance took  the flight described on this page. It was taken shortly after the start of the final approach.  The dial in centre reads 900 feet. The one below shows 700 feet per second descent.  and there had never been any  problems with the aero club  holding up their end of the work  around the airfield.  Morgan Thompson told the  gathering that even if the lease  was thrown out the door the club  could still use the runway. This  type of lease was not out of the  ordinary, other organizations  have been granted similar leases  and nothing was done to keep  this secret. He asked if any  of the group had spoken to mem:  bers of the areo club, at this  point several people tried to  speak at once. Mr. Thompson  used his ��� gavel and announced;  that if there were similar outbursts he would clear the chambers. He pointed out that in the  past both villages had contributed  financially to the running of the  airport. This had varied from  as high as $1,000 per year to  as low as nothing, with the areo  club contributing any labour  necessary. The lease was not up  for debate, but if the group  could come up with anything  better, council would certainly  take it into consideration.  Towards the end of the discussion, Alderman - Leitner told  the members of C.A.R.E. that  the lease had already been  signed.  Morgan Thompson concurred,  pointing out that it had been  before the council for two or  three months, and had been  brought up at several public  *. meetings.  Alderman Kolibas said that she  ^1 was unaware that any lease had  * been signed.  The members of C.A.R.E.  were indignant. They felt that  for the past two hours they had  been discussing a fait accomplis,  and they would go next to the  Department of Municipal Affairs.  *u*6efween^the time of the meeting and going to press the true  nature of the signing has been  clarified. Mayor Labonte of  Gibsons and clerk Jack Copland  signed the lease last Tuesday,  and it was in transit to Sechelt  by registered mail.for completion.  The signing which had been  done at an earlier date had in  fact been done by the aero club  and not by the councils.  The sudden and violent windstorm last Wednesday played havoc with many coastal trees.  This one came down across Gower Point Road.  had flown over to pick up flight'feet, at Field Road it j was 1,000  manuals at Bomber Joe's Book   feet.   The final approach began  Store.  We had a discussion with   at 1,000 feet over a 'very lightly  the manager who was well in-   populated area,  formed on the various regulations       Although  Dr.   Farrar  did fly  higher than the average he  demonstrated that there is no  need under normal flying situations to break any height restrictions.  The flying club members own  ten aircraft. . A. high estimate  would be that on the average  each is flown three times a week.  This does not constitute heavy  air traffic. What swells the  numbers, are. through flights,  pilots coming from other clubs  to practice in an area less' busy  than their own, and general airport traffic from other areas.  If the Areo Club would rather  do without adverse public opinion  then they must show some legitimate concern and not, as the  bookseller in Vancouver did,  call. everyone, sight unseen,  "little old ladies" because they  have a difference of opinion  with him.  One suggestion from Dr.  Farrar was that the two groups  get together and discuss the  situation, even at the risk of it  turning .into a shouting match.  ��� Please turn to Page Eight  McGeer heard from again  Education Minister Pat McGeer, recently called in the provincial legislature the "Cardinal Richelieu of the Insurance  Corporation of British Columbia", does not apparently restrict  his autocratic tendencies to insurance matters alone. It was  learned at the School Board meeting held on September 8th  that he has instructed officials of the B.C. School Trustee  Association that he wants the teachers of the province to receive zero pay increases this year or face increased class sizes  and consequently fewer jobs. McGeer's dictum comes at a  time when concern is already being expressed about the number of teaching graduates unable to find work in the province.  The information, was elicited by a question from Sechelt  Teachers' Association President Doris Fuller who said that she  had heard rumours to this effect. The rumours were corroborated by local trustees who said, however, that official word had  not come from the provincial trustees association as yet. Preliminary indications are that McGeer's move had disturbed both  teachers and trustees and may considerably complicate this  fall's bargaining procedures, if any bargaining can be said to  be held under the circumstances.  Sechelt council meets  The Sechelt council held their  regular meeting on Wednesday,  September. 7th. One piece of  good news for the residents of  Seaside Village was that the  debris around the powerline has  been burned. However, it was  found that there, is still more  clean up to be done in the marsh  area. The problem of the truck  and the batch plant and modulars  is still unresolved.  At a previous meeting, the  arena executive had asked if  council would pay their overdue  summer hydro bill, on the condition that they would reimburse  the village in the winter. This  was given approval on the  grounds that during the summer  the arena is unused and no income is realized until the winter  months.     A proposal was put  forth by Alderman Leitner to  meet with the arena committee  to discuss a similar " situation  which has arisen over interest  payments. Also to be discussed  at the meeting would be the  feasibility of installing a cement  floor in the ice rink, which would  . make it possible for the premises  to be used on a year round basis.  A representative of the Arts  Club was on hand to discuss  their upcoming lease. Clarke  Steabner could not be present,  but it was felt that final ization  was only a case of ironing out  some of the details.  Alderman Kolibas reported  that a new health office had  opened in Westview, Powell  River, housing a speak therapist  and an audioligist. She expressed  ��� Please turn to Page Eight  Mr. C. Lee of the Committee Against the Rape  of the Environment makes his presentation at  last week's Sechelt Council meeting.  Resignation sought  At a meeting for the press in  Selma Park last Wednesday,  the members of C.A.R.E. gave  out the following statement.  Alderman Frank Leitner categorically stated that the lease  was already signed by the Mayor  when in fact the lease was still  In transit from. Gibsons council  and had not been signed.  This conduct by an alderman is  beneath the integrity of our  elected   representatives  anH   in  all decency we ask him to resign.  Conversely we ask that the Mayor:  and council demand his resignation.  This statement will be incorporated in a presentation,  which will be put before council  at the next meeting. If the group  does not get satisfactory answers  it plans to go to the Minister of,  Municipal Affairs and ask for an;  investigation into the Fitness of  the council to serve its citizens.  ivered to EVERY address on the Sunshine Coast News, September 13,1977.  A CO-OPERATIVELY AND LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER  Published at Gibsons, B. C. every Tuesday  By: Glassford Press Ltd.  Box 460, Gibsons Phone: 886-2622 or 886-7817  Editor - John Burnside  Reporter / Photographer - Ian Corrance  Receptionist/Bookkeeper - M. M. Laplante  Production - Bruce M. Wilson  Typesetting - Lindy Moseley  Advertising - Mike Simkins  Layout - Pat Tripp  Subscription Rates:  Distributed Free to all addresses on the Sunshine Coast.  British Columbia: $12.00per year; $8.OOforsix months.  Canada except B.C. $15.00 per year.  United States and Foreign $20jOO per year.  Phone 886-2622 or 886-7817.  P. O. Box 460, Gibsons, B. C.  CNA  Initiative  The initiative shown by the Navy  League of Canada and their spokesman  Commodore Ian Morrow in calling for  the construction, which their organization  will spearhead, of a multi-purpose hall  on the recreational complex by the swimming pool to provide an activity centre  for the young people of Gibsons and  community groups generally must be  applauded. There was an impressive  air of 'can-do' about Morrow's presentation and one felt that here was an initiative which other community organizations  will be able to get behind and that this  was a project which was not only needed  and worthy of support but also likely of  success.  Equally praiseworthy with the initiative  is Commodore Morrow's open-minded-  ness about the flexibility and versitility  that such a hall should provide in the  village. His avowed interition of realizing  a hall which can be in use by various  youth and community groups for 'sixteen  hours a day' is the kind of attitude which  speaks well of full financial value for the  village and service club money which will  no doubt be raised. It is a timely project  and one that deserves a full measure of  support from the community. A recent  nostalgia issue of Weekend Magazine  marking their twenty-five years of opera-,,  tion contained an old Navy advertisement  from the early fifties which had as its  catch-phrase "Go places. Go Navy." In  the face of this recent Navy League  initiative it would seem to be apt.  The airport dispute  The long-simmering dispute about  airplane noise particularly in the Roberts  Creek and Selma Park areas has erupted  into a full-scale controversy with the  group calling itself the Committee  Against the Rape of the Environment  (C.A.R.E.) calling for the resignation  of Alderman Frank Leitner of the Sechelt  Council and threatening to go over the  head of the council to the Department  of Municipal Affairs if their protests  are not attended to. It is, no doubt,  a vexatious problem.  The Coast News is personally acquainted with a lady who left her home of  twenty years in the Selma Park area and  moved to Halfmoon Bay because she  could no longer bear the noise of the  airplanes using the airport.   In Gibsons  too, all conversations must pause occasionally as float planes take  off from  the Gibsons harbour.   No easy solution  is immediately at hand. The same people  who wince as a float plane takes off  from Gibsons harbour are often grateful  of the  opportunity  of taking  a  quick  flight to Vancouver or can appreciate  the airplane's usefulness on mercy flights  to Vancouver hospitals.  It is a case where the interests of  two groups are in conflict and some  compromise must be reached, the kind  of compromise which, taking into consideration and accommodating the needs  of both groups, is the very corner-stone  of civilized community living. We hope  that such a compromise will eventually  be reached. Our first impressions would  be that since the group of non-flyers  who would enjoy the undisturbed quiet  of rural living is a much larger group  than the people who fly, the onus for  settlement would seem to be on the  flying club to take the initiative in resolving the dispute.  It is of course true that the problem  is likely to be with us for the foreseeable  future as the area grows and as it is  within easy flying distance of other,  more crowded airports. But whatever  can be done to lessen the aggravations  inherent in overhead traffic must, however, be done and one without further  delay.  Thank you.  One of the most gratifying things that  happens up and down the Sunshine Coast  is that we are continually hearing from  the people we serve how much they enjoy  our newspaper. We hear from the post  office lady in Egmont that she needs  more papers from us because she doesn't  get enough and daren't distribute them  in boxes because everyone is upset if  they don't get their copy of the Coast  News and she has to rely on a first come  first served basis to avoid disputes. We  hear from the Hopkins Landing Store  that people are upset and querying  anxiously when Labour Day makes our  paper one day later than usual. It is  heartening to feel that the efforts of our  little group of workers and contributors  is being appreciated.  Particularly heartening recently were  the gracious and practical gestures of  longtime   residents   Frank   White   of  Pender Harbour and Hubert Evans of  Roberts Creek who both sent into the  office the regular subscription fee for  what is after all a free distribution newspaper.     Particularly  appreciated  were  the kind words of Hubert Evans who  served on Canadian newspapers for many  years and knows  whereof he  speaks.  There is no praise like the praise of an  old pro.  /'  Thank you, gentlemen, for the kindness of your words and the thoughtful-  ness of your gesture. You help make our  efforts on your behalf seem well worthwhile.  .. .from the files of Coast News  5YEARS AGO  Don Lockstead, newly elected NDP  member of Mackenzie constituency in  the provincial legislature has informed  the Coast News that he intends to support  the general public desire for an upper  levels highway in the vicinity of B.C.  Hydro power line right of way.  10 YEARS AGO  Copies ofthe "hippy" paper Georgia  Straight were offered for sale to students  at Elphinstone School. School officials  warned the salesmen to stay off school  property. Sales were conducted during  the noon hour, across the highway.  School population jumped 12%, more  than double the average 5% yearly  increase. School attendance last June  totalled 1193. Today's attendance is  2,225.  15 YEARS AGO  Good progress has been made during  the past two weeks on the preparation  of plans for the new hospital.  $50,000 worth of taxes were collected  by  the  Village  of Gibsons  this  year.  Last year's intake was $48,000.  20 YEARS AGO  A fair presentation of property owners  of Roberts Creek turned out to a meeting  called by the P.T.A. to discuss the  probability of licensed premises being  included with the new building project  on the Sechelt Highway.  25 YEARS AGO  Gibsons Village commission was subjected to a barrage from delegates Of  the Gibsons Ratepayers' Association  when a delegation of their members  turned up to protest the granting of  water to parties living outside the village  IrWffflt"68-          No. 3 General Hospital, Rondebosch, South Africa, 1900. Table  Mountain rises in the. background. The South African War was in  progress, and Mary Affleck, one of the first four Canadian nurses  to serve beyond the boundaries of her country was stationed here.  Nurse Affleck's entries in her official Wellcome Diary gave an  intimate view into the suffering inflicted by that incredible conflict.  Before her tour of duty was over, she had survived a bout with the  enteric fever which took the lives of some twenty thousand soldiers.  More than fifty years later Mary Affleck Wolfe spent the twilight 6f  her life ait Gibsons, where her daughter and grand-children lived,  continuing her services as a nurse as long as she was able to do so.  Photo courtesy Mary Affleck Wolfe collection and Elphinstone  Pioneer Museum. L. R. Peterson  ft^"  The twin misadventures of a  protracted wind storm and a mislaid wallet had left us, as we  recounted the little story of a  tyro canoe trip, just three miles  from our starting point on Bear  Island five days after setting out  on a circular trip of one hundred  and thirty miles. Undaunted by  misfortunes on that long ago  Thursday morning we set our  faces on the completion of the  trip.   For the rest of that Thurs-  Musings  John Burnside  Slings & Arrows  George Matthews  and one can of beans. The  thought of arriving in Latchford  on a small town Ontario Sunday  was not a cheeful one so we  determined to bend our best  efforts to achieving Latchford by  the next night, Saturday.  And so we did. We woke  early and breakfasted on porridge. Porridge is not everyone's choice at the best of times  but without milk or salt or anything else  it becomes a bland  day we dipped our paddles with ��and   unpalatable- breakfast   but  great resolution in lake  waters    it was all we had.  We saved the  that    were    again    sunlit    and    single tin of beans for lunch,  friendly and the canoe  slipped '?    We paddled into Latchford just  through   the   water   with   that    before the grocery closed at six,  graceful ease that only canoes  and swans seem to know.  We paddled long and hard past  the hour of supper and the sun  exultant but famished.   We had  ' fueled the last ten miles  with  thoughts of the great steaks we  would devour once the groceries  was very low before we allowed  ;were  bought  but,   alas,   Latch-  ourselves to think of stopping.  At the edge of a small channel  between a large island and the  lake shore we came upon a fire-  ranger's cabin. A sign on the  window said "Please don't break  in. The door isn't locked!" and  inside we found cots and a wood  stove and dined and slept in  great comfort convinced that all  would be well henceforth.  It was not to be so, however.  As I mentioned last week, Temagami is a vast lake with many  bays   and   many   promontories  and due to some careless map  reading on the part of the author,  mid-afternoon found us drifting  dispondently   among   the   fire-  charred stumps of.trees with their  base in the water in a dead-end  bay.   To make matters infinitely  worse as far as I was concerned  the wind came up again and by  the  time  we  had  returned  to  where we had gone wrong we  were again faced with a great  open stretch of lake advancing  with white tops.   There was no  help for it this time, we Had to  go on.   Despite our lack of progress, the constant exposure to  the fresh air and our exertions  had sharpened our appetites and  we had eaten our way through  almost all of the food we had  brought for the first week.    So  it was that' at about five-fifteen ������;  in the afternoon I was sitting in  the bow of a canoe which was  leaping  and   rolling   and   over  which bow water was breaking  when we plunged into the troughs  of the waves and I was devoutly  wishing that I could be standing  in  cramped  discomfort   aboard  the C.N.R. commuter train which  was at that moment making its  way under Mount Royal tunnel  on its way towards the safe if  stolid suburbs.  There was nothing for it, of  course, but to dip the paddle  deep and pull hard until the  safety of a lee shore was reached.  That night we took stock of the  situation as we dried our clothes  by a roaring fire. We were back  on course and knew where we  were but we were still thirty  miles from a little hamlet called  Latchford at which we planned to ,.  restock for the balance of the trip  and we were down to oatmeal  ford boasted only one greasy  spoon cafe with no steak on the  menu and so it was we ate hamburgers and milkshakes and  apple pie and then some more  ; hamburgers and apple pie and  milkshakes - an outburst of  ingestive excess which I was to  come to rue as much as any in  a career which has not been  without incidence in that regard.  Buoyed, however, by the suc-  ' cess of our arrival and the new-  ��� felt confidence of full stomachs  we decided to paddle three miles  , up lake from Latchford where we  would find a creek which marked  the end of the longest portage  we would have to make - one and  three quarters miles. We reasoned that if we took that leisurely paddle up the lake as the sun  set we would be in fine position  to make the portage the next  day. The beginning of the portage which we found just before  nightfall proved a major disappointment, however. It was  nothing more than the rocky bed  of a late summer creek with  absolutely no level or even remotely comfortable spot.  So it was, having decided to  get the tent and bedding, over  the portage and make camp on  the other side to return in the  morning for the canoe and the  rest of our equipment, that dusk  found us stumbling suddenly  dreadfully weary over a barely  'marked trail waging war, with  the insistent mosquito arrayed  in fearsome battalions in those  Ontario woods. We were near  exhaustion and it had started to  rain by the time we got to the  other end of the portage and began-; putting our tent up in the  dark!. This end ofthe portage was  no great joy either, seeming to  be some form of low grade swamp  but at least it was level and we  were very tired.  About five o'clock with the  first light of the grayest, most  miserably drizzle-laden dawn  imaginable I awoke in the tent  with an absolutely phenomenal  stomach ache and realized that  a swift exit was a dire necessity.  I dived out into the damp gray-  ness which seemed like some kind  of mosquito heaven and did what  I had to as far from the tent as  I could get. The mosquitos  enmasse attended my ablutions.  It went on for hours: the grinding  pain, the desperate exits, the  millions of attendant mosquitoes.  How I cursed my fate and my  innocently snoring friend.  All things must pass, however,  and some hours later we trod the  trail back to the beginning of  the portage and carried the canoe  over. Then we carried the food,  intending to eat at the end of  the second trip. But we hadn't  brought the pots and pans and  so a third trip was necessary and  I was getting decidedly wobbly.  And so it was we were huddling  in a gray mist of a noon over a  very hasty meal when an Indian  of the region swung over the  trail. He was carrying his canoe  alone and with an ease which  made mockery .of our joint  stumblings. I looked up from my  urgent spoonings and caught his  eye just as he'd finished taking  in our campsite with a quick  sweep of his eye and on his face  was a look of such disgust and  such contempt that I cringed  pathetically. I looked around  myself, and there was the tent  we had put up the night before,  poles askew and sagging hideously and all around it were the  evidences of my early morning  forays into the mist. He spared.  us not a word but passed mute  and disapproving by. We could  but hang our heads.  I am pleased to report that  with this chronicle of misadventure our miseries ceased and our  second week was as glorious as  the imagination could dare dream  of and we returned to our offices  in Montreal as tanned and fit-  looking as we could have wished.  And if we had a new respect for  the men who made the canoe the  vehicle with which they crossed  a continent, who would be  surprised?  Like any good citizen of the  state I have been thinking metric  for the past few weeks. As I  sit here for example I have before  me half a hectoflagon of my  favorite metric ale (that's five  centoflagons or five hundred  milliglagons). A few grams of  my favorite metric cheese are  within easy reach of my metric  cheese board. I certainly don't  begrudge the necessity of bending to the will of the state when  the times require such national  unity and obedience. The rigorous discipline of the state however leaves little time for personal  considerations and it just so happens that this is the time of year  when I embark on my annual  fitness campaign.  Getting fit has never been easy  for me and this metric business  has only complicated the problem. I have been sitting here  for days plotting the strategy  and logistics for the campaign  and I'm totally baffled by the  necessary metric conversions.  Somehow I just can't get excited  about 87 kilograms especially  when all I have to lose is seven  kilograms for maximum fitness.  As far as dieting is concerned,  converting ounces of peanuts,  cookies, cake, beer and so on  into-their metric equivalents is  enough to drive a man to eating  and drinking. When Jt comes to  exercise, I'm about ready to  throw in the sponge. How many  kilometers do I run every day to  ensure proper cardio-vascular  conditioning? How many kilograms of weights do I use for my  weight lifting programme?  When it comes to keeping fit  however, metrics are the least of  my problems. Every year when  the fitness hysteria strikes it  seems that there are more and  more "experts" to tell me how  it's supposed to be done. These  experts    are    invariably     non-  Death -  be not proud  Death, be not proud, though some have called thee  Mighty arid dreadful, for thou art not so,  For those whom thou think 'st thou dost overthrow  Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.  From rest and sleep, which but thy picture be,  Much pleasure, then from thee much more must flow;  And soonest our best men with thee do go-  Rest of their bones and souls' delivery!  Thou 'rt slave to fate, chance, kings and desperate  men,  And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,  And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well,  And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?  One short sleep past, we wake eternally,  And death shall be no more: Death, thou shalt die!  JOHN DONNE  smoking, non-drinking, skinny  and aesthetic fanatics. They give  lectures and interviews on the  subject; they write books by the  hundreds telling us how we can  become just like them; they have  Masters degrees in Pushups and  Ph.D.'s in aerobics. What most  of us really need is some advice  on fitness for people who prefer  to be decadent; some quiet,  laid-back suggestions from someone who is simply trying to avoid  total decline and collapse.  I used to know such a person  and for those of you who feel  the same .* way T , do about the  tedious need for fitness I'm going'  to pass on some of his advice.  Harv was in his late thirties  and his predisposition for the  good life made it necessary,  every now and then, to get himself into shape. He was quite  a sportsman, enjoying an evening  at the pool table or a vigorous  game of Backgammon as much  as umpiring the occassional  girl's softball game but he never  got too serious or self-rightious  about his active life.  The first thing he told me was  that nobody should worry about  fitness until they're at least  thirty. It was his opinion that  anyone who had to worry about  keeping in shape before he was  thirty was clearly neurotic and  should be avoided at all costs.  