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Bella Coola Courier 1916-09-30

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 ������������������#  M  jJ^y^^TTT^_������____���������_i   ,   ," ______i   i   r    ______        i1  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR AUGUST.  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 74,   Minimum, 45.  Highest Max. (25th) 93. Lowest Min. (SOth) 45  Rainfall, 0.62 inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915) 34.33 inches.  VOL. 4���������NO. 51  Ariv;3������:S Greece  to Oeclare War  immediately  Athens, Sept. 29.���������King Constantino received this morning  an exhaustive report from General Mo.schopoulos, chief of the  general stall', advising immediate declaration of war by Greece  without awaiting either assistance or insistence of Entente,  powers is the only way to save  the situation.  Bulgarians Repulsed  Paris, Sept. 29. ��������� Bulgarian  forces made two , attacks last  night near Fiorina, western end  of Macedonian front, but were  easily repulsed by French and  Russian troops.  Submarine L7 Launched  Long Beach, Sept. 29.���������United  States submarine L7 was launched here today.  Chicago, Sept. 29���������-Col. Roosevelt is to make at least 5 speeches  in their southwestern states for  Hughes and Fairbanks next  month.'    , ~  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1916.  $1.00 a Year  St. Lawrence Route to.be  ; the Steamship Lane  London, Sept. 28.��������� It is believed here that- after the war  the St. Lawrence route will be  the principal transatlantic steamship lane from the suggestions  Mr. Asquith'made last week.  The following quotation, taken  from a shipping journal, is additional evidence: "We predict remarkably interesting developments in the North Atlantic service after the deadweight of war  has been removed."  Repulse German Attacks  British Advance on Somme Front  Paris, Sept. 29.���������A strong attack was made by the Germans  last night on the Verdun front  between Thiaumont and Fleury.  The assault was repulsed with  heavy losses to the enemy. "On  the Somme front, French batteries actively bombarding German  positions.  London, Sept. 29.���������Advance  was made last night at various  points on the Somme front be-  tween Martinpuich and Gende-  court by British troops.  Italians Progressing  In Trentino Region  , Rome, Sept. 29.- Italians occupied the high position between  Marie and Tovo, west of Monte  Comone in Trentino region. In  Astico valley along the Carso  river heavy Austrian artillery  fire is proceeding. <>  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  S. S. Camosun delayed her  coming to our port a whole day  on the last trip. She,#1arrived  Monday forenoon about 10 o'clock. Her list of passengers  included 11. M. Burritt, Geo. E.  Bennett, .J. L. Converse, Geo.  Kilsey, J. GotV, Mr. Nelson and  M. Nygaard with family.  The cannery yielded the usual  consignment of salmon to her  cargo. It may be noted in passing that the owners of the Camosun, the Union Steamship Co. of  B. C., have shown their patriotism and prosperousness by the  investment of $100,000 in the  new Dominion War Loan.  Western Grain Yield  Predicted to Reach  577,000,000 Bushels  Winnipeg, Sept. 28.���������The Canadian Bank of Commerce give as  their estimate of this year's  grain crops in Western Canada,  the total of $455,000,000; thirty-  seven percent above the average  value of wheat, barley and oats'  for the past five years'. The  total production of these grains  is placed at 577,000,000 bushels.  Harvest in France  Paris, Sept. 28.���������The agricultural situation in France was  summed up authoritatively today  as follows: The wheat yield is  somewhat below that of the average year, but in the west, central and southeaster^/sections  the harvest is satis'f iictbry ass a  whole. The situation as to oats  ,-, is quite favorable. Potatoes suffered from dryness/ but good  crops were raised in many sections. The beet yield was satisfactory. Vineyards suffered from  heat, but on the whole the yield  is considered a satisfactory one.  Prince George of Greece  Recalled  London, Sept. .29.���������Prince  George- of- Greece, brother of  King Constantine,/whp has been  in London some, time representing the views of the Greek court,  received a telegram from the  king recalling him.'  Paris, Sept. 29.���������A despatch  from Athens'says that at a meeting, to be held tomorrow at>Mity-  lene a revolution will be proclaimed.  Sir Wilfrid Laurier  . Speaks at Montreal  Montreal, Sept..29.���������In an ad-  >  dress delivered here on Wednesday night before 15,000 people  Sir Wilfrid. Laurier was partly  political and intensely patriotic,  making it abundantly,clear that  he strongly favored the cause of  Gr.eat Britain and her Allies in  the war and regarded it the duty  of "French-Canadians to assist  therein.  Steamer Escapes,Submarine  Newport News, Sept. 29.���������A  story of a desperate battle with  a German submarine off the coast  of Algiers is being told by Capt.  Fiswick of the British steamer  Antinous. A running fight for  several miles took place before  the submarine gave up the chase.  Fort Churchill Deserted  _ .   . _  Ottawa, Sept. 28.���������The white  population of the once flourishing settlement of Fort Churchill,  Hudson Bay, has been reduced  Qh#^hird'bj|;the departureipf A.  H:^oifer:of the R. N. W?M. P.  All that remains of the browd  who moved up to the northern  port in the days when it was  thought that the Hudson Bay  Railroad would terminate there,  are two mounted policemen and  the Hudson's Bay Company's  factor.  H. M. Burritt, representing  the wholesale firm of Mackay,  Smith, Blair & Co. of Vancouver,  is visiting the merchants in the  interests of his firm and incidentally also those of his customers.  ���������i  Geo. E.. Bennett, selling groceries for Leeson/ Dickie,'Gross  & Co. of Vancouver, is such a  frequent visitor that we have  come to the conclusion that it is  his intention to monopolize the  grocery, trade of the valley. His  efficiency and assiduousness ,go  a long way towards the attainment of that object.  Martin Nygaard and family  came in last Sunday from the  Manitou Cannery, Kimsquit,  where Mr. Nygaard has been engaged, for several years. He is  spending a week's well-earned  holiday among friends and relatives before entering upon his  winter's work as the caretaker  of the cannery.  J. L. Converse and Mr. Nelson  of Auburn, Washington, Geo.  Kilsey and Joe Goff of Vancouver, B. C, came in last Monday  with a view of locating here.  They are friends of the Rat-  cliff brothers, and we have no  doubt were induced to make the  trip here with these, intentions  upon the favorable account given  of our valley by ,the Ratcliff s on  their recent visit to the South.  We hope they will find .suitable  land on terms which will be acceptable to them.  A; C. Christensen has again  found it necessary to take a look  at his cattle ranch at Takush  Harbor.   He took his departure  last Monday.  The fact that the=GourJer-=an=  nounced last week that Rev. W.  H. Gibson had gone to Kitimat  did not prove sufficient inducement to hasten his departure.  He waited until last Tuesday;  then he took with him eight Indian children who will be placed  at school, six at Kitimat and,two  at Port Simpson. The whole  Dominion force of Indian officials  support him in his efforts to take  care of the little ones. Indian-  agent Fougner, Constable Tucker and engineer Sutherland on  the Dominion launch Charles  Todd are the hosts of the expedition.      '   "  John Widsten, fishery officer,  and Olaf Fosbak, his assistant,  spent election day,in the wilds  forty miles'up the'Kimsquit river.  They went1 there to blast logjams that obstructed the passage  of the salmon to the spawning  grounds.  They report the density of the  brush almost' impenetrable,  and that they had about as'trying  a time as the politicians had at  the polls on that historic day.  There"' is quite a large area of  agricultural iand in that valley  which in Mr. Widsten's opinion  ought to be surveyedand have a  trail made to it. The need of  the trail appealed very strongly  to the1 fishery officers in$their  arduous task.  The farmers and others of the  -valley must, during the coming  week, busy themselves in getting their exhibits ready for the  10th of October.'  Every indication is to the effect that it will be, next to Empire Day,, the great day for the  people of the valley and therefore everybody must do their  share, tqpmake it a success in all  respects.  ,   All the members of this community rise to congratulate Mr.  and Mrs. Rev. H. ���������Sageng of  Hagensborg, on the arrival in  their family on Sunday, Sept.  24th, of a daughter. Mother  and child are doing well.  '"Tin cannery tug Kiltik from  Namu came in during the week.  The S. S. Celtic called last  Tuesday at the cannery for a  load of salmon.  To the Electors of Bella Coola and District!  Mr. E. Green, B. C. L. S., of  Green Bros. & Burden Co., Victoria, who for some time past  has been engaged in surveying  timber limits, left here last  Thursday'for Kimsquit where he  Avill spend the next three weeks.  The timber limits were originally located by C. & C. A. Fields  of Regina, Sask, and latterly sold  to the North American Timber  Holding Co., Chicago.  The fishing for cohoe salmon  at the local cannery has been  quite satisfactory during the past  two weeks. In all probability  fishing will continue another  week at least as more empty cans  are expected up. Manager Saint  is in hopes of establishing a record that will require some beating before closing down.  The Hospital Board will shortly instal a new water system at  the, hospital and build an. additional chimney at the doctor's  residence._   Farmers'are now busy cutting  and hauling the second crop oi  clover and storing it in silos. In  the past some difficulty has been  experienced in drying the_second  crop owing to it being late and  considerable rain to contend with,  but now with the use of silo?,  of which there are quite a few  in use throughout the valley, this  has been overcome.  "Poultry Rations and , their  Practical Application" is the  title of Circular Bulletin No. 19,  which has just be^n issued by  the Department of Agriculture,  Victoria. All the rations given  in this interesting little circular  have been experimented with  many years ago, and have been  used constantly and successfully  by. a great many poultrymen in  this Province. It is with the  idea that many poultry 'raisers  can better and cheapen' their  methods of feeding their- stoek  by following out the suggestions  in this publication that it is issued at the present time.  