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Sunshine Coast News Jun 28, 1977

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 *???&^r^^B��^X-f '!��� '>���>'-  ;  }f; 'J ��� '. .'��� \ :��� i'y.r'  29 VI'7?      >Jjivo      ..   ___��-HH______  P.B. *>v_X��^-* 260155 S   mmwHWrw  Published at Gibsons, B.C. .  15* per copy on newsstands  Serving the Sunshine Coast since 1945  Volume 30, Number 26  June 28,1977.  sign recreational pact  {The;freighter M.V. Star Light lost her power last weekend off Port  Mellon and the incoming tide threatened to put her on the rocks. The  largest tug available proved unable to move the freighter against  joins re  ��� ;" "I think we are ready to go.  - After four years of hard work I'm  7 very happy. I think it is a historic  : occasion."     With these words  7 Gibsons   Mayor   Larry   Labonte  I -saluted the agreement in principle reached last week between  I-the   Gibsons   Council   and   the  I-Regional Board to tie Gibsons  I "into the regional water system.  1   The plan to be followed will  ��� Ibe a proposal made by the consulting   firms   of   Dayton   and  Knight.    Works superintendent  for the regional board, Gordon  Dixon also expressed satisfaction  at tiie accord which had been  reached ,and said he would get  right to work towards implemen-  i   tation ofthe agreement.  In his memo to the regional  board members, Dixon said that  even with the admitted deficiencies in the Gibsons system it  would be a major asset to the  regional system. It provides a  block of users which makes the  proposed large water main feasible. The cost of pumping is  an ever increasing load on well  systems, making Chapman Creek  an even more valuable resource  which should be used by all  areas of the regional district.  The Gibsons system could be  upgraded by a planned program  over a span of several years,  similar to what has been done in  Sechelt. The administration is  already set up in Sechelt and has  proven trouble free.  ' Sechelt representative to the  regional board, Morgan Thompson, assured the Gibsons council  at the meeting held on Wednesday, June 22nd that Sechelt had  been well satisfied with its tie-in  with .the regional board water  system.  Parking  Parking arid associated by-laws  came in for some discussion at  the meeting of the Gibsons Council held on Tuesday, June 21st.  Correspondence from the firm of  barristers and solicitors Campney  and Murphy advised the council  that delay should be implemented  in the institution of a by-law  governing parking since the sys-v  tern which had been instituted  in Kelowna had not in its present  form held up in court. The letter  from the solicitors said in part  "we have concerns as to the enforceability of the existing by-law  in the Village of Gibsons on the  basis of its present drafting and  we might be well advised to wait  the filing of the new. by-law of  the City of Kelowna to acertain  the format that has been adopted  by that municipality.''  the action of the tide and it eventually took three tues acting in concert  to get her safely to dock. She is pictured above just as they got her in  Pender learns  recreation expensive  Lorraine Goddard at the controls of the bulldozer for the first ceremonial sod turning at  the site of the new swimming pool planned for Gibsons.  The upcoming referendum on  Sunshine Coast recreation facilities will be much more than a  simple vote on the Pender Harbour swimming pool and the  other items proposed under the  initial five-year plan, a public  meeting in Madeira Park was  told Monday, June 20.  "The two mill tax this referendum establishes will go on indefinitely," past Recreation Commission chairman Norm Watson  said in answer to a question.  "I would hope that much is  clear."  The meeting had been called  jointly by the Sunshine Coast  Recreation Commission, which is  a branch of the regional-district,  and the Pender Harbour Aquatic  Committee, which is directing  plans to construct a public swimming pool in the new Pender  ; Harbour Secondary School. It  was attended by members of the  commission and Aquatic Committee head Shirley Vader, who discussed pool plans.  Under current plans the pool  would cost $280,000 and be  financed jointly by the school  board and the regional district.  The district would contribute  $52,000 to the initial construction  under the community schools  plan, which would be supplemented by $75,000 from the school  board. The school board would  also contribute about $5,000  annually to help offset the pool's  operating deficit, which is expected to be $23,400. The remaining costs would be raised  by the Recreation Commission  and paid off by a 2-mill tax levied  over the whole regional district,  providing the referendum (to be  held in the next six months) receives an overall 50.01 % majority  vote.  Watson told the meeting that  Oops!  Last week we Inadvertently  gave die name of the new Regional Board Planner as Miss  Harrison. It should of course  have been Robyn Addison. Oar  apologies to flie lady.  Regional Board Chairman Harry Almond and School Board  Chairman Celia Fisher affixed their signitures at the regular  school board meeting last week to: the agreement which will  see increasing community recreational use of schools on a  joint program. The spearhead of the movement towards joint  endeavour and use by the two boards was the collaboration  between the two boards in the matter of the construction of  the Pender Harbour Secondary School with swimming pool  incorporated.  At the conclusion of the signing ceremony both chairmen  expressed great satisfaction at the achievement of the high  measure of co-operation which has led to the joint action on  the Pender Harbour School and which bodes well for future  endeavours between the two boards. Individual trustees also  expessed their delight at the signing of the pact.  Educational  Meetings  Also at/ Thursday's meeting  Trustees Don Douglas and Klaus  Spiekermann spoke strongly in  favour of continuing next year the  series of educational meetings in  the different; communities of the  school district. "We should continue to make ourselves ' available to the public," said Douglas.  The board voted unanimously to  continue the format instituted  with such success this year.  ects  Secretary-Treasurer Roy Mills  also reported to the board on the  status of the installation of a  sprinkler system at the Pender  Harbour School as a means of  fire protection. The design work  for the project is well under way  and a cost estimate should be  available within a week or two.  The board also agreed to install a  sprinkler system in the Madeira  Park Elementary School  during  In other school-related construction work the trustees heard  that the Pratt Road School construction is proceeding smoothly  and on schedule. No decision  has been made as yet on the  choice of a site for the new Bowen  Island School. The school trustees agreed that sofrie consultation with the people of Bowen  Island should take place as was  the case prior to the construction  of Chatelech Secondary School in  Sechelt. A tentative date of July  12th was set for such a meeting  on Bowen Island.  Chatelech  praised  In connection with Chatelech  Secondary School the trustees  heard high praise for the staff  of that particular: school in a  letter written by Mr. R.W.  Thomas of Sechelt, Mr. Thomas  concluded his missive with the  words: "Mr. Hawse and the  teachers of Chatelech deserve a  pat on the back and our thanks  for a job well done.   Mr. Denley  the renovation work to-be done ;^ andthe^schbol; board  deserve  there this summet^^^':i^  on our behalf. If these same  standards are applied to the staffing and operation of the new  Pender Harbour School, you will  have another reason to be proud.  You will also present a ''tough  act to follow" for future school  boards."  In keeping with its apparent  policy of consulting the public,  the school board - principally  Trustees Douglas and Spiekermann - have been circulating  with a questionnaire designed to  elicit reaction from the communities of the Sunshine Coast concerning the efficacy of the work  of School Superintendent John  Denley. It was agreed that the  said questionnaire should be -  circulated by the newspapers  and it is included elsewhere within these pages. Those members  of the public interested in having  some input in this matter should  send the completed questionnaire  to School District #46, P.O. Box  220, Gibsons.  Board    ������  contributes  Mike Bujan, Chairman of the  Association for the  aid  of the  mentally  retarded  was   present  at the board meeting to receive a  cheque from School, District #46  in the amount of $30,000 to facilitate the  work of the  Sunshine  School.   The board and Mr. Ba-;  jan heard a moving expression of  thanks  from   the   father  of .anl  eighteen year old ) boy 7who . hasv:  been able to experience7 the joy.V  of   communication   with   others  for  the   first  time   in   his   life  through    the    Sunshine    School  ^aissistanic^prbj^r^ v  although the 2-mill tax would  continue indefinitely and would  be used for different projects  in future, no new works would be  started in the, first five years  following the referendum. In  addition to the Pender pool the  plan calls for two major .works  at Sechelt - a curling rink and an  arts centre - a large new community  hall  at  Roberts  Creek,  Continued on Page 9:  Cavalcade  Arrangements for Sea Cavalcade 1977 are reported well under  way. Among the new events  this year for which pre-registration will be required is a novice  War of the Hoses. Rugby or  baseball teams or any other  athletic organization whose members feel that they could show the  world a thing or two in a battle  of the hoses can register for the  new event at the Municipal Hall  in Gibsons. Pre-registration is  also' possible for the Long Distance Swim from Keats Island.  Other familiar events will  include the Pet Show, the Judging of the Poster Contest and  a separate Bike and Costume  Parade, all of which will be  judged at Dougal Park on Saturday, August 6th, starting approximately at noon.  There is evident satisfaction on the faces of both Regional Board Chairman Harry Almond  and School Board Chairman Celia Fisher as they affix their signatures to the agreement  made between the two boards to enter into a joint recreation program, with the first undertaking to be the construction of the Pender Harbour swimming pool.  Madeira Boy  to row at  Henley  Seventeen year-old Chris  Milner from Madeira Park is  among the thirty-five rowers and  tennis players from Shawnigan  Lake School who are heading to  Europe this summer for three  weeks of sports in England and  three weeks of cultural touring  in Europe.  Chris is the stroke, of the  Varsity Eight rowing team and  will be stroking his crew at the  world famous Royal Henley  Regatta, in competition for the  Queen Elizabeth Cup. The tour  will include regattas against  English schoolboy clubs at  Huntington, Durham and Bedford.  The  tour  left   Vancouver  on -  June  26th  and  will  return  on  August 9th.  Elphie upgrading report  At their meeting held on Thursday, June 23rd, the. trustees of  School District #46 heard a report  from school principal Don Montgomery of Elphinstone Secondary  School on the upgrading of  Elphinstone Secondary School  building.  Many of the projects had been  completed or were in process of  being so, reported Montgomery.  Two areas of activity awaiting  initiation on a priority basis  were the installation of cafeteria  facilities in the lunch room area  of the school and the installtion  of.air conditioning units in the  upstairs Science wing of the  school. The science area has become a 'dead air' space due to  the structural changes caused  by the building of the new portion of the school and trustee  Don Douglas reported that he had  been in that area last week and  that even without students it was  unbearably hot.  At  the  conclusion  of  Montgomery's report on the upgrading  activities Superintendent - John  Denley commented that it had  been "an excellent project.  Money well spent." The trustees  thanked the Elphinstone principal  for the clarity of his report and  he in turn expressed appreciation  for the work of Maintenance  Superintendent Bob Rutter and  his crew who had managed most  of the projects without disrupting  the educational work of the  school.  Negotiation  In other school board business  the trustees heard a report from  Secretary-Treasurer Roy ��� Mills  concerning the status of negotiations with Local 801 of C:U.P.E.  Mills said that agreement was  close and that the last meeting  held had seen considerable progress towards final settlement.  It is thought that the wage increase will eventually be approximately 8 percent.  Delivered to EVERY address on the Sunshine Coast every Tuesday] Coast News, JUne 28,1977.  A CO-OPERATIVELY AND LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER  Published at Gibsons, B. C. every Tuesday  By: Glassford Press Ltd.  Box 460, Gibsons Phone: 886-2622 or 886-7817  Editor - John Burnside  Reporter /Photographer - Ian Corrance  Advertising - Josef Stanishevskyj  Receptionist/Bookkeeper-M. M. Laplante  Production - Bruce M. Wilson  Typesetting - Lindy Moseley  CNA  Subscription Rates:  Distributed Free to all addresses on the Sunshine Coast.  British Columbia: $8.00per year; $6.00 for six months.  Canada except B.C. $10.00per year.  United States and Foreign$12.00 per year.  Phone 886-2622 or 886-7817.  P. O. Box 460, Gibsons, B. C.  O Canada  '.The federal government has launched  a gaudy and expensive campaign to make  us all appreciative of being Canadian.  It's  about  as  slick and fundamentally  shallow as the pitch of a carnival barker.  -Its purpose, of course, is to make sure  at  the   tax   payer's   expense   that   the  Liberal   Party  should  be  seen  as  the  saviours of the country.   Now this very  Subject has been brilliantly treated by  ,qur   acknowledged   liberal    columnist,  George Matthews, and it would be re-  'dundant and superfluous to say more on  #ie subject here.   Suffice to say that is  4 cynical attempt by a bankrupt party to  'retain power.   The question of national  'unity is simply a straw an increasingly  '.inept government is clinging to in the  ;ftopes   of   maintaining   some   credible.  identity.  :' It is nonetheless approaching the  'one hundred and tenth anniversary of  .'this gigantic country and one feels the  'need for some observations on the state  of the federation. Quebec, of course,  ��� is .Being portrayed as the villain of the  piece. The Liberals would have us  ' bleating in unison a chorus of O Canada  like so many wooly minded sheep apparently in the hopes that the volume of  bleating will persuade Rene Levesque to  disappear. Let's take a rational look at  Quebec and the Parti Quebecois if we  can! and ignore the clap-trap from the  federal Liberals.  The Parti Quebecois came to power in  last year's elections over a provincial  Liberal government which was notably  corrupt. They came to power promising  only honest administration and with the  proviso that a referendum would be  placed before the people before any  attempt towards separation would take  place. In this it would seem to be analogous with the Social Credit party of  Alberta which came to power in the  thirties with radical notions of what they  would do to the money supply. The  radical notions went and they stayed in  power for over thirty years as a notably  conservative and conventional government. So, it would appear to this observer, will it prove with the Parti Quebecois? The Canadian union has only  been possible because when real emergencies arise reason and the. spirit of  compromise have prevailed. As the  nation approaches its one hundred and  tenth anniversary it can be confidently  asserted that it is most probable that  they will so prevail again.  It is a privilege to be a Canadian; to  be part of this civilized adventure in  nationhood. Canada has had fearsome  problems holding its vastness together  since the very inception of the country.  If today there is a threat to the nation it  arises not from the Parti Quebecois but  from the failure of either of the major  parties at the federal level to rise to the  challenge of government. The Liberals  are cynical and corrupt; the Conservatives laughable in their ineptitude.  Quebec is not the only region in  Canada crying its frustration over the  government of this country at the federal  level. It is not the only region that wishes  more control over its destiny than the  present division of powers allows:  Canada has real problems. They will  not be solved by wrapping ourselves in  the flag and mindlessly allowing a party  which has shown neither the will, the  resolution, nor the moral courage to  govern well to hoodwink us into letting  them continue on their directionless way  at the helm of .the ship of state. What  Canada -needs most is a decent federal  government, not a tired and cynical  campaign designed to discredit the men  of vision and energy who are not in  charge of one of our biggest provinces.  Ten years ago Pierre Elliot Trudeau  won the hearts of the Canadian people  and single handedly saved the life of  the Liberal Party. It is a monument of  corruption and inefficiency he raises for  himself.  Credit due  There were two events in the affairs  _ of our Sunshine Coast last week which  7-were particularly notable for the promise  ^hat they held.   One was the signing of  -;the agreement by the school board and  7 the regional board concerning joint com-  :: munity use of schools and the other was  -the agreement reached by the Gibsons  ; council and the regional board to co-  7 operate in the providing of water to the  7 people they mutually serve.     On both  7 occasions  there  was  evident from  all  7 parties a spirit of co-operation and com  mon sense that does credit to all concerned.  With such congenial common sense on  the part of our governing bodies we on  the Sunshine Coast can look to a future  more peacefully productive than the  jealousies and rivalries of yesterday  allowed us. To the Ladies and Gentlemen  who hold public office locally, then, perhaps it is time to say simply "Well  Done. You are serving your communities  well."  ��'  from the files of Coast News  .mber  7 5YEARSAGO  X     Ken Krintila is appointed manager of  ..-; the Elphinstone Co-op.  v     Slipping quietly into the harbour, the  ~; Hudson Bay Nonesuch, a replica of the  v original Nonesuch which sailed the seas  ;  in 1868, spent several hours in port at  ;  Gibsons, on her way to other destinations  * on the coast.  * 10 YEARS AGO  * Dave Smethurst, skin diving off Hop-  ~  kins Wharf looking for specimens for  * his biology classes at Elphinstone Secon-  *. dary School, came across a five foot Wolf  * Eel. He says it is the largest specimen  ;   he has caught so far and it probably is  * the ugliest.  ] 15 YEARS AGO  |      Following a visit of the Native Brother-  * hood to Victoria to see Hon. Robert  *. Bonner, Attorney-General, on the subject  ;' of allowing Indians of British Columbia  * the same liquor rights as other people,  < Clarence Joe, speaking for the Sechelt  _ Indian Band Council, announces that the  'Indians now have the same privileges  '"as others.  20 YEARS AGO  British Columbia fishermen earned  $1,855,000 for their fish landing according to the Dept. of Fisheries. Halibut  fishermen topped the list, followed by  the salmon fishermen and the grey cod  fishermen.  Danny's Ltd. has announced the  opening of a new coffee bar at Langdale  to serve people waiting for the Black  Ball ferry to Vancouver.  25 YEARS AGO  Ad:   You may stand on the shoes we  sell, but we stand behind them with a  "sure to please'' guarantee. Anderson's  Shoes, the store with the x-ray fitting.  30 YEARS AGO  400 pounds of shark fell to the harpoon  of Bud Ramussen of Lund last week  when he speared two big ones while  fishing near Harwood Island. Scourges  of these mackerel sharks, which chase  game fish out of Straits waters, have  been  reported  this  year.  Gravel spit at the mouth of Chapman Creek. The Union Steamships Company  SS Lady Cecilia, in a dense fog, with no navigational aids to guide her, had strayed  too close to this deceptive point. Even thus stranded, the grand old lady retained  her equipoise and her air of dignified calm. Through fifty years of coastal service,  neither hail no sleet nor snow kept the Union fleet from their appointed rounds,  with very few mishaps even as minor as the one shown here. Photo courtesy  E.S. Clayton Collection and Elphinstone Pioneer Museum. L. R. Peterson  Musings  John Burnside  There were six of us on the Iron  Creek Cavalry Expedition, as it  came to be called.  The object of  the expedition was to shoot a bull  elk and it took place in the mountains around Fernie in the Crowsr  nest Pass.   I'm not entirely sure  what I was doing on the hunt in  the first place because a hunter  I am not.   I have owned a rifle,  mind  you,   and   even   tramped  around with it in the November  snows of the .Yukon ostensibly^  ; in   pursuit   of' m'0pse_"whichf'T7  secretly hoped I wouldn't  find  and never did.   I made no such  pretence in the case of the Iron  Creek Cavalry.   I carried no rifle  and had no intention of shooting  anything.   I think they just had  a spare horse.  There were four horses and six  men. The master plan was devised by one William Kennedy of  Fernie, an avid slaughterer of  . Canadian fauna but apart from  that for the most part a fine  fellow, captain of the darts team  and deviser of eccentric adventures. It called for two of the men  to drive the truck with which we  were going to transport the meat  on the return journey as far as  possible on the road which strug- -  gled to the top of the ridge above  the valley of. Iron Creek. The  other four were to ride the horses  to the end ofthe road, rendezvous  with the truck and then were to  venture into the virgin valley by  means of a path known only to  master strategist Kennedy.  There we would find elk in abundance we were assured.  Napper Jack was the owner of  three of the horses. He was a  Fernie product who had spent  almost all his adult life as a bartender in Vancouver and returned  to retire with horses in the mountains, a boyhood dream which, as  is so sadly often the case, he had  perhaps waited too long to fulfil. The years and the bars had  taken their toll. Hank Bath delivered the coal in Fernie and was  Kennedy's long suffering hunting  partner, a man of dry and twinkling wit who found no joy in  horses. "Every time I get involved in a hunting trip with the  ponies along something goes  wrong.   I either spend my time  digging them out of swamps or  chasing them through the bush  when they run away.'" Jack  Worthington worked for B.C.  Hydro and was an experienced  woodsman. The last man was  called Thompson and worked in  the liquor store.  Kennedy had been ambushed  by a kamikaze moose on the eve  of hunting season while driving  his family and the collision had  ' killed the; moose arid shattered.  3his;.eW>ow.s6]fe  with Hank Bath. Napper Jack  rode a hefty black mare who was  to be the pack horse supreme on  the return from the valley bottom,  Thompson rode a wall-eyed roan,  Worthington bestrode Kennedy's  ancient white mare and I was  aboard a rangy palomino of uncertain temperament which had  run away on Kennedy a week  before and left the imprint of  its rear feet on his belly - none of  which I was apprised of until  the trip was well under way.  The schedule called for an  earlymorning start on the Saturday of the Labour Day Weekend,  but it called in vain. Instead of  being oil the Iron Creek Ridge at  noon we were somewhat shakily  assembling in the Kennedy living  room. In fact it was at this point  I joined the party. I just happened by and suddenly 'found  myself conscripted. A long horse  ride in the mountains, great I  thought.  Napper Jack was in the throes  of a monstrous hangover and  clutched grimly and shakily to  his saddle horn and refused to  let us proceed at anything faster  than a walk, the consequence  being that it was after seven in  the evening when we found ourselves atop the ridge above Iron  Creek.  There we had a summit conference. The weary, saddle sore  riders were unanimous in favour  of making camp for the night but  Captain Kennedy was adamant.  "No, no lads, load up the ponies.  Forty-five minutes to the creek  bottom while the light lasts then  supper and an early start after  the beasties in the morning."  Hank Bath said nothing. We  loaded up the horses with the  camping gear and the grub and  took to Kennedy's Trail.  .  As  events  took  their  course  the party was about evenly divided.    One half maintained that  the trail was overgrown to the  . point of impassability; the other  insisted there never had been a  trail there in the first place.   We  had, it seemed, just stepped off  the: ridge when the black mare  lost her" pack to the clawing uin-  -,. derbrush. 7 Swearing -softly arid  .V with the sadness born of * foreknowledge   Hank   Bath   helped  Napper Jack repack her.     Our  progress    was    virtually    nonexistent.     If we ' were  not  repacking horses we were standing  hopelessly  in   a  willow  thicket  while the indefatigable Kennedy  insisted that the trail was "right  around  here   somewhere".      It  was a precipitous mountain ridge  and it got suddenly very very  dark.  We were six men and four  horses thrashing around in the  densest brush imaginable on a  mountainside in total darkness.  Kennedy had one small, totally  inadequate flash light and as the  curses aimed at his head increased in volume and tempo so did  his maniacal laughter.    Napper  Jack's woes were compounded by  the   fact   that   his   high-heeled  cowboy boots were not the footwear for mountaineering even if  there  had been a recognizable  trail and if it had not been, pitch-  black.  Somewhere around one third  of the way down the mountain,  mind you there was no way that  one could tell at the time how  far along towards wherever we  were, Hank Bath and Napper  Jack balked at repacking the  black mare one more time and  made camp just where they were  on the mountainside. The rest  of us chose to blunder on, cold,  tired, hungry, leading horses we  couldn't even see in the dark  down the mountainside on the  Kennedy Trail.  Let's leave the intrepid lads of  the Iron Creek Cavalry there on  the trail in the dark with one  third of their number already  defected and the rest in severe  disrepair. We'll finish the tale  of their woebegone adventures,  God willing, next week.  mmmmmmmm  TO MERLIN  think back, think way back  what did you tell me  that morning -  with what spell  you held my heart  and made a flying speckled bird  a hawk.  flexed wings that could soar  above and see  the farmlands,  wet brown purple  green gleaming grass  creased with ruddy lanes.  my shadow laced across and traced  the cold moist  fragrance of the day.  if I can feel the breath of sunlight  on my hooded eyes  and taste the morning  on the air once more  I shall not die.  Slings & Arrows  George Matthews  by Cedar Christie  ;%��:%:  There are some important  issues facing our country this  Canada Day week. We are experiencing an extremely high rate  of unemployment; energy sources  are dwindling; we will soon be  challenged by a de-control of  inflationary policy which promises to leave workers in the public sector far behind those in the  private sector. There remains  the problem of protecting minority interests while assuring the  greatest good for the greatest  number. There are old Socreds  calling for union between the  United States and Canada. We  have the national police force  allowing its high officials to break  into newspaper offices and apparently getting away with it.  