As far as his own fitness programme was concerned there  were four steps; motivation,  degree of commitment, method  and testing.  Motivation was the most dif  ficult part. Like old Harv said.  "You've got to have a damn good  reason to ruin your life for a  few weeks." His approach was to  pick out some particularly attractive member of the opposite  sex and to ask her over for dinner  at his apartment the following'  Saturday. Now., this is the part  that required some sensitivity.  If she accepted Harv would know  that there was absolutely no reason to bother getting fit. If she  demured, but with a good excuse  he would try again next-.week.  If she had some lame but polite  reason for refusing, like she had  to take her pet alligator for a  nose job at the Mayo Clinic that  day, then Harv would immediately put himself on his low level,  rapid fitness programme. If  she was down right rude he would  shift into his intermediate level  programme and if she just  laughed hysterically he "would  initiate his special "total fitness"  programme.  That simple pre-test told Harv  both whether or not he should  bother and what level of programme  was  required.     Once  these factors  were  determined  he  went to work   immediately  putting   the   programme    into   '  action.     First he had to stop   >  smoking.    This was done .with   ���  firm commitment and discipline   ;  by smoking up the last of his   I  weekly carton on a Friday night.    >  This was followed up with heroic   ���  determination   as   Harv   would    ;  ��� Continued on Page 3 . Coast News, September 13, 1977.  LETTERS to the EDITOR  Armaments  Editor:  In reference to an article entitled "Marching for Peace" in  the Coast News of August 30,  reportedly from' the United  Church of Canada, the sponsors  appear to lament that Canada has"  purchased "130 new fighter aircraft for the largest defence  expenditure in our history".  The article in question appears  to equate this purchase to a heedless aggravation of world wide  tensions. But our country is not  yet a pawn in the "military  industrial complex". Neither  have we any dreams of military  expansion, Canada is trusted,  worldwide.  However, we live in a world  where freedom and justice is  not universal. We have therefore  entered    a    collective    security  Slings & arrows (cont'd)  stay rooted to his bed until Monday morning. (He had a phobia  about smoking; in bed.) Bright  and early Monday morning he  would squeeze his bulk into his  shorts and sweat shirt and walk  vigorously around the block.  This uncharacteristic early morning effort was based on his  belief that all exercise should be  done before you are awake so  as to avoid the unpleasantness  of it all.  Next came breakfast of a litre  and, a half'of unsweetened "tea  followed by three aspirins';' (he  always got a headache if he didn't  eat.) After breakfast he would  walk the three and a half blocks  to work. He had to walk because  very cleverly on the previous  Friday he had mailed both sets  of car keys to himself by second  class mail thus ensuring himself  at least four weeks without a  vehicle. During the day, whenever he felt the need for food or  ���   it       ' ���  tobacco he would get up from his  desk and move around. His  usual .method was to walk around  the typing pool until he found one  of the secretaries wearing an  especially short skirt whereupon  he would request a file from one  of the bottom drawers of the  filing cabinet. This fitness activity had a dual purpose; it both  gaye him some needed exercise  and provided further motivation  for his strenuous programme.  For lunch it was a dry martini  without the olive and for dinner  a small steak and a half a head of  lettuce. After dinner it was  straight to bed to ��� escape the  desire for a cigarette or food.  He  also made some other tough  sacrifices, for example instead  of his usual half dozen beer a  , day it was a Spartan litre of dry  red wine.  After a couple of weeks of  this monk-like existence Harv  was running around the block  every morning instead of walking,  of course still early enough that  he wasn't quite awake yet. He  walked the one flight up to his  office instead of taking the  ;,elevator and aU things considered  he would be feeling like a twenty  year old.  This is where the final phase  became operative: testing.  Harv's acid test for fitness consisted of asking the first attractive twenty year old he met for  dinner at his apartment next  Saturday. Depending on the response, Harv would either curtail,  modify or continue his fitness  programme until it met with some  degree of success.  I'm sorry to say that even  Harv's deep commitment to  fitness and good health couldn't  save him from an unpleasant  fate. It seems that one day a  couple of years ago, after a particular heavy fitness project,  he tried out his testing programme on a young lady con-,  siderably under his. usual minimum of twenty and when her  father found out old Harvey  suffered a massive heart attack  and died on the spot.  As I sit here contemplating  my own fitness programme and  the fate of my old buddy I think  maybe this year I'll just sit around  and get fat - metrically.  Church Services  Roman Catholic Services  . Rev.T.Nicholson,Pastor  .   Times of Sunday Mass:  8:00 p.m. Saturday and 12 Noon  Sunday at St.Mary's Gibsons  |In Sechelt: 8:30 a.m. Our Lady of  Lourdes Church, Indian Reserve  10:00 a.m. Holy Family Church  885-9526  SALVATION ARMY  Camp Sunrise  Hopkins Landing  Sundays 10:30 a.m.  In the Chapel  886-9432  Everyone is Welcome  SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST  CHURCH  Sabbath School Sat. 3:00 p.m.  Hour of Worship Sat., 4:00 p.m.  St; John's United Church  Davis Bay  Pastor C. Dreiberg  Everyone Welcome  For information phone:  885-9750 or 883-2736  UNITED CHURCH  Rev. Annette M. Reinhardt  9:30 a.m. - St. John's  Davis Bay  11:15 a.m. - Gibsons  886-2333  GLAD TIDINGS TABERNACLE  Gower Point Road  Phone 886-2660  Sunday School - 9:45 a.m.  Worship Service -11:00 a.m.  Revival - 7:00 p.m.  Bible Study - Wed. 7:30 p.m.  Pastor Nancy Dykes  alliance with our trusted American friends and with certain  countries of Western Europe and  elsewhere. Moreover, we have  an immense, coastline, east,,  west, and north, and now we are  looking at a 200-mile coastal  limit. It is obvious our growing  share of national and .international responsibilities indicate  the need for appropriate modern  surveillance aircraft, at least."  We can not shirk our share of  this load, shielding behind the''  strength of bur allies and realistic friends. For such is the  fragile nature of'society, that  when the police absent themselves from duty, our cities are  at the mercy of thieves and  criminals. So it is, in the international field, we may have to  protect ourselves, and our allies,  by force of arms, if necessary.  Someday, the prayer of all  good men may be a fact, where  justice and peace may prevail.  But that day is not yet. Meanwhile, the 'Price of Liberty is  ^.Eternal Vigilance'.;*;1.;        . :^';;:;\ ;;  Maybe ithie dread spectre of  the 'Nuclear Balance of Terror'  may yet bring all mankind around  the table of conciliation before  the holocaust.  Ernest W. Davies  Hopkins Landing  Outrage?  Editor:  Where is the outrage? There is  a strange silence across, our  country after the Liberal cabinet  passed an order-in-council #2368  prohibiting us from talking about  their role in the uranium cartel,  or from possessing any information about it.     The  Conser-  TED HUME;  services!  AUTHORIZED  ESSft  | Home j  | Equipmentj  I   Dealer   !  FURNACES  j HOT WATERHEATERS\  HUMIDIFIERS  CUSTOMIZED  WARM AIR  i    HEATING SYSTEMS    \  \ CALL i  886-2951  vatives are starting a court case :  suing for the right to even dis-'  cuss the issue.    The fact madea  the news, then silence - except  for CTV's Tom Gould.  Can you imagine the press  hysteria if an NDP government -  passed a gag law prohibiting  discussion of its policies, and  threatened those who possessed  such information with jail?  Editorial pages would ' quive^,  with anger. Radio hotliners  would shout "dictatorship!  Tyranny!" v<A  However, when the Liberals^  pull off a stunt like this, theli>  national media bows its head in:.'  silence, when it should be hang^.'v  ing its head in shame. .-:>-  Richard Von Fuchs..?  Muddy water  Editor:  With reference to your article"'1'  on Page One, your issue ofr'r  September 6, 1977... "Granthams1 d  Clarification.." 'ril  It  seems to  me   that  rather'*?  than clarify the issue, you have ''  contrived deliberately, or other-iv;-  wise7   to'   further''' muiidy ; the  situation,   and   wonder" too," 'if;  you have an axe to grind.    (   '  ''  To abandon our much superior  water for anything the Regional  Board has to offer is the height  of folly.  Our supply source is from a  bounteous Spring of unsurpassed  pure   artesian   water   from   an:  under-ground river, whose source"  no doubt is from some far-off '--���  glacier, hence its coldness.    It  is also more than adequate for  our community.  The statement made by Dayton  & Knight Ltd., Consulting Engineers, in the Sunshine Coast  Waterworks Survey, "Granthams  Landing is least in need of a new  source of water of any community  on West Howe Sound."  The Regional water can only  come from creeks, dams, and  lakes. Surface water subject to  all forms of pollution hazard.  It is my personal opinion,  that some of the owners of pro-  - perty above our Improvement  District, who are unable themselves to share our bounteous  water, have banded themselves  together, to abolish our system  and bring in Regional District  water by any means, fair or foul,  and have suborned by devious  and illegal methods.  Let  them  keep  their   cotton-  picking   hands   off   our   water,^  gaind let us up-date our*'system  lirselves without outside inter-  bnce.  j If the property owners above  . our Improvement District wish  tb; have the Regional Board  supply them, well and good. We  / tfish tliem well, but leave our  ; .system alone.  v>jri the same issue, the letter  by Felix Comeau regarding their  approach to the Regional Board  to take over our system (a very  sneaky trick), and supply Cemetery, Reed, North, Chamberlain  Roads and Upper Granthams.  Pair enough. Those areas badly  need water and will no doubt  eventually have Regional water.  But that is no reason to take over  our vastly superior system.  The wise, late. Doctor Grantham, who in 1909 installed the  initial water service to  the   93  31 i.  parcels of land in his sub-division,  knew what he was doing, and he  did it well.  Throughout the^e many years,  this wonderful spring has faithfully served this community without any outside help from any  government, board or commission, and if left to ourselves,  we can at very little expense,  bring our system up to equal any  standard the Regional Board  could provide and have a far  superior product.  If you wish to prove your  neutrality and integrity, you  would avail yourself of an opportunity to personally inspect our  water system, and see jusr yvhit:  is at stake.  Mr. Fred Feyer would be glad  to take you on a tour of the waier  system, of I myself would be  glad to show it to you.. The  spring is less.than five minutes  from my home.  David Fearn  ���*t�� ��_�� ���_> si* Sfcf Stf _t* St* ���_�� <l* ��X? *_* ���_. ��_- *1- *A. %&.  ���** �����* *T*���*���* -I* *T* *���*^* *��^ *** *T- *T��� t?T- *v�� -.*��� *v* *?*  Please don't ignore those  Church Bazaar Raffle Books yuvt  see on store counters this Fall,  buy a ticket, you'll feel beller for  helping. Miss Bee's, Sechelt  %: sj�� sjs s{c sjc :fc sfc sf: jfc sfc sfc %z j}c %z %z -�� >>.  F.ditor:  He:   John   Faustmann's   column  on   Visitors    Are   Very   Special  People.  This is humour??? I hope we  in Bellingham may be less  patronizing to our Canadian  friends. I really don't understand Mr. Faustmann's superior  stance, based on anything of  his that 1 have read.  Bellingham Resident  High Potency Vitamin E  -^serve  you best  u  SATURDAY  'otency  Improves  iew'E-Pill'  SEPTEMBER 17th  The Sunshine Coasts'  very own  REG DICKSON  Entertaining from  7:00 p.m. til closing  886-9815  NEW YORK. N.Y:(Special)���  An amazing new '"super-charged"  . vitamin  E-Pill  has recently been  developed thai reportedly "quickly  increases and  rejuvenates sexual  drives- and potency for both men  and  women  nf all   ages. It also  makes   them   feel   healthier   and  more youthful". It is now available to the American public.  The  new  high'potency   E-Pill  ���   not only seems to" increase sexual  ���-ability of both;sexes;but also "actually perks up. sexual interest and  ...stimulates a persons desires," according to a spokesman  for the  ���rrranufacturer.-''      "-'"���  . ALSO IMPROVES GENERAL HEALTH  This   new,   easy-to-take   E-Pill  .contains-newly formnlated, highly  concentrated vitamin E. Tt tends  to quickiy huiid up and strengthen  . the na.iur.ul physiological processes  of. the l?pdy that are believed to  he   basically   responsible   for   its  potency, youthfulncss, health and  ��������� long life ,; "'���'���'' '  ;;   HELPS 4 OUT OF 5 PEOPLE'-  ..... Indications  are "that .the; new  .., E-Pill. gives  quick .....and.-effective  'results'"lb as high as 4 put of 5  people (80%) who have,usea* it.  Some    people-  report', no   -great  change but feel, the'high .potency  of. vitamin   E.   in   the. pill   does  quickly   make   them   feel "better  frqm a general health standpoint.  Other reports also show it tends  to "lessen-daily -tension and-give  a more relaxed!, happier outlook  on life.".  NOW -AVAILABLE  The use .of these high potency  /.-one-a-day)  .E-Pills   is   perfectly  '- ���1 arc  --l-i-i-  u  j" < ti i  safe  ate anil" arc 'now "available" without1 !^rcscVfptfpt]frfroni' fh��*mknu-  A0T#  e#0Y  }~y>:-���:  BBB-713  We handle I.C.B.C. claims.  facturCr' bv'niaiT ordcrvdnlyr-"To  get your supply, send $6.95 for  a 2 week /supply,..(or.���.$ 1,0.95 for  a 30 day supply, or $17.95 for a  ���60 dav supply) cash, check or  '���M.O. to: E-Pill. Dept. 516, 447  Merrick Road, Oceanside, N.Y.  11572. . (Unconditional , money-  back guarantee if not satisfied.)  A1272/9/13/77  Exploit tha nKanyAuturnfifdf  ^r^tf^'   'mwt       IMF ^^ftk^r,       ^^m_^^    JBPIIPWS ^^Ittlr- - ^^ ..;^��      ****  NcwV\Me the mpmeftte last.  '* '#��*&!����� ' ' ?,������ V-   ,4     ''';r     v, J 7     ;  imo fleeting season/ '���> -t^> -&vpioreagba$H0wnjRjde*a \>  A short stent blaze of sunshine^ " back r<?ad- fteflt'a cabin; Walk a-  arcq* cotaur before the long gtey   - 3Ute* beach. Retaxj Talk, f  Anq reniember. >    -      -.*  , But do it now, Pick up and go  Winter Is so dose,     "    - Coast News, September 13,1977:  THE GEOGRAPHY OF  BOYHOOD  It seemed the fields fanned out  forever around the drowsy village  of Islip where I lived as a boy.  They were green, pleasant fields  that we wandered at will in search  of mushrooms, bird's eggs or  any random adventure. A lazy  tributary of the Thames fingered  through the fields and through  the ancient village itself, under  an old stone bridge at which some  obscure battle had been fought,  centuries before. It was Islip's  sole claim to historical fame. The  village did contain a very old  church which boasted Oliver  Cromwell's signature in a musty  record book but whose origins  reached clear back to Norman  times. I can still recall its vaulted, echoing interior on sermon-  droning Sundays; the strange  bas-relief faces peering blindly  and forever , from hoary stone  walls.  Islip   was   rurality   incarnate  with    its   cobbled    streets    and  small,     cram-windowed     shops  which   always   in   my   memory,  seem to have been run by rimless-  spectacled, sometimes-snappish,  little old ladies.    In roughly the  centre of the village was a huge  antique mansion, once owned by  some member of the privileged  class.    By the Thirties, its sole  occupants     were     two    elderly  spinster sisters.   Generally, they  were rather reclusive but once a  year, they opened their doors and  threw a ritual party for certain,  selected   local   children.      I   remember attending one of these  elitist functions.   The house was  literally enormous inside, full of  staircases,     creaking     corridors  and    endless,     musty    unused  rooms.      A   game   of  hide-and-  seek was organized and we were  allowed to scatter off like mice  into the tunnels and caves of that  massive building. I found a door,  ducked through it and descended  nervously, a long flight of flag-  stoned stairs.    As my eyes adjusted to the dim light, 1 made  out something that looked, to my  feverish     imagination,     exactly  like a medieval rack.    My God!  I must be in a torture-chamber!  I shot back up the stairs like a  Guy   Fawkes   Day   rocket,   forgetting all about the game.   One  Page s  frpm a Li fe-Log  Peter Trower  of the spinster ladies calmed me  down, assuring me that what I  had seen was simply a cider-  press. But I never completely  believed her.  Like  a  private  kingdom,   enclosed    by    the    small,    quaint  world  of the   village,   was   my  maternal grandparent's 5lA acre  estate.   This pleasant microcosm  was the spacious centre of our  pre-War,   English  world.     The  house itself, misleadingly called  "The    Cottage"    was    actually  three     buildings     eccentrically  joined together by some former  owner's whim. The main part of  the  house  was three-stories   in  height and contained all the main  bedrooms.   On the ground-floor,  an impressive front-door opened  on   a  small  cloak-room   full   of  mackintoshes and walking-sticks.  Beyond this and to the left was  a   large,   old-fashioned   lounge-  hall,   almost  the  depth   of  the  house.   To the right of this was  a long, carpeted staircase to the  upper floors with its slant-roofed,  mysterious    cupboard   beneath.  Yet further to the right lay the  long drawing-room with its sedate  and  expensive  upholsteries;  its  piano,    prim,    black,     seldom-  played in a far corner; its mah-  jong   sets   on   polished   tables.  Due to the delicate nature of the  terrain, we were not privy to this  room   unless   on   our  best   behaviour. At the back of the house  and parallel to the drawing-room,  was   our   grandfather's   brown,  book-filled and vaguely-forbidden  study.    We called him Gamox.  He was a kind, bald, scholarly  man who had entered Oxford at  seventeen; who had received a  C.B.E.   for   his   administrative  work in Malaya; who translated  poems from the Greek and drafted petitions for the Preservation  of Rural  England.     There  was  reputed to be a secret chamber  between the two rooms, long ago  bricked-up   for   who-knew-what  sinister   reasons.       I   used   to  imagine it vaguely, stuffed with  mouldering documents, treasure-  chests or bones.  The mid-section of the house to  the left of the parlour, consisted  of a lengthy back passageway  with an enormous dining-room  opening off it. It was a bright,  well-windowed room whose  salient feature was an oaken table  of truly Arthurian proportions.  When the first air-raids began,  my brother Chris and I were  bedded down beneath it. The  room had a spacious, friendly  ambience and we often played  there on rainy days.  The lower-end of the house  was purely my grandmother's  domain. It contained the large  and orderly kitchen where she  did most of her own cooking,  the larder, the scullery and the  maid's room. An additional room  had been built at the back of the  kitchen-complex and here, for a  time, our mother made candies  professionally. There was a big,  dusty loft above, the kitchen,  piled with trunks and boxes  through which we delighted to  browse. They were filled with  out-of-date tropical clothes and  exotic Malayan curios.  But the house was only the  capitol of that sprawling country  of grounds that lay behind it.  Directly at the rear of the main  house was a courtyard and beyond this, a Victorian walled  garden, green-lawned, and brilliant with flowers in the summer.  A weeping-willow spread its  umbrella of cool fonds in the  garden's centre and in the upper  righthand corner was a greenhouse, redolent with the smell of  tomato-plants. Down the entire  lefthand side of the garden was  a towering, ornamental hedge  full of evergreen caverns where  we built secret forts.  A gate at the back of the garden opened on to the wider and  less-manicured vistas of the  estate-proper. Directly to the  right and behind the old stables  that were used mainly for storage  now, was an enormous chestnut  tree that would have done. any  village smithy.proud. It produced ���  a virtual king's ransom of conkers  each year. We swung on ropes  from its lower limbs but were  chary to scale it far for it reached  up at least a hundred feet. Once  a reckless, older cousin climbed  it clear to the dizzy top, impressing us greatly.  To the left of the wall-garden  door, was another storage-shed  fuil of odds and ends. It stabled  an almost life-size rocking-horse,  battered and chipped beyond redemption but still functional.  Every so often, we would take  this weary steed for a canter and  gallop away into wildwest fantasies.  Behind the rocking-horse shed/  lay vegetable gardens in which  we were not particularly, interested. Along their edge was an  ornamental and bowered grass  path that fingered away like a  green ribbon to distant tennis-  courts. This path lies captured  forever on a firescreen our mother  embroidered long ago. To the  right ofthe path, beyond a stretch  of waste-ground, lay variously:  a discreet rubbish-dump; chicken  coops and a wild backdrop of  small trees and underbrush.  There was also a small playhouse called Uncle Tom's Cabin  which had been built specifically  for us but where we spent little  time. A boy prefers to construct  his own crude castles.  At the end of the ornamental  path and behind the tennis-  courts, was an area of turfy  ground that we had staked out for  our own. Here, in company with  our cousin, Peter Gray, the same  boy who conquered the chestnut tree, we conducted our  private wars. They were strange  wars indeed for our warriors  came from every place and age.  Roman centurions confronted  cowboys; knights-in-armour  squared-off with red Indians;  chariots challenged tanks. Unhampered by logic or time, we  waged our tatterdemalion campaigns.  Such was the geography of  ���my boyhood. Beyond our naive  battleground, the property stretched on through fruit trees and  braken to the railway-tracks -  where it ended. But the image  that stays with me now, is that of  the toy soldiers. Beyond those  prophetic games; beyond the  brief kingdom that contained  them, a real War bubbled its  way to obscene reality.  *����^*����*����W����**����������������������������*��***  Ellingham's  ^   Astrology  %*++++**++****+++*#************+++*+  Screwball antics galore  at the Twilight Theatre  are you  Ready  PHILIPS MODULARq  the new season's programs axe upon ns and winter sports  are Just around the corner. Philips and J & C Electronics  can equip you for the best viewing ever.  Zaniness is the norm at the  Twilight Theatre this week with  all three of the featured movies  scheduled being noted for frenetic frivolity and high-pressure  hilarity.  First up is Grand Theft Auto  which   will   be   seen   Thursday  through    Saturday,    September  15  -   17.     Televison   star  Ron  Howard has directed the movie,  his first directorial stint, and may  well have set some record in the  car crash sweepstakes.   Howard  shows a sensible touch and keeps  the   action   moving   throughout  the film.    He wrote the script  with his father and stars as well  as directs.   Nancy Morgan plays  his love interest.    She and Howard are the objects of a zany  chase the object of which is to  stop the pair from going to Las  Vegas to be married. ' Chasing  them are a bus-load of senior  citizens, the oafish fiance jilted  by Morgan, a carload of Chica-  - nos,   Mafia  hitmen  brought   in  be a private detective, a couple  of hot-rodders, a preacher, and  a disc jockey who follows  the  tracing cars in a helicopter while  delivering a radio report on the  action. '  Sunday through Tuesday,  September 18 - 20, will see a  double invasion of the madcap  "Carry on" gang from England.  The films are entitled Carry on  England and Carry, on Matron  and the censor rates them as  suitable for mature audiences,  warning that there is occasional  nudity and suggestive language  as though we could expect anything else by this time from that  screwball collection of zanies  and curvaceous cuties with their  penchant for double entendres  and sex as leering hilarity.  ��� So if you get your chuckles  from light-harted larking around  and meaningfree mirth, this  could be your week at the Twilight.  Heritage  Dancers  Costumed in traditional dress  of years gone by, the Heritage  Dancers will perform at the  Elphinstone High School gym  Saturday, October 1st.  The pageant gives a short  history of the dance, the dancers  dressed in costumes to authentically represent the specific  historical eras of the individual  dances. They have elegant  costume changes for the five  periods to cover the different  dances.  Demonstrating the different  eras as they go along, the performers will do the old English  Morris and country dances dating  back to the 1400's. Then the  French court dances of the 1700  era. Next is shown the Colonial  and Pioneer dances in North  America and finally the program brings the history up to  date with some examples of  modern square dancing and  round dancing.  Since the dress rehearsal of  the company, nearly fifty performances have been given to  thousands of spectators throughout British Columbia.  