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Bella Coola Courier 1917-09-01

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 h\  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR JUNE  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Ur3eth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 64.   Minimum, 43.  Highest Max. (14th) 82. Lowest Min.illth) 30  Rainfall, 2.42.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 37 '  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER I, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  War News for the Week  Tuesday:   London.--Three great allied drives assailed Teutonic  lines on three fronts today.   British and French resumed offensive.   Italy continued her fierce drive uninterruptedly.   In past  week, Italians have taken approximately ninety square miles of  Austrian territory, close to twenty-five thousand prisoners, vas?  stores of munitions, guns and supplies, and inflicted stupendous  casualties on the enemy, estimated at seventy-five thousand men.  French changing point of attack from left bank to right bank of  the Mouse, General Petain struck another blow at German defense out of Verdun.   Initial shock carried French nearly a mile  forward on  two fronts.    British successfully pushed  forward  ' against German positions in sector north of St. Quentin, where  'thjre.has been little fighting in last two months.   Powerfully fortified posts on Hindenburg line stormed and taken and British  front advanced half mile over a mile front.  Wednesday:   London.-British forces in Flanders took tighter  grip of German's thirdjine.   They advanced two thousand yards  astride St. Julieri-Poelcapple road.   German attempts last night  . to drive back British from their positions on Inverness copse,  .Ypres-Menine road, frustrated and prisoners taken from the attacking forces.   Germany has lost more that fifty thousand men  in Flanders since,July 1st.  '    Paris.-French troops penetrated German trenches at Butte De  Souain and captured prisoners.   Considerable artillery activity on  Verdun front.  Washington.-Trieste being evacuated, civilian population seek  refuge in the interior of Austria.   Italians sweep forward from  Monte Santo across the plateau of Bainsizza and are fast turning  Austrian., withdrawal in.to a debacle.   ',   ..���������,..... . '.  ..-'.- ���������  America's present war congress will be thirty billion dollars  session. $7,147,222,907 has been appropriated since Congress convened In March. More than twenty-three billion dollars pending  for estimates and others will be made soon and must be cared for  before session quits. Henry Ford advocates government taking  95 per cent of all war profits. Ford company now building aeroplane cylinders for government on basis of no profits.  Moscow.-"Unless Russia's army is regenerated and resists the  enemy, Riga'road to Petrograd will be open," declared General  Korniloff in vigorous demand made yesterday to Russian conference for iron discipline.  Petrograd.-At the trial for high treason of-Gen. Soukhomlinoff,  former minister of war, General Ivanoff, former commander of  ��������� Volhynia and Galicia, testified yesterday that he had information  showing that military secrets had been communicated direct from  Petrograd to Berlin and Vienna by way of Warsaw. Gen. Velit-  cKko, director of engineer corps, regarded Soukhomlinoff as being  principally responsible for death of Russian army, czar not to  blame. Russian army retires before enemy attack in Boyany region, retirement occasioned by beginning of offensive in region  of Tasczernowitz, Bukowina, by Germans and Austrians.  Thursday: London:���������During night British carried out successful raids northeast of Gouzeaucourt and southwest of Halluch and  captured a few prisoners. Italy's great offensive paused temporarily today. Italian forces advanced so rapidly that the heavy  artillery failed to keep up with  the infantry. Bainsizza plateau  now virtually centre of fighting,  reported Austrians preparing to  make a stand on theplateau.  Friday:   London.-Furtherop-  erations by British on western  front hampered by rainstorm today.   Germans re-inforcing northern frontier of Belgium, near  Bay Scheldt and village of San-  tvliet, large guns been located  on strong concrete floors.    Number of reserve troops in fortified  positions, around   Antwerp  in-,  creased daily, now estimated at  fifty thousand. ��������� Only,23.'ships  lost out of 5309 movinglastweek.  Italy's victorious offensive reached its second and most important  stage today, Having attained the  dominance of Bainsizza plateau  Gen. Gadorna's trOops began vast  flanking movement northward,  with Tolmino as immediate object of the drive.   First standardized  merchantman   built in  Britain completed today.  RussiaFacesUtterChaos  Moscow, Aug. 30���������Russia faces  utter chaos by November unless  railway workers are willing to  make personal sacrifices, if not,  transportation will cease. It is  a-problem to restore, discipline  in the army: Troops completely  poisoned by ill-interested doctrines and are split into two  camps. Officers are now mar-  tyres, soldiers look on While their  leaders go bravely forward to  face enemy and certain death.   .  Petrograd,-Aug.-30.���������A Russian divison yesterday abandoned  its position in the region of Fok-  hania and fled in disorder.  U. S. Rejects Peace  Washington, Aug. 30.���������President Wilson sends reply to the  Pope, offer rejected, useless to  discuss peace while autocracy is  in control. Peace rests upon decision of the German,people and  not their rulers. Reports from  Germany lead observers here,to  believe that the central powers  will not reject the peace propos  als of the'Pope.  Plan to Put Czar Back  Copenhagen, Aug. 31���������Russian  fleet-may join revolutionists in  revolt. Navy said to be under  the influence of Nicholas, Lenine  ���������and his adherents. Second revolution planned to start from  Kronstadt. Troops prevent diet  assembling in Finland. Martial  law in Kazan.      ��������� -  Petrograd, Aug. 31.���������A large  proportion of the Russian regiments in Fokhania region, Rou-  mania front, left their trenches  and retired yesterday. Russian  war ministry knew of Germany's  military preparations and was also aware that she contemplated  declaring war in 1909 and again  in 1913, according to the .testimony yesterday by Gen. Michael-  son, who swore he had reported  Gemany's military activity to the  Russian war office. ,  Austrian Attacks Repulsed  Rome, Aug. 31.���������Counter at  tacks by Austrians against our  newly-won positions on front  above Gorizia, were repulsed.  San Gabrielle has been partly  taken by Italian troops.  Salmon fishing, locally, for the  past week has been very good  and the canneries have had all  theycould handle, in fact some  of the fish was sent away to Na-  mu to be canned. Next week  and up to the close of the season  the fish to be principally canned  will be cohoes. The' packs put  up so far, approximately, todate  are: Bella Coola cannery. 25,000  cases; Tallio Fisheries, 15,000;  Kimsquit, 16,000; Manitou 16,000  and Namu 40,000 cases. No report to hand of the pack of the  East Bella Bella cannery, though  the run at that place has been  very satisfactory all through.  Borden Wants to Resign  Ottawa, Aug. 30.'���������Sir Robert  Borden is willing to resign the  leadership, but Conservatives in  caucus would not hear of any  other chief, meeting pledged him  continuance of loyal support.  Premier offered to vacate in  favor of Sir Geo. Foster. .  Montreal, Aug. 30.���������Penalties  are severe under military service  act.' One to five years imprison-  ment^ for personal resistance to  operation, of the act or persuading others to resist or impede it.'  London, Aug. 30.���������Earl Gray,  governor-general of Canada from  1904 to 1911, died at six o'clock  yesterday morning at Howich  House, Northumberland, after a  long illness.  Penetrate German Trenches  Paris, Aug. 31.���������German attacks last night on Verdun front  repulsed completely. French  troops penetrated German trenches in Champagne" sector, taking prisoners and two machine  guns.,  New York's Irish Problem  New York, Aug. 31���������New York  has Irish problem. "Friends of  Irish freedom" caused serious  disturbance, police reserves called out and orators jailed before  the crowd was dispersed.  Rioting in Montreal  Montreal, Aug; 31.- A strong  force of police charged and broke  up, in face of- a hurricane of  bricks and stones, theworstanti-  conscription demonstration Montreal has yet witnessed. Volly  of blank revolver shots by rioters followed, who declare they  will use ball cartridges tonight  if police interfere.  Of the many activities visible  along the coast, mining is foremost and considerable prospecting is going on. Claims that  have been lying idle for years  are now being given another overhaul and it is quite possible that  the new year wilf see some real  development in many places.  The Eutsuk Lake country is re-  Peter Marin, is now in England  undergoing treatment for rheumatic fever, contracted on the  battlefields of France. The report states that he is on the mend,  and will return to his post when  physically fit.  B. F. Jacobsen has just returned from a two weeks trip looking,  over some of his many mining  properties on Dean Channel. A  little work was done in places  and some claims are presenting  very satisfactory showings,'over  which Mr. Jacobsen is very optimistic.      ^  The Fall Fair at Prince Rupert  will take place in (hat city, September 19 20-21. It will be to  the interest of the faimers of  this valley to place some of their  product on exhibition in the northern city. ��������� The Fair at Bella  Coola is set for October 121 h and  i  it is expected that this year will  see a very fine ,lot of garden stu ff  of all kinds displayed.   '  -- ^.^ '.~     ',...-   '   - . i  '   Notices are out stating that Dr.  ON'T forget to bring.in your Subscription'  to. the Courier���������The more support you  give us, the better paper we will give you.  ISONZO FRONT-WHERE THE ITALIANS ARE MARCHING TO COMPLETE VICTORY.  Italians.in their attempt'to capture Trieste have inflicted enormous losses on the Austrians, who  are preparing to make a last stand to save the city on Bainsizza plateau.  ceiving most attention at pres-  sent. A party from here left  recently to spend some time in  that section looking up some old  claims and also to prospect in the  unexplored territory, said by old  Indians who have roamed over  that country for ages past, that  there is "hiyu chicimen stone"  to be found.  Mr. Henry Doyle, of the Tallio  Fisheries, Ltd., came up on last  week's Camosun and spent a  couple of days at the new cannery to size up things. He left  for Kimsquit and will spend  some time over there before going up the.Naas river, where his  company have a cannery operating also a new one in course of  construction that will be completed for next year's operations.  Mr. Doyle informed the Courier  that things were looking up all  along the coast, and from a commercial aspect things have not  looked so good for years-back as  they do at present.  J. T. Mandy will show some very  interesting moving pictures hei e,  "with the Allied aimies," en  Monday and Tuesday nights the  3rd and 4th September. These  pictures are interesting and describe accurately the war of today as it is carried on along the  battle line. We advise everybody/to see this moving picture  travelogue;   1 This section of the coast has  enjoyed real, nice weather during the month just passed.  BELLA COOLA AND DISTRICT RED  CROSS AND PATRIOTIC FUNDS  Mr. and Mrs. E. Qien, whom  for the past two years have been  residents at Smiths Inlet, returned here this week and will reside  on their ranch up the valley for  atime...      .'.'���������������������������" ,  Among the passengers for this  port last week were Mr. and Mrs.  j. D. Clayton, who returned after their wedding trip to the coast  cities.  STATEMENT FOR JULY.  Red Cross Fund  Collected by Miss L.  Schulstad the sum of  ..     10.00  Collected  by Misses  Livelton and Peterson        5.00  Collected by Mr. F.  Broughton the sum of..     31.00  Total $   46.00  Patriotic Fund  Collected by Mr. F.  Broughton the, sum of .. 12.50  Collected by Rev. H.  Sageng the sum of ��������� .. J.00  .. Total........ $14.50  4.v..;;ffilptrdf Ntfito  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  V  7  ���������9  r  a.  Our former townsman,  Pte. J oa><j>c������������^<j������>������^^J������������L>s*a^'rI"������  Preacher for Sunday-  W. H. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  -Rev. BELLA" COOLA COURIER  Saturday, September 1,  19)7  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year $1.00  C Monthi       0.75  3 Montln t    0.50  United Statei  I Year $1.50  United Kingdom  1 Year $1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  Ht once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  Births, Marriages and Deaths.  50c  per insertion.  For Advertising Rates,   Apply at  Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable ,an-  onyrooua communications will be published, the  ,   name anil address of everywriter of such letters  muHt be given to the editor. ,  The Editor reserves the risht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk. '���������  "^alita pnjiuli atuinmta rut Ipx."  SATURDAY, SEP. 1, 1917.  The Fish Supply Problem.  ���������   Some of the evidence given at  Vancouver   before   the   Royal  Commission inquiring into the  fishery conditions is very interesting, and in many cases contradictory. ��������� The person who gave  .the most reliable evidence was  Mr. A. L. Hagar of the Canadian  Fishing  Co.,  Vancouver.      He  favors close seasons, particularly  for halibut, also   the   government's allowance in sharing the  freight rates on' broken   shipments of fish to apply to other  kind besides halibut.   Mr. Hagar  also ^informed the Commission,  besides many others things of  vital importance to the industry,  ���������that,fully ninety per cent of certain food fish is wasted annually.  We are all aware that this state  of affairs in food fish waste has  existed in British Columbia for  the last twenty years and over.  One of the reasons for this is  that politics entered largely into  the industry.   Unless, a pull was  to be had with the members of  parliament at Ottawa no license  could be obtained for a fishing  establishment of any kind, and  when there was a license to be  granted the  money   consideration to politicians would be so  great that-the poorer concerns  had no chance and  the whole  thing was left  to the salmon  trust.' This trust was left alone,  the fishery regulations were in  part or wholly ignored by them  in almost every detail.   Fishing  boundaries in rivers had to be  fixed by'their consent, with the  result that now the salmon, particularly  the sockcye, are running Yory much short.   The trust  has never bothered to look after  the spawning grounds or clear-  ingof obstructions in rivers leading thereto, the killing of the  enemies of young fish, or anything that would be of assistance  in the propagation of our salmon  supply.   In fact they sucked the  lemon dry.   Yet the Canadian  government has given this trust  a freehand to destroy a national  .���������"resource.'   Now.that the supply  is getting less they are hitting  on alii sorts of schemes, but all  of such a nature that the public  must pay, while those that have  made millions out of the industry  go scot free. .���������-���������.  To remedy the practise, both  past and present, of the government allowing the rivers and  streams to remain blocked up by  log jam, thereby preventing the  fish from reaching the spawning  grounds, Mr. Hagar suggested  that a cannery license and fee  should be made sufficiently high  and named $5000, to assist in  keeping the rivers open. This  is a most reasonable suggestion,  and coming from a business man  of Mr.- Higar's. ability' should  have some weight with the.commissioners. The Courier has for  years suggested that rivers and  streams leading to the spawning  ground should be cleared of all  obstacles, and that hatcheries  should be built on all salmon  streams in the north, but as the  salmon truLt have had all the  fish that they could conveniently  handle up to now they have opposed, it, in fact as stated before  the head of the trust have never  even had a look at the breeding  grounds, and they are the people  that are to a great measure responsible for the, salmon shortage. It is now up. to both the  Provincial and Dominion governments to get together and jointly work for the preservation of  what is ieft and to use every  means for the increase of the  future supply of salmon.  '������������������' ������   '���������' O      O       O     ' o  "Why Not Before?  There has been a lotof talk of  a union government for Canada,  while some are in favor others  are ^gainst it.   What is the most  mysterious to us is that the Borden   government   should   have  waited so long before attempting to form a coalition government.   Sir Robert knew that his  time was up last year, he was  granted another year to set his  house in order and yet he waited  to the last days before he hit'upon this union government business.' ,  If the premier had done  what was right and'attempted  a fusion of the two great parties  earlier, similar to that established in England soon after the war  broke out,   then  the   Canadian  people would have thought it an  honest endeavor on his part. As  it is now it is only a political  move, just to lengthen the time  to enable the friends of the Borden government to have an extra  chance to profiteer out of the  war at the expense of the people.  MAGIC  BAKING  POWDER  CONTAINS NO ALUM  ,  MADE IN CANADA.  ernmentwere playing with conscription as with the coalition  idea, leaving it until they are  forced by necessity to do something. Perhaps they are waiting  for the Germans to be driven  across the Rhine. ��������� We were told  when conscription was first introduced that it was imperative  and urgent that the question  should be settled without delay,  and if the urgency existed then  it does today, with a growing  casualty list. The Canadian casualties in last weekend's fighting alone totalled overone thousand. The needs of the country  must be subservient to the game  of politics. An argument which  was adduced in the debate on  conscription, but which was not  dwelt on at any length, is worth  noting here. Canada is the only  British,country in which there  is,a race issue where conscription has been broached. England  did not put,conscription in force  in Ireland. Conscription was  not attempted in South Africa,  which is the latest addition to  the galaxy of free nations which  compose the British Empire.  It is only fair to state that the  conscription bill .got its hardest  knocks from its own friends. In  fact all through the crisis the  last thing the Borden government seemed to think about was  conscription as conscription. All  its eyes were for conscription as  a life-saver for the Borden government. While the conscrip-  tian fever was at its height the  Borden government was hustling  around for a coalition that might  pull it out of the hole by dragging Sir Wilfrid Laurier and half  a dozen other Liberals in.  Remember, and Save!  "The children of Belgium are  crying for food. Serbia has been  over-run by the enemy. Half of  Roumania is occupied. Much of  France is laid waste. Tennations  of the world are on rations. Sixty  million men are withdrawn from  production for war service. To  feed the allied armies and nations  the men and women of Canada  must pledge themselves to maximum production, the elimination  of waste, and the largest possible  consumption of perishable foodstuffs, " says,Hon. W. J. Hanna,  Canadian Food Controller.  O      O      Ct'     o      o  A Wonderful Future.  "I predict a wonderful future  for the Canadian fisheries," said  Major Hughie Green, officer in  charge of the fish supplies for  the overseas Canadian army, and  the Imperial Board of Trade.  "If the war were to end tomorrow, the British fish trade would  not be reorganized for at least  five years. 0The Canadian fisheries should produce $100,000,000  annually instead of the $34,000,-  000 produced today."  :o ,,o '. o    o   ��������� o  Fish is to become more plentiful in the Canadian market. The  Canadian food controller has inaugurated a special refrigerator  express car service direct from  Mackay Smith, Biair & Co.-Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,  OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send,for Catalogue  'MADE   IN   B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  the Nova Scotia coast to Toronto.  This is the first step in a plan to  put on a fish car express service  from both Pacific and Atlantic  points to supply Central Canada  with sea food cheaply.  o .. o    o . o���������..'��������� o,  If you can't be a fighter, don't  be a waster.  Conscription Becomes Lqw  The military bill became la  on Tuesday and formal assent to  the conscription measure was  given by the governor-genei  the following day.  With conscription  placed  on  the statute books the way will be  w  al  a  .ver  Wants'em  of course!  The foods called for by Great  Britain and the Allies from Canada and United States are beef,  It looks as if the Borden gov-1 bacon and wheat.  S. M. NEWTON  _  . The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding-.  While others stand for' what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these districts.  ���������Delicious, Appetizing, Melt-in-the-mouth Buns  and Biscuits that taste as good as they look and  smell.. Made from ROYAL- STANDARD FLOUR  they couldn't be otherwise.     ���������  Royal Standard Flour,is made from a wheat  that has no peer���������No. 1 Canadian Hard���������carefully  selected and just as carefully milled; It's kernels  are sweet as a nut. And because every atom of its  goodness goes into- ROYAL STANDARD ' FLOUR  you get the most perfect and satisfying Flour that  ever entered a household.    .     ��������� '  Look for the Trademark, "The Circle V" on  every sack.  MILLED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS .  Compare���������price for priced���������  GREAT  WEST  TEA  with the tea you aire now using.  It's Better.  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  hoe  HOE  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  ,? ���������:,,:':. :>"'.,,���������,.':/; BETWEEN'-., ������������������"���������������������������.���������',������������������ ,,:.:.,'   >'��������� ..  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      CeiniOSlin      Leaves Vancouver every  Thursday at 11 p.m.     (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S. " Coquitlam '' sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carryipg Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, Garrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria. . >  nan  3������0  HOE  ise your  3^  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY  m  ssssers  ������������&' tir  P  I  tf  '^Mm  Saturday, September 1,   1917  -BELLA COOLA COURIER  Our Booklet Explains  why Kootenay Ranges stay good, as  new, long after other ranges have worn  out; how the asbestos joints prevent  leakage of air or drafts; how, the alum-  inized flues prevent rust; and why  they require less fuel than other ranges.  ,  Ask our dealer or write for booklet.  ITOaiyfc  ECOOTENAY RANGE  LONDON      TORONTO      MONTREAL      WINNIPEG      VANCOUVER  ST. JOlINt N.B.      HAMILTON     t'ALGARV \$  - ���������    -���������-        -     EDMONTON  compared with that exported in  the raw state is steadily increasing. These and other particulars of this important industry  are set out in the bulletin which  may be had free by any citizen  interested by addressing the director of Forestry, Ottawa, and  asking for the Pulp wood Bulletin for 1916.  inn. li.n.      tit  SASKATOON  cleared for a union government,  and maybe one will be formed  cbeforc we go to press.   In any  case we hope it will include the  best brains in Canada and have  but a single eye���������the support of  our gallant boys at the front.  With full support victory is ours,  democracy will  surely triumph  over militarism.|lf our politicians  will stop squinting around for  political  .advantage, ��������� but   look  straight ahead, <it may safely be  said that Canada will come out  of this crisis a better Canada. >,  Canadian Pulp Manufactured  .     in 1916.  The Forestry Branch of the  Department of the Interior, Ottawa, has just issued the annual  bulletin on the manufacture of  pulpwood. The. total value of  the pulpwood,made into pulp in  Canada and exported for manufacture elsewhere in 1916 was  nearly $20,000,000, which represents an increase of over 28 per  cent as compared with 1915. The  proportion of pulpwood manufactured  into pulp in  Canada  PACIFIC MILK  Is the most economical milk you  can use. It is rich, heavy consistency, and vcan be diluted to a  greater extent for cooking and  table use than any other milk.  YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC"  FOOD PRODUCTS  CO., LTD., Manufacturers  Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.      .  Ask Your Dealer for  "Minister Myles"  Shoes  .  - "BERESFORD" Shoes (or Men  "VASSAR" and "MISS CANADA" Shoes lor Women  Life at the Front  Extracts From the Letters of Fred  , Grant.  July 5.  Well! we are still at the re-  serve'line, and having a dandy  time swimming.   I go in three  time a day and am .making the  c  best of it.   I have never been so  clean since 1 came to France.  Mr. Keeping arrived to see me  just as 1 had finished my letter  home the other day.   He stayed  for dinner and spent the rest of  the day with us, the two other  sergeants and myself enjoyed  his company immensely/   You  will be surprised, to hear that 1  have applied for a commission in  the Royal- Flying' Corps, as an  observer first and later on pilot;  my papers have been signed already by the colonel and also the  brigadier.   I still have to go to  theR. F. C. headquarters to see  if they will accept me, and cannot say till then whether I can  make the grade or not.   Being  out' here so long and knowing  machine gunnery, is all in rhy  favor, but I fear most for my  weight (175 lbs.) is against the  regulation (161 lbs.)  July 13.  To give you an idea 'of what  sort of a place we are in- first ol  all it is a town which is pretty  well battered down.   Half a dozen of us are in a dug-out, about  thirty feet'underneath an'old  building and street, then there  is another opening cwhich comes  out in a building on a different  block.' The tunnel is about 70  ft. long, 6 ft. hijrh and 5 ft: wide,  and the Germans have lined it  nicely -for  us with three-inch  planking.   There is' an alley way  off it "which we use for a bed:  room:   In it are big; box spring  beds with feather mattresses.  The Germans took the best they  could find and brought them here.  In the drawing-room   there is  some of the loveliest furniture  you could wish for: couch, settee,  arm chair, smaller chairs,  side board and a big mirror, also  a hundred dollar clock hanging  on the wall. We have also a splendid set of crockery and enamel-  ware, some of which is going into our sergeant's mess.     The  dug-out is lighted up with candles, but the concussion of Fritz's  "minnewerfers" has put them  out quite a few times already today.   I wish you had been here  yesterday to see our new planes  bring down two of Fritz's.   One  fell upside down and there ������ere  two men and a dog in it, one man  was killed and the other badly  wounded and shaken up with the  bump.   I have fiye outposts to  look after and have to. get what  sleep I' can during the day. .  ". ,V;:;:7';:\';;/.ri:.\Juiy2i. .;  ;, The night before last we^ame  out of the; line, and, a-#eir|r;. wet  and stormy night it was. It was  just about daylight when we got  into camp and I Was covered  with mud from head to foot, in  fact so bad that I took my clothes  Continued on page 4, column 4.  SYNOPSJS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  r-.OAL MINING BIGHTS of the Dominion, in  *���������* M*.nit6ba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Trbritoky, the North-west Tebri-  i Tories and in a portion of thu Province of  BlUTIBH Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre., Not more than 2.060 acre* will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to Ihe Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself. ���������  , Each application 'must be accompanied by a  fee of 15 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shull furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  fullquantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining right*  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coat mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted tn purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information  application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  -Interior. Ottawa, or to any A (font or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N.B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������3OG50.  