In the midst of all of these  slowly developing and otherwise  aggravating-difficulties'we' are  being told' that the real problem  ��� facing " Canada is : ' 'national  unity". We are further being  dictated to that this "problem"  is so grave that poisoned water,  the Mafia, greedy land developers, what's left of the environment, get rich quickers, unscrupulous builders and generally  speaking the parasites and low  life of our country pose no threat  whatever compared to the  wickedness of those who would  support our French-Canadian  brothers in their efforts to protect  their language and culture. My  friends we are being tricked,  duped'and conned.  The Liberal government of  Canada has become so corrupted  by power that they will stoop to  the lowest form of political chicanery to fool the people into thinking that as soon as "we" can  solve the "national unity" question then all will be well. They  are very good at this kind of  barnyard extravagance. So good  in fact that they even have the  members of the opposition  mouthing the party line. Flora  McDonald made a speech last  week in which she made a call  for national unity which must  have brought a smile to the lips of  our beleaguered prime minister.  Even Joe Clark has been right  in there with his sanctimonious  non-efforts to keep us all. together.  Just where did this "national  unity"   nonsense   come   from?  Last  November  the   people   of  Quebec elected the P.Q. government.   While thirty or forty' percent  of  Quebeckers   had   been  voting for these fellows for years,  now all of a sudden they were a  "serious threat" to the unity of  this country. The largely Liberal-  supporting national press jumped  right in there when the P.M. pulled their strings and at a time  when it was becoming obvious  that Parliament was not getting  the job done a new issue was  invented to get our minds  off  reality.     If you can't give the  people bread then it had better  be circuses and what better entertainment than to dredge  up  all the worst in our country; all  that    latent    hostility,    bigotry  and   intolerance  that  exists   a-  mong us is just the thing to keep  the poor suckers away from the  gates.  Do you have any idea what our  national government costs us?  Check your income tax and multiply by several million and it  might give you some idea. After  paying out  all that money the  .-. :..  best they can  do  is   "national"''  unity".     We're  in big  trouble." *'.  brothers and sisters.    One pro-,'  vince in this country has apparen-"/ ;  try  decided  that  if they   don't "  look after themselves then no-^'  body  else  will.      Old   Premief '\  Bennet traded on that policy for;*"  years and the people kept bring-   '  ing him back for more.     Airy'"'  province in the country would be  crazy not to look out for its owfl'J  interests.1 The people of Quebec"_/  were doing the same thing when1*' '  they elected  Levesque.     Those:!  fat,   cigar   chewing,    Montreal'.,"*  Liberals  had been  dividing  up ���'  the   spoils   like  the   barbarians,  were   at   fhe   gates   arid, they  '  weren't   even   subtle   about   it.   -  Given a choice between the ban:  dits and the nationalists who ih  their right mind would riot have "."  voted for the P.Q.?       T , X'.XX^  But no, it can't just end there". :r,  There are too many reaf prpblerh^'.'j  to   deal   with   and   not   enough  solutions, so the federal Liberals'.,  have made a fake issue for us all'.,  to dwell on in the dark of the..^  night.   The truth be known the.;  Liberals have created a "national;."  unity" problem.     If they were.--  honest enough to recognize the, ~  Quebec election for what it was ~  then no such "problem" would '.  be upon us.    When you hire a  gunslinger to clean up the town ,.  it is often difficult to get rid ofj^  the gunslinger when the job is. ������  done. What happens if the totally' ���  manufactured    "national    unity-,  crisis" gets out of hand?   What.7  new issue are they going to in-.  vent to take our minds off this,  one?     A  national  non-smoking. ���  campaign?      Take   a   moments,  silence.      Listen.      A  way   off..!  through   the   forest,   over   the  mountains,   across   the   endless -,  prairie, on the other side of,the",  rocks, trees and lakes the sound.',  you hear is the rattling of a cor-7  rupt,     dissipated,      crumbling} >  stumbling   and  broken   governmentattempting to stay alive,.     "������"  If you don't believe me about _>  the   spuriousness   of   "national j-  unity" look for a moment at^lio;:  is being blamed for the mess. ��!  Is it Levesque himself?    No,'; he ���.'  is obviously a symptom of dis-��  content rather than a cause.    Is*:  it the Quebec electorate?    No; I;  it would be undemocratic to sug-1;  gest that the people made a mis-y  take at the polls.   Is it the oppo-*  sition?  No, they are just as keen:  to   play   the   "national   unity"v  game as the Liberals. The people ~  being blamed for this one are ther  C.B.C, and that is where ther  whole house of cards falls down. *  When it comes to the nationals-  government putting the blame on-  one institution in Canada which t  had done more to support, pro-,  mote   and   encourage   national!  unity than any other,  then itsZ  days are numbered. :~  It angers and frustrates me tot  hear people suggest that the��  people of Quebec are any less..*  loyal to the idea of this country!  than the rest of us. What can;  we do about it? Nothing. Exceptj_  maybe we can see the "nationaK-  unity" con for what it is and re->  fuse to be fooled by it. The nextC  time you hear a politician refect  to "national unity", tell him orl  her to shut up, sit down and stop*  insulting the people. And if th��J  Liberals call the election some| j  time this fall, we can throw thdj  blackguards out. ji-  Happy Canada Day. ���' ~-j}'  0 LETTERS to the EDITOR  Advisory committee  Coast News, June 28,1977.  From the Fire* Hall  Editor:  Through the initiative shown by  the;staff of the Sechelt Elementary School, an opportunity for  the; parents and teachers in this  community to become actively  involved in the curriculum development and the use of school  facilities is becoming a reality.  The vehicle of communication  concerning these areas is seen as  a "Parent Advisory Committee"  to die Sechelt Elementary School.  To this point in time there has  been no formal committee set  up. ; This article was composed  by parents who have shared these  concerns and who have expressed  ari enthusiasm for the community  to "become involved in the com-'  munity school concept.  The school and the working  comriiittee is of the opinion that  there is a need for direct community", involvement in the development of school curricula. Further;, it is of the opinion that the  school facilities could be put to  more extensive use through community involvement in the co-  ordinative planning, organizing,  and supervising of the school and  extra-curricular based activities.  It is seen that the intention of  the committee is to neither undermine nor to work independently  of the school administration.  Rather, its function is seen as  providing the opportunity for  school administrators and teachers and the community which  they serve to communicate. It  is hoped that the committee will  reflect the feeling of parents and  be able to express their major  concerns. The school, on, the  other hand, will have an opportunity to explain Us programmes  and policies which may be of  interest to the community.  Some basic, potential objectives of this parent adivisory  committee are developing and  majrbe:  1. To be totally representative  of the Sechelt Elementary district, that is attendance area.  2. ;To interpret and communicate  the'needs of the school district  as seen by the parents.  3. 'To understand the develop-  meht and administration and  teaching ofthe school curriculum.  4. ' To assist in the organization  of the full' and extensive use of  the school facilities to the benefit  of the school district.  It is hoped that representation  on this committee will be forthcoming from the Sechelt school  attendance area, the areas which  are: Davis Bay, Selma Park, '  Indian Band, Sechelt Village,  West Sechelt and Halfmoon Bay.  Other avenues of representation  may be from many and varied  resources in the area.  Gordon Berarducci, the appointed representative for this working committee presented the  above concept to the school board  and met with the following response.  Dear Mr. Berarducci:  This will advise that your letter  of June 3, 1977, was placed before the board at their meeting  of Thursday, June 9, 1977, and  the following motion adpoted:  "That the board encourage  the group to develop the concept  of a community advisory committee at Sechelt Elementary  School."  In as much as no formal com  mittee has been formed, an invitation is extended to all parents  who are interested to contact any  of the people named below either  by telephone or by mail: Mr. and  Mrs. B. Blackwell, Box 364,  Sechelt (885-9989); Mr. and Mrs.  L. McCuaig, Box 10, Sechelt  (885-2459); Mr. and Mrs. L. Dan-  vers, RR #1, Sechelt (885-3750);  Mr. and Mrs. G. Berarducci, Box  1251, Sechelt (885-3640); Mr. and  Mrs. D. Farenholtz, Box 1398,  Sechelt (885-3323); Mrs. Patti  Cawsey, Box 722, Sechelt,  (885-2391); Mrs. Perry, Box 13;  Sechelt (885-3742).  Any   support   for   this   effort  will be gratefully accepted.  Sechelt Parent  Advisory Committee  Abuses  B.C. Alcohol & Drug Commission  805 West Broadway,  Vancouver, B.C.  Dear Sirs: 7  This letter is written at the request of the Plant Accident Prevention Committee representing  over five hundred employees of  Canadian Forest Products Ltd.,  Howe Sound Pulp Division, at  Port Mellon.  Our purpose is to support the  efforts of local groups to have an  alcohol and drug abuse counselling service established on the  Sunshine Coast. Specifically,  we feel the area requires at least  one full time counsellor.  We all recognize the need for  this service when serious accidents occur, but how much greater loss is there daily, in absenteeism, lowered production and  family problems? We often see  these problems in our daily  lives without recognizing the true  cause. Very often, the people  most deeply involved do not realize what the problem is, nor are  they aware of the assistance  available to them. If, and when,  the problem becomes obvious,  our semi-isolation creates stumbling blocks when seeking counselling or treatment.  For these reasons we urge you  to give, very serious consideration .  to the requests for. a counselling;  service in this area.  - Canadian Forest Products Ltd.  Howe Sound Pulp Division  R. E. Pitman  Personnel & Accident Control  Supervisor  Beaches  Editor:  Premier Bennet plans to cleanup the beaches with public funds  and burn what he calls "the  rubbish". This is-mainly wood  and dry logs.  This debris is one of the sources of fuel for the people who  have installed wood burning  stoves because of the high price  of oil.  I wonder if Mr. Bennett's  concern has something to do with  paying a political debt to the oil  companies.  Oliver Pearl  Gower Pt. Rd.  Church Services  Roman Catholic Services  Rev. T. Nicholson, Pastor  Times of Sunday Mass:  8:00 p.m. Saturday and 12 Noon  Sunday at St. Mary's Church in  Gibsons  In Sechelt: 8:30 a.m. Our Lady of  Lourdes Church, Indian Reserve  10:00 a.m. Holy Family Church  885-9526  ' UNITED CHURCH  Rev. Annette M. Reinhardt  \ 9:30 a.m. - St. John's  Davis Ray  11:15a.m.-Gibsons    t  886-2333  ���j SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST  CHURCH  ' Sabbath School Sat. 3:00 p.m.  Hour of Worship Sat., 4:00 p.m.  1    St. John's United Church  Davis Bay  Pastor C. Dreiberg  Everyone Welcome  For information phone:  885-9750 or 883-2736  SALVATION ARMY  Camp Sunrise  Hopkins Landing  Sundays 10:30 a.m.  In the Chapel  886-9432  Everyone is Welcome  BAPTIST CHURCH  Pastor F. Napora'  Office 886-2611 Res. 885-9905  CALVARY - Park Rd., Gibsons  SUNDAYS  Morning Worship - 9:30 a.m.  Sunday School -10:45 a.m.  Evening Fellowship ��� 7:00 p.m.  1st, 3rd and 5th Sunday  Thursday - Prayer and Bible  Study 7:00 p.m.  GLAD tlDINGS TABERNACLE  Gower Point Road  Phone 886-2660  Sunday School - 9:45 a.m.  Worship Service -11:00 a.m.  Revival -7:00 p.m.  Bible Study ��� Wed. 7:30 p.m.  Pastor Nancy Dykes  Ferries  Editor:  We have sent a letter to the  Honorable Jack Davis regarding  our ferry service to the Sunshine  Coast. A copy of this is attached.  We would appreciate it if you  would publish it so that other  readers may be made aware of  these items. Perhaps with others  writing we can have these things  improved.  David H. Hartman  Sechelt  Dear Sir:  On the 10th of June 1977, I  was aboard the ferry, Queen of  Burnaby and noticed that she had  a newstarid on board. Upon inquiring, however, I was informed  that the newstand was not allowed to be opened on the'Horseshoe Bay-Langdale and return  run and that it was only opened  for the benefit of passengers between Horseshoe Bay and Na-.  naimo. As a regular commuter,  usually sailing on the Queen of  New Westminster, I find this  situation very unfair. It appears  that the B.C. Ferry Authority  has taken it upon itself to practise  discrimination towards the citizens of the Sunshine Coast. We  are all paying passengers and I  see no reason why the newstand  should not be open for the use  ofthe Sunshine Coast travellers.  Another situation are the differences in the food service. My  wife and I had occasion to sail  on the Queen of Nanaimo June  14th, 1977 and noticed that one  menu was over-turned. I had  noticed this also on the Queen of  Burnaby. On inquiry about this,  we were informed that it was the  menu only for the Vancouver  Island run. We also noted they  provide the passengers with cups  and saucers, not styrofoam cups  as on regular Sunshine Coast  runs. Deserts were available  in attractive containers ��� again  a luxury we don't have. Our entire menu was a chicken pie,  served with potato chip crumbs  and a salad. The balance of the  menu was sandwiches and snack  food; hardly classified as a dinner  menu for, any traveller in the  20th Century. We, appreciate ;  the fact that due to the time .  element of the run it is not feasible to serve full course meals,  but surely a hamburger/cheese  platter, fish and chips, chili  or the like could be served; hot  and economically, to give the  traveller a bit of variety.  We would appreciate the courtesy of a reply from you on these  matters.  David H. Hartman  Sechelt  Rebuttal  Herbicides  Editor:  Editor:  My article advocating an end to  school subsidies and a return to  private schools and grants to  students brought an interesting  response from .George Matthews  in "Slings arid Arrows" last  week. He suggested a little  knowledge is a. dangerous thing,  and he may be right. At least  my knowledge conies from 6  years at private schools and 5 at  public ones. George's information about private schools seems  to be based- mainly on Dickens'  novels and St. Trinians.  He claims he is trying to protect the confidence of the,, people  in the public schools. /r-His work  is cut out for him.. The strong  favourable response I received  to my article snow's there is obviously a serious lack of confidence in public education already.  ' George   claims   that   private  schools breed  elitism.      But  I  suggested that all schools'be private (i.e. self-supporting).   With Alan Pattinson  every child a private school stu-                               '- Gibsons, B.C.  dent, who is the elite?                                ���  He says he supports freedom      f^l/IFl _tf    \fkfmti  of choice, which prevents him     x ������** 1*1*   J *J*A>  I read with interest the story on  B.C. Hydro spraying by Harry.  Almond.  Last Monday I was talking to  one of the sprayers of the contractor who did the spraying last  summer in our area. He said that  "they made a mistake," they had  sprayed too soon as there was still  run-off happening. With the  weather we had last summer, I  can understand there was a late  run-off. t  And now I read, "The Hydro  official tried to assure me that  these smaller creeks were dry  when the spraying took place,  and would be dry again in a week  or two." .     ;      '  Since no one seems to know  know the immediate, delayed, or  accumulative effect of these  herbicides is on humans, this  spraying must stop.  Must we wait 2 or 3 generations  to find out?  from eliminating private schools  as he would obviously like to do.  But he sees nothing wrong with  effectively removing the option  of a private school by keeping  compulsory school taxes. After  being forced to pay for the public schools, how many parents  can afford private school fees as  well?  George would rather have  school boards control his children's education than "private  school twits". I'd rather have  neither; With a real choice of  schools, the parents would be in.  control. If a school were run by  twits, I'd make sure my children  went elsewhere. That's hard to  do when all the schools in a district are run by the same people.  As to saving money, with a  private school system, the unwieldy and expensive education  ministry could almost be eliminated. And who really believes  government handles money better than private enterprise?  Come on, George, you're in a  dreamworld.   There's a lot more  Editor:  On behalf of the Sechelt Timber  Days Committee, I would like to  express our thanks for the excellent news coverage given by your  newspaper of the 1977 Timber  Days festivities.  Your interest and assistance  ' helped to make Timber Days the  success it was, and we sincerely  appreciate your efforts.  Cindy Partriquin  Secretary  Sechelt Timber Days Committee  Centennial  Editor:  -  i  Gravenhurst, Ontario, was incorporated as a village in 1877.  This means that we are celebrating our. Centennial in 1977.  .  We know that former residents  and friends of our town are scattered across Canada and around  the world.    We invite them all  to 'private' schoolsth'sui you" cari'.'jto tafaus for a grand 'reunion oh'  firid u) ^^^*il]^^Sti^n��^^*Fr&ajv July i.':_��fie beginning of",  And there's a lot less to public  schools than we're all paying for.  But to cap it all, you misunderstood that I'm as much against  private school subsidies as you.  It's just that I'm against public  school subsidies too.  Adrian Stott  'our Old Home Week.   For more  '. information, please write Centennial,   Box   2132,   Gravenhurst,  Ontario, POC1GO.  Cyril Fry  Chairman  Centennial Committee  This Is the third part of a three-  part series on fighting mobile  home fires.  Years ago - even today in some  localities - the popular method of  fire extinguishment utilized a  straight stream with as much  flow as possible. Popular theory  held that the only way to completely extinguish a fire was to  "float the furniture out the front  door". This method is neither  practical nor efficient. Mobile  homes frequently are located in  an area where the engine company must depend only on the  water carried in its booster tank  or a tank truck. Areas of low-  pressure water supplies also may  dictate that the engine company  make the most efficient use of  the available water and the shortest possible lay of hose.  In 90 percent of mobile home  fires, the fire should be fought  with small lines: the booster  line or the IV.-inch or 'leader'  line. These lines supply sufficient  water to do the job, and are  easier to handle and much more  maneuverable than larger hose  in the compact areas of a mobile  home.  The most efficient fire attack  utilizes an adjustable fog nozzle  on a small line. Water converted  to steam occupies a volume some'  1,650 times greater than its  volume as a liquid. This vaporization produces not only a cooling  effect, but tends to smother combustion by displacing air and  combustible gases. The smaller  room areas in mobile homes tend  to allow steam to become more  concentrated, increasing its  extinguishing effectiveness.  In the rooms of a mobile home,  the fire fighter should use a fog'  pattern of approximately 90 or  100 degrees. This produces wide  coverage and, at a 100-pound  nozzle pressure, provides enough  turbulence to break the stream  into small particles of fog that are  quickly converted to steam: A  smaller fog pattern of about 60  degrees gives the stream more  reach down hallways.  The physical layout of a mobile  home makes it impractical to use  a straight stream.    Coverage is  ��� greatly reduced and, if, the homer ���  is   not' totally   involved,, ,water;r*  damage .co.uW.. comprise a large..,,  part of the overall loss figure.  BON ^mWfr FETE I  **|**  *V   *^r*  FETE  I CANADA!        I  885-3400  FREEZER BEEF  SPECIALISTS  GRADE A-1 STEER  Sun -Thur 10-6:30  Fri & Sat till 8:00 p.m.  SEAVIEW MARKET  Roberts Creek  ��� AN EVALUATION OF SCHOOL DISTRICT PROGRAMS            ���  ��� and the                                                 ���  ��� SUPERINTENDENT                                          ���  ��� Are you a parent/teacher/student?         Rating is Low/Medium/High.           ���  ��� -                               D          D             D                                                                                ���  ��� To what degree does the Superintendent posses the following qualities?          ���  L M H     ���             S  ���           1. Ability to deal with major problems.  DDD                   ���  ���          2. Knowledge of all aspects of education.  DDD                   ���  ���           3. A well developed philosophy of education.  DDD                   ���  ��� .       4. Ability to articulate the aims of programs and  _          directions of this school district.  DDD                   ���  _          5. Ability to show and feel genuine concern for the needs  ���          and feelings of others.  DDD                   ���  ���          6. A high degree of energy and committment to  J          the aims of education in School District #46.  DDD  '                ���  5          7. Presentable in a public sense.  DDD                   "  ���           8. Ability to communicate well with people.  DDD                .   2  ���          9. Personally generates many ideas for education.  DDD                   ���  ���           10. Has the ability to share decision making with princi-  "          pals, teachers, parents and others in School District #46.  DDD                   ���  SI           11: Has given the public a better understand ing of the  ���           programs in the schools of School District #46.  DDD      '             ���  ��� 12. When approached in confidence, deals with situation  ��� in confidence and with trust.  DDD                   2  ���           13. Is child /student centred.  ��� ��� ��� ,                ���  B           14. Acts rather than reacts to the concerns of individual  ���           pressure groups.  DDD                   ���  S|                                       Send replies to:         SCHOOL BOARD OFFICE,           i      ���  ���                                                                            BOX 220,  ���                                                                               GIBSONS, B.C.  _  Utility Connections  Quite often the need .arises to  turn off utilities. Mobile homes  built in conformance to current  codes make this quite easy, because standard cut-off locations  are specified.  The gas supply connections are  located under the rear half of  the home, on the "road" or left  side of the home as viewed from  the front end. The connection  will be within 18 to 24 inches of  the edge of the floor. If a second'  supply connection is used, it will  be at the A-frame or hitch at the  front of the home. A tag identifying the system also will be  found near the supply connection.  The electrical feeder assembly  will always be connected at the  rear one-third portion of the  home. Where.a 50-amp supply  cord is connected to a box on a  pole, it can be unplugged in most  cases. If the service is 100 amps  or higher, generally it will be run  in rigid conduit and must be disconnected in the same manner as  for a conventional home, normally  by pulling the metering device.  Furnaces, whether gas, electric, or fuel-oil fired,-generally  are located in the middle one-  third of both single-wide and  double-wide mobile homes. If  smoke hampers your ability to  locate a furnace fire, this general  rule of thumb can almost always  lead you to the furnace.f  One factor unique to mobile  homes increases the probability  of property damage. Zoning and  planning commissions'7'and  city  councils usually have relagated  mobile homes to outlying areas  where either there is no fire protection or the protection is so  distant that the response time is  too long. You can't save a mobile  home - or any other structure -  that is fully involved when you  arrive.  SECHELT - 885-3277  POWELL RIVER ��� 485-2748  Vane. Airport  278-3941  J's UNISEX  Hair Care for  the Entire Family  SPECIAL  Professional Curling  Irons $18.00   ���-:  One Year  Guarantee  WALKIN'S  WELCOME!  Monday - Saturday   '  SUNNYCREST MALL  886-7616  YOStU'S  %&  RESTAURANT  Cantonese style and Canadian Cuisine.  FRESH CAUGHT  in the Gulf of Georgia  LOCAL SALMON  COD 8l OYSTERS  ^i.      DINING ROOM HOURS  4r'��*�� (Closed on Wednesdays)  - Monday thru Thursday   12:00 noon - 9 p.m.  *j Friday &. Saturday c-   ;; 12:00noon -10:00 p  v'Sunday"- 7      4:00 p.m;-9:00 p.m  886-2700  THE  AT LAST THEY'RE HERE  HIFGoodrich  All Terrain  Radial"  The latest in 4 wheel drive is now at Coastal Tires.  It's the BF Goodrich All Terrain Radial T/A 12Rx15.  Combines superb traction, fantastic ride  and greater fuel economy.  Don't settle for average tires when you  can have the best and be first too.  ONLY $159.95  Coastal Tire  masiei chaige  TIRE & SUSPENSION CENTRE 4.  Coast News, June 28,1977.  THE LOGANBERRY LANCERS  During my somewhat chequered career, I have never more  than fleetingly entertained the  idea of Military Service. Regimentation is defintely not my  bag. I was once, at nineteen,  almost conned into joining the  Air Force by a twenty-year-man  cousin but weaseled out at the  last minute and ran away to the  logging-camps. Since the same  cousin was later involved in a  tragic crash that killed the rest  of the crew and crippled him for  life, I don't entirely regret my  choice. The woods were no bed  of roses but at least you could quit  if it got too hairy. My sole experience with the hup-two-three-  four routine came about in 1961  when I found myself caught up  in a six-week travesty called a  Nuclear Survival Course.  This precursor of the make-  work programs so prevalent today, was a wheeze dreamed up  by the Deifenbaker Government  to keep the layabouts out of mischief. It involved a month and a  half of quasi-Army service for  which we received the lavish  stipend of forty dollars per week.  Several of my streetfriends and  myself decided to give the thing  a whirl. Actually, we had little  choice. Our Social Assistance  was to be cut off if we refused.  One chilly October morning,  we found ourselves at the Jericho  Beach Base, getting inducted  along with as ragtag a crew of  misfits and deadbeats as can  possibly be imagined. Besides  the smalltime bar-hustlers like  Ourselves, there were scraggly  winos, a couple of pallid and  sniffling junkies, several well-  known fags, assorted snarly and  shaggy-haired young hoods,  .various shabbily-dressed Indians  and the odd, neat-suited and  fortyish man looking for a brief  reprise of World War Two's lost  ���youth and excitement.   Hardly a  ��iii  Peter Trower  SECHELT 885-3277  POWELL RIVER 485-2748  Vane. Airport  278-3941  recruiting-sargeant's dream. But  the written tests were a breeze  and the medical, sketchy. Most  of us passed including some of  the more emaciated winos.  "God help the bloody country if  she ever had to defend herself  with this lot!" said someone  loudly in a broad English accent.  Finally came the actual swearing-  in and a paranoid fantasy flashed  through my head. What if this  were all some elaborate scheme  to con us into the regular Army?  A quick glance at my fellow inductees disabused me of this  notion.  Next day, the actual training  began.  