Week commencing Sept. 13th.  General Outlook:  Mercury returns to direct  motion on September 15th indicating a general improvement  in all channels of communication.  Letters and messages delivered  after that date should eventually  bring more satisfactory results.  Projects started this week will  succeed providing one takes the  courage to try original approaches.  At the weekend, Venus and  Saturn are gloomily aligned  warning us that social activities  could be disappointing.  Early week babies will be  sticklers for detail whilst weekend  arrivals will have a strong sense  of duty and show caution in  affairs of the heart. Good luck,  kids.  ARIES (March 21 ��� April 19)  Take advantage of a temporary  social lull to attend to any neglected health or employment  problems. Work on new, original  ideas connected with the home.  TAURUS (April 20 ��� May 20)  The news you've been waiting  for should assist you in finalizing  serious domestic decisions.    Be  prepared to speculate.  GEMINI (May 21 ��� June 21)  Financial rewards for past  endeavors are received at last.  Emphasis is on changing domestic conditions during the next  few weeks. A gloomy weekend  message is best ignored.  CANCER (June 22 - July 22)  Many short journeys are undertaken as you finally go ahead  with plans destined to succeed.  Avoid carelessness with money  and possessions as the week  closes.  LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  Behind the scenes preparations  now begin to pay off but financial  matters will demand clarification.  That 'down-in-the-dumps' feeling  will fade next week.  VIRGO (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22)  Restlessness ends now as new  starts, hopes, and wishes revive  your optimism. Unexpected communications will surprise you.  Avoid being alone at the weekend. (Happy Birthday, Dad!)  LIBRA (Sept. 23 - Oct. 23)  Expect your present lifestyle  to slow down for a while as it's  now time for serious planning  and quiet reflection. That long-  awaited money order or cheque  finally arrives.  SCORPIO (Oct. 24 - Nov. 22)  A sudden surge of energy will  surprise friends as future plans  are quickly organized. . Try hot  to be too disappointed with a  weekend failure. It's not important.  SAGITTARIUS (Nov 23 - Dec 21)  Don't ignore present intuitions.  You have a chance to boost your  image and position very soon.  Others may find your philosophical meanderings rather boring  as the week closes.  CAPRICORN (Dec 22 - Jan 19)  Emphasis is on long distance  communications and the improvement of personal skills and  knowledge. Friends, acquaintances, and loved ones are still  eager to assist and your faith in  them is strengthened.  AQUARIUS (Jan 20 ��� Feb 18)  Financial affairs shared with  others are organized more clearly'  and your public standing is highly  respected. A melancholy loved  one needs cheering up as the  week closes.  PISCES (Feb. 19 - Mar 20)  Relationships with others  change for the better. Health  check ups are now due but, for  you Pisces, it's an excellent week  for light-hearted speculation  with lottery tickets. Good luck.  TWILIGHT THEATRE  Gibsons  886-2827  SiuTii Color Television  The dependable one  not exactly as shown  With Optional  OPTAVISION REMOTE  All the controls at your fingertips  ���Volume Control, Color Control, Tint  Control, Mute Control ��� to simply cut  off sound, Autotlnt Control ��� to return  your set to the factory preset tint level.  Every Optavision Pushbutton Command  Module remote control set has an added  feature ��� behind the panel door is the on  set Optavision pushbutton control panel.  If you misplace your Command Module  remote control you can operate your set  manually.  Now $849  reg. $929  The influence of Mediterranean styling  is evident in this 26" floor length console,  from the squared over-hanging top to  the full flared fase. Decorative front  panels complete the elegant appearance.  CLEARANCE OF '77 SETS TO MAKE ROOM FOR NEW STOCK!  ELECTRONICS  AND  APPLIANCES  IN THE HEART OF SECHELT  885-2568  Some of the Heritage Square Dancers soon to  visit Gibsons are pictured above at the conclusion  of one of their recent performances.  Monday  School  by Lorrl Kennaugh  HEY KIDS! Gibsons United  Sunday School starts a new program....instead of Sunday School  we have an all new MONDAY  SCHOOL and every second Monday there will be a supper after  Monday School lessons. Monday  School starts at 4 o'clock after  school at Gibsons United Church.  Many special activities, ball  games, parties, eats, and prizes  will be awarded for attendance  for more information call Gloria  Charlebois at 886-7638.  Chamberlin  painting  on display  Now showing at the Gibsons  Public Library is a display of  paintings by Vivian Chamberlin  of Hopkins Landing. Some of the  work reflects the experience of  a summer course at the Vancouver School of Art, which was  taught by Nora Blanck, whose  own work is presently on display  at the Contemporary Gallerie  Royale and the Vancouver Art  Gallery in Vancouver.  T.J's  has a sound idea  for every budget.  THIS WEEK'S  SPECIAL  CAR WASH  Two record set  reg. $8.99  SALE     $6"  See the movie at the  Twilight Theatre.  Listen to the music  at home.  T.J's for the sounds  |[  STEREO EQUIPMENT  SUNNYCREST   CENTER  GIBSONS 886-9111 Coast News, September 13,1977.  5.  jpwwwmwwa^^  Books  with  John  Faustmann  'Aummmmiim  Picasso's World of Children  Helen Kay  Doubleday & Co.  "His. mother his mama was  looking at the child of I and the  other she loved him gave him the  soup of her breast washed him  morning and night combed him  and sewed his dresses went with  him to the movies to the theatre  to the sea and slapped him Mama  Mama I have finished Mama  give me a drink Mama I am  thirsty Mama I am hungry Mama  I am sleepy Do you want me to  blow your nose Are you hot are  you cold nighty night pipi caca  Ah how heavy to carry are the  wings of the horse said the I  putting down the package on  the sink. Neither rain nor shine  nor snow and even less the vines  in autumn."  "You can write a picture in  words just as you can paint  sensations in a poem."  These are two quotes from  Pablo Picasso that appear in  Helen Kay's large, lovely and  exceptionally well-produced book  Picasso's   World   of   Children.  Fish Talk  I can't say that I have seen  enough of Picasso's original  works to adequately judge the  quality of the prints here, but  the overall effect of the book,  with its text, and the 190 reproductions (28 in colour) is  extremely satisfying. Picasso had  a maddening facility for almost  any medium he used, and Helen  Kay, singling out one particular  aspect of his work; clearly enumerates Picasso's ability.  Art'books, as you may know,  generally suffer from a surfeit of  soppy prose commentary. People  who write them, blinded temporarily by the proximity of  genius, tend towards a reverence  that makes for very dull reading.  In this particular volumn, dealing  as it does with both the world of  art (with a capital A) and the  world of children, Ms. Kay could  easily have slipped over the edge  into maundering sentimentality.  She seldom does this, and as a  result her book is not only a  pleasure to look at, but a pleasure  to read as well.  Culling her information from  interviews    with    Picasso,    his  family, and his main art dealer, ���  Ms. Kay's text is mostly biographical in nature. Through  her, we follow the artist from the  time he was a boy till the late  1960's, passing, through his  childhood, his "blue" period,  his fascination with the circus,  his horror of war, etc. The portrait ofthe man emerges in careful stages.  This is just as well, for Picasso  was such an insatiable man  that too many details at once  would be boggling to the ordinary  reader. His output was incredible. In 1901 he was turning  out two or three pictures a day,  and by 1944 he had catalogued  more than seven thousand separate works. He not only painted,  he sculpted, carved, wrote,  married several times, fathered a  number of children, and still  found time to make all sorts of  toys and games .for his offspring.  On top of this, when���- someone  requested a special picture,  rather than try and find a painting  he'd already done, Picasso would  often simply do the painting  over again.  Picasso experienced the world  of childhood, as do all parents,  through his own children. He  enjoyed especially very small  children - ones that had not yet  been circumscribed by the harsh  lines of the adult consciousness,  and these form the bulk of this  book. He began with Paulo,  his first-born son, and continued  throughout his marriages and  liasons to paint his subsequent  children - his daughters. Maya  and Paloma, and his other son,  Claude. Picasso did this work  primarily for his own family.  He seldom sold the portraits.of  '~$ir~^X ' . ^^7^' . ' ��� ^*lk ^**- ; ^^Jj  'E>-  t&  &  VS  v^ a,-*?  his children. Aside from these  personal works, and sketches  done of his grandson Bernard,  Picasso was also capable of  realizing children in their more  universal form. ��� A section of. this  book is given to the studies he  did of wartime, in Guernica.  These are harsh, aching indictments ofthe waste that war is;  and portray, with a controlled  brutality, a series of mothers  clutching their dead children.  From looking at this work,'  it's not difficult to see the extraordinary empathy Picasso had for  children. His own children continued to love him long after  they'd grown up, and they were  frequent visitors to his studio  until the time of his death. His  daughter Maya recalls: "The  nicest thing about being with my  father? We have so much, both,  that it is impossible to find one  nicer than the other. My childhood was during the war and my  father would every day find  jokes for the little girl I was.  Making me drawings, books by  himself, funny dresses, etc.,  dolls - and as you can imagine,  he made them with everything."  ��� Picasso's deep understanding  of children, which he displayed  in his discordant, seemingly disjointed presentation of them,  never tended to that idealized  concept that endows them with  that mystical niceness. He loved  them, but he was not fooled by  them, just as he loved, but.was  not fooled by las palomas, the  doves. "They are greedy, quarrelsome birds," he said. "But  who are more greedy than children? How else can they grow? "  To coincide with this review  we've made an attempt on this  page to reproduce three of the  simpler reproductions from this  book. ;The boy with the pencil  is entitled. ' 'Claude in Blue".  The feeding baby,- rendered in  the simplest lines imaginable,  is Picasso's grandson Bernard.  Surrounded by doves, the third  picture shows a child removing  the mask of his grownup - it's  called "The Old and the New  Year."  Helen Kay's presentation of  this work shows a fine understanding, one that enables her  to write: "Childhood is a very  short-lived state - yet it lives  with us always. The outer child  disappears, lost in a few years,  but within the adults we become,  the small child continues to inhabit our house and haunt us  all our lives." I would rather  think that our small child is  calling us to come out and play.  'Haunting' is perhaps not the  correct word for what our child  ren do. But Picasso, who could  say things as well with a pen as  he could with a brush, said it  better: "Listen to your childhood, to the hour that white in  the blue memory borders  white..."  TOPS on  Thursdays  If you want to lose weight and  need "extra help" and "understanding", join our TOPS chapter  on a Thursday afternoon at the  Health Unit on South Fletcher  Road.  <iby Geny Ward  �� In almost all of my past articles  *I have mentioned that live food  v;is a must if you want your fish  t;to become strong and healthy.  5: Two of the types of live foods I  ?use are Thbifex and White  �� worms. If I find a pond or large  Spuddle with an abundant supply  ��of mosquito larvae, blood worms,  ^or other water creatures that can  ��be fed to my fish, I Will gather  fclarge quantities but come winter  ^most of these, creatures'are not  i-available, so j revert back to the  rTubifex and White worms.  r' ���-. ���  *--,.���  ��   The Tubifex or sludge worms  -are an excellent food, but they  tare   found   in   extremely   dirty  ^surroundings.       These    worms  ydwell in slow moving  polluted  ^streams where they can be seen  fas a1 red colored moving carpet.  "If you gather these worms caution  must  be  taken  before   feeding  your fish.    The worms can be  gathered from mud placed in a  bucket, then they must be well  cleaned   in   clear,   fresh,   cool  water. Another way of gathering  Tubifex which is  not  quite  so  tedious is to get hold of your local  fish dealer and ask them to get  some Tubifex from  his  whole-.  saler.  The White worm is far more  easily gathered. All you-need is  a wooden box, some good soil  and a place to store them. You  can raise White worms easily by  feeding them oatmeal, bread  and milk, mashed potatoes and  a variety of other things. I  usually alternate between oatmeal and bread and milk. Place  the food on the surface of the  dirt or in shallow holes, place  :ypiir White worm culture 'pn^this^  and then put a pane of glass over  it. In a month to six weeks you  should be able to see the worms  gathered ph and around the food.  Just pick out clumps of the worms  and feed your fish. Be sure to  look periodically to see if their  food is getting low, if so replace  with fresh.  When feeding-your fish Tubifex don't feed them just Tubifex  all the time, as they are slightly  laxative to your fish. When using  White worms don't overfeed  because these worms are very  fattening and if your fish are  fed too many it will cause their  reproductive organs to be closed  off or possibly some other ailment connected to obesity. ,If  you would like a culture of White  worms for yourself, give me a  phone call at 886-2778.  Ask  for this  folder  from our  representative,  who will be at:  Bella Beach Motel,  Sechelt. Tel: 885-9561  On Wednesday, September 21st  If you require financing to start, modernize or  expand your business and are unable to  obtain it elsewhere on reasonable terms and  conditions or if you are interested in the  FBDB management services of counselling  and training or wish information on  government programs available for your  business, talk to our representative.  FEDERAL  BUSINESS  DEVELOPMENT BANK  145 West 15th Street,  North Vancouver, B. C. 980-6571  Opening new doors to small business:  Save up to  350  on materials.  That's right. If your home  was built before 1941 in  British Columbia we'll pay  you 2/3 the cost of your  insulation materials-up  to $350-when you  improve the insulation'  in your home.  Cut your  fuel bill as  much as  one-third.  And you may save as  much as 1/3 on your  heating bills for years to  come. The Canadian Home  Insulation Program of taxable grants was created to  help Canadians conserve  energy by the Federal  Government, j   ;  Insulation is easy to do. An  outlay of about $525 for  instance, should purchase  enough matertels to do the  attic, basement, and some  exterior walls of an average  home. We'll provide you  with complete details.  Pre-1941.  Your home must have  been built before 1941 in  British Columbia to qualify  for this phase of the program. And only materials  purchased and installed  after September 1,1977  can qualify for a grant.  If your home was built  after 1941, stay with us.  Over the next seven  years, most homes will  be included.  If your home was built before 1941 in British Columbia, you may  qualify for a grant of 2/3 the cost of materials, up to $350.  ��� Yes, my home (or apartment in a building under three storeys)  was built before 1941 in British Columbia.  ��� Yes, I'm interested in insulating with CMHC acceptable materials  on or after September 1,1977.  | J Yes, this is my principal, year-round residence.  If you've answered "yes" to all three questions, we'll send along our  complete information kit.  Please print. This is your mailing label.  NAME  ADDRESS  CITY  PROV.  POSTAL CODE  |     I English kit  [     | French kit  Send to:   Canadian Home Insulation Program  P.O. Box 700  St. Laurent, Quebec  H4L 5A8  Note: You may also qualify separately for assistance under a  provincially-funded program in your province. Check with your  B.C.Hydro. (9/13/77-#117)  Canadian Home  Insulation Program  i+  Government  of Canada  Canadian Home  Insulation Program  Gouvernemant  du Canada  Programme d'isolatlon thermique  des residences canadiennes  Honourable Andre Ouellet L'honorable Andre Ouellet  Minister Ministre 6.  Coast News, September 13,1977.  Gibsons  "Mipow* Tfc^  886-7215  HAND BRAIDED RUGS $6.95  BREAKFAST  LUNCHK SINNERS  ��� 8 86 -2 8 & 8 :GIW0M. KC.  "The Shopper's Bus is here and making  regular mns Thursday and Friday for your  shopping convenience.  LUCKY  DOLLAR  Prices Effective:  886.2257 Thur., Fri., Sat., Sun.  September 15,16,17,18.  Canada Grade'A'#1  Fresh Whole  Frying Chicken  79  lb.  Baby Beef Liver    89*b  Beef Sausages     89*  Fletcher's 5 lb. Box  Bacon Ends     '2.29  lb  Bananas     5ibs 7*1.00  <��5fi?<_ Pears  m  *~^~ ���    MacKintosh  Apples  29*  99��  f Purex       ^ ~ Scott     I  ( Paper     Bathroom ���'  Towels 2S Tissue *>/  Nabob        24 oz.  Strawberry Jam *1.49  Better Buy       48 oz.  Peanut Butter   $2.29  Malkin's French Cut   14oz.  Green Beans 3/*1.00  Mai kin's Australian  Pineapple 14��.    2/89*  Gold Seal  Pink Salmon 7*��.  89*  Mom's  Margarine 1 ib 2/M.09  Clover Leaf Light  Chunk Tuna   6*oZ  75*  [ Catelli  Macaroni, Spaghetti,  Vermacellit   p s 2/85*  Kraft Libby's Red  Sandwich   Kidney  Spread       Beans  24 oz.  M.19  14 oz.  2/75  We reserve the right  to limit quantities.  ���".A  Dollar  FOODS  HOPKINS  STORE  rThe Neighbourhood Store  with Supermarket prices.  _mMm9mm0*mm0*m+00*m0  ��� CBC Radio  by Maryanne West  Special Occasion, Sunday,  5:05 p.m. presents Dinah Christie  and Tom Kneebone in a revue  recorded for CBC following a  successful 16-week cabaret engagement at Dell's Tavern in  Toronto. Both have won international reputations in a highly  competitive field. The Chicago  Tribune described Dinah Christie  as "a statuesque beauty who can  turn just vulgar enough to be  funny, and still be ladylike when  the occasion demands." Both  have the Coward touch, light,  brittle, tender, wistful, archly  funny. Both learnt how to strike  that delicate balance between  humour and pathos at the feet  of the master of that fine art:  Shakespeare. At 13 Dinah was a  call boy at the Stratford festival,  and later a resident member of  the company before starting a  new career as a singer. Tom left  home in New Zealand to train  with the Bristol Old Vic, then  toured Canada and the U. S. with-  the London Old Vic before settling in Canada and distinguishing himself on stage, TV, radio  and film.  Tom and Dinah have performed  together for years, and have represented this country abroad.  The revue is composed of material they have always wanted  to perform but had not previously  found an opportunity and includes the work of Peter Allen,  Anthony Burgess, John Dank-  worth, Bob Merrill, Rogers and  Hart, William Shakespeare,  Stephen Sondheim and others.  Sondheim's bittersweet elegance  might have been tailormade for  Christie and Kneebone and  they devote a good part of their  fast moving show to it.  Wednesday September 14  Afternoon Theatre: 2:04 p.m.  The Private Secretary by Kenneth  Sinclair.  The Elton John Story:  8:04 p.m.  Keyboard Wizard, Part I.  Mostly Music:    10:20 p.m. Festival Singers of Canada, Melville  m0m  Cook, organ, Ruth Watson Henderson and Cynthia Clark, pianos.  Nightcap:  11;20 Le Grand Magic  Circus from Paris.  Thursday September 15  My Music: 2:04 p.m. BBC quiz.  Playhouse:   8:04 p.m.   The Sentinel  Papers by  Eric  Hambiln,  The Survivors.  Jazz Radio-Canada: 8:30 p.m.  Part I. Nostalgia Jazz. Part II.  Classic small groups, Jelly Roll  Morton, Dizzie Gillespie, Miles  Davis and others.  Mostly Music: 10:20 p.m. Atlantic Symphony Orchestra, Forsyth,  Bruckner.  Nightcap:     11:20 p.m.  Conversation   with   Colin   McDougall,  author of Execution.  Friday September 16  Souvenirs:     2:04     p.m.     Dave  Epstein.  Danny's Music: 8:04 p.m. CBC  broadcast recordings.  Country Road: 8:30 p.m. Paul  Gurry. Artie MacLaren.  Mostly Music: 10:20 p.m. Radio  Orchestra of Leipzig, Heinz  Schunk, violin. . Music by Beethoven.  Saturday September 17  Update:    8:30 a.m. Roundup of  B.C. happenings.  Farce d'Ete:     11:30  a.m.   Bob  and Ray.  Quirks and Quarks: 12:10 p.m.  Science magazine, DNA special,  debate on genetic engineering.  Opera by Request: 2:04 p.m.  Verdi's Don Carlo. Prelude to  the Canadian Opera Company  production.  Festival Celebrations: 5:05 p.m.  Percussion group Nexus.  Between Ourselves: 9:05 p.m.  Loyalists in New Brunswick prepared by Marjorie Whitelaw.  Anthology: 10:05 p.m. William  Carlos Williams a portrait by  Patrick Hynan of the American  poet.  Music from the Shows:     11:05  p.m. Mancini.  Sunday September 18  Voice of the Pioneer:   8:40 a.m;  Jake    McDonald   assesses    the  Scottish chiefs of today.  ^Px  The advertisers on these pages  are members of :  GIBSONS HARBOUR  BUSINESS ASSOCIATION  jfllfifc      REAL ESTATE  *  INSURANCE  FLORON  AGENCIES LTD  Box 238  1589 Marine Drive  Gibsons,  9S  RON MCSAVANEY  AGENT  885-3339  OFFICE: 886-2248  JOHN BLACK  886-7316  *   Crafts & Hobbies  Enter Our  MODEL CONTEST  Contest open to ages  16 and under  Closing Date: Sept. 17th  For further information on the  Contest and also on the upcoming Crafts Drop-In Centre,  call:     886-2811  $25.00  first prize!  ��  Gilmour's Albums: 12:05 p.m.  Mozart, Lehar, Bach, Handel,  Gilbert and Sullivan.  Music Maker's: 4:05 p.m. Andrew Marshall in conversation  with Richard Rodney Bennett.  Special Occasion: 5:05 p.m. An  evening with Dinah Christie and  Tom Kneebone.  Sunday Pops Concert:  7:05 p.m.  Repeat of concerts recently telecast on CBC-TV, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Gwenlynn Little  soprano; Arthur Ozolins,.piano.  Monday September 19  Crime Serial: 2:04 p.m. Inspector  West at Bay by John Creasey.  Pick of the Goons:    8:04 p.m.  Round the World in Eighty Days.  Gold  Rush:      8:30  p.m.      Joe  Mendelssohn. The Crusaders.  Mostly Music:    10:20 p.m. CBC  Vancouver Chamber  Orchestra,  Spohr, Mendelssohn.  Nightcap: 11:20 p.m. Swiss born  actress Marthe Keller.  Tuesday September 20  My Word: 2:04 p.m. BBC quiz.  Frank Muir:   8:04 p.m. A comic  look at fear.  Touch the Earth:   8:30 p.m. Tim  Williams, Luckenbach, Texas.  Mostly Music:   10;20 p.m.   The  York Winds.  Nightcaps: 11:20 p.m. Roy  Slade discusses conflict between  classical and modern art.  Nutrition  QUESTION:     Are  old  or   new  potatoes the best buy?  ANSWER:       Considering   cost,  old   potatoes   are   generally   a  better buy than new ones.   The  exception would be  during the  summer when tiew potatoes are  widely available.  The Vitamin C  content   of   potatoes   decreases  during storage.     Potatoes used  after they are recently dug have  26 milligrams Vitamin C per cup.  After three months storage the  Vitamin C content drops to 12  milligrams per cup and after six  months to 8 milligrams per cup.  QUESTION:   Is rapeseed oil one  of the vegetable oils recommended for people who have heart  conditions and must reduce the  animal fat content of their diets?  ANSWER:    The vegetable oils  recommended   for   such    diets  are ones which contain a high  content  of  a   substance   called  linoleic acid.   Rapeseed oil does  not fit into this_ category.    Saf-.  ^flower,  sunflower and' corn  oil?  are the ones to use;  QUESTION:     Why  does   dried  fruit   appear   to   contain   more  iron than the original fresh fruit?  ANSWER: In the drying process  most of the water has been removed,   therefore,   dried   fruit  weighs   less   than   fresh   fruit.  For an example, two medium raw  apricots weigh approximately 100  grams while it takes about  17  large dried apricot halves to yield  the same weight.   With the removal   of water,   the   nutrients,  become more concentrated.   Because   nutrients   are   stated   by  weight of food,  the more  concentrated   dried   fruits   actually  contain more iron.     Using the  apricot example again, 100 grams  of   fresh   apricots   contain   0.5  milligrams   of   iron   while    100  milligrams of dried apricots contain 5.5 milligrams of iron.  QUESTION:    What is the best  method for storing fresh parsley?  ANSWER: Wash, trim and drain  the parsley.   Then refrigerate it  in a tightly closed plastic bag  or glass jar with a paper towel  to absorb excess moisture.   The  parsley will remain fresh for up  WT155  ,   15.2 cu. ft. frost-free  146 Ib. frozen food capacity  ONLY   $570.00  Introducing  our  new line of  WHITE -  WESTINGHOUSE  refrigerators  Whlte-Westinghouse offers big  capacity good looks, efficient operation...completely frost-free!  Spacious food storage capacity for  any size family's1 needs all wrapped  up in smart looking, attractive  styled cabinets. From the superbly  - styled walnut grained door handles  to the perfect combination of interior  colour accents, these White-West-  inghouse refrigerators offer you our  best value.  ALSO   Ranges,   Washers  &   Dryers,   Dishwashers,  and  Deep Freezers  PAJAK    Electronics CovLtd.  Seaside Plaza, Gower Pt. Rd. Gibsons 886-7333  Wildlife  corner  by Ian Corrance  Dorothy Wright of Roberts  Creek designed her home specifically to give her. a view from  the living window of an old fallen  tree which is centre stage for a  variety of forest dramas.  I was invited to share the view  one afternoon and it was like  watching live television.  