Twas Ever Thus.  There is a tendency,to, overlook the fact that, the-government is composed of ordinary  human beings���������some of them  very ordinary. , Few of the members were selected because of  their ability to handle the,affairs of the nation even in peace  times���������few, indeed,, are of the  calibre to fill the breaches which  are demanding men of , great  capacity today.���������Financial Post  of'Canada.  Which,seem to,say much in  little space.  ���������  The American corn crop is reported favorable from a majority  of ihe big producing states:  \ ���������'    BUSINESS CARDS  Watch Repairs  Send your watch to ua for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.  ��������� A price given before proceeding with work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.  O.B.ALLAN  Diamond Merchant���������Optician  Granville and Pender, Yancouver.B.C.  ������ H  HOC  ���������tu  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.'  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always. ���������  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  H3 n to' ������i m  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTEICT OF COAST���������RANGE in.  Take notice that I, Frank Inrig, of  Wadhams, B. C, occupation cannery-  man, .intend to apply for permission  to lease the following described hind:  Commencing at a post planted ut the  southwest corner of Lot 1041 oh Goose  Bay, Rivers Inlet, thence east20 chains,  thence south 20 chains, thence west 20  chains to the shore, thence following  the shore line to the place of commencement.      ."'.������������������������������������������������������  FRANK INRIG.  August 25th, 1917.     ��������� '    ,-  Sep. 1-Nov. 3.  V-  PRINCE RUPERT EXHIBITION  September 19-20-21  Greatest Agricultural and Industrial Show in the  North.        Over $3000 in, Cash Prizes  GRAND INDTaN^BaND CONTEST  Baseball ��������� Football ��������� Water Sports  Particulars  to  be   had from  the   Secretary at   Prince Rupert  ae^i  X&7HAT person so happy and.contented as the prosperous farmer?  \ji7HAT person so independent?  11WHAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of the necessaries  of life? a  Bella Coola  farmers are independent',  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  ���������"THE REASONS for this enviable condi-'  ���������*���������   tion of affairs are   obvious to  anyone  who -knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and .needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long -warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  ���������"^ country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  *#'-.  'i,-:\f '������������������'���������'���������' ���������'���������'���������'���������   CANADA.   ' ���������'  One Year 1. ....'..���������....''.'.,  Six Months .......  Three Months "............,.'.  UNITED STATES.  One Year.: ���������..;..  .$1.00  . 0.75  . 0.50  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year '.'.��������� .....,....$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK,  BELLA COOLA, PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  '   '[  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  y     Enclosed, please find........'..;.  for ;Bella Coola Courier for,.,. \....  .subscription  NahieT.'.  .  ���������H '    "���������   :. ���������������������������'��������� '"������������������.'   .'���������' ������������������ .   ���������������������������' '  '������������������'������������������ ':' '  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  O  V  fife*  I  ># <-'li  SELLA C60LA C6URIER  Saturday, Septemler I,  19l7   *  13  30E  D     D  Subscribe  for the  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  It Will be to your interest to* keeP WeM *n~  formed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.   '  fi  Loggers  Fishermen  Prospectors  are in a class by themselves  They have been tried and  tested for over Fifty Years  and have not been disappointing.  ASK YOUR MERCHANT FOR AMHERST  "HOME-MADE" BRAND  AMHERST  HALIFAX  ADVERTISERS -  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE, booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  'Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse., Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the ''Courier."  noting  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do* it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  D TOWN.. Do not talk���������support home industries���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  $1 a Ypar  ���������'' " ' ���������'  ���������  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  TALE OF THE BUFFALO.  The buffaloes found in the telegraph poles of the Overland  Line a new source of delight on  the treeless prairie���������the novelty  of having something to scratch  against. But it was quite expensive scratching for the telegraph company, and there, irf-  deed was the rub, for the bisons  shook down miles of wires daily.  A bright idea struck somebody,  to send to St. Louis and Chicago  for all the bradawls that could  be purchased, and these were  driven into the poles, with a view  to wound the animals and stop  their rubbing propensity. Never  was a greater mistake. The buffaloes were delighted. For the  first timethey came to thescratch  sure of a sensation in their thick  hides that thrilled them from  horn to tail. They would go fifteen miles to find a bradawl.  They fought battles around the  poles containing them, and the  victor would proudly climb the  mountainous heap of his fallen  companions and scratch himself  into bliss until the bradawl broke  o  or the pole came down. There  has been no demand for bradawls from the Kansas region  since the first invoice."  Russia is on rations. A wheat  embargo exists in Argentina.  Australia, New Zealand, and India are out of reach of Great  Britain because of the shortage  of ships.   It has fallen to the  rT,HE two principal reasons  1   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioned  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  United States and Canada to  beat the German blockade and  feed Great Britain, the' Allies,  and the armies in the field.  ' LIFE AT THE FRONT���������Continued  from page three.  off and threw them into the  river, then jumped in after and  washed them out. By this time  the rain had stopped and a very  strong wind was blowing and it  was not long after putting the  wet clothes on that they were  fairly dry after running about a  bit. We came on the rest of the  way that morning and were in  time to see the 4th Divisional  sports, and I am almost sure that  I saw John Nygaard "running in  one of the relay races, butowing  to the tremendous crowd I was  not able to locate him after the  race. Today I have been orderly-sergeant and certainly have  been kept on the go. We got up  at 6 a. m., had breakfast at 6-15  and a work1 party had to be got  ready to move off at seven. Kit  inspection at a quarter to eight  and at nine, one hour's drill. At  ten* all hands went to a large  steam boiler and had all clothing  fumigated, and at eleven all who  had not beep inoculated within  the last twelve months had to be  done over again. I, fortunately,  was not among the bunch. At  1:30 there was instruction at  bayonet fighting and at three  o'clock the paymaster opened his  heart and gave us our pay.  .  Ames Holden McGready^Ltd.  Vancouver, B.C.  1  LEADING WHOLESALERS IN BOOTS,  SHOES  AND' RUBBERS  FOR ~MEN,  WOMEN AND CHILDREN.   .  H  Largest Manufacturers of Boots and  Shoes in Canada   .  ������-  Just a Few of Our Exclusive Specialties  THE GOAL EVERBEARING APPLE."   The only everbearing  apple in existence.   A delicious all-the-seasun fruit.   Fine  ���������     tree, each, $1.00.  THE VANDERPOOL RED APPLE. The great export apple  and keeper.    Each, 50c.  THE OREN.CO APPLE.   The best dessert apple.    Each, 50c..  THE YAKIMENE PEACH-APRICOT. ' A remarkable combination of the' apricot and peach.   Hardy.   Each, $1.00.  THE VROOMAN FRANQUETTE WALNUT.   Produces food  of great nutritious value on a highly ornamental tree.  Each $1.  THE SOUVENTR' EVERBEARING RASPBERRY.   The greatest everbearer.   Hundred, $14.00.  SPECIAL   SAMPLE   OFFER  We will send prepaid to your nearest station next Spring one of each of  these splendid trees and a dozen Souvenir Raspberries on receipt of a $5.00  bill, or C. O. D. $5.50.   Orders should be placed NOW for these or any  other of our well-known stock.   We do not ship into the interior in the Fall.  N.B-It is MOST IMPORTANT that ordors be sent In AT ONCE-tho  stock must be reserved MOW.  The British Columbia Nurseries Co., Ltd.  1493 SEVENTH AVENUE WEST       -   .      VANCOUVER, B. C.  Nurseries at Sardls-  5S%  CLUB OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the. leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.' ' ���������'.  The Courier   .  : ,.       .       .'     ���������^���������00   Both papers  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg 1.50   f      p p  ,  .-,������������������   lor/'.  $2.50  $2.00  .The Courier   .     ������������������'.'���������"    .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto.  $1:00  L50  $2.50  Both papers  for .  .   $2.00  The Courier,  $i.oo  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal . . 1.00  '    $2:00  Both papers  or  $L75  ^  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  jj  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  :*-!  