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Bella Coola Courier Aug 18, 1917

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IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT
VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-
LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.
WEATHER REPORT FOR JUNE
Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the
Bella Coola Observatory.
Temperature: Maximum, 64.   Minimum, 43.
Highest Max. (14th)82. Lowest Min. tilth) 20
Rainfall, 2.42.
Rainfall for the year (1916) -40.89 inches.
VOL. 5—NO. 35
BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 1917.
$1.00 a Year
War News for the Week
Wednesday: London.-Few changes reported'on the battlefront
today. In France and Belgium sharp local engagements. German raidjng parties in Champagne repulsed. In Flanders, both
Anglo-French and Germans apparently resting in preparation of
further infantry activity. French again repulsed Germans along
*Aisne front. Ofiicically staled, number of lives reported lost on
B.'ithh m irchant vessels from beginning of war to June 30—9748.
2828 passengers, 5920 officers and seamen. ■ British destroyer stink
by mine in North Sea, captain, two officers and 43 men saved.
China has declared war upon Germany and Austria-Hungary.
Rome.--Pope Benedict issues another peace proposal. Reduction of armament, freedom of seas, and international arbitration,
are the foundation stones of his peace proposal.- Suggests restoration of Belgium, Serbia and Roumania.
Ottawa.-Whole new Canadian army be mobilized before end of
year. First call to colors for hundred thousand recruits be made
early in September.
Thursday:   London.-Peace proposal fails to meet with any
favor.   London press generally hostile to plans laid down by Popp.
Status quo anti-settlement would leave Germany victor.   Pope's
efforts bound to have effect.   Austrian court been  in   constant
touch with Vatican.   Holland hears Germany will make no move
until Octobar., International  situation in  Germany said to be
growing steadily worse.   By capturing first'line of German trenches in outskirts of Lens, British are closing in on that city today.
British and French resumed attack in Flanders.   American troops
marched through London today and were reviewed by Ambassa7
dor Page and King George, great crowds thronged the streets
which were decorated profusely "with American flags.   "We are
,»'• fighting for one thing,  victory of democracy over aggression,"
declared Lloyd Georgein an address today, premier's utterance
- regarded as an informal reply to the Pope's plans.    Labor men
may force election, Lloyd George ready to appeal to country if
party insists on sending delegates to Stockholm. ^Arthur Henderson named by labor party to discuss peace terms with enemy representatives.   Battle of Putna most.stubbornly contested of the
' entire operations on the Roumanian front.   Nine enemy divisions
' shattared.   Massed attack continued without interruption for four
. days and nights.
Rome.-Italian public regard with mfsfavor the initiative taken
by the Pope in putting forth peace proposals.
Paris.-French attacked in Belgium last night and made considerable advance in region of Dixmude road. Germans directed
heavy artillery fire against French first lines on Aisne front between Hurtebise and Craonne. On Verdun front French repulsed
German attacks, elsewhere quiet.
Washington.—Great war must go on until Germany is willing
to talk reparation, restoration and guarantees. United States
government stands with Allies in determination to fight until
their objectives secured. Pope's appeal made no change in war
aims of this country, State Department announced today. With
approval of President Wilson, food administration today announced
formation of a corporation to take- over the control of the country's grain supply. Dr. Jean.Sutzer, recently appointed minister
to United States from Switzerland, arrived today.
Plot Discovered for
Restoration of Czar
Petrograd, Aug. 17.—A counter revolutionary plot, having as
its object the restoration of the
Czar to the throne, was discovered and squashed. It is believed
former czar and family now en-
route to Siberia.
bRIC-GEN.  JOHN
PERSHING,
From a late photograph of the
commander of America's   -
forces in France.
Ex-Czar Removed
Petrograd, Aug. 16.—Former
emperor Nicholas and family being transferred to another point.
Removed in. an ordinary .-train
instead of gorgeous imperial
train. Facts which prompted
removal to be announced later.
Departure followed several se
cret sessions of council. '.
Berlin, -Aug! 17.—Refusal of
Entente powers to grant passports to Stockholm conference
show that England and America
are determined upon Germany's
destruction.
of that year and shared in the
life and hardships of the first
settlers.
From the time he was a young
man Mr. Carlson is known to
have.taken an active part in the
work of the' church and his interest in all which would further
the kingdom of God and righteousness only increased with his
years. His interest in missions,
temperance and prohibition is
well known, not only here but in
the United States where he formerly resided. He took ah active
part in the temperance movement of the early eighties in the
States and was not only an active
and' interested woi'ker in the
cause, but in fact one of the
pioneers of the movement in the
States and here.
Studious in'his habits and a
great reader, Mr. Carlson became
in the province.
Washington,Aug. 17—Department of Justice stated today it is
prepared to deal severely with
activities in northwest of I. W. W'.
in so far as they relate to stop- i iterested. early in politics and
page or curtailment of produc- public, affairs and was always
tion in industries whose continu- Prominent as a'leader frcm the
„*■:„- •, j      -j i.- i a   i.u    first days of the colony.    By'his
ation is deemed essential tothei  ,...,. '.    „ ;,,    t,
,. „ ,   abilitics-in the use ot the Eng
prosecution of war.    Party lead-
News from Kimsquit is that
they have more salmon that can
be comfortably handled at the
canneries. .The Manitou plant
had to send fish away to the Kil-
dala cannery at Rivers Inlet to-
be put up. The Draney Fisheries cannery have all they can do
to get away with the fish from
the gill nets, the seine fish is being taken to Namu for canning.
ers plan to throttle peace talk in
the Senate.
New York, Aug. 17—Speculation in sugar, which has been advancing in price for months, was
banned .in - the New York- coffee
and sugar exchange today at the
instance of the food controller!,
Amsterdam, July 16—The suppressed newspaper-Zukunft, edited by Maxmilan Harden, reappeared today and advocated
the restoration of Alsace Lorraine to France and Trieste to
Italy if durable peace can be secured.
. Friday.-Forces'of the Entente at daybreak began another drive
against the troops of Crown Prince Rupprechtof Bavaria, along
wide ■ front from a point at Polygon wood, east of Ypres, to left
of French positions northward. First onslaught on right flank,
French troops charged across Steenbeke river at the same time
left wing pushed forward correspondingly.   Canadians still hold
i
positions dominating Lens. These meagre facts represent total
news from zone of new offensive. According to the Daily News
some wounded American soldiers arrived at the hospital base The
stock of wheat now on hand is sixteen million bushels above that
of lBst year. Premier says: ''England^ food position better than
in many years."   0(nly 16 ships of all tonnage sunk last week.
Paris.-French troops in Belgium^ attacking early today, in conjunction with British, both sides of the road between Steenstraate
and Dixmude and carried all objectives. French made, an attack
in Aisne sector and-.captured' German trenches, on a front of .one
kilometre. Four German counter attacks repulsed. President
Poincaire visiting Italian front as guestof King Emanuel.
Rome.-Four persons killed and twenty-seven injured when
Austrian aeroplanes raided Venice Tuesday. Hospital struck by
bombs, two patients killed and twenty-one injured. j
Vienna.-Four tons of bombs were dropped on the maritime arsenal at Venice, causing a number of conflagrations.
Anti-Conscriptions May
Run Candidates
Montreal, July 16.—Nationalist leader, Henri Bourassa, is expected to hold conferences with
Lavergne and anti-eonscription-
ists to decide if they put candidates in ■ the field at the next
election. Canada has no_respori-
sibility in the war says Montreal
Gazette.
Lady McBride and family have
sailed for Canada, bringing the
ashes of Sir Richard.
B. C. Probably Go
Dry October First
Victoria, Aug.-17.—The legislative assembly opened today
and will deal with the prohibition
question only. The purport of
the premier's resolution on the
prohibition issue would make the
Act effective for October 1st.
There are many possibilites,
however, in coming debate.
Montreal, Aug. 17.- Sir Wilfrid Laurier confined to his home
by illness. Expected to be around
in a day or two, lumbago is the
trouble.'
lish language as well as that of
his mother tongue he has been a"
very-useful citizen, and for that
reason he was' honored with a
number of public oifices.
Mr. Carlson is survived by a
widow and six sons, who mourn
the loss of a kind husband and a
loving father.
The local canneries are working overtime in order to keep
their decks clear, though there
is a shortage in labor at both
plants. The run now in'cohoe
salmon is quite heavy.
The sockeye salmon pack at
Rivers Inlet is approximately as
follows: ,   ■ . ■■'■   ',
Wadhams- -   -   -
11, COO
Strathcona   • -   -
.7.S00
Good Hope    -   -
6,700
Rivers Inlet  -   -
7, £00
Kildala     -   -   -
0,(00
Brunswick     -   -
7,5:00
Beaver      -    -   -
7,800
Provincial     -   -
4, COO
At Smiths In'
et.
allace Fisheries
-   5-01
Fred and Chas. Hendricks and
Orville Robinson came up from
their logging camp for supplies
last Saturday and spent Sunday
in town. They inform us that
logs are wanted by many of the
coast mills and they disposed of interest have erected a new can-
some of their output to the Em- nery this year.
Chambers - - - - 4,000 ■,
The report from Alert Bay is
that the sockeye pack there is
very light. The cannery at Shu-
shartie did not operate for the
early run, but will be cannirg
fall lish; this also applies to Seymour Inlet, where the Bell-Iryirg-
0NT forget to bring in your Subscription
to the Courier—The more support you
give us, the better paper we will give you.