There are a couple of regular  raucous visitors, two stellar jays  who will just about feed out of  hand. Nuts were set out on  the various stumps and we sat  down with a pot of coffee to  watch the show.  The two jays had to be full,  but they kept on eating until  their crops looked like double  chins. Pretty soon a squirrel  joined in, his favourite eating  placed seemed to be the old  fallen log, which he took ownership of and chased away the jays  when they came too close. It  didn't do much good because  they would dive bomb as soon as  his back was turned. This  carried on for quite a while,  the chases never did get too  serious as everyone was getting  more than enough to eat. Suddenly I saw what I thought for  a second was a racoon sneaking  up on the feeding animals, it  turned out to be a relative's gray  cat. Dorothy was up and out the  door hollering and scattering  the animals in all directions.  The wild visitors came back after  a few minutes, but the cat took  off, indignant that some human  had cheated it out of dinner,  not realizing how close it had  come to being crab bait itself.  Dorothy told me about the time  two hawks came down after the  jays,,at.first there were only a  couple of jays, but after the  hawks showed up, six more  appeared around the house,  possibly feeling safer there. One  of the hawks sat in the alders just  a few feet away from the window,  the jays were around in the  branches complaining bitterly.  One attempt was made by the  hunter, it didn't catch anything  but did knock one of the jays to  the ground. After the lack of  success the two preditors took off  to the orchard and greener  pastures.  Has anyone heard of blue jays  in this area? According to the  book they don't get this far west,  but Dorothy is positive she saw  six of them a while back. Another  strange one was sighted by her  last Saturday, it looked like a  yellow-billed sapsucker, but the  head was completely red. Before you say "Ah Ha, that's the  same bird, but the red race we  get around here," in flight this  one had quite distinct bars running across its back and not the  two white patches. Maybe it is  the red race going through some  type of plumage change, does  anyone know?  On Saturday I saw a brewer's  blackbird hopping around the  streets of Gibsons, what a fine  change from all those starlings.  The week before last John  Hindsmith told me he had seen  two flocks of geese flying south,  it seems to be a bit early for  them. There's an old wives  tale (many of which shouldn't  be discounted) about how the  hummingbirds fly south. They  wait for a flock of geese to go  over, fly up, nestle in the feathers  and hitch a ride. I have one  friend who swears he's seen it  happen. Well it could be that  with the rotten weather we had  when I decided to take my holidays last fortnight, the hummingbirds figured that the summer  was oyer and ordered their  flights early.  If you have anything of interest  and want to contact me, call  886-7817.  Freethinker's Pulpit  by Andy Randall  The following comments could  very well be my own to every  detail, but they come from a  famous minister, and prolific  author of books on the matters of  freethought, and other subjects.  Leslie D. Weatherhead, writes:  'I am an angry old man, and I  feel I must get the fire out of my  bones. In my retirement I have  had more time to listen, to study  and to meditate. I have visited  churches of every demonimation  and have talked with men and  women who belong to them. I  have also talked with those who  have no use for the churches,  and I am sad and angry at the  same time. I believe passionately  that Christianity is a way of life,  not a theological system with  which one must be in intellectual  agreement.'    He puts it better  than   I   could   have   done,   but  those are my sentiments too.  There are 23 years left to go  in the 2,000 year period of history of human experience since  an unknown child was born in  obscure, or lowly circumstances,  that is according to your belief.  Surely, there are enough people,  who, thinking along the lines of  the above quoted material, can  bring about a new tradition that,  'Christianity is a way of life' and  thought based on writings of the  life and teachings of its founder  by those who knew Him best.  Only then could we rid ourselves of many 'authoritative'  deliberations of the Pauline doctrines that might have been best  left as he intended, simply as  guidelines to erring, or struggling  church groups in his missionary  scope of travel and work.    Only  rNOWi  IS THE TIME  TO SPRUCE UP  YOUR FALL WARDROBE  Place Quality in the Hands  of the Experts  at  Peninsula Cleaners  & Laundry  DRVCLEnniHG  service  ALTERATIONS & REPAIRS  With 2 locations to serve you best  WHARF ROAD       1521 GOWER PT. RD.  SECHELT GIBSONS, B.C.  885-9554 886-2200  then could we also rid from us  the tortuous and dreary theologies that empty  more churches  than  fill  them.     Christianity  a  way of life.  So simple a concept,  yet it has evaded the minds of  most, except perhaps those but-  side who could in plain fact come  to no other.    For no other concept was left to them.   It is like  the story of the little girl in the  tale of the simple-minded king  who thought he had a beautiful  array   of fancy-tailored   clothes.  No one dared tell him he was as  naked as the day he was born,  until the wee lass shouted, "He's  wearing no clothes!"  I started with one person's  declared convictions, here are  the words of a famous psychologist: 'Not only do I leave the  door open for the Christian  message, but I consider it of  central importance for Western  Man (and Woman). It needs  however to be seen in a new  light, in accordance with the  changes wrought by the contemporary spirit. Otherwise, it  stands apart from the times and  has  no effect on  man's whole  ness.  Vnvittp  Jfoobs;  OELI  and  HEALTH FOODS  m  smile!  We are now your  New Harbour  Williams Photo  Finishing Centre!  In Beautiful  Gibsons Harbour  one block from  Government Wharf  886-2936  >< Profiles of this place  rby Carolynn Blchler  IMRS. CLARICE CLARKSON  * On Pratt Road there is a small  Chouse with the most lovely  "English garden, poppies, tulips,  pnasturtiums, polyanthus, and all  ��sorts of wonderful; exotic plants  .fill every nook and cranny. Mrs.  ^Clarkson's garden should be declared , a point of interest along  ?the Sunshine Coast. It is a super  ' garden to walk through especially  pwhen Mrs. Clarkson takes you on  '. the tour, she knows the botanical  7as well as the common name for  peach plant.  j A lovely proper little English  ;lady, Mrs. Clarice Clarkson was  born on July 24, 1885, in a place  called   Walsall   Staff,   England.  Mrs. Clarkson has been living in  r Gibsons since 1924. It is a treat  7 to sit and have her tell of her  " special adventures in a world of  bygone times.     Mrs.  Clarkson  son saw some of the first movies  ever produced which then were  strange new inventions.  While in New York Clarice  went to Long Island beach. In  those days you wore a swimming  costume which came down to  just above your knees. She put  on her suit and prepared to go  swimming which she had done  many times in England. Clarice  noticed people were looking at  her but she felt that everything  was proper. When she came out  of the water an irate woman with  a bunch of keys, the attendant of  the dressing booths, told her,  "Don't you dare show yourself  again." You see, Clarice had  not worn stockings which were  the proper attire on New York  beaches, and her legs from the  knee down were bare.  After travelling abroad Clarice  returned home to England.  Clarice helped shop and design  dresses for her mother's dress-  is an excellent story teller, and  well worth listening to.  Monty is Mrs. Clarkson's constant companion, he's an 18 year  old American Cocker Spaniel,  who was given to her as a puppy  ' by her husband. She and Monty  are old friends.  Now for some history. Mrs.  Clarkson has always been a busy  person. When she was sixteen  she wet; 'viillinery school to  learn to make hats. She would  study and copy the French  fashions.  At about twenty-two young  Clarice travelled to New York  City by herself and was introduced to an elderly lady who  needed a travelling companion.  She spent the next year in the  United States staying in fine  hotels in places like Washington D.C., the State of Virginia,  and New York. Mrs. Clarkson is  the type of person who enjoys  meeting-and talking to people.  Travelling was exciting to her,  she saw all the historical sights.  One thing that she noticed about  New York City was that everyone  seemed to be chewing gum. She  felt that New York was a restless  city, not at all peaceful. Remember that this was about 1913,  the world was quite different  then.  In New York City Mrs. Clark-  making business.  At twenty-eight Mrs. Clarkson  came to Canada to visit her sister  in Alberta. She crossed the  country by train. She stopped off  at a place called Rocky Mountain  House Hotel, it was 25$ for a  complete meal.  A cart drawn by two horses  picked Clarice up and she rode  with her sister to the homestead.  Along the twenty-two mile route  there was a hailstorm, and they  had to get under the cart to protect themselves. To pass the time  Mrs. Clarkson told her sister of  her adventures since they had  ALL SPORTSI  Marine  Inc.  last seen eachiOther.  On the prairie Clarice met a  young man, Robert Clarkson,  who had come from Norfolk  England, and was homesteading  in Alberta. He asked her to become his wife; they were married  in 1918. Robert and Clarice had  to drive 12 miles to the church,  and then 12 miles home, no  cars, just horses and buggies.  They lived in a small log house  which' belonged to Robert, it  had no conveniences. Mrs.  Clarkson, did a lot of canning.  They had cows, chickens, a pig,  four horses, and pet lambs.  Homesteading is a hard, life;  the people on the prairie had to  make their own fun. In the  winter they had dances. Square  dancing was popular, and they  waltzed of course. In the summer  it was picnicking, and catching  fish.  Mrs. Clarkson mentioned that  she feels the art of conversation  has been lost because people  today have so many ways of being  entertained that they don't make  an effort to be entertaining or  interesting in what they say to  each other.  When the Clarkson's moved to  Gibsons in April 1924, they came  to the eight acres on Pratt Road  where Mrs. Clarkson resides.  There was no electricity or water.  In order to get to Gibsons'they  had to take a Union Steamship'  which left Vancouver at 9:00  -a.m. and arrived in Gibsons at  4:00 p.m. There were no taxis,  but a neighbour met them with  a horse and cart.  Over the hill from Pratt Road  were many, shacks which belonged to summer residences.  There were lots of people who  lived in Vancouver in the winter  and summered in Gibsons.  About ten local families including the Clarksons got together and started a vegetable  co-op, they grew vegetables and  sold them to the campers. The  Clarksons grew fruits and vegetables, and raised goats and  chickens on their property.  The house that Mrs. Clarkson  lives in has been added on to,  but it does have the original four  rooms that were their first home.  ' For  several   years   the   local  Gibsonites had a cannery,  and  Robert and Clarice both worked.  7?,cy> Mrs.   Clarkson   worked   several  s"^*    days a week for half the  day  weighing the fruit that came to  be canned,  she made 25$ per  hour.   The cannery made raspberry,   loganberry,    plum    and  blackberry jam.    Mrs. Clarkson  grew    raspberries    where    her  garden is now.    She also grew  field potatoes.     Everyone grew  plants for, and worked  in  the  cannery,    it   was   another   cooperative effort.  Unfortunately Mrs. Clarkson  developed cataracts on her eyes,  and at 70 had one eye operated  on, a very unpleasant experience.  Her sight is poor, but she does  tend to her plant's and house by  herself; a wonderfully independent lady at 92. Mrs. Clarkson  is alone now, her husband passed  away ten years ago, but she and  Monty manage well tucked away  in their little house behind the  wooden fence which her husband  built years ago.  Can Canada set  arms example?  Coast News, September 13,1977.  ^������������������BHHBBBHBBBaBBBBBiHHnHHBBBBBI  n  From   the   United   Church   of  Canada  Canada is embarking on a  shopping spree for arms that  eventually will cost a total of  $8 billion. This figure includes  $2.5 billion for a new fleet of  fighter aircraft and a major ship  replacement program that will  cost about $3.5 billion. Other  more immediate spending plans  include procurement of tanks  and armored cars, military communications and artillery equipment.  By 1981, Canada will be spending $1.3 billion annually on  equipping its armed forces ���  almost three " times today's  figure of $450 million. Admittedly, the Canadian expenditure is  only a fraction of the $350 billion  being spent each year on military  costs by all ofthe world's nations.  This kind of global folly is no  excuse for needless spending by  the Canadian Armed Forces. If  only there could be agreement  among all nations ��� and particularly the great powers -��� then  the productive capacity that could  be released by a reduction of  military spending could help to  alleviate poverty at home and  abroad.  Military spending and military  commodities production are  among the least efficient means,  of creating employment, and as  a result actually create unemployment. Military commodities production is with every few exceptions highly capital intensive.  This is true particularly of the  aerospace industry. Therefore,  as capital is channelled into these  military industries, other sectors  of the economy that would be  more effective in creating jobs  are left short of capital financing.  Arms expenditures severely  reduce the resources available  for essential sectors and social  services. And they also cut the  money available to help developing countries. The total debt of  the developing world is now about  $200 billion. By next year, the  poorer countries will be paying  .*��� ��������-���..-.t- ^#-�� -.1,���Mj. -if,��� 9��� -fa ���J,--ii- -Jp "it- -_> -_r nfr  Mb* Bee would be grateful again  this year for some Oyster Shells.  Thank you.    Miss Bee's, Sechelt  ^^^ik^ife^^^lv ^^tik^il^ ^M0 ^t& ^^#%l# ^_m__?  a year in interest to  nations.       Clearly,  $13 billion  the   richer  their need for more assistance  including grants and concessionary loans ��� is great. Although  Canada is only 22nd in the world  in per capita military spending  ($130 per person per year),  should we not be cutting our arms  costs even further in an effort  to give more help to poorer  countries ��� and as an example  to other rich nations?  CLASSIFIED NOTE  Drop off your Coast News  Classifieds at Campbell's Family  Shoes & Leather Goods in downtown Sechelt. It's convenient!  m  Your Co-op has  more to offer.  HAIR CARE  FOR THE  WHOLE FAMILY  DILL & SHIRLEY  SEASIDE PLAZA  886-2120  886-9303  Co-op  Margarine  1 lb.  47  On the Beautiful Sunshine Coast at Gower Point  ��� Guestfooms (Breakfast Included)  ��� Dining Room    886-9033     SXnBSSBrberB  Bicks  Polish Dills  87c  32fl.oz.  TOMATO JUICE  J| 48f!.oz.  79  Co-op Unsweetened  GRAPEFRUIT JUICE  69c  48floz.  Co-op Fancy  ASPARAGUS TIPS  79��  Co-op  ANGEL FOOD  CAKE MIX  �������������������������  Co-op  CHEESE SLICES  420 gr.  89  �����������������������  Kraft  SANDWICH  SPREAD . ���  24fl.oz. 1.17  WEEKLY  8oz.  Heinz Strained  BABY FOOD  79  12fl.oz.  Co-op Stuffed  MANZANILLA  OLIVES  12fl.oz.  89c  ��������*������������������������  4V2 fI. oz.  5/97'  PRODUCE  SPECIALS  Weston's  WAGON WHEELS  12*s  89  Kleenex  FACIAL TISSUE  2oo's Da  Bananas  5.bs/$1.00  Lettuce      2hea_s/49c  Broccoli   3 bs 7$ 1.00  Windex  WINDOW  CLEANER  20fI. 02.  99  Javex  BLEACH  64fl.oz.  68c  ���  Co-op  : Choice  ���  j Strawberries  FAMILY SIZED SAVINGS  CM FROZEN FOODS  ������rmnTnui  ���ninmrrr  Co-op  2 lb.  1.89  >������������������  McCain's  19 oz.  Chips  &  Fish  24 oz.  1.29  ! Chocolate  jcake   *1.29  CO-OP  Prices Effective:  Thur., Fri., Sat.  September 15,16,17.  We reserve the right to limit quantities.  886-2522 8.  Coast News, September 13,1977.  Ministry of Transport consulted  The following is a transcript  of a conversation which took place  on Friday afternoon of last week  between Sechelt Village Clerk  Tom Wood and George Dungee  of the Ministry of Transport.  The Coast News reporter was  permitted to listen on the extension telephone in the interest  of full and open public information    on    the    controversial  issue.  n>  TRAVEL TALK  n  BEN SIMEN-FALVY  MEXICO CITY  Anywhere you go in Mexico,  you will see little road markers  each bearing a number and  nothing else. They indicate  the number of miles you are  from Mexico City, the heart of  Mexico. It is the country's  true centre, politically, culturally and emotionally. What  most people don't realize until  they have been there, is that  Mexico City is not only the  oldest city in the Western  Hemisphere, but one of the  biggest in the world.  It is this combination of age  and size that makes it such a  fascinating' place.     You  can  step   into   the   street   from  the most luxurious of modern  hotels and in five minutes be  in a quarter of the city where  most   of   the   buildings   are  hundreds of years old.    You  can spend the morning shopping  at  a department  store  the equal of anything in New  York,   London  or   Paris   and  later in the day visit a street  market    where    goods    are  brought in by man on burro  and sold in the same way they  have since before the Spanish  came to conquer in the 16th  century.  For $289.00 you" can  see    Mexico    City,     Puerto  Vallarta, Guadalajara, Mazat-  lan,   Los   Angeles   and   San  Francisco.  CONTINENTAL  TRAVEL  Trail Bay Mall, P.O. Box  1040,     Sechelt,      B.C.  I Phone your local travel i  igent at 885-3277.  Wood: Who has jurisdiction  over'this matter?  Dungee: It is a public airport.  Unless there is a proven hazard  no one can be refused use of it.  Planes must be 1,000 feet over  built up areas and it is unlawful  to harm anyone on the ground.  I was up there on Thursday  talking to Mrs. Fitzgerald. I  looked at the traffic pattern.  The noise complaints should be  no problem if minimum height  procedures are followed. The  right hand circuit could be bad.  There could be the need for  education there. . If the flight  path is over a populated area  then common sense is needed.  On take-offs and landings the  1,000 feet height restriction is  waived. I can't remember a  built-up area and I've flown in  there often.      *  Wood: It's to the south east  ofthe airport, about five miles.  Dungee: If the population is  five miles away planes should be  at 1,000 feet before going over it.  Wood: One problem is with  students doing power climbs and  touch and go's.  Dungee: We have taken noise  readings. A truck would make as  much noise. The difference is  that the plane's noise repeats.  Wood: Who has the authority  over the airport? The people  want the club  to accept it for  ���Phon  |ggen  :ravei|  UniseX  Sunnycrest Centre  HAIR CARE FOR  THE ENTIRE  FAMILY  Monday - Saturday  Eve Schilling  Jean Braun  Jerry Dixon  WALK IN'S  WELCOME!  QUALITY REDKEN  PRODUCTS  AVAILABLE  regulating plane height and feel  we should not sign a lease until  this is included.  Dungee: I would agree to that  stipulation. You can't guarantee  that everyone will comply. You  can train, but not guarantee.  It is impossible to legislate.  There would need to be a safety  officer at the flying club or something. At five miles it is bad airmanship if you are too low over  built-up areas. We can put up  notices at the airport but since  Vancouver and Pit Meadows are  so busy people fly up here and  you can't control airspace. Not  even the Ministry of Transport  can do this. Like water, airspace  is a God-given right.  As I said, except for landing or  take-off you must be 1,000 feet  over a built-up area. It is practically impossible to measure this.  Everybody's idea of height will  vary. We have some cases come  up and heights vary from fifty  to 1,000 feet. Can this wait till  Monday and I'll talk to the  Superintendent?  Wood: Good! Now if the space  is leased to the club the group  want the club to be responsible -  to assist in maintenance. They  want specifics.  Dungee: Minor maintenance is  normal, for example oil spots on  the runway and that type of thing.  Anything major, like trees blown  down or worse is the responsibility of the Ministry of Transport.  Wood: What about noise?  Dungee: You could ask the club  to police it, that would be best.  It's not that bad, really. They  can't control everyone coming in.  We could assist with notices to  maintain traffic patterns.  Wood: The name of the group is  C.A.R.E.     Have  they  been  in  touch with you?  Dungee: Is Jack Pope with them?  Wood: Yes.  Dungee: He has been in contact  with Gerry King.  They probably  have a valid point.  At the close of the conversation  Dungee said he would get back  to Wood on Monday after he had  had a chance to talk to his Superintendent.  Flight  report  ��� Continued from Page One  This would be a good beginning,  there are strong minded people  in both camps, and a little respect  for the other sides point of view  might be necessary. While in  the Areo Club I met a gentleman who, within two minutes,  had me feeling angry enough to  vote against' anything he proposed without even bothering  to find out what it was aboufc  This aggresive attitude will only  do harm if continued.  As mentioned previously, on  take off we did a 45 degree turn  inland, enabling us to easily  reach the required height over  built up areas. This may not  be possible on every occasion,  but it certainly would make life  easier for the people on the  ground whenever it could be  done. .,.;.  There must be many other  examples like this, and only  communication between the two  groups will bring them to light.  An understanding of each other's  situation is half way on the road  to solving the problem.  *"LX'X '' \ -7   .* ���%' 77-' "  Madeira Park Elementary School teacher Cindy  Cameron is shown teaching her youngsters how  Sechelt council meeting  to play baseball. Corey Howard is at the bat with  Dougie Silvey pitching.   A Fat Tripp Photograph  -A-Continued from Page One  the feeling of people in Squamish  and Pemberton, that they were  being denied adequate public  health, a similar situation to that  of the Sunshine Coast. The  present public nurse has been on  sick leave for two years and a  replacement has not been appointed.  Acting-Mayor Morgan Thompson asked why there was a need  for a second unit in Westview,  to which Alderman Kolibas  replied, "This is what the other  communities are wondering  about, since Lions Gate Hospital  is outside the Coast Garibaldi  area and not available to either  Squamish or Pemberton."  Teddy Brackett had worked  with Mr. Fawkes in the village  this summer. I was reported that  he had done a good job and it  was recommended that a letter  Sears  GIBSONS  NEW HOURS  FOR CUSTOMER'S  MONDAYS  9:30 - 5:30  886-2237  CONVENIENCE  OPEN 6 DAYS  A WEEK!  THIS WEEKEND  be sent to him thanking him for  his efforts.  Council had been in touch with  Tucker Forsythe regarding the  installation of sidewalks on Cowrie Street. It was recommended  that at the same time a curb and  gutter should be installed as it  would be cheaper to do it now,  while construction was in progress, than -to wait till a later  date. The    recommendation  was carried.    The cost will be  five to six thousand dollars.  The village clerk Mr. Wood  was instructed to arrange a  special meeting with Mr. Roy and  possibly the Regional District  planner to discuss zoning bylaws. Included in this would be  the proposals put forward by Mr.  Killam.  The UBCM convention coincides with the scheduled next  general meeting and, as there  could be a problem getting a  quarum, it was decided to cancel  the September 21st meeting. In  case of emergency a special  meeting could be arranged on  an alternative date.  We will be OpOll  for lunch  HOURS:  Tues. to Thurs.  11:00a.m. -9:00p.m.  Fri. & Sat.  11:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m.  Sunday  4:00 p.m. ��� 9:00 p.m.  Closed Mondays & Holidays  Sechelt  winner  Henry Christensen came to  Sechelt several years ago with a  suitcase and no job. Today he  and his wife Louise are quarter-  millionairs.  How did it happen? Suddenly.  Louise bought ticket number  1470114 in the Provincial lottery,  and won $250,000.  Henry is a mechanic at the  bus depot, a job he plans to  continue. His employer phoned  Toronto for him as soon as the  hews was broken, he was put in  touch with Brill Weiseman in  Winnipeg, who arranged for an  examiner to come over to Sechelt  from Victoria.  The examiner gave the ticket  a thorough going over, he came  complete with jewelers eyepiece,  and equipment, necessary, to run  an acid test, it turned out to  be a lenghty process.  Neither Henry or Louise have  any definite plans about what  they   will   do   with   their   new  wealth. They both intend to continue working, with one difference, they will now have a nice  piece of security behind them. "'"*  , Congratulations to you both.  PINK  M. V. TITANIUM  FRESH FROZEN  ATSEA  Processed  the day  they are caught  Pictured above is the executive of the Sechelt  Teachers Association for 1977-78. Back row left  to right is Mike Simkins, Mike Lynch, Leif Mja  nnes, Ron Breadner, Frank Fuller, Paul Lavigne,  v TRAVEL^**  Conveniently located in the new  Gibsons Mall  Invites You to:  HAWAII  Lottie Campbell, Roger Douglas, and Isla Nicholson. Middle row Bruno Dombrowski, Jody Pilling, Sheila Page, Joan Robb, Pres. Doris Fuller,  Cheryl Douglas, and Gwen Boyte. Seated in  front are past-President George Matthews and  Becky Mills. Not shown are Dave Reese from  Pender Harbour and Geographic Representative  Geoffrey Madoc-Jones.  