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  C^MP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's, and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    Q    ������  ���������BB  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  oar stock. Nothing but the mosT: suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints - Oils - Varnishes  - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  ,,.' kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  v  li  pi ���������  Fl;-  Al>.  r*1  is  B>.  It  ���������   .  it  r  ft  P<  !���������*������  \:  1  ���������       ������  t  lip '  til  ������������������������  fa"  i  .WnHJtaBBW  E52S3ESB  gaaaggBa  MMBMBBHUmeBSBS  i  k Ami  J*Ti1",f'VSi v'  ���������������* * 7 dJ.ilM   ir  priV * S-V'-fyi    .���������' 4s  ���������*���������*.-'  'fill1  YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  ISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  |ENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  COB  WEATHER REPORT FOR JUNE  Compiled  by  Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 64.   Minimum, 43.  Highest Max. (14th) 82. Lowest Min. (,11th) 30  Rainfall, 2.42.  Rainfall for the, year (1916) 40.89 inches.  e  s  )L. 5���������NO. 37  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,  1917.  $1.00 a Year  War News for the Week  :s  ..;-  ������i3i  m  *<='<  t^  Tuesday:   London.--Three great allied drives assailed Teutonic  ������s on three fronts today.    British and French resumed off en-  Italy continued her fierce drive uninterruptedly.    In past  ������k, Italians have taken approximately ninety square miles of  itrian territory, close to- twenty-five thousand prisoners, vast  res of munitions, guns and supplies, and inflicted stupendous  fualties on the enemy, estimated at seventy-five thousand men.  mch changing point of attack from left bank to right bank of  Meu3e, General Petain struck another blow at German de-  fse out of Verdun.    Initial shock carried French nearly a mile  fward on  two  fronts.    British successfully pushed  forward  linst German positions in sector north of St. Quentin, where  Ire has been little fighting in last two months.    Powerfully for-  jd posts on Hindenburg line stormed and taken and British  it advanced half mile over a mile front.  edhesday:   London.-British forces in Flanders took tighter  of German's third line.    They advanced two thousand yards  [ride St. Julien-Poelcapple road.    German attempts last night  rive back British from their positions on Inverness copse,  ���������res-Menine road, frustrated and prisoners taken from the at-  ing forces,    Germany has lost more that fifty thousand men  landers since July 1st.  aris.-French troops penetrated German trenches at Butte De  ain and captured prisoners.    Considerable artillery activity on  rdun front.  ashington.-Trieste being evacuated, civilian population seek  luge'imth'e interior of Austria. Italians sweep forward from  fate Santo across the plateau of Bainsizza and are fast turning  Strian.withdrawal into a.debacle. ���������.,^-^.,^..;^.        - , ���������    ^   -  America's present war congress will be thirty billion dollars  sion. $7,147,222,907 has been appropriated since Congress coned In March. More than twenty-three billion dollars pending  .estimates and others will be made soon and must be cared for  lore session quits. Henry Ford advocates government taking  er cent of all war profits. Ford company now building aero-  2 cylinders for government on basis of no profits,  oscow.-"Unless Russia's army is regenerated and resists the  Imy. Riga'road to Petrograd will be open," declared General  Srniloff in vigorous demand made yesterday to Russian confer-  for iron discipline.  etrograd.-At the trial for high treason of Gen. Soukhomlinoff,  toier minister of war, General Ivanoff, former commander of  glhynia and Galicia, testified yesterday that he had information  owing that military secrets had been communicated direct from  trograd to Berlin and Vienna by way of Warsaw. Gen. Velit-  iko, director of engineer corps, regarded Soukhomlinoff as being  incipally responsible for death of Russian army, czar not to  time. Russian army retires before enemy attack in Boyany re-  Ion, retirement occasioned by beginning of offensive in region  Tasczernowitz, Bukowina, by Germans and Austrians.  Thursday:   London:���������During night British carried out success-  i raids northeast of Gouzeaucourt and southwest of Halluch and  ptured a few prisoners.    Italy's great offensive paused temporarily today.    Italian  forces ad-  RussiaFacesUtterChaos  Moscow, Aug. 30���������Russia faces  utter chaos by November unless  railway workers are willing to  make personal sacrifices, if not,  transportation will cease. It is  a problem to restore discipline  in the army. Troops completely  poisoned by ill-interested doctrines and are split into two  camps. Officers are now mar-  tyres, soldiers look on while their  leaders go bravely forward to  face enemy and certain death.  Petrograd, Aug. 30.���������A Russian divison yesterday abandoned  its position,in the region of Fok-  hania and fled in disorder.  In;  ice  m  U. S. Rejects Peace  Washington, Aug. 30.���������President Wilson sends reply to the  Pope, offer rejected, useless to  discuss peace while autocracy is  in control. Peace rests upon decision of the German people and  not their rulers. Reports from  Germany lead observers here to  believe that the central powers  will not reject the peace proposals of the Pope.  Borden Wants to Resign  Ottawa, Aug. 30.���������Sir Robert  Borden is willing to resign, the  leadership, but Conservatives in  caucus would not hear of any  other chief, meeting pledged him  continuance of loyal support.  Premier offered to vacate in  favor of "Sir Geo. Foster.  Plan to Put Czar Back  Copenhagen, Aug. 31���������Russian  fleet-may join revolutionists in  revolt. Navy said to be under  the influence of Nicholas, Lenine  ���������and his adherents. Second revolution planned to start from  Kronstadt. Troops prevent diet  assembling in Finland. Martial  law in Kazan.  c Petrograd, Aug. 31.���������A large  proportion of the Russian regiments in Fokhania region.Rou-  mania front, left their trenches  and retired yesterday. Russian  war ministry knew Of Germany's  military preparations and was also aware that she contemplated  declaring war in 1909 and again  in 1913, according to the testimony yesterday by Gen. Michael-  son, who swore he had reported  Gemany's military activity to the  Russian war office.  Austrian Attacks Repulsed  Rome, Aug. 31.���������Counter attacks by Austrians against our  newly-won positions on front  above Gorizia, were repulsed.  San Gabrielle has been partly  taken by Italian troops.  Penetrate German Trenches  Montreal, Aug. 30. ���������Penalties  are severe under military service  act. One to five years imprisonment for personal resistance to  operation of the act or persuading others to resist or impede it.  London, Aug. 30.��������� Earl Gray,  governor-general of Canada from  1904 to 1911, died at six o'clock  yesterday morning at Howich  House, Northumberland, after a  long illness.  Paris, Aug. 31.���������German attacks last night on Verdun front  repulsed completely. French  troops penetrated German trenches in Champagne'sector, taking prisoners and two machine  guns.  New York's Irish Problem  Salmon fishing, locally, for the  past week has been very good  and the canneries have had all  they could handle, in fact some  of the fish was sent away to Na-  mu to be canned. Next week  and up to the close of the season  the fish to be principally canned  will be cohoes. The packs put  up so far, approximately, todate  are: Bella Coola cannery. 25,000  cases; Tallio Fisheries, 15,000;  Kimsquit, 16,000; Manitou 16,000  and Namu 40,000 cases. No report to hand of the pack of the  East Bella Bella cannery, though  the run at that place has been  very satisfactory all through.  Of the many activities visible  along the coast, mining is foremost and considerable prospecting is going on. Claims that  have been lying idle for years  are now being given another overhaul and it is quite possible that  the new year will see some real  development in many places.  The Eutsuk Lake country is re^  Peter Marin, is now in England  undergoing treatment for rheumatic fever, contracted on the  battlefields of France. The report states that he is on the mend  and will return to.his post when  physically fit.  B. F. Jacobsen has just returned from a two weeks trip looking  over some of his many mining  properties on Dean Channel. A  little work was done in places  and some claims are presenting  very satisfactory showings, over  which Mr. Jacobsen is very optimistic.        .���������'   The Fall Fair at Prince Rupert  will take place in that city, September 19 20-21. It will be to  the interest of the farmers of  this;valley to place some of their  product on exhibition in the northern city. The Fair at Bella  Coola is set for October 12th and  it is expected that this year will  see a very fine lot of garden stuff  of all kinds displayed.  -Notices are out stating that Dr.  New York, Aug. 31���������New York  has Irish problem. "Friends of  Irish freedom" caused serious  disturbance, police reserves called out and orators jailed before  the crowd was dispersed.  Rioting in Montreal  Montreal, Aug. 31.- A strong  force of police charged and broke  up,' in face of- a hurricane of  bricks and stones, the worst anti-  conscription demonstration Montreal has yet witnessed. Volly  of blank revolver shots by rioters followed, who declare they  will use ball cartridges tonight  if police interfere.  Italian  'anced so rapidly that the heavy  irtillery failed to keep up with  f   ^Hipk infantry.    Bainsizza plateau  ow virtually centre of fighting,  'eported Austrians preparing to  make a stand on the plateau.  ^JFriday:   London.