A second edition of Bulletin  |-No. 48, "Exhibiting Fruit and  Vegetables," has just been issued, owing to the enormous demand which exhausted the supply of the first edition very soon  after it came off the press. This  bulletin deals with the standards  of judging adopted by the judges  supplied by the Department, ancl  also with the arrangement and  selection of exhibits. Its pages  are full of many useful hints that  are of great value to those exhibiting fruit or vegetables in  the Province.  For copies of either of these  publications, write to the Publi:  cations Branch, Department of  Agriculture, ''Victoria, and give  both' the name and the number  of the bulletin or circular reel u i re d.       Chas. Tucker the secretary of  theHopital Board, acknowledges  the receipt of the sum of $14.65  and a bedspread donated to the  hospital bytheMariaand Martha  Young Ladies Society of Hagensborg. The bedspread is of a very  attractive design and has the  names of the members of the  society worked into the pattern.  The spirit shown by these young  ladies is very commendable and  if adopted by the people as a  whole will make our hospital an  enterprise ,of which they may  feel justly proud.  Red Cross Auxiliary  At the kind suggestion of the  Farmers'<Institute all funds received at the Agricultural Exhi:  bition on October 6th are to be  donated to the Red Cross.  A Refreshment Committee has  been appointed, consisting of the  followingladies: Mesdames Hanson, Lauritson, Oveson, Enge-  bretson, ,���������Brewster and Gross;  Misses R. Nordschow, Hallowes, ���������  Ericson, Schulstad, Fredericren,  Waal,rand the Executive Committee. Luncheon, afternccn  coffee and cakes, and supper will  be served.  An Auction, Sale  During the afternoon a sale by  auction of fruit, vegetables,  (lowers, candies, cakes, needlework,,and any other goods contributed. It is impossible to ask  each person individually for ccn-  tributions,' so will every one  please regard this- notice as a  personal appeal to give some big  or little thing which can be turned into funds' for our boys at the  front? At this time of the year  .each one can spare something-r-  a box of apples, a sack of potatoes, a few cabbages, a jar, of  preserves, fancy work, flowers,  etc. All contributions will be  taken charge of by the Ladies'  Committeee and will be'sold to  the best advantage to the willing  buyers. Donations either for  refreshments or for sale can be  left, the day before the Fair,  with Mrs. Fougner, Mrs. T.  Draney, or any member of the  Ladies' Committee.  A Grand Concert  A Concert will be held in the  evening, the program being in  charge of Miss R. Nordschow,  Miss Hallowes, Mr. T. Saugstad  and the Executive.     .,'  In expressing my thanks for the support accorded me, 1 desire to  slate that it will be my earnesl endeavor to merit your confidence.  T. D. PATTULLO.  NOTICE.  Harry C. Evans, piano tuner,  will be in Bella Coola, October  1st. . Any person having pianos  or organs requiring tuning will  find me at the Hotel Bella Coola  after the above date.  !"���������>��������� <TO'<"!C>-<"l 0  Sunday School  , -    10:45 a.m.  Church Service    ���������   7:30 p.m.  . Preacher:  Rev.'Hans Sageng, A. B.  9  AH Are Welcome.. X BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, September 30,   191 6  The Courier  i'liuMSiiKU W i:kki,y at Hklla Coola by  the Bulla Cooi.a J'iihushini; Co. I .to.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1   Year  $1-00  G Month.       0.75  3 Month*    0.50  United Stales  1   Year....! $1-50  United Kingdom  1  Year $1-00  Subscription* payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising  Rates,  Apply at  OrTICH.  To CokresI'ONDENT?���������While um>bjrctioiml>> mi-  onymuui cuiniiiunicntioni will bo published, tlit  name and wldnwuf ovi-in wriiuruf micli Icllou  must liu Kl\rn to tlii- editor.  Ilio Editor rc������L'rv<'s tin' liwhl to H-fiiso publi  Citiun uf any letter. All muiiusi-ripl nl ttriU-r't  risk.  'S>ttliui j.ui}iuli luiumtut ntf lr.\.  SATURDAY, SEPT. 30,101(5.  \Y/e beg to i-emind our readers that the Courier having completed its fourth year  the subscriptions of all our  early subscribers are now du^  for renewal.  The management wishes to  thank our numerous readers  for their support during the  past and trusts to -continuance of the same in the future.  The subscription rate remains at $1  per year, payable strictly in advance.  Two Years After the Marne.  According to the judgment of  military experts in neutral countries the hope of Germany to  gain a decisive victory over her  enemies was shattered at the  tim3, when in September two  years ago her" armies were  turned back twenty miles from  Paris at the battle of the Marne.  It is the fourth, phase on which  the war has now entered, a phase  that is different from the three  others by the fact that, the offensive has at last passed from  Garmany to her enemies, not on  one front only, but on all.  The first phase of the war was  -marked by the 'tremendous efforts of Germany to destroy  France and to prevent England  coming to her Ally's aid. Those  attempt's were foiled at the  Marne and Ypres.  The second phase showed the  Germans holding their lines in  the west and winningone victory  after another in the east against  the .Russians, and in the south  conquering Serbia and Montenegro. But they failed to conquer  Russia and to turn the Allies out  of Saloniki and proved a second  failure to Germany.  The third phase was entered  upon when the crown prince began his tremendous attack on  Verdun and the Austrians hurled  their forces against the Italians  in a gigantic effort to crush them.  This part of the war proved to  be rather short and was ended  by the concerted offensive of the  Allies and thus added another  disappointment to German expectations.  The Russian millions reorganized and re-equipped have defeated the Austrians in battle  after battle and are now on Austrian soil and pouring into the  passes of the Carpathians on the  way to Hungary.  The Italians have taken Gorizia  and threaten Trieste. The French  and British are slowly but surely  ! forcing the Germans back on the  i  1 western front.  The Allies on Greek soil are  ��������� hammering away at the Bulgarians and are only awaiting some  | prearranged moment when they  ! will make a great onslaught and  ��������� overrun Bulgaria and reconquer  Serbia and Montenegro.  In the meantime Roumania has  joined the Allies, opened her  territory for the advancing Russians on their way to punish the  ungrateful Bulgarians, and is  ,iow making great strides into  LYansylvania driving the Austri-  tns from one city to another.  It is said it is a long lane that  lias no turn. We have now come  to the turn of the long lane in  this desperate struggle. Now,  for the first time since the war  began the gun power and,the  mununition' supply of our side  ire equal to those,ol* the enemy.  '\Veevcn hold that ours are superior. For the,first time our superior man power can be applied  dltoclively.  The end of the second year of  the war saw the last of Germ-,  any's colonies conquered. It has  seen a great naval battle off Jutland which scored a British victory and showed the uselessness  of disputing Britain's supremacy  on the sea;  The submarine warfare seems  to be abandoned as a means of  crippling trade, and, will only be  carried on to annoy the shipping  of the Allies. It seems that a  crisis must be near.  o    o    o    o    o  ,The New War Machine.  At the beginning of the war it  was conceded in all quarters that  Germany had the best machines  for carrying on the war.  Her preparedness foi" the gigantic conflict, her almost unbelievable equipment excited,the  amazement of the civilized world  and many of tlnr neutrals admired the qualities which had  been able to accomplish such preparations and oi'ganizations.  But as the war proceeded and  the Entente Allies were roused  to a true estimate of the great7  ness and the significance of the  conflict'they employed their best  geniuses to.overcome the disad-  ���������Jisadvantages u.r,dcr which they  DECLINE SUBSTITUTES  suit that today they are superior  to the Central Powers on every  point, viz: number of men,'guns,  ammunition, aircraft, etc.  The latest inventions in war  machines brought into practical  use is (iecidedly-anc-VT* departure  and promises great, possibililies.  It is an armored motor car and  has proved a great success. -  Its invention and manufacture  were successfully kept a secret  until its appearance in action a  few days ago'when it created  surprise-both among-friends and  foes. - r.  It may be called a travelling  turret or fort built on lines similar to the caterpillar motor cars  which can be operated over soft  ground.,,  An ordinary motor car requires  comparatively smooth ground for  travel; but this new car crawls  over all sorts of obstacles: shell  holes, stumps, mine craters and  is bullet proof. In an attack���������it  calmly and persistently advances  through the 'heaviest rifle and  machine gun fire towards and up  to the enemy's trenches; but in  its advance it is not at' alL'quiet,  spits an incessant stream of bullets and is manned by gunners  who work their "guns in nearly  nude condition. When the "tank"  as this car is called by its admirers, arrives at the enemy's trenches it stops and sends it stream  of bullets lengthwise into the  trenches, compelling either surrender, retreat', or death.  It is said that if the Allies had  3000 such armored cars they  would end the war in a month.  c    o    o     o     o  Duchess of Connaught's  Prisoners of War Fund.  We print a telegraphic mes-  House from Lady Borden addressed to Mrs. Barnard, which is  self-explanatory. Mrs, Barnard  will place the matter in the hands  of the different women's organizations and ask them to co-operate with her in making a substantial gift from the women of  British Columbia to the Duchess  of Connaught's "Prisoners of  War Fund," in recognition of  Her Royal Highness' patriotic  work in Canada, and the sympathy she has always shown for  the various women's organizations, and the good work they  are doing.  It is hoped that the many women's organizations of Bella Coola  will co-operate in a grand effort  to place themselves in line with  their sister organizations in the  Dominion. .    Ottawa, Ont., Sept. 11, 191G.,  Mrs. Barnard,  Government House,  Victoria, B. 0.     "  Three months ago Duchess  of Con naught was infoimrd that  women of Canada desired to present her on occasion her departure, some token of appreciation  of her deep interest in all, that  concerns the welfare of tlje  country. Under present conditions Her Royal Highness decided that she could not accept a  personal gift. The suggestion  was made that in memory with  her association with Canada a  fund might be raised for some  patriotic purpose connected with  the war. -This was also declined  on account of the numerous  funds being raised. The women  again brought the matter to the  attention of Her Royal Highness,  and she has graciously consented  to allow us to present (her "Prisoners of War Fund" with a gift.  As the time for appeal is limited  would you kindly place it as early  as possible before the women of  your Province as worthy of their  sympathy and co-operation.  (Signed) Laura Borden.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd;  ���������-_     VANCOUVER, B.C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF <rFfclDE OF*THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,  PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE   IN    B. C.v  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  if'  CLUB OFFER  ���������\  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The, Courier   .       .       .   '  .       .$1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg .1. 50  '   $2.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  The Courier   .       .  Family Herald _ Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  v 1.50  $2.50  . $1.00  . 1.00  $2.00  Bo ih papers  for  .   .   $1.50  Both papers  for   .  .   $1.50  Both papers  for  .' .   $1.75  Vi  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  J  r=-\  found themselves, with the -re- sage  received  at  Government  What a Conservative  .   Journal Thinks.  ' 'One of the most striking incidents in the election is the return of Mr. M. A. Macdonald at  the head of the poll in Vancouver. Serious charges have been  made against Mr.' Macdonald,  charges which would constitute  him a criminal deserving of imprisonment. The Government  case, as developed through the  committee of investigation into  the Vancouver plugging, meant  that Mr. Macdonald had imported an election crook and that he  had paid for this dirty work and  subsequently paid heavily to prevent the truth from coming to  light. No more serious charge'  could bevmade against" a public  man. In his very able address  in the Old Victoria Theatre the  Premier elaborated a most convincing argument along these  lines, and practically endorsed  the charge in its entirety.  "On the other hand, Mr. Brewster has always professed the  fullest confidence in his colleague.   He. has declared that  i > '  the whole thing was a Conservative plot, designed to ruin Mr.  Macdonald. He has on every  platform declared his unabated  confidence in that gentleman,,  and the great constituency of  Vancouver has endorsed him'up  to the hilt by returning Mr. Macdonald at the head of the poll  and by placing'all the Conservative candidates, including- the  Premier,  in the, defeated list.  Incidentally,1 the one man who  gave damnatory evidence in the  Court against Mr. Maqdonald has  been defeated   by the   largest  majority in the Province.   It is'  impossible   to   exaggerate  the  significance of these facts. Theyff  go to the very root of the question, and they probably explain  more truly than any other single  incident'the reason for the over-   ���������  whelming defeat of the Govern-  i     3 r  ment and for the sake of the  purity of pubiic life it is almost '  imperative that this whole question should be thrashed out in  the courts. The honour of both  parties and of both leaders is involved, and it is not to .indicate  the slightest opinion on the value .  of the position taken up by Mr.  Brewster to say that the smashing defeat of the Premier-and  his colleagues in the City of  Vancouver and' the position of  honour accorded, to Mr..Macdonald is such a drastic comment on  the plugging case astooutweigh  every other issue raised in the  campaign."���������The Week.  fflE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN to r__re������cnt  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B.C., them, in different parts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest, energetic men onlyare needed. We particularly  want a good man at Bella Coola and for coast points, also a man  on the G. T. P. Railway.  _o_  ��������� c  _o_  PROJECTED ROUTE OF. THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY*  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  '   BETWEEN i  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      CstmOSUIl      Leaves  Vancouver  every  Thursday at 9 p. m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  _  0  o  0  S! S., " Coquitlam"  sails  from  Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline, and Explosives,  will call'  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  .,Por rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply, to  Head Office, Garrall St., .Vancouver; or GEO'i McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St.', Victoria.-  _fe  t A  HOC  HOE  w  iiium���������m Hi_mf_ a  Saturday, September 30,   1916  BELLAj COOLA COURIER  '3  r'.w  si;.  Simply a little rub with a cloth keeps the highly burnished cooking top always glistening, dustless clean, without blacking; in four pieces it cannot warp or bulge.  \  It won't be hard to decide what range you want in your  kitchen after I show you the Kootenay's special features.  867  Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  How to Utilize Our Bush  Land.  No matter'how enthusiastic  we, may be in our praises of Bella Coola we must admit that the  clearing of the land-am! getting  it under cultivation have not progressed with the speed the fertility of the soil and the favor-  ableness of the climate warrant.  The reasons for this state of affairs are several, but one of the  chief ones is that the timber is  heavy and makes the clearing of  the land a slow and expensive  process under the best of conditions.  Our attention has been called  to an article in the B. C. Fruit  and Farm which has appealed to  us forcibly in this connection,  and for the benefitof our farmer  readers we will give some extracts from it.  Mr. William Miller a resident  of Vancouver, who for 40 years  was engaged' in the sheep business in Australia, knows this  business about as well as it is  possible for it to be known. He  says: '/There is no country in the  world where conditions for the  sheep raising industry are better  than they are in British Columbia." *    "  He goss on to state that our  conditions both as to climate and  timber are about the same as  those obtained in New Zealand,  and the'production of mutton is  a very profitable business in New  Zealand:  "The method of bringing this  dense forest jungle into a fattening ground to lill the ships with  frozen mutton is simple. To be  brief, the country is slashed and  laid in a labyrinth of debris.  After lying a few weeks, fire is  introduced, which licks up the  dead twigs and foliage and leaves  the country a mass of charred  debris on a bed of ashes. These  fires often sweep miles of country, and frequently considerable  damage is done, but where dollars of damage is donei hundreds  of dollars of good is accomplished. Directly the ashes cool, the  process of seeding with English  grass and clover is commenced,  regardless of the logs, stumps  and debris. . Dozens of women  and children, and everyone who  has time, jump from log to log  scattering the seed everywhere,  and after the first shower of rain  the grasses spring up interspersed with all kinds "of bracken,  scrub and young growth.. W hen  fairly rooted, which is in an astonishingly short time,.thousands of sheep are turned on to  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  A few lines we specially  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs��������� -  Jams and Jellies  Griffen&Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������  Canned and dried  fruits  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers. Vancouver, B. C.  the apparent wilderness, and the  grass and young growth is eaten  down and kept down until the  grass is fairly started! In course  of time the grasses kill out all  other growth, and you (have a  country of magnificent grasses  among logs and stumps so thick  that it is sometimes a.,problem  how to extricate the sheep from  its entangled meshes, and trails  have frequently to be cut to get  them out to market.  "It is in such conditions1 as  these where the cross-bred or  long wool sheep excel the merino.  They are more active and intelligent, and in a run of that kind  will prosper amazingly.        ;  "In British Columbia, on the  lower mainland and Fraser Valley there are hundreds of thousands of acres of land, which, if  in New Zealand would immediately become subject tortheaxe  and enterprise of the grazier.  There is no land in New Zealand  or Australia which exhibits the  same quickness of response to  propagation of grasses as any  land, stoney, sandy or otherwise,  on the low lands or the mountain  top of this province. And I have  seen nowhere in New Zealand,  Australia or Tasmania, such magnificent, luscious grasses as you  see here-wherever the land has  been cleared or burnt and' the  English grasses and clovers  given a chance to propagate:  "As a field for breeding crossbred sheep," asserted Mr. Miller,  "for the foreign or local trade;  for the institution of the dairy or  cheese-making industries, the  coast districts of British Columbia have positively no equal."  Please, bear in mind that the  subscription for both the Courier  and the Family Herald and  Weekly Star"is only $1.75.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  /"���������OAL .MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ^ Manitoua, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Tebritohv, the North-west Tekri-  ��������� Tories and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an -annual rental of $1 an  acre. Nut more than 2,00(1 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Airent or Sub- Aifent  of the district in which the njjhta applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be de-  K-ribed by sections, or lcfcnl subdivisions of sections, undin ungurveyed territory the Uact applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a -  fee of fit which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise..  