A number of winos went  south that  night,   selling  their  boots to finance a little oblivion.  The rest of us gamely showed up  at the various hangars to which  we   had   been   assigned.      My  friends and I had been committed  to the Signal Corps.  We were all  clad  in   itchy burlap   now   and  looked a good deal more plausible.  Finally a sargeant arrived  and let us in out of the cold.  Things were in a fine state of  disorganization   to   begin   with.  The Reserve-Army noncoms who  were supposed to be running the  show, didn't seem at all sure what  they were doing.    Young corporals rushed about, countermanding each other's orders. Finally,  they managed to take roll-call and  separate us into platoons.  The first week was pretty slapdash to say the least.  During the  drill-periods, we stumbled about  in   a   vague   approximation   of  marching.  It was like a satire of  all the boot-camp movies I'd ever  seen. Outside of the middle-aged  vets  who  fell  easily  back  into  ancient routine, we were an awkward-squad to end all awkward-  squads. The corporal in charge of  our platoon was a wet-behind-the-  ears kid.   He tried his damndest  to act like a drill-instructor but  his    earnest    commands    were  frequently met  with  ribald  re-  joiners.    I felt rather sorry for  him.   The rest of our time was  taken up with.classes.   It was all  basic Army stuff - map-reading,  rifle-breakdown,    first-aid    and  went smoother than the marching  since the instructors were older  CKAI> ���PfiMIHC  The  RAINBOW'S  END  Boutique  Individually designed clothes  ��� ���    for sale and made to order   '  We will be open 11:30 - 5:30  Thursday, Friday and Saturday  each week  men with some air of authority.  I asked one of them about the  Nuclear Survival business which  was the only aspect of the whole  thing that held much interest  for me. I was told we wouldn't be  "getting to that until the fourth  week.  That Friday, we took part in  our first pay-parade. One by one,  we marched up to receive two  tens and a twenty from the bespectacled pay-master. Upon  receipt of the money, we were  supposed to salute, wheel smartly  and return to our place in line.  I got nervous, turned the wrong  way, blew the salute and retreated in an agony of embarrassment. But the incident was  soon forgotten as we roared  downtown in our uniforms to  weather the jibes of the Granville  Street regulars and have our first  Army-financed blowout.  "After the goof-off shennani-  gans of the first weeks, we returned the following Monday to  a quite-different atmosphere.  Regular Army types had been  brought in to replace the inept  Reserve kids. Our particular instructor was a menacing-looking  brute called Sergeant Murdoch, a  beefy-featured man 'who came on  like Ernest Borgnine at his most  villainous. From that point,  the drill-periods were inseparable  from the real thing. With tyrannical Murdoch breathing down  our necks, it was easy to forget  that we were only temporary  soldiers. Our marching improved  markedly.  Finally the fourth week rolled  around and the Nuclear Survival  portion of the program began.  This was a good deal more interesting than the routine basics  they'd fed us up to that point.  The essential idea was to teach us  how to rescue survivors from the  rubble of an H-bombed city and  somehow avoid radioactive-poisoning in the process. A simulated section of a ruined block  had  been   constructed   (or   de-  structed) in an open area. Thankfully, it was not radioactive.  Much of our rescue-training consisted of tying volunteers to  stretchers and lowering them, by  means of four ropes, from a tower  the approximate height of a  second-story window. I did not  volunteer to be a victim.  One day, towards the end of  the session, they marched us into  a hitherto-unknown ready-room  that was right out of Dr. Strangelove. A gigantic map of the  Lower Mainland covered almost  one entire wall. Superimposed on  it were the circles of destruction  that would result were a five-hundred megaton bomb to be dropped on the city centre. The distance from ground-zero to the  outer fringes of fallout was  awesomely vast. It was an effective object-lesson and our minds  were suitably boggled. They had  planned to explode a large firecracker at this point to make us  jump and drive the point home  even harder but the thing proved  to be a dud and failed to go off.  On the final day of instruction,  the career-soldier who was  schooling us on radioactivity,  confided that the entire course  was utterly futile. "Hell, they've  got the bloody cobalt bomb now!  The Doomsday Machine! They  start tossing those bastards  around, there ain't going to be  any survivors." A comforting  thought to conjure with, for  certain.  Examination-time came. We  pencil-chewed our way through  the absurdly-simple written tests  and lowered our volunteer victim  from the tower with surprising  efficiency. Graduation Day arrived and I don't think anyone  failed. Following this, we were  summarily demobbed and shooed  back to the street.  That was my brief fling with  the Loganberry Lancers. (The  name was coined by one of the  newspapers in reference to the  preponderance of drunks.) I  think I still have the diploma  someplace. It certifies me as  being qualified to rescue people  from radioactive rubble. , I  wouldn 't want to bet on it.  Books  with,       \  John  Faustmann  Twilight Theatre  The Twilight Theatre continues  its policy of offering entertainment varied to fit the variety of  entertainment tastes which prevail.  Thursday through Saturday,  June 30th to July 2nd, at 8:00  p.m. with a Saturday matinee  at 2:00 p.m. the theatre will  present some more adventures of  that lovable mutt, Benji. The title  is For the Love of Benji and  features the excapades of the  winsome little canine on a voyage  to Greece.  The mood changes dramatically  for the second feature of the  week. Sunday through Tuesday,  July 3rd to 5th, will see the  latest of diabolical horror shows  The Sentinel come to town. Once  again the implied presence of the  Devil is a major factor in the  movie and some of the scenes  will not be to the taste of all.  Close-ups of a face being hacked  to pieces by a knife and a scene  of ghouls feeding on Chris  Sarandon's head may be difficult  for the average audience to endure. The censor's warning  tells us that there are many  gory and frightening scenes  along with some scenes of nudity  and masturbation.  The quality of the production  is, however, high with such fine  cinematic names as Jose Ferrer,  Martin Balsam and John Carra-  dine lending their considerable  talents to the enterprise. The film  is filmed in Panavision and Tech-  nicholour and features a good  musical score by Gil Melle.  iCamp s  oFQenn  8:00 p.m.  Thurs. Fri. Sat.  June 30, July 1,2.  Matinee; Saturday at 2:00 p.m.  TWILIGHT THEATRE  Gibsons 886-2B27  Piano recital  Blind Ian Hamilton won his way through to the  finals in the recent Chess Tournament held at  the Cedars Inn before losing narrowly to Ron  Qually of Port Mellon.  Twenty-nine piano students  of Arlys Peters presented a recital on Friday evening, June 3rd.  The parents and friends who  came to hear enjoyed the new  level of competence their "special  student" achieved this year.  Mrs. Peters has just completed  her seventeenth year of instruction, her eighth in Gibsons.  The following are the students  and their respective presentations: Cindy Skytte, 'At the  Roller Rink'; Ladonna Steward,  'The Singing Brook'; Wendy  Montgomery, 'Waltz'; Myron  Peters, 'Hungarish'; Andrew  Winn, 'Russian Cradle Song';  Douglas    Raines,    'Cucaracha';  Wilson Creek Road,  Highway 101  885-2933  NOVA SCOTIA  LOBSTER  FRESH  LIVE  Flown  Air Canada  to Vancouver  and  Tyee  to Sechelt.  $6.95  Salad Bar Available  FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY  Secfielf  garden  (Bantra  Cowrie Street  885-9711  Karen Keine, 'Country Gardens';  Carol Montgomery, 'Play of  Fountain Waters'; Sandra Mc-  Quary, 'Spanish Flea'.  Among the usual younger  students, several mothers showed  that piano can also be learned a  little later in life. Bobby Johnson  was joined by her daughter,  Sylena, to play 'Garlands of  Roses'; Pat Muryn, 'Dangerous  Journey'; Lorraine Goddard,  'At the Prom'; and Shirley  Gamble, 'Tender Flower'.  Mario Reiche gave a change of  pace to the recital and played  'Gypsy Dance' on his accordian  for which he won the Sunshine  Coast Arts Council Scholarship.  He is also a regular piano student.  Play a Lone Hand  Luke Short  Bantam Books  The last stage has left town.  Down on the main street the dust  has begun to settle, and the sun  is setting, the colour of a gut-shot  cigar. Somewhere, in the distance, an unemployed coyote  howls. Two men step out onto the  street, facing each other as their  shadows lengthen. Their eyes  squint, their whiskery faces  puckering at the citrus fruit of  impending violence, and their  hands twitch over the low-slung  sixguns on their hips. The sod-  busters and their bonneted wives,  the tinhorn gamblers and the fat  bartenders in their greasy aprons  all scurry inside. There's a-going  to be trouble. A surly voice with  an edge of steel rings out: "All  right, Bart. That's far enough!"  Welcome to Corazon, your  standard cowtown in the days of  the golden west, when men were  men and women were either glad  of it or they got shot. It's a nice  sleepy little place. Main street.  Couple of saloons, the hardware  store, newspaper office, the  Family Cafe and the bank. That's  Sherriff Edwards over there.  He's got a peaceful job here, and  he aims to. keep it that way.  There's Doc Miller, heading toward the saloon. And that there  big fella, that's Grady Sebree.  Owns the Torreon Cattle Company, biggest spread around  these parts. And that tall guy  with him? - The one with four  pistols, two bowie knives and  fangs? That there's Traff, Sebree's foreman. You thought he  was the preacher, eh? Say,  you're a stranger around here  aren't you, stranger?  Things were getting pretty  good for Grady Sebree around  these parts. Course he had to  shoot a few homesteaders, pull  up their fences, set fire to their  houses and falsify the deeds to  their land, but by now he was the  richest hombre in the whole  dadburned state. Had the whole  town baffaloed too. Wouldn't  nobody sneeze, 'cept they asked  old Grady if it was all right. But  there was one thing he didn't  reckon on, and that was the no-  account drifter who wandered  into town that day.  Giff Dixon, his name was,  "...a tall, black-Irishman with a  go-to-hell look in his eyes." They  brought, him into town in a buck-  board, all shot full of holes. Nobody knew where he came from.  Doc patched him up though, and  when the government land surveyors came * to town, he got  hisself a job with them. He  seemed to take it kind of personal  when a bunch of Sebree's boys  kicked his head around one night.  I guess that's when the trouble  started. "He was only a little  taller than the ordinary man, but  there was a kind of soft and  bitter challenge in his long face  that made a man wonder.''  You don't have to wonder for  very long in Play a Lone Hand,  though. By page eighty, two men  have been shot in the back, one's  been beaten up in a dark alley  and another one's had his jaw  broken with a full bottle of  whiskey. By this time you've  also met The Girl, the sharp-  tongued but essentially lovely  young typesetter for the local  paper. -. And you've also riiet  Sebree's mistress, the dark and  fiery Sarita, whose half-Mexicari  blood is a-boil with thoughts of  vengeance. Throw in Mr. Welling, ' government surveyor,  "boozer and lightweight", and!  a couple of ex-gamblers who've:  lost their nerve, and Cass Mur-:  ray, the good clean guy who runs?  the stables, and the widow Wiatt,,  with her prim brick house, andl  you've pretty well got the picture.  Everybody knows that Sebree:  has been bamboozling the government for years.     Every time;  someone comes to survey the land:  he either shoots them, or buys  them off, or both, just to make  sure.   But this time it looks like  it's going to be different.    Giff  Dixon, with only "...raw nerve  and a hot, bitter need for justice"  is here to save the day.  A man's  got to do what a man's got to  do, and if that just happens to  involve hitting people, shooting  them, getting kidnapped, arranging for a hired killer to shoot  the villain, and lying tied up in  an  attic  for  three   days,   well,  shucks.    What's a fellar with a  hot bitter need for justice to do?  Well, for one thing, he's got to  survive 152 pages of raw violence.  Never mind that he keeps turning  up at the newspaper office all  covered with bruises, or that the  fight scene in the bunkhouse goes  on for two full pages: "Now he  crawled back to him, balled up  the man's shirt in his fist and  rose, yanking the rider erect.  Balancing him, he swung with all  his might at the man's face," etc.  Not to worry. Giff can take it.  But will he be able to expose  Sebree for the doublecrossing,  silver-tongued sidewinder that  he really is? Can he escape the  maniacal vengeance of Traff, the  overweight throwback nasty?  And most important, will he ever  marry The Girl, and hang up his  guns, and settle down somewhere  to raise up a whole passle of  young 'uns?  Ah, the code of the west. Mind  you, the dialogue isn't much.  Everyone in the book is so thin-  lipped they -probably have to  strain their porridge through  their teeth in the morning. And  the women characters don't have  too much depth to their personalities: the blond-haired one has  a heart of gold, and the dark-  haired one seems- to have the  centre of her being somewhat  lower down on her anatomy.  After the first few pages you  get the impression that everyone  is wearing a cowboy had, and you  suspect, rather quickly, that  black or white are the only colours  they come in.  But action's the name of the  game here, and there's plenty of  it. And there's enough twists  to the plot to keep you guessing  for at least part of the time, arid  more than enough gunplay,  brawls and downright onery  behaviour to keep the thing  moving at a sprightly pace.  It's like to take yore breath  away, podner. And as we stand,  leaning noncommittedly up  against the feed store, watching  the last rays of the sun falling  on the posterior of the hero's  horse, we see him riding, once  more, out of town. And once  more the time-honoured question  has to be asked: "Say," mutters  one of the cowboys, "Who was  that masked man? "  1 GALLON POTTED  PLANTED SHRUBS  $1.99  YES! WE DO DELIVER!  $1.99  WINDMILLS  886-9815  OPEN 11-11  ' 'To serve you best"  CEPAtt.S.  Thursday & Friday  June 30 & July 1st  BETTE GRAHAM & KEN DALGLEISH  I  *eft  O*5  &  Saturday July 11 o\*0<x  Saturday July 18    ^e$v  MMWVWVVWWWWWA  CLASSIFIED NOTE  Drop off your Coast News  Classifieds at Campbell's Family  Shoes ft Leather Goods In downtown Sechelt. It's convenient!  wwwwvwwwwwwww  FURNISHINGS  ��� TEAK  ��� WATER BEDS  ��� CARPETS-LINO  ��� DRAPERIES  ��� KITCHEN CABINETS  ��� FREE ESTIMATES  Gibsons,  B.C  LeonKazakoff   886-9093  4 Coast News. June 28,1977.  5.  Fish   Talk  ���By Gerry Ward  '. - Having mentioned breeding of  ���fish in several of my past articles,  ;-I would like to now go into a more  '-specific explanation and show the  ;'type of fish required to have good  ''healthy offspring. In this week's  "article I will only write about the  jtegg layers. *  ���~l The first and most important  step of breeding egg layers, is  that you haye healthy fish which  ��� have been well conditioned. They  ���should show good colour, have  ���all fins in good shape, and be  ���strong.  These fish should be fed  -a' variety of live foods, and they  should  be  kept   under  optimal  conditions.    One of the biggest  problems   of   breeding   tropical  fish is to have soft, slightly acid  "water.   With modern technology  this may be achieved with different  additives  and  with   substances   which   can   soften   the  Water, but with a lot of different  -types   of  fish   this   isn't   good  -enough.     An  old,   and  at  one  :time, reliable source of neutral  "water was plain'old rain water,  T>ut again. because of supposed  'modern-day  technology,  this  is  "not always reliable due to our '  present problems of pollution.  -'  Another problem is trying to  'get live foods for the baby fish  ���dnce the/ have hatched.     One  method I have used in the past,  a*nd it worked extremely well, was  ;to take the used filter floss from'  st filter and squeeze the mulm into  CLASSIFIED NOTE  Drop, off  your   Coast   News  Classifieds at Campbell's Family  Shoes & Leather Goods In downtown Sechelt. It's convenient!  Vutiztp  DELI  and  HEALTH FOODS |  In Beautiful  Gibsons Harbour  one block from  ^Government Wharf;  Open  Friday til 7:00  886-2936  ,(we speak German).  m  mm  the rearing aquarium. This con-  taines large amounts- of certain  types of protazoa and rotifiers  which are ideal for most egg layer  babies, because they are quite  small.  Before starting breeding egg  layers, three aquariums are nec-  cessary for any amount of success. One will be needed for  conditioning, a second as a  breeder tank and a third as' a  rearing tank. The last two must  be kept scupulously clean as the  eggs and babies are subject to  a large number of infections and  infestations of fungus and parasites. Whenever it is possible,.  the breeder tank should be positioned so it gets morning sunlight. With some of the varieties  this is an absolute must.  Many tropical fish are spawn  eaters and they will consume all  the eggs they spawn if not detected in time. Some of the safe  methods to use, which have  helped aquariusts for many years  is as follows: For fish whose  eggs sink, place marbles over the  bottom of the tank, the eggs  will fall past the marbles where  the parents can't get them. For  adhering type eggs, use a nylon,  or other synthetic type of substance which will hang like a mop  when weighted to the bottom, the  eggs will adhere on or into these  mops and, being transparent,  will not be easily seen by the  parents. For floating eggs use  a mop type of synthetic fibre or  plants, the eggs float into these  and will not be easily seen. Once  the fish have spawned, be careful for fungused or dead eggs,  they can usually be easily seen  as white or an opaque colour,  they should be removed immediately to stop further infection.  Once the eggs have hatched  the babies should be protected  from light for a day and they  should not be fed right away.  On the second day, depending on  the size of the fish, they can be  fed a small amount of rotifiers or  protazoans, or for the bigger  ones, newly hatched brine  shrimp, daphnia, micro eels,  or grindal worms.  Partners that have spawned  once successfully will usually  spawn quite easily on consecutive spawnings. All of these  points m'ay'help you get a start,  but do not forget that God made  these finny charges and therefore they will not always' obey  your every wish arid command.  In the few years of my experiences with fish I have been disappointed many times, but I have  seen some very startling and unsuspecting things also.  Cornel cry with me  The graduating class of Elphinstone Secondary  School are picture in a group at the graduation  ceremonies held at the high school on Saturday,  June 25th.  Lucky Leo Lottery helps handicapped  July 1, the British Columbia  Lions Society for Crippled Children launches the fourth Lucky  Leo Lottery to raise money for  the society's programs for the  handicapped: transportation,  camping, accommodation; and  patient care.  Three previous Lucky Leo  Lotteries raised $687,855. for  charity with $246,424 going to  commissions to selling clubs and  $441,431 to the Lions programs  for the disabled.  "It costs about $12,500 to  operate one Easter Seal Bus a  year and we have 103 buses transporting 3,000 disabled-youngsters  and adults every day all over  British Columbia," says Ralph  H. Long, .Chairman of Lucky  Leo Lottery IV.  "In the summertime the buses  drive the kids to one of our three  Easter Seal Camps for the handicapped at Winfield in the Okanagan; Squamish in the Lower  Mainland and Camp Cowichan  on the Island," says Long.  Lucky Leo IV has 470 prizes  with top prize of $100,000.00 to  be drawn Friday, November 25  and eight Early Bird Draws for  $1,000.00 to be drawn about  every two weeks. Main feature  of the lottery is that the purchaser  can win nine times on the same  ticket. After each draw,, all  tickets go back into the barrel.  Odds on the first Early Bird to be  held in Kamloops, July 15, are  especially good since it is only  two weeks after sales begin.  The second Early Bird will be  in Courtenay July 29th and the  third in Kelowna, August 19.  Locations for subsequent Early  Birds will be announced at a  later date.  Prize money for the 470 prizes  total $136,800.00 including the  $100,000.00 first prize, $7,500.00  second prize, $2,500.00 third  prize  and  9  seller's   prizes  of  <m^  The advertisers on this page and  the one following are members of:  GIBSONS HARBOUR  BUSINESS ASSOCIATION  *mm  m  J Crafts & Hobbies  886-2811  # Hobby Supply  -fr Games & Toys  x WINE ART Supplies  ��  Local sculptor Dave Kydd accepts his third place prize at a recent ceremony in Toronto.  Kydd's welded metal sculpture of a crow took third place in the national competition  despite having been slightly damaged in transit to Toronto.  THE VOICE OF EXPERIENCE  COMES TO CB -WITH THE  MOTOROLA CB40 ~ ONLY $262.00  1930  t puts sound on \  the introduction  : comnitrciiil car  1942  Mutorcfif puts sound on wheels  with thP introduction of  tht: first comnitrciiil car radio.  1977  Motorola introduces the- ���Wchanni'l, CB r.iilit-  that only 40 yeir�� ot e xifnera* creii'J pns.Ui.c.  \telorola cneineeis create the hand-held  " Wilkie-TalKie-the first tniniatunzwl  AM tronscriver small enough  to be cradled in a hand.  Motorola is cleatly tlw leader  ui professional communications  a* police, fire, departments,  taxis, and industry pul the tool.  of 2.way radio to work.  PAJAK    Electronics Co.,Ltd.  ONLY AUTHORIZED MOTOROLA  SALES ON THE SUNSHINE COAST  886-7333  Sculptor accepts award  Henry Galinski of Powell River  and David Kydd of Gibsons were  awarded second and third prizes  respectively in a welded metal  sculpture competition for amateur  sculptors. The annual competition, called Weldart, is sponsored  by Canox and Deloro Stellite,  divisions of Canadian Oxygen  Ltd.  Mr. Galinski, * ho placed  second, received $500 for his  entry called "Matriarch". The  sculpture depicts a strong, proud  woman of mid lie years reflecting  on her life and family with deep  fulfillment and satisfaction. Originally formed in clay, the 16" x  8" x  12" sculpture is made of  16 gauge mild steel.  Mr. Kydd's entry, entitled  "Vagabond" earned him the 3rd  prize of $250. His sculpture is  a 34" x 15" abstract of a crow in  a mischievous attitude.  The theme of this year's competition was "joie de vivre".  ,. Judges for the competition  were Ronald Nasgaard, Curator  of Contemporary Art for the Art  Gallery of Ontario; Walter Yar-  wood, R.C.A., Canadian sculptor; and Arnold Edinborough,  President and Chief Executive  Officer of the Council for Business and the Arts in Canada.  as  aoe  ape  ace  ace  ������  )  BONNIEBROOK LODGE  XfUj'i't;  W_f��'>  Pn the Beautiful Sunshine Coast at Gower Pom  ��� Guest rooms (Breakfast Included)  ��� Dining Room    886-9033     S^nleSlrbero  ���~z  aoe  ~z  ������  aoe  $200.00 each.  Tickets are $2.00 each and can  be purchased .from, local Lions  Club members or other selling  agents, from newspaper coupons  or directly from the . Society  Offices at 171 West Sixth, Vancouver; 3937 Quadra Street,  Victoria or RR #1, Sorrento.  ANN NAPIER  Dear Ann:  I've been two years in a new  community and I've had such a  difficult time making friends. I  like some people but when I try  to see them they seem cold and  sometimes brush me off. I wonder what I am doing wrong?  Alone  Dear Alone:  I think we've touched on this  subject before. First I think you  have to like yourself. When you  feel self-sufficient, for instance,  you have a hobby and enjoy your  time with yourself, it brings you  in contact with others that share  that interest. Being alone lets  one get to know themselves. Gardening is so soothing, just the  sounds of summer, the' warm sun  on your body. You are helping  plants to grow and filling their  needs, being in harmony with  nature is very enjoyable so when  you go about your life with pleasure and a smile, people are  drawn to you. You put yourself  on a plane to make genuine  friends. First love yourseii and  others will too.  Dear Ann:  I've been wanting to meet  someone for quite a while that I  could go dancing with, go to  dinner and movies and have a  good time with. I just don't  seem to meet anyone that I have  anything in common with. I've  gotten so desperate I feel like  running an ad in the lonely  hearts column.  Looking  Dogwood Takeout  Dear Looking:  You have a common problem,  but a commercial answer probably won't help - and it can be  dangerous to advertise for a  mate. Many a womanizer has  preyed on women by romancing  them, when they are in a.rosy  daze, sell their belongings, get  their property or bank account  in his name then they are at his  mercy. He has no mercy, this is  a business with him. He soon  disappears. The person in'question is not only lonely but broke  and disappointed, maybe despairing. So join groups or take a  cruise, a train ride, spend the  weekend in Lund, bue never be in  a hurry, have a good time and  attract someone to you, be aware  that all who approach you may not  be sincere. Play a waiting game.  Dear Ann:  In a column of the past' few  weeks you were listing the~con-  tents of a stay young diet. Don't  you find it takes a lot of time and  shopping to get all the varied  ingredients for that diet?  Trying  Dear Trying:  I'm glad to hear you are trying  to follow that diet. I don!t find  ' it hard to shop as I live in an area  that is near Gibsons. I just go  to a market in Gibsons and the  fish market nearby with lovely  fish. The diet calls for fish 5  times a week and shell fish ,two  times a week. The health food  store has alfalfa seeds and.mung  beans to sprout, yogurt, contents  for your health bread and-many  other goodies with no additives.  Once you decide no more; ernpty  calories, you will enjoy, a. ^dif-  ferent way of cooking.    ������_>.,  Kids. Everyone's pleasure,  everyone's problem.  In Gibsons the pleasures and  problems are probably no different than it is anywhere else.  The little guys have little  league baseball, they play  hockey, go to boy scout meetings,  camps, etc. The Navy League  has their cadet corp and in general until about age 15 or 16 there  are Organized activities for young  people to enjoy.  j,7All;.-. of ^these ,,acfiyUies7have;  ^pne thing in common. ^None of  them can be made to work without discipline. '  In this permissive society discipline is a nasty word with military  overtones: visions of jackboots,  brass buttons and Sam Brown  belts go hand in hand with brainwashing and Hitler youth; things  our parents had good reason to  be disillusioned with and yet  discipline is essential to studies,  to self-improvement and to self-  respect. Very little in fact has  ever been achieved without discipline.  Children do not instinctively  know what society expects from  them, they have to be told,  they have to be punished when  they do wrong and rewarded  when they do right. In this way  we instill in them our own values.  If we have no moral values of  our own, our children can hardly  be expected to have any either.  If we do not believe in the values  we expound and thereby do not  live up to them ourselves our  children can be expected to grow  up as liars and hypocrites.  As a community, children are  everyone's responsibility. Those  people who take time to coach  little league; camp with the boy  scouts and teach seamanship to  navy cadets deserve a strong  vote of thanks from all of us.  . This Tuesday, thanks to a few  dedicated people, upwards of  70 youngsters will spend the day  aboard the Navy minesweepers  H.M.C.S. Meramiche and  H.M.C.S Thunder. Even if they  learn nothing factual, the exposure to a disciplined working  team will be good for them.  Children are tomorrow's people  but even more they are today's  responsibility. Let's not rob them  of their self-respect by "giving  thenfi everything we never had".  Give them a little discipline instead so that they have an anchor  instead of being left adrift in  a sea of indecision. Get involved;  you owe it to your kids.  MURRAY'S  Garden JSyi  Pet Suppl��5|  .�����������.. .���*.-��� ������% '-���  Last week for  STEER MANURE  AT  886-2919  GIBSONS  FISH  MARKET  OPEN: Tiies.-Sat.  10:30-6:30  Halibut Creole  Set the oven at 400*.  Place on a buttered ovenproof platter or  baking pan  IV. pounds halibut in one slice  Sprinkle with  Salt and pepper  Put over the fish  5 thick slices peeled tomato  Vt green pepper, chopped  2 teaspoons chopped onion  Bake 25 minutes. Baste S times during  baking with the pan juices and with  Vt cup melted butter  SCTVCli.  Dencious  home-made style  FISH & CHIPS  886-7888 Coast News, June 28,1977.  ���     ;*.--���' v.'.�� ;^>:>t: 7"-P'sV  '<^*��Sj��<3:  Showing impeccable form and concentration, a young rider takes her horse over one-of  the jumps at the gymkhana held at Brushwood Farm on Sunday, June 26th.  Grade Horse Association  Are you a grade horse owner?  Maybe you just don't know what  constitutes a grade horse...well  we'll start by saying that any  horse with one or neither parent  being registered purebreds of  the same breed, signifies that  horse agrade.  We are looking for grade horse  owners all across Canada. There  is now an, association just for  you and your horse and it is called  the   International   Grade   Horse  BETTY'S  Family  {Thrift Store*  Next to  the' Dogwood Cafe  ''"""'Open    _ _  10:00-5:00  Tuesday - Saturday  *   CLOTHING   *  ������*     DRAPES      *  \ *    BEDDING    *  'Great Buys\  Association. We know you are  out there competing in everything from cutting to pleasure,  to barrels and jumping, and it  is for this reason that the association has been formed.  Our association provides a  points system to collect points  on any class in which you place  at any show (open) no nutter  where the location. Remember  you don't have to live in any  specific area to collect points.  These points are tallied at the  end of the six month show season  and annual awards will be presented in each of the 12 championships available in three  age divisions. Competition is  Canada wide, so you may be  running against a member from  B.C. to New Brunswick.  At the annual closed Grade  Horse Show, competitions for  Queen, Princess (to 18 years)  and Sweetheart (12 years & under) will be held. These girls  are crowned at the Awards Banquet where annual  awards  are  Operation  Life'tujc  Lifestyle is keeping in shape  or resolving.. to get into  shape by regular physical  activity.  Peninsula Cleaners  Co/trp/ete  drv ciEPninc  seruite  WHARF ROAD  SECHELT  .    885-9554*  ALTERATIONS & REPAIRS  1521 GOWER PT. RD.  GIBSONS, B.C.  886-2200  LUCKY  DOLLAR  Dollar  886-2257  Specials....  Canada Grade A #1  Florida Tomatoes 39c lb.!  LOCAL NEW WHITE  Potatoes     9 lbs. 99c  ��� 9V-Cauliflower 49c ea.  Strawberries   59c lb.  By the Flat $5.89  ^Canada Gr. A No. 1  Cottage Rolls  *1.69 lb.  'Breakfast Delight  Si&e Bacon  >, *  *<  Medium  <($i*ound Beef  ���1.59 lb.!  89c lb.  presented.  The Monthly newsletter put out  to keep members in touch with  activities show dates and clinics  etc. in their area is available  through subscription with a free  classified section to all members.  It is true we are indeed a registry, not designed for breeding  stock but solely for the purpose  of recording those outstanding  horses and their show achievements. Registration is available  for whatever reason the owner  sees fitting.  There are no regular meetings  to attend but a period during the  spring when members are urged  to contact their Provincial representative regarding the issues  they have in mind. All issues  are put to a vote for the entire  cross Canada membership.  Along with the regular annual  awards, there is an Outstanding  Merit of Achievement certificate- presented to any horses  earning those points required.  Any horses ,, ridden by strictly  , youth rider can-achieve and, .earn,  the Yqiith;O.M:'A. certificate;.  In .'the hot too distant'future,  you will see the Canadian National Grade Horse Invitationals for  top levels in all aspects of competition. If you want to get in  on something very big just beginning for the grade horse and  his owner, then drop us a line,  it won't cost you anything more  than an 12* to find out all about  us. The address is: International  Grade Horse Association, RR #2,  Beausejour, Manitoba.  Winner  At the recent draw of the Navy  League Cadets and Wrenettes  raffle, the winner was Jim  Shepperd of Lockyer Road. He  was the winner of a $100 Gift  Certificate from Richard's Men's  Wear. The winning ticket was  drawn by Richard Macedo.  The proceeds will go towards  Summer Camp in July. Mahy  thanks to those who participated  in the raffle.  Soccer  by Barnlbus & Co.  The Wanderers Soccer Club  is having a well deserved rest  until practises begin again in  late July.  During the next month, the  club executive is making plans  for the coming year and laying  the foundation for the new Juvenile Soccer team to be entered  in the North Vancouver, Soccer  League.  Graham Chapman is presently  in best position to take the coaching job with the juveniles. He  has a good background as he  coached the Burnadettes Juvenile  team in West Vancouver for three  years. He has played with the  Burnadette Senior Men's team  and is trying out for the Wanderers team this season.  Recent reference to soccer as  a gentleman's game by George  Matthews has spurred this  brief account of the history of  soccer.  It all began with the Chinese  about 400 B.C. Later, the Romans picked the game up where  two sides, usually soldiers, tried  to gain victory by forcing a ball  across a line marked on the  ground in the rear of their opponents.    They often- played in  the garrison camps in England.  The Romans were known to use  a human skull for a ball in their  friendly kind of fighting.  The English chose Shrove  Tuesday in the 1100's to match  school against school and village  against village. Rules were  ignored and "broken heads and  broken limbs were plentiful".  Soccer was banned in Middle  Age England because it interfered with military training and  it was sometimes too vigorous.  Since 1863 when soccer became  legitimized and the Football  Association was created, the  game has had remarkable growth. Crowds of over 100,000 are  common place in Europe and  South America.  Penalty Shots: Future Juvenile  Soccer team players are requested to get in touch with Jan de  Reus at 886-2046 as soon as  possible. Players are invited from  Sechelt, Gibsons and Roberts  Creek. Games will be played  starting this fall in the West  Vancouver 3rd Division on Saturdays. Wanderers are urged to  continue training in preparation  for some summer exhibition  games and the August outdoor  5 aside tournament.  Elphinstone teachers and  students Blood Donor champs  <3H*V  ALLSPORTS  Marine  Inc.  886-9303  Featuring:  SPARTAN  12V Searchlight  $170.00  OMC  2 eye  motor oil  16 02.  Senior     softball  SENIOR MEN'S SOFTBALL June 23  Clay Carby presents the Blood Donor Cup on behalf of Kinsmen Chairman John Wra.y  to Jaimie McPhedran, president of Elphinstone's Student Council.   The cup is presented  annually to the organization who has the largest number of donors at the Kinsmen's Blood  Donor Clinic. This year it was won by the teachers and students of Elphinstone.  The dog's name is Blossom. It is not believed that she was a donor.  Langdale students awards  LEAGUE STANDINGS  Roberts Cr.  Legion  SecheltR&W  Windsor  Sechelt  W  9  7  7  6  1  L  4  5  5  5  13  Pto  18  14  14  12  2  HOME RUN LEADERS  D.Lamb, R&W5  P. Gaines Legion 5  5 players tied with 2 each.  TOP BATTERS  R. Crosby .408  P. Gaines .380  R. Baba .375  P. Rigby .367  June 22nd  R     H     E  SecheltR&W     11      12     7 "I  Legion 12,:,    9 .  5  >;. W.P.i Fi7Reynolds s(^2h 4th,  B. HolmesJ A. Skytte^thf LijP.  J. Hall (1-1)' H.R.7 J; Gray "it  D. Lamb 2 (5) Sechelt, B. Bennett  1, R. Baba 1, Legion,   v  The battle for second place  turned into a slugfest as Legion  downed Sechelt 12-11. There  were 21 hits and 5 homers in the  game. Jim Gray with 1 and Dave  Lamb with 2-2 run homers were  the big guns for Red and White.  Brian Bennett a 3 run shot and  Robert Baba a grand slam led  the Legion attack. Alex Skytte  came on in the 7th to nail down  the win for Legion.  Windsor 12  Sechelt 3  W.P. L. Loden (3-2), L.P.  R. Dixon (0-5), H.R. R. Williams  1 Windsor.  Windsor's Les Loden lost his  bid for a shutout in the bottom  of the 7th inning when his teammates committed 3 errors.  R     H     E  Sechelt       2      4       1  Legion       12     12 '   1"  W.P. F. Reynolds (5-2), L.P.  R. Dixon (0-6), H.R. F. Reynolds  1 (2), R. Baba 1 (2), B. Bennett  1(2).  Brian Bennett 3-4, Pat English  3-4 and Freeman Reynolds 2-3  lead the 12 hit Legion attack.  Roberts Creek  SecheltR&W  R  4  6  W.P.   J.   Mercer   (4-4),   L.P.  B. Lineker (0-3), D. Elson 2nd,  G. Ferris 6th, H.R. J.   Pomfret  1 (2) Roberts Creek.  ������j Sechelt continued their dominance over Roberts Creek as they  ^knocked off the League leaders  * for the third, straight time.   The  only bright spots for the Creek  weJ*e��Kerry Eldred 2-3 and Jay  omfret'&solohOrber.'-777 ��:.X^  ,��� # ^GjifesTHli'WEE^' W   "  'June   28:      Roberts   Creek   vs  Sechelt R & W at Brothers.  Sechelt vs Windsor at Reserve.  June 29:     Sechelt R & W vs  Sechelt at Hackett Park, Windsor  vs Roberts Creek at Brothers.  July 2 & 3:   League Tournament  Brothers    Park,    games     start  10:00 a.m. all day both days.  Students at Langdale Elementary School have been participating in the Canada Fitness  Award Program. The awards given are based on levels of achievement in six fitness ex^;  ercises. 114 Langdale students received participation awards; 18 received participation pins;  46 were awarded bronze medals; 29 silver medals; 14 gold medals; and the six students  pictured above achieved the highest possible award - the Award of Excellence. Recipients  of the highest award were Annabel Webb; Sheila Reynolds; Christine MacPhee, Maria  Christian; Ian Stevenson; and Brandon Whalen. A seventh student, Anne Grafton, who  also won the highest award has since moved to Victoria.  Job  Placement  A Job Placement Programme  for adult offenders was initiated  as a LIP project in December,  1975. As a result of the success  of the project, it was further supported in August, 1976 by the  B.C. Corrections Service and  most recently expanded to include job finding services for  juveniles - funded by Manpower  Outreach and B.C. Corrections.  Job Finders are continually  seeking employment possibilities  for their clients. If you know of  an interested employer, please  contact Lynne Northfield at  261-0277.  GIBSONS ATHLETIC ASSOC.  Minor Baseball & Softball  TEE BALL  Independent Order of W L Pte  Foresters 10 1   20  Gibsons Legion #109 6 6 12  Gibsons Athletic Assoc. 5 8 10  Royal Bank 3   11    6  SOFTBALL  W   L Pte  Helen's Heros 10   1  20  Gibsons Atheltic Assoc. 7 4 14  Gibsons Legion #109 5 7 10  Gibsons Hardware 0   12   0  PLAYOFF SEMI FINAL  TEE BALL  Independent Order of Foresters  20;    Royal   Bank    19;    Gibsons  Legion #109 30; Gibsons Athletic  Association 25.  SOFTBALL  Helen's Heros 34, Gibsons Hardware 3; Gibsons Atheltic Association 23, Gibsons Legion #109,  7.    .       ���  Bronco  tZXSS&ZEDADS  Legion #109 won the Bronco  Baseball Tournament at Brothers  Park on Saturday, winning all  three games. In the first game  Legion defeated Roberts Creek  16-3. The second game between  Gibsons Athletic Association and  Kinsmen featured good .pitching  by Shawn Murphy and Gregg  Schneider as the G.A.A. won 5-4.  In the third game Legion defeated  Wilson Creek 2-1 behind the  strong pitching of Rick Kinne as  Glen Hanchar scored the winning  run.  In the final game Legion defeated G.A.A. 9-3 with Tom  Kurucz the winning pitcher.  The teams thank the parents  and spectators for their support  during the year and high school  students from Elphi for their  help umpiring games during the  season.  886-7215  m\mV���  LOH4  NCIES  ~\9  FLORON Box 238  AGENCIES LTD  REAL ESTATE  ��  INSURANCE  1589 Marine Drive Gibsons,  RON MCSAVANEY  AGENT  885-3339  OFFICE: 886-2248  JOHN BLACK  886-7316  ���   t  FOODS  HOPKINS  STORE  Gib,ons e0aS_. 7W?,886-7215  <&**    Co.      a\  HURACHE SANDALS     $3.75 PER FOOT   [  1977  T��HITH  Solid State  Colour  fromv^Wi  Summer  Savings  on Quality  Robinson's T.V.  Marine Drive        GIBSONS  886-2280  We give Personalized  Service  i   at Chain-Store Prices  i  Wh at more could  one ask?  <?>*.  We're Just an easy stroll from  Langdale Ferry Terminal  HIGHWAY 101  ^  r^jTI Hopkins  '���' Store  Langdale Terminal  ZENITH The qualify goes in before the name goes on'  Hopktn's Wharf Coast NewS, June 28,1977.  ftlSf SEWH  CLASSIFIED DEADLINE  NOON SATURDAY  CLASSIFIED RATES &  INFORMATION:  All listings 50C per line per week.  Or ose the Economical 4 for 3 rate  4 weeks for the price of 3  12 P0i Dt     counts as 2 lines  24 Pt.  counts as 4 lines  *  A************************  Here! Mew!  Our  Classified  Ad Policy  Minimum $2.00 per Insertion.  All fees payable prior to Insertion.  * In the event of an error the  publisher shall be responsible for  one corrected Insertion only.  NO REFUNDS  Tills offer Is made available for private individuals.  Print your ad faa die squares Including the price of the item and your telephone number. Be sure to leave a blank space after each word.  No phone orders Please. Just mall in the coupon below accompanied by cash, cheque  or money order, to Coast News, Classifieds, Box 460, Gibsons, B.C. YON 1VO, or  bring In person to the Coast News office, Gibsons  DROP OFF POINT: Campbell's Shoes and Leather Goods Store, Sechelt.  *  *  J  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  ��  *  ***************************  These Classifications win remain free  ��� Coming Events  -Lost  ��� Found  Coast News  CLASSIFICATION:  Classifieds  Box 460, Gibsons, B.C.  VON1VO  Eg. For Sale, For Rent,  etc.  III                     II I  I  T  I..  ."  Announcements    Work Wanted       Work Wanted       Help Wanted  Home Health Service of Canada  presents: You and Your Health  v (3 vol.) The Bible Story (10 vol),  Uncle Arthur's Bedtime Stories  (5 vol.) Golden Treasury of  Bible Stories (1 book) Tiny Tots  Library (1 book) Representative:  Bob Wickwire - 885-9750. 26  We wish to thank our many  friends for their kindness and  understanding during the recent  loss of our beloved wife and  mother. Mr. Chris Beacon,  Alex Kerr & Family. #26  ROBERTS CREEK LEGION  Opens at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday!  Early bird  bingo  7:00,   regular  8:00 p.m. Everybody welcome 1  Work Wanted  For Sale: My services as a professional Exterminator. 'Certified  7 years experience in control of  fungus, insects, rodents and  odors. North Island Pest Control.  885-3606  HIGH FUEL COSTS  Peerless Tree Services Ltd. will  turn your problem trees into firewood. $18.00 per cord. We do  danger tree falling, topping and  limbing too. Expert insured work  'Know the cost before you start'  'Know the cost before you start'  Call us at 885-2109. Free estimates. JohnRisbey.  LAVA  CONSTRUCTION  MADEIRA PARK  House   Construction  Renovations  Repairs  883-9032      883-2488  CLASSIFIED  1,1 l-M I I I I I I I'I 4 I A_LU_l_L_J_i    ,  _D DEADLINE SATURDAY NOON 11  CREATIVE LANDSCAPING  Enhance and Beautify your  surroundings with creative  landscaping. By appointment  only: 886-7785 tfn  HOUSEKEEPING  Experienced. Reliable. From  1:30 - 5:30 p.m. After 6 p.m. call  Darlene at 886-9082. 25  EVERGREEN CONTRACTING  Trees topped, limbed or fell  and bucked into firewood lengths-  FREE ESTIMATES    886-9192  - * #27  CREATIVE ORGANIC  LANDSCAPING  ENHANCE & BEAUTIFY  YOUR SURROUNDINGS  NATURALLY  For Free Estimate  CaU 886-7785  For explosive requirements -  dynamite, electric or regular  caps, B line E cord and safety  fuse, contact R. Nlmmo, Cemetery Road, Gibsons. Phone  886-7778. Howe Sound Farmers  Institute.  * CAT-BACKHOE ���  GRAVEL TRUCK AVAILABLE  Land clearing, Septic systems  886-9633 886-9365  f "new service? "j  HANDYMAN SERVICE  All types Home Repairs  and Services  Renovations, Additions,  Painting, Clean-up, etc.  North of Davis Bay  883-9266  BARRY LARGE  BOX 43,18 ELLIOT RD.  GARDEN BAY  : hugh's :  i i  PAINTING;  &  WINDOW  | CLEANING;  I ���  I Free Estimates I  I Call I  I 886-7060 I  TELEPHONE  ANSWERING  SERVICE  886-7311  ��� Evergreen Landscaping ���  Complete Landscaping services  Scheduled    lawn    and    garden  maintenance.     Free  estimates.  -      885-5033  1 TON TRUCK FOR HIRE  Light Moving & H��pHng  Gardening & light landscaping  After 6 p.m. oil 886-9294.  Opportunities  * Portraits     * Weddings     ���  * Passports   ��� Commercial  ���  * Copy and Restoration work ���*���  Professionally done in your home  or in ours.  Day or Evening call 886-7964  PROFESSIONAL EAR PIERCING  Fast and sterile. Birthstone  studs, af GIBSONS GIRL & GUYS  SALON. 886-2120  DARK ROOM FOR RENT  Enlarger &. Chemicals supplied.  $2.50 per hour.     Call 886-9781  Wed.-Sat. 10-3p.m.  PART-TIME COLLEGE  INSTRUCTORS  Commencing this Fall, Capilano  College will be offering English  100 and Psychology 100 on the  Peninsula. It is expected that  new courses will start in January,  1978.  Instructors  are wanted  for the  following subjects:  English 100 (Fall 1977)  Anthropology 120  Art 100  Philosophy 101  Sociology 100  Instructors with qualifications to  teach other credit courses are  also invited to apply.  Please mail application with a  short resume of education and  previous work experience to  Co-ordinator Karin Hoemberg,  Continuing Education, ' Box 6,  Sechelt, before July 15. The  office is closed until August 1. #26  HELP WANTED  Mature women required for the  Sunshine Coast Homemaker  Service. Rewarding service with  flexible hours. In service training  given. Must have own transportation. For detailed information  call 885-2876 or apply in person  to the office above Sechelt Credit  Union. #26  The dental office of Dr. Webb  and Dr. Rosland will be needing  a part-time assistant. Three  days a week. Please apply in  writing: RR #2, Gibsons, B.C. #26  Yoshi's Restaurant ' requires  waitress & person to mix drinks.  Please write with resume to  Box 1023, Gibsons. #26  For Rent   ~  Room & Board available at  Bonnie-Brook Lodge! Meals &  services incl. laundry.  Private room. 886-9033.  Gower Point ocean beach esplanade.  For Rent  Spacious furnished 1 bdrm. suite,  fireplace, patio, ideal for working  person.   Refs please. ��86-7769. .  #26   :  2 bdrm. furnished trailer at  waterfront.    No dogs. 886-2887.  Available immediately: Bachelor,  suites and 1-1 bdrm. in Gibsons!  886-7490 & 886-2597. . tfri  :  Newly decorated 2 and 3 bdrm!  apts. Stove, fridge, heat and  cablevision incl. in reasonable  rent. Sorry, no pets. Close to  schools and shopping. 886-7836  tfh  Furnished 1 bdrm. suite, waterfront, Marine Drive, Gibsons.  No dogs. 886-7108. #26  3 bdrm. waterfront house, Mission Road. $276.50 per mo.  White: 886-2937. #27  For  rent:     1   bdrm.   furnished.  cottage, all modern conveniences,. ���  for mature single man.   Roberts  Creek wft. 886-9885. #26 -  Duplex, Gibsons: 2 bdrms,-nice   Z  view, big yard, washing machine,  available July 1. $175.00.    Call  886-7218. #26''  Wanted to  Rent  Young couple looking for small '  house with reasonable rent.��� 2 -*���  bdrm. at least. 886-7908. #26   ���  Employed writer seeks secluded .   .  cabin, "a sunlit clearing in the ,  woods", for work, rest, contemplation.   Caretaking or livestock' - -  duties possible. Reasonable rent.' ^  Anywhere in southern portion ;.of*.  the Sunshine Coast.   Respond to  Box 13, Coast News, Gibsons.   ���  Property  2 bedroom house, Selma-Park.  $285. per mo. Available July  1, no pets. 885-3644. #26.  r  TAT-r-T-r AUTOMOTIVE  jrjrmmVmWMmWjrjr  Gibsons  JAMIESON AUTOMOTIVE  TOYOTA  New & Used Car Sales  All Make, Parts & Services  AL JAM IESON Phone 886-7919  Quefii eiettrir Itfc.  ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING & CONTRACTING  Serving Sechelt, Gibsons, Roberts Creek & Madeira Park  885-3133  J. McKenzie Ron Blair, P. Eng.  Porpoise Bay Rd. P.O. Box 387 Sechelt   V0N3A0  >V  r  NEED TIRES1'  Come in to  COASTAL TIRES  at the S-BENDS on Highway 101  Phone 886-2700  A  Box 860  Gibsons  @VBE ELECTRIChd.,  Phone  886-7605  >V  V.  RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL  Maintenance    Pole Line    Electronics  ������POWER   TO    THE    PEOPLE''  -r-r-T-rjmW-r-r BUILDING SUPPLY -#5#5_P5_P__R_P__P5_r  r  TWIN CREEKLUMBER  & BUILDING SUPPLIES LTD  Everything for your building Needs  Free Estimates Phone 886-2291 -2  WINDSOR   PLYWOOD  (THE PLYWOOD PEOPLE)  Construction Plywood, Fancy Panels, Insulation, Doors, Bifolds,  Sidings and all Accessories.  Delivery Phone 886-9221 Highway 101, Gibsons  <<KC_p_#_��_05_PS_PS#S-r    EXC A VA TING    'Mmmmmm^  ' CUSTOM BACKHOE WORK ""^  SEPTIC TANKS INSTALLED  Government Approved  Free Estimates  Excavations - Drainage Waterlines. etc  VPh.8B5-2921  Roberts   Creek  J. B. EXCAVATING  886-9031  SS8^  Water, sewer, drainage installation  ��� Dump Truck ���  Backhoe  ��� Cat ��� Land Clearing  ��� Free Estimates # Septic Fields  r  CADRE CONSTRUCTION LTD.  - HOUSES BUILT TO COMPLETION -  Framing, remodelling, additions  y     886-2311  886-2311  A  Gibsons  STANHILSTAD   ROOFING  DUROID. SHAKES  ORREROOFING  R.R. 1, Port Mellon Highway        Phone 886-2923  L & H SWANSON Ltd.  Sand and Gravel  BACKHOES  Ditching - Excavations -Ready-Mix Concrete  885-9666 Porpoise Bay Road Box 172, Sechelfr B. C.  R & B BULLDOZING & BACKHOE  GRAVELTRUCK  Septic Systems    Land Clearing  886-9633 or 886-9365  r  \M KITCHEN  CREMODELLING  l^H  CENTRE  KITCHENS AND  BATHROOMS  886-9411  DAY or EVENING  OCEANSIDE FURNITURE  &CABINETSHOP  Custom Built Cabinetsand Fixtures -it 30 Years Experience  ExDert Finishing   -tr Kitchen Remodelling A Specialty  ^ R   BIRKIN  885-3310  885-3417  R. BIRKIN       .      .  Beach   Ave.,   Roberts   Creek  THOMAS HEATING  OIL BURNER SERVICE  Complete Instrument- OO0"7111  set-up of furnace  ANDREASSEN    ELECTRIC  (GIBSONS CO.) Serving the Sunshine Coast  ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR  Per Andreassen 886-9439  General Delivery Hopkins Landing, B. C.  t At the sign of  the  Chevron  HI LL'S MACH IN E SHOP  & Marine Service Ltd  Arc and Acty. Welding Machine Shop  Steel Fabricating Automotive - Marine Repair  Phone 886-7721 Marine Ways Res. 886-9956  /r  v.  ABC  GENERAL PAINTING  SPRAY - BRUSH - ROLL  Call 886-2512  R.R. 2  SUNSHINE PAINTERS  Let us brighten up your life  RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL  886-9564  Free Estimates  "N  Gibsons  r  ^  RAY COATESPLUMBING  886-7695  Contract Renovations & Service Work  ^  SEASIDE PLUMBING  PLUMBING - PIPEFITTING -STEAMFITTING  HOT WATER HEATING  886-7017  All Work Guaranteed  "~ TIDELINE ',  Plumbing and Heating Contractors'  RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL  FREE ESTIMATES  Bernie Mulligan 886-9414 Denis Mulligan  >V  Space for Rent  ^\  D.J.ROY  SURVEYOR - ENGINEER  Marine Building Wharf Street  Box 609 885-2332 Sechelt, B.C.  --r-r-r-r-K^JT MISC. SERVICES -4P5_WK#5#5#5_P5_r  GUTTERS  FREE ESTIMATES  phone  CUSTOM CRAFT PRODUCTS  Commercial AAR.9QQO Chapman Rd.  Residential ��XKJ-��W��* Sechelt  DAY and NIGHT  PEN BOWLING G|BSOns lanes  BOWLING HOURS  FRIDAY 8. SATURDAY 7:00-11:00 p.m.  SUNDAY 2:00 - 5:00 and 7:00 -11:00  ^S  MACK'S NURSERY  SUNSHINE COAST HIGHWAY  ' Shrubs, Fruit Trees, Plants  Landscaping, Pruning Trees, Peat Moss 8l Fertilizer  Licensed for Pesticide Spraying  COAST PAVING  PAVING FROM DRIVEWAYS TO HIGHWAYS  Highways, Parking Areas, Driveways, Crushed Gravel  Equipment Rentals  Main Office: Box 95,   Powell River,    485-6118  Branch Office:        Sechelt, Ph. 885-2343 9:30 to 3:30 p.m.  >V  /*"  Serving  Langdale  to Earls  Cove"  r  r  BERNINA  SEWING MACHINES NOTIONS etc.  REPAIRS AND SERVICE TO ALL MAKES  SEWEASY  Cowrie St. Sechelt 885-2725  SUNSHINE COAST  DISPOSAL SERVICES  Port Mellon to Ole's Cove  Commercial Containers available  885-9973  886-2938  r  Marv Volen  TREE TOPPING  VIEW DEVELOPMENTS LTD.  Clean up your wooded areas.  Remove lower limbs for VIEW  Top tall trees adjacacent to building  886-9597  MOVING AND STORAGE  LEN WRAY'S TRANSFER Ltd.  Household Moving & Storage Complete Packing  Phone 886-2664  Packing Materials for Sale  Member Allied Van Lines     R.R.1. Gibsons  r  ���* �� ��  JOHN HIND-SMITH  REFRIGERATION &. MAJOR APPLIANCE SERVICE  Port Mellon to Pender Harbour  Res. 886-9949  BILL BLAGK>  ROOFING  Shingles, Shakes, Tar and Gravel'  V886-7320 or 885-3320   Industrial & Residential     j 8.  Coast News, June 28,1977.  Property  LANGDALE HEIGHTS  Approx. 2200 sq. ft. of finished  area. Carpet up & down, 2 brick  fireplaces, 3 bedrooms upstairs.  Ensuite plumbing. Extra large  picture window in living room,  Crestwood cabinets in kitchen &  baths. Family room. Playroom.  Concrete driveway, sundeck.  4 deluxe appliances. Walking  distance to school & ferries.  Panoramic view. F.P. $59,900.  Eves: 886-9770. #28  Cleared view lot above Selma  Park. . Natural Dogwoods, 88'  frontage on a street of fine  homes. 885-2198. '   #26  Grandview Road: 3 bedroom  rancher, lrg. fenced lot, beautifully treed and landscaped, only  1 yr. old, close to school. $43,000.  Phone 886-9451. #27  By owner: Halfmoon Bay, beauti-  ful waterfront property, approx.  60'xi75'. Lovely Arbutus trees,  sewer, hydro & water included.  Lot #48, Trueman Road. $33,000.  576-6261  Fairmont Road: 2 bdrms, large  living room with corner fireplace.  Excellent view, needs work but  good potential. 886-2164 eves.  3 Bedroom home, full basement.  Electric heat, on 6 acres close to  Gibsons. Phone 886-7832 or  886-2813.   Brand New -1300 sq. ft., 3 bdrms  on grade entry to full basement.  600.sq. ft. sundeck, 34' of carport, fantastic view, level lot,  150; yards to lovely beach &  mooring, on sewer. New subdivision, Franklin Rd. area,  Gibsons. Bank appraised in the  $60,000. bracket, asking in the  low! $50's. You have to see this  dream home to believe it. Call  886-9890  Property  A number to note:  885-3521  WHARF REALTY LTD.  For sale by owner: 3 bdrm post  & beam home near tennis courts.  Gibsons. $35,000.    886-7566  Eves, after 4:00.  Lot ��� for sale in Sechelt near  Hackett Park, fully serviced.  Asking $11,500. 596-7022  Lot,;65'x130' on Cochrane Road.  Phone after 6 p.m.: 886-7407.  MUST SELL  '/2 acre lot.     Water,  power  &.  drive way, cleared building site.  $10,700. o.b.o. 885-9798.  BONNIEBROOK CAMP &  TRAILER PARK  For sale: 2 good  view  lots on  Chaster   Road,   1,000   ft.   from  waterfront, utilities. 886-2887.  Cleared, fenced, level, ready to  build on 62 x 120' lot on Dolphin  St., across from Hackett Park.  Within 2 blocks of shopping and  school. 885-9976.  View lot on Thompson Road,  Langdale Heights $14,500.  Call owner at Victoria, 658-8055  or Vancouver 980-5431.  5V_ acres land, year round creek  in Roberts Creek area, $7,000.  Down and assume mortgage of  10% interest @$200. per month,  approx. price $27,000. 885-3881.  In Langdale, 79' x 150' lot for  sale. Near school, beautiful view,  by owner: 112-255-4805.  By Owner: 2 bdrm. home, lot  size 69 V_ x 220', large family  room, newly decorated inside &  out. Rosamund Road. Call  886-2060. #29  By Owner: Retirement honte,  Franklin Rd., 816 sq. ft., newly  decorated inside & out. W/W,  close to beach, store, P.O. &_  church. 2 bdrms. $35,600.  