Edmonton, Aug. 17.—The two
Eskimos charged with killing
two priests at Copper Mine river
pleaded guilty. Eskimos declared they were afraid of their lives
following the quarrel. Not sentenced yet.
Joltings of Bella Coola and District
Death of a Well Known Resident.
Christian Carlson, who for the
last six months has been gradur
ally failing in health,'-'died at the
Bella Coola hospital on Saturday
morning, August 11th, and was
interred at the Hagensborgcemetery on Monday last.
Mr. Carlson by sheer force of
will power endeavored, after his
return from undergoing an operation at Victoria, to keep on his
pire Pulp and Paper Mills.   The
logs will be towed to Swanson
Bay. '     " "'~  •
G. J. Sumner came up from'
Vancouver and is on his way to
the Tetachuck Lake region where
considerable prospecting is now
going on.   This part of the province has come into prominence
lately and many of the old time
prospectors are going in there in
'search of minerals.   The country
'is practically unexplored and one
j of the largest, if not the largest,
fresh water lakes in British Co-
feet up to about ten days ago1,     , .   .   , ,     , ., .       ,
■•■■   ,    ,   ,^   .   it      . .   ,T  ' lumbia is here, and yet it is not
when he had to betaken into the
hospital, but it soon became evident that death was not far off,
Mr. Carlson himself seemed to
understand this and was prepared and satisfied to die.
Mr. Carlson was born, near
Ghristiania, Noiway, in 1854 and
emigrated with his parents to
America in  1869.     In 1894, he
The Courier is in receipt of a
very interesting letter frcm Mr.
H. Helgesen, ex-M.P.P., Metch-
osin, which speaks of the good
crops, the revival of business in
general and that the farmers are
doing exceptionally well in his
section of the province, and
closed with a wish to be remembered to all his many Bella Coola
friends.
on any maps of the province.
Another lake, close to the trail,
We hereby wish to express our
deep gratitude to all kind friends
who have helped and comforted
us in our sad bereavement.
Mrs. C. Carlson and boys.
now known as Whitesail Lake is!?
C
*o.<ir>v<r!ffN<8f><M>^irxs8
nearly thirty miles long, was not
c
(Eliitrrij Sfattr?
■    10:45 a. m.
-   7:30 p.m.
known   to  but  a very   few up to J A Sunday School
just recently.    Parties here who, A Church Service
have been through that country j fc     Preacher for7unday_Rev
claim it to be heavily mineral- t W. H. Gibson.
joined the Norwegian colony that jized and contend that it will beljj
settled in this valley in the fall 'equal to anything yet discovered «
9
3
All Are Welcome.
If you want to reach the markets of Northern
Columbia advertise in the Courier.
/THE BEST WEEKLYV
VlN NORTHERN B. C.J
One of the greatest advertising experts of the American continent talking advertising to a friend
said: "A Weekly paper as a rule is small and does not contain much news. But what news it does contain is local and for thai
reason is closely read and thus afford a better medium than many of the larger city dailies for the party that advertises."       i
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BELLA  COOLA  COURIER
Saturday, August 18,   19\7
a
The Courier
Published Weekly at Hella Coola by
the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.
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Subscribers "not receiving their copy
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For Advertising Rates,  Apply at
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To Cokkcspondents—While unobjectionuble anonymous communications will be published, the
' name and addressof every writerof such letters
must be given to the editor.
The Editor reserves the riuht to refuse punli-
catiuii of any letter. All manuscript at writer s
risk. ,
"g>aluu p0}utli Bitprrma est lex."
Saturday, aug. is, wi7.
Economy.
A Victoria publication a short
time ago related the costly neglect of the Bowser-governmcnt
in respect to a powerboat, Falo-
ma, which was bought at a cost
- of, $10,000 and was lying in a
slc-igh' up the Fraser river. It
relates that Premier Brewster in
O
his travels happened to find it
there. This boat, paid for out
■ of the. taxpayers,'money, was
evidently used by the agents of
the government during the election campaign and when the
election was over all hands walked ashore and the ship was left
for the Almighty to take care of.
' However, our prime minister
knows something about steamboats and has had this particular
case attended to.' The Hon. H. C.
Brewster above all other men
must be apprehensive for the
tens of thousands of dollars of
government property that is fast
being destroyed for the want of
being looked after.
The Faloma case is not the j
only sample of the haphazard
fashion in which the late administration kept track of the goods
' purchased   by ' the   taxpayers
money of this province.    We do
not have  to go outside of the
Bella Coola Valley for any evidence of this kind.    From tide
water through  to the Cascade
range of mountains may be found
anything from a road roller to a
cookstove   lying outside   along
the   so-called roads and trails,
and there these expensivethings
are to be found rusting away to
this day.   Several thousand dollars worth of; public property is
rotting away in British Columbia
every month for lack of system
and care, and we have not seen
any signs to alleviate this state
of affairs. ''■■"■■■■
On the hustings politicians
promise that if they are elected
frugality will be their watchword, next to economy. Forget-
fulness is a common disease with
most men and particularly with
politicians. A politician wi
promise almost anything and
forget all things unless it concerns his pocketbopk or that of
his friends. •   ■ .
oooo.o
The late government of this
province did most anything that
;a shrewd administration or any
business firm would not dare to
do.    The bonusing of railways to
the tune of millions, a provincial
building in London at a price' no}
one seems to know, and many
other costly undertakings like
the Strathcona national park,
were so common that people began to look on these things as a
matter of course.
This extravagance is also common in other provincial governments. In Ontario a government
house was built by the Conservatives at a cost of over a million
dollars. On investigation it was
shown that the fixtures for lighting cost $15,000. Afloorrugfor
the dining room cost$1380. The
garage cost $14,000. The front
hall or artirum cost $30,000.
Chairs for the dining room were
$1500 and the curtains $800. A
curtain for the archway in the
ballroom cost $445, and everything else to match in,color and
price. It is also stated that the
construction of this building at
the present time was not required, and further, that a friend of
the Ontario government had air
over abundance of land that he
wanted to'get rid of and in order to help the friend out .this
building was put up. Now these
same politicians are travelling
around in that province lecturing
the people on the need of economy during war times.
*EATS DIRT
..(.n«uc-.'/ i w •;        .. ^"•Ill|'il•ill1'*■.■-"'';
©iLlEflilS
CtEANS-DISINFECTS—USED FOR
SOFTENING WATER—FOR MAKING
HARD AND SOFT SOAR .FUJJ,
DIRECTIONS Wlfff EACH CAN.
Columbia the following may be
worth reading. This new taxation, which is often referred to
' r
as a surtax, will only bring in to
the government if all is collected
$462,000; and it costs the'tax:
payers over $900,000 a year to
pay interest on defaulted bonds
of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. This Bowserian scheme of
building railroads was certainly
some undertaking as the taxpayers will find out as time passes,
another case were the fool and
his money soon part.
Slow Down.
As far as a nation goes in population Canada must be considered small. In natural resources
she is large, and the population
takes advantage of that fact.
Politicians waste millions upon
themselves and their friends.
The housewives are assisting the
men to this extent that $65,000,-
000 is the annual food waste in
Canada in a single year. Now
we are told that food supplies
are essential to the winning of
the war, so it- will1 be up to the
Canadiarh-as a nation to begin
slowing up on throwing good food
into the garbage can, and also
eat less. Large cities are a curse
to any country and state, it is in
A Precedent.
It is interesting at this time
to recall that the first Canadian
statesman to forego partyism in
order to attain an object of national welfare and importance
was George Brown, who joined
a coalition cabinet in order to re-
move the first obstacle to confederation. In 1864, as at present, party government was collapsing in Canada. The leaders
were in much the same quandry
as today, when Brown proposed
a committee of nineteen members of the assembly to consider
the difficulties connected with
national government.  ■
It is recorded that the greal
Libera] of fifty years ago was as
firm in his sense of right as the
opposition today. It was the inflexibility of Brown which caused
violent and frequent clashes
with his own party, a political
manifestation not unknown to
day. Yet Brown suffered the
temporary abdication of his own k
not necessarily forego his Liberal principles to even^the smallest degree. This was indicated
in his famous speech in which he
read out of the Liberal party the
two members of that political
faith who remained in the Mac-
donald cabinet in 1867, Messrs.
William McDougali and, W. P.
Howland. Referring to his own
action in going into the coalition
three years previously, Brown
said: "Sir, I understand what
degradation it was to be compelled to adopt that step by the
necessities of the case, by ,the
feeling that the interests of my
country were at stake, which
alone induced me ever to put my
foot into that government, and
glad I was when I got outof it."
0     o     o     o     o
Business Efficiency Wanted
for Adapting the Land.
■ ' One of the surprises to those
visiting Europe in peace times
is the method by which all lands
are carefully examined and put
to work according to their capacity.- No farmer is permitted
to locate on non-agricultural soil,
and at the same time, good farming soil cannot be retained under
such a crop as timber. Canada
has only made a beginning at
applying "such a policy of business efficiency in the use of the
nation's natural resources.
these that vice of all kinds convictions'for what he conceiv-
flourish and where most of this ed to be the welfare of the coun-
appalling waste of food takes try.   He did'not like coalition.
He had a scorn for Sir John McDonald and distrusted his every
act.     Nevertheless  Brow,n en-
place.
o     c     o     o    o
The New Taxation.
For the benefit of the growler dured a year of coalition, until
about high taxation in British" the crisis was passed.   He did
NEWTON
The Prince ■ Rupert Empire
man, who is a candidate for the
House of Commons for this Riding. "'
, While others stand for what
will benefit their party, hestands
for what will benefit these districts.