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the A Kent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal inininK rights  are not bcinif operated, such lelurns should be  ���������.furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining riithts  only, but the leasee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rixhls may be  considered necessary for t he working of the mine  at the rate of {10.00 an acre.  For full infni niatlon application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Airent  of L*ominion Lands,  W. W. COUY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. li.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30CU0.  BUSINESS CARDS  o   c  30E  >     O  Fur Sales Agency  000 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon und Alaska'huve taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value, on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  _=]  0  HI  HOC  By A. R. NEALE, Assistant Provincial  Horticulturist.  Although in some ways this  summer has not been as favorable as it might have been yet in  many ways we find that the excellence of some crops will, in a  measure, compensate for the  failure of others. Accordingly  there are .a number of farmers  in the valley that perhaps were  a little disappointed with the  haying season, who find that  they can cut quite" a heavy crop  of clover. In some cases this  will probably be made into silage  and a few timely remarks will  not be out of place.  The introduction of the silo  has' considerably aided in the  economical winter feeding of  livestock. The cow is unable to  give as good results from dry  food as a horse. What it requires  to a great extent" is bulky, succulent food. In the summer time  there is the pasture, but in the  winter it is a problem to.obtain  juicy feed. Here is where the  silo steps in. ;;  ; Corn is of course really the  crop for silage, but clover, vetch,  alfalfa, rye, peas and some, of  the grain crops have been used  with success.  The question of using clover  as a silage crop depends on local  conditions. In most parts it is  used as hay and mixed with corn  silage. Of course corn is a crop  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  The Soldiers' Vote.  The result of the civilian vote  in our province defeated the administration with very few of  its adherents elected. But Mr.  Bowser and some of his defeated  candidates entertain, the. fond  hope that the Soldiers' vote will  turn the scale in' their favor.'  They argue that the majority of  the soldiers are Conservatives  and therefore the soldiers will  support the Bowser machine.  If it should turn out that the  Liberals receive a majority of  the Soldiers' vote we hope that  no Liberal will be so mean as to  claim that more Liberals than  Conservatives have enlisted.  We have reason to believe that  the sentiment among the soldiers  as to the need of a change of  administration in our province is  at least as strong as that shown  by the civilian voters, and that  Mr. Bowser and his party will  experience a bigger defeat even,  when the soldier vote is counted.  ^-      -=������f  TheMason (������r Ixisch Piano  " of to-day will nwf(e plain our  privilege lo stale with authority:  "NO FINER. PIANO MADE! ".  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  i  ^jl Let us attend your Victor Record  jl  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER. B. C.  1&&  r_--3  ] cm  r^>  ������__*  i���������i  V&7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \)L7HAT person so independent?  THL7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  THE REASONS for this  enviable  condition of affairs  are-obvious'to, anyone   '  .who knows the Bella Coola Valley.'  The* land is fertile arid needs little or no  irrigation. ������/Ihe climate is mild and enjoyable; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for, excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown   to   the  best  advantage.  This   fact  was   established  at   the  Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm pro-,  duce from Bella Coola Valley'carried away',  over, twenty first prizes'.    ..  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  **-* country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as. yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  \  _=]  ������  CZ3  w&sm  Get "More Money" lor your Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver. Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected in your section  SHIP YOUR FURS TMItECT lo "SHUBERT" the Urtjesl  house in the World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMERICAN RAW FUkS  a reliable���������responsible���������safe Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more than a third of a century." a lornr;successful record of sending Fur Shippers prompt. bAT IS FACTOR^  AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for IFtjr &&ul>trt febipptr.  the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published..  Write for il-rNOV-lfi FREE  A. B. SHU BERT, Inc. De'ptx ������7 Chicago, u jjl  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Yeak ':.-.-......'.......$1.00.  Six Mqnths  ,>..... f 0.75  Three Months .... .........i'. 0.50  UNITED STATES.  One;Year......:.....-,y.��������� ��������� ��������� ���������... $1.50  United Kingdom-and "the Continent.  One' Year. ...................'.... .$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  .. subscription  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find............  for Bella Coola Courier for....:......'........!.  Name..............r ���������'..  .  ���������      ;; P. 0;.....;...................  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed '4  BELLA  COOLA COURIER  Saturday, September 30,  1916  D  ONE DOLLAR  FOR.ONE YEAR  The'Courier is lhe only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasV between Vancouver ancl  Prince Rupert.  A distance o( six hundred miles.  // will he lo your in-  ierest to keeP WeU 'n~  formed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of\  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  Clover as Ensilage  (Continued from column 3, pape 3.)  which makes heavy demands upon the soil and will not give success unless heavily nanured.  Therefore where corn is r.ol  crown toanygro;it extent clover  may take its place to advantage,  especially where weather conditions' are such that it is hard  to cure for hay.  Filling the Silo. ,  The time to cut the clover is'  when it is in full bloom and it  must be hauled in without any  delay. In-order to obtain the  best results a silage cutter must  be used and the clover cut in 1-4  inch length. If the crop is put  in whole it may give some success, but it is certain that there  willalwavs bo considerable loss  from the fact that it will not  pack properly.  There are three important factors in the successful curing of  of silage: pressure- heat-acid.  The pressure excludes air which  favors the formation of molds.  The h&it formed by the ferment-  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Ramsay Bros. & Cov. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Will You Help ?  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public:, No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  MANUFACTURERS  "      OF  Biscuits :: Candy :; Macaroni  Milk-and Nut  Chocolate Bars  i  Also Refiners of Syrup and  Packers of Molasses  "WESTAND-BEHIND OUR GOODS"  If so, Mr. Francis It. Jones will be pleared to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Olfice of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel,.Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist. ,  i VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT'  rnii" " "**~*  DEAL ESTATE'booms in the  cities have' come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for -all. ��������� ��������� Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on develop  mants by reading the "Courier.  raran  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DISTRICT   OP   COAST���������BANG-   III.  Take Notice that. I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, H. C, occupation contractor, intend to apply'for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  half a mile within the western entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20chains, thence  South 20 chain's, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Bated, August 22, 1������1G. i^ept.. 2-Nov. 4  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  D TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  ing of the clover is detrimental. be fed as a substitute for other  to the growth of "molds and the,: feed. Its value lies rather in  acid produced1 in fermentation its ability to improve the palat-  further prevents.moldsand aids  in the preservation not only of  silage but also of the silo itself.  Hence itismostimportantthat  the silage be packed as tight as  possible and therefore in filling  the silo it should be done evenly,  the outside being kept higher  than the center and .trampled  down,as much as possible. This  will be found more difficult where  the crop is put in whole and by  hand. In any case clover does  not pack as easily as corn and  therefore to aid this it is advisable to sprinkle with water about  every two feet and also keep the  walls of the silo wet.. \Vhen the  cutter is used the water is fed in  a small stream into the cutter  and so'is evenly distributed thru-  out.  . Feeding Silage.  It must not be thought that  silage cf any kind is intended to  ability of drier feed when mixed  with it and should be used accordingly. ' Clover silage will  tend to have a slightly stronger  odour than corn due to its greater  richness, but even then not too  much when cured1 properly. It  will be found that by mixing  silage and hay far better results  i  will be obtained by the combination than be either fed separately. The hay sweetens the silage  and the silage adds flavor and  succulence to the hay. It should  only be fed once a day. Care  should also be taken in taking  feed from the silo not to make  holes and admit air. It should  be taken out in such a way that  the top is left level after each  feed.  Any further information can  be obtained from the Department- of Agriculture at Prince  Rupert.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  wg--w**t-W-���������~n ~w- mm-^wsm  ���������_Hf~i\_riTMrti-������t-Mii__n  u������_i*ftri it'll i -   m  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  0  no-  =_ \o  HTHE two principal reasons  '     ,why Jyou   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc.,.are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money .it home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioners  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  ' Ogilvie's  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  etter order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS.  