Call 886-2060. #29  3 bdrm. new home, 1300 sq. ft.,  basement, 2 fireplaces, sundeck,  beautiful view. W/W carpets,  double glass windows. New area  in Davis Bay. Asking $68,500.  885-3773. ttn  Large lot for sale, 12x60 trailer  pad on North Road, 12x60 workshop, 12x12 pumphouse, hydro  pole in ready for building or for  trailer. Asking $12,500. Offers.  886-9041  3 Bedroom waterfront house in  front of Post Office. Cream  coloured. No collect calls please.  874-9574  View Lot - Granthams Landing.   886-2978   Spacious 3 bedroom family home  in Langdale. Large granite fireplace in 16' x 30' living room.  Custom walnut kitchen cabinets,  new kitchen appliances included.  Beautiful view. Close to ferry and  one block from school. Garage  workshop, fruit trees. F.P.  $49,500. Call eves: 886-2090.  By Hwner: Selma Park home on  large lot, panoramic ocean view.  1400sq. ft., 2 bdrms. up, 2 down.  Heatilator fireplace on each level.  Sundeck, fenced yard. F.P.  $72,500. Call 885-3773.  Property  Large  home on  waterfront   lot.  60'x278'  Franklin Road. 261-1756.  New 3 bedroom home, family  room, basement, 2 car garage,  carport, view of Trail Bay,  $61,000. 885-2503.   Mobile Homes  SUNSHINE COAST MOBILE  HOME PARK  Units now on display - phone:  886-9826  USED UNITS  1971 12x63 Leader, 3 bdrm., fully  furnished, very good condition.  1966 Chickasha,   10x50,   3 bedroom, fully furnished with 14x20'  extension.   Set up on large well  landscaped lot.  1975 Statesman, 24x48, double  wide. All appliances including  built-in dishwasher, 2 bedrooms  and den or 3 bedrooms. Carpeted  throughout, electric fireplace,  built-in china cabinet, large  corner landscaped lot with 2  paved driveways. Lovely attached sundeck. Very good  condition.  NEW UNITS  SPECIAL  12   x   60   Colony,   2   bedroom,  limited addition, carpeted living-  room, fully furnished and decorated.  12x68 Meadowbrook, 3 bdrms.,  front kitchen with bay window &  patio door. Built-in dishwasher.  Carpeted throughout and fully  furnished.  BONNIEBROOK CAMP  & TRAILER PARK  Two choice  mobile  home sites  available.    Gower Pt. Rd. Call:   886-2887   1974 Bendix mobile home, 12x60,  includes stove, fridge, drapes  and metal shed. Rented lot is  very private, landscaped and near  beach. New owner subject to  land owners consent. $15,000.  o.b.o. Flume Road, Roberts  Creek. 885-3302. #29  MUST    SELL: 1975    mobile  Brittany home, 12x60, two brms,  coloured appliances, fridge, dish-  wahser & range. Trailer to be  moved. Price: $11,000. Call  886-7654. #28  Cars & Trucks  Boats  20% OFF  All tires in stock in the  New MacLeod's Store  in Sechelt  885-2171  1971 Toyota Celica, excel, shape,  new everything, mags, 7 radial  tires, 60,000 miles, $1,950.  886-7993 or 886-2761. 26  1974 Austin Marina, low mileage,  excel, cond. $1,800. o.b.o. Call  885-3949. #26  1963 Chev pick-up, good cond.  throughout. $500. 886-9819 or  886-7310. #26  Must Sell! No reasonable offer  refused. 1973 Ford Courier,  canopy, 36,500 mi., good cond.  buying new truck. After 5 p.m.  885-9440. #26  1968 Vauxhall Viva Hatchback,  fair cond. 58,000 miles, $250.  o.b.o. 885-9553. #26  1969 Renault, must sell. New  engine, good for parts at least,  needs body work. $200. o.b.o.  885-9859. #26  V.W. Stn. Wgn. good cond.  with snows & roof rack. $600.00,  o.b.o. After 6: 885-9577. #26  1953 Pontiac Chieftain, good running cond. $950. o.b.o. Call  885-9563. #27  10Vi ft. Capilano Camper, sleeps  five, furnace, range, ice box, lots  of cupboards. Tie downs & jacks.  $1,500. o.b.o. 886-2531. #26  Motorcycles  1975 Yamaha, dirt bike. Call  885-3185. #26  175 Honda XL, 1973, Sell or swap  for truck of equal value. Call  886-2737. #26  1974 Suzuki, TS 185 Enduro,  knobby tires, MX hop-up kit,  helmet, many extra parts, goes  anywhere, 2,000 mi. $750. Call  886-7993 or 886-2761. 26  WANTED: 7 ton "A" Licence or  7 ton "B" licence or equivalent  thereof. Phone 885-3342 before  2300 hours. #26  Hydroplane, 50 H.P. Merc, brand  new paint job, with trailer.   Call k  885-3185. #26  11 ft. fibreglass boat, clinker  style, very beamy, good shape.  $125.00. 885-9313. #26  Jet Boat, 18 ft. log salvage.  886-2737. #26  12' Wood runabout with controls $50.00, 10' rowboat, fibre-  glass over ply, $50.00, 8' hydroplane, wood-fibreglass seams,  $45.00, 14' Hurson glass craft,  45 Chrysler elec. two tanks &  trailer, good shape $1,100.  885-3410. #26  MARINE SURVEYS  AND APPRAISALS  For selling, purchasing  or financing.  Surveys for insurance  or settlement of claims.  Captain W. Y. Higgs  Box 399, Gibsons, B. C.  Phones: 886-9546, 885-9425  1973 Davidson/Crown 18' Fibre-  glass sailboat, c/w dacron sails,  SS rigging, aux. engine, view at  Gibson's wharf. F.P. $2,450.  firm. 886-2738. 26tfn  For Sale  Wringer washer $10.00, Oil cookstove $50.00, Wood-electric  cookstove $100. o.b.o. All in good  working order. 885-3811 until  June 30th 1 pm - 4 pm. #26  Stereo set, includes speakers,  amp & turntable. $150. after  6 p.m.: 885-2835. #26  Fridge & range,. $35.00 each.  4-pce. living room suite $150.,  886-7449. #26  Speed Queen washer, Easy  dryer, wash basin, toilet, bath,  also 18 ft. ladder; reasonable.  885-3341. #26  Sony portable cassette recorder,  excel, cond. 885-9313. #26  Misc. cottage windows, PR L.R.  lamps, Blk & gold $12.00, bookcase w/ glass door $4.00, tri-  light lamp $12.00, new canoe  paddle $6.00, garden shears  $3:00, bronze sundial $10.00.  885-3441. #26  For Sale  SECHELT OFFICE SUPPLIES  885-3258  2 drawer filing cabinet  letter size -18" depth  $69.00  2 drawer filing cabinet  letter size - 24" depth  $79.00  SECHELT OFFICE SUPPLIES  885-3258  For Sale: Good mixed hay, to  clear $1.50 a bale, minimum 20  bales. Call 886-2887.  Coming  Fvenfs  Wanted  Used red bricks.  Call 883-9253.  Will pick up.  #26  For Sale  Good new mixed hay, $2.00 bale.  Min. 20 bales. 886-2887. tfn  2 tubular style beds, reg. size.  $45.00 each. 2 fold-away cots  $20.00 each. Evenings phone:  885-2083. #26  Hand    mower,     lightweight  Clemson. $25.00. 886-9696.     #26  MACLEOD'S  WESTINGHOUSE SALE  Refrigerator reg. *569.95  NOW '489.95  Washer        reg. ��469.95  NOW '409.95  Dryer reg.*279.50  NOW '249.50  Hot Water Tanks  reg.��144.95  NOW *132.95  In the New  MACLEODS STORE  in Sechelt  885-2171  Boats  17 ft. Houston Glass Craft boat.  75 H.P. motor, 3 H.P. aux. with  trailer, canvas convert top, A-l  cond. Must sell. Consider offers.  885-3173. #28  SUB-DIVISION  CONSULTATION  HEAL ESTATE  ���   m\  V~U  LORRIE GIRARD  886-7760  JONMcRAE  885-3670  AND LAND DEVELOPMENT LTD  Office: 886-2277  Vancouver Line:  Toll Free:  682-1513  CHRIS KANKAINAN  885-3545  APPRAISALS  MORTAGES  NOTARYPUBLIC  FAIRVIEW ROAD: 'REVENUE' - This  new duplex on a Vi acre lot represents  the ideal investment property. There are  1232 sq. ft. in both of these side by side  suites. Features are post and beam construction with feature wall, fireplaces  and sundecks. There is appeal to separate rental markets with a 2 and a 3 bedroom suite. Assumption of present mortgage makes purchase very easy and a  yearly income of over $7000.00 makes  this property hard to beat.     F.P.$75,000.  CEMETERY ROAD: Imagine! 6 acres  plus a modern, approximately 6 year old  home in rural Gibsons. The home has  3 bedrooms on the main floor. Full unfinished basement, 2 fireplaces and carport. This is an exceptionally good buy  considering the lovely 6 acres of property.  : F.P. $65,500.  MARTIN ROAD: Beautifully landscaped  yard sets off this lovely 2 bedroom home.  Breathtaking view of Bay area and Keats  Island. On sewer with blacktopped driveway and carport. Includes washer,  dryer, fridge and stove. F.P.$42,900.  SARGENT ROAD: This lovely custom  built home has every feature you could  imagine. Finished fireplaces upstairs  arid down (heatilators). 4 finished bedrooms. A 4-piece master bathroom with a  3-piece ensuite. 23x13 ft. finished rec.  room. Double windows throughout,  mahogany custom cabinets and trim.  Nicely landscaped and terraced yard with  6stone retaining walls.        F.P. $64,900.  DOUGAL ROAD: 1288 square feet of  comfortable living space on level landscaped lot, fronting also on Bay Road.  Close-to shopping and only V. block to  the boat launch. Large living room with  fireplace. Presently 2 bedrooms (could  be 3) and a sewing room.       F.P.$39,900.  FAIRMONT ROAD: 4 finished bedrooms  in" this 1360 sq. ft. full basement home.  Fireplaces up and down, finished rec  room, 2 full bathrooms, plus ensuite.  Living room, dining room with nook area  all have a beautiful view of the Bay area  and out through the Gap. Double carport and huge sundeck round out this  home designed for comfortable family  living. F.P. $67,500.  HILLCREST AVE: Almost 1100 sq. ft.  home in good area, close to schools,  shopping centre, etc. Large living room  22 x 12 with ��� view. Two bedrooms,  large kitchen, utility room and dining  area make this a very livable home and  w.ith a little bit of work, could be quite  lovely. NOTE I The down payment Is  only $3,500. F.P. $34,500.  GIBSONS RURAL: Lovely large uniquely  designed LOG house, exceptionally well  built, feature-wall fireplace, large living  room, w/w carpets and two bedrooms on  main floor. Upstairs has master bdrm.  with ensuite plumbing and another room  that could be a den or another bedroom.  ALL this on 2V_ acres mostly cleared  and fenced view property with chicken  house, barn, corral and garden. The  price also includes a built-in range, wall  oven, dishwasher, washer & dryer.  LOW...LOW...PRICE. ONLY:  F.P. $49,500.  GLEN ROAD: Cozy 2 bedroom starter  or retirement home situated on a fabulous  view lot overlooking Keats Island. This  home can be purchased with a low down  payment and easy monthly instalments.  F.P. $32,900.  COMMERCIAL WATERFRONT:    With  waterfront as scarce as it is this double .  use lot represents real value. F.P. $22,000  GIBSONS: Highway 101. Really nice  small house situated in the centre of the  village. Close to shopping and beach  Panoramic, spectacular view of the Harbour and Howe Sound. This one bedroom  nicely' decorated home is an ideal retirement find. Especially with the low,  low price of only: $F.P. $29,900.  SOUTH FLETCHER: A perfect family  home with 4 bedrooms. Has a beautiful  view from the large living room. Feature  wall fireplace. Large kitchen and eating  area. All of this over a V. basement.  Rear access from a lane. Separate workshop. A super value for only:  F.P.$39,900.  SUPER SPECIAL - must sell NOW  SOUTHWOOD DR:    Redrooffs: Owner  most anxious to sell.   Large lot 230 x 80.  This is a very fast growing area.   Light  clearning only. F.P. $9,500.  GLASSFORD ROAD: Modern living at  its best. This 3 bdrm., split-level home  has an endless array of features. There  are skylights in the kitchen, living room &  dining room that will brighten up any day  around home. The extra large living  room has sliding glass doors to front,  fireplace & wood feature wall. The kitchen has a nook area, while the dining  room will easily accommodate the largest  of dining room suites. The upstairs offers  1V. baths and 3 bedrooms with access to  the sundeck, and If you reed room to  expand, the family room is just waiting  for your finishing touches. The workshop  and utility area are also roughed in. This  must be seen to appreciate the value.  F.P. $49,900.  LANGDALE: Johnson Road: A truly  lovely executive home with an unsurpassed view. Approx. 1400 sq. ft. on the  main floor, plus full basement. Two fireplaces, two full baths, feature wood  panelling in Dining area, large entrance-  way. Paved driveway, carport, sundeck  and special lighting features throughout.  This Is a well designed, spacious home  in a very good area, close to school and  ferries. Make an appointment to see this  today. F.P. $62,500.  GRANDVIEW ROAD: Brand new!  Quality built 1300 sq. ft. home with full  basement. Many extra features including  heatilator fireplace, 2 full baths plus  R.I. In basement. Built-in dishwasher,  fridge & stove, w/w carpeting throughout. F.P. $58,500.  HILLCREST ROAD: At the corner of  Crucil Road. Two bedrooms upstairs,  plenty of room for expansion in the full  basement. Spend your leisure hours  enjoying the spectacular view from the  living room and huge sundeck. Be the  first owners, this home is brand new.  F.P. $52,500.  NORTH FLETCHER: Almost new, 3  bedroom, well-designed home with  absolutely magnificent view. 1268 sq.  ft. home with sundeck, w/w carpeting,  ensuite plumbing in an area of good  homes. THIS CAN BE YOURS FOR AS  LITTLE AS $2,500. DOWN. The full  price is ONLY: F.P. $44,900.  CHASTER ROAD: New Home, 1.%  blocks from the Chaster Road School now  under construction. Well designed 3  bedrooom family home on full basement.  Nestled in the trees to provide the ultimate in natural landscaping. Many  deluxe features such as 2 finished fireplaces, skylights, sundeck and custom-  made kitchen cabinets.        F.P. $54,900.  SARGENT ROAD: Spectacular view,  beautifully designed home in good area.  3 bedrooms, sunken living room, 2 fireplaces, full basement and sundeck. Lot  all landscaped and terraced. Many  extras such as built-in bar, etc.  F.P. $74,000.  REDROOFFS: Small unfinished house  on large, V. acre lot. Electric heat.  Ideal do-it-yourself project. F.P. $23,500.  ARNE PETTERSEN  886-2277  LOTS  LANGDALE: Investment Value: This  beautiful view lot has but one flaw - it  is partially in a ravine. For the man with  some fill and a truck to move it, you can  build your dream lot. On Langdale  Ridge in area of high quality new homes.  Make an offer. F.P. $7,500.  CHASTER ROAD:  Nestle your home in  the trees on this 67' x 123' building lot.  Area of proposed new school. Name your  own terms, no reasonable offer refused.  F.P. $11,500.  UPLANDS ROAD: Tuwahek, ideal recreational lot in beautifully wooded &  park-like area, zoned for trailers. This lot  overlooks Sechelt inlet and the Lamb  Islands. F.P. $8,900.  ABBS ROAD: One of the nicest building  lots in Gibsons. Level building site with  drop-off in front of property to protect  privacy, spectacular panoramic view.  Size66'x128'. F.P. $18,500.  GOWER POINT ROAD: Privacy and  100' of Waterfrontage, beach just at  other side of the road. Driveway is in,  building site cleared with septic tank  and main drains in. F.P. $25,000.  LOWER ROBERTS CREEK ROAD:  1.12 acres In the very desirable Roberts  Creek area. There Is a driveway already  In and a tapped Artesian well on the  property. F.P. $14,900.  GEORGIA DRIVE: Lovely large view lot,  just up from Georgia Park. Lot size  67' x 108' x 99' x 121*. NOTE! Septic  tank and field are already in AND approved. f.P. $19,900.  SCHOOL & WYNGART ROADS: Only  6 of these Duplex zoned lots left. Beautiful view properties overlooking the Bay,  close to schools and shoppings. All lots  perfectly suited to slde-by-slde' or up/  down duplex construction. SPECIALLY  PRICED NOW: Only 1 will be sold at  $14,500. and only 1 ��$15,500. Act now!  LOWER ROBERTS CREEK ROAD: Off  Cheri Ann Park, beautifully cleared and  level building site hidden from the road  by many large trees. Easy access to an  exceptional beach, 70' x 100* and priced  for Immediate sale. F.P. $12,900.  GOWER POINT: WATERFRONT:  Lovely cleared 100 x 195' very steep to  the beach but a fabulous building site  with southern exposure and panoramic  v'ew- F.P. $25,900.  ALDERSPRING ROAD: Absolutely the  best soil going on this 50' x 150' lot on  sewer in the heart of Gibsons. Potential  view of the Bay area. Excellent terms  available. F.P. $12,000.  GIBSONS BUILDING  SUPPLIES  CLEARANCE  While quantities last  1x10 utility S/lap 12c Un. ft.  2x3 utility S4S cedar     9* Un. ft.  1x10 economy cedar s/lap  7cUn.ft.  4x4 cedar SL/S random length  29* ft.  4x8x3/iK-3 *3.29  4x8x5/16K-3 ���        ��3.09  PANELLING  Cdlortone   '  ���    ���"���'- ! ��4;79  Pecan ��6.99  Rosewood *4.59  Slate Pattern reg. S3S9 ��7.29  GIBSONS BUILDING  SUPPLIES  886-8141  RIDING LESSONS  -ft-  Expert Instructor  ���it  English or Western  -& Gentle horses provided.  BRUSHWOOD FARM  886-2160  Leaving coast. Available end  June, near new RCA washer and  dryer $550., Danby 15' refrig.  $350,885-3854. #26  FOR SALE  Horses, Saddles  Shoeing, tack, etc.  886-7967  Reasonably priced propane range  must be in good working cond.  Appearance is not important as  it is to be used in an outside  area. 885-3360. #26  Very reliable small car for local  use. After 6: 885-3561. #27  Free fill. No rubbish. After 8 pm.  call: 886-2153. #28  WANTED  * Used Furniture  or What Have Vou  AL'S  USED FURNITURE  WE BUY BEER  BOTTLES  Gibsons 886-2812  Timber Wanted pins Alder  Poles bought and sold. Let ur.  give you an estimate. D & O Log  Sorting Ltd. Phone 886-7896 or  886-7700.   WANTED  Wilderness retreat, hunting or  fishing camp. Will consider  water access and no power.  886-9009. #27  LOGS WANTED  Top Prices Paid for  Fir-Hemlock-Cedar  L&K LUMBER  (North Shore) Ltd.  Phone 886-7033  Sorting grounds, Twin Creeks  Mt. Elphinstone Eastern St&t  Tea, 2:00 p.m. Saturday, July-  9th, at the Masonic Hall. #26  �� Wednesday - July 6th - 7:30 p.nr*  SLIDE PRESENTATION  of Accelerated Christian Education by Temple Acadamy Principal    B.M.   Gagliardi    at    Gladr  Tidings Tabernacle,   Gower  Pt.;  Road,    Gibsons. Everybody,.  Welcome. #27  Cavalcade of Fashions        _  July 16th at Gibsons Legion Hall.-"  $1.00 admission. Starts 2:00 p.m.  Participants are  Sea  Cavalcade  Queen contestants. #28  SAVE THE WHALES  Greenpeace anti-whaling vessel:  needs supplies and help before  mid-July   -   Food    and    galley  equipment, paint, electrical and,  mechanical   help,   Zodiac    and  engine use, money. Will pick up.  Call Bobbi:  738-7134,  or write  2108 West 4th Ave., Vancouver..  For Sale  *  TYDEWATER CRAFTS *  Needlepoint,    crewel,    knitting,  crochet, handcrafts. We can help  every Wednesday   1:00  - -3:00.  . 886-2811  See Gibsons United Church Thrift  Shop for your summer needs.  Swimsuits, shorts, tops, runners,  books, babywear, men's wear,  shoes, lingerie, misc. items.  Every Friday 1 - 3. Church bsmt.  #27  Found  At the Twilight: Key with small  bell attached. Will the gentleman  with the beaten up Austin come  and get it. .   - #26  Found: Green budgie, Roberts  Creek area. 886-9885. #26  LIVESTOCK  * HORSE SHOEING ���  Horse Manure for Sale. T. Bowe.  886-7967  YOUR AUTOPLAN CENTRE  ALL TYPES OF INSURANCE  Seaside Plaza  886-2000  Gibsons  886-2607  Atottfuuelt  ALL SERVICES AVAILABLE  ��� Airline Tickets  ��� Air/Sea/Land Tours  ��� Camping & Sports Holidays  AGNES LABONTE  886-7710  Going through the Change of Light?  WHETHER WIRING A NEW HOME, OR ADDING AN OUTLET, I  OFFER YOU PERSONALISED SERVICE AT ONE OF THE MOST  REASONABLE RATES ON THE PENINSULA.  IL  SUPERIOR ELECTRIC  FOR GUARANTEED SERVICE  CALL R. SIMPKINS "  885-2412  FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE   II  FOR SALE IN GIBSONS  Large bedrooms, ensuite plumbing,  custom-built teak cabinets in  kitchen and bathrooms. Thermo-  pane windows. Dining room plus  nook. 2 fireplaces. Close to mall  and schools.  F.P. $48,500.00      PHONE 886-7625  1971 BMW 2002.  quire: 885-9777.  $2,500.    en-  #26  JAMIESON  AUTOMOTIVE  YOUR TOYOTA  DEALER  Presents JUNE  CLEARANCE  SALE!  1966 Chrysler  New Port, v/8, Auto.,  P.S. P.B.  1968Volks��pgen  St6L_GWagon  16TOcc, Radio  1969 Dodge Coronet  V/8, Auto,, P.S., P.B.  2-Dr, Hard Top  1969 Pontiac Laurentian  V/8, Auto., 2-Dr H.T.  P.S..P.B. :  1970 PonttaoConvert  j/u&Mo.  P>?P.B., P.W.  1970 Toyota Corono MKII  Station Wagon  4 Speed .  .  1971 Volkswagen  1600 cc., Automatic.  Fast Back    .  1971 Mazda  Station Wagon   \  1800 cc.  1972 Plymouth Fury II  V/8, Auto., (318)  2-Dr. H.T. P.S., P.B.  1972 Mercury Montego  Station Wagon  V/8 Auto., P.S., P.B.  1972 Datsun ;  1600cc. 2-Dr., Automatic  1973 Toyota Corolla  2-Dr. Sedan  4-Speed, 1600 cc.  1973 Dodge Polara  4-Dr. Sedan  V/8Auto.,P.S.,P.B.  1973��^un  1200Wflpe, 4-Speed  1973 Dodge Polara  4-Dr. Sedan, 440  V/8, Automatic  1976 Austin Mini 1100  TRUCKS  1967 Ford  Vi Ton, V/8, Automatic  1970 Chev  Vi Ton, 4x4,4-Speed  1973 International  V* Heavy Duty, 4-speed     ~-  1974 Toyota HIlux  L/B, 4-Speed  1971E200 Ford Van  302, Automatic  Your Choice of Any New Toyota  Cars or 4x4 Trucks and Several  Demo 1976 Models. AU Cars  are Shop Certified.  MDL01342A  886-7919  Any reasonable offer  will be considered  and all trade-ins  accepted.  The Gibsons  All Nighter  Wood Heater  CUSTOM BUILT  From $310.00  The best  in economical woodheat  May also be used for cooking.  ALL HEAVY STEEL  CONSTRUCTION  .     BRICK LINED  One Hundred Year  Guarantee  886-2808  ^ mxssiFmDjms  hoikkiys  THE ONLY AUTHORIZED  AIRLINE TICKET AGENT  ON THE SUNSHINE COAST  TICKETING  WHILE YOp WAIT  complete travel  ...Agency services  FULLY  EXPERIENCED AGENTS  NOW OPEN  Monday through Saturday  ' " "���       9s00-5:00  Saturday till Noon  1212 Cowrie St. Sechelt  885-3265  PUBLIC NOTICE  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  The Financial Statements for School District No. 46 (Sechelt)  for the calendar year  1976 are available at the  School Board Office for  the inspection of any  interested persons.  R. Mills  Secretary-Treasurer  NOTICE TO  CREDITORS  Kiatherine Margaret  EWART, Deceased,  formerly of: Roberts  Creek, British Columbia.  Deceased: April 27th,  1977.  NOTICE IS HEREBY  GIVEN that the Creditors and others'having  claims against the estate  of the above deceased  are hereby required to  send them to "the  Executor, Estate of  Katherine Margaret  Ewart" c/o Box 390,  C'hilliwack, British  Columbia before the 31st  day of July, A.D.. 1977,  after which date the Executor will distribute the  said estate among the  parties entitled thereto,  having regard only to  the claims of which he  then has notice.  Jphn Norman Ewart,  Executor ;  This Notice, was . prepared and published by  Laurence R. Stinson, Esq  of the firm of Davies,  Baker & Company, Barristers & Solicitors, 123  Main Street, Chilliwack,  British Columbia, solicitors for the Executor.  CEN-TA TOURS  1666 Robson St.  Phone Collect  689-7117  RENO'119.50  8 Days, 7 Nights Bus Tour  SUPER WEEKEND  RENO M69.00  SAN. FRAN. '179.  Hotel & Air Included  WAIKIKI '379.00  15 Days, 14 Nights >  MAUI *409  8 Days, 7 Nights  BRITISH COLUMBIA  ASSESSMENT  AUTHORITY  Request for Quotation  Quotations are invited  for Janitorial Services at:  British Columbia Assessment Authority, Sunshine Coast Assessment  Area, Bank of Montreal  Building, Corner of  Wharf & Cowrie Streets,  Sechelt, B.C.  Request for quotation  and performance specification forms may be obtained from the Area  Assessor at the above  location, during normal  working hours, 8:30 a.m.  to 4:30 p.m.  Quotation closes:  15 July 1977  SUNSHINE COAST  REGIONAL DISTRICT  NOTICE  Effective July 5th, 1977 weekly garbage  collection will commence in the Sunshine Coast Regional District.  Weekly garbage pick-ups will be made  on the same days of the week as under  the present bi-weekly schedule.  (Mrs.) A. G. Pressley  Secretary-Treasurer  WILSON CREEK COMMUNITY  CENTRE IS PRESENTING A  "SUMMER FUN"  PROGRAM  : " Program for children aged 6-13 years at the  :    Wilson Creek Hall. The program will begin on  ��� July 4th and it will be open daily from 9:00 a.m.  to 4:00 p.m. The children will be involved in  arts  and  crafts,   sports,   hiking,   swimming,  ��� picnicking, etc.  ; This program is financed by Canada Works  J and there is NO charge for parents for the  .;; service except for special field trips.  :]   Please register at the hall on opening day.  SERVING THE SUNSHINE COAST  MODERATE,COST LOCAL OR DISTANT BURIALS  CREMATIONS - MEMORIALS- PRE-ARRANGEMENTS  D. A. Devlin  Director  886-9551  1665 Seaview  Gibsons  West Coast apathy jeopardizes future  This is the final part of a three-  part series on the projected movement of oil tankers along our  coast. By Howard White  It is a well-publicized fact  that the supertankers will be running into Cherry Point at a rate of  six per month this fall. The  media, acting on their own to a  large degree, has done a good job  of publicizing the danger. Where  then is the public response?  Where is the least sign among  people themselves, their spokesmen or their institutions that  they have apprehended the  danger?  The coastwise recreation industry has proven itself very responsive to the slight hardship  wrought by last year's increase in  ferry rates, but it has yet to be  heard on the issue that faces it  with complete devastation. The  United Fishermen and Allied  Workers Union has spoken  against the tanker threat on  several occasions but not in a way  that would indicate it is more important to them than the latest  restrictions imposed on Georgia  Strait trollers or a raise for herring tendermen. The canning  and packing companies, who  could be bankrupted by a full-  scale spill, have shown no interest  in saving themselves.  What is sane about any of this?  Environment protection groups  such as the Greenpeace Foundation have added the oilspill  threat to their list of concerns '  but haven't placed the emphasis  on it they have on pestering the  Newfoundland seal hunt.    S.P.  E.C.. has  given  the   issue   top  priority from the outset but theirs  has been a lonely voice.   In the  political arena the issue has not  had an effective spokesman since  Liberal backbencher David Anderson used it as a stepping stone  to patter leadership and oblivion  several years ago.    The federal  government attitude is best exemplified by the External Affairs  Department's two-year suppression of the National Film Board  documentary  Forecast  for  Survival, on the basis that its quite  moderate   anti-oilspill   message  could   have    "negative   impact  on Canada-U.S. relations."  It is always pointless to~ blame  politicians for not doing what  their constituents never asked  them to do however, and their  course only leads us back to the  apathy ofthe B.C. public.  It is illuminating in this regard  to compare the issue here to a  very similar' controversy which  has arisen on the East Coast.  There the plan was to establish  a supertanker port at Eastport,  Maine, which would have been as  near the New Brunswick border  as the Cherry Point port is near  the B.C. border - and for much .  the same reason. The Eastport  project also resembled the Kitimat proposal in that part of the  tanker route passed through  Canadian islands in the Bay of  Fundy. Public resistance to the  plan in New Brunswick was swift  and massive. Fishermen took  boats of petitioners across the  border to speak at state Bureau .  of Environmental Protection  hearings; a businessmens' coalition and a media information  system were formed; local politicians were put under steady  pressure and delegates were sent  both to Ottawa and Washington.  The campaign went on for over  seven-years and resulted ultimately in the Department of External Affiars sending a formal note  to Washington declaring that  the Easport plan "constituted  unacceptable risk" to the New  Brunswick environment and  access would not be granted.  The Marine B.E.P. in turn made  its permits to Pittston Oil Company conditional on their first  "making peace with the Canadians", which effectively killed  the Eastport refinery project  last last year.  The federal government which  declared the Eastport tanker  route "an unacceptable risk" is  the same one which suppressed  films unflattering to the Cherry  Point oil port and on March 4th  gave its tentative support to the  immeasurably more risky tanker .  route through Wright Sound to  Kitimat. The difference in the  two positions is the difference in  the two affected populations; the  one, in the West, seemingly  willing to let itself be used, the  other, in the East, quite definitely  unwilling.  The battle on the west coast is  not oyer yet, although the oil  companies have become entrenched to the point there can be  no totally successful opposition  to them.   A campaign here com-  Pferider recreation (cont'd)  a $25,000 donation to Gibsons  for its pool, and a contribution  of $1,500 to the community hall  at Egmont to 'help improve its  heating. Total cost of the plan  would be "in the area of one  million dollars."  