-Furtheroperations ��������� by British on western  front hampered by rainstorm to-  $?Ptay.    Germans re-inforcingnor-  ui������*|fcheirn frontier of Belgium, near  *3j&ay Scheldt and village of San-  ;L tyliet, large guns been located  ,^TOti strong concrete floors.    Num-  \fkber of reserve troops in fortified  Ojo-dtions   around   Antwerp   in-  v?*drt ased daily, now estimated at  -V fifty  thousand.    Only  23' ships  '^lo-toutof 5309 moving last week.  *   'Italy's victorious offensive reach-  ,_ *ed its second and most important  /Stage today, having attained the  ^dominance of Bainsizza plateau  Y Gl i. Ca'dorna's troops began vast  flanking  movement northward,  \ with Tolmino as immediate ob-  ( je������ t of the drive.    First stand  ardized  merchantman   built in  Britain completed today.  > s������ &  >   t  >,i  hA  ISONZO FRONT-WHERE THE ITALIANS ARE MARCHING TO COMPLETE VICTORY  3?: -    ���������~        '  STAOT  ������3  A*-  -���������*���������*��������� s.  <M  8ft. "d^rffy&MlgL  ,^���������,v..~    .,. "V%&!%&  *TnCNY  mola!  SI AGO  ronra  set*"  'icM  ;hiogoiA  JLlWJRIJbTJl'C  r^ONT forget to bring, in your Subscription':  to the Courier���������-The more support you  give us, the better paper we will give you.  ceiving most attention at pres-;J. T. Mandy will show some very  sent. A party from here left j interesting moving pictures heie,  recently to spend some time in'"with the Allied armies," on  that section looking up some old ; Monday and Tuesday nights the  claims and also to prospect in the j 3rd and 4th September. These  unexplored territory, said by old j pictures are interesting and de-  Indians who have roamed over scribe accurately the war of to-  that country for ages past, that  there is "hiyu chicimen stone"  to be found.  Mr. Henry Doyle, of the Tallio  Fisheries, Ltd., came up on last  week's Camosun and spent a  couple of days at the new cannery to size up things. He left  for Kimsquit and will spend  some time over there before going up the-Naas river, where his  company have a cannery operating also a new one in course of  construction that will be completed for next year's operations.  Mr. Doyle informed the Courier  that things were looking up all  along the coast, and from a commercial aspect things have not  looked so good for years-back as  they do at present.  day as it is carried on along the  battle line. We advise every-  body-to see this moving picture  travelogue.           This section of" the coast has  enjoyed real, nice weather during the month just passed.  BELLA COOLA AND DISTRICT RED  CROSS AND PATRIOTIC FUNDS  STATEMENT FOR JULY.  Red Cross Fund  Collected by Miss L.  Schulstad the sum of   ..  Collected   by  Misses  Livelton and Peterson  Collected by Mr. F.  Broughton the sum of..  Total $   46.00  10.00  5.00  31.00  Italians in their attempt to capture Trieste have inflicted enormous losses on the Austrians, who  are preparing to make a last stand to save the city on Bainsizza plateau.  Mr. and Mrs. E. Oien, whom  for the past two years have been  residents at Smiths Inlet, returned here this week and will reside  on their ranch up the valley for  a time.   Among the passengers for this  port last week were Mr. and Mrs.  J. D. Clayton, who returned after their wedding trip to the coast  cities.          Our former  townsman,   Pte.  Patriotic Fund  Collected by Mr. F.  Broughton the sum of . .    12.50  Collected by Rev. H.  Sageng the sum of       2.00  Total  $14.50  c  (ttljttrrlj Nnito  7  6  t  Sunday  School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  4  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W. H. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  9  4 BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,  Srp((rnkf ;  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year :....$1.00  6 Month.       ������-75  3 Month. ...v    ������������������������������������������������������   ������-50  United State.  1 Year >}.:....: *!���������������>  United Kingdom  1 Year /..., *!���������������>  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon'as possible.  Births, Marriages aot������ Deaths.  50c  per insertion. ,  For Advertising Rates,  Apply at  Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable anonymous commnnicationa will be published, tne  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be given to the editor. '  The Editor reserves the njrht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.     , i  M&aluH papnil Hiiprenta *Ht Isx"  SATURDAY, SEP. 1, 1917.  The Fish Supply Problem.  Some of the evidence given at  Vancouver before the Royal  Commission inquiring into the  . fishery conditions is very interesting, and in many cases contradictory.' The person who gave  the most reliable evidence was  Mr. A. L. Hagar of the Canadian  Fishing Co., Vancouver. - He  f avors close-seasons, particularly  for, halibut, also the government's allowance in sharing the'  freight rates on broken ship-  ' ments.of fish.to apply to other  kind besides halibut. Mr.Hagar  also informed the Commission,'  besides many others things of  vital importance to the industry,  -that.fully ninety per cent of cer-  tain food fish is wasted annually.  We are all aware that this state  of affairs in. food fish waste has  existed in British Columbia for  the last twenty years and over.  One of the reasons for this is  that politics entered largely into  the industry. Unless a pull was  to be had with the members of  parliament at Ottawa no license  could be obtained for a fishing  establishment of any kind, and  when there was a license to be  granted the money consideration to politicians would be so  great that- the poorer, concerns  had no chance and the whole  thing was left to the salmon  trust.* This trust was left alone,  the fishery regulations were in  part or wholly ignored by them  in almost every detail. Fishing  boundaries in rivers had to be  fixed by their consent, with the  result that now the salmon, particularly the sockeye, are running very much short. The trust  has never bothered to look after  the spawning grounds or clearing of obstructions in rivers leading thereto, the killing of the  enemies of youn# fish, or anything that would be of assistance  in the propagation of our salmon  supply- In fact they sucked the  lemon dry. Yet the Canadian  government has given this trust  a free hand to destroy a national  resource. Now. that the supply  is getting less they are hitting  on all sorts of schemes, but all  of such a nature that the public  must pay, while those that have  made millions out of the industry  go scot free. ^  To remedy the practise, both  past and present, of the government allowing the rivers and  streams to remain blocked up by  log jam, thereby preventing the:  fish from reaching the spawning;  grounds,  Mr. Hagar suggested  that a cannery license and fee  should be made sufficiently high:  and named $5000, to  assist inj  keeping the rivers open.    This  is a most reasonable suggestion,;  and coming from a business man;  of Mr.; Hagar's ability should!  have some weight with the com-j  missioners.   .The Courier has for  years suggested that riversand  streams leading to the spawning  ground should be cleared of all  obstacles, arid   that   hatcheries  should  be" built on  all salmon  streams in the north, but, as the  salmon trutt-have, had all the  fish that they could conveniently  handle up to now they have opposed it, in fact as stated before  the head of the trust have never  even had a look at the breeding  grounds, and they are the people  that are to. a great measure responsible for the salmon shortage.   It is now up. to both the  Provincial and Dominion governments to get together and jointly work for the preservation of  what is left and to  use every  means for the increase of(the  BAKING j  MAGIC  BAKING  POWDER  CONTAINS NO ALUM  MADE IN CANADA.  future supply of salmon.  O      O      O      O   ' o ���������  Why Not Before?  There-has been a lot.6f talk of  a union government for Canada,  while some are in favor others  areggainst it. What is the most  mysterious to us is that the Borden .government' should have  waited so long before attempting to form a coalition government. ;" Sir Robert knew .that his  time, was up -last, year, he was  granted���������";a'h"other'.5year to set-his  house in order and yet he waited  to the last days before he hit upon this union government business^ If'the.premier had done  what* was right and attempted  a fusion of the two great parties  earlier,- similar to that established"^ England soon after the war  broke out, then the Canadian  people would have thought it an  honest endeavor oh his part. As  it is now it is only a political  move, just to lengthen the time  to enable the friends of the Borden government to have an extra  chance to profiteer out of the  warat the expense of the people.  It looks as if the Borden gov-  A  Wonderful Future.  "I predict a wonderful future  for the Canadian fisheries," said  Major Hughie Green, officer in  charge of the fish supplies for  the overseas Canadian army, and  the Imperial^ Board of Trade.  "If the war were to end tomorrow, the British fish trade would  not be reorganized for at least  five years. The Canadian fisheries should produce $100,000,000  annually instead of the $34,000,������:  000 produced today."  