LUNCH MENU  Sandwiches  Hamburgen  Fish ft Chips  Home-made Soup  <#���<.  r  Dressed- Head Off  *  per pound      1.40  ; FOR SALE AT GIBSONS WHARF  . SEPTEMBER 16th, 17th. & 18th  To place orders ahead of time phone  886-2574  y7vi?rW//7_?  HWMUl. fit MtVMrKSSMOMI IP \<I\K  Already sold out for December  Departing Jan. 7th & 14th for 14 nights  OAHU ��� one island holiday $469.00  OAHU & MAUI ��� two island holiday  7 nights on each $539.00  ^        "ONE CALL DOES IT ALL" _  $ 886-9255   $  Pasley  886-9984  or  evenings  YOStfi'S  RESTAURANT  Sunnycrest Shopping Plaza  Gibsons 886-8015  DINE IN OR TAKE OUT  .TV  HARVEST  DANCE /f(  Dance to  SPICE"  Elly  885-3300  OCTOBER 1st .  Limited Tickets  Available for members & guests  From: / 886-8181  886-2109 885-3258 Coast News, September 13,1977.  COAST NEWS   CLASSIFIED ADS  SMf f ViV��  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE  NOON SATURDAY  CLASSIFIED RATES &  INFORMATION:  All listings 50c per line per week.  Or use the Economical 4 for 3 rate  4 weeks for the price of 3  Minimum $2.00 per Insertion.  All fees payable prior to Insertion.  * In the event of an error the  publisher shall be responsible for  one corrected insertion only.  **************************  *  *  *  *  t  Here! Hew!  Our  Classified  Ad Policy  i  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  i  ��  *  *  *  NO REFUNDS  **************************  These Classifications will remain free  ��� Coming Events  -Lost  This offer is made available for private individuals.  *******************************************  Print your ad in the squares Including the price of the item and your telephone number. Be sure to leave a blank space after each word.  No phone orders Please. Just mall in the coupon below accompanied by cash, cheque  or money order, to Coast News, Classifieds, Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1VO, or  bring in person to the Coast News office, Gibsons  DROP OFF POINT: Campbell's Shoes and Leather Goods Store, Sechelt.  Coast News  Classifieds  Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.  VON 1VO  CLASSIFICATION:  Eg. For Sale, For Rent, etc.  r "'                       1111  ~ "  1   x   _  ,  r , ���  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE SATURDAY NOON  Coming  Ev-nts  Sat. September 24th, the Elves  Club annual general meeting will  be held at the home of Mr. and  Mrs. D. Konrad, No. 9, Sundance  Trailer Court, at 8:00 p.m.  General discussion and an election of officers will take place.  Refreshments will be served.  For info: 885-2438.  JACK & JILL CHILD MINDING  Centre: General Meeting, Sept.  20th, 7:30 p.m. at the Gibsons-  Health Unit. Places available  for 4 year olds NOW. Phone  Joyce: 886-2826.  FIGURE SKATING  Registration and general meeting  will be held Sept. 19th at 7:30  in the Sechelt Arena. Registration will be taken. Further regis-_  tration times will be Gibsons Mall  Sept. 19, 21, 23, 10:00 a.m. -  2:30 p.m. Friday evening 7:00 -  8:30. Sechelt Mall Sept. 20, 22,  24, 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Friday  eves. 7:00-8:30 p.m.  MINOR HOCKEY  Registration, Sat. Sept. 17th,  10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Pender -  Madeira Park Shopping Centre,  Sechelt ��� Trail Bay Mall, Gibsons-  Sunnycrest Mall. Pups, Tykes,  Peewees, Bantams & Midgets  $44.00, Juveniles $45.00. Wire  cages on helmets are mandatory  this year. There will be a draft,  system to determine teams.  GLAD TIDINGS  October 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and  Sunday 9th Special 17th Anniversary Thanksgiving Services at;  Glad Tidings Tabernacle, Gibsons. Guest speakers: Pastor  Linnis Perry, Tacoma, Washing?.:'  ton, and Sunday 9th, Pastor  Maureen Gaglardi, Vancouver.  Phone:886-2660. \      7!  Golf Club Bridge  Round   Robin   type   of  Rubber  Bridge will be played at the Golf  Club from  8:00 p.m.  to   10:30.  on alternate Thursdays,  begin-17  ning   September   29th.      Cost: *���.  $10.00 a partnership and players   :  Coming  Events  Announcements    Work Wanted     Work Wanted  must be willing to attend every  session or provide substitutes.  To enter or for further info  phone L. P. Todd at 885-3949  by September 22nd.  Egmont Community Club, tea  and bake sale in Egmont Hall,  1:30,   Wednesday   the   14th  #37  Jack & Jill Child Minding Co-op  Dance, Oct. 15th, Music by  "Spice". Tickets on sale soon,  watch for them.  GUIDES & BROWNIES  Registration for Gibsons Guides  and Brownies will be Monday,  Sept. 12th at 7:30 p.m. in the  Gibsons United Church Hall.  Brownies 7 yrs. & up, Guides  10 yrs. & up. 886-7714. #37  POWER SQUADRON  Bask Boating Course  For information phone: 886-7714  or 883-2649. #37  TOPS 1147 meet Wednesday,  7:30 p.m. at the Garibaldi Health  Clinic, downstairs. New mem-  bers welcome. #37  DUPLICATE BRIDGE  September 20th, Golf course.  7:30 p.m. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays  monthly. Everyone welcome.  For more information please  call 886-2575. #37  Announcements  ROBERTS CREEK LEGION  .Opens at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday!  Early bird  bingo  7:00,  regular  8:00 p.m. Everybody welcome!  The family of Jim Higgs wish  to thank and show our deep  appreciation to our many friends'  'who have supported us on the  loss of our son and brother.  Special thanks to the hospital  , staff and emergency vehicles  who did everything in their power  to save our son's life.  Leonard, Rita & Louise,  Judy & Kerry Eldred,  Bill & Joyce Higgs.  INMEMORIAM  Jones - A. Craig.  In loving memory of a dear son  and brother who passed away  September 3, 1973.  Today and tomorrow  We will always remember.  Mum &Dad, Howie, Bud,  Norm, Lome and Cyndie  CARDS OF THANKS  I wish to thank my friends and  neighbours for the sympathy and  kindness extended during my  recent bereavement, also the  staff at St. Mary's Hospital.  God bless you all.  Florence Kirkham  ATTENTION!  New residents to the Sunshine  Coast: Your Welcome Wagon  hostess is here to help you.  Phone: Irene Bushfield 886-9567  or Beryl Sheridan 885-9568.     ^38  For explosive requirements -  dynamite, electric or regular  caps, B line E cord and safety  fuse, contact R. Nlmmo, Cemetery Road, Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound Farmers  Institute.  I would like to thank my many  friends and customers for their  help, kindness and lovely gifts  presented to me on my opening  day at the Dogwood Cafe.  Sincerely,  Beth Hawken  Work Wanted  CHIMNEYSWEEP  Stove * Furnace * Fireplace  Thoro Cleaning - Easy Rates  Now is the time!  886-7273 #38  Will do odd jobs, any area.  Have truck, tools & ability.  Call 886-7917. #38  CARPENTER  With 20 years experience available for small jobs in Roberts  Creek & Gibsons area. Gordon  Lindsay. 886-2332. #39  f "w SER VI CeT "*  " HUGH'S i  PAINTING!  &      1  WINDOW !  cleaning;  Call    <��Jk       I  886-7060|fy/ ���  I  I  I  I  Free Estimates    |  Randy's Garden Service  Complete garden services - now  is the time to think about fall  pruning - ornamentals and fruit  trees. Complete tree maintenance. 885-3727. #40  2 boys aged 15 and 13 will do  baby sitting, lawn cutting and  odd jobs during evenings and  weekends. 886-7148. #37  CREATIVE ORGANIC  LANDSCAPING  ENHANCE & BEAUTIFY  YOUR SURROUNDINGS  NATURALLY  For Free Estimate  Call 886-7785  HIGH FUEL COSTS  Peerless Tree Services Ltd. will  turn your problem trees into firewood. $18.00 per cord. We do  danger tree falling, topping and  limbing too. Expert insured work  'Know the cost before you start'  'Know the cost before you start'  Call us at 885-2109. Free estimates. John Risbey.  1 TON TRUCK FOR HIRE  Light Moving & Hauling  Gardening & Light Landscaping  After 6 p.m. call 886-9294.  Fast, Clean, Efficient  CHIMNEY CLEANING  Vacuum equipped. 886-7785.  tfn  Will babysit children 2 and older.  Playmate for my 2 yr. old child.  886-7671. #37  * CAT-BACKHOE *  GRAVEL TRUCK AVAILABLE  Land clearing, Septic systems  886-9633 886-9365.  Bob Kelly Clean Up L��d.  A load on this truck  is a load off your mind!  886-9433 tfn  CREATIVE LANDSCAPING  Enhance and Beautify your  surroundings* with creative,  landscaping. By appointment  only: 886-7785 tfn  TELEPHONE  ANSWERING  SERVICE  886-7311  Wanted  LOGS WANTED  Top Prices Paid for  Fir-Hemlock-Cedar  LltK LUMBER  (North Shore) Ltd.  Phone 886-7033  Sorting grounds, Twin Creeks  HT  * WANTED ���  Person for  Commercial Sewing  full or part-time  for ATTIC ANTIQUES  886-2316 or 886-9976  Sunshine Coast Business Directory  r*mWjrAr_r_rAr_r AUTOMOTIVE   -Tjr^JT-Tjr^-r-r  r  JAMIESON  AUTOMOTIVE  TOYOTA  New & Used Car Sales  All Make, Parts 81 Services  Gibsons AL JAMIESON Phone 886-7919  NEED TIRES?  Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  at Jhe S-BENDS on Highway 101  Phone 886-2700  -T_v_tat_t_T-T BUILDING SUPPLY\-TJT-VJKMMMW  ��urfit electric ttb.  ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING & CONTRACTING  Serving Sechelt, Gibsons, Roberts Creek & Madeira Park  885-3133  J. McKenzie Ron Blair, P. Eng.  Porpoise Bay Rd. P.O. Box 387 Sechelt   V0N3A0  r  Box 860  Gibsons  ��i  BE ELECTRIC ltd.  J  Phone  886-7605  RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL  Maintenance     Pole Line    Electronics  'POWER   TO    THE   PEOPLE" j  *MmW*jrjrjm-wjr-v ���  EXCAVATING    ^smwr^r  ATMMmmTMMMMlSC. SERVICES -9S_PS_PS#S#_#&#5#V  PENINSULA DRYWALL SERVICE  "The Dependability People" ���& Gyproc put up  Enquiries please phone 767 Insulation installed  after 6:00 p.m. Greg or Rick: 886-2706  P.M. GORDON  B.C. LAND SURVEYOR  P.O. Box.609  Sechelt, B.C.  Bus. 885-2332  Res. 886-7701  MACK'S NURSERY  SUNSHINE COAST HIGHWAY  Shrubs, Fruit Trees, Plants  Landscaping, Pruning Trees, Peat Moss & Fertilizer  Licensed for Pesticide Spraying   COAST PAVING  PAVING FROM DRIVEWAYS TO HIGHWAYS  Highways, Parking Areas, Driveways, Crushed Gravel  Equipment Rentals  Main Office: Box 96,  Powell River,    485-6118  Branch Office:        Sechelt, Ph. 885-2343 9:30 to 3:30 p.m.  r  TWIN CREEK LUMBER  & BUILDING SUPPLIES LTD  "\  V  Free Estimates  Everything for your building Needs  Phone 886-2291-2  CUSTOM BACKHOE WORK  SEPTIC TANKS INSTALLED  Government Approved  Free Estimates  Excavations - Drainage Waterlines. etc.  ^Ph. 885-2921 Roberts   Creek  A  A t the sign of  the  Chevron  HILL'S MACHINE SHOP  & Marine Service Ltd  Arc and Acty. Welding Machine Shop  Steel Fabricating Automotive - Marine Repair  Phone 886-7721 Marine Ways Res 886-9956  V.  ^  "Serving  Langdale  to Earls  Cove"  TAXI  mtiw  Fancy Panels, Insulation, Doors, Bifolds,  Construction Plywood, and all Accessories.  Delivery Phone 886-9221  Highway 101, Gibsons  r  r  CADRE CONSTRUCTION LTD.  - HOUSES BUILT TO COMPLETION -  Framing, remodelling, additions  V.    Payne Road Gibsons  886-2311  J.B. EXCAVATING 886-9031  Water, sewer, drainage installation  ��� Dump Truck ���  Backhoe  ��� Cat ��� Land Clearing ���w.  ��� Free Estimates ��� Septic Fields   -��--  L& H SWANSON Ltd.  Sand and Gravel  BACKHOES  Ditching - Excavations - Ready-Mix Concrete  885-9666 Porpoise Bay Road Box 172, Sechelt, B. C.  ^W.W. UPHOLSTERY & BOATTOPS LTD. A  i 7  Everything for your upholstery needs  FOAM ��� PLEXIGLASS SALES  886-7310 rix*H,LM.i,      -3       1779Wyngaert^  THOMAS HEATING  OIL BURNER SERVICE 7111  Complete Instrument OOU'/lll  BERNINA  SEWING MACHINES NOTIONS etc.  REPAIRS AND SERVICE TO ALL MAKES  SEWEASY  Cowrie St. Sechelt 885-2725  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon to Ole s Cove  885-9973  Commercial Containers available  886-2938  STAN HILSTAD   ROOFING  DUROID. SHAKES  OR REROOFING  Gibsons'. R.R. 1, Port Mellon Highway        Phone 886-2923  r  \m.  R & B BULLDOZING & BACKHOE  GRAVELTRUCK  Septic Systems   Land Clearing  886-9633 or 886-9365  >  KITCHEN  REMODELLING  CENTRE  KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS     ^  886-9411  DAY or EVENING  Showroom in the Twilight Theatre Bldg.  f ��� ��� ^  VIN YLDECK is the final deck  For maintenance free weatherproof attractive  sun decks and patios, call:  PACIFIC VINYLDECK     886-7259  PIANO & ORGAN LESSONS YOU ENJOY  Ages 3 to? 886-9030  .    B. C. Registered Music Teacher       children  D.J.ROY  SURVEYOR - ENGINEER  Marine Building Wharf Street  Box 609 885-2332 Sechelt, B. C  r  \^  Marv Volen  TREE TOPPING  VIEW DEVELOPMENTS LTD.  Clean up your wooded areas.  Remove lower limbs for VIEW  Top tall trees adjacacent to building  "N  886-959?  "\  N  OCEANS IDE FURNITURE  &CABINETSHOP  Custom Built Cablnetsand Fixtures -fr 30 Years Experience  Expert Finishing   -fr Kitchen Remodelling A Specialty  R. BIRKIN  885-3417 Beach   Ave.,   Roberts   Creek        885-3310  V.  r  >v  ANDREASSEN    ELECTRIC  (GIBSONS CO.) Serving the Sunshine Coast  ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR  Per Andreassen 886-9439  General Delivery Granthams Landing, B.C.  r  v.  RAY COATES PLUM BING  886-7695  Contract Renovations & Service Work  SEASIDE PLUMBING  PLUMBING -PIPEFITTING -STEAMFITTING  HOT WATER HEATING  886-7017  All Work Guaranteed  V  GUTTERS FREE ESTI MATES  , phone  CUSTOM CRAFT PRODUCTS  Commercial flflCOOQO Chapman Rd.  Residential ��K>-*5HW Sechelt  N  ^ MOVING AND STORAGE  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER Ltd.  Household Moving & Storage Complete Packing  Packing Materials for Sale  x^Phone 886-2664     Member Allied Van Lines     R.R. 1, Gibsons   , .   / JOHN HIND-SMITH <'  REFRIGERATION & MAJOR APPLIANCE SERVICE  Port Mellon to Pender Harbour          Res. 886-9949      ^  BILL BLACIO  ROOFING  __       Shingles, Shakes, Tar and Gravel  1^886-7320 Or 885-3320   Industrial & Residential     ^  r      UNIPLAST PRODUCTS LTD. 886-2318  WATERPROOFING SPECIALISTS  SUNDECKS, BALCONIES  C.H.M.CAppr.       &BOATDECKS Best Rates  iQuality Work For over IS years Free Estimates^ 8.  Coast News, September 13,1977.  Ministry of Transport consulted  The following is a transcript  of a conversation which took place  on Friday afternoon of last week  between Sechelt Village Clerk  Tom Wood and George Dungee  of the Ministry of Transport.  The Coast News reporter was  permitted to listen on the extension telephone in the interest  of full and open public information    on    the    controversial  issue.  n  TRAVEL TALK  n  BEN SIMEN-FALVY  MEXICO CITY  Anywhere you go in Mexico,  you will see little roadmarkers  each bearing a number and  nothing else. They indicate  the number of miles you are  from Mexico City, the heart of  Mexico. It is the country's  true centre, politically, culturally and emotionally. What  most people don't realize until  they have been there, is that  Mexico City is not only the  oldest city in the Western  Hemisphere, but one of the  biggest in the world.  It is this combination of age  and size that makes it such a  fascinating  place.     You  can  step   into   the   street   from  the most luxurious of modern  hotels and in five minutes be  in a quarter of the city where  most   of   the   buildings   are  hundreds of years old.    You  can spend the morning shopping  at  a  department  store  the equal of anything in New  York,   London  or   Paris  and  later in the day visit a street  market    where    goods    are  brought in by man on burro  and sold in the same way they  have since before the Spanish  came to conquer in the 16th  century.  For $289.00 you'can  see    Mexico    City,     Puerto  Vallarta, Guadalajara, Mazat-  lan,   Los   Angeles   and   San  Francisco.  CONTINENTAL  TRAVEL  Trail Bay Mall, P.O. Box  1040,     Sechelt,      B.C,  I Phone your local traveh  igent at 885-3277.  Wood: Who has jurisdiction  over this matter?  Dungee: It is a public airport.  Unless there is a proven hazard  no one can be refused use of it.  Planes must be 1,000 feet over  built up areas and it is unlawful  to harm anyone on the ground.  I was up there on Thursday  talking to Mrs. Fitzgerald. I  looked at the traffic pattern.  The noise complaints should be  no problem if minimum height  procedures are followed. The  right hand circuit could be bad.  There could be the need for  education there. . If the flight  path is over a populated area  then common sense is needed.  On take-offs and landings the  1,000 feet height restriction is  waived. I can't remember a  built-up area and I've flown in  there often.      *  Wood: It's to the south east  ofthe airport, about five miles.  Dungee: If the population is  five miles away planes should be  at 1,000 feet before going over it.  Wood: One problem is with  students doing power climbs and  touch and go's.  Dungee: We have taken noise  readings. A truck would make as  much noise. The difference is  that the plane's noise repeats.  Wood: Who has the authority  over the airport? The people  want the club to accept it for  ���Phdn  rajen  Z)  fJ's  UniseX  Sunnycrest Centre  HAIR CARE FOR  THE ENTIRE  FAMILY  Monday - Saturday  Eve Schilling  Jean Braun  Jerry Dixon  WALK IN'S  WELCOME!  QUALITY REDKEN  PRODUCTS  AVAILABLE  regulating plane height and feel  we should not sign a lease until  this is included.  Dungee: I would agree to that  stipulation. You can't guarantee  that everyone will comply. You  can train, but not guarantee.  It is impossible to legislate.  There would need to be a safety  officer at the flying club or something. At five miles it is bad airmanship if you are too low over  built-up areas. We can put up  notices at the airport but since  Vancouver and Pit Meadows are  so busy people fly up here and  you can't control airspace. Not  even the Ministry of Transport  can do this. Like water, airspace  is a God-given right.  As I said, except for landing or  take-off you must be 1,000 feet  over a built-up area. It is practically impossible to measure this.  Everybody's idea of height will  vary. We have some cases come  up and heights vary from fifty  to 1,000 feet. Can this wait till  Monday and I'll talk to the  Superintendent?  Wood: Good! Now if the space  is leased to the club the group  want the club to be responsible -  to assist in maintenance. They  want specifics.  Dungee: Minor maintenance is  normal, for example oil spots on  the runway and that type of thing.  Anything major, like trees blown  down or worse is the responsibility of the Ministry of Transport.  Wood: What about noise?  Dungee: You could ask the club  to police it, that would be best.  It's hot that bad, really. They  can't control everyone coming in.  We could assist with notices to  maintain traffic patterns.  Wood: The name of the group is  C.A.R.E.     Have  they been  in  touch with you?  Dungee: Is Jack Pope with them?  Wood: Yes.  Dungee: He has been in contact  with Gerry King.   They probably  have a valid point.  At the close of the conversation  Dungee said he would get back  to Wood on Monday after he had  had a chance to talk to his Superintendent.  Flight  report  ��� Continued from Page One  This would be a good beginning,  there are strong minded people  in both camps, and a little respect  for the other sides point of view  might be necessary. While in  the Areo Club I met a gentleman who, within two minutes,  had me feeling angry enough to  vote against anything he proposed without even bothering  to find out what it was about*  This aggresive attitude will only  do harm if continued.  As mentioned previously, on  take off we did a 45 degree turn  inland, enabling us to easily  reach the required height oyer  built up areas. This may not  be possible on every occasion,  but it certainly would make life  easier for the people on the  ground whenever it could b.e  done.  There must be many other  examples like this, and only  communication between the two  groups will bring them to light.  An understanding of each other's  situation is half way on the road  to solving the problem.  Madeira Park Elementary School teacher Cindy  Cameron is shown teaching her youngsters how  Sechelt council meeting  to play baseball. Corey Howard is at the bat with  Dougie Silvey pitching.   A Plat Tripp Photograph  -A-Continued from Page One  the feeling of people in Squamish  and Pemberton, that they were  being denied adequate public  health, a similar situation to that  of the Sunshine Coast. The  present public nurse has been on  sick leave for two years and a  replacement has not been appointed.  Acting-Mayor Morgan Thompson asked why there was a need  for a second unit in Westview,  to which Alderman Kolibas  replied, "This is what the other  communities are wondering  about, since Lions Gate Hospital  is outside the Coast Garibaldi  area and not available to either  Squamish or Pemberton."  Teddy Brackett had worked  with Mr. Fawkes in the village  this summer. I was reported that  he had done a good job and it  was recommended that a letter  1 Sears  GIBSONS  NEW HOURS  FOR CUSTOMER'S  MONDAYS  9:30 - 5:30  j      886-2237  CONVENIENCE  OPEN 6 DAYS  A WEEK!  THIS WEEKEND  be sent to him thanking him for  his efforts.  Council had been in touch with  Tucker Forsythe regarding the  installation of sidewalks on Cowrie Street. It was recommended  that at the same time a curb and  gutter should be installed as it  would be cheaper to do it now,  while construction was in progress, than -to wait till a later  date. The    recommendation  was carried.    The cost will be  five to six thousand dollars.  The village clerk Mr. Wood  was instructed to arrange a  special meeting with Mr. Roy and  possibly the Regional District  planner to discuss zoning bylaws. Included in this would be  the proposals put forward by Mr.  Killam.  The UBCM convention coincides with the scheduled next  general meeting and, as there  could be a problem getting a  quarum, it was decided to cancel  the September 21st meeting. In  case of emergency a special  meeting could be arranged onv  an alternative date.  Sechelt  winner  Henry Christensen came to  Sechelt several years ago with a  suitcase and no job., Today he  and his wife Louise are quarter-  millionairs.  How did it happen? Suddenly.  Louise bought ticket number  1470114 in the Provincial lottery,  and won $250,000.  Henry is a mechanic at the  bus depot, a job he plans to  continue. His employer phoned  Toronto for him as soon as the  hews was broken, he was put in  touch with Brill Weiseman in  Winnipeg, who arranged for an  examiner to come over to Sechelt  from Victoria.  The examiner gave the ticket  a thorough going over, he came  complete with jewelers eyepiece,  and equipment, necessary; to run  an acid test, it turned out to  be a lenghty process.  Neither Henry or Louise have  any definite plans about what  they   will   do   with   their   new  wealth. They both intend to continue working, with one difference, they will now have a nice  piece of security behind therii.^ '  .Congratulations to you both.  We will be  M. V. TITANIUM  Pictured above is the executive of the Sechelt  Teachers Association for 1977-78. Back row left  to right is Mike Simkins, Mike Lynch, Leif Mja  nnes, Ron Breadner, Frank Fuller, Paul Lavigne,  ALMON  FRESH FROZEN  ATSEA  Processed  the day  they are caught  ^*W_  Lottie Campbell, Roger Douglas, and Isla Nicholson. Middle row Bruno Dombrowski, Jody Pilling, Sheila Page, Joan Robb, Pres. Doris Fuller,  Cheryl Douglas, and Gwen Bpyte. Seated in  front are past-President George Matthews and  Becky Mills. Not shown are Dave Reese from  Pender Harbour and Geographic Representative  Geoffrey Madoc-Jones.  Open  for lunch  HOURS:  Tues. to Thurs.  11:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m.  Fri. & Sat.  11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.  Sunday  4:00 p.m. -9:00 p.m.  Closed Mondays & Holidays  LUNCH MENU  Sandwiches  Hamburgers  Fish & Chips  Home-made Soup  Dressed- Head Off  per pound   *1 .40  FOR SALE AT GIBSONS WHARF  . SEPTEMBER 16th, 17th. & 18th  To place orders ahead of time phone  886-2574  r^ TRAVEL^  Conveniently located in the new ��*  Gibsons Mall  Invites You to:  HAWAII  i J   77  -*#'<  I i/wWm~r    '"'in.  YOSM'S  RESTAURANT  Sunnycrest Shopping Plaza  Gibsons 886-8015  DINE IN OR TAKE OUT  _>/7vfe��rWtf7_?  IIWMlU.til \K\MIKSM.((IM> IOM>\h.  Already sold out for December  Departing Jan. 7th & 14th for 14 nights  OAHU ��� one island holiday $469.00  OAHU & MAUI ��� two island holiday  7 nights on each $539.00  ^        "ONE CALL DOES IT ALL"  $ 886-9255   $  V  Pasley  886-9984  or  evenings  Elly  885-3300  GIBSONS LAWN MOWER  & CHAIN SAW  SERVICE  HARVEST  DANCE  Dance to  SPICE"  OCTOBER 1st .  Limited Tickets  Available for members & guests  From: > 886-8181  886-2109 885-3258 Coast News, September 13,1977.  COAST NEWS   CLASSIFIED ADS  ***���*������������**������**���������*********  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE  NOON SATURDAY  CLASSIFIED RATES &  INFORMATION:  All listings 50C per line per week.  Or use the Economical 4 for 3 rate  4 weeks for the price of 3  Minimum $2.00 per Insertion.  AU fees payable prior to Insertion.  * In the event of an error the  publisher shall be responsible for  one corrected insertion only.  *  I  *  Here! Hew!  Our  Classified  Ad Policy  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  NO REFUNDS  **************************  These Classifications will remain free  ��� Coming Events  -Lost  ��� Found  This offer is made available for private individuals.  *******************************************  Print your ad In the squares including the price of the item and your telephone number. Be sure to leave a blank space after each word.  No phone orders Please. Just mall in the coupon below accompanied by cash, cheque  or money order, to Coast News, Classifieds, Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. VON 1VO, or  bring In person to the Coast News office, Gibsons  DROP OFF POINT: Campbell's Shoes and Leather Goods Store, Sechelt.  