Watson noted that the committee had decided on the two projects in Sechelt because it is  "the central area", this reasoning applied also to the new  Roberts Creek Community Hall,  which would be built on the site of  the ill-fated Cliff Gilker Park.  When asked who would be in  charge of spending funds from  the recreation tax in future and  Fbr all ypur Carpets  T. Sinclair  885-9327  what control local people would  have over them, neither Watson  nor Area 'A' Director Jack Paterson gave a clear answer. The  present recreation commission  grew out of local groups ' with ���  some input .vom regional director's.  One questioner asked commission chairman Jack Whittaker  why the commission was planning to give $25,000 for the Gibsons Village had refused to participate in the recreation commission and would not be contributing to the 2-mill tax. Watson replied that, ' 'However you  cut it, the Gibsons pool is improving the recreation, picture on  the ^Sunshine Coast and it.dejsej^.  7ves:Support." "-...���,"/  Another questioner asked how  she could be sure the tax would  not be jacked up like all the other  local service taxes in the district, and Watson replied that the  2-mill ceiling could be "absolutely guaranteed". Asked further  what would be done if it was discovered halfway through that the  2-mill tax was not enough to  support'the projects, Watson said  another referendum could be  called to raise the tax "or we  could just shut our doors like  they're doing in Powell River."  PENINSULA ROOFING & SHEET METAL  (Formerly  Tuffy's Roofing)  SECHELT  885-9585  RESIDENTIAL  COMMERCIAL  TAR & GRAVEL  SHINGLES & SHAKES  "A COMPLETE ROOFING SERVICE"  Noting that plans to start  building the combined school  and pool called for a start next  month, a questioner wanted to  know what would become of the  partly-completed pool if the referendum was turned down. Shirley Vader answered that the  Aquatic Committee had, considered this and would probably  seek federal grants, then try to  finance the remaining cost with  a specified area tax confined to  the Pender Harbour-Egmont  area. .Gibsons Village has done  this.successfully although its tax  base is less than half that of the  Pender-Egmont area.  "No matter what happens,  we'll get the pool," she said,  "Because it will be there. Once  the school is built, the pool will  be in it and one way or another  it will get finished."  In the meantime, she pointed  out, it will still serve its function  as aj water reservoir for fighting  fires at the school. This.comment.  led to a heated discussion oh the  pool's efficacy In firefighting.  One: woman suggested it would  be much better to use chemicals  than^ water. Fireman Barry Wiibee asked that it be understood  the 60,000-gallon pool would  supply pumps for only one hour,  whereas the last fire had taken  six hours to put out! Former  school maintenance supervisor  Bill Scoular said the unfortunate  fact was that the pool was being  used by the school board to avoid  their responsibility to provide  the new school with a proper  water system. Mrs. Vader, who  seemed to have more facts and .  answers at her fingertips than  anyone else at the meeting, defended the school board and said  that if a water system was to be  built in the Kleindale area it  should probably be done by the  regional district. She added that  the Aquatic Committee was in  favour of a sprinkling system  being installed in the school,  using the pool as water source.  SUMMER COMFORT #3843  Very cosy summer home with fireplace, close to store land Post  Office. Guest cabin, trees and garden. Firm at $32,000. cash.  Call Jack Warn at 886-2681 evenings.  THE NUMBER  TO REMEMBER (24 In.)  885-2235  Vmw. 689-5838 (24 hn.)  ca3 new fer ear  Box 128  AGENCIES LTD.  Sechelt  Real Estate  Catalog*  parable to that in New Brunswick,  working in league with the anti-  supertanker lobby in Puget Sound  may once have been successful  in preventing the Alaska traffic  from entering Juan de Fuca  Strait. Now the best compromise  that could realistically be hoped  for would be a location on the  south side of the strait, at Port  Angeles or west of Port Angeles.  In dealing with the Cherry  Point route, south coast protesters will not have the lever of the  Eastport protesters or Kitimat  protesters of controlling access to  the port, but it is a tenet of natural law that no man shall knowingly foul his neighbour's property,  and the U.S. has shown itself able  to respect this tenet when pressured in the past, most recently in  the billion-dollar Garrison Diversion project of North Dakoka,  which has been halted partially  because ofthe flood risk to farms  in Manitoba.  Changes in British Columbia  law to make the oil giants themselves and not the dummy companies owning the ships responsible for oilspill damages and  cleanup costs would also be very  effective in helping them decide  to avoid Canadian waters, as  would revisions to tanker regulations to bring them up to the, level  set in Puget Sound.  There is still time for all of  this to be done but every day that  passes without action moves the  job one step closer to impossible.  ' The point surely is .that the  B.C. coast is one of the great  geographical wonders of the  world. People flock here to see .  it in the thousands every summer.  Oceanographer Jacques Cou-  steau, who is in as good a position  as anyone to make the comparison, has.said Georgia Strait is  the last of the planet's great inland seas left unpolluted. This  coast is our sacred trust, and we  could no more be excused for  exposing it to ruin than the  Americans could for damming  the Grand Canyon or the Greeks  for grinding the Acropolis up for  cement. No price short of saving  the human race could justify the  risk our politicians are currently  subjecting the coast's immense  and fragile beauty for a hundred  or so steady jobs and a very  dubious advantage to our energy  future. If we let them proceed  and the consequences,befall as  they surely must, then we will  have no doubt leaking back^ to  whether or not we were acting  in our right senses.  Coast News, June 28,1977.    _ <i  Pender Seniors  c?  BRANCH 80  Their last meeting before the  summer has held Monday, June  20, by Pender Harbour Senior  Citizens' Association with an  enthusiastic assemblage of members and friends, two of whom  were British visitors:. Mrs.  Violet O'Hanlon and Mrs. Elsie  Heath.  A  final  count* of the   money   ^,;ii  collected by members taking partl0  in the Health Clinic Walkathon,,/,  yeilded the following breakdown:..li,.j  Gladys Brown .5100.25; Majy,;;.^  Ledingham and/.1 Eric Brooks ^x  $58.00; Mrs. Linda Parker $27.00;r.rr  effecting a total 0^5182.25. .;,:-b  An interesting^and informative:?,;?  question period concluded the.-o;- <  meeting. .;.    . -'>; >���-  ID  .1  CAMpbell's  FAMILY^  SHOES  &  LEATHER GOODS  "IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SECHELT"  Your   friendly   neighbourhood   drop-off   point  for Coast News    "I Box 381 Sechelt, B.C.  885-9345 VON 3AO  V.'"-.  Classified Ads.  SWIMMING  LESSONS  FEE AND REGISTRATION  ;*������  ��*'  10:30a.m. -1:00 p.m.  JUNE25th and JULY 2nd  GIBSONS ATHLETIC CLUB  Advance or late registration discouraged  .���������at .   ' '     '  >c )  I -f '  ;*���:  : (V  :i0  85 ;.  _2__iyr-���-  ���v3.  o7  ee  <J mj  7\i_ -_<jo :!-*.���  o.cl.o .00  Sound Construction  N     V  Car pen ter-Con tractor  v     -v  Interior Finishinq  7     \,    "V       "  House v Framing -  Concrete Form Work  Gary Wal I i nder   886-2&16  Box 920        GibsonsN.  *   Staying  in the  Gibsons  dr.Sechelt  area for the summer?  You can still enjoy your favorite  Television programs with a Cable  Connection....  JO.  -v 'J'hb  on  A  Just call  COAST CABLE VISION  885-3224  DAVIS BAY WATERFRONT  Top quality beach front home.    2 full  floors,   2  bedrooms,   2 fireplaces,   hot  water heat.   One of the coast's finest.  F.P. $92,000.  VIEW LOT & VILLAGE HOME  Compact 3 bedroom home dri view lot  in village. Is well featured with w/w carpets, a large utility room, all teak cupboards and ensuite plumbing: Shake  roof. F.P. $41,500. 'f'  FAMILY 3 BEDROOM HOME  Roughed-in suite in full ground level  basement. A large sundeck over a double  garage. Large family room adjacent to  a compact kitchen. Nook eating area  and separate dining room. Master ensuite. Tremendous buy at $61,500.  Trades considered.  FULL BASEMENT VILLAGE HOME  3 bedrooms - 2 up and 1 in .basement.  Finished Rec room, utility room and large  sundeck. Yard is all fenced for privacy.  Sunken carport. Home has electric heat  and is very economical. Located across  from tennis courts in Hackett Park.  F.P. $54,250.  "HORSE LOVERS"  Wilson Creek - large 3 bedroom home on  2.58 acres zoned R2.  Can be developed.  Land mostly cleared.    Located on.Gun  Club Road. Asking $57,000. Terms!  For further information on  the above, contact:  SECHELT VILLAGE HOME  3 bedroom full basement home all  finished including ensuite plumbing.  36" fireplace, wall to wall carpets throughout. 200 amp electrical service, thermal windows, ground level basement  and several sundecks. Vi acre treed lot,  2 blooks from Marina. F.P. $47,500.  George Townsend  Jack Anderson  885-3345  885-2053  Stan Anderson  Doug Joyce  885-2385  885-2761  anderson  REALTY LTD  885-3211  FREE  REAL ESTATE  CATALOGUE  Post Office Box 1219, Sechelt  toll free 684-8016  anderson  REALTY LTD.  885-3211  :b  .u  ���3'  "5.  1  il  6  .���cflww. 10.  Coast News, June 28,1977.  ' The usual $5.00 prize will be awarded to person  >."whose correct location of the above is drawn  '���'from the pile of correct entries this week. Mail  7lyour entry to the Coast News, Box 460, Gibsons.  ���I-Last week's winner was Sandra McQuary of Box  7-608 in Gibsons who correctly identified Gibsons  7 ;new dog pound on Henry Road.        t?  Women's  Centre  A quiet struggle to keep the  Women's Centre open has been  waged during the past year. We  have been dependent on the donations of supportive people,  and on the hard work of a core  group of dedicated volunteers.  Financially, we survived through the spring by selling Greenpeace lottery tickets, and we are  now mowing the grass in the park  out front in lieu of paying rent  for the summer. Several people  have offered to sell used books,  odds and ends and Memberships at the summer Flea Market.  And our fund raising committee  reports earning $200 at the Rummage Sale last week!  Our volunteers, at this point  have been decimated by the  finding of "paid employment"  by no less than five of us. The  remaining two volunteers, having  put in a lot of hard hours have  decided to take a well earned  vacation, and close the doors of  the Women's Centre for July and  August.  Any woman interested in:  Using the Centre for meeting or  a quiet retreat for the summer;  helping with a fund raising dance  in August; Donating books for  flea market stall; Talking about  ideas for a Canada Works Grant,  for employment for women;  Taking a turn at mowing the  grass; or information during the  summer, contact Sharon Craig  at 885-3182.  Pender Harbour Clinic  In response to a request from  the Pender Harbour Health  Clinic, Mrs. Brown created a  garden committee of senior citizens to assist in the collection  of suitable plants and shrubs to  beautify the Health Clinic grounds. Mrs. Isabel Ralph will convene this committee.  Mrs. Evelyn Olson reviewed  the highlights of the May Convention in Vancouver. Notable  speakers were U.B.C. law professor Frank Maczko, who explained legal matters important  to the elderly; and Dr. Stuart  Bland, a gerontology consultant,  who discoursed upon healthy  attitudes which should be cultivated by the elderly for physical  and mental well being.  Of the 50 resolutions presented  to the convention, 22 were passed  including     Pender     Harbour's  resolution concerning the continuance of the Open Shelf Library in Victoria.  The focus of the meeting was  an explanation by R.C.M.P.  Sargeant Doug Farenholtz of  the programme, Neighbourhood  Watch, now being organized on  the peninsula in an attempt to  reduce break-ins and thefts.  He explained its objectives and  functions and showed a film  demonstrating ways in which  citizens may make their houses  safer from breaking and entering. U.B.C. student Vivian  Evans, a personable young  woman from Chilliwack, assisted  Sargeant Farenholtz.  Between June 21 and July 5,  the Neighbourhood Watch is  being introduced to all householders in the Pender Harbour  area.  Wedding  shower  A wedding shower was held  last week for Miss Debby Fiedler  at the home of Mrs. Lois McLean.  The hostesses were Mrs. Cathy  Mandelkau and Mrs. McLean.  Guests present at the shower  included Mrs. Elsie Earls, Mrs.  Mary Strom, Mrs. Mary Solnick,  Mrs. Eve Harris, Mrs. Edit  Mrs. Eve Harris, Mrs. Edie  Mason, Mrs. Lily Hammond,  Mrs. Doreen Crosby, Mrs. Agnes  Johnson, Mrs. Mary McBride,  Mrs. Diane B irs tens, Mrs.  Shirley Peters, Mrs. Wendy  Fiedler, Mrs. Fay Fiedler, Mrs.  Ivy Fiedler and Miss Terri  Fiedler.  Guests unable to attend were  Mrs. Athalie McKie, Miss Barbara Roberts and Miss Maria  Schneider.  In memoriam-  Mary Brooke  Death came suddenly to Mrs. of this fine lady would be, in  Mary Margaret Brooke of Half- lieu of flowers, to send, a con-  moon Bay on June 19th, 1977. tribution to the fund being raised  A popular and well respected to purchase a grand piano by the  music teacher on the Sunshine Sunshine   Coast   Music   Group,  Neighbourhood Watch        Library  Coast for twenty years, Mrs.  Brooke was born in Winnipeg,  Manitoba, on September 21st,  1908.  Mary, as she was known to her  many friends, taught her first  music student at the age of nine  and has been a teacher of music  ever since. A talented and versatile teacher, she gave lessons in  in care of Mr. P. L. Precesky,  RR #1, Madeira Park, B.C  A memorial service wks":held  at the Devlin Funeral Chapel in;  Gibsons on Wednesday, June  22nd. A former student of Mrs  Brooke's, Paul Birch paid tribute;  to her before the many relatives  and friends and students of  music gathered for the occasion;  piano, drums,  piano accordion,  Mr. Birch is presently a teacher  of English in Vancouver^ He isja  member of the Bach Choir,  formerly president.  Church feels growth not goal  For years growth has been the  measuring stick of success in the  Western technological world.  Thetmore we produced, the more  wev ^consumed and the more  things we had, the better off we  were. Happiness and the Gross  National Product were synono-  mo'us" and the only time Canadians were ever challenged on  thisKslavish devotion to technology and growth - for the two  go;hand-in-hand - was occasionally from some church-pulpit when  wer were reminded not to lay up  treasures on earth. Even this had  a faintly hollow ririg'as materialism grew.  Now it appears that technological growth is almost at an end.  Our earth has once again become  finite.      Resources,   particularly  fossil   fuels,   are   running   out.  Despite   what   the   technocrats  (who are fast replacing democrats  as  the  government  of Canada)  under 50 tell us, growth is not  a natural and God-given right.  J. Tuzp Wilson, director-  general of \ the Ontario Science  Centre andone of Canada's best  known scientists, said recently  that it is*Vquite incredible that  economists'and leaders of government have failed to recognize  that petroleum is a limited resource that shouldbe husbanded  like capital. Instead they have  encouraged its squandering as  income so: that now. like a rich  young man who has squandered  his inheritance, we must look for  another way of making a living."  Now we are being forced, perhaps too late, to recognize not  only that we have squandered  the earth's resources, we may  well have exhausted them.  Limits to growth may force us to  find an economic system based  on values and ethics rather than  those of economics and growth.  What Dr. Wilson and others  are saying is what is said in the  Bible. We must be stewards of  the creatfon. There are limits  to the land that' can be cultivated.  There is a limit to fresh water .  supplies. There is a limit to what  heat the atmosphere can absorb.  There is a limit to what pollution  our environment can handle.  To face the reality that our  world is fragile and finite may be  the first step in forcing our  leaders to change their ideas and  accept limits.  Then we can begin, solving our  problems, acknowledging that  growth is not the ultimate goal  for humanity.  Bracewell  At the recent B.C.I.T. Convocation held at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Vancouver, Kim  Bracewell of Hopkins Landing  was one of the fourteen hundred  ofthe graduating class of 1977.  Gibsons Co-op Store patrons  will remember him when he  worked at the store after graduating from Elphinstone Secondary  School. For the past two years  Kim has been enrolled with the  survey technology department at  B.C.I.T. specializing in photo-  grammetry. ���  -   SECHELT -885-3277  POWELL RIVER - 485-2748  Vane. Airport  278-3941  Langdale sewage plant  INTRODUCING  BANK  OF  MONTREAL  Gibsons, B. C.  Work 6ji a new sewage treatment plant at the Langdale ferry  terminal near Gibsons, is on  schedule, and a contract has been  awarded to Raymond Enterprises  of Aldergrove, to construct a  24 foot by 19 foot concrete block  building to house treatment  equipment at a price of $10,700  it was announced today by Highways and Public Works Minister  Alex V. Fraser.  The firm submitted the lowest  of three tenders for the job which  will begin as soon as foundations  for the building are completed  by the sewage system contractor,  Tideline Enterprises of Gibsons,  scheduled for between two and  three weeks from now. The building   phase   will   provide   equip  ment for up to five workers for  a month.  Tideline was awarded a contract for $66,234 for their share  of the project which provides  employment for up to 11 workers  for varying periods of time up  to 16 weeks.  Third contract will be awarded  in July, tenders having been  called, returnable July 6 for installation of lift station control  and other electrical installations  which concern the treatment  facility.  Other improvements to the  Langdale ferry terminal facilities  have already been completed,  such as new turning dolphin  and walkway to accommodate  larger ferries at the dock.  SHARON DAVIDSON  :���& Since her arrival  at the Bank of Montreal  in' April, Sharon has  handled her job of processing all checks and  internal entries in a very  efficient manner.  ]���&. The Bank of  Montreal has many services to offer you including a friendly,  efficient and above all,  courteous staff.  :# Let's Talk.  NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!        885-3815  TZ* '^-?'<*'- v **'��� *&  'S*.p.;i  ;V3*\��.vT!  �����IWrKNON  LIVE  ENTERTAINMENT  FRIDAY  &SATURDAY  RESTAURANT Sechelt  11:00a.m.  -2:30 p.m.  4:30 p.m. til Closing  Sat. & Sun.  reservations  art) recommended  Filet Mignon or New York  10oz. 10 oz.  $9.50 $8.25  INCLUDES: Baked Potato,  Chef Salad with choice of  dressing, Garlic Bread, Fried Fresh  Mushrooms, Assorted Desserts.  Tea or Coffee.  The Sechelt Peninsula Neighbourhood Watch project is well  underway. Homes in the Halfmoon Bay-Secret Cove and Earl's  Cove-Egmont areas have been  visited, and it is anticipated  that the Pender Harbour area  will be completed by the end of  this week.  Neighbourhood   Watch   is   an  R.C.M.P.    sponsored    program  aimed ��� at  reducing  the  rate  of  crimes against property in this  area.    An instrumental part of  the program is Operation Identification,  where  homeowners- are  encouraged    to    engrave    their  Social    Insurance    Number    on  valuable property.   This type of  identification is a proven deterrent to thefts and breaking and  enterings.      It   has   been   very  successful in other areas, and its  success in this area will rise in  proportion   to   the   number   of  households helpful in the project.  Lions   volunteers   have   been  extremely helpful in the project.  The Pender Harbour Lions, organized    by    Mike    Cashaback,  have distributed a large number  of the engravers.  In areas where  homes are most spread out, the  six  students   employed   by   the  project have done the legwork -  and   legwork   it   is,   scrambling  down long driveways to homes  perched on seaside cliffs!    The  only real problem to date has  been   that  a   large   number  of  people have not been at home  when  their home   was   visited.  Many of these homes will be revisited.   However, if your home  is missed by the Neighbourhood  Watch workers, do not hesitate  to drop in to the Sechelt R.C.M.P.  detachment, to pick up  an  engraver.     For thirty  minutes  of  your  time  you   will   receive   a  lasting method of property identification.  Recent Israeli Prime Minister  Golda Meir has A Land of Our  Own on the Biography shelf.  The Gardening shelf sees the  appearance of Organic Vegetable  Growing by Samuel Ogden.  Happy and Glorious appears on  the General shelf. It is by Donald  Edgar. Lyn Hancock has a book  with a fetching title on the Nature  shelf. It's There's a Raccoon In  my Parka. The non-fiction additions are rounded out with the  appearance on the History shelf  of Pioneer Churches by Kalman  ahdDeVisser.  The new...fiction titles are The  Company of Friends by John  Crosby; The Realms of Gold by  Margaret Drabble; The Big Footprints by Hammond Innes;  Wednesday the Rabbi got Wet  by Harry Kemelman; The Chancellor Manuscript by Robert  Ludlum; The Lonely Lady by  Harold Robbins; Celestial Navigation by Anne Tyler.  violin, trumpet, guitar, organ and  a variety of other musical instruments. She had a passionate  love of music and the desire to  pass that love on to others, thus  enriching their lives with music  as she felt hers had been.  -She had in abundance that  quality that all great teachers  must have, great patience. It  was her study to impart confidence to her students, never  expressing displeasure, knowing  that learning is done from mistakes.  Once a young musician became  a pupil of Marry Brooke that  musician became a member of  her family of musicians. Many  times she held small recitals in  her home with her musicians performing for each other and relatives and friends thereby learning  how to share their music with  others at the same time developing confidence in themselves.  It is not surprising that Mary  Brooke was one of the founders  of the Sunshine Coast Music  Festival - an annual event which  has since been expanded to become the Sunshine Coast Music,  Drama, and Dance Festival.  It is suggested that the most  fitting way to honour the memory  Mary Brooke was predeceased  by her husband, Gordon L.  Brooke, who died in 1975 a short  time after retiring from the  Meterology Department in Vancouver. She is survived by her  son Gordon of Halfmoon Bay,  her granddaughter Marilou Long,  grandchildren Tommy 13, and  Patti 18, of Richmond.. Another  granddaughter, Susan aged 20,  is now domiciled in New Zealand.  Mary Brooke was President of  the Music ��� Teachers Federation  at one time, a position, at present  filled by one of" her students,  Joyce Root. She played violin  with the Vancouver and Winni  pet sympnony companies and  played the organ at Ryerson  Church in Vancouver. She taught  music for many years in Vancouver before moving to the Sunshine Coast. .  A great teacher has left us but  the love of music instilled in  those fortunate enough to come  into contact with her will undoubtedly be passed on, perhaps  enriching the lives of. many not  yet born.  STA Executive  Manageress Nancy Bradford, seamstress Jane May and candy maker,Susan Wolpert  snip ceremonial ribbons to mark the opening of the End of the Rainbow Boutique in the  centre of Roberts Creek.  The next executive of the  Sechelt Teachers' Association  takes office officially on July 1st.  The executive was elected at a  meeting held last month in Pender Harbour.  Elected as President for the  coming year is Doris Fuller,  librarian at Gibsons Elementary  School. Mike Lynch is the Vice-  President and Joan Robb will  perform the functions of Secretary. Cheryl Douglas will be  the Treasurer.  Geoffrey Madoc-Jones will  again be Geogtaphic Representative at the meetings of the  B.C.T.F. in Vancouver and Elphinstone librarian Gary Foxall  will be this year's Agreements  Chairman.  When contacted by the Coast  News President-Elect Fuller  said that she was looking forward  to a fruitful and interesting year.  She pointed to the fact that relations between the S.T.A. and  the local board are better now  than at any time in recent years  and that educationally things are  going relatively well in the district. One possible area'of concern that Mrs. Fuller pointed to  was the possible threat of mounting unemployment among teachers of the province in the coming  year. "There would seem to be  a directive from Victoria to the  local school boards,'' said Fuller,  "to reduce the number of teachers. This may have the effect of  raising the pupil-teacher ration  within the classroom and the  number of unemployed teachers  outside the classroom and may be  a matter of some concern."  Sechelt Council hears zoning recommendations  The Zoning Committee recom- eight inch cement blocks is re-  mendations were read out at last quired, but Mr. Gray felt that due  week's regular Sechelt  Council   to the building being temporary.  meeting. The committee asked  that further study and a plan from  Len Van Egmont were needed  before a site could be chosen  for his new apartments. The report also stated that it could see  no economic advantage to Mr.  Hall's proposal for another mall  in the Sechelt area. Alderman  Booth moved that the recommendations from the committee be  accepted and implimented.  Denis Gray, the proprietor of  Coast Cycles asked council' to  grant temporary permit > to  operate out of his present building. According to the fire regulations, a fire wall made from  the expenditure was unreasonable. Plans are in the works to  rebuild on the site, but since the  new sewer system is still at least  a year away they are being delayed. Council granted a one year  permit on the condition that Mr.  Gray not do any major repairs  inside the building.  A by-law restricting the use of  trail bikes is still in the works,  the clerk felt that they would run  into difficulties enforcing it and  would write a letter to the Department of Municipal Affairs  suggesting that one be drawn up  under the   Municipal   Act  pro-  A letter was received from the  Chamber of Commerce asking if  a ramp could be built at the bottom of Trail Avenue. It was  pointed out by Mayor Nelson that  in the past, attempts to put a  ramp on the open beach had been .  unsuccessful and that the Indian  Band had informed him that the  public could use their one beside  the church free of charge.  The arena is expected to have  a fire and smoke alarm system  before it reopens, tenders are  invited, and the system will be  financed from general revenue.  J&C  ELECTRONICS  Cowrie Street  SECHELT  885-2568  FAST SERVICE  For Your  TV & STEREO  (loaner set available)  hibiting trail bikes as nuisances.  j Building or going to j  \build a new dwelling  ��  I     DID YOU KNOW?  8 38  ���:;     While your house is under construction :..  I you can spray to prevent  infestations of ��_  ii; wood-boring insects such as ants, beetles %,  and termites and for only one half the cost %  of treatment of occupied dwellings.   Don't S  wait...doitnow! Give us a call at  NORTH ISLAND  PEST CONTROL  WORK GUARANTEED   AT REASONABLE RATES %  Local Licensed Operator ...  Charlie Cairns 885-3606  886-9414  BATHROO?  PLUS  (Boutique)  McGregor  SHOWER CURTAINS  BA TH ACCESSORIES  BEADED TIE BACKS  SHOWER HOOKS  SOAPS  Kirsh  VANITY TOP  MIRRORS  SHOWERRODS  TOWEL TREES  SOAP DISHES  FIELDCREST TOWELS  ��  ���*:*k*:��*:*:*:*:%%s^^^^^  ��  ��ft$  ��~7  886-9414  BATHROOMS  PLUS  '^1  WE CARRY  A COMPLETE  LINE OF  PLUMBING  SUPPLIES  PULSATING  SHOWER  HEADS  MOEN  CRANE  WALTEC  FIXTURES  ABS, COPPER  GALVANIZED  PIPE  and FITTINGS  (Brass Fittings)  TIDELINE PLUMBING & HEATING CONTRACTORS  RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL - FREE ESTIMATES  BIG  OIL  DEAL  ON  FISHING  MERCS  BUY A NEW MERC  4.5,7.5, 9.8,  20 or 40 H.P.  