o     o    o    o    o  Fish is to become more plentiful in. the Canadian market. The  Canadian food controller has inr  augurated a special refrigerator  express car service direct from  ernment were playing with conscription as with the coalition  idea, leaving it until thev are Canadian Pood Controller  forced by necessity to do something. Perhaps they are waiting  for the Germans to be driven  across the Rhine. We were told  when conscription was first introduced that it was imperative  and urgent that the question  should be settled without delay,  and if the urgency existed then  it does today, with a growing  casualty list. The Canadian casualties in last weekend's fighting alone totalled overone thousand. The needs of the country  must be subservient to the game  of politics. An argument which  was. adduced in the debate on  conscription, but which was not  dwelt on at any length, is worth  noting here. Canada is the only  British country in which there  is a race issue where conscription has been broached. England  did not put conscription in force  in Ireland.. Conscription was  not attempted in South Africa,  which is the latest addition to  the galaxy of free nations which  compose the British Empire.,  t, '���������     '-���������        t    '  It is only fair to state that the  conscription, bill .got its' hardest  knocks from its own friends. In  fact all through the crisis the  last thing the Borden government seemed to think about was  conscription as conscription. All  its eyes were fo_r conscription as  a life-saver for the Borden government. While the conscrip-  tian fever was at itfc height the  Borden government was hustling  around iot a coalition that might  pull it out of the hole by dragging Sir Wilfrid Laurierand half  a dozen other Liberals in.  Remember, and Save!  "The children of Belgium are  crying for food. Serbia has been  over-run by the enemy. Half of  Roumania is occupied. Much of  France is laid waste. Ten nations  of the world are on rations. Sixty  million men are withdrawn from  production for war service. To  feed the allied armies and nations  the.men and women of Canada  must pledge themselves to maximum production, the elimination  of waste, and the largest possible  consumption of perishable foodstuffs," says Hon. W. J. Hanna,  NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  The foods called for by Great     While others stand for what  Britain and the Allies from Can- will benefit their party, he stands  ada and United States are beef,  bacon and wheat.  '9������;  Mackay Smith, Biair & Co JtJ  VANCOUVER,  B.C.       "       '  Wholesale  DRY GOODS  AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF  "PRIDE  OF THE  WEST'   BRANn  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE   IN    B. C.'  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Or  the Nova Scotia coast to Toronto.  This is the first step in a plan to  put on a fish car express service  from both Pacific and Atlantic  points to supply Central Canada  with sea food cheaply.  o    &     o    o    o  If you can't be a:fighter, don't  be a waster. ,  id  nsenption Becomes I  The military bill became^  assent .j  measure. *,  given  by Ih, ^  the following i];.1V-  .With   conscription placed(1  the statute books ihe wav,a  on Tuesday and formal  the  conscription  Everybody  Wants 'em  of course!  ���������Delicious, Appetizing, Melt-in-the-mouth Buns  and Biscuits that taste as good as they' lock and  smell.' Made from ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR  they couldn't be otherwise.  Royal Standard Flour is made from a wheat  that has no peer���������No. 1 Canadian Hard carefully  selected and just as carefully milled. It's kernels  arc sweet as a nut. And because every atom of its  goodness goes into ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR  you get the most perfect arid satisfying Flour that  ever entered a household.  Look for the Trademark, "The Circle V" on  every sack.  MILLED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  for what will benefit these districts.  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY  Compare���������-price for price���������  GREAT   WEST  TEA  with the tea you are now using.  It's Better.  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO, Ltd,  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B.C  HOE  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSKN'flKU SKKVIlk  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.  "CamOSUn"   Leaves   Vancouver every  Thursday at 11  p. m.     (Victoria day previous)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a.m.  S.  S.   "Coquitlam"   sails   from   V:m<-������"UT ������'^j  nightly, carrying Gasoline and   Explosive.   u>  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  ���������jM  For rates of Freights, Fares and other "'lf,^m:ill''/{;V;i<U'K-  ead Office, Carrali. St.,  Vancouver ; or ���������il"   '  Head  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria  -iflrt  <?H  nor  Advertise your Wants in the Co"  m  ���������..utra :������  ilurJay, -September I,   1917  BELLA; COOLA COURIER  ���������" mmmiii i  K  !������������������>  L   ���������  *W  m  Our Booklet Explains  why Kootenay Ranges stay good as  new, long after other ranges have worn  out; how the asbestos joints prevent  leakage of air or drafts; how the alum-  intzed flues prevent rust; and why  they require less fuel than other ranges.  '���������V  (   Ask our dealer or write for booklet.  McQary&  LONDON      TORONTO  ST   IOHI*   W^������KTX^������lr,.rtSrn"P1MEG      VANCOUVER  J   iiii/^nW-���������     CALGARY  SASKATOON      EDMONTON  16  (eared for a union government,  id maybe one. will be formed  lefore we go to press. In any  fase we hope it will include the  lest brains in Canada and have  fut a single eye���������the support of  fur gallant boys at the front,  'ith full support victory is ours,  iemocracy will surely triumph  fver militarism.!If our politicians  will stop squinting around for.  political advantage, , but look  straight ahead, it may safely be  jaidthat Canada will come out  If this crisis a better Canada.  Canadian Pulp Manufactured  in 1916.  The Forestry Branch of the  Department of the Interior, Ottawa, has just issued the annual  bulletin on the manufacture of  pulpwood. The, total value of  1 the pulpwood made into pulp in  Canada and exported for manufacture elsewhere in 1916 was  nearly $20,000,000, which represents an increase of over 28 per  cent as compared with 1915. The  proportion of pulpwood manufactured   into pulp in   Canada  PACIFIC MILK  Is the most economical milk you  can use. It is rich, heavy consistency, and can be diluted to a  greater extent for cooking and  table use than any other milk.  41  YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC"  FOOD  PRODUCTS  CO., LTD., Manufacturers  Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C.  compared with that exported in  the raw state is steadily increasing. These and other particulars of this important industry  are set out in the bulletin w^hich  may be had free by any citizen  interested by addressing the director of Forestry, Ottawa, and  asking for the Pulpwood Bulletin for 1916.  Life at the Front  Extracts From the Letters of Fred  Grant.  Ask Your Dealer for  ' 'Minister Myles"  Shoes  "BERESFORD" Shoes for Men  "VASSAR" and "MISS CANADA" Shoes for Women  July 5.  Well! we are still at the reserve line, and having a dandy  time swimming. I go ih three  time a day and am making true  best of it. I have never been so  clean since I came to France.  Mr. Keeping arrived to see me  just as I had finished my letter  home the other day. He stayed  for dinner and spent the rest of  the day with us, the two other  sergeants and myself enjoyed  his company immensely. You  will be surprised to hear that 1  have applied for a commission in  the Royal Flying Corps, as an  observer first and later on pilot;  my papers have been signed already by the colonel and also the  brigadier. I still have to go to  the R. F. C. headquarters to see  if they will accept me, and cannot say till then whether I can  make the grade or not. Being  out here so long and knowing  machine gunnery, is all in my  favor, but I fear, most for my  weight (175 lbs.) is against the  regulation (161 lbs.)  July 13.  To give you an idea of what  sort of a place we are in- first of  all it is a town which is pretty  well battered down. Half a dozen of us are in a dug-out, about  thirty feet' underneath an' old  building and -street, then there  is another opening -which comes  out in a building on a different  block. The tunnel is about 70  ft. long, 6 ft. high and 5 ft. wide,  and the Germans have lined it  nicely for us with three-inch  planking. There is an alley way  off it which we use for a bed:  room. In it are big; box spring  beds with feather mattresses.  The Germans took the best they  could find and brought them here.  In the drawing-room there is  some of the loveliest furniture  you could wish for: couch, settee, arm chair, smaller chairs,  side board and a big mirror, also  a hundred dollar clock hanging  on the wall. We have also a splendid set of crockery and enamel-  ware, some of which is going into our sergeant's mess. The  dug-out is lighted up with candles, but the concussion of Fritz's  "minnewerfers" has put them  out quite a few times already today. I wish you had been here  yesterday to see our new planes  bring down two of Fritz's. One  fell upside down and there were  two men and a dogin it, one man  was killed and the other badly  wounded and shaken up with the  bump. I have five outposts to  look after and have to get what  sleep I can during the day.  July 21.  The night before last we$ame  out of the line, and ayery wet  and stormy night it was. Itwas  just about daylight when we got  into camp and I was covered  with mud from head to foot, in  fact so bad that I took my clothes  Continued on page 4, column 4.