Mackay Smith, Biair & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Wholesale
DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS
Manufacturers
OF "PRIDE fOF THE WEST'   BRAND
SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW
"MADE   IN    B. C.
Send for Catalogue
Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders
Thousands of farmers are today tied to farms that only produce a few dollars an acre, their
efforts and ambitions practically
wasted when man power is at a
high premium. Taking Canada's
area, more than two-thirds will
never produce field crops, and
the bulk of the two-thirds will
prove profitable under only one
crop, 'namely timber.
All efforts for the protection
of forests against fire and other
forms of needless waste aim to
keep in a productive condition
those millions of acres that can
n
m
Look for,
the
"Circle V"
Trademark
on,
Every Sack
BEST
<#L«%|
ROYAL'STANDARD |\
VANCOUVER
MILLING &
GRAIN CO. LTD.
Vancouver
Victoria
Nanaimo
New
Westminster
'   Royal Standard is without exception" the most
popular Bread Flour in Western Canada.
It is milled from "No. 1 Canadian Hard Wheat
especially for Home Baking.
Its absolute uniformity—year in and,year out—
great rising power—full strength—more loaves to
the sack—its freedom from lint and dirt—all these
appeal to the housewife.
SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS
m
Compare—price for price—
GREAT  WEST
TEA
n       Iniii— M        a.
with the tea you are now using.
It's Better.
LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.
Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.
101
HOE
]&•
UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF BX., LTD.
REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE
BETWEEN
BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER
S. S.      L&mOSUn.      Leaves  Vancouver  every
Thursday at 11p.m.     (Victoria day previous.)
- Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.
■ S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives,, will call
at Bella Coola by arrangement.-
For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to,
Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,'
agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.
ior~
9 C
hoc
W
Advertise your Wants in the Courier
PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY.
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Saturday, August IB,  1917
BELLA COOLA  COURIER
ft.
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The Cleanest Range
The Kootenay has a nickeled steel,
rust-proof oven that is as easy to wash
, and keep clean as any cooking utensil.
The ash-chute directs all the ashes
into the pan, which is roomy and large
enough to hold a two days' accumulation.   Write for booklet.
McCIaiyfc
KOOTENAY RANGE
LONDON      TORONTO      MONTREAL      WINNIPEG      VANCOUVER
ST. JOHN, N.B.      HAMILTON      CALGARY 14
SASKATOON      EDMONTON
naver grow field crops.   Canada
holds a tremendous national ad-
0
vantage in her forests, but from
the beginning of thelastcentury
about two-thirds of the original
inheritance has been destroyed
by fires: Nearly all modern
countries have put an end to
forest (ires by carefully organized protective, systems.
o    o     o    o     o
Political Neroes.
^ The daily communiques of the
operations on the western front
tell of the lionhearted struggles
of the Canadian troops for the
important city of Lens, while
the daily communiques from Ottawa tell of the political struggle
that is denying the brave lads
urgently needed help. Truly the
professional politicians willhave
a lot to answer for when, the
boys come home.—Windsor Record.
War- Weaxiness in Germany
In' a recent issue of the Swedish Soeial-Demokraten (pro-Ally)
appears the impressions of a
Swedish workman returned from
Germany:    <
''The war-weariness has, of
course, grown greater day by
day. t Now, when children of 18
and old men of 48 are seen driven to the railway stations ^like
fresh beasts fo be slaughtered,
there are no flowers thrown and
no singing any longer. The days
of glory anj jubilation of the
patriotic bluff are at an endeven
in military Germany!. The name
of the Somme even to the Germans is now the great monster
grave, they acknowledge this
themselves. They also* admit
that Germany must return Belgium, the occupied parts of
France, and perhaps Alsace-Lorraine, also.   Such things are, of
PACIFIC MILK
Will go farther than
any other canned- milk
sold in this market."
YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC"
FOOD PRODUCTS  CO., LTD., Manufacturers
Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B.LC.
Prince Rupert Waterfront
Leases.
CbaLED TENDERS for the
*-* purchases of leases of lots
One (1), Two (2) and Five (5),
Block F, in the City of Prince
Rupert, will be received by the
Minister of Lands, at Victoria,
B. C, up to 12 o'clock noon on
Monday, August 27th, 1917.
Tenders may cover one or more
lots. '
Terms of lease, 20 years.
.Certified cheques covering six
months' rental must accompany
each tender, cheques of unsuccessful tenderers to be returned
immediately.
The highest or any tender, not
necessarily accepted.
Tenderers must state what
business they are engaged in
and must designate clearly just
what use they intend to make
of the lot or lots applied for; how
much they intend to expend in
improvements, in what manner
and in what time. '
The following, amongst other,
conditions will be imposed under
the leases:
(a) The front-line of any
wharf erected on any of
these lots must conform to
plans to be seen at the bf-
- fice of the Government
Agent at Prince Rupert or
in the Department of
Lands at Victoria, B. C.
(b) Rent shall be payable in
quarterly instalments in
advance!
G. R. NADEN,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING
"7 ,   REGULATIONS
pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in
*"." MA.NHOBA. Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the North-west Terri-
- TORIES and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term of
twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an
acre.' Not more than 2,560 acres wilt be leased
to one applicant.
' Application for a lease must be made by the
applicant in person to the A«ent or Sub-A»:ent
of th> district in which the rights applied for
. are situated. >
In surveyed territory the land must be described by Bections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant
himself.
' Each application must be accompanied by a
fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights
applied for arc not available, but not otherwise.
A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable oul-
putuf the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person opcrutinK the mine shall furnish
the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the
full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay
the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such returns should be
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining rights
only, but the lessee muy be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be
considered necessary for the working of the mine
at the rate of $10.00 an acre.
For full information   application  should  be
made to the Secretary of the Department of the
Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent
of rAotninion Lands, '"
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.U.—Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.—30690.
Manitoba's First Gold.
The first carload of gold-bear
ing quartz ever shipped from the
province of Manitoba was sent
to be smelted at Trail, B. C. It
was mined at Herb Lake, near
La Pas, in Northern Manitoba.
course, spoken of very cautiously
but I have heard them from soldiers who come from the front,
who are thrown from,one front,
to another in order to break up
discontent by this means."
o    o     o    o    o
 A Just Tribute.
The New York World would
have the United States make a
gift of $1,000,000,000 to France,
as a proof of affection and appre-
jciation of the aid given the co-
i lanials during the American revolution of 1776. It would be
only a just tribute; for, accord-
ing to a recent statement they
received from France $700,000,-
000 at that time, oi which neither the principal nor the interest
thereon was ever asked for or
returned.
Sanity has but one safeguard,
and that is understanding.
o    c
non
HIH
Fur Sales Agency
'600 dealers and trappers of B. C„
Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.
Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20
of the biggest fur buyera in the world
bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market
price always. ,
We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,
sending balance immediately after sale.
Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.
LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES
'.<,     AGENCY, LTD.
54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.
HOE
Land Notices
ear the "Dayfoot"
Solid Leather
Shoe
MADE FOR B. C. WEATHER
G. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y 303 Mercantile Building
Georgetown, Ont. and        Vancouver, B. C.
BUSINESS CARDS
Watch Repairs
Send your watch to^us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.
A price given before proceeding with work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free
of expense. '        ,
O. B. ALLAN
Diamond Merchant—Optician
Granville and Pender,Vancouver, B.C.
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
DISTRICT   OX*   COAST—BANOE   III.
Take Notice that Oliver Handy, of
Chezacut, B.C., occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at' a post planted 120
chains west and 60 chains south of Mile
Post 33, 124th Meridian, thence north
twenty chains, thence east forty chains,
thence south twenty chains, thence west
forty chains to point of commencement.
OLIVER HANDY.
Dated May 25, 1917.
June 23--Aug. 18
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
0>«bs»-o-<
»-0«&S»4>
MXB8BKQ
Comfort and luxury assured at a
; minimum cost.   Many Prince Ru-
per(^testimonials prove its worth
Have You Got $20 7
If not your credit is good,
Harry Hanson
Special Water Heater
(Patented in Canada) .
Installed in your kitchen range
will give you all the hot water
you can use within thirty minutes
after fire is started. .121 now in
use in Prince Rupert and every
user a booster: You don't know
hot water comforts till you have
seen these results. $20.00 is the
Cost. Absolutely no charge unless satisfactory. ■ ■>.'■'■'■
A bath supply within twenty minutes
after fire is'started and then a new supply eoery twenty minutes thereafter.
Wall radiators can also be run from
your hot water, boiler and other rooms
heated pith no extra cost for fuel.        i. "
The Result Will Surprise You
Investigate!
Harry HansonThP%R^le
P. O. Box 395
1'39 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.
DISTSICT   OF   COAST—BANOE   III.
Take Notice that Gilbert Axford, of
Chezacut, B.C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northwest corner of
Lot 1077, Range 3, Coast District,
thence north twenty chains, thence
east twenty chains, thence south twenty
chains, thence west twenty chains to
point of commencement. '  -
GILBERT AXFORD.
Dated, May 19, 1917.
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
DISTBICT   OF   COAST—EANOE   III.
Take Notice that Gilbert Axford, of,
Chezacut, B. C, occupation farmer, in- j
tends to apply for permission to lease :
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted forty
chains east and forty chains south from ■
the southeast corner of Lot 1077, Range
3, Coast District, thence east twenty
chains, .thence south twenty chains,
thence west twenty chains, thence
north twenty chains to. point of. commencement.