GETA  COMPLIMENTARY  CASE OF  QUICKSILVER OIL  iiw$33  at your participating  Mercury dealer  HURRY!  Offer ends June 30  _l  jJSnncocist  Marine ��<������  'The Chain Saw Centre  Cowrie St.       Sechelt  885-9626  K  mjEfrcxij��� v 10.  Coast News, June 28,1977.  Guess Wherel  * ���'The usual $5.00 prize will be awarded to person  7."whose correct location of the above is drawn  '���'from the pile of correct entries this week. Mail  7"your entry to the Coast News, Box 460, Gibsons.  ���I-Last week's winner was Sandra McQuary of Box  7-608 in Gibsons who correctly identified Gibsons  7 ;new dog pound on Henry Road. %  Women's  Centre  A quiet struggle to keep the  Women's Centre open has been  waged during the past year. We  have been dependent on the donations of supportive people,  and on the hard work of a core  group of dedicated volunteers.  Financially, we survived through the spring by selling Greenpeace lottery tickets, and we are  now mowing the grass in the park  out front in lieu of paying rent  for the summer. Several people  have offered to sell used books,  odds and ends and Memberships at the summer Flea Market.  And our fund raising committee  reports earning $200 at the Rummage Sale last week!  Our volunteers, at this point  have been decimated by the  finding of "paid employment"  by no less than five of us. The  remaining two volunteers, having  put in a lot of hard hours have  decided to take a well earned  vacation, and close the doors of  the Women's Centre for July and  August.  Any woman interested in:  Using the Centre for meeting or  a quiet retreat for the summer;  helping with a fund raising dance  in August; Donating books for  flea market stall; Talking about  ideas for a Canada Works Grant,  for employment for women;  Taking a turn at mowing the  grass; or information during the  summer, contact Sharon Craig  at 885-3182.  Pender Harbour Clinic  In response to a request from  the Pender Harbour Health  Clinic, Mrs. Brown created a  garden committee of senior citizens to assist in the collection  of suitable plants and shrubs to  beautify the Health Clinic grounds. Mrs. Isabel Ralph will convene this committee.  Mrs. Evelyn Olson reviewed  the highlights of the May Convention in Vancouver. Notable  speakers were U.B.C. law professor Frank Maczko, who explained legal matters important  to the elderly; and Dr. Stuart  Bland, a gerontology consultant,  who discoursed upon healthy  attitudes which should be cultivated by the elderly for physical  and mental well being.  Of the 50 resolutions presented  to the convention, 22 were passed  including      Pender     Harbour's  resolution concerning the continuance of the Open Shelf Library in Victoria.  The focus of the meeting was  an explanation by R.C.M.P.  Sargeant Doug Farenholtz of  the programme, Neighbourhood  Watch, now being organized on  the peninsula in an attempt to  reduce break-ins and thefts.  He explained its objectives and  functions and showed a film  demonstrating ways in which  citizens may make their houses  safer from breaking and entering. U.B.C. student Vivian  Evans, a personable young  woman from Chilliwack, assisted  Sargeant Farenholtz.  Between June 21 and July 5,  the Neighbourhood Watch is  being introduced to all householders in the Pender Harbour  area.  Wedding  shower  A wedding shower was held  last week for Miss Debby Fiedler  at the home of Mrs. Lois McLean.  The hostesses were Mrs. Cathy  Mandelkau and Mrs. McLean.  Guests present at the shower  included Mrs. Elsie Earls, Mrs.  Mary Strom, Mrs. Mary Solnick,  Mrs. Eve Harris, Mrs. Edit  Mrs. Eve Harris, Mrs. Edie  Mason, Mrs. Lily Hammond,  Mrs. Doreen Crosby, Mrs. Agnes  Johnson, Mrs. Mary McBride,  Mrs. Diane B irs tens, Mrs.  Shirley Peters, Mrs. Wendy  Fiedler, Mrs. Fay Fiedler, Mrs.  Ivy Fiedler and Miss Terri  Fiedler.  Guests unable to attend were  Mrs. Athalie McKie, Miss Barbara Roberts and Miss Maria  Schneider.  Neighbourhood Watch        Library  Church feels growth not goal  For years growth has been the  measuring stick of success in the  Western technological world.  The!more we produced, the more  wer ^consumed and the more  things we had, the better off we  were.. Happiness and the Gross  National Product were synono-  mo'us" and the only time Canadians were ever challenged on  this^slavish devotion to technology and growth - for the two  go;hand-in-hand - was occasionally from some church-pulpit when  wer were reminded not to lay up  treasures on earth. Even this had  a faintly hollow ririg'as materialism grew.  Now it appears that technological growth is almost at an end.  Our earth has once again become  finite.      Resources,   particularly  fossil   fuels,   are   running   out.  Despite    what   the    technocrats  (who are fast replacing democrats  as the government  of Canada)  under 50 tell us, growth is not  a natural and God-given right.  J. Tuzp Wilson, director-  general cki the Ontario Science  Centre and one of Canada's best  known scientists, said recently  that it is*';'quite incredible that  economists'and leaders of government have failed to recognize  that petroleum is a limited resource that should be husbanded  like capital. Instead they have  encouraged its squandering as  income sjS'that now. like a rich  young man who has squandered  his inheritance, we must look for  another wky of making a living."  Now we are being forced, perhaps too late, to recognize not  only that we have squandered  the earth's resources, we may  well have exhausted them.  Limits to growth may force us to  find an economic system based  on values and ethics rather than  those of economics and growth.  What Dr. Wilson and others  are saying is what is said in the  Bible. We must be stewards of  the creatfon. There are limits  to the land that' can be cultivated.  There is a limit to fresh water .  supplies. There is a limit to what  heat the atmosphere can absorb.  There is a limit to what pollution  our environment can handle.  To face the reality that our  world is fragile and finite may be  the first step in forcing our  leaders to change their ideas and  accept limits.  Then we can begin, solving our  problems, acknowledging that  growth is not the ultimate goal  for humanity.  Bracewell  At the recent B.C.I.T. Convocation held at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Vancouver, Kim  Bracewell of Hopkins Landing  was one of the fourteen hundred  ofthe graduating class of 1977.  Gibsons Co-op Store patrons  will remember him when he  worked at the store after graduating from Elphinstone Secondary  School. For the past two years  Kim has been enrolled with the  survey technology department, at  B.C.I.T. specializing in photo-  grammetry. -  The Sechelt Peninsula Neighbourhood Watch project is well  underway. Homes in the Halfmoon Bay-Secret Cove and Earl's  Cove-Egmont areas have been  visited, and it is anticipated  that the Pender Harbour area  will be completed by the end of  this week.  Neighbourhood   Watch   is   an  R.C.M.P.    sponsored    program  aimed ��� at  reducing  the  rate   of  crimes against property in this  area.    An instrumental part of  the program is Operation Identification,  where  homeowners- are  encouraged    to    engrave    their  Social    Insurance    Number    on  valuable property.   This type of  identification is a proven deterrent to thefts and breaking and  enterings.      It   has   been   very  successful in other areas, and its  success in this area will rise in  proportion   to   the   number   of  households helpful in the project.  Lions   volunteers   have   been  extremely helpful in the project.  The Pender Harbour Lions, organized   by    Mike    Cashaback,  have distributed a large number  of the engravers.  In areas where  homes are most spread out, the  six   students   employed   by   the  project have done the legwork -  and   legwork   it   is,   scrambling  down long driveways to homes  perched on seaside cliffs!    The  only  real  problem  to  date  has  been   that  a   large   number  of  people have not been at home  when   their  home   was   visited.  Many of these homes will be revisited.   However, if your home  is missed by the Neighbourhood  Watch workers, do not hesitate  to drop in to the Sechelt R.C.M.P.  detachment to pick up  an  engraver.     For thirty  minutes  of  your   time  you   will   receive   a  lasting method of property identification.  Recent Israeli Prime Minister  Golda Meir has A Land of Our  Own on the Biography shelf.  The Gardening shelf sees the  appearance of Organic Vegetable  Growing by Samuel Ogden.  Happy and Glorious appears on  the General shelf. It is by Donald  Edgar. Lyn Hancock has a book  with a fetching title on the Nature  shelf. It's There's a Raccoon In  my Parka. The non-fiction additions are rounded out with the  appearance on the History shelf  of Pioneer Churches by Kalman  ahdDeVisser.  The new...fiction titles are The  Company of Friends by John  Crosby; The Realms of Gold by  Margaret Drabble; The Big Footprints by Hammond Innes;  Wednesday the Rabbi got Wet  by Harry Kemelman; The Chancellor Manuscript by Robert  Ludlum; The Lonely Lady by  Harold Robbins; Celestial Navigation by Anne Tyler.  In memoriam-  Mary Brooke  Death came suddenly to Mrs. of this fine lady would be, in  Mary Margaret Brooke of Half- lieu of flowers, to send, a con-,  moon Bay on June 19th, 1977. tribution to the fund being raised  A popular and well respected to purchase a grand piano by the  music teacher on the  Sunshine  Sunshine   Coast   Music   Group,  Coast  for   twenty   years,   Mrs.  Brooke was born in Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  on   September   21st,  1908.  Mary, as she was known to her  in care of Mr. P. L.  Precesky,  RR #1, Madeira Park, B.C.  A memorial service wks":held  at the Devlin Funeral Chapel in;  Gibsons   on   Wednesday,   June;  many friends,  taught  her  first' 22nd.   A former student of Mrs:  Brooke's, Paul Birch paid tribute;  to her before the many relatives  and friends and students of  music gathered for the occasion;  Mr. Birch is presently a teacher  of English in Vancouver^ He isja  member of the Bach Choir,  formerly president.  music student at the age of nine  and has been a teacher of music  ever since. A talented and versatile teacher, she gave lessons in  piano, drums, piano accordion,  violin, trumpet, guitar, organ and  a variety of other musical instruments. She had a passionate  love of music and the desire to  pass that love on to others, thus  enriching their lives with music  as she felt hers had been.  Mary Brooke was predeceased  by her husband, Gordon L.  Brooke, who died in 1975 a short  ���^She had in abundance that time after retiring from the  quality that all great teachers Meterology Department in Van-  must have, great patience. It couver. She is survived by her  was her study to impart con- son Gordon of Halfmoon Bay,  fidence to her students, never her granddaughter Marilou Long,  expressing displeasure, knowing grandchildren Tommy 13, and  that learning is done from mis- Patti 18, of Richmond- Another  takes. granddaughter, Susan aged 20,  Once a young musician became  is now domiciled in New Zealand,  a  pupil  of Marry  Brooke  that      Mary Brooke was President of  musician became a member of the Music ��� Teachers  Federation  her family of musicians.    Many  at one time, a position.at present  times she held small recitals in  her home with her musicians performing for each other and relatives and friends thereby learning  how to share their music with  others at the same time developing confidence in themselves.  It is not surprising that Mary  Brooke was one of the founders  of the Sunshine Coast Music  Festival - an annual event which  has since been expanded to become the Sunshine Coast Music,  Drama, and Dance Festival.  It is suggested that the most  fitting way to honour the memory  filled by one of ~ her students,  Joyce Root. She played violin  with the Vancouver and Winni-  pet sympnony companies and  played the organ at Ryerson  Church in Vancouver. She taught  music for many years in Vancouver before moving to the Sun  shine Coast. .  A great teacher has left us but  the love of music instilled in  those fortunate enough to come  into contact with her will un  doubtedly be passed on, perhaps  enriching the lives of. many not  yet born  -   SECHELT - 885-3277  POWELL RIVER ��� 485-2748  Vane. Airport  278-3941  Langdale sewage plant  STA Executive  INTRODUCING  BANK  OF  MONTREAL  Gibsons, B. C.  Work qxi a new sewage treatment plant at the Langdale ferry  terminal near Gibsons, is on  schedule, and a contract has been  awarded to Raymond Enterprises  of Aldergrove, to construct a  24 foot by 19 foot concrete block  building to house treatment  equipment at a price of $10,700  it was announced today by Highways and Public Works Minister  Alex V. Fraser.  The firm submitted the lowest  of three tenders for the job which  will begin as soon as foundations  for the building are completed  by the sewage system contractor,  Tideline Enterprises of Gibsons,  scheduled for between two and  three weeks from now. The building   phase   will   provide   equip  ment for up to five workers for  a month.  Tideline was awarded a contract for $66,234 for their share  of the project which provides  employment for up to 11 workers  for varying periods of time up  to 16 weeks.  Third contract will be awarded  in July, tenders having been  called, returnable July 6 for installation of lift station control  and other electrical installations  which concern the treatment  facility.  Other improvements to the  Langdale ferry terminal facilities  have already been completed,  such as new turning dolphin  and walkway to accommodate  larger ferries at the dock.  Manageress Nancy Bradford, seamstress Jane May and candy maker,Susan Wolpert  snip ceremonial ribbons to mark the opening of the End of the Rainbow Boutique in the  centre of Roberts Creek.  The next executive of the  Sechelt Teachers' Association  takes office officially on July 1st.  The executive was elected at a  meeting held last month in Pender Harbour.  Elected as President for the  coming year is Doris Fuller,  librarian at Gibsons Elementary  School. Mike Lynch is the Vice-  President and Joan Robb will  perform the functions of Secretary. Cheryl Douglas will be  the Treasurer.  Geoffrey Madoc-Jones will  again be Geogtaphic Representative at the meetings of the  B.C.T.F. in Vancouver and Elphinstone librarian Gary Foxall  will be this year's Agreements  Chairman.  When contacted by the Coast  News President-Elect Fuller  said that she was looking forward  to a fruitful and interesting year.  She pointed to the fact that relations between the S.T.A. and  the local board are better now  than at any time in recent years  and that educationally things are  going relatively well in the district. One possible area'of concern that Mrs. Fuller pointed to  was the possible threat of mounting unemployment among teachers of the province in the coming  year. "There would seem to be  a directive from Victoria to the  local school boards,'' said Fuller,  "to reduce the number of teachers. This may have the effect of  raising the pupil-teacher ration  within the classroom and the  number of unemployed teachers  outside the classroom and may be  a matter of some concern."  J&C  Sechelt Council hears zoning recommendations  ELECTRONICS  Cowrie Street  SECHELT  885-2568  FAST SERVICE  For Your  TV & STEREO  (loaner set available)  NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!  885-3815  885-9769  The Zoning Committee recommendations were read out at last  week's regular Sechelt Council  meeting. The committee asked  that further study and a plan from  Len Van Egmont were needed  before a site could be chosen  for his new apartments. The report also stated that it could see  no economic advantage to Mr.  Hall's proposal for another mall  in the Sechelt area. Alderman  Booth moved that the recommendations from the committee be  accepted and implimented.  Denis Gray, the proprietor of  Coast Cycles asked council' to  grant temporary permit > to  operate out of his present building. According to the fire regulations, a fire wall  made from  eight inch cement blocks is required, but Mr. Gray felt that due  to the building being temporary,  the expenditure was unreasonable. Plans are in the works to  rebuild on the site, but since the  new sewer system is still at least  a year away they are being delayed. Council granted a one year  permit on the condition that Mr.  Gray not do any major repairs  inside the building.  A by-law restricting the use of  trail bikes is still in the works,  the clerk felt that they would run  into difficulties enforcing it and  would write a letter to the Department of Municipal Affairs  suggesting that one be drawn up  under the   Municipal   Act  pro-  A letter was received from the  Chamber of Commerce asking if  a ramp could be built at the bottom of Trail Avenue. It was  pointed out by Mayor Nelson that  in the past, attempts to put a  ramp on the open beach had been .  unsuccessful and that the Indian  Band had informed him that the  public could use their one beside  the church free of charge.  The arena is expected to have  a fire and smoke alarm system  before it reopens, tenders are  invited, and the system will be  financed from general revenue.  SHARON DAVIDSON  :<&��� Since her arrival  at the Bank of Montreal  in' April, Sharon has  handled her job of processing all checks and  internal entries in a very  efficient manner.  lit. The Bank of  Montreal has many services to offer you including a friendly,  efficient and above all,  cdurteous staff.  ,* Let's Talk.  ��� l>AKTH*N0N  LIVE  ENTERTAINMENT  FRIDAY  &SATURDAY  RESTAURANT Sechelt  11:00a.m.  -2:30 p.m.  4:30 p.m. til Closing  &Sun.  T3I  reservations  are recommended  Filet Mignon or New York  10oz. 10 oz.  $9.50 $8.25  INCLUDES: Baked Potato,  Chef Salad with choice of  dressing, Garlic Bread, Fried Fresh  Mushrooms, Assorted Desserts.  Tea or Coffee.  hibiting trail bikes as nuisances,  ���ft :��:  I Building or going to J  I build a new dwelling  ��  1     DID YOU KNOW?  | While your house is under construction ��  I you can spray to prevent infestations of ����  g wood-boring insects such as ants, beetles $  :���; and termites and for only one half the cost ��  i of treatment of occupied dwellings. Don't $  $ wait...do it now! Give us a call at  NORTH ISLAND  PEST CONTROL  WORK GUARANTEED  It     AT REASONABLE RATES g  886-9414  BATHROOT  PLUS  (Boutique)  McGregor  SHOWER CURTAINS  BA TH ACCESSORIES  BEADED TIE BACKS  SHOWER HOOKS  SOAPS  Kirsh  VANITY TOP  MIRRORS  SHOWERRODS  TOWEL TREES  SOAP DISHES  FIELDCREST TOWELS  886-9414  S Local Licensed Operator  Charlie Cairns 885-3606  ss  ��  ^BATHROOMS  WE CARRY  A COMPLETE  LINE OF  PLUMBING  SUPPLIES  PULSATING  SHOWER  HEADS  PLUS  MOEN  CRANE  WALTEC  FIXTURES  ABS, COPPER  GALVANIZED  PIPE  and FITTINGS  (Brass Fittings)  TIDELINE PLUMBING & HEATING CONTRACTORS  RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL - FREE ESTIMATES  BIG  OIL  DEAL  ON  FISHING  MERCS  BUY A NEW MERC  4.5,7.5, 9.8,  20 or 40 H.P.  GETA  COMPLIMENTARY  CASE OF  QUICKSILVER OIL  Suggested $^fc *%  at your participating  Mercury dealer  HURRY!  Offer ends June 30  n  -^Snncoast  IHarine ���  'The Chain Saw Centre  Cowrie St.       Sechelt  885-9626  ~ym~J-��X��fJ~ Y X&��iV^mi*^&i&''*���*$&'*M '���  ~J> ���-  -.,-.��� -;  Coast News Insert Page 1. June 28,1977^  t&tf-f     * ^ 'ft;  ���'r  73- <i ��;:>   T<    J'���.cr  t,~ .tr;  ��s ...*'-  *�����''��  '���.-��.- *'  ..-^.�����������v.����)3MUMa��iR*"4r.E4^a^^  ~��^����*SpS��^.KJ��KA-.' Coast News Insert, Paae 2. June 28.1977.  Gibsons  WESTERN DRUG M  PRICES IN EFFECT JUNE 28 to JULY 4th  Sunnycrest Centre  Roll On  Deodorant  1 oz.   .87  Kroydan  Tennis Racket  reg $9.95     7.97  Vilking  Angle Broom  reg. *2.99 2.17  Secret  Anti  perspirant  9oz. 1.67  Slazenger  Tennis Balls  3/tin  white    4-07  yellow    4.47  Protein 21      =  Shampoo       g  14 oz.    1.47  Scope  Mouth  Wash  new  1 litre size  2.57  Bic  Shavers, disposable  (3 plus 1 free)     .57  Vilking  Magnetic Broom  reg.$2.29 .1.67.  Agree  Creme  & Conditioner  8oz.   $1.27  Scotch Tape  3 rolls     1.49  Crest  H Toothpaste  Miht&   i ���  Regular J'*f  150 ml  Short & Sassy  Conditioner  for short hair  300 ml  2.17  Bandaids ^^^  9 Plastic Strips ���  J&J  100's    1.57  Listermint      =  _____ Mouthwash    _  & Gargle        ���  18 oz. 1.47  Pampers  Toddlers   1.57  Newborn   1.97  NeoCitron  Adult  Solarcaine:  \ Fast relief of  sunburn pain  Lotion bottle  170ml    1.87  Areosol  150 gms-, 1*47  Mennen  g Speed Stick  75gms  1.17  -jl  __-  Toni  Home Permanents  reg, super & gentle  Pace 1.97  Home Barber Set  8piece    17.87  20 % Off  Noma  Party & Patio  Lanterns 611'gh't sets  Head&  Shoulders  Lotion  250 ml 1.97  10% Off  Picnic Jugs,  Coolers & Servers  HAYFEVER:  obtain relief from  Chlortripolon  4mgtabs18's .97  8mgtabs18's 1.67  Syrup 113 ml        1-07  Nugget  Scuff Cover Polish  =     liq. white, 2oz.   .67  Vilking  Magnetic Broom  reg.*3.99. 2.87  ! 10% Offl  Summer Hats  mens,  ladies & children's  J&J  Baby Powder  20 %Off I s����Jpuffs   ���  Timex  Watches  Assorted  Ban ���-������  Basic, Scented &  Neutral 3.5 oz. 1.77  Sony  Palm Size  Transistor Radio 9.97  Hartz Mountain  Flea Collars 2 in 1  Cat   1.97  dog   1.97  Travel Iron  Dual Voltage   ���  J&J  Baby Shampoo  350 ml  1.87  24.97  NeUson  Drink Mix  14.3 oz.    .89  Scholl  Sandals Eggshell &  Denim     t3.37 7  Hostess  Plastic  Hot & Cold  Clips  40's 1-07  Preparation  Supposi tone's  12's  ' 1.37  Place Mats:  vinyl individualized  Photo Album  Refills 4pageAlco  .99  ,67  g Bic-Lighters  disposable  Hershey  Instant Chocolate  500 gms      .57  Vinyl Air Mattress  -97 2.27  ^�� ''ti^���}?���/?�� Ii ~ S35  Cotton  =_ Garden  gloves  Iced Tea  m   24oz.Tin    1.79       I Styrofoam      fl  Cups 7 oz.      B  20's       .37  ��� Vinyl Swimming Pool  -77 3 ring   10.57  Bic  Table  Lighters  Vapona  No Pest Strips  Pic Bug Killer  Indoor/Outdoor  11 oz.      1-67  H BarB-Q  collapsible,  portable  Bar B-Q Fire starter H  19 oz;   ,77  I 3 only    9.57 = New Freedom  t___===_^_____W Mini's 4's, trial size  ��pkgsrf;27-  Styrofoam  Coolers  30 quart  2.37  ~  _^-.���j �����-. ��_����-.   ����, ��^*-_r_J.��r..i��j m. ~ ^ml *������?  "* ^^tf^J^w ���*-�����.���_��������*i_T      "���_t_T-.'    '��l*-��V(syUr*^**Vf'.  ,y  Coast News Insert, Page3, June 28,1977.  ^Canada/  I want to shake  your band.  T  Canada Day July 1  WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT CANADA?  So you think you know a lot about Canada and  its history?    Here are 20 Canada Day questions  1 to test your knowledge.    There's no time limit  on them, but please avoid the temptation to reach  for that reference book.  1. When was the first and last time Canada and  the U. S. went to war?  2. Where was the first capital of Upper and Lower  Canada?  3. Who was Canada's prime minister after Sir  John A. Macdonald?  4. Where is Canada's most northerly settlement?  5. Where were the first hockey games played in  Canada?  6. How many provinces were there before Confederation, and how many afterwards?  7. Which is Canada's largest province?  8. Which is Canada's most populous city?  9. Where did the east and west lines of the first  Canadian Pacific Railway meet?  10. Who was Britain's reigning monarch at the  time of Confederation?  ���11.   Why was the new nation called the Dominion  of Canada?  12. When did curling first come to Canada?  13. Which of the provinces was the lastjtb^ join.  Confederation?  14. When did Canada get its first newspaper?  15. Where was the bill for Confederation actually  drafted?  16. Where will you find the fewest two-dollar bills?  17. What is Canada's constitution called?  18. Who is the only living Father of Confederation?  19. How many original Fathers of Confederation  were there?  20. Where was the telephone invented?  Answers: Turn to page 16  An aerial view of Gibson's Harbour with the Sunnycrest Centre in the foreground.  Summer  ^i  ^w-8*^  ***&"    �����  FASHION CENTRE  886-8111  CANADIAN IMPERIAL  BANK OF COMMERCE  SUNNYCREST SHOPPING CENTRE  G.A. (Gerry) KIRSCH  Manager  CANADA DAY: HOURS OF BUSINESS  THURSDAY-JUNE 30-10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.  FrtlDAY- JULY 1st -CLOSED  SATURDAY-JULY 2nd-10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  SUNDAY-JULY 3rd-CLOSED  MONDAY-JULY 4th - CLOSED  886-8111  *-.���_��"���*������*����� .��se-��i�� i��r ���mi^f^t.  .��-���*.�� .�� ����������*������.�� tr .������������������-.���.  .  -    7U-4-.. \  ���* e,:m j��* m  *s*.  -TSr  '.   a  ����������� '��-.��-.��� *M...-��.�� ��-"*��.-��. �� ���'��-����� *VS:"a. *:.���-*..*'��. �������������.'��.��   ��..��.-��� .��,-..ji|r .��:.��.���.  *���;�������"j. �� ���* ���.��.;���".<���* ��� �����..����� a  i- ..���'����������.���.�� i��v"�� j��* .��.>�����;��  ��'*.��t*ji'j��j��.i������.j��a��.������ji-j��:in��*'<ra -.������-j* .��v��.-tw��_ Coast News Insert, Rage 4, June 28,1977.  igns  from  N atu re  courtesy Outdoor Canada  Are you just as uncertain about tomorrow's  weather after, you've heard the weatherman on  the six o'clock news? Do the terms isobar, precipitate and thermal confuse you? In short, does  meteorology cloud your brain?  Like the farmer, Indian and pioneer before  him, the outdoorsman should be both scientist  and sage. If you can't always be right, at least  be philosophical!  Weather folklore is more than just homespun  homilies. It's the accumulated knowledge of  generations. Here we offer a few of the more  practical sayings, all scientifically sound. Clip this  page, keep it in your pack or pocket, and become an  instant weather expert. We won't tell where you  got them.  "When ditch and pond offend the nose, look for  rain and stormy blows''  Notice how your sense of smell becomes keener  just before a storm? As a front approaches, air  pressure lowers and captive smells, pleasant and  unpleasant, are released.  "When the moon is in its house, it will rain. "  This Indian saying, familiar to trappers and  guides, is a foolproof forecaster of rain. The halo  of reflected light is caused by cirrostratus clouds;  an approaching warm air mass that inevitably  brings with it a long, slow rain.  i  "Smoke rising, disappearing: fair weather; Smoke  curling downward: rain. "  Poor weather decends upon us from higher  altitudes, creating a ceiling of air that traps rising  smofe -gfegg Jp^thejrround,, ^., ,,, y ^,,, ^ ^ Jm,,, J,,  All animals are sensitve to changes in the air  or water pressure around them. Some, however,  modify their behaviour in abrupt and sometimes  puzzling ways. Insects, birds and fish are nature's  best barometers. The following are useful signs  from our wildlife friends.  ?  A*?  "When the rain's about to blow Bats and Swallows  will fly low^  "When the barometer rises, so do the fish. "  "Ants travelling in a line: shine; Ants scattering:  showers. " . ������-���-������  ��  886-7922  ��  k  y>$  ����� *'      ��&  S"*       %  V.  **M  -: ���������$���  r t 't  gereift,  z?r-.s~  'zr***,  '4  Summer  Snacking  Bulk  Imported Cheeses  Fresh European  Meats & Sausage  and a full line of  Table Ready Foods  Look for OUR IN-  ���".JjfcvyoflV*" <��� ^  /  **���  % j ���g��_____________fcH^:S?-':^-��  ./>  'r-\*5t  /meat  '* ���) jfJ^'XT *'  I^S^S^  -rgT ">v  y  ^  * '**  s_,\nV__  ~y  "���^v  ?$fcl*��*'  K v  1*6  * Ti^'"  ^  ***��"  **__7  -**.  1  S_-f>S��� I  #s  WISEST  JROP  2?f  .�����  rf?_! Coast Newsy Insert Page5, June 28,-1977.  by John Burnside  There is a self-effacing quality about Canadians  generally which is refreshing in contrast, say, with  tiie often overly assertiveness of our American  neighbours. Sometimes it slips into a kind of self -  denigration, however, which is less than healthy.  