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  ? REGULATIONS  f.OAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ^' Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta.  the Yukon Territory, the North-west Terri-  i Tories and in a portion of the Province of  Britib'h Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in urisurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself. ���������  .Each ���������application must be accompanied by a  fee1 of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A'rbyalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents pec ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco"nting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available, surface rights may be  : considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  'For full information   application should be  . made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  ���������   N.B.���������Unauthorized publication of thiB advertisement will not be paid for.���������30G90.  'Twas Ever "Thus.  There is'a tendency to overlook the fact that the government is composed of ordinary  human beings���������some, of them  very ordinary. Few of the members were selected because of  their ability to handle the affairs of the nation even in peace  times���������few, indeed,, are of the  calibre to fill the breaches which  are demanding men of great  capacity today.���������Financial Post  of-Canada.  ; Which  seem  to say much in  little space.  The American corn crop is reported favorable from a majority  of the big producing states.  ' BUSINESS CARDS        \  Watch Repairs  Send your watch to us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.  - A price given before proceeding-with work.- If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.  OB. ALLAN  Diamond Merchant���������Optician  Granville and Pender,Vancouver; B.C.  ID H  JOE  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Far Saley Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  \o\rn  nor:  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DZSTSICT   Or   COAST���������BAHOE   IH.  Take notice that I, Frank Inrig, of  Wadhams, B. C, occupation eannery-  man, .intend to apply for permission  to lease the following described land:  Commencing at a post planted ut the  southweBt corner of Lot 1041 on Goose  Bay, Rivers Inlet, thence eastliOchains,  thence south 20 chains, thence west 20  chains to the shore, thence following  the shore line to the place of com  mencement.  FRANK INRIG.  August 25th, 1917.  Sep. 1-Nov. 3.  nrrnwiw iiwi'mif-  PRINCE RUPERT EXHIBITION  September 19-20-21  Greatest Agricultural and Industrial Show in the  North.        Over $3000 in. Cash Prizes  GRAND INDIAN BAND CONTEST  Baseball ��������� Football ��������� Water Sports  Particulars   to   be   had from   the   Secretary at   Prince Rupert  w  HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?    (  YlfHAT person so independent?  ^WTHAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  C~TD  THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  *��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who "knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and. needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  B  c=3|  1                     . 1  SUBSCRIPTION   RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $'.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  ft tf$A 4  BELLA C66LA C6VM������&  m o  HOE  Subscribe  for the  "Courier"  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  AMHERST  Solid Leather  BOOTS  *Ssfi  h������&  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland, coasi: between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  N90202  For Miners  Loggers  Fishermen  Prospectors  are in a class by them-  : selves  They have been tried-and:  tested for over Fifty Years  and have not been disappointing.  It will he to your interest to'keep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"   .  GIVES THEM.  "  ASK YOUR MERCHANT FOR AMHERST  "HOME-MADE" BRAND  Amherst Boot & Shoe Co.  AMHERST HALIFAX REGINA  ADVERTISERS  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. . No manufacturer or wjholesaleho.use can  afford to! let slip-the opportunity1 of ' increased  sales that public advertising brings.  A  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  J  nting  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do* it right.  BUILD UP, YOUR HOME  TOWN. ;Db not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  TALE OF THE BUFFALO.  The buffaloes found in the telegraph poles   of   the   Overland  Line a new source of delight on  the treeless prairie���������the novelty  of having something to scratch  against.    But it was quite,ex-  pensive scratching for the telegraph company, and there, indeed was the rub, for the bisons  shook down miles of wires daily.  A bright idea struck somebody  to send.to St. Louis and Chicago  for all the bradawls that could  be purchased,-- and" these were  driven into the poles, with a view  to wound the animals and stop  their rubbing propensity.,.Never  was a greater mistake.   The buffaloes were delighted.    For the  first time they came to the scratch  sure of a sensation in their thick  hides that thrilled  them from  horn to tail.    They would go fifteen  miles to  find a  bradawl.  They fought battles around the  poles containing them, and the  victor would proudly climb the  mountainous heap of his fallen  companions and scratch himself  into bliss until the bradawlbroke  or the pole came down.    There  has been no demand for bradawls  from   the   Kansas region  since the first invoice.  Russia is on rations. A wheat  embargo exists in Argentina.  Australia, New Zealand, and India are out of reach of Great  Britain because of the shortage  of ships.    If has fallen to the  United States  and , Canada to  beat the German blockade and  c  feed Great Britain, the Allies,  and the armies in the field.  " LIFE. AT.THE FRONT���������Continued  from page three.  off and threw  them  into the  river, then jumped in after and  washed them out.   By this time  the rain had stopped and a very  strong wind was blowing and it  was not long after putting the  wet clothes on that they were  fairly dry after running about a  bit   We came on the rest of the  way that, morning and were in  time to see the 4th Divisional  sports^and I am almost sure that  I saw John Nygaard "running in  one of the relay races, but owing  to the tremendous crowd I was  not able to locate him after the  race.   Today I have been orderly-sergeant and  certainly have  been kept on the go.    We got up  at (S a. m.. had breakfast at 6-15  and a work party had to be got  ready to move off at seven.    Kit  inspection at a quarter to eight  and at nine, one hour's drill. At  ten all hands went to a large  steam boiler and had all clothing  fumigated, and at eleven all who  had not beep inoculated within  the last twelve months had to be  done overaVain.    I, fortunately,  was not among the bunch.    At  1:30  there   was  instruction at  bayonet fighting and ��������� at three  o'clock thepaymasteropened his  heart and gave us our pay.  Ames Holden McCready Ltd.  Vancouver, B.C.  0  LEADING WHOLESALERS IN BOOTS,  SHOES  A.ND' RUBBERS   FOR   MEN,  WOMEN AND CHILDREN. ...  i  Largest Manufacturers of Boots and  Shoes in Canada   ;7. '  -���������  Just a Few of Our Exclusive Specialties  THE GOAL EVERBEARING APPLE.' The only everbearing  apple in existence. A delicious all-the-season fruit. Fine  tree, each, $1.00.  THE VANDERPOOL RED APPLE.   The great export apple  -  and keeper.-    Each, 50c.  THE ORENCO APPLE. - The best dessert apple.    Each, 50c.  THE YAKIMENE PEACH-APRICOT. A remarkable combination of the; apricot and peach.   Hardy.    Each, $1.00.  THE VRbOMAN FRANQUETTE WALNUT. Produces food  of great nutritious, value on a highly ornamental tree.  Each$l.  THE SOUVENIR* EVERBEARING RASPBERRY. The great-  est everbearer.    Hundred, $14.00.  SPECIAL   SAMPLE   OFFER  We will send prepaid to your nearest station next Spring one of each of  these splendidtrees and a dozen Souvenir Raspberrieson receipt of a $6.00  eipt  the  bill, or CO. D. $5.50.   Orders should be placed NOW for these or any  other of our well-known stock.   We do not ship into the interior in the Fall  -It is MOST IMPORTANT that order* be a������nt In AT ONCE-tho  stock must be reserved NOW.  N.B.-  the British Columbia Nurseries Co., Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  1493 SEVENTH AVENUE WEST  Nurseries at Sardls  j  Courier  1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  m \s  lOL  la  HTHE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  (T  Burns;  bacon  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioned  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  CLUB OFFER  "H  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier  $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg 1.50  ���������:���������    for  $2.50  Both papers   '  .  $2.00  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for  .  .   $2.00  The Courier   .       .  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  ��������� 1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for  .   .   $1.75  -J 1   ^  1L  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  :i  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA  BeBrymldsen  LEADING   DEALERS  IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOrTsTOVf^  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  ^omenXand Children's Shoes  iii all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������   ������  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospe&ors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  oar stock. Nothing but the moft suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stocky  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  kuia  4  1     ^Tj-l  '%  Jt*fifa.  1 *$$  M  5  i -ii.  *&  1   K?lWA  ���������^ iflffJL'

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