GILBERT AXFORD.
Dated, May 19, 1917.
June 23--Aug. 18
/ heMasonCT Jtxischriano
of to-day will make plain our
privilege to stale with authority:
"NO FINER   PIANO MADE!"
SOLD DIRECT By THE MANUFACTURERS
1
tfjf Let us 'attend your Victor Record
jJ mail orders—our service is intelligent •■
and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue
Mason & Risch Ltd.
738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.
-   —   k *%■ -
SUBSCRIPTION  RATES OF
BELLA COOLA COURIER;
Subscriptions Payable in Advance.
.CANADA.
, One! Year	
Six Months ............
Three M6nths>..„	
, .$1.00
.. 0.75
,. 0.50
.         UNITED STATES.
•One Year;.................  $1.50
United Kingdom and the Continent.
One Year  .$1.00
r^
Jo Cnj c
\X7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?
Wo
HAT person so independent?
IX7HAT ambition more noble than to
be a producer of the necessaries
of life?
Bella Coola  farmers are independent;
they are strangers to hard times.
i    1',*. •,-«    ' *   "V.itf   "•'   * V*.tfl»- **-   .
•■<•-'. :;-;^^^-■•'■'-'.•.••. £&'£'"* ■■'■ '
View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.
""THE REASONS for this enviable condi-
■*■ tion of affairs are obvious to anyone
who knows the Bella Coola Valley.
The land is fertile and needs little or no
irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient
rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.
Large and small fruits, garden and field
,crops are grown to the best advantage.
This fact was established at the Prince
Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away
over twenty first prizes.
|ELLA COOLA and the surrounding
country possesses wonderful wealth
in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point
on the Northern Coast is there the same
opportunity for a remunerative invest-
"ment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.
SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.
BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.
BELLA COOLA, B. C.
Enclosed please find	
for Bella Coola Courier for.........
.. subscription
Name..........-...:    .
P. 0..	
Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed
A» A
BELLA COOLA COURIER
Saturday, August 18,  19)7
Subscribe
ONE DOLLAR
FOR ONE YEAR
The. Courier is the only
newspaper published on
the mainland coasl: between Vancouver and
Prince Rupert.
- A distance of six' hundred miles.
■   .
ERST
.eather
It will be to your interest to keeP VteH informed regarding the
happenings throughout
the Northern section of
this Province—
THE "COURIER"
GIVES THEM.
n
a tiers
Loggers
Fishermen
Prospectors
are in a class by themselves
They have been tried and
tested for over Fifty Years
and have not been disappointing.
Ask your merchant for amherst
"home-made" brand
AMHERST HALIFAX
REGINA
ADVERTISERS-
Now is the time to keep
your name before the
public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can
afford to let slip the opportunity of increased
sales that public advertising brings.
NEGLECTING' THE BIBLE.
Quite apart from its moral and
religious hearings, the neglect
of the Bible involves a cultural
x.
handicap worth noting. It involves a cramping of the popular
vocabulary, as no other literary
masterpiece is such a1 well of
English ,pure and undented. It
involves a dullingof literaryper-
DEAL ESTATE booms in the
cities have come and gone.
People are beginning to flock to
the country. The North-West
Coast of British Columbia offers
opportunities for all. Did not
know, is no excuse. Investors
should keep~posted on developments by reading the "Courier."
"THE two pi'incipal reasons
■    why   you   should   buy
"Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,
Lard, etcM are:
FIRST—
There is none better.
SECOND—
They are the only
brands produced in
B. C. under government inspection.
Ask for "SHAMROCK"
BACON
HAMS
Burns;
You are judged by the
stationery that you use.
Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.
DUILD UP YOUR HOME
TOWN. Do not talk—support home industries — talk is
cheap. The best way to show
that you are in earnest is to
practise it.
Support the "Courier" and you
are doing something for yourself
and your community.
BUTTER   EGGS
and keep your money at home.
P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.
Packers and Provisioned
Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton,
ceptions,' as literature abounds
in Biblical allusions which every
reader of the Bible instantly understands, but which only'readers of the Biblee'vercan.   Final-
HARVEST EVERY MONTH.
All through the year wheat is
being harvested. In January it
is cut in the great'fields of the
Argentine and in New Zealand.
In February and March it is cut
in the East Indies and Egypt.
The wheat fields are harvested
in April'in Cyprus, Asia Minor
and Cuba, and in May in China
and Japan. June is the busiest
harvest month of the whole year,
for then Turkey, Greece, Spain
and southern France, as well as
most of the southern states of
America are all cutting wheat,
northerly states of America, and
provinces of Canada, as well as
Austria, Germany and parts of
Russia begin their harvest gathering in' July, August sees the
wheat crop gathered in Great
Britain and September and October for. Sweden ' and Norway.
Peru and South Africa are busy
harvesting in November and December.
ly, it involves a failure to respond
to many a good joke, an astonishing percentage of the best quips
are nothing more or less than
Biblical allusions.
I believe in the Fatherhood of
God and therefore in the Brothei'-
hood of Man." By' 'Man,'' I mean
all men.—Joseph Fells.
< <
Ames Holden McCready Ltd.
Vancouver, B. C.
LEADING WHOLESALERS IN BOOTS,.
SHOES  AND   RUBBERS  FOR   MEN,
WOMEN AND CHILDREN.
Largest Manufacturers of Boots and
Shoes in Canada
y.'/
$1 a Year
Published every
Saturday at
,B.C.
IOE
To make a big catch-
first get your tackle!
IOME call it
"Luck "-and
some  "Experience!"
But one point all
good fishermen agree
on is that our store
is Fishermen's Headquarters. •
For minnows or
sharks—we can lit you
' ;OUt.' '   ■ ■    ■■;'' ;'
Ours is a dandy line
—and  it   will  interest
.you.; ".■ ■
Sportsmen's
Headquarters
■'.. An d ho w
fibout shooting? .
We carry the renowned Remington
UMC line cfeArrns and
Ammunition. A full
fresh stock at all times.
B. BRYNILDSEN & CO.
Just a Few of Our Exclusive Specialties
THE GOAL EVERBEARING APPLE. The only everbearing
apple in existence. A delicious all-the-season fruit. Fine
tree, each, $1.00.
THE VANDERPOOL RED APPLE. ' The great export apple
and keeper.   Each, 50c;
THE ORENCO APPLE.   The best dessert apple.   Each, 50c.
THE YAKIMENE PEACH-APRICOT.   A remarkable combin-'
-   ation of the apricot and peach.   Hardy.   Each, $1.00.
THE VROOMAN FRANQUETTE WALNUT. Produces food
of great nutritious value on a highly ornamental, tree.
Each $1.
THE SOUVENIR EVERBEARING RASPBERRY., The greatest everbearer.    Hundred, $14.00.
SPECIAL   SAMPLE. OFFER
We will send prepaid to your nearest station next'Spring one of each of
these splendid trees and a dozen Souvenir Raspberries on receipt of a $5.00
bill, or C. O. D. $5.50. Orders should be placed NOW for these or any
other of our well-known stock.   We do not ship into the interior in the Fall.
N.B.
-It is MOST IMPORTANT that orders be sent in AT ONCE-the
stock must be reserved NOW.
The British Columbia Nurseries Co., Ltd.
1493 SEVENTH AVENUE WEST       -   ■
Nurseries at Sardls.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
it
O
^
CLUB OFFER
We have pleasure in announcing that we have made*ar-
rangements with two of the leading weekly publications
so that bur subscribers may; have the best of reading at
substantially reduced rates.        ,
The Courier   .  •   .,     .       f \ .'$1.00
Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg i. 50
'■■■'■•'■'■ .'$2.50
The Courier : .   ..;■'.'■'     ;
Canadian Countryman, Toronto
$1,00.
1.50
$2.50"
Both papers
for  . ■■'.  $2.00
Both papers
for.      $2.00
The Courier   .      '.'■      .       i'
Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal .
$1'00    Both papers
'1-00   f~- $1.75
f
or
$2,00
c
The four papers may be had for $4.50.
J
ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.
rynildsen
LEADING   DEALERS   IN
General Merchandise
Dry Goods and Notions
Staple and Fancy
Groceries   >
HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE
CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES
o
Large and well assorted stock
of Men's, Boys' and Children's
Clothing, Shirts and Underwear
We carry the largest and most
up-to-date stock of Men's,
Women's and Children's Shoes
in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings
to suit individual tastes    ®    ®
Tents-Pack a nd Riding Saddles
&
Best Goods—Lowest Prices—Largest Stock
RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD
B.BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B
Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trap-
pers, Campers and Land-Seekers will
find it to their advantage to look over
- our stock. Nothing but the mosT: suitable articles are kept at prices that
invite competition.
Paints -  Oils - Varnishes -  Stains
Crockery and Glassware of all kinds
Patent Medicines of all descriptions
Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts
kept on hand.    Prompt service
a&T&JV
IlillilMtli'iVTr.
SBBSBBSBassaassstBBisa
EffiaSBBH5BfiHEffl5SH
SESBSHBESEHffl '< n\
•o,
I
se
>n$
\RE
VES
:k
s
ir
st
s,
IS
5
ies
fV
"'SI
I      •"£
p**a
'"* ■*-.
you want good sport
[isit bella coola. excel-
:nt hunting and fishing.
&¥3Zr. mmmr-r-=E.   .   nji     ^~'     - ■..-,-"-        r -        ■ I
COU
WEATHER REPORT FOR JUNE
Compiled  by  Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the
Bella Coola Observatory.