IT'S  CANADA'S  BEST FLOUR  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    ������  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it" to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing,but the mosT: suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints - Oils - Varnishes - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  i  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.   Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C. V7  If YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  ^^___^S__^^^l!^SE_yic^^^__}  WEATHER REPORT FOR AUGUST.  Compiled  by  Mr. C.  H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 74.   Minimum, 45  HighestMax. (25th) 93.,Lowest Min. (Cflth) 45  Rainfall, 0.62 inches.  Rainfall for the year  (1915)  34.33 inches.  ���������*������������������*���������   ~irn i-   -T_i|._|.| 1|_i  pVOL. 4-NO. 51  lAHvises Greece  to Declare War  Immediately  Athens, Sept.'29.���������King Con-  stantine received this morning  an exhaustive report from General Moschopoulos, chief of the  ^/jeral staff, advising immedi-  | ate declaration of war by Greece  I without awaiting either assistance or  insistence of   Entente  powers is the only way to save  the situation'.  WMMHMMHMWI  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1916.  $1.00 a Year  Bulgarians Repulsed  Paris, Sept. 29. ��������� Bulgarian  forces made two attacks last  night near Fiorina, western end  of Macedonian front, but were  easily repulsed by French and  Russian troops.  Submarine L7 Launched  Repulse German Attacks  British Advance on Somme Front  Paris, Sept. 29.- -A strong attack was made by the Germans  last night on the Verdun front  between Thiaumont and Fleury.  The assault was repulsed with  heavy losses to the enemy. On  the Somme front, French batteries actively bombarding German  positions.  London, Sept. 29.���������Advance  was made last night at various  points on the Somme front between Martinpuich and Gende-  court by British troops.  fottings of Bella Coola and District  Long Beach, Sept. 29.���������United  [States submarine L7 was launch-  fed here today.  Chicago, Sept, 29���������Col. Roosevelt is to make at least 5 speeches  I in" the southwestern  states for  Hughes   and   Fairbanks   next  [month.  Italians Progressing  In Trentino Region  Rome, Sept. 29.- Italians occupied the high position between  Marie and Tovo, west of Monte  Comone in Trentino region. In  Astico valley along the Carso  river heavy Austrian artillery  fire is proceeding.  S. S. Camosun delayed her  coming to our port a.whole day  on the last trip. She arrived  Monday forenoon about 10'o'clock. Her list of passengers  included PI. M. Burritt, Geo. E.  Bennett, J. L. Converse, Geo.  Kilsey, J. Goff, Mr. Nelson and  M. Nygaard with family.  The cannery yielded the usual  consignment of salmon to her  cargo. It may be noted in passing that the owners of the Camosun, the Union Steamship Co, of  B. C, have shown their patriotism and prosperousness by the  investment of $100,000 in the  new Dominion War Loan.  , H. M. Burritt, representing  the wholesale firm of Mackay,  Smith, Blair & Co. of Vancouver,  is visiting the merchants in the  interests of his firm and incident.  Harbor.   He took his departure  last Monday.  The fact that the Courier announced last week that Rev. W.  H. Gibson had gone to Kitimat  did not prove sufficient inducement to hasten his departure.  He waited until last Tuesday;  then he took with him eight Indian children who will be placed  at school, six at Kitimat and two  at Port Simpson. The whole  Dominion force of Indian officials  support him in his efforts to take  care of the little ones. Indian-  agent Fougner, Constable Tucker and engineer Sutherland on  the Dominion launch Charles  Todd are the hosts of the expedition.  John Widsten,  fishery officer,  and Olaf Fosbak, his assistant,  spent election day in the wilds  forty miles up the Kimsquit river.  They went there  to blast log-  ,  .,     ,     ^.          ....        ,       ,.-   jams that obstructed the passage  tay also those of his customers. :,.. . ., *  J   of the salmon  to the spawning  \St. Lawrence Route to be  the Steamship Lane  London.   Sept.   28.���������It is be-  llieved here that after the war  the St. Lawrence route will be  the principal transatlantic steam-  ; ship lane from the suggestions  Mr. Asquith made last week.  The following quotation, taken  from a shipping journal, is additional evidence: "We predict remarkably interesting developments in the North Atlantic service after the deadweight of war  has been removed."  Western Grain Yield  Predicted to Reach  577,000,000 Bushels  Winnipeg, Sept. 28.���������The Canadian Bank of Commerce give as  their estimate of this year's  grain crops in Western Canada,  the total of $455,000,000; thirty-  seven percent above the average  value of wheat, barley and oats  for the past five years. The  total production of these grains  is placed at 577,000,000 bushels.  ���������    v   Harvest in France  Paris, Sept. 28.���������The agricultural situation in France was  summed up authoritatively today  as follows: The wheat yield is  somewhat below that of the av-  ei'age year, but in the west, central and southeastern sections  the harvest is satisfactory as a  whole. The situation aa.to oats  ���������3quite favorable. Potatoes suffered from dryness, but good  crops were raised in many sections. The beet yield was satisfactory. Vineyards suffered from  heat, but on the whole the yield  13 c������nsidered a satisfactory one.  Prince George of Greece  Recalled  London, Sept. 29.���������Prince  George of Greece, brother of  King Constantine, who has been  in London some time representing the views'of the Greek court,  received a telegram from the  king recalling him.  Paris, Sept. 29.���������A despatch  from Athens says that at a meeting to be held tomorrow at Mity-  lene a revolution will be proclaimed.  Sir  Wilfrid Laurier  Speaks at Montreal  Montreal, Sept. 29.���������In an address delivered here on Wednesday night before 15,000 people  Sir Wilfrid Laurier was partly  political and intensely patriotic,  making it abundantly clear that  he strongly favored the cause of  Great Britain and her Allies in  the war and regarded it the duty  of French-Canadians to assist  therein.   Steamer Escapes Submarine  Newport News, Sept. 29.���������A  story of a desperate battle with  a German submarine oil' the coast  of Algiers is being told by Capt.  Fiswick of the British steamer  Antinous. A running fight for  several miles took place before  the submarine gave up the chase.  Geo. E. Bennett, selling groceries for Leeson, Dickie, Gross  & Co.  of Vancouver, is such ai  grounds.  They report the density of the  brush almost impenetrable,  and that they had about as trying  frequent  visitor  that we  have       .  come to the conclusion that it is !-time as, the politicians had at  his intention to'monopolize the  grocery trade of the valley. His  efficiency and assiduousness go  a long way towards the attainment of that object.  Martin Nygaard and family  came in last Sunday from the  Manitou Cannery, Kimsquit,  where Mr. Nygaard has been engaged for several years. He is .  spending a week's well-earned' valley must, during the coming  holiday among friends and vela  the polls on   that  historic day.  There is quite a large area of  Mr. E. Green, B. C. L. S., of  Green Bros. & Burden Co., Victoria, who for some time past  has been engaged in surveying  timber limits, left here last  Thursday for Kimsquit where he  will spend the next three weeks.  The timber limits were originally located by C. & C. A. Fields  of Regina, Sask, and latterly sold  to the North American Timber  Holding Co., Chicago.  For copies of either of.these  publications, write to the Publications Branch, Department of  Agriculture, Victoria, and give  both the name and the number  of the bulletin or circular required.  Chas. Tucker the secretary of  the.Hopital Board, acknowledges  the receipt of the sum of $14.65  and a bedspread donated to the  hospital by the Maria and Martha  Young Ladies Society of Hagensborg. The bedspread is of a very  attractive design and has the  names of the members of the  society vvorked into the pattern.  The spirit shown by these young  ladies is very commendable and  if.adopted by the people as a  whole will make our hospital an  enterprise of which they'may  feel justly proud.  Red Cross Auxiliary  At the kind suggestion of the  Farmers'Institute all funds received at the Agricultural Exhibition on October 6th are to be  donated to the Red Cross.  _ , ... A Refreshment-Committee has  Farmers are now busv cutting . . .  and hauling the second crop of | been appointed, consisting of the  clover and storing it in silos. In j followingladies: Mesdames Han-  the past some difficulty has been ; son, Lauritson,   Oveson,   Enge-  bretson,   Brewster   and   Gross;  Misses R. Nordschow, Hallowes,  The fishing for cohoe salmon  at the local cannery has been  quite satisfactory during the past  two weeks. In all probability  fishing will continue another  week at least as more empty cans  are expected up. Manager Saint  is in hopes of establishing a record that will require some beating before closing down.  The Hospital Board will shortly instal a new water system at  the hospital and build an additional chimney at the doctor's,  residence.  experienced in drying the second  crop owing to it  being late and  agricultural land in that valley I considerable rain tocontend with,  r'7"        0 ,    ,  ,   ,  _,    ,    .  , r-���������i   ���������- Tvi     ,x,-j l    ,-���������..-, . ,   A. ���������    .,      iLncson, Schq stad, Fredencscn,  which in Mr. Widsten s opinion  but now with the use of silo?,: '  of which there are quite a few ; WaaI' aml  the Executive Corn-  in use throughout the valley, this, mittee.       Luncheon,   afternoon  ought to be surveyed and have a  trail made to it. The need of  the trail appealed very strongly  to the fishery officers in their  arduous task.  The farmers and others of the  has been overcome.  tives before entering upon his  winter's work as the caretaker  of the cannery.  J. L. Converse and Mr. Nelson  of Auburn, Washington, Geo.  Kilsey and Joe GofT of Vancouver, B. C, came in last Monday  with a view of locating here.  