Coast News  Classifieds  Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.  VON1VO  CLASSIFICATION:  Eg. For Sale, For Rent, etc.  n .'"                       11 ii  ��� ��� - ��� ��� ��� ���  "  ������           J  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE SATURDAY NOON  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  Coming  Events  Coming  Events  Announcements    Work Wanted     Work Wanted  Sat. September 24th, the Elves  Club annual general meeting will  be held at the home of Mr. and  Mrs. D. Konrad, No. 9, Sundance  Trailer Court, at 8:00 p.m.  General discussion and an election of officers will take place.  Refreshments will be served.  For info: 885-2438.  JACK & JILL CHILD MINDING  Centre: General Meeting, Sept.  20th, 7:30 p.m. at the Gibsons-  Health Unit. Places available  for 4 year olds NOW. Phone  .Joyce: 886-2826.  FIGURE SKATING  Registration and general meeting  will be held Sept. 19th at 7:30  in the Sechelt Arena. Registration will be taken. Further regis-_  tration times will be Gibsons Mall  Sept. 19, 21, 23, 10:00 a.m. -  2:30 p.m. Friday evening 7:00 -  8:30. Sechelt Mall Sept. 20, 22,  24, 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Friday  eves. 7:00-8:30 p.m.  MINOR HOCKEY  Registration, Sat. Sept. 17th,  10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Pender -  Madeira Park Shopping Centre,  Sechelt - Trail Bay Mall, Gibsons-  Sunnycrest Mall. Pups, Tykes,  Peewees, Bantams & Midgets  $44.00, Juveniles $45.00. Wire  cages on helmets are mandatory  this year. There will be a draft  system to determine teams.  ~~ GLAD TIDINGS  October 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and  Sunday 9th Special 17th Anniversary Thanksgiving Services at  Glad Tidings Tabernacle, Gibsons. Guest speakers: Pastor  Linnis Perry, Tacoma, Washington, and Sunday 9th, Pastor  Maureen Gaglardi, Vancouver.  Phone:886-2660.  Golf Club Bridge  Round   Robin   type   of   Rubber  Bridge will be played at the Golf  Club from 8:00 p.m.  to   10:30^  on alternate Thursdays,  beginff;  ning   September   29th.     .Cost:&  $10.00 a partnership and players  must be willing to attend every  session or provide substitutes.  To enter or for further info  phone L. P. Todd at 885-3949  by September 22nd.  Egmont Community Club, tea  and bake sale in Egmont Hall,  1:30,   Wednesday  the   14th  #37  Jack & Jill Child Minding Co-op  Dance, Oct. 15th, Music by  "Spice". Tickets on sale soon,  watch for them.  GUIDES & BROWNIES  Registration for Gibsons Guides  and Brownies will be Monday,  Sept. 12th at 7:30 p.m. in the  Gibsons United Church Hall.  Brownies 7 yrs. & up, Guides  10 yrs. & up. 886-7714. #37  POWER SQUADRON  Basic Boating Course  For information phone: 886-7714  or 883-2649. #37  TOPS 1147 meet Wednesday,  7:30 p.m. at the Garibaldi Health  Clinic, downstairs. New members welcome. #37  DUPLICATE BRIDGE  September 20th, Golf course.  7:30 p.m. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays  monthly. Everyone welcome.  For more information please  call 886-2575. #37  Announcements  ROBERTS CREEK LEGION  Opens at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday!  Early bird  bingo  7:00,   regular  8:00 p.m. Everybody welcome!  The family of Jim Higgs wish  to thank and show our deep  appreciation to our many friends  who have supported us on the  loss of our son and brother.  Special thanks to the hospital  staff and. emergency vehicles  who did everything in their power  to save our son *s life.  Leonard, Rita & Louise,  Judy & Kerry Eldred,  Bill & Joyce Higgs.  INMEMORIAM  Jones - A. Craig.  In loving memory of a dear son  and brother who passed away  September 3,1973.  Today and tomorrow  We will always remember.  Mum & Dad, Howie, Bud,  Norm, Lome and Cyndie  CARDS OF THANKS  I wish to thank my friends and  neighbours for the sympathy and  kindness extended during my  recent bereavement, also the  staff at St. Mary's Hospital.  God bless you all.  Florence Kirkham  ATTENTION!  New residents to the Sunshine  Coast: Your Welcome Wagon  hostess is here to help you.  Phone: Irene Bushfield 886-9567  or Beryl Sheridan 885-9568.    #,38  For explosive requirements -  dynamite, electric or regular  caps, B line E cord and safety  fuse, contact R. Nlmmo, Cemetery Road, Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound Farmers  Institute.  I would like to thank my many  friends and customers for their  help, kindness and lovely gifts  presented to me on my opening  day at the Dogwood Cafe.  Sincerely,  Beth Hawken  Work Wanted  CHIMNEYSWEEP  Stove * furnace * Fireplace  Thoro Cleaning - Easy Rates  Now is the time!  886-7273 #38  f* "new ser v i ceT "j  ' HUGH'S i  PAINTING!  &  WINDOW  CLEANING!  Call  886-7060  1 TON TRUCK FOR HIRE  Light Moving & Hauling  Gardening & light Landscaping  After 6 p.m. call 886-9294.  Fast, Clean, Efficient  CHIMNEY CLEANING  Vacuum equipped. 886-7785. tfn  Will babysit children 2 and older.  Playmate for my 2 yr. old child.  886-7671. #37  * CAT-BACKHOE *  GRAVEL TRUCK AVAILABLE  Land clearing, Septic systems  886-9633 886-9365.  Bob Kelly Clean Up ltd.  A load on this truck  is a load off your mind!  886-9433 tfn  CREATIVE LANDSCAPING  Enhance and Beautify your  surroundings* with creative,  landscaping. By appointment  only: 886-7785 tfn  Will do odd jobs,  Have truck, tools  Call 886-7917.  any   area.  &   ability.  #38  CARPENTER  With 20 years experience available for small jobs in Roberts  Creek & Gibsons area. Gordon  Lindsay. 886-2332. #39  Randy's Garden Service  Complete garden services - now  is the time to think about fall  pruning - ornamentals and fruit  trees. Complete tree maintenance. 885-3727. #40  2 boys aged 15 and 13 will do  baby sitting, lawn cutting and  odd jobs during evenings and  weekends. 886-7148. #37  CREATIVE ORGANIC  LANDSCAPING  ENHANCE & BEAUTIFY  YOUR SURROUNDINGS  NATURALLY  For Free Estimate  Call 886-7785  HIGH FUEL COSTS  Peerless Tree Services Ltd. will  turn your problem trees into firewood. $18.00 per cord. We do  danger tree falling, topping and  limbing too. Expert insured work  'Know the cost before you start'  'Know the cost before you start'  Call us at 885-2109. Free estimates. JohnRisbey.  TELEPHONE  ANSWERING  SERVICE  886-7311  Wanted  LOGS WANTED  Top Prices Paid for  Fir-Hemlock-Cedar  L&K LUMBER  (North Shore) Ltd.  Phone 886-7033  Sorting grounds, Twin Creeks  * WANTED ���  Person for  Commercial Sewing  full or part-time  for ATTIC ANTIQUES  886-2316 or 886-9976  Sunshine Coast Business Directory  ��� jr^Jm-wmMMmw AUTOMOTIVE ATjrjrjmwjr-Tjm-w  r  r  JAMIESON  AUTOMOTIVE  TOYOTA  New & Used Car Sales  All Make, Parts & Services  Gibsons AL JAMIESON Phone 886-7919  NEED TIRES?  Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  at.the S-BENDS on Highway 101  Phone 886-2700  ATMmwmkTAT  BUILDING SUPPLY ^5#5#5_f5#5#5#ar  (Quest Clectric Itb.  ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 8. CONTRACTING  Serving Sechelt, Gibsons, Roberts Creek & Madeira Park  885-3133  J. McKenzie Ron Blair, P. Eng.  ^ Porpoise Bay Rd. P.O. Box 387 Sechelt   VON 3A0  jr-r-rjmT-rMtr-fMISC. SERVICES ��#5��_#5#5_f5_P5_P3_r  r  r  Box 860  Gibsons  @v  BEELECTRICM  i>  Phone  886-7605  "\  RESIDENTIAL -COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL  Maintenance     Pole Line    Electronics  'POWER    TO    THE    PEOPLE"  MmM*-TJKMdr-T-r:   EXCAVATING     -#5#5��5_PMr-_r  PENINSULA DRYWALL SERVICE  ''The Dependability People " it Gyproc put up  Enquiries please phone "^  Insulation installed  after 6:00 p.m. Greg or Rick: 886-2706  P. M. GORDON  B.C. LAND SURVEYOR  P.O. Box.609  Sechelt, B.C.  Bus. 8852332  Res. 886-7701  MACK'S NURSERY  SUNSHINE COAST HIGHWAY  Shrubs, Fruit Trees, Plants  Landscaping, Pruning Trees, Peat Moss & Fertilizer  Licensed for Pesticide Spraying  COAST PAVING  PAVING FROM DRIVEWAYS TO HIGHWAYS  Highways, Parking Areas, Driveways, Crushed Gravel  Equipment Rentals  Main Off ice: Box 95,  Powell River,    485-6118  Branch Office:        Sechelt, Ph. 885-2343 9:30 to 3:30 p.m.  ^"Serving  Langdale  r  TWIN CREEKLUMBER  & BUILDING SUPPLIES LTD  Everything for your building Needs  Free Estimates Phone 886-2291-2  CUSTOM BACKHOE WORK  SEPTIC TANKS INSTALLED  Government Approved  Free Estimates  Excavations - Drainage Waterlines. etc  VPh. 885-2921    ���  "N  Roberts   Creek  r  Fancy Panels, Insulation, Doors, Bifolds,  Construction Plywood, and all Accessories.  Delivery Phone 886-9221  Highway 101, Gibsons  J.B. EXCAVATING  886-9031  Water, sewer, drainage installation   <v^_  Dump Truck ���  Backhoe  Cat ��� Land Clearing  ���  Free Estimates ��� Septic Fields  i��  A t the sign of  the  Chevron  HILL'S MACHINE SHOP  & Marine Service Ltd  Arc and Acty. Welding Machine Shop  Steel Fabricating Automotive - Marine Repair  Phone 886-7721 Marine Ways Res. 886-9956  AW.W. UPHOLSTERY & BOAT TOPS LTD.  X  Everything for your upholstery needs  FOAM - PLEXIGLASS SALES  ^  to Earls  Cove"  r  CADRE CONSTRUCTION LTD.  - HOUSES BUILT TO COMPLETION -  Framing, remodelling, additions  Pavne Road Gibsons   886-2311  L& H SWANSON Ltd.  Sand and Gravel  BACKHOES  Ditching - Excavations - Ready-Mix Concrete  885-9666 Porpoise Bay Road Box 172, Sechelt, B. C.  886-7310  BERNINA  SEWING MACHINES NOTIONS etc.  REPAIRS AND SERVICE TO ALL MAKES  SEWEASY  Cowrie St. Sechelt 885-2725  1779Wyngaert.  THOMAS HEATING  OIL BURNER SERVICE    00C7111  Complete Instrument OO0"/lll  r  v*.  885-9973  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon to Ole*s Cove  Commercial Containers available  886-2938  r  r  STANHILSTAD   ROOFING  DUROID. SHAKES  OR REROOFING  Gibsons R.R. 1, Port Mellon Highway        Phone 886-2923  Vs.  R & B BULLDOZING & BACKHOE  GRAVELTRUCK  Septic Systems   Land Cleari ng  886-9633 or 886-9365  r  fc  KITCHEN  REMODELLING  CENTRE  KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS  886-9411  DAY or EVENING  Showroom in the Twilight Theatre Bldg.  /*  ���: \  VIN YLDECK is the final deck  For maintenance free weatherproof attractive  sun decks and patios, call:  PACIFIC VINYLDECK     886-7259  PIANO & ORGAN LESSONS YOU ENJOY  >V  Ages 3 to? 886-9030  Km  for pre-school  B. C. Registered Music Teacher       children  r  \^  Marv Volen  TREE TOPPING  VIEW DEVELOPMENTS LTD.  Clean up your wooded areas.  Remove lower limbs for VIEW  Top tall trees adjacacent to building  "N  886-9597  ^  D. J. ROY  SURVEYOR - ENGINEER  Marine Building Wharf Street  Box 609 885-2332 Sechelt, B.C.  "N  *\  OCEANSIDE FURNITURE  &CABINETSHOP  Custom Built Cabinetsand Fixtures it 30 Years Experience  Expert Finishing   it Kitchen Remodelling A Specialty  R. BIRKIN  Beach   Ave.,   Roberts   Creek        885-3310  A  ^ 885-3417  r  -r_rjr_T_r_r_r_rAr ELECTRIC  ANDREASSEN    ELECTRIC  (GIBSONS CO.) Serving the Sunshine Coast  ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR  Per Andreassen 886-9439  General Delivery Granthams Landing, B.C.  ^  RAY COATESPLUMBING  886-7695  Contract Renovations & Service Work  SEASIDE PLUMBING  PLUMBING - PIPEFITTING -STEAMFITTING  HOT WATER HEATING  886-7017  All Work Guaranteed  "N  GUTTERS FREE ESTIMATES  , phone  CUSTOM CRAFT PRODUCTS  Commercial 885-2992 Chapman Rd.  Residential Sechelt  UNIPLAST PRODUCTS LTD. 886-2318  WATERPROOFING SPECIALISTS  SUNDECKS, BALCONIES  C.H.M.CAppr.       &BOATDECKS Best Rates  V^Quality Work For over IS years Free Estimates^  MOVING AND STORAGE  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER Ltd.  Household Moving & Storage Complete Packing  Packing Materials tor Sale  v   Phone 886-2664     Member Allied Van Lines     R.R. 1. Gibsons   .  ' JOHN HIND-SMITH   '  REFRIGERATION & MAJOR APPLIANCE SERVICE  Port Mellon to Pender Harbour  Res. 886-9949         j  BILL BLACK  ROOFING  _       Shingles, Shakes, Tar and Gravel  V886-7320 or 885-3320   Industrial & Residential     ^ 10.  Coast News, September 13,1977.  Wanted  Timber Wanted pins Alder  Poles bought and sold. Let us  give you an estimate. D & O Log  Sorting Ltd. Phone 886-7896 or  886-7700.   Propane fridge, pref. small, and  rug, approx. 10' sq. Call Fri -  Sun. 886-2622 ask for Lindy.  LOST  Men's spectacles in black leather  case with clip. Brown, heavy  frames. 886-9997 eves. #37  In upper Gibsons, blue & white,  beaded teepee-shaped change  purse. 886-2831. #37  LOST  Black Persian cat, white spot on  neck, pink flea collar. Lost on  Martin Rd. but just moved from  Tantalus apts., missed by kitten  and family. If found please hold  & keep in house till you call  886-9650, the cat hates staying  indoors. #37  Wanted to  Rent  Responsible mature young man  recently transferred to Gibsons  requires accommodation for the  winter months. Will supply  refs. Vane: after 6 p.m. please  988-2513. #37  COAST HOMES  Double Wide Price Examples  24x44 CHANCELLOR, 3 BDRM  Base Price  $23,950  Price Includes: fridge, stove, drapes, carpets in living room, hall and  master bedroom. Complete set-up, delivered and all taxes.  FULL FINANCING WITH 15% DJ>  BANK FINANCING OVER 15 YEARS  Pads Available  One Year Service Guarantee  Full Information on Gov't Grants  14' Wide Price Example  14x52 HIGHWOOD, 2 BDRM  Base Price  $14,950  Price  Includes:  fridge,  stove,   carpeting  in  living  room,  drapes.  Complete set-up, delivered and all taxes.  Help Wanted  JOB VACANCY  Class B Utility Engineer.  The applicant must be familiar  with institutional maintenance,  ventilation system, electrical,  plumbing and carpenter work.  Hours of work 0730 to 1530 with  some on call duties.  Salary and benefits according  to the International Union of  Operating Engineers.  Please   apply   in   writing   to:  L. Buchhorn  Personnel Officer  St. Mary's Hospital  Sechelt, B.C.  WANTED  Used Furniture  or What Have You  AL'S  USED FURNITURE  WE BUY BEER  BOTTLES  Gibsons 896-2812  For Sale  COAST  HOMES  COAST MOBILE HOMES  885-9979  Box 966, Porpoise Bay Rd.. Sechelt, B.C. VON 3A0  MDL #00623A  8' Safeway camper, 3 burner  stove, furnace, ice box, sleeps  4, good clean condition. CaH  886-9879. #37  Potatoes, onions, carrots for  sale, reasonable prices. Call  884-5240. #37  Hoover spin dry washer $85.00,  Polaroid Square -Shooter camera  $15.00, man's suit, black size 40  *as new', waist 34, leg 29, $20.00.  10 National Geographies '76-77,  $2.50. A few coins unc. mint-  sets. Silver, cactus plants.  885-2357. #37  2 only, new prehung mahagany  int. doors, 2'8" x 6'8", $21.50  ea. or both for $40.886-7540.  #37  Kenmore automatic washing  machine, avacado, $95.00. Call  886-9107. #37  Used chain 3A in. approx. 70 ft.  lengths, 50? lin.  ft.     Anchors,*  moorings, etc.   Some used piling  $1.50    ft. FLOATS    BUILT.  Eves, or leave message: 886-2861  #39  RELAX   in the comfort of  .yourown home.  smffissssssss^^  For Sale  GIBSONS BUILDING  SUPPLIES  886-8141  PLYWOOD  3/�� D Grade Unsanded Spruce  $5.59  V�� Std. Spruce $6.29  Vi Std. Spruce $8.79  5/s T & G Std. Spruce     $10.69  LUMBER  1x4 Std. & Better Spruce  $180 M.  2x4-6' 7Cft.  2x6-6' 10C ft.  2x4 Util. Fir R/L 12* ft.  2x3 Hemlock-6' 6Cft.  2x10 Util. Hemlock $185 M. or  31��ft.  1x8 Util. Hemlock S/Lap  $169 M.  2x12 Util. Rough Red Cedar  48Cft.  ABS 800 SEWER PIPE  3"Perfo 49��ft.  4"Perfo 69Cft.  R10 INSULATION  3,/2"xl5'' paper-backed,  105 sq.ft. $13.99  Presto Logs 9 for $2.00  SKIL  CHAIN SAWS  25% OFF  For Sale  mmmmammmmmmmmmmmm  NEW  TO THE COAST  NEPTUNE POOL  SUPPLIES  liquid & Dry Chlorine  PHnp/PHdown  Stabilizer, Test Kits  North Road       Gibsons  886-2103  ir  ���ir  RIDING LESSONS  Expert instructor  English or Western  Gentle horses provided.  BRUSHWOOD FARM  886-2160  APPLIANCES  Used appliances on Sale at New ���{  MacLeod's Store, Sechelt. t  ^MUSIC WEAVERS^-  used  Records , Pocket Books,  Guitars  &  Musical Accessories  Lower Gibsons  ^ 886-9737        C  HONEY 7  Place your order now.    90$ lb. jj  plus container. 886-7853. |  Wrought iron coffee tables,  end tables, candle holders, plant-  holders, weather vanes, etc.  886-9159. #40  Property  WATERFRONT PROPERTY  Comm. zoned,  100 ft.  Revenue  ?bear.    Lower Gibsons.     Owner  open to offers.     After 7 . p.m.  phone 987-5414. #37  FOR SALE BY OWNER  Grandview and Mahon Road area  3 view lots, fully serviced.  PLUS!!  One small house, fireplace,  terrific view, large lot. Call  886-9984. #37  One third acre lot (58 x 213 x  91 x 269), Langdale Chines,  treed, private with view, underground wiring. Compare with  lots Vi as big. $12,700. Call  886-7218. #37  For Sale. Roberts Creeek. Well  treed two thirds acre on Henderson    Rd.    Water    &    Hydro.  $11,900. Must sell. 594-1241.   #37  Marlene Road - Roberts Creek.  Completely remodelled 3 bdrm.  home. Located on large beautifully treed corner lot! $47,000.  885-3604. #38  Lot. 65'x130' on Cochrane Road.  Phone after 6 p.m.: 886-7407.  A number to note:  885-3521  WHARF REALTY LTD.  ;. Electric fences , and insulators "'  in stock at new MacLeods Store, '  Sechelt. tfn  9.2    Chrysler   outboard    motor  with day tank. 885-2489. #37  The Gibsons  All Nighter  Wood Heater  CUSTOM BUILT  From $310.00  The best  in economical woodheat  May also be used for cooking.  ALLHEAVY STEEL  CONSTRUCTION  BRICK LINED  886-2808  NOW AVAILABLE AT  GIBSONS BUILDING  SUPPLIES  886-8141  COMPLETE REAL ESTATE SERVICE: REAL ESTATE-MORTGAGES  REALTY WORLD  MEMBER BROKER  LOTS  View lot in Village on Gower Pt Rd$1 3,500  Wharf Road, Langdale $12,500  Waterfront, 100x200' $22,900.  Cheryl-Ann Park    $13,500  Roberts Creek, large 22,000 sq ft lot,  nicely treed, water on road,  139x309,315 $13,000  Langdale, large view lot close to school in  new home area. Cleared, level and ready  to build. Open to off ers    $15,500  HOMES  BE KING OR QUEEN OF THE MADEIRA  CASTLE: This is an authentic, not  patterned after another home on a  large lot. Look down on the eagles  and a spectacular view from your  circular rooftop sundeck. Enjoy a  luxurious bath in a sunken gold  bathtub surrounded by cedar and  mirrors. A large spacious kitchen  featuring handcrafted wood cupboards and a cozy dining room. A  sunken living room with a specially  designed fireplace and original  mural. Climb the circular staircase to  the master bedroom with another  original mural and ensuite. The lower  level of the castle features a large  third bedroom and a circular rec room  and a roomy utility room. Raise the  curtain on a new type of lifestyle by,  phoning us for a royal tour. $79,000.  ROBERTS CREEK $52,000  Family home in quiet subdivision. A short  walk to beach. Just over a year old, this  home has 3 bedrooms, a kitchen with  space for family meals, a bright living  room with fireplace. There is a full  basement with foyer and recreation room.  The good-sized lot has a pretty little creek  at its back boundary.  M ASKELL ROAD $51,500  Country relaxation. Most of the amenities  and enjoy all of the fresh ocean breeze  from the nearby sea on your wrap-around  sundeck. This well kept three bedroom  home on a generous half acre with fruit  trees will satisfy your urge for country  living. Try your offers.  HILLCREST DUPLEX $37,500  Live in one side and rent the other or  collect both rents. Terrific lot 65x260'.  Assumable mortgage of $23,000 @ 9  1/2%. $220 per mo. which is good for five  years. Revenue $330 per mo. and could be  increased Dec. 1, 1977.  New 3 bedroom home, family  room, basement, 2 car garage,  carport, view of Trail Bay,  $61,000. 885-2503.  In Langdale, 79' x 150' lot for  sale. Near school, beautiful view,  by owner: 112-255-4805.  ,      MUST.SELL,:,   .,.,,  Vi acre" lot. Mater, power &  drive way, cleared building site.  $10,700. o.b.o. 885-9798.  Lot for sale in Sechelt neai  Hackett Park, fully serviced.  Asking $11,500. 596-7022  Mobile Homes  SUNSHINE COAST MOBILE  HOME PARK  Units now on display-phone:  886-9826  NEW UNITS  : Hie ew 14ft. wides are here.  14x70 Meadowbrook - 3 bdrm. &  den. Master bdrm. has ensuite  plumbing. Mirrored closet doors.  All appliances incl. built-in dishwasher & dryer. Built-in china  cabinet. ,. Completely furn.' &  decorated.  12x60 Colony. 2 bdrm. Reverse  aisle plan.  USED UNITS  1966 Chickasha 10x50 - 3 bdrm.  furnished with 14x20 extension.  Loads of cupboards. Set up on  large well landscaped lot.  1975   Statesman   24x48   double  wide.   All   appliances   including  built-in dishwasher. 2 bdrms. or  3  bdrms.   Carpeted  thoughout.  Electric fireplace. Built-in china  cabinet. Large corner lot with 2.  paved driveways. Lovely attached  sundeck.   Very   good  condition.  1975 Atco. 3 bdrms. and separate  dining rm. Unfurnished.  Mobile Homes  12 x 55 Pathfinder trailer in  excellent condition. Has two bedrooms, "one on each end, makes  larger living area, car-port  attached which can be moved.  886-9192. #37  12 x 60 Mobile Home, semi-  furnished on Landscaped lot on  North Road. School bus stops  right at driveway, mail box is  close by too. A good price at  $24,700 or make me an offer.  886-9041. tfn  3 bedroom 12 x 68 Safeway  Bona Vista. Stove, fridge, carpets and drapes. $13,500. Call  886-7989. #37  Motor home for sale: Low  mileage, good condition. $3,500.  o.b;o. 885-9090. #40  Complete Selection  of Mobile Homes  24x44 to 24x60  12 x 68 Deluxe units  14 x 52,14 x 60  and 14 x 70 available  NOW IN STOCK  14x60 Highwood  14x70 Highwood  Drop in and view!  All units may be furnished and  decorated to your own taste.  Park space available for both  single and double wides.  COAST HOMES  Across from  Sechelt Legion  Dave: 885-3859  evenings  Bill: 885-2084  evenings  For Rent  1 bdrm trailer with carport.  Fully furnished on private property. Avail. Oct. 1st. 886-9625.  #40  1 bdrm furnished suite, fireplace,  view. $200. per mo. includes  heat & light. 886-2565. #37  Gibsons: Vi mile to P.O., beach  and view, elec. heat, stove &  fridge, garage, garden, fireplace,  W/W. 886-9044. #37  2 bedroom, fully furnished cottage. Very reasonable rent to  suitable applicant. No children  or pets. 885-9200 weekends/  17th & 18th Sept. or Vane.  261-5255. #39  2 bdrm. semi-furnished waterfront cottage. Sorry, no dogs.  886-9033. ��� ��������������� #38  2 bdrm. cottage, 3 houses east  of Granthams Store, on the beach  phone 939-9650. #37  2 bdrm duplex on North- Rd.  IV. baths, utility room, garage.  Close to shops & school. Avail.  Oct. 1st.    $230. per mo.    Call  886-7625. #38  Large 3 bdrm duplex, W/W carpets, just decorated,. Hwy 101  Roberts Creek. Heat inch,  $275. per mo. eves: 885-5305. #40  2 bdrm. furnished home Palm  Desert Country Club, Palm  Springs, California on golf  course.    Oct. & Nov.    Reliable  adults. 885-3547. " #37  Furnished bachelor suite fully  modernized, private entrance,  heat and light included, lower  Gibsons area. $135. per month.  Available immediately.  ir ft ir  Ranch-style home in Pender  Harbour area, 2 bedrooms, delightful setting, offering privacy  but within easy reach of the main  highway and marinas. Rent:  $350. per month. Available  Ist'ofOctober.  ir ir ir  Large modern 1 bedroom suite,  carpeted throughout, private  entrance, rent including heat  and light $225. per month. Gower  Point area. Available immediately. Call 885-3271.  For Rent  Waterfront - Granthams. Nice  bright 2 bdrm. suite, appliances,  curtains, heat incl. $200. per  mo. Not suitable for children or  pets. Anytime: 886-2163.        #38  Far Reni  Newly decorated 2 and 3 bdrm.  apts. Stove, fridge, heat and  cablevision incl. in reasonable  rent. Sorry, no pets. Close to  schools and shopping. 886-7836  For Rent. 20ft. Motor Home. All  facilities incl. Air conditioning.  Tape player & telephone. $200 a  week. 10* a mile. 885-2235  anytime. tfn  Room & Board available at  Bonnie-Brook Lodge. Meals &  services incl. laundry.  Private room. 886-9033.  Gower Point ocean beach esplanade^^   DARK ROOM FOR RENT  Enlarger &. Chemicals supplied.  $2.50 per hour.    Call 886-9781  Wed.-Sat. 10-3p.m.   Unfurnished two bedroom house.  Close to Sechelt. $200. Refs.  Gordon Agencies. 885-2013.   #37  Modern home, two bedroom, wall  to wall carpet at Brightside  Resort, Garden Bay area. $175.  per month, year 'round rental  preferred. Phone 883-2321.    #37  Large 2-bedroom house with  fireplace, carport and sundeck,  with rented suite in basement in  the Gower Point area. Available  immediately. Rent including heat  and light $325. per month.  ir -Cr -s=r  Furnished bachelor suite, fully  modernized, private entrance,  heat andjight included $135. per  month. Lower Gibsons area.  Available immediately.  ir ir ir  Ranch-style home in Pender  Harbour area, 2 "bedrooms.  Delightful setting, offering  privacy but within easy reach of  the main highways and marinas.  Available from 1st October 1977.  Rent $350. per month.  ir -ir ir  Large modern 1 bedroom suite,  carpeted throughout, private  entrance. Rent including heat  and light $225. per month.  Telephone: 885-3271.  Large 3 bdrm. deluxe suites in  Triplex - decks, wet bars, drapes,  etc. Would be ideal for 3 working  persons sharing. $325. up to  $350. Port Mellon Hwy. Call.  886-9352 or 884-5338. #38  Tantalus Apartments c/o Ian  MacLean, RR #4. Gibsons, B.C.  An unfinished 1 bedroom apartment available "opt. 1st. Call  886-2^9"'or V86-'/490. tfn  CAMpbcll's  FAMILY  SHOES  and  LEATHER GOODS  RENOVATION   SALE  SAVINGS UP TO 50%  "IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SECHELT"  Your friendly neighbourhood drop-off point  for Coast News Box 381 Sechelt, B.C.  Classified Ads. 885-9345 VON 3AO  CHECK US OUT FIRST  FREE  ESTIMATES  FOR YOUR  RAILING NEEDS  WROUGHT IRON  and ALUMINUM with  the new Powdura finish  Maintenance free for  up to 20 Years  (railings as low  as $10.25 per  foot)  FOR YOUR FIREPLACE SCREENS  AND ACCESSORIES  FOR WROUGHT IRON PRODUCTS  FOR GENERAL AND ALUMINUM  WELDING  Coast  Industries 886.9159  At the back of Peninsula Transport  ACREAGE  SAKINAW LAKE $115,000  Twenty five acres with 850 feet of  lakefront. Beautifully treed recreational  property. Excellent boating and fishing.  $55,000 down.  NEAR JOE ROAD $31,000  Five acres on Highway 10K  WILSON CREEK AREA $90,000  Try your terms I Twenty seven treed acres  with year round creek in Wilson Creek  area. Loads of possibilities on this parcel.  JAY VISSER  885 3300  SUZANNE DUNKERTON  885 397 1  ANNE GURNEY  886 2 164  GEORGE COOPER  886-934-*  CHARLES ENGLISH LTD.  Sunnycrest  Shopping   Centre  ���  Gibsons  GIBSONS; 886-2481  VANCOUVER; 687-6445  K. BUTLER REALTY  1538 Gower Point Rd.     886-2000 or 886-2607  GIBSONS: In area of new homes. Exceptionally well built & maintained 4 bdrm.  home on level corner lot. Main floor features  2 bedrooms (master en-suite), spacious  living room has fireplace and adjoins attractive dining room. Modern step-saving  cabinet kitchen, vanity bath, Rec room with  fireplace and extra bedroom completed in  the above ground basement. Wall-to-wall  carpet throughout in attractive colour.  For the handy man there is a large double  garage finished for a workshop detached  from the house. Truly a great buy at  $63,000.  GIBSONS: Upper & Lower Duplex in centre  of town. 2 and 3 bedrooms respectively.  Offers near $28,000. considered.  KEATS ISLAND: This delightful waterfront home is situated on the west side of  the island getting the most out of summer  sunshine and has 3 nice bedrooms. Modern  living, dining & kitchen areas. Part basement. 110' sandy beach. Also good boat  moorage has ramp and float installed.  Phone for full details. Asking only $60,000.  ROBERTS CREEK: Lightly treed 113V x  185' lot in good location. All services except  sewer. $16,500. full price.  PRATT ROAD: Well situated corner lot  in popular area. $12,900. j  <P>X  v, For Rent  2 bdrm house, 1538 Gower Pt.  Rd. Includes fridge & stove,  W/W in bedrooms & living room.  Possession Sept. 1st. $180. per  mo. 886-8029. .    #37  Avail. Sept. 1st. 12x68, 3 bdrms.  c/w 5' x 40' enclosed addition.  Fridge, stove, washer. $250.  per mo. incl. pad rental. Right in  Sechelt. 885-9979 days or 885-  2084 eves. tfn  Real Estate - Insurance  GORDON  AGENCIES  885-2013  Evenings & weekends:  885-9365  Boats  Reconditioned 16 ft. Reinell  runabout with brand new full  canvas top. . With or without  40 H.P. Evinrude O/B in good  condition on tilt trailer; Must be  seen. Offers at 886-2323. tfn  HIGGS MARINE SURVEYS LTD..  Insurance claims, condition and  valuation surveys. Serving the  Sunshine Coast and B.C. Coastal.  Waters. Phone:    885-9425,  885-9747,885-3643,886-9546. tfh  171/. ft. K & C complete with  trailer and 60 H.P. Evinrude O/B  884-5370. #37  12 ft. glass over ply, 20 H.P.  Merc, and trailer. 886-2331.   #37  MUST BE SEEN!  15' 6" glass over wood bottom,  Ride Guide steering, completely  refinished, near-new Road Runner trailer with spare, 28 H.P.  Evinrude with recent work.  2 t 5 gallon Cruis'e-A-Day tanks.  $2,200. firm. 886-7561. #40  Pets  Terrier-cross puppies. 883-9665.  j ���'.:      #39  WANTED ��� GOOD HOME  For a female spayed pom poo  dog, 4 yrs. old, friendly and  loving & fond of children. We  are not allowed to have a dog  where we live. 886-2136.        #37  For all your Carpets  T.Sinclair  885-9327  Found  Young white cat, blue eyes,  crooked tail, vicinity of Lower Rd.  and the Cemetery. Very affectionate. 886-7935. #37  Cars & Trucks  1967 Volkswagen camper van,  good engine & camping equipment. Best offer. 886-7041.     tfn  1974 Ford  Super-van VB  Auto  32000 orig. miles, partly camper-  ized. Good cond. $4,200. 886-7369    #38  1970 Ford Pick-up, 6-cyl, $950.  Call Lindy: 886-2622 Thurs -  Sundays only. tfn.  1973 240 Z, excellent cond.  $3,900. o.b.o. 886-2946. #38  1976 Ford, crewcab; 15,000 miles,  heavy duty P.S. & P.B. excell.  cond. $5,500.  16ft. travel trailer, interior  totally renovated. Used once.  $1,850. 886-2628. #38  1969 Road Runner 383, 4 barrel,  headers', cam, black. $1,400.  886-2626. #36  Dodge, 1973, 4x4 3A ton, $3,000.  o.b.o. 884-5370. #37  1967 Chev 6 cylinder standard,  runs good. $250. 886-2082.    #37  1966 Chrysler 2-dr H.T., good  running order.   $200.   886-9031.  #37  1966 Plymouth Fury III, good  condition. 886-2667. ' #37  1976 Firebird, excellent condition  throughout. Low miles. $4,800.  firm. 886-2884. #37  Motorcycles ""  1976 Honda XL 350, 2,o60iniles.  $1,100. After 9 p.m. please call  886-9227. #37  LIVESTOCK  Hay for sale - $1.00 a bale. Mulch  50 cents. 885-9357. tfn  Obituaries  Brodie: Passed away September  3rd, 1977. Jean Roberta Brodie,  late of Gibsons. Survived by her  loving husband Wilfred S.  Brodie, two sons, Norman, Port  Moody, and Alan, Langdale,  four grandchildren, one sister  Eleanor Anonson, Surrey, B.C.  and also survived by her mother,  Mrs. Agnes Sutherland, Burnaby. Funeral service was held  Thursday, September 8th from  St. Bartholomew's Anglican  Church, Gibsons, B.C. Rev. D.  Brown officiating. Cremation  followed. Devlin Funeral Home  Directors.  Matthews: Passed away September 8, 1977, Ernest Edward  Matthews of 1130 Seafield Crescent, Richmond. Survived by his  loving wife, Evelyn, one son  Patrick, Victoria, daughter Mrs.  Janet Steer, Surrey, B.C., one  brother, John, of Hopkins Landing, two sisters; Mrs. Babs  Roberts, Pender Harbour and  Mrs. Joyce Jeeves, Chiliiwack.  Three grandchildren. Funeral  Service Monday, September 12,  at 2:00 p.m. from the Devlin  Funeral Home, Gibsons. Pastor  F. Napora officiating. Interment  Seaview Cemetery.  Cooper: Passed away the 7th of i  September, 1977. James Martin.  Cooper, late of Coopers Green,  Halfmoon Bay, B.C. Survived  by his loving wife, Khona, two '  daughters, Mrs. Patricia Hilton,  Sechelt and Mrs.. Marilynn Ross,  North Vancouver, two brothers,  Robert Easton, California, and  William Kenneth, Calgary, and  one nephew, Paul of Edmonton,  two granddaughters, Jaime and  Dyan. Funeral service was held  Saturday, September 10th at  2:00 p.m. from the Devlin Funeral  Home, Gibsons, B.C. Rev. Stagg  and Pastor Fred Napora and  Royal Canadian Legion Branch  #140 officiated. Interment Forest  Lawn Cemetery, Monday, September 12th at 12:00 noon.  Coast News, September 13,1977. 11,  School Board holds first meeting  The first meeting of the school  year was held on Thursday,  September 8th, by trustees of  School District #46. Present  weire Chairman Celia Fisher,  trustees Maureen Clayton, Don  Douglas, Jo-ann Rottluff, Klaus  Spiekermann, and Kay Dombrowski, along with Superintendent of Schools John Denley and  Secretary-Treasurer Roy Mills.  Absent was trustee Peter Precesky of Pender Harbour.  A highlight of the first meeting  was the presentation of Provincial  Government Scholarship Awards  to Martina Phillips of Pender  Harbour and Bruce Goddard of  Gibsons. Phillips is attending  the Vancouver General School of  Nursing and Goddard is enrolled  in the first year science program  at the University of British  Columia. Chairman Celia Fisher  presented the awards on behalf  of School District #46.  No decision was reached on  the planned extension of the  Madeira Park Elementary School.  Student enrolment figures are  slightly lower than those forecast  and some doubt expressed by the  Department of Education caused  the trustees to table the decision  on going ahead with the necessary construction work.  Still pending, also, was a  decision on the new site of the  Bowen Island school and the  Native Environmental Studies  program planned for the Deserted  Bay area of Jervis Inlet in conjunction with the Sechelt Indian  Band.   In the case of the native  studies program, word is being  awaited from the federal Department of Indian Affairs with respect to monies being sought to  help implement the program. On  Bowen Island no word has been  received about the new site that  the School District was seeking  to acquire but trustees learned  that an extension of the present  site may still be possible since  the land which would be involved is no longer owned by  Stan James who proved recalcitrant to the School Board's request to purchase some land for  the needed expansion of the  facility.  gfatitiue*  On    Hwy. 131 overlooking 886-2316  Gibsons  Harbour ��� AntlqUOS   ��� CurlOS  ��� Boutique Clothing  & Custom Sewing  Opportunities  Make your kitchen a fascinating  Laboratory, never boring! Leant  the'relationship of food', body and��  mind taking the first of 4 indepen-J  dent courses of "Vegetarian Food  Preparation".  Whole Grain Bread Baking  (Wheat, Rye, Pizza Pie, etc.)  Monday or Tuesday for 8 weeks.;  9:30-11:30 a.m. or 1:30-3:30 p.mi.  or 7:30-9:30 p.m.    Shiftworkers  may alternate classes.   Fee $30.  payable at registration. 15% discount at registration.    15% discount for group registration of  at leasts persons. 885-2546 daily.  * Portraits     * Weddings     ���  * Passports  ��� Commercial  ���  * Copy and Restoration work *  Professionally done in your home  or in ours.  Day or Evening call 886-7964  The editor of the coast News was amazed upon leaving his house lately to And this cluster  of crocuses blooming vigorously in September. Subsequent investigation revealed that  these are a specific variety of crocuses which only make their appearance in the fall. These  apparently delicate little fellows, sheltered by a friendly oak tree, survived last week's  violent windstorm with only a few casualties. Photo by John Burnside.  Police news of the week  Federal  Fisheries ��pfficers   in     in Gibsons.   The second was in  conjunction    with    the    RCMP;    Irvings Landing, a  picture  and  seized thirty pink salmon from a     details are included elsewhere in  logging camp in, Jervis Inlet.   It.   the paper,  is likely that the fisheries will  be in charge of any legal proceedings.  There were two boat fires  recently. One at Keats Island  on September 3rd when Mr.  Mortell's 16 footer caught fire.  It was extinguished by a passing  boater from Madeira Park and  then towed to Smitty's  Marina  Going through the Change of Light?  WHETHER WIRING A NEW HOME, OR ADDING AN OUTLET, I  OFFER YOU PERSONALISED SERVICE AT ONE OF THE MOST  REASONABLE RATES ON THE PENINSULA.  SUPERIOR ELECTRIC  Province of  British Columbia  Ministry of Forests  Reforestation Division  NOTICE OF TREE  PLANTING CONTRACTS  Sealed tenders for the  following tree planting  contract (s) will be received by the District  Forester, British Columbia Forest Service, 355  Burrard Street, Vancouver  B. C. V6C 2H1, on the  dates shown below.  Contract 92G5-10,  located at Mt. Elphinstone  Ranger District Sechelt.  Number of Trees 86,000.  NOTE: Viewing of the  planting site prior to submitting a tender for this  contract is not mandatory.  Deadline for receipt of  tenders is 3:30 p.m.  September 23,1977.,  Tenders must be submitted bri the form and in  the envelopes supplied  which, with particulars,  may be obtained from the  Forest Ranger(s) indicated or from the District  Forester, 355 Burrard  St., Vancouver,..._ B.C.  V6C2H1.  The lowest or any  tender will not necessarily  be accepted.  r  Rugby  victory  Victory   was   sweet   for   the  Gibsons Rugby Club last  Sunday, September 11th when they  trounced   the,   visiting    U.B.C. .  Old Boys team 20 to 10.    What  made the event sweet for Gibsons .  was  the  fact  that  U.B.C.   Old;  Boys is one division higher in  the Rugby  Union and  Gibsons-  has  recently  been   denied   en-'  trance  into the  Rugby  Union's'  2nd division.  Trys in the game were scored,:  by Doug Kilo, Ryan Matthews, :;  and Bill Henderson.   Having an  :  exceptionally   good   game  were,  Leif   Mjanes,    Bill    Bradshaw/'  Jay  Pomfrett,   Pat  Gaines   and  Jim Pers.  The game was played at Elphinstone High School field. Next  games played will be Saturday,  September 17th at 1:00 p.m. at  Elphinstone field and will be a  double header with visiting teams  from Tsawwassen and the  Fijians.  WAIKIKI $379  8 Days, 7 Night*  WAIKIKI $399  ISDa.s. 14 nights  RENO $119.50  8 Days. 7 Nights Bus Tour  RENO $179  8 Days. 7 Nights Air Tour  DISNEYLAND $288  8 Davs. 7 Nights. Ajr Tour  Daily Flights  RENO $169  SAN FRAN. $179  3 Niflht*. Hotel & Air ln<  IL  FOR GUARANTEED SERVICE  FOR  CALL R. SIMPKINS  885-2412  YOUR FREE ESTIMATE  sr  sr  ar  ar  ������  ���ac  ar  aoe  MATE   II  HERITAGE SQUARE DANCE COMPANY  PAGEANT  CK  David Ingram'*  OENlATOURSl  1ht��6 Robson Street  Call Collect  689-7117 .,.-,  ������  3T  ar  ar  ar  ar  32C  aoe  ������  ~c  SATURDAY,  OCTOBER 1st  Admission $1.50  Gibsons Phone:  886-9852  English Country  Colonial  Modern Square  French Court  Pioneer  Round Dances  Tickets Available:  Whitaker House  Sechelt  ������  ar  ace  ���-���  SOS  as  as  ar  ar  aa  Elphinstone High School Gym  Gibsons  7:30 - 9:30 p.m.  frv&x&tt&tt^^^  Bulk Imported Cheeses  Fresh European  j Meats & Sausage  and a full line of  ( Table Ready Foods  ��� DELICATESSEN  ��� CAFETERIA  Sunnycrest Centre |  RATS  you  I  got  get  'em?l  'em!  _xx=ar  as  SUB-DIVISION  CONSULTATION  REAL ESTATE Is  LORRIEGIRARD  886-7760  '���A  JONMcRAE  885-3670  AND LAND DEVELOPMENT LTD  Off ice: 886-2277  Vancouver Line:  Toll Free: 682-1513  CHRIS KANKAINEN  885-3545  APPRAISALS  MORTAGES  NOTARYPUBLIC  ARNE PETTERSEN  886-2277  WEST SECHELT: 40 acres of level land.  4 acres are cleared pasture, the rest  is mixed forest.    Large remodelled log  house with new plumbing and wiring.  Must Be Seen! Owners must sell. Price  reduced to $85,000. Try your offers!  NORTH ISLAND  PEST CONTROL  WORK GUARANTEED  AT REASONABLE RATES  Local Licensed Operator  Charlie Cairns 885-3606  BE HAPPY  with this new 3 bedroom elegant home with panoramic  view on Sargent Road.  ft Over1400sq. ft. finished  ft Roughed in fireplace & bathroom in basement  ir Double glazed windows  ft Heatilator Fireplace  ft 11/2 Bathrooms  A SUPER BUY AT $59,900.00  Phone 886-2311  CADRE CONSTRUCTION LTD.  P.S. Buy Now and Save!  Just started construction on new 3 bedroom home with  panoramic view on Sargeant Road.  ft 1200 sq. ft. to be finished  Another GREAT BUY at only $49,900.00  HOMES  TUWANEK: Lovely 2 bedroom Gothic  style home, could be year round or summer residence. Thermo pane windows,  large living room, with sundeck overlooking Tuwanek Bay. Very close to  public beach across the road. This home  is one of a kind in a very exclusive,  quiet area. Large landscaped lot. Priced  to sell at only: F.P. $36,500.  JOHNSON ROAD: Langdale: Imagine  approximately 1400 sq. ftj each floor  plus all the extras such as ensuite off  master bedroom, featuring wood panelling and red brick in kitchen - dining  area. Special lighting features. Ali this  plus a spectacular view - for only:  F.P. $64,900.  POPLAR LANE: Brand new home on a  quiet cul-de-sac, close to shopping,  schools and transportation. This home  has many outstanding features including  fireplace, double glazed windows, sundeck, sauna, indoor heated garage.  Master bedroom features walk-in-closet  ensuite plumbing. THIS HOME MUST  BE SEEN! F.P. $69,500.  GIBSONS: Brand new approx. 1300 sq.  ft. quality built house with full basement.'  Large sundeck w/aluminum railing.  Built in bookcase planter. Heatilator  fireplace. Large kitchen with lots of  cupboards. Master bedroom has ensuite  and his and hers full double closets.  Nestled at the foot of the bluff on quiet  street with view. F.P. $68,000.  NORTH FLETCHER ROAD: On 76 ft.  view lot, landscaped, 2 bedrooms up,  extra large L.R. completely finished  downstairs with Rec room, bathroom,  spare bedroom and utility and workbench area. With mortgage available  to 90%: F.P. $54,000.  WATERFRONT: Mission Point at Davis  Bay. Two small cottages on 60' waterfront property with a 20* lane along side.  Property Is on Tsawcome lease land and  is prepaid to October 1993. Level to  beach, privacy and spectacular unobstructed view. Tenant presently renting  one of the cottages. This is your opportunity to Invest In desirable water-  frontage for only: F.P. $24,900.  CRUCIL ROAD: View of North Shore  .mountains, Keats Island and Shoal  Channel. 3 bedrooms upstairs with one  bedroom finished down. 1'/j bathrooms  up. Fireplaces up and down with finished  rec room, built-in china cabinet in large  dining room. Features vinyl siding,  : sundeck "over' carport and paved panhandle driveway. Priced for quick sale.  F.P. $54,900.  ALDERSPRING ROAD: 2-storey home  with in-law suite all set to go. 3 bedrooms  upstairs and 2 bedrooms down. 4-piece  plumbing up and 3-piece down. Beautiful view of Gibsons Bay and Keats Island  from both floors. An ideal revenue.  property, live in one half and rent out  the other to meet the mortgage payment.  On sewer with all services.  F.P. $42,900.  FIRCREST PLACE: Brand new 3 bedroom home in quiet residential area. One  mile from schools and shopping. Large  open living room with fireplace. The full  basement is unfinished with roughed in  wiring and plumbing. Separate entrance  to 4-piece bathroom from the master  bedroom. Nicely treed lot waiting for  your landscaping touch.       F.P. $46,000.  DAVIDSON ROAD: Spectacular view  and privacy in Langdale Ridge. Large  3 bedroom home has ali large rooms.  Fireplace upstairs. Separate carport  allows more room for expansion in the  full basement. Large cedar sundeck and  many extra features. Enter by way of  . nicely treed panhandle driveway to the  Vi acre you can call home.    F.P. $54,900.  GLASSFORD ROAD: Beautiful well built  Spanish style home in new development  area. Many extras including arches  throughout, lovely fireplaces up and  down. Extra' large master bedroom and  a skylight In master bathroom. W/W  carpeting throughout. Well designed  kitchen with sliding glass doors from  dining area to large sundeck. Full unfinished basement. F.P. $52,000.  CEMETERY ROAD: Imagine 6 acres  p|us a modern approx. 6 year old home in  rural Gibsons. The home haa 3 bedrooms  on the main floor. Full unfinished basement. 2 fireplaces. Carport. This is an  exceptionally good buy considering the  lovely 6 acres of p roperty.    F.P. $65,500.  SOUTH FLETCHER: A perfect family  home with 4 bedrooms. Has a beautiful  view from, the large living room. Feature  wall fireplace. Large kitchen and eating  . area. ' All of this over a V. basement.  Rear access from a lane.  Separate work-  . shop. A super value for only:  7 ���    F.P.$39,900.  LOTS  LANGDALE: Investment value: This  beautiful view lot has but one flaw, it  is partially in ravine.: With some fill,  this could be a truly lovely building lot  and at this price...how can you lose?  On Langdale Ridge in an area of quality  new homes. MAKE AN OFFER.  F.P.$7,500:  CEMETERY ROAD: Enjoy the quiet  privacy of one acre in rural Gibsons.  The property is all level usable land.  Treed with some view. F.P. $17,900.  COMMERCIAL WATERFRONT: With  waterfront as scarce as it is this double  use lot represents real value. F.P. $22,000  GOWER POINT ROAD: At the corner  of 14th. This property has levels cleared  for the building site of your choice.  Excellent view of Georgia Strait. Approximately 80'x250'.        F.P. $16,500.  GEORGIA .DRIVE: Lovely large view  lot, just up from Georgia Park. Lot  size 67' x 108' x 99' x 121'. NOTE!  Septic tank and field are already in and  approved. F.P. $19,900.  ABBS ROAD: At the corner of School  Road. Excellent 75 x 150' approx.  building lot with spectacular view of  Bay, Howe Sound and Georgia Strait.  F.P. $16,800.  PORPOISE BAY: Best building lot in  Sechelt Inlet Estates is now available!!  Fantastic view of Porpoise Bay. On water  and power. Owner must sell! Priced  at only: F.P. $9,000.  TUWANEK: Only one block to beach,  full view of Inlet. Piped community  water available. 80' x 140'. NEW low  prlceONLY: F.p.$9,900.  PRATT ROAD: Near proposed new  school site. This lot is cleared and ready  to build on. Mature fruit trees dot this  76'x 125'lot. F.P. $13,500.  . LOWER ROBERTS CREEK ROAD:  Off Cheryl Ann Park. Beautifully cleared  and level building site hidden from the  road by many large trees. Easy access  to an exceptional beach, 70' x 100' and  priced for immediate sale.    F.P. $12,900.  UPLANDS ROAD: Tuwanek. Ideal  recreational lot in beautifully wooded  and park like area. Zoned for trailers.  This lot overlooks Sechelt Inlet and the  Lamb Islands. F.P. $8,900.  ABBS ROAD: One of the nicest building  lots in Gibsons. Level building site with  drop-off in front of property to protect  privacy, spectacular panoramic view.  Size66' x128'. F.P.$18,500.  DAVIDSON ROAD: Fantastic view from  Langdale Ridge, (you won't need a ferry  schedule as you can see the boat half  a., hour before it arrives.) This lot has  a small creek on the very back of the  property. All new homes in this area.  This lot Is a full 2/5 of an acre.  F.P. $14,900.  WHARF ROAO: At the corner of Davidson: With a little easy clearing, this  lot will be ready to build on. Walking  distance to the Ferry. Lot size Is 80' x  110'. F.P. $12,900.  ACREAGE  ROBERTS CREEK: Highway 101 divides  this property diagonally down the centra.  Develop both sides of the road. Try all  offers. 5 acres. F.P. $30,000.  ROBERTS CREEK: 2V4 acres nicely  sloping land right next to Camp Byng  Insuring privacy and fully treed at that  side of the property. Mostly cleared,  access road part way in. Don't miss the  opportunity to purchase this large piece  of land for only: F.P. $14,500.  LOWER ROBERTS CREEK ROAD:  Beautiful view across Georgia Strait to  Vancouver Island. This landscaped Vi  acre lot provides everything you could  ask for in a piece of property, size,  seclusion and view. The main house is  a 4 year old 2 bedroom home on concrete  slab. Large walk-in closet in the master  bedroom. An excellent family home.  Plus a 500 sq. ft. one bedroom cottage  with rental value of $125.00 to $150.00  per month. Includes double garage,  metal storage shed on slab, and two  sets of kitchen appliances.   F.P. $37,900. Coast News, September 13,1977.  885-3400  FREEZER BEEF  SPECIALISTS  GRADE A-1 STEER  Sun -Thur 10|-6:30  Frl & Sat till 8:00 p.m.  SEAVIEW MARKET  Roberts Creek  ;7 SECHELT GARDEN CLUB &  i  ^VFALL FLOWER SHOWg,  -��5��   ^        ~^i  ">*���     <=,  Saturday, September 17th  2:00 p.m.  759      Senior Citizen's Hall  Plant Sale    Refreshments    Door Prizes  GRANTHAMS LANDING  IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT  The Special General Meeting of September 17,  1977, will be in the form of a poll, from 8 a.m. to  8 p.m., with ballots to decide your preference  between:  (a) Keep the Granthams Water System  (b) Join the Regional Water System  List of property owners posted at Store.  SUNSHINE COAST  REGIONAL DISTRICT  ATTENTION HUNTERS  This is a reminder that Sunshine Coast Regional  District Firearms By-law No. 81 is in effect and  no person shall, at any time, discharge any  firearm within the limits of "Firearms Regulation  Area No. 1 and Firearms Regulation Area No. 2"  except as specifically provided under the by-law.  A copy of the by-law showing the restricted  areas is posted on the notice board at the Regional  District Office, Wharf Street, Sechelt, B.C. and  at various locations in the district.  Mrs. A. G. Pressley  Secretary-Treasurer  SUNSHINE COAST REGIONAL DISTRICT |  COURT OF REVISION  Take notice that the Sunshine Coast Regional  District Court of Revision will sit on the following dates in the Board Room of the District  office, Wharf Street, Sechelt, B.C.:  Saturday, October 1, 1977 -10:00 a.m. to 12:00  Saturday, October 1,1977:  10:00a.m. to 12:00 noon  Monday, October 3,1977:  10:00a.m. to 12:00 noon  to hear any complaints and correct and revise  the 1977 S.C.R.D. Electoral List.  Copies of the 1977 List of Electors covering  Electoral Areas "A", "B'\ "C'\ "D'\ "E"  and "F" of the Sunshine Coast Regional  District will be posted upon the Public Notice  Board in the Regional District Office and at  all post offices and community halls on September 20, 1977.  (Mrs.) A. G. Pressley  Secretary-Treasurer  SUNSHINE COAST  REGIONAL DISTRICT  THE GIBSONS AREA ���  WHAT OF THE FUTURE?  Last month a questionnaire was mailed to  residents of the Gibsons vicinity (from Langdale  on the North to Seaview Cemetery on the West)  asking for their opinions about the area and how  it should develop in the future. The returns will  be used as guidelines by the committee that will  be drafting the vicinity plan.  If you intended to complete the questionnaire  but were too busy, it is not too late to do so now.  Simply fill it out and return it to the Sunshine  Coast Regional District, Box 800, Sechelt, B.C.,  VON 3AO. If you have mislaid your copy, extras  are available at the Gibsons Municipal Hall or  the Regional District Office in Sechelt.  This project is jointly sponsored by the Village  of Gibsons and the Sunshine Coast Regional  District.  IF YOU WANT A SAY IN HOW THE GIBSONS  AREA IS TO DEVELOP, THIS IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY. USE IT.  Pender ratepayers  by the Pender Harbour & District  Ratepayers' Association Publicity  Committee  Repesentatives of the Pender  Harbour and District Health  Centre Society have taken strong  exception to statements concerning operation of its clinic  made in last week's Coast News  by Sechelt doctor Eric Paetkau.  In an article which he authorized for publication Paetkau said  it would have been cheaper for  the Pender Harbour clinic to hire  a Sechelt doctor part-time than  to have its own doctor on full-time  salary. The article went on to  say Paetkau "wonders what the  community feels it has gained  with the extra cost it is incurring  over the independent doctor."  Health Centre Society trustees  Joe Harrison and Jim Tyner,  who represent the Society's  publicity committee, and former  trustee Bill Scoular met with the  Ratepayers' publicity committee  to discuss Paetkau's statements  September 9.  Tyner said it was not the Pender Harbour group's wish to rehash the question of having  Sechelt doctors in the Pender  Harbour clinic but that Paetkau's  statements "must be answered."  "The Pender Harbour and  District Health Centre Society  is a group of unpaid volunteers  and we have worked very hard  to improve health services in  Pender Harbour. As a result of  our effort Pender Harbour now  has a well-equipped modern  health centre, housing its own  full-time doctor, its own full-time  nurse, and starting at the end of  September, a full-time dentist.  It also serves as a base for many  other community services such as  public health nurse, social worker, prenatal classes and others.  This is quite a change from the  situation we had a few years ago  with a part-time doctor operating  from what the Vancouver Sun  referred to as *an over-stuffed  biffy'," Tyner said. He added  that the key to the clinic's success  was and will continue to be strong  community support and for this  reason it is important that there  be no public misunderstanding  about the costs of running it.    '  The Sechelt group of doctors  first offered to provide their  services at the Pender Harbour  clinic in a meeting between  Scoular, Tyner, Paetkau and Dr.  Walter   Burtnick   on   June   10,  1975. In the article Paetkau  said his group would have provided the service on a "sessional  basis" for $110 per half-day  session.  . Figuring a year at 260 office  days this would come to 528,600  annually, less than the salary  the Pender clinic now pays its  doctor, which Paetkau gave as  $40,000.  According to Tyner and Scoular  the offer Paetkau and Burtnick'  made at the meeting was to provide the service for $100 per  session' but the sessions would  only be 2 hours in length. Considering at least two sessions  would be required each day,  this arrangement would cost a  yearly total of $52,000, considerably more than the clinic pays  its own doctor.  In   any   case   these   original  terms were changed when  the/  Sechelt group make another offer 1  to supply doctor services in the '  Pender   clinic   on   October   8,'  1976. The figures this time were  put on paper:    $100 per 4-hour~  session with Sechelt getting the  fees. '    ���  Judging    by   the    increasing  amount of work the Pender dbc-fs  tor   is   now   doing,   this   final*  Sechelt   offer   could   well   cost  between  80  and   100 thousand^  dollars a year, Tyner said.  And this would be for the ser-i-  sohool SUPPUEB  Chevron  Pender Harbour Chevron  corner Hiway 101 & Francis Peninsula  883-2392  - *^i2!^ v  24-HOUR TOWING ��� REDROOFFS TO EARLS COVE  GOVT CERTIFIED  ���ves. 883-9698 or 883-2334  CHARGEX  CHEVRON CREDIT CARD  MECHANIC  MASTERCHARGE  J'*/**  TAMMY'S  RESTAURANT EARLS COVE  ��� 'Where you wait for the ferries in comfort''  Featuring: FULL FACILITIES  ��� Comprehensive menu  -A- Seafood  ��� Steaks  OPEN EVERY DAY  Mon.-Fri.: 8:00 a.m. till last ferry  883*9012     Sat. & Sun.: 9:30a.m. till last ferry  vices of a doctor only. Nursing,  administration, maintenance  costs would all add to this and  without either fees or subsidy  the clinic would have no way of  paying them.  "Having a Sechelt doctor in  the clinic would not be cheaper;  it would be more expensive,"  Tyner said: "It would be much  more expensive.~ The Sechelt  offers were not acceptable to the  Society and obviously would not  have been acceptable to the  government."  It was noted that Paetkau's  discussion of Pender Harbour  health care was limited to a consideration of financial aspects  only, while there were other  reasons for the community having  a doctor who would be responsible to it and no one else, and  would stay on to become a part  of the community.  "At one point in the article  Paetkau speaks of his group not  desiring to have a monopoly  and seems to agree with the advantages of an independent doctor himself," Harrison said,  , '.'And his inference later on that  we would be better off under  his group is inconsistent with  this."  It was also pointed out that  the present arrangement at the  .'_' Pender Harbour clinic is really  ; hot expensive if fee savings are  considered, and if money saved  '. through reduced stays of Pender  Harbour patients in hospital  is  considered, it may be more than  paying its way in strict dollars-  ���  and-cents terms.  "If cost is the issue there is  no question that a public-owned  clinic such as ours is a better  j bargain for the taxpayer," Harrison said.  "Every dollar that goes  into this clinic is used for health  i care.     There is  nothing  being  drained off in profits.   No one is  - getting rich out of this clinic.''  The three also took exception  to  a   number   of  other   things  Paetkau said in the wide-ranging  I article,   particularly   those   concerning    the    Pender    doctor's  pay and work hours.   The doctor  ' "has  it  made",   Paetkau  said,  because,  "he's getting  $40,000  '������' a.year for 40 hours a week." The  actual salary is $37,000 and the  trustees said the doctor  works  well over 40 hours a week, some-  ., tunes as high as:80 hours a week.  1 In addition he is on 24-hour-a-  '* day call during the week.  I "One ofthe reasons we agreed  to pay Sechelt the $7,000 for  cross-coverage was that our doctor had.gone four nights without  getting to sleep," Harrison said.  Of Paetkau's remark that the  Pender doctor earns more than  jiany of the Sechelt doctors,  .Scoular said, "I would very much  like to see proof of that.''  Last week we ran a full-size picture of the Skookumchuck Cafe which was taken by Coast'  News staffer Pat Tripp on a lazy pleasant day in August. Unfortunately the'page was so  squeezed for space that we neglected or were unable to get a cut-line under the picture.  The story immediately below it was about sewers and the juxtaposition unfortunately  caused some people to believe that the sewer story had relevance to the picture. The Coast  News would like to apologize to the owners of the pictured marina for the misunderstanding,,  Stu Leg gat on the Liberals  .X:  Tl'*;'"  Slide show  for seniors  An interesting programme of  colour slides by Eric Brooks,will  be presented at the Pender Harbour Senior Citizens Association's first meeting ofthe season.  Members are reminded that the  place is the Legion Hall and the  'time 7:30, Monday evening,  September 19th.  jr  WATCH YOUR  CAMPFIRESAND  SMOKING MATERIALS  ONLY YOU CAN  pftcvefir FOREST FIRES!  Stuart Leggatt M.P.  New Westminster  Sometime in the next year,  Pierre Trudeau and his merry  gang of economy-wreckers are  going to ask for your vote.  Why should I vote for you,  you might ask them.  Think about national unity,  they'll reply.  What about the one million  unemployed? What if I'm next,  you might ask.  Forget the unemployed, they'll  reply; Think about national  unity.  What about the nine percent  inflation rate, you might ask.  Forget inflation, they'll reply.  Think about national unity.  What about an Anti-inflation  Board that rolls back workers'  wages without touching prices  and profits, you might ask.  Forget the A.I.B., they'll  reply. Think about national  unity.  Enough!  ; Let's start thinking about the  apo'n^jmjs:'^ Abput^yoiir* -future.  Abd$#$'Our children's future.  Now, no-one, least of all a  federal M.P., is saying that  national unity isn't important.  But surely it's a sick joke when  Pierre Trudeau, the federal  politician who more than any of  us has helped the separatists to  power in Quebec, thinks he can  manipulate the national unity  issue to con the Canadian people  into another four years of dan-  erously inept economic leadership.  For, more than anything else,  it is the despair surrounding the  disintegration of our economy  that has led hundreds of thousands of average, working Quebeckers to gamble their future  on hopes of independence.  This, hand in hand with the  inflexibility of a federal leader  to consider the necessary constitutional concessions that will  keep the future of Confederation  alive for moderate Quebeckers.  Our economy is in a mess,  and it isn't getting any better.  And attempts by the Liberal  government to smear public  servants and trade unions won't  hide the fact that most of the  blame for our economic woes  can be laid at the door to the  Top quality Regal latex interior products by  Benjamin Moore. Your choice of decorator finishes.  ir easy to     * fast * soap and water       * over 1200  apply drying        clean-up colors  /   Moore's Regal  AQUAVELVET  latex eggshell flat enamel  Sale" 1395  Limited time only  GALLON  w  Moore's Regal  WALL SATIN  latex interior flat  Limited time only  13  GALLON  00$  AC RENTALS  & BUILDING SUPPLIES  Hwy 101 & Francis Pen. Junction  Madeira Park, B.C. 883-2585  DO IT YOURSELF!  CLEAN YOUR CARPETS.  THE PROFESSIONAL WAY.  Rent the fantastic new Up & Out Hydro-Mist Machine  for superior carpet cleaning. Loosens and  removes dirt, previous shampoo residue,  and up to 90% of the moisture in just  one step. Lightweight machine and  pop-up handle makes this Model 625  so easy to operate. Save money...  get results just like a professional!  AVAILABLE  FOR RENTAL  4 HOUR   8 HOUR OR  OVERNIGHT  BASIS  OVERNIGHT  RENTAL  ONLY  $15.00  AC RENTALS  & BUILDING SUPPLIES  Hwy 101 & Francis Pen. Junction  MADEIRA PARK, B.C. 883-2585  federal Cabinet.  Our   Gross   National   Product  is stagnant.    Our trade deficits,  continue to mount. The Canadian  dollar   is   skidding   downwards  on world money markets.  No less an authority than the  Financial Post notes that wage  and salary increases, are slowing  to the point where the average  'real' gain (after inflation) is  almost at zero.  Economists are almost unanimous in calling for a government - stimulus to consumer  spending. Unless inflation slows  (and we've seen no sign that it  will) we need immediate tax  cuts for low and middle-income  Canadians in a new emergency  federal budget.  Such tax cuts will lead to  greater consumer spending,  which will spur on production  and its inherent job creation.  Economic leadership, not  national unity, is the real issue  facing all Canadians. The dignity  of work and the security of a  .healthy.ecopomy;will do mprejto-  stop Rene'7 Levesque in" his  tracks    than    a    dozen    Pierre  is  Trudeaus.  The   Liberal   government  the national unity problem.  If we take care of the economy,  the economy will take care of  national unity.  But, to take care of the eco-,  nomy, we all have to take care  of Pierre Trudeau and his government. For good.  CLASSIFIED NOTE  Drop   off  your   Coast   News.'  Classifieds at Campbell's Family  Shoes & Leather Goods In downtown Sechelt. It's convenient!     ���  *"S*  ���rd  ��������8  ,'.i\V  ' ��.\V  .Vto  .ii  *S  is  ft;  Jw  m  'i j  ���A  'is  ���tft  ���;-,  .it  M  O?.  OO  au  ::o  :dl  W  H  ?tl  to  NEW HOME  WARRANTY  PROGRAM OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA  RegiMtrad BuiWw fttamtwr  A Divuixi ot Pacific Mwt Horn* S*fvtc��i, Inc.  SeaCoast Design  and Construction Ltd.  885-3718 ;./ Box; 1425���  B85:9?13,(Res.)/rSechelt^BiC^  COMPLETE. BUILDING SERVICE.  PENINSULA BLASTING    .<���� ���_*&*���  Control Blasting x\a*^  ft Stumps  ft Septic Tanks  ft Etc!   ft. ,,.  John McCready  886-7122  Gibsons  ���i  -d  A  ,n  .-a  ��������2  .it  ,rf  ::��  tide tables  STANDARD TIME  >  Tue. Sept. 13   0455  13.6   Sat. Sept. 17 0150  4.4  1100  5.1                           0825  13.7,  0540  14.4                          0155  8.4'  1140  6.6                           0745  14.3  Wed. Sept. 14 0530  '    Sun. Sept. 18 0240  13.8                          0925  4.0  13.5  1155  ia'I                              0245  9.2  0605  145                           0820  13.9  Thur. Sept. 15 0020  5 7 Mon. Sept. 190330  4.0  0625  13;9                           1045A  13.4  1225  6.5                         0355 7,  10.0  0635  14.6                          0915  13.4  Fri. Sept. 16 0100  .GIBSONS LANES  0725  0105  0710  nq                 open; ;  j4        Friday & Saturday 7-  iA\     Sunday 2-5 p.m. and 9  11p.m.  -11 p.m.  Hwy 101,   886-2086  SUNSHINE  AUTO & INDUSTRIAL PARTS;LTD,  WHARF RD., P.O. BOX 10    885-2296  SECHELT, B.C. VON 3AO  A  U.A.P;  Associate  FORD  &  CHRYSLER  SPIN-ON  OIL FILTERS  reg. $4.50  SPECIAL PRICE  $1.99  While  stocks last  VALVOLINE  30 Wt.  MOTOR OIL  reg. $1.64  ONLY 99*  per quart  Serving your needs with:  Brake Shoes - Brake Line - Front End  Parts - Exhaust Systems - Clutches -  Starters - Water Pumps - Proto &  Westward Tools - Fan Belts - Rad  Hoses - Turtle Wax - Seat Covers -  Floor Mats - Spark Plugs - Oil Filters -  AirFilters   COME IN AND BROWSE  i%L  IP  V Coast News, September 13,1977.  13.  Postie Sinclair - a most remarkable manl&Sllil^^  by John Burnside  My friend Corrance is a Highlander. He is also a photographer. You would expect,  would you not, that when a stalwart gentleman of some eighty  years strode into the Coast News  office in full highland regalia  that our intrepid Highland photographer would leap into action  and procure an on-the-spot  and highly, memorable picture of  what turned out to be one of the  most memorable gentlemen to  come through the door this year.  Alas it was not so. Some beastie  attacked the photographic reflexes of our ace cameraman  and we are indebted for the picture we do have to the gentleman's friends in Vancouver,  Mr. and Mrs. S. Wellburn.  The highland gentleman's  name was "Postie" William  Sinclair, described by, his friend  as "Highland gentleman, philosopher, ex-postal sargeant, and  poacher cum laude". Faithful  readers of the Coast News may  remember that some time ago in  'Musings' I wandered around the  topic of poaching in Scotland as  opposed to the connotations of  the word in Canada. It was that  column that brought Postie Sinclair into the office. He had, he  informed us, seventy years of  undetected poaching behind him  on the hills and moors of Scotland.  It soon became apparent,  however, that this Postie Sinclair  was one of those truly remarkable  men and not for his poaching  alone. He was born in Caithness  in Scotland and as a very young  lad served as a sniper in the First  World War. Having survived the  carnage of the trenches, he  emigrated to Canada and worked  at a grain elevator until the outbreak of World War II when he  joined the Seaforth Highlanders  of Canada and embarked for  overseas on December 15,1939.  While stationed at Hurstpier-  pont in the south of England,  Postie Sinclair acquired a silk  top hat from a friend who had .  been a magician in civilian life.  At first he wore it only when the,  mail arrived from Canada but  eventually wore if on all occasions. In the strict discipline of  the Second World War, a soldier  in a top hat was unheard of,  but Postie Sinclair got away with  it. . His friend Stan Wellburn  remembers that when the battalion was stationed for training  at the Duke of Argyle's estate at  Inverary it was not uncommon to  see Postie Sinclair riding in a  horse-drawn carriage with the  Duke doffing his elegant topper  to all and sundry.  But perhaps the classic story  of Postie and his silk top hat  was recorded by no less a person  than Field Marshall Lord Mont  gomery and took pla<Je when the  Field Marshall was General  Montgomery and commanding  the campaign in Sicily. Here it  is in Montgomery's own words:  "I well remember an incident  that occurred one day as I was-  driving in my open car up to the  front. I saw a lorry' coming towards me with a soldier apparently completely naked in the  driver's seat, wearing a silk top  hat. '  ' '  "As the lorry passed me, the  driver leant out of his cab and  took off his hat to me with a  sweeping and gallant gesture. I  just roared with laughter.  "However while I was not  particular about dress so long as  the soldiers fought well and we  won our battles, I at once decided  that there were limits. When I  got back to my headquarters I  YOUR SPEEDOMETER  Through September  all provincial highway signs  wiU be converted to metric.  SPEEDOMETERS: Most 1977 and all 1978 model cars have speedometers and odometers calibrated in km/h and Ian. Some earlier model  cars have speedometers with dual calibrations. If your speedometer  indicates only mph, you may find this conversion scale handy.  1<m/h0   10   20 30 40 50 6070 80 90100  I      I.I 1.     I    ,l      I ,   I 1 L__U-  mpho     10    20 30 40 50 60  Always drive at the posted speed. It is legal when posted. You'll be surprised at hbw little time you really save when you exceed the speed  limits.*  SOME TIPS: Keep this advertisement or the folder prepared by the  Ministry of Highways.and Public Works in your glove compartment.  Province of Ministry of  British Columbia   ^hwa^sand  issued the only order I ever issued  about dress in the Eighth Army.  It read as follows:     'Top hats  will not be worn by the Eighth  Army.' "  Postie Sinclair put his poaching  skills to good use in the army.  In the south of England he acquired a ferret and named it after  the reigning Regimental Sargeant  Major. He carried the ferret in  his battledress and employed it  to snare many rabbits. These  were tagged and put in the mail  to Postie's many friends in the  United Kingdom. It must be remembered that meat of any kind  was scarce and strictly rationed  so Postie's unconventional mail  was always warmly received.  When his battalion left for  Sicily, Postie Sinclair was left*  behind with the rest of the rear  party at the Duke of Hamilton's  estate near Glasgow. The young  officer in charge was Lieut.  Ken Barton, now residing at  Langdale. Word came that Sgt.  Sinclair, due to his age, was not  to proceed to Sicily with the rear  party. It was not known how the  order became lost. Sufficient to  say that when the rear party  commanded by Lieut. Barton  went to Sicily it included Postie  Sinclair.  ' Postie suffered a few minor  ailments from time to time when  the battalion was at war but was  nursed by his comrades. They,  did not want to see him sent down  the line for fear red tape would  prevent him returning to his  beloved battalion. He was with  his battalion ' through Sicily, '  Italy, France, Belgium, Holland  and Germany. At all times his  cheerful attitude and his philosophy of life was a treihendous  boost to the morale of the bat-  Last week's winner of the Guess Where contest was Tammy Entis of Box 767, Sechelt,  who correctly identified the cement pad on the Sechelt waterfront kitty corner to the Parthenon Restaurant. The usual prize of $5.00 will be offered for the correct location of the  above. Send your entries to the Coast News, Box 460, Gibsons. In addition, there will be  an additional $5.00 prize donated by the kindly old editor for anyone who can correctly  identify the carved quotation. The Coast News would also appreciate any information  available about who carved the quotation and when  talion. He was one of the few  soldiers who actually saw action  in both world wars.  At the cessation of the war,  Postie Sinclair chose,not to return  to Canada but to remain in his  beloved Scottish Highlands. He  lives at the present time at Bonar  Bridge in Sutherlandshire, some  twelve miles north of Inverness,  in a house which was the boyhood  home of the late Frank Ross,  former Lieutenant Governor of  British Columbia.  ,' Also after the war, Postie -  a life-long non-smoker and teetotaller - took himself a wife in  his fifties and now has three  grown children.  His recent visit to Canada was  his first since 1939 and was  occasioned by a special invitation  to be guest speaker at the Annual  Dinner of the Seaforth Regimental Association. It is interesting  to note that his wife, jean, who  accompanied him has a cousin,  Jean Calder, who resides at  Granthams Landing and one of  the highlights of Postie's trip to  Canada was his visit to the Sunshine Coast.  We are pleased that something  in  our  paper  brought  us   into  contact with this remarkable and  unpretentious man and grateful  to Mr. Stan Wellburn for making  available to us some of the details  of Postie's long and interesting  life and in the face of the temporary and uncharacteristic photographic paralysis that attacked  our highland photographer -  grateful too, for the picture of  Postie Sinclair that adorns this  page.  Facts About  FUNERALS  ��� The local funeral home1  charges no fee for pre-arranging  and recording your funeral instructions. Those who have  already enrolled in Funeral  Plans or Societies, but prefer arrangements or service locally,  should take advantage of our  Pie-Arrangement Plan.  ���*��� The local funeral home  offers all types of services,  Funeral or Memorial, at moderate cost.  ���k The local funeral borne  will arrange for local or distant  burials, cremations, or services  in other localities.  -A- At time of bereavement,  your first call should be to the'  local funeral home, no matter  what type of arrangements you  prefer.  for further information  write or phone:  D. A. Devlin  owner-manager  ���\\  Devlin Funeral Home  1665 Seaview Rd.,  Gibsons      886-9551  r  COAST  FURNISHINGS  ��� TEAK  ��� WATER BEDS  ��� CARPETS -LINO  ��� DRAPERIES  ��� KITCHEN CABINETS  ----- ���# FREE ESTIMATES ���- ���  Gibsons,  B.C.  LeonKazakoff   886-9093  JUSTIN  ��� Down or Fibre Filled  HUNTING VESTS  & JACKETS  ��� Mackinaw Jackets & Jac-Shirts  Also a complete stock  RAIN GEAR  & WORK  CLOTHES  AT  mens WGar Sunny Crest Centre  ..... Going hunting?   Going Fishing?   Getting stuck? and   Cursing a lot?  GET TIRES!!!  COASTAL TIRES has a good stock  of light truck and RV tires at  Competitive prices with excellent service.  FGoodrich  All Terrain T/A  * Astro Cat Trac  * Dayton XM  * Cooper Discoverer)   And if you're lucky,  BF Goodrich All Terrain Radials  [COASTAL  TIRES  One mile west of Gibsons  on Highway 101  886-2700 14.  Coast News, September 13,1977  and the  the sfAce conquerors  AS SEEN  ON T.V.  "The Stereo Specialist"  Authorized Sansui Dealer  SECHELT  885-2522  Sansui 551  IE-Equipped. FK/l/AM Stereo Receiver, 30  Watts per channel, less than 0.8% total  harmonic distortion.  SANSUI SR-222BEI.T DRIVE MANUAL TUftNTM-.;. F  No frills Of unnecessary ''assures, just q;x;:! ���..:,; :.?:���'  and durability. Orirrinol l-.ifih pe:rforrr-.a;-.r. "'��� C<:'~: .  54 ctB S/N will be rnain.vifivxJ ov*i :r;y ,'-:. '';���.���  engineering. Tonynui; U.y.i ii-.jiii-in :>���'<������ _r_i::i-:: ur.   .:���.  l.'ii ,'.������..   !'JOkS  ������'i'liit-r and  long range  EMPIRE 1000ED MAC?  Exceptionally precijo t:  tracking weights Wide  and low tracking :\''i~:s:  parameters to consider .  is equipped with ;i prc->  longer life and redut^i rer.-ord wear.  Ci lO PHONO CARTRIDGE  ���/.���k.ng, i-.'jc-.vg Ui.d compliance even at low  :-id ilai frequency response, great separation  ;.>���, These ar* the three most important  ������j-- buying a phut.o cartridge. The cartridge  .s;oi> cut and polished  diamond stylus for  Sansui 5050 Amplifier  35 Watts per channel, less than 0.5% total  harmonic distortion at rated output.  Sansui FR 1080  Automatic  return  turntable,   magnetic  cartridge.  Sansui LM 220 (Linear Motion) Speakers  8" Woofer, 3" Tweeter.  reg. list $1,008.00  ���*������?* ?<��  }   JV    *|)>ic*  SPECIAL  $798  SANSUI 221 AM/FM STEREO RECEIVER  The Sansui 221 AM/FFVI stereo receiver is tree ot infrequently-used  decorative features and friiis. but .:'s not short on high quality circuity  where it counts. FM has precision-finished frequency-linear variable  capacitor and low noise MOS FET to improve sensitivity to faint  signals. Precise phono equalizer is ideal for clean, wide range reproduction of records, wmle tape, aux and tuner selection extend  versatility. Power amp features packed Hybrid IG with four large  output transistors to enhance /.liability, improve S/N and lower  distortion. Speaker terminals are patented one-touch type, aiding  simple connection.  EDS 330 SPEAKER SYSTEM  2-way 2 speaker system of the Phase inversion design, using a 8"  woofer and 3" tweeter to give a flat and full response. Equipped  with a removable, acoustically transparent, sculptured foam grill.  As you can see, a combination of these outstanding stereo components  at this greatly reduced price makes this system the obvious choice  for anyone shopping in this popular price ranga.  :���:���:���]  FR 1080  Auto, return turnbable.  magnetic cartridge.  Stage 60 Speakers  60 RMS  Handling  Capacity.  10"  Woofer.   5" Mid-range,   .  3" Tweeter.  reg. list $937.00  SPECIAL    *599  ;.;.]  s2kb ~-s? ^  a:  *"&���.'" 'iw  gw^  Sansui AU 6900 Amplifier  62 Watts per channel,  less  harmonic distortion.  Sansui FR 1080  Automatic  return  turntable,'magnetic  cartridge.  $r *.* ��� ��� ��� ��� ���  reg. $529.00  SALE PRICE  399.  ALSO these other great units at outstanding  savings  AU 5900  45 RMS per channel  AU 3900  22 RMS per channel  AU 2900  15 RMS per channel  TU   7900   Precision   Stereo   FM/AM   Tuner  75 RMS per channel,   less  than  0.1%  total  harmonic distortion at rated output.  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Damaging interference from the woofer is blocked out for  smooth transition.  Twin 3" Tweeters. Two 3" Phenolic ring tweeters, small but important. These tweeters handle the super highs (above 10,000 Hz)  much more efficiently than standard tweeters and produce the upper  harmonics of cymbals, piano, strings and other instruments that you  probably didn't know could be heard. They are mounted symetrically  to assure best dispersion and dampened to remain unaffected by the  back sounds of the other units.  reg. $1,509.00  list price  SPECIAL PACKAGE DEAL     $1098.  Sansui 8080  80 RMS per channel.     Less than  .2% total  harmonic distortion.   F.M. Sensitivity 1.7 uV.  ONLY $349.00  ONLY $189.00  SPECIAL   S149.00  Sansui SC 3003 Tape Deck  Dolby noise reduction system, wow & flutter  .09% Frequency response, 30-16000 Hz:  BONUS OFFER  reg. $429.00   May be purchased with any of  the packages above for ONLY $299.00  reg. $798.00  SPECIAL   $599.  YEAR WARRANTY ON SANSUI PRODUCTS

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