Temperature: Maximum, 64.   Minimum, 43.
Highest Max. (14th) 82. Lowest Min. tilth) 30
Rainfall, 2.42.
Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.
)L. 5—NO. 35
BELLA COOLA, B.C., SATURDAY, AUGUST 18,  1917.
$1.00 a Year
War News for the Week
[ay.
ions
orts
Wednesday:   London.-Few changes reported on the battlefront
In France and Belgium sharp local engagements.    Germ-
fraidjng.parties  in   Champagne repulsed.    In Flanders, both
do-French and Germans apparently resting in preparation of
fther infantry activity.    French again repulsed Germans along
fne front.    Officically stated, number of lives reported lest on
tish merchant vessels from beginning of war to June 30—9748.
passengers, 5920 officers and seamen.    British destroyer sunk
line in North Sea, captain, two officers and 43 men saved,
ma has declared war upon Germany and Austria-Hungary,
fame.--Pope Benedict issues another peace proposal.    Reduc-
of armament/freedom of seas, and international arbitration,
Ithe foundation stones of his peace proposal. - Suggests restor-
>n of Belgium, Serbia and Roumania.
fttawal-Whole new Canadian army be mobilized before end of
ir. First call to colors for hundred thousand recruits be made
gly in September.
hursday: London.-Peace proposal fails to meet with any
or. London press generally hostile to plans laid down by Pop«°.
tus quo anti-settlement would leave Germany victor. Pope's
rts bound to have effect. Austrian court been in constant
rch with Vatican. Holland hears Germany will make no move
il Gctobar. International situation in Germany said to be
wing steadily worse. By capturing first-fine of German tren-
s in outskirts of Lens, British are closing in on that city today,
tieh and;French resumed attack in Flanders. American troops
iched through London today and were reviewed by Ambassa-
Page and King George, great crowds thronged the streets
ichWere; decorated profusely with American flags. "We are
ting for one thing, victory of democracy over aggression,"
lared Lloyd George in an address today, premier's utterance
urded as an informal reply to the Pope's plans. Labor men
j force election, Lloyd George ready to appeal to country if
ty insists on sending delegates to Stockholm. Arthur Hender-
named by labor party to discuss peace terms with enemy rep-
entatives. Battle of Putna most stubbornly contested of the
ire operations on the Roumanian front. Nine enemy divisions
"tsred. Massed attack continued without interruption for four
s and nights.
jme.—Italian public regard with misfavor the initiative taken
the Pope in putting forth peace proposals,
aris.--French attacked in Belgium last night and made consid-
l»le advance in region of Dixmude road. Germans directed
ry artillery fire against French first lines on Aisne front be-
in Hurtebise and Ci'aonne.    On Verdun front French repulsed
i nan attacks, elsewhere quiet,
ashington.—-Great war must go on until Germany is willing
•alk  reparation, restoration  and  guarantees.    United States
'yernment stands with Allies in determination to fight until
r objectives secured. Pope's appeal made no change in war
3 of this country, State Department announced today. With
roval of President Wilson, food administration today announced
mation of a corporation to take over the control of the coun-
's grain supply.    Dr. Jean Sutzer, recently appointed minister
United States from Switzerland, arrived today.
Plot Discovered for
Restoration of Czar
Petrograd, Aug. 17.—A counter revolutionary plot, having as
its object the restoration of the
Czar to the throne, was discovered and squashed. It is believed
former czar and family now en-
route to Siberia.
Berlin, Aug. 17.—Refusal of
Entente powers to grant passports to Stockholm conference
show.that England and America
j are determined upon Germany's
destruction.
&RIG.-GEN.   JOHN
PERSHING.
From a late photograph of the
commander of America's
forces in France.
Ex-Czar Removed
Petrograd, Aug. 16.—Former
emperor Nicholas and family being transferred to another point.
Removed in an ordinary train
instead of gorgeous imperial
train. Facts which prompted
removal to be announced later.
Departure followed several secret sessions of council.   ;
Washington, Aug. 17—Department of Justice stated today it is
prepared to deal- severely with
of that year and shared in the
life and hardships of the first
settlers.
From the time he was a young
man Mr. Carlson is known to
have taken an active part in the
work of the' church and his interest in all which would further
the kingdom of God and righteousness only increased with his
years. His interest in missions,
temperance and prohibition is
well known, not only here but in
the United States where he formerly resided. He took an active
part in the temperance movement of the early eighties in the
States and was not only an active
and interested worker in the
cause, but in fact one of the
pioneers of the movement in the
States and here.
Studious in his habits and a
great reader, Mr. Carlson became
in the province.
News from Kimsquit is that
they have more salmon that can
be comfortably handled at the
canneries. The Manitou plant
had to send fish away to the Kil-
dala cannery at Rivers Inlet to
be put up. The Draney Fisheries cannery have all they can do
to get away with the fish from
the gill nets, the seine fish is being taken to Namu for canning.
activities in northwest of I. W.W
in so far as they relate to stop-interested early in politics and
public affairs and was always
.prominent as a leader frcm the
first days of the colony. By his
abilities in the use of the Eng-
prosecution of war.    Party lead- iiah language as well as that of
page or curtailment of production in industries whose continuation is deemed essential to the I
ers plan to throttle peace talk in
the Senate.
New York, Aug. 17—Speculation in sugar, which has been advancing in price for months, was
banned in the New York coffee
and sugar exchange today at the
instance of the food controller.
£A
|V\
lei
Amsterdam, July 16—The suppressed newspaper-Zukunft, edited by Maxmilan Harden, reappeared today and advocated
the restoration of Alsace Lorraine to France and Trieste to
Italy if durable peace can be se-
cured.	
Anti- Conscriptions May
Run Candidates
Jl
C
[Friday.-Forces'of the Entente at daybreak began another drive
ainst the troops of Crown Prince Rupprechtof Bavaria, along
Ide front from a point at Polygon wood, east of Ypres, to left
^French positions northward.    First onslaught on right flank,
ench troops charged across Steenbeke river at the same time
'^-^Llft wing pushed forward correspondingly.    Canadians still hold
t --,*«$j>sitions dominating Lens.    These meagre facts represent total
fx i:iIImSws from zone of new offensive.    According to the Daily News
$ ' tfjfsff'me wounded American soldiers arrived at the hospital base   The
*  .'jxf&ock of wheat now on hand is sixteen million bushels above that
V    ™6f lust year.    Premier says: "England's food position better than
-l. •SpK'Tnany years."    Only 16 ships of all tonnage sunk last week.
sj^Paris.-French troops in Belgium attacking early today, in con-
.^Jtmction with British, both sides of the road between Steenstraate
3'and Dixmude and carried all objectives.     French made an attack
"dti Ai3ne sector and captured German trenches on a front of one
r,'kilometre.    Four German counter attacks  repulsed.   President
• -^Poincaire visiting Italian front as guest of King Emanuel.
F.y Rome.-Four persons  killed and twenty-seven  injured when
•' ? Austrian aeroplanes raided Venice Tuesday.    Hospital struck by
i bombs, two patients killed and twenty-one injured.
$$fH Vienna.-Four tons of bombs were dropped on the maritime ar-
*
l>I|enal at Venice, causing a number of conflagrations
'lit
Montreal, July 16.—Nationalist leader, Henri Bourassa, is expected to hold conferences with
Lavergne and anti-conscription-
ists to decide if they put candidates in ' the field at the next
election. Canada has no responsibility in the war says Montreal
Gazette.
Lady McBride and family have
sailed for Canada, bringing the
ashes of Sir Richard.
B. C. Probably Go
Dry October First
his mother tongue he has been a
very-useful citizen, and for that
reason he was honored with a
number of public offices.
Mr. Carlson is survived by a
widow and six sons, who mourn
the loS3 of a kind husband and a j
loving father.
The local canneries are working overtime in order to keep
their decks clear, though there
is a shortage in labor at both
plants. The run now in cohoe
salmon is quite heavy-
The sockeye sal
mon pack at
Rivers Inlet is app
roximately as
follows:
Wadharr.s- -   -
- 11, COO
Strathcona  "• -
-   7.S00
Good Hope
-   6,700
Rivers Inlet  -
-   7, £00
Kildala      -    -
-   6,(00
Brunswick
-   7,800
Beaver      -    -
-   7,800
Provincial
-   4,E00
At Smiths
Inlet.
Wallace Fisherie
3     -   5,000
Chambers 	
-:■■-   4,000
The report from
Alert Bay is
Fred and Chas. Hendricks and j that the sockeye pack there is
Victoria, Aug. 17.—The legislative assembly opened today
and will deal with the prohibition
Orville Robinson came up from
their logging camp for supplies
last Saturday and spent Sunday
in town.    They inform us  that
very light. The cannery at Shu-
shartie did not operate for the
early run, but will be canning
fall fish; this also applies to Seymour Iniet, where the -Bell-Irving
logs are wanted by many of the
coast mills and they disposed of interest have erected a new can
question only. The purport of some of their outPut to the Em-'nery this year
the premier's resolution on the
prohibition issue would make the
Act effective for October 1st.
There are many possibilites,
however, in coming debate.
Montreal, Aug. 17.- Sir Wilfrid Laurier confined to his home
by illness. Expected to be around
in a day or two, lumbago is the
trouble.
ON'T forget to bring in your Subscription
to the Courier—The more support you
give us, the better paper we will give you.