They are friends of the Rat-  cliff brothers, and we have no  doubt were induced to make the  trip here with these intentions  upon the favorable account given  of our valley by the RatelifFs on  their recent visit to the South.  We hope they will find suitable  land on terms which will be acceptable to them.  week, busy themselves in getting their exhibits ready for the  10th of October.  Every indication is to the effect that it will be, next to Empire Day, the great day for the  people of the valley and therefore everybody must do their  share to make it a success in all  respects.   All the members of this community rise to congratulate Mr.  and Mrs. Rev. H. Sageng of  Hagensborg, on the arrival in  their family on Sunday, Sept.  24th, of a daughter. Mother  and child are doing well.  Th 3 can nary tug Kiltik from  Namu came in during the week.  Celtic   called   last  cannery  for a  Fort Churchill Deserted  Ottawa, Sept. 28.-The white  population of the once flourishing settlement of Fort Churchill,  Hudson Bay, has been reduced  one-third by the departure of A.  H. Colferof the R. N. W. M. P.  All ;that remains of the crowd  who moved up to the northern  port in the days when it was  thought that the Hudson Bay  Railroad would terminate there,  are two mounted policemen and  the Hudson's Bay Company's  factor.  A. C.  Christensen   has again!    The  S.S.  found it necessary to take a look ; Tuesday at the  at   his  cattle  ranch at  Takusii   load of salmon.  To the Electors of Bella Coola and District!  In expressing my thanks for the support accorded me, 1 desire to  -late that it will be my earned endeavor to merit your confidence.  T. D. PATTULLO.  "Poultry Rations and their  Practical Application" is the  title of Circular Bulletin No. 19,  which has just be^n issued by!  the Department of Agriculture,  Victoria. All the rations given  in this interesting little circular  have been experimented with  many'years ago, and have been  used constantly and successfully  by a great many poultry men in  this Province. It is with the  idea that many poultry raisers  can better and cheapen their  methods of feeding their stock  by following out the suggestions  in this publication that it is issued at the present time.  A second edition of Bulletin  No. 43, "Exhibiting Fruit and  Vegetables," has just been issued, owing to the enormous demand which exhausted the supply of the first edition very soon!  after it came off the press. This  bulletin deals with the standards  of judging adopted by the judges  supplied by the Department, and  also with the arrangement and  selection of exhibits. Its pages  are full of many useful hints that  are of great value to those exhibiting fruit or vegetables in  the Province.  NOTICE.  Harry C. Evans, piano tuner,  will be in Bella Coola, October  1st. Any person having pianos  or organs requiring tuning wil'  find me at the Hotel Bella Coo  after the above date.  coffee and cakes, and supper will  be served.  An Auction Sale  During the afternoon a sale by  auction of fruit, vegetables,  flowers, candies, cakes, needlework, ancl any other goods contributed. It is impossible to ask  each person individually for contributions, so will every one  please regard this notice as a  personal appeal to give some big  or little thing which can be turned into funds for our boys at the  front? At this time of the year  each one can spare something���������  a box of apples, a sack of potatoes, a few cabbages, a jar of  preserves, faneywork, flowers,  etc. All contributions will be  taken charge of by the Ladies'  Committeee and will be sold to  the best advantage to the willing  buyers. Donations either for  refreshments or for sale can be  left, the day before the Fair,  with Mrs. Fougner, Mrs. T.  Draney, or any member of the  Ladies' Committee.  A Grand Concert  A Concert will be held in the  evening, the program being in  charge of Miss R. Nordschow,  Miss Hallowes, Mr. T. Saugstad  and the Executive.  QUutrrh Nattr*    _  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a.m.  7 : 30 p. m.  "*  IVouflier:  lii-v. liana Sageng, A. H.  All Are  Welcome. _*  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, September 30,   J9t $  1  I  x  w  W-  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1  Year  $1-00  6 Months       0.75  3 Months    0.50  United States  1   Year $1-50  '           United Kingdom   .  1   Year..". .$1.00  Subscriptions' payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising  Rates,  Office.  Apply at  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be given to the editor.  The Elitor reserves the riprht to refuse pubh-  - cation of any letter.    All manuscript at writer's  risk.  M9alit0 populi mtpraua tst Ime."  SATURDAY, SEPT. 30, 1916.  J "VJT/s beg to remind our readers that the Courier having completed its fourth year  the subscriptions of all our  early subscribers are now due  for renewal.  The management wishes to  thank our- numerous readers  for their support during the  past'and;trusts "to a continuance of the same in the future.  The subscription rate remains at $1  per year, payable strictly in advance.  Two Years After the Marne.  Accarding to the judgment of  military experts in neutral countries the,hope- of Germany to  gain a decisive victory over her  enemies was shattered at the  tima, .when in September two  years ago her armies were  turned back twenty miles from  Paris at the battle of the Marne.  It is the fourth phase on which  the war has now .entered, a phase  that is different from the three  others by the fact that the offensive has at last passed from  Garmany to her enemies, not on  one front'only, but on all.  The first phase of the war was  marked by the'tremendous efforts of Germany to destroy  France and to prevent England  coming to' her Ally's aid. Those  attempt's were fOiled at the  Marne and Ypres.  The second phase showed the  Germans holding their lines in  the,west and winningone victory  after another in the east against  the Russians, and in the south  conquering Serbia and Montenegro.' But they failed to conquer  Russia and to turn the Allies out  of Saloniki and proved a second  failure to Germany.  The third phase was entered  upon when the crown prince began his tremendous attack on  Verdun and the Austrians hurled  their forces against the Italians  in a gigantic effort to crush them.  This part of the war proved to  be rather short and was ended  by the concerted offensive of the  Allies and thus added another  disappointment to German expectations.  The Russian millions reorganized and re-equipped have defeated the Austrians in battle  after battle and are now on Austrian soil and pouring into the  passes of the Carpathians on the  way to Hungary.  The Italians have taken Gorizia  and threaten Trieste. The French  and British are slowly but surely  forcing the Germans back on the  western front.  The Allies on Greek soil are  hammering away at the Bulgarians and are only awaiting some  prearranged moment when-they  will make agYeat onslaught and  overrun Bulgaria and l-econquer  Serbia and Montenegro.  1 In the meantime Roumania has  joined the Allies, opened her  territory for the advancing Russians on their way to punish the  ungrateful Bulgarians, and is  now making great strides into  Transylvania driving the Austrians from one city to another.  It is said it is a long, lane that  has no turn. We have now come  to the turn of the long lane in  this desperate struggle. Now,  for the first time since the war  began' the gun power and the  ammunition supply of our side  are equal to those of the enemy.  We even hold that ours are superior. For the first time our su-'  perior man power can be applied  effectively.'  The end of'the second year of  the war saw the last of Germany's colonies' conquered. It has  seen' a great naval battle off Jutland which scored a British victory and showed the uselessness  of disputing Britain's supremacy  on the sea.  The submarine warfare seems  to be abandoned as a means of  crippling trade, and will only be  carried on to annoy the shipping  of the Allies. It seems that-a  crisis must be near.  o     o     o     o     o  The .New War Machine.  - At the beginning of the war it  was conceded in all quarters that'  Germany had the.best machines  for carrying on the war." ���������  Her preparedness for the gigantic conflict, her almost unbelievable equipment excited-the  amazement of the civilized world  and many of the neutrals admired the qualities which had  been able to accomplish Such preparations and organizations.  But as the war proceeded and  the Entente Allies were roused  to a true estimate of the greatness and the significance of the  conflict they employed their best  geniuses to overccmethedisad-  disadvantages under which they  found themselves, with the. re-  DECUNE SUBSTITUTES  House from Lady Borden addressed to Mrs. Barnard, which is  ; self-explanatory. Mrs. Barnard  will place the matter in the hands  of the different women's organizations and ask them to co-operate with her in making a substantial gift from the women of  British Columbia to the Duchess  of Connaught's "Prisoners of  War Fund," in recognition of  Her Royal Highness' patriotic  work in Canada, and the sympathy she has always shown for  the various women's organizations, and the good work tkey  are doing.  It is hoped that the many wom-  en's.organizations of Bella Coola  will co-operate in a grand effort  to'place themselves in line with  their sister organizations in the  Dominion.   Ottawa, Ont.r Sept. 11, 1916.  Mrs. Barnard,  Government House,  Victoria, B. C.  Three months ago Duchess  of Connaught was informed that  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER,  B.C.  suit that today they are superior  to the Central Powers on every  point, viz: number of meni guns,  ammunition, aircraft, etc.  The latest inventions in war  machines brought into practical  use is decidedly a new departure  and promises great possibilities.  It is an. armored motor car and  has proved a great success.  Its invention arid manufacture  were successfully kept a.secret  until its appearance in.action a women of Canada desired to pre  few days ago  when it  created sent her on occasion her depar-  surprise both among friends and ture, some token of appreciation  Wholesale  DRY GOODS  AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE  OF THE  WEST"  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  MADE    IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  it'  foes.  ��������� It miay be called a travelling  turret or fort built on lines similar to the caterpillar motor cars,  which can be operated over soft  ground.  An ordinary motor car requires  comparatively smooth ground for  travel; but this new car crawls  over all sorts of obstacles: shell  holejs, stumps, mine craters and  is bullet proof.- In an attack it  calmly and persistently advances  through the, heaviest rifle and  machine gun fire towards and up  to.the.enemy's trenches; but in  its advance it is'not a������all quiet,  spits an incessant stream of bullets and is manned by gunners  who work their guns in nearly  nude condition. Wherithe "tank"  as this car is called by its admirers, arrives at the enemy's trenches it stops and sends it stream  of bullets lengthwise into the  trenches, compelling either surrender, retreat, or death.  It is said that if the Allies had  3000 such armored cars they  would end the war in a month.  ��������� . o   , o     o     o    o  Dachess of Connaught's  Prisoners of War Fund.  We.print a telegraphic message   received   at   Government  of her deep interest in all that  concerns the welfare of the  country. Under present conditions Her Roj'al Highness decided that she could not accept a  personal gift. The suggestion  was made that in memory with  her association with Canada a  fund might be raised for some  patriotic purpose connected with  the war. This was also declined  on account of the numerous  funds being raised. The women  again brought the matter to the  attention of Her Royal Highness,  arid she has graciously consented  to allow us to present her "Prisoners of War Fund" with a gift.  As the time for appeal is limited  would you kindly place it as early  as possible before the women of  your Province as worthy of their  sympathy and co-operation.  (Signed) Laura Borden.  o     o     o     o     o  What a Conservative  Journal Thinks.  "One of the most striking incidents in the 'election is the return of Mr. M. A. Macdonald at  the head of "the poll in Vancouver. Serious charges have been  made against  Mr.  Macdonald,  charges which would constitute  him a criminal deserving of imprisonment. The Government  case, as developed through the  committee of investigation into  CLUB  OFFER  *\  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg   1.50  ������2.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .    .   $1.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  The Courier   .       .        .    /.  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  .  1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.75  \i  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  the Vancouver plugging, meant  that Mr. Macdonald had imported an election crook and that he  had paid for this dirty work and  subsequently paid heavily to prevent the truth from coming to  light. No more serious charge  could be made against a public  man. In his very able address  in the Old Victoria Theatre the  Premier elaborated a most convincing argument along these  lines, and practically endorsed  the charge in its entirety.  "On the other hand, Mr. Brewster has always professed the  fullest confidence in his colleague. He has declared that  the whole thing was a Conservative plot, designed to ruin Mr.  Macdonald. He has on every  platform declared his unabated  confidence in   that .gentleman,  Incidentally, the one man who  gave damnatory .'evidence in the  Court against Mr. Macdonald has  been" defeated   by  the   largest  majority in the Province.   It is  impossible   to -'exaggerate the  significance of these fads. 1 hey  go to the very root of ik- question, and they probably explain  more truly than any other sinjjie  incident the reason for ihe overwhelming defeat of the Government and  for the sake of the  purity of public life it l< almost  imperative that this whole question-should be thrashed out in  the courts.    The honour of both  parties and of both leaders i.s involved, and it is not to indicate  the slightest opinion on the value  of the position taken up by Mr.  Brewster to say that the .smashing defeat of the Premier and  and the great constituency of I his  colleagues   in   the   City of  Vancouver has endorsed him up  to the hilt by returning Mr. Macdonald at the head of the poll  and by placing all the Conservative candidates, including the  Premier,   in  the  defeated  list.  Vancouver and the position of  honour accorded to Mr. .Maedcr.-  ald is such a drastic comment on  the plugging case as to outweigh  every other issue raised in ^  campaign."���������-The Week.  fHE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN to reprint  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in differed /art. of  the Province m the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and ivmunera-  tivc Hone3t, energetic men only are needed. We pariifiilarly  want a good man at Bella Coola and for coast points, abo a man  on the G. T. P. Railway.  _U  0  o  0  ion  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY*  5J������[c  HOE  f-S]fo  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C, LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SHRVI''U  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      CamOSMl"   Leaves   Vancouver   every  Thursday at 9 p. m.        (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver  nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, wil  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  fort-  Cilll  it    ForVra<-es of Freights, Fares and other information, "I'l'b  Head Office, Carrall St.,  Vancouver; or Gko. Me(.i:i|nli  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  <ais  _ZIOE_:  ) ��������� C  :;jlf0 Ti  Saturday, September 30,   1916  BELLAS COOLA  COURIER  Simply a little rub with a cloth keeps the highly bur  nished cooking top always glistening, dustless clean without blacking; in four pieces it cannot warp or bulge.  WClarys  It won't be hard to decide what range you want in your  kitchen after I show you the Kootenay's special features.  Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  How to Utilize Our Bush j conditions both as to climate and  Land. | timber are about the  same  as  , m       ,������������������/������������������,.,������������������    ,.   i those obtained in New Zealand,  No matter  how  enthusiastic:  ������������������_'���������-.'��������� ���������    ���������   c u i iand the production of mutton is  we may be in our praises of Bel-;  ���������   . ,,     ,   ., ;.'   , ,,    ! a very profitable business in New-  la Coola we must admit that the:  .        ; .,    ,     ,      ,     ...     iZealand:  clearing of the land and getting;  ,L.            L           ,         !    ' The method of bringing this  it under cultivation have not pro-' t _          gressed with  the speed the fer-  dense forest, jungle into a fatten-  e ., -,       , .,     f .       sing ground to fill the ships with  tility of the soil and the favor-     bb ���������  ...      ,.     , ,    frozen mutton is simple.    To be  ableness of the climate warrant.' '  -     ...     .   ,      ,   ,.. j brief, the country is slashed and  The reasons for this state of af-'  ...-���������������������������-������������������        iii c iu   1'aid  in  a  labyrinth  of   debris,  fairs are several, but one of the}  ,. ,������������������;������������������'���������:. ���������   ,    .  ,,     ,-   ,      .  i After lying a few weeks, fire is  chief ones is that the timber is \. J    ~.    ,.,,.,.  introduced,  which licks up the  dead twigs and foliage and leaves  heavy and makes the clearing of  the land a slow and expensive  process under the best of conditions.  Our attention has been called  to an article in the B. C. Fruit  and Farm which has appealed to  us forcibly in this connection,  and for the benefitof our farmer  readers we will give some extracts from it.   ���������������������������  Mr. William Miller a resident  of Vancouver, who for 40 years  was engaged in the sheep business in Australia, knows this  business about as well as it is  possible for it to be known. He  says: "There is no country in the  world where conditions for the  sheep raising industry are better  than ttiey are in British Columbia."  . He goes on to state that our  the country a mass of charred  debris on a bed of ashes.   These  fires often sweep miles of country, and frequently considerable  damage is done, but where dollars of damage is done, hundreds  of dollars of good is accomplished.    Directly the ashes cool, the  process of seeding with English  grass and clover is commenced,  regardless of  the logs, stumps  and debris.    Dozens of  women  and children, and everyone who  has time, jump from log to'.log  scattering the seed everywhere,  and after the first shower of rain  the grasses spring up interspersed   with  all kinds of  bracken,  scrub and young growth.    W hen  fairly rooted, which is in an astonishingly short   time,   thousands of sheep are turned on to  the apparent wilderness, and the  grass and young growth is eaten  down and kept down until the  grass is fairly started. In course  of time the grasses kill out all  other growth, and you have a  country of magnificent grasses  among logs and stumps so thick  that it is sometimes a problem  how to extricate the sheep from  its entangled meshes, and trails  have frequently to be cut to get  them out to market.  "It is in such conditions as  these where the cross-bred or  long wool sheep excel the merino.  They are more active and intelligent, and in a run of that kind  will prosper amazingly.  "In British Columbia, on the  lower mainland and Fraser Valley there are hundreds of thousands of acres of land, which, if  in New Zealand would immediately become subject to the axe  and enterprise of the grazier.  There is no land in New Zealand 1  or Australia which exhibits the  same quickness of response to  propagation of grasses as any  land, stoney, sandy or otherwise,  on the low lands or the mountain  top of this province. And I have  seen nowhere in New Zealand,  Australia or Tasmania, such magnificent, luscious grasses as you  see here wherever the land has  been cleared or burnt and the  English grasses and clovers  given a chance to propagate.  "As a field for breeding crossbred sheep," asserted Mr. Miller,  "for the foreign or local trade;  for the institution of the dairy or  cheese-making industries, the  coast districts of British Columbia have positively no equal.  Please bear in mind that the  subscription for both the Courier  and the Family Herald and  Weekly Star is only $1.75.