As a young Scots immigrant to this country  twenty-three years ago, for example, one of the  first things I heard with frequency was the assertion from my Canadian peers that Canadian history was boring. Boring, I thought, how can  Canadian history be boring? It had wars between  the French and the English in a fantastic wilderness setting; it had Indian tribes, notably in the  early days of the white man's coming the Iroquois  and the Hurons; it had the amazing fur trade with  coureurs de bois virtually crossing the entire continent by canoe in search of beaver furs; there was  the unending struggle between the economic  interests and the church with the trade in brandy to  the Indians a constant bone of contention.  BRITISH COLUMBIA  The story of Canadian development is peopled  by the most incredible characters like Louis, Comte  de Frontenac, leading a punitive expedition against  the Iroquois in the wilderness in his seventy-fifth  year; through its pages run the stories of those  incredible men who mapped -the continent, La  Verendrye, La Salle, Hearne, Thompson, Mackenzie, routinely performing feats of the most incredible hardihood.  ALBERTA  What, I wondered as a newcomer to the country  and its history, could one ask for more than this by  way of a colourful history culminating in the epic  struggle of the Plains of Abraham. If there's a  country in the world which has a more colourful  period than the early history of white settlement in  Canada and such a period set in a more truly  awesomely magnificent setting, I've yet to hear  about it. '  -  SSSiSy  ?:^d-  f^lPt?W?��.^ 1  SASKAT  CHEWAN  ^L_\ __ j_M  v-:-?:';.;":-  SASKATCHEWAN  If the period of political activity of the 19th Century featured more frock coats and mutton chops  than fur-clad adventurers, it is nonetheless full of  absorption as the scattered pockets of settlers  across the vast northern half of the continent  fought to retain an identity separate from their  rapidly expanding giant neighbour to the south.  There are few politicians in history more engaging,  moire fascinating, or more brilliant than Canada's  first Prime Minister John A. Macdonald. The pity  is that so few Canadians know much about him.  There, are few national undertakings of the scope  of the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway in  a country so vast, in terrain so difficult or with a  population so tiny. Quite simply it had to be built  if the far-flung colonies were to be held together  and it was built, though it took the moving of  mountains, both physical and financial, to build it.  MANITOBA  On the less than epic scale Canadian history is  the valiant story of settlers in a new land enduring  a climate which is northern and can be harsh. Un  recorded stories of heroic struggle are everywhere  across the vast northern half of the continent. The  Canada we know today did not have an easy birth.  There were two founding peoples with centuries  of rivalry and struggle between them and there  was the land itself, magnificent and vast, but  severe and unforgiving in its seasons.  ONTARIO  And perhaps the Canadian tendency to self-  denigration arises from the fact all too commonly  there is a lack of physical awareness about the  northern giant which is their geographic heritage.  Continued on page 10.  Wear  //  ^ \v  0  c.  \\  \\  ���iSSNi  :/>  ^���.^  w  ��r/'" ~  i~4  <**.-.  'W*.  r,���i)��-'>a_  y  - ��'   i   .. V-  ��__-������**  Clothes  OFF  Be sure to see  our other  in-store specials! fcbast News, Insert, Pa^6, ^uhe 28; 1977  The SUNNYCREST SHOPPING  With 26 stores to serve you best!  Cactus Flower  Kits Cameras  Charles English R e alty World     Link H ardware  Don's Shoes Liquor Store  \-i  Douglas Variety  Driftwood Craft Shop  Fab Shop  Fawkes Rooks & Stationery  Gift Flowers  Globetrotter Travel  Goddards Fashions  Henry's Rakery  Imperial Bank of Commerce  J's Unisex  Party Stop  Richard's Mens Wear  Royal Rank of Canada  Super Valu 7  T.J.'s Sound  Todd's Childrens Wear  Trail Ray Sports  "... ��� i.  Western Drugs  Yoshi's Restaurant  You-Dels Delieatessen;  i  *-. ���:^\^?^'^^.^'':-":*^'i*^  c<LKJsu\*s.',i^.'s*^'x-m -���  :\_Xi -i.WcV.-^--v. '">���~>-������>���->'��.'>-.^.-5.' >-4-^->��� >���-.%-���������-:';��-':~  . -~v c" i ^..S. -v  ;. ---i*^*- Av._^X;.^j_���_:..��,*7.y .i\^^ .yA.^.��v*/.tf.^.:^.��...ir:-_*^  '.. __.��. _*y��. ^a--"*--1 ggMMMWBHrtM^IWWfff^^  Coast News, Insert, Page 7, June 28,1977.  I  (in Vancouver)  Liz, Jo-Anne  at  i  (In Gibsons)  Julia Mgr.,  Cheryl  TWO  LOCATIONS  west 10th ave.,  Vancouver  Su n nyc rest  ing  ^MWWM  /s/s//,vs. ;���'////,//,: '/,���/��� y;//////////y///////y//////s////s/^^^^ y//////////v//s///s//y//////////'/".'t''. News Insert, Page 8, June 28,1977.  'l;$��vf "'"' "  *  Show  Us  Your  Pictures  Bill Hallam did and  discovered how to take  informal close-ups of  little Christopher.  At KITS CAMERAS we've  learned that the happier  you are with your pictures  . . . the happier you are  with us. Show us  your pictures, for  better pictures next  time.  Show  Us  Tfour  Pictures  Julia Treharne did and she  found a better way to  capture the people-pictures -  of Spain.  At KITS CAMERAS  we believe-there's  more to processing  your pictures  than just  dropping  them off  and picking  them up.  Show us  your pictures,  for better  pictures next time.  SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR BEST ADVERTISING. THANK YOU MR. HALLAM.  SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR BEST ADVERTISING. THANK VOU JULIA.  Don't miss our PHOTO DISPLAY  in the mall June 27 - July 2  featuring COLOUR ENLARGEMENTS  and ANTIQUE CAMERAS  Pronto!  pronto!  r^m0_\  Wk.  K-,  P0t A***0  IA*0  CAM�����A  \ j"* -"�����*�����- r-l.  Everything  you need to  take great  super colour  pictures..  PRONTO! SM  ��� Takes beautiful  long-lasting  SX-70 pictures  that develop  while you ���  watch.  : a i ������ ���>_��   '���:.'".   ^i tri .<-rr ���>   |  J. THPOD MOUNT  ACCESSORY  POLAROID  CARRYING CASE  A beige-coloured  soft vinyl case  to protect your  Pronto! while  carrying it over  your shoulder.  Reg. 5.88  POLAROID  TRIPOD MOUNT  Enables your  Pronto! to be  used with any  tripod, so you  can get into"  ' the picture yourself  Reg  3 95  While  Quantities  Last  MS  m  -*,  *ii��iL>  *3\i?a_  mmms  886-8010  *'�����"*. ? Coast News, insert Page 9, June 28,1977.  '���/  Pt\ces Effective:   June 28v29.30&July^  Gov't Inspected Grade A Beef  Full Cut  69$ Ib  Chuck  cross rib roast  $1.09 lb.  Gov't Inspected C.D.V.  turkeys  79$ Ib.  Gov't Inspected  5 lb. Ctn.  $3.99  6-10 lbs.  Gov't Inspected  frying chicken breasts  99c lb.  Approx. 5 Ib. Carton  Bonus  whole chicken  52oz.Tin $1 ��� 77  Capri        ;.W- .���:,::;���;: x . ::.���    \ ,      ���;.;..  bathroom tissue  Allen's  fruit drinks  All Flavours M A jk  _48oz..Tins HJJlp  Blue Water Frozen  fish & chips  Presto  charcoal briquettes  20 Ib. Bag $Z�� 99  McLaren's  relish  4-Roll Pkg.  79C  32 oz. Box  $1.69  4 Varieties  12oz. Jar  49$  Super Valu  salad dressing  32oz.Jar   98$  Foremost  ice cream  5Flavours  _*%   OQ  4 Litre Pail 3>^��� v9  Kraft  marshmallows  11 oz. Pkg.  490  Super Valu  potato chips  Regular or Dippers  225 gm  coke or sprite  1.5 Litre Bottle  590  Plus Deposit  Farmhouse  apple pie  24oz. Pkg. 99$  Martha Laine  Washington  or Okanagan  69c lb  hamburger or hot dog  12's  iff watermelon  Oven Fresh  12c lb.  Dozen  69c  Hawaiian  Venice Bakery  Garlic  Each  49C  8oz.  Fresh Local  Oven Fresh  coffee cakes  ���^^mss?^  Apple, Cherry,  Lemon or Blueberry,  - "i  \^reser\/eth  tbLirriitQuantities.  X\-"^&$ii0(^t^\  SUNNYCREST CEJNtRl \^  a"S&  Coast News Insert, Page 10, June 28,1977.  Continued from page 5.  It is a fact that almost ninety percent of the Canadian population are lined across the continent within two hundred miles of the American border with  their faces yearning south towards the palm trees  with their backs turned figuratively on the northern  heritage which is the envy in its untapped plenty  of much of the world. It is true that the Canadian  north has been looked at as a place to draw wealth  from but little attempt has been made as yet to  relate to it as a place capable of settlement and  development.  g(*?^S!?  QUEBEC  Canadian writers  such as  Farley  Mowat,   in  particular, in the last few years have been declaring the folly of the lack of northern development. In his book Siber Mowat makes a convincing  argument that much more should be done. He contrasts the emptiness of the Canadian north, its  exploitation and virtual destruction of the native  people to it with what is happening in that other  Northern Giant, Siberia, where cities are built  and native residents conduct the affairs of their  area in their native tongue.  The Canadian' lack of positive identity must  in part be caused by reason of the refusal to relate  truly to the vast and challenging land which is  theirs. Sometimes, it seemed, that the entire  (population wished that they had been Americans.  The last ten years, however, have seen a reversal  of this position. Perhaps the recent war in Vietnam with thousands of young Americans fleeing  their homeland to seek refuge in Canada, was a  factor in this change. In any event there seems to  be less of a feeling now that Canadians would be  American.  NEW BRUNSWICK  t>  NEW MUNSWICK  NOVA     W  SCOTIA^  P  NOVA SCOTIA  It would seem that Canadians are beginning to  become aware of the fact that in a troubled world,  theirs is a country of stability and plenty. They are  beginning to become aware that in the peace and  plenty of their lives they are among the favoured  of the world. That, in short, there are not mahy  more favourable countries to call home anywhere  on this globe.  PRINCE  EDWARD  ISIANU  4^>  MHNCI  EDWARD ISLAND  Again, as an immigrant over twenty years ago,  one of the first things noted by that long ago Scots  boy was that in Montreal, where he first resided,  the  companies were inevitably Siii %y /^SigKP/  Saxons whilst the French Canadians ran the elevators, cleaned the streets, drove the taxis.  Since  then there has been a change in the political  climate and education of Quebeckers.    They are  demanding and earning a control over their own  economic lives which a people needs if they would  live in dignity.   There are difficulties which beset  this confederation, but when were there not?   As  the country approaches now its one hundred and  tenth birthday it can be confidently asserted that  Canadian  tendency   towards   reason   and   compromise which made this country possible will yet  The history of this country is comprised of men of  different backgrounds living together and together  in times of crises rising to the challenge ofthe time.  NEWFOUNDLAND  NEWFOUNDLAND  For among the nations of the world this great  empty northern land is unique in its hope of a  future in which it may be possible for peoples to  live together in separate ways and without subjugation of one by the other. The Canadian Mosaic,  as it has been called, is as much an accident of  history as it is a consciously wrought entity. But  it may well be a divine accident nonetheless and  those of us privileged to be a part of it should be  proud to be so and careful in our guarding of it.  CANADA  In the essential decency which followed the wars  between the colonial powers, in the daring dream  of Confederation and the struggle which achieved  it, in the time of two World Wars, the men and  women who people this land have shown themselves capable of personal sacrifice, of great effort,  and of reasoned compromise. It is a privilege to  be a Canadian. Happy Birthday, Canada, and  many happy returns of the day.  GIBSONS  LINK  HARDWARE     STORES  886-2442  m  ���ii����  Model 7140  BLACK ft DECKER 3/T  REVERSIBLE DRILL��� 2.4  amps. Variable epeed fc  perfect control with revere-  ing switch for backing out  scrawa or driM bits.  Each.......   reg. *29.95  ^��. .^  10  Model F218  (L) CGE SELF-CLEANING STEAM N DRY IRON  Polished aluminum sole plate, water level indicator and wrap 'n rest feature.       ���: ��^ A*--  -:Eifeir>' t '"   *28-95  reg.$35.95  ���t  [sm  41  ,*H  'Otck  X��'����  ���-���.  _>..  Model 7301  BLACK 7ft DECKER 7*"  CIRCULAR SAW-9 ampaJ  With burnout protect!  motor. Bevaf and dapth ed-  juetmenta made aaaUy.  CBwII ��� *  reg.$34;95  RID-JID IRONING TABLE-Ad  justs to any height up to 36".  __��"'.-?> ; h;  ��� ������������������������  ���v^ -..i/ ��.*  $  reg. *15.95  ��>     '1  m  10% OFF  PRESTO  PRESSURE  COOKERS  REMINDER:  Weed Eaters,  Lawn & Patio Supplies,  CIL Paint & Wallpaper,  Giftware  CLEARANCE  PRICES  ON  GARDEN  TILLERS  #  ���&W4%KM?MXiyW^^^^ Coast News,���IniwM.PaO^  This handsome reproduction of a Woodcut - Circa 1867 r suit^y^ &^ life that arastill of importance 110years later.  &��  Visit Gibsons'   New Books & Stationery!  our Summer Sale is _____/ On -  Savings on all lines!  Books  GARDEN GUIDES reg. *1.50   SALE.99*  CANADIAN PAPERBACKS 7-25% OFF  BETWEEN FRIENDS"        List $42.50 NOW *29.50  Party Supplies  A selection of Colourful Paper Plates, Cups  and Napkins 25% OFF  Large  DECORATOR CANDLES  reg. ��3.50&*4.50  SALE'2.49 &'3.29  FLORAL CANDLE RINGS   |   reg^2,5^)& *3.2&  (for above candles) SALE '1.87 & '2.49  Fashion Jewelry  25%to30%OFF  GOLD & SILVER CHAINS     reg. *2:00 to *10.96  SALE'1.49 to'7.99  Games & Puzzles  UP TO 50% OFF  '   ' ': ���'     . ��� ���'���'r'-.,-v-' '������;���...   .    ���'-  '������������' ...���.������.;.��� ' ������ ��� :      ���������'.���,  ' ��� ���  '  CHECKERS, CHESS, BFUDGE SETS, POKER  CHIPS/JIG SAWS & FUHPUZZLES. 7  FEEL FREE TO BROWSE THROUGH OUR  LARGE SELECTION OF HARDCOVER &  PAPERBACK BOOKS.  WWDO H|wi K/IAPS OF THE SUNSHIN&Sr-m��> sHj \.  COAST!  ��� It  master charge  nn  886-8013  CHARGEX News Insert, Page 12, June 28,1977.  I   Ganada>  I vvarrt to shake  T  Day July 1  AFE BOATING WEEK  JULY 1 - 7 1977  Do's and Don'ts of Boating  I want to shatce  yourfiand;  T  Canada Day July 1  Do's  Head for the nearest safe anchorage or landing  when a storm threatens and avoid the temptation  to "buck it".  Obey the regulations regarding livesaving equipment, using only that stamped or labelled "approved" by the Department of Transport.  Assist any boat in distress. The waving, in a vertical circular motion of a piece of light coloured  material or a light by night is a distinctive distress  signal.  Slow down when passing dredges or water where  d ivers may be working.  Slow down when making sharp turns, and in bad  weather.  Slow down when passing row boats and canoes,  especially in narrow waters.  Learn the Rules ofthe Road and practise them.  When operating at night, carry a few red flares  in a watertight container; the red flares used on  railroads are efficient and inexpensive.  Keep the bilges of the boat clean, free of oil,  gasoline and rags etc. Vent any enclosed areas  into the open air.  Check the battery and its ventilation..  Obey the regulations regarding fire precautions  and fire extinguishing equipment.  Carry an anchor and sufficient length of sound  cable, rope or chain - at least five times the average  anchorage depth. Be sure that the inboard end of  the line is securely fastened to the boat.  Wear a lifejacket in a small boat whether or not  lifesaving cushions are carried.  Join a yacht or boat club if possible, and keep  yourself informed on regulations.  When engaged in extended cruising carry the  latest corrected charts and related publications in  your boat at all times.  Obtain Annual and Weekly Notices to Mariners.  "Fifteen men on a dead man's chest,  Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum."  A fine old sea chantey which aptly depicts a  sailor's lifestyle in days of old when rum was  synonymous with seafaring and vice versa.  No one has ever determined the cause of death  of the man in the song. Perhaps he died as a result  of an accident due to his excessive alcoholic intake.  a .-�� .-. t/-' *���   ��� -.,���*���"  W ���������  * '���*������.   *" t - ���*������ V   ���.-'*.�� - ���* X :mmt- .*."  Today our waterways are very much more  crowded than in days of old and our vessels much  more sophisticated, especially those equipped with  high powered engines. Drinking and driving  afloat can be just as hazardous as on the highways. There is good reason to believe that the  frequency rate of accidents which involve alcohol  is just as high in boating as it is in motoring. Alcohol inpairs the senses and increases the reaction  time that is necessary for safe and pleasurable  boating.  STAY SOBER AFLOAT OR YOU MAY PAY AN  UNPLANNED VISIT TO DAVEY JONES * LOCKER  Don'ts  Stand up or change seats in a small boat, particularly when the boat is fully loaded. If necessary,  crouch low and keep the weight on the boat's  centerline, holding on to both gunwales.  Stand up when starting an outboard motor.  Operate near swimmers.  Mix liquor and boating.  Use a leaky or poorly built boat.  Cruise fast enough to create a dangerous swell  when near small boats.  Leave your tiller or steering wheel unattended  when under way, especially in harbours, anchorages or narrow channels.  Throw garbage overboard.  Sound your horn or use spotlight unneccessarily.  '   f     . - 7  Wait until the last minute to signify your intentions  of obeying the Rules of the Road.  Anchor close to other boats.  Cruise at high speed in pr near an anchorage,  Hold impromptu races/ with ^n  row boats, canoes and other small craft are endangered by the wash.  Attempt to swim ashore if your boat  is swamped; hang on to the boat  picked up.  Bea "show-off".  capsized or  you are  "Buzz" bathing beaches; swimmers are hard to  see in the water.  Carry out-dated charts and related publications  in your boat but always use the latest corrected  editions.  Create excessive wake, this can endanger others  in your vicinity and also cause bank erosion; and  damage to property .'���..  ��* *���- *-������*��� *..  "�����-._ ���-..!&��� ji/m. '���-:-��$��� *+'����� v��p  *'-.'��� '.*��   �� ;  .*���-���' <-.'-���*  -��'-&,������    .v.".  ���-���**v *���'..��''>��� .*7. ,�����_��� _:.> -_..*;'*-���< aal. >>*/--<y: vO'^'-'iK-j ;ja ?.{}.!...%������ *  *'.# .--si Coast News Insert, Page 13, June 28,1977.  SAVE YOUR SKIN  Before you hit the beaches, pools, tennis courts,  golf courses and boat docks for a summer of fun,  heed this advice from sun-and-skin experts.  1. Too much sun exposure without adequate  protection can dry out, age, even damage skin.  Ask your doctor or pharmacist to recommend  a sun-screen that protects you against sunburn  and stays on while you swim or perspire in the sun.  Most sunscreen products wash off, requiring  frequent reapplication to maintain protection.  2. Don't try to get a summer's tan in one weekend.  Tan gradually, increasing exposure time daily.  Use a good sunscreen for protection and remember  the sun is hottest during the midday hours.  3. The sun reflects off sand and penetrates water,  so even if you think you're protected by shade or  an umbrella, it's best to cover up after sunbathing -  towel, robe, hat, etc.  Fair-skinned individuals and others who are sun-  sensitive should be especially careful to avoid  overexposure, even with the^protection of a sunscreen. ��� '. ''"��� ' '  4. Eyes need special protection from the sun's  powerful ultraviolet rays. Wear top quality sunglasses, not "funglasses". If the eyes can be seen  through the lenses, you don't have proper sunglasses. '"'.'"'.'    "  ���  ���-��� Greyand green tints are most widely recommended by vision experts because they interfere least  with colour perception.  5. If you are taking medication, check with your  doctor before sunbathing.    Some drugs increase,  sensitivity to light.  > TUAVKL ^jft  ONE CALL DOES IT ALL"  ��� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������a  ��� ������������������������>**���������*���������������������*��������������������������������������#������������������������_ _ _ __ _ .  ��� ��� ���'��� ��� ��� ���  C^t-*^ ��� ������*��������������������� - j���  ������������������������������������������������������������������*������*  ��� *���������������> *i_o ���>�����������  ��� ��� ��� ��� * ^s^m ���������������������������������������������������������*���������������  <t    ���������������������   ��V"T ���   *   ���   m   * ���    ��   a   m *ST ��������������������*������������������*���������������������������        J  I  ��� ���������������    \  \        _ ^*s_  ������������������������������������������*���*  '������������������    \   V��__/T   Mi   ������������������*������������������������������  Now open for all your travel needs.  Conveniently located in the new  Gibsons Mall  See us today and fly tomorrow  Pasley  886-9984  Mall hours  or  evenings  Elly  885-3300  ��� ��� ��� *  !_��� ����������������������������������������*���<  ���m**********  ���   ���������  ��� ..��  JL.J   ���   ���   s  '     ���     *     *  ��   1    ?    "    '  *   -   *-  .__       X   V-   '^ff  ^   *<W   ��   *��   l ���  ^*%-^7  ��� *��1  J***"  vs.  tas-  toat better.  *  "*.&**#'  85  ^���W��S��*^.Xft>>(  Jf I--  JJbngarTS  V'��� j^__pii;,.l  >*!  ;x?y*tar' SS  4MM*'���- -v*_.*<3_S  .��ii-i��-3flW^^^.��,  i*.w  - ��.    "&���      _. ���'._$ i  ^_V  ,v*0  .y^"n  175  200  ���oMPIIMMWmiMI  IWH1!^ ���������<�������� ��� < i>i'i<* ��<+��  t-�����^ 3����>-^i  2 locations to serve you  Sechelt-885-2512  Sunnycrest Centre  88JS-8020  Take advantage of terrific savings during this once a year  DISeOUNT SALE NEW '77 MODELS  H.P.  15  55  70  85  115  140  Suggested ���-.- .-...:��� ������   . ������   ������������  Price        *344      ��497      ��704    '882    *1,007     *2,120      $2,540  ��2,892      *3,114       $3,330  Special    ^299    M39   ��599   *759   *879    M.799   ^2.159   ��2.399   ��2.549    ^699  We provide qualified local service to ensure your continued satisfaction.  Prices effective at Sechelt and Sunnycrest Mali stores. Coast News Insert, Page 14, June 28,1977.  ^*i> V-  '%���  TENNIS PLAYERS' GUIDE  FOR FOOT AND LEG CARE  By Dr. St. Subotnick  1. Start slowly if you haven't been playing for a  while. Stop playing beforeyou feel fatigued.  2. Get a good book on stretching and flexibility  exercises and set up a program of exercises to be  performed daily.  3. Jog regularly starting off by walking 100 yards,  then jogging 100 yards. Increase speed and distance gradually.  4. Stretch the calf muscles and hamstrings before  and after playing.  5. Do muscle strengthening exercises equally for  the muscles on the front and back of the legs and .  for the quadriceps muscles in the thighs.  6. Avoid over stretching for ' 'impossible'' returns.  7. Wear comfortable tennis shoes with a high toe  box and deep heel seat. Tie them snugly but not  tightly.  8. Do not "play through" pain. You may cause  further damage to your feet, legs, knees, or hips.  I  8  s  Caulks,Steel Toe,Plain Toe, |  and Ranch Boots  now available  ���  t  m  i  Step in for our  in-store specials!  DonTs  t  A. A.GANT  Sunnycrest  Gibsons  ^v  SEE A DEMONSTRATION OF  OUR NEW SEWING MACHINES  AND SAVE WITH OUR  SIMPLIFIED THREADING  Tho easiest and fastest  method ever . . . takes  just seconds'to thread.  ALL FABRICS  ATTHE  Sewing Machines  ZIGZAG  AUTOMATIC  ELECTRONIC  XL795reg.*259.95  661 reg. M59.95  From *159.95  From *319.95  *699.95  Special $239.95  Special $139.95  FAB  PUSHBUTTON REVERSE  For sewing in either direction without turning  material.  PHONE 886-2231  ������' mi-,**'���**   *'-.*>' at' -**" i*r mr -wc ��   ,_f -**.��� ��**-.*. -m ���+*   *   ���  ^   -m     m     ��. . ���-  * ;�� ~*��   ��' m* -**  -����� .-. �����  _��.��  * ��� ,*-t ..*��� ^* ��� Coast NeWs Insert, Page 15, June 28,1977;  PROUD  Limited stock available  All  components  may  be  purchased  separately  with similar reduced prices.  FPiEE DELIVERY  PORT MELLON to SECHELT  SUNNYCREST SHOPPING CENTRE  GIBSONS     886-9111  040  PACKAGE #2 List Price $1,214.80 $  SALE  STR 7055 - 40 Watt AM / FM Receiver  A powerful 40 watt receiver to provide more than  enough power for today's listening. In a medium  price range, it's performance and features rival  those of any class.  PACKAGE #1 List Price $649.85 * FT  STR 7015 -15 Wait AM/FM Receiver       9WmM:.9.  A low-priced stereo receiver with high quality  performance in an attractive woodgrain finish.  PS 1450 - Semi-Automatic Belt Driven Turntable  With Sony's new disc type rubber insulation mat  for reduced noise transfer characteristics. The  PS 1350 comes complete with Sony VM-26G  induced magnet cartridge, wooden cabinet and  dust cover.  SSC 610 - Speakers  A compact 3-way stereo system which can be  used horizontally, vertically or hung on the wall.  Featuring an 8" cone type woofer, 4" cone type  mid-range and a 2" cone type tweeter in woodgrain  cabinet.  PS 2700 - Fully Automatic belt driven Turntable  With Sony's new disc type rubber insulation mat.  This unit does not normally come with a cartridge,  but we will supply a Sony VL32G moving magnet  cartridge with this package.  (suggested list price $44.95)  SS 2250 - Hi quality Speakers  With 3-way infinite baffle featuring a 10" cone  type woofer, a 21/2" cone type midrange and a  horn type tweeter in ah attractive woodgrain  cabinet.  rifaQ*t9&  "*i|tjtaL ��/#r,-a*--W^��T.*��-��;^w ��*'**  wl   hOniid  master charge  l(M8*H��   i    AMD  -2  _ ~&*&- -       reg. $7.98  SALE  *5����  SST,  w *  &.*.*/>���&+* I.**  X ���Tfa.'^.'v^ *--^w >ii��]wa>. **ii'-��firiPArt'iiE.  *J Coast News Insert, Page 16, June 28,1977.  ;^> .  Vx  \.  Answers to quiz from page 4  Canada,  I want to shake  your hand.  T  Canada Day July 1  CANADA QUIZ ANSWERS:  1. June 18,1812.  2. Kingston.  3. Alexander Mackenzie.  4. Alert on Ellesmere Island, 518 miles south of  the Pole, which is also the world's most northerly  settlement. It's inhabited by 200 servicemen and  six Eskimos.  5. Halifax and Kingston, 1855.  6. Three - Province of Canada; Nova Scotia and  New Brunswick; after 1867, there were four -  Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.  7. Quebec, with an area of 523,860 square miles.  8. Metropolitan Toronto, with a population of  2.8 million.  9. Craigallachie, B,C. in 1885.  10. Queen Victoria.  11. At the time of Confederation, the British were  concerned that Sir John A. Macdonald's suggestion  to call the infant nation the Kingdom of Canada  would upset the anti-royalist Americans. The name  "Dominion'' was inspired by a line from Psalm 72:  ' 'He shall have dominion also from sea to sea..."  12. It was first played by'British soldiers on the  ice of the St. Lawrence River during the 1760  siege of Quebec City.  13. Newfoundland in 1949.  14. In 1752, with the first issue of the Halifax  Gazette.  15. London, England from December 4-24,1866.  16. Saskatchewan, where farmers believe two-  dollar bills bring bad luck. The Bank of Canada  doesn't issue those bills to the province, and issues  very few to the West in general.  17. The British North America Act.  18. Joey Smallwood, former Premier of Newfoundland.  19. A total of 36; 23 attended the first conference  in Charlottetown, September 1, 1864; 33 were at  the Quebec Conference, October 10-29, 1864; and  16 attended the London, England conference  December 4,1866.  20. Brantford, Ontario by Alexander Graham Bell.  } . ��� �����  Canada  un beau pays  un pays libre  T  Fete du Canada, 1er juillet  none  * i  ihe  GREATEST LITTLE BAKE SHOP  on the Coast  for that  ULTRA SPECIAL OCCASION"  ask about our  AUTHENTIC GERMAN TORTES  886-7441  Sunnycrest Centre  What a Sale!  SLACKS all of them 20% OFF  CORD SUITS .......... 30% OFF  JEANS & CORDS  as low as *l 5.95  VELOUR SHIRTS  low as *15.95  LEATHER JACKETS 20% OFF  Plus great specials on jewellery,  work clothes and lots more!  Celebration starts June 28 ends July 4  mens  Wear  886-2116  nnycrest  f   JE   '�����    * ~jff   .V- ,y     *     >' ������**   .  .-&/������-���  ���.: ���,  ..  .-. ��i   .^'-;  *= '����� .;����� ������;������ r  i     .4' ���*<* ,*.^F'-yf- ���������*  t&i&ti&itHjSit). .-V  ���-���-..��.-W-. ,. ���    .^. . i     ,!.���

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