Edmonton, Aug. 17.—The two
Eskimos charged with killing
two priests at Copper Mine inver
pleaded guilty.    Eskimos declar-
pire Pulp and Paper Mills.    The!    The Courier is in receipt of a
logs will be towed to Swanson | Very interesting letter frcm Mr.
Bay.
G. J. Sumner came up from
Vancouver and is on his way to
theTetachuck Lake region where j general and that the farmers are
H. Helgesen, ex-M.P.P., Metch-
osin, which speaks of the good
crops, the revival of business in
considerable prospecting is now
Jottings of Bella Coola and District
ed they were afraidof their lives going on< This part of the pro.
following the quarrel. Not sen- vince has come into pr0minence
tenced yet. lately and many of the old time
            prospectors are going in therein
', search of minerals. The country
[ is practically unexplored and one
j of the largest, if not the largest.
Death of a Well Known Resident.
Christian Carlson, who for the
last six months has been gradually failing in health, died at the
Bella Coola hospital on Saturday
morning, August 11th, and was
interred at the Hagcnsborgcem-
etery on Monday last.
Mr. Carlson by sheer force of
will power endeavored, after his
return from undergoing an operation at Victoria, to keep on his
fresh water lakes in British Co-
feet up to about ten days ago!lumbia is nerC| ,uuj      t jt is not
when he had to betaken into the, .    , .    ■
•on any  maps  of  the  province.
doing exceptionally well in his
section of the province, and
closed with a wish to be remembered to all his many Bella Coola
friends.
We hereby wish to express our
deep gratitude to all kind friends
who have helped and comforted
us in our sad bereavement.
Mrs. C. Carlson and boys.
hospital, but it soon became evident that death was not far off,
Another lake, close to the trail,
Mr. Carlson himself seemed to , now known as Whitesail Lake is V       QThltl*rh  MllttC£
understand  this and   was  prepared and satisfied to die.
Mr. Carlson was born near
Christiania, Noiway, in 1854 and
emigrated with his parents to
America  in   1869.     In 1894. he
nearly thirty miles long, was not
known to but a very few up to a
just recently. Parties here who ^
have been through that country £
claim it to be heavily mineral-  C
Sunday School
Church Service
10:45 a. m.
7:30 p.m.
Preacher for Sunday—Rev.
W.  tl. Gibson.
f
joined the Norwegian colony that jized and contend that it will be   ' A1, ,
settled in  this valley in the fall'equal to anything yet discovered ■ i*>^ji<*«u-<
Are  Welcome.
9
j
5
to Advertise.       If you want to reach the markets of Northern
§ British Columbia advertise in the Courier,   (^"northe^n^c.)
One of the greatest advertising experts of the American continent bilking advertising to a friend
said: "A weekly paper as a rule is small and does not contain much news. But tdIkiL news it does contain is local and for that
reason is closely read and thus afford a better medium than many of the larger city dailies for the parly that advertises. "
;.:ii4 2
BELLA COOLA  COURIER
Saturdc
The Courier
the tune of millions, a provincial;
| building in London at a price no!
Published Weekly at Bella Coola by lone seems to know,  and  many;
the Bella Coola Publishing Co^Ltd. ; other cogt]y   undertakings   ]ike|
: =z^z.-=--zz.        t^e  gtrathcona   national  park,;
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: j were SQ common  thafc p(k)p]e be_ j
j Year na.*. $1.00 jgan to look on these things as a;
0.75
.EATS DIRT
MADE     IN
CANADA
Wtti&X
6 Montht   	
3 Month* ..   .       °-50
United States
1 Year *l-5°
1 Year.
United  Kingdom
Subscriptions payable in advance
Subscribers not receiving their copy
regularly please notify the management
at once. Changes in address should be
sent.in as soon as possible.
Births, Marriages and Deaths.  50c
per insertion.
For Advertising Rates,  Apply at
Office.
To CORKESPONDE»rrs—While unobjectionable an-
, onyroous communications will be published, the
name and address of every writer of such letters
must be given to the editor.
The Editor reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer's
risk.
'Bnhis pojiult sitprrma tst itx.
SATURDAY, AUG. 18, 1917
Economy.
A Victoria publication a short
time ago related the costly neglect of the Bowser government
in* respect to a powerboat, Palo-
ma, which was bought at a cost
.otjl0,000 and was lying in a
sleigh up the Fraser river.    It
relat'e-£,that Premier Brewster in
his travels- -happened to find it
there.   This boat, paid for out
of, the taxpayers-money,   was
evidently used by the agents' of
the government during the election   campaign   and   when  the
election was over all hands walk-
ed ashore and the ship was left
for the/A.lmighty to take'care of."
However, our prime minister
knows- something about steamboats and has had this particular
case attended to." The Hon. H. C.
Brewster above all other men
must  be apprehensive for the
tens of thousands of dollars of
government property that is fast
being destroyed for the want of
being looked after.
The Faloma case is not the
only sample of the haphazard
fashion in which the late administration kept track of the goods
purchased by the taxpayers
money of this province. We do
riot have to go outside of the
Bella Coola Valley for any evidence of this kind. From tide
water through to the Cascade
range of mountains may be found
anything from a road roller to a
cookstove lying outside along
the so-called roads and trails,
and there these expensivethings
are to be found rusting away to
this day. Several thousand dollars worth of public property is
rotting away in British Columbia
every month for lack of system
and care, and we have not seen
any signs to alleviate this state
of affairs.
On the hustings politicians
"promise that if they are elected
frugality will be their watchword, next to economy. Forget-
fulness is a common disease with
most men and particularly with
politicians. A politician will
promise almost anything and
forget all things unless it concerns his 'pocketbook or that of
his friends.
o     o     o     o     o
The late government of this
province did most anything that
a shrewd administration or any
business firm would not dare to
do.   The bonusingof railways to
matter of course.
This extravagance is also cdta-
mon'in other provincial govern-
*J00 ments.  In Ontario a government
house was  built by the Conservatives at a cost of over a million
dollars..   On investigation itwas
shown that the fixtures for lighting cost $15,000.    A floor rug for
the dining room cost $1380.  The
garage cost §14,000.    The front
hall ,pr  artirum   cost   §30,000.
Chairs for the dining room were
§1500 arid the curtains §800.    A
curtain for the archway in the
ballroom cost §445, and everything else to match in color and
price. t It is also stated that the
construction of this building at
the present time was not required, and further, that a friend of
the Ontario government had an-
over abundance of land that he
wanted to'get rid of and in order to help the friend out this
building was put up.   Now these
same politicians are travelling
around in that province lecturing
the people on the need of econo
my during war times.
GILLETT5
I not necessarily forego his Liberia! principles to evenj.he smallest degree.    This was indicated"
Jin his famous speech in which he
I read outof the Liberal party the
two  members of that political
faith who remained in the Mac-
donald cabinet' in 1867, Messrs.
I William  McDougali and  W. P.
Hovvland.    Referring to his own
action in going into the coalition
■: three years  previously, Brown
'said:   "Sir,  I understand  what
degradation  it was to be compelled to adopt that step by the
Columbia the following may be necessities of the case, by.the
VANCOUVER,  B. c
air & Co. Ltd
CLEANS-DISINFECTS—USED TOR
SOFTENING WATER—FOR MAKING
HARD ANP.SOFT 5GAR: .fjjy,
DIRECTIONS. WlfB EACH CAN,
Wholesale
DRY GOODS AND  MEN'S  FURNISHINGS'
Manufacturers
OF "PRIDE'OF THE  WEST'   BRANn
SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW
Send for Catalogue
MADE    IN    B. C
Prompt Attention G
iv'*n Letter 0rde
iHtfBB
worth reading. This new taxation, which is often referred to
as a surtax, will only bring in to
the government if all is collected
§462,000; and it costs the taxpayers over §900,000 a year to
pay interest on defaulted bonds
of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. This Bowserian scheme of
building railroads was certainly
some undertaking as the taxpayers will find out as time passes,
another case were the fool and
his money soon part.
Slow Down.
As far as a nation goes in population Canada must be considered small.   In natural resources
she is large, and the population
takes advantage of that fact.
Politicians waste millions upon
themselves and   their   friends.
The hbusewives are assisting the
men to this extent'that §65,000,-
000 is. the annual food waste in
Canada in a single year.   Now
we are told that food supplies
are essential to the winning of
the war, so it will be up to the
Canadian as a nation  to begin
slowinguponthrowinggood food
into the garbage can, and also
eat less
A Precedent.'
It is interesting at this time
to recall that the first Canadian
statesman to forego partyism in
order to attain an object, of na-
tional welfare and importance
was George Brown, who joined
a coalition cabinet in order to re-
move the first obstacle to confederation.- In 1864, as at present, party government was collapsing in Canada. The leaders
were in much the same quandry
as today, when Brown proposed
a committee of nineteen members of the assembly to consider
the difficulties connected ..with
national government. .•■
It is recorded that the great
Liberal of fifty years ago was as
firm in his sense of right as;the
opposition today. It was the in*
flexibility of Brown whichcaused
violent and frequent clashes
with his own party, a political
manifestation not unknown to
Yet Brown   suffered the
feeling that the interests of my
country were at stake, which
aloneinduced me ever to put my
foot into that government, and
glad I was when I got outof it."
o     o    o     o     o
Business Efficiency Wanted
for Adapting the Land.