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  (T"OAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  '-' Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Vukon Tekiutoky, the North-westTekju-  'Touiks and in a portion of the Province of  UhlllSH (Joi.UMMlA, may be leased (or a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2.5WJ aerea will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease rnuut be made by the  applicant in perHon to the Affent or Sub-A������ent  of the district in which the rights apphed for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or lejjal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of it> which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco"OtinK for the  full iiuantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  'furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to pur-  chane whatever available surface riirhts may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior. Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. I-.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  _OE  Fur Sales Agency  -: Jn EL.i'--:___i 23  I heAdason & riischriano  oj to-day  will make plain our  privilege to stale with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  IS  Let us attend your Victor Record  ^11 mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.  r_z_||[n3 i  3 rz  ���������* ���������*������������������'   600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  __  JOE  Dealers and Trappers  Advertise your Wants ih the Courier  A few lines we specially  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  Griff en & Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������  CanneJ and dried  fruits  D  Clover as Ensilage  By A. R. NEALE. Assistant Provincial  Horticulturist.  \jkTHAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \\7HAT person so independent?  \\THAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  HPHE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers  Vancouver, B. C.  "ftAlways Pleases"  a*  Although in some ways this  summer has not been as favorable as it might have been yet in  many ways we find that the excellence of some crops will, in a  measure, compensate for the  failure of others. Accordingly  there are a number of farmers  in the valley that perhaps were  a little disappointed with the  haying season, who find that  they can cut quite a heavy crop  of clover. In some cases this  will probably be made into silage  and a few timely remarks will  not be out of place.  The introduction of the silo  has considerably aided in the  economical winter feeding of  livestock. The cow is unable to  give as good results from dry  food as a horse. What it requires  to a great extent is bulky, succulent food. In the summer time  there is the pasture, but in the  winter it is a problem to obtain  juicy feed. Here is where the  silo steps in.  Corn is of course really the  crop for silage, but clover, vetqh,  alfalfa, rye, peas and some of  the grain crops have been used  with success.  The question of using clover  as a silage crop depends on local  conditions. In most parts it is  used as hay and mixed with corn  silage. Of course corn is a crop  !       (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  The Soldiers'  Vote.  The result of the civilian vote  in our province defeated the administration with very few of  its adherents elected. But Mr.  Bowser and some of his defeated  candidates entertain the fond  hope that the Soldiers' vote will  turn the scale in their favor.  They argue that the majority of  the soldiers are Conservatives  and therefore the soldiers will  support the Bowser machine.  If it should turn out that the  Liberals receive a majority of  the Soldiers' vote we hope that  no Liberal will be so mean as to  claim that more Liberals than  Conservatives have enlisted.  We have reason to believe that  the sentiment among the soldiers  as to the need of a change of  administration in our province is  at least as strong as that shown  by the civilian voters, ancl that  Mr. Bowser and his party will  experience a bigger defeat even,  when the soldier vote is counted.  IjELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  ������  <     )  Get"MorcMonoy" for your l^oxcs  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected in your section  SIIII' VOI'U IMTUS IHHKCT <o "SHUHKRT" tlie lanjcsl  house in I lie World dealing exclusively In NOUTH AMEK1CAN R,\W FUUS  a reliable���������responsible���������Hate Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing tor "more than ;i third of a century." a Ions successful record of sending Fur Shippers prompt.SATISFACTORY  AND I'kOl'ITAin.K returns. Write for "ITbr febuiitrt fcliipptr,"  the only reliable, accurate market report ancl oricelist published.  Write for It-NOW-il's FREE  A  R ^HURFRT Inr  25-27 west Austin ave.  /\. D. jnUDE-ft 1 , inc. DeptC67 CHICAGO, U.S.A.  ���������-...���������        mm   ii ��������� iifn ii-w ��������� 11 w   >n_i iwi__-_h__ib _���������inwr TWIIMBT  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscription* Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  Onk Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO.,  LTD.  BELLA COOLA, P>. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. O   Tear out ancl mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  1 IP'S  P  nj;i  SK  iff-JCi  K  eg?;  _������_  ;>  _r  it'  p  LPs "J  .'4  .J  w.  1  CtfV  ITS  jvys  N  r#  *J ���������  '  rfS?L-4  fe#  Ew  to < ..i  tt  $  *..  ���������-/;  ���������<v.  PA-  *$  hi  -t  BELLA COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,  September 30,   l9j$  ONE DOLLAR  .  i   FOR ONE YEAR  Th(  the only  le Courier is  newspaper published on  the mainland coa������t between ��������� Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  It will be to your interest to keeP well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  Clover as Ensilage  (Continued from column 3, page 3.)  which makes heavy demands.upon the soil and will not give success unless heavily irar.urcd.  Therefore where corn is not  grown to any great extent clover  may take its place to advantage,  especially where weather conditions are such that it is hard  to care for hay.  Filling the Silo.  The time to cut the clover is  when it is in full bloom and it  must be hauled in without any  delay. ' In order to obtain the  best re.'sults a silage cutter must  be used and the clover cut in 1-4  inch length. If the crop is put  in whole it may give some success, but it is certain that there  will always be considerable loss  from the fact that it will not  pack properly.  There are three important factors in the successful curing of  of silage: pressure���������heat���������acid.  The pressure excludes air which  favors' 'the formation of molds.  The heat formed by the ferment-  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  ADVERTISERS-  Now is: the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  Ramsay Bros. & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS  OF  Biscuits'  Candy  Macaroni  Milk and Nut  Chocolate Bars  Also  Refiners of Syrup  and  ���������Packers of Molasses  WE STAND BEHIND OUR GOODS"  I VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  R  EAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People, are beginning to flock to  the country. The NorthrWest  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier.  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DISTRICT   Oi"   COAST���������BANGE   IH.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation contractor, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a ppst situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  half a mile within the western entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West 20 chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to, the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS .J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, Aujrust 22, 1916. Sept. 2-Nov. -1  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C  S3 __  ~OE  -'"THE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Eacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Burns;  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Proviaioners.  Caigary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Will You Help ?  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and. Circulars  to any who are.willing to,assist.  ing of the clover is detrimental]be fed as a substitute for other  to the growth of ��������� molds and the;feed. Its value lies rather in  acid produced  in  fermentation jits ability, to improve the palat-  fufther prevents molds and aids  in the preservation not only of  silage but also of the silo itself.  Hence it is most important that  the silage be packed as tight as  possible and therefore in filling  ���������the silo it should be done evenly,  the outside being kept higher  than the center and trampled  down as much as possible. This  will be found more difficult where  the crorris put in whole and by  hand. In any case clover does  not pack as easily as corn and  therefore to aid this it is advisable to sprinkle with water about  every two fee tt and also keep the  walls of the silo wet. When the  cutter is used the water is fed in  a small stream into the cutter  and so is evenly distributed thru-  out.  Feeding Silage.  It must not be thought that  e of any kind is intended to  silage  ability of drier feed when mixed  with it and should be used accordingly. Clover silage will  tend to have a slightly stronger  odour than corn due to its greater  richness, but even then not too  much when cured properly. It  will. be found that by mixing  silage and hay far better results  will be obtained by the combination than be either fed separately. The hay sweetens the silage  and the silage adds flavor and  succulence to the hay. It should  only be fed once a day. Care  should also be taken in taking  fe6d from the silo not to make  holes and admit air. It should  be taken out in such a way that  the top is left level after each  feed.  * Any further information can  be obtained from the Department of Agriculture at Prince  Rupert.  irnn it tmrn  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  OgfilvieV  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  -_n i    Better order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  .Brynildsen&Co.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������    ������-  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosl suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  m  *y%

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