One of the surprises to those
visiting Europe in peace times
is the method by which all lands
are carefully examined and put
to work according to their capacity.   No farmer is permitted
to locate on non-agricultural soil,
and at the same time, good farming soil cannot be retained under
such a crop as timber.    Canada
has only made a beginning at
applying such a policy of business efficiency in the use of the
nation's natural resources.
'M
Thousands of farmers are to-1 the bulk of
n t;
day tied to farms that only;pro-(prove profitable lni(j
duce a few dollars an acre, their! crop, namely umber
efforts and ambitions practically |    All efforts fur the
wasted when man power is at a I of forests against
highpremium.   TakingCanada'sj forms of ntvji.ss
area, more than two-thirds will | keep in a proiluct
never produce field  crops,; an'd] those million of
t*.vo-thirdfi
Tonlv,
protect
'a a.-te
ac'"« Ihi-t-J
tow
Large cities are a curse j day
to any country and state, it is in [temporary abdication of his own jv
these   that   vice   of   all   kinds,convictions for what he conceiv-
flourish and wliere most of this led to be the welfare of the coun-
appalling waste of food takes try.    He did not like coalition.
place.
The New  Taxation.
He had a scorn for Sir John McDonald and distrusted his every
act.     Nevertheless  Brow^n en-
For the benefit of the growler dured a year of coalition, until
about high taxation in British'the  crisis was passed.    He did
NEWTON>
The Prince • Rupert Empire
man, who is a candidate for the
House of Commons for thid Riding-
While others stand for what
will benefi^their party, he stands
for what vvill benefit these districts.
ROYAL
STANDARD
FLOUR
Look for
the
f»
"Circle V
Trademark
on
Every Sack
IKST
IT
.<&!**&
R0TA1 STAXHASD
♦♦uw
%
linr—-""***^!
VANCOUVER
MILLING I
GRAIN CO. LIB.
Vancouver
Victorij
Nanaimo
New
WcMmimter
Royal Standard is without excepn'rn the itch
popular Bread Flour in Western Canada.
It is milled from No. 1 Canadian Hard Wheat
especially for Home Baking.
Its absolute uniformity—year in a:.-: yt-;,rn:.;t-
great rising power—full strength nv-.v,' Ii.av.-= to
the sack—its freedom from lint and dirt -ui! thi-?*
appeal to the housewife.
SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS
_ !
Compare-—-price for price—
GREAT   WEST
TEA
with the tea you are now using,
It's Better.
L&S0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO, Ltd.
Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B.C.
UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C.
SKKVH'l'
REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENOI
BETWEEN
BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER
S. S.   "CamOSUIl"   Leaves   Vancouver every
Thursday at  11   p. m.     (Victoria day previous)
Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.
S. S. "COQUITLAM" sails from Vaiw
nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives
at Bella Coola by arrangement.
ii'.i'i'
hii'i
.-ill i-ai
i.lv l"
For rates of Freights,  Fares and other inf..rin;*t:-'!l- *!,'   ,„•
Head Office, Carrall St.,   Vancouver  ,:'"- ■"' '
ageht,  1003 Government St., Victoria.
>r <.ii-:<>.
PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY
Advertise your Wants in the ConjJ l*   i*-Ok?
,9'r JW&tow&v; ^u^us/ AS, 79/7
. >'*
w
Ml
BELLA  COOLA   COURIER
i'V?
anlyciji
The Cleanest Range
The Kootenay has a nickeled steel,
rust-proof oven that is as easy to wash
and keep clean as any cooking utensil.
The ash-chute directs all the ashes
into the pan, which is roomy and large
enough to hold a two days* accumulation.   Write for booklet.
McQaryS
KOOTENAY RANGE
LONDON      TORONTO       MONTREAL      WINNIPEG      VANCOUVER
ST. JOHN, N.B.     HAMILTON      CALGARY 14
SASKATOON       EDMONTON
\jver grow field crops. Canada I War- Weariness inGermany
olds a tremendous national ad-j In a recent issue of the Swed.
antage in her forests, but from j -sh Social-Demokraten(pro-Ally)
appears the impressions of a
Swedish workman returned from
Germany:
le beginning of the lastcentury
)Out two-thirds of the priginal
iheritance has been destroyed
s'y, fires.      Nearly   all   modern
apuntries  have put  an   end to
forest fires by carefully organ-
>d protective, systems.
00000
Political Neroes.
The daily communiques of the
Iterations on the western front
?ll of the lionhearted struggles
"The war-weariness has, of
course, grown greater day by
day. Now, when children of 18
and old men of 48 are seen driven to the railway stations like
fresh beasts to be slaughtered,
there are no flowers thrown and
no singing any longer. The days
of glory and jubilation of the
f the Canadian troops for the i patriotic bluff are at an end even
iiportant city of Lens, while
he daily communiques from Ot-
iwa tell of the political struggle
[i.at-is denying the brave lads
it gently needed help. Truly the
irofessional politicians will have
in military Germany!. The name
of the Somme even to the Germans is now the great, monster
grave, they acknowledge this
themselves. They also admit
that Germany must return Bel-
lot  to  answer  for when the gium,   the   occupied    parts   of
>ys come home.—Windsor Re- j France, and perhaps Alsace-Lor-
jord.
raine also.    Such things are, of
A  T*
PACIFIC MILK
Will go farther than
any other canned milk
sold in this market. •
YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC"
Prince Rupert Waterfront
Leases.
QeALED TENDERS for the
K-' purchases of leases of lots
One (1), Two (2) and Five (5),
Block F, in the City of Prince
Rupert, will be received by the
Minister of Lands, at Victoria,
B. C, up to 12 o'clock noon on
Monday, August 27th, 1917.
Tenders may cover one or more
lots.
Terms of lease, 20 years.
Certified cheques covering six
months' rental must accompany
each tender, cheques of unsuccessful tenderers to be returned
immediately.
The highest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
Tenderers must state what
business they are engaged in
and must designate clearly just
what use they intend to make
of the lot or lots applied for; how
much they intend to expend in
improvements, in what manner
and in what time.
The following, amongst other,
conditions will be imposed under
the leases:
(a) The front line of any
wharf erected on any of
these lots must conform to
plans to be seen at the of-
- fice   of  the   Government
Agent at Prince Rupert or
in    t h e   Department  of
-,   Lands at Victoria, B. C.
(b) Rent shall be payable in
quarterly instalments in
advance.
G. R. NADEN,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING
"'■■'{       REGULATIONS
pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in
*-' ' Manitoba. Saskatchewan and Alukkta,
the Yukon Territory, the North-west Terri-
• Tories and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term of
tweli-ty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an
acre. ■ Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased
to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by the
appUdant in person to the Afcent or Sub-Afrent
of tHJ; district in which the rights applied for
are situated.
In' surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant
himself.
Each application must be accompanied by a
fee of to which will be refunded if the rights
applied for are not available, but not otherwise.
A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable out-
purof the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall furnish
the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the
full Quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay
the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such returns should be
furnished at least once a year.
•The lease will include the coal mining rights
only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be
considered necessary for the working of the mine
' at the rate of $10.00 an acre.
. For full information application should be
made to the Secretary of the Department of the
Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent
of E>ominion Lands.
W. W. CORY.
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. U.—Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.—30690.
FOOD   PRODUCTS  CO., LTD., Manufacturers
Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
'*5!
••-:■
\ "Vi'i!
is
-pi*.
r i
course, spoken of very cautiously
but I have heard them from soldiers who come from the front,
who are thrown from one front-
to another in order to break up
discontent by this means."
o     o     o     o     o
A Just Tribute.
The New York  World would
.'have the United States make a
| gift of $1,000,000,000 to France,
j as a proof of affection and appreciation of the aid given the co-
jlanials during the American re-
I volution of  1776.    It would be
[only a just tribute; for, accord-
• ing to a recent statement they
'received from France $700,000,-
000 at that time, oi which neither the principal nor the interest
thereon was ever asked  for or
returned.
Manitoba's First Gold.
The first carload of gold-bearing quartz ever shipped from the
province of Manitoba was sent
to be smelted at Trail, B. C. It
was mined at Herb Lake, near
La Pas, in Northern Manitoba.
Sanity has but one safeguard,
and that is understanding.
nor:
Fur Sales Agency
600 dealers and trappers of B. C,
Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.
Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20
of the biggest fur buyers in the world
bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market
price always. '
We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,
sending balance immediately after sale.
Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.
LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES
AGENCY, LTD.
54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.
nor
Wear the " Day foot"
Solid Leather
Shoe
MADE FOR B. C. WEATHER
G. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y 303 Mercantile Building
Georgetown, Ont. and Vancouver, B. C.
Land Notices
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
BUSINESS CARDS
Watch Repairs
Send your watch to.us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.
A price given before proceeding with work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free
of expense.
O. B. ALLAN
Diamond Merchant—Optician
Granville and Pender.Vancouver.B.C.
s
When You Need
Coffee
Specify
NABOB
Kelly, Douglas & Co.LtdL
VANCOUVER,
B. C.
DISTRICT   OP   COAST—BANGS   III.
Take Notice that Oliver Handy, of
Chezacut, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 120
chains west and 60 chains south of Mile
Post 33, 124th Meridian, thence north
twenty chains, thence east forty chains,
thence south twenty chains, thence west
forty chains to point of commencement.
OLIVER HANDY.
Dated May 25, 1917.
 June 23-Aug. 18
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
DISTRICT   OF   COAST—RANGE   III.
Take Notice that Gilbert Axford, of
Chezacut, B.C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northwest corner of
Lot 1077, Range 3, Coast District,
thence north twenty chains, thence
east twenty chains, thence south twenty
chains, thence west twenty chains to
point of commencement.
GILBERT AXFORD.
Dated, May 19, 1917.
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
Oh
HH
Comfort and luxury assured at a
minimum cost. Many Prince Ru-
perCtestimonials prove its worth
Have You Got $20?
If not your credit is good
Harry Hanson
Special Water Heater
(Patented in Canada)
Installed in your kitchen range
will give you all the hot water
you can use within thirty minutes
after fire is started. 121 now in
use in Prince Rupert and every
user a booster. You don't know
hot water comforts till you have
seen these results. $20.00 is the
Cost. Absolutely no charge unless satisfactory.
A bath supply within twenty minutes
after fire is started and then a new supply) every twenty minutes thereafter.
Wall radiators can also be mn from
your hot water boiler and other rooms
healed with no extra cost for fuel.
The Result Will Surprise You
Investigate!
Harry HansonThP0,u^H^,e
t P. O. Box 395
I   139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.
DISTRICT   OP    COAST—RANGE   III.
Take Notice that Gilbert Axford, of ,
Chezacut, B. C, occupation farmer, in- J
tends  to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands: j
Commencing at a post planted forty j
chains east and forty chains south from ;
the southeast corner of Lot 1077, Range
3, Coast District, thence east twenty
chains, thence south twenty chains,
thence west twenty chains, thence
north twenty chains to point of commencement.
GILBERT AXFORD.
Dated, May 19, 1917.
June 23-Aug. 18
I he Mason (jr txischriano
of to-day will make plain our
privilege to state with authority:
"NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"
SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS
mu
r-iii
IT!
m
m
Mjj  Let us attend  your Victor  Record
^1  mailorders—our service is intelligent •
and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue
Mason & Risch Ltd.
738 GRANVILLE ST.,  VANCOUVER, B. C.
i   „ i
r^h
\X7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?
\117HAT person so independent?
117HAT ambition more noble than to
be a producer of  the necessaries
of life?
Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent;
they are strangers to hard times.
View of a ranch in Bella Coola Vallev.
CZID
THE REASONS for this  enviable  condi-
■*•   tion of  affairs   are   obvious  to   anyone
who knows the Bella Coola Valley.
The land is fertile and needs little or no
irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient
rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.
Large and small fruits, garden and field
crops are grown to the best advantage.
This fact was established at the Prince
Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away
over twenty first prizes.
OELLA COOLA and the surrounding
country possesses wonderful wealth
in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point
on the Northern Coast is there the same
opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola-
1                        I
1     1
SUBSCRIPTION   RATES OF
BELLA COOLA COURIER.
Subscriptions Payable in Advance.
CANADA.
One Year $1-00
Six Months   0.75
Three M6nths  0.50
UNITED STATES.
'One Year  $1-50
United Kingdom and the Continent.
One Year $L00
r.n *   "ii i r r hit ■"■t- in mr ■ n nri «
SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.
BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO.,   LTD.
BELLA COOLA.  15. C.
Enclosed please find subscription
for Bella Coola Courier for	
Name	
P. O	
Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed V
BELLA COOLA  COURIER
■   Saturday,  AUa.
ONE DOLLAR
FOR ONE YEAR
The Courier is the only
newspaper published on'
the mainland .coasT between Vancouver and
Prince Rupert.
-   A distance of six hundred miles.
ASK YOUR MERCHANT FOR AMHERST
"HOME-MADE" BRAND
Amherst Boot &Shoe
AMHERST HALIFAX REGINA
HARVEST EVERY MONTH.
All through the year wheat is
j being harvested.    In January -it
is cut in the great fields of the
Argentine and in New Zealand.
In February and March it is cut
in the East Indies and Egypt;
The wheat fields are harvested
in April in Cyprus, Asia Minor
and Cuba, and in May in China
and Japan.   June is the busiest
harvest month of the whole year,
for then Turkey, Greece, Spain
and southern France, as well as
most of the southern states of
America are all cutting wheat,
northerly states of America, and
provinces of Canada, as well as
Austria, Germany and parts of
Russia begin their harvest gathering in July,  August sees the
wheat crop  gathered  in  Great
Britain and September and October for. Sweden   and  Norway.
Peru and South Africa are busy
harvesting in November and De
cember.
I
ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOL A is
Brynil
. // will be. to your interest 'to ^ep well in-      NEGLECting the bible.
formed  regarding   the   Quite apaft from its moral and
happenings thrOUghoutireKgious hearings, the neglect
the Northem Section 0/|°f the B'Me involves a cultural
±1 •    D -  ■ *•     ~ -   handicap worth noting.    It in-
thxsrrovince-^- .     F *-     .
volves a cramping of the popular
Trie.    COUKIH.K vocabulary, as no other literary
GIVES   I rIfc«M. masterpiece is  such a well of
English pure and undefiled.    It
involves a dullingof literary per
ADVERTISERS-
Now is the time to keep
your name before - the
public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can
afford to let slip the opportunity, of increased
sales that public advertising brings.
ceptions, as literature abounds
in Biblical allusions, which every
reader of the Bible instantly understands, but which only readers of the Bible ever can.  -Final
ly, it in volves a failure to respond
to many a good joke, an astonishing percentage of the best quips
are nothing more or less than
Biblical allusions.
I believe in the Fatherhood of
God and therefore in the Brotherhood of Man. By ' 'Man,'' I mean
all men.—Joseph Fells.
LEADING   DEALERS
General Merchandise
Dry Goods and Notions
Staple and Fancy
Groceries
DEAL ESTATE booms in the
cities have come and gone.
People are beginning to flock to
the country. The North-West
Coast of British Columbia offers
opportunities for all. Did, not
know, is no excuse. Investors
should keep~posted on developments by;reading the "Courier."
J
ing
You are judged by the
stationery that you use.
Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.
IDUILD UP YOUR HOME
TOWN. Do not talk—support home industries— talk is
cheap. The best way to show
that you are in earnest is to
practise it.
Support the "Courier" and you
are doing something for yourself
and your community.
The Courier
$1 a Year
Published every
Saturday at
BELLA COOLA, B. C.
""THE two. principal reasons
1   why   you   should   buy
"Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,
Lard, etc., are:-
FIRST—
There is none, better.
SECOND—
They are the only
brands produced in
B. C. under government inspection.
Ask for "SHAMROCK"
Ames Holden McCready Ltd.
Vancouver, B. C.
Burns;
.BACON
HAMS
LARD
BUTTER   EGGS
and keep your money at home.
P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.
.Packers and Provisioned
Calgary    Yanconyer    Edmonton
i
=j      LEADING WHOLESALERS IN BOOTS,
SHOES  AND   RUBBERS   FOR   MEN,
J                WOMEN AND CHILDREN.
u
Largest Manufacturers of Boots and
" ~ Shoes in Canada
HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE
CAMP. HEATING AND  COOK STOVES
Large and well assorted stock
of Men's, Boys9 and Children's
Clothing, Shirts and Underwear
vv /y/;
To make a big catch-
first get your tackle!
SOME call it
"Luck"-and
some  "Exper-.
lenceP*
But one point all
good fishermen agree
on is that our store
is Fishermen's Head-
Quarters.
For minnows or
sharks—we can fit you
out.
Ours is a dandy line
—and it will interest
you.
Just a Few of Our Exclusive Specialties
THE GOAL EVERBEARING APPLE. The only everbearing
apple in existence. A delicious all-the-season fruit. Fine
tree, each, $1.00. ; .-•■■.
THE VANDERPOOL RED APPLE.    The great export apple
- and keeper.    Each,.50c;
THE ORENCO APPLE.   The best dessert apple.    Each, 50c.
THE YAKIMENE PEACH-APRICOT.   A remarkable combin-
:r- ation of the apricot and peach.    Hardy.    Each, $1,00.
THE VROOMAN FRANQUETTE WALNUT. Produces food
of great nutritious value on a highly ornamental tree.
Each$l.
THE SOUVENIR EVERBEARING RASPBERRY. The greatest everbearer.    Hundred, $14.00.
SPECIAL   SAMPLE. OFFER
We will send prepaid to your nearest station next Spring one of each of
these splendid trees and a dozen Souvenir Raspberries on receipt of a $5 00
bill, or-C. O. D. $5.50.   Orders should be. placed NOW for these or any
other of our well-known stock.   We do not ship into the interior in the Fall
:     M.B.-lt is MOST IMPORTANT that orders be sent in AT ONCE-the
1 stock must be reserved MOW.
The British Columbia Nurseries Co., Ltd.
We carry the largest and most
up-to-date stock of Men's
Women's and Children's Shoes
in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings
to suit individual tastes
'»   $
Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles
1493 SEVENTH AVENUE WEST
Nurseries at Sardis.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
& [c
HOE
0 in
REHiNGtpi
Sportsmen's
Headquarters
And how
about shooting?
We carry the re-
5?T°wned Remington
UMC line of Arms and
Ammunition. A full
fresh stock at all times.
B. BRYNILDSEN& CO.
Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trap
pers, Campers and Land-Seekers wil.
find it to their advantage to look over
our stock. Nothing but the most suitable articles are kept at prices thai
invite competition.
(t
CLUB OFFER
"\
We have pleasure in announcing that we have made'ar-
rangements with two of the leading weekly publications
so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at
substantially reduced rates.
The Courier $1.00
Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg   l 50   Bot}l paPers
 for   .   .   $2.00
$2.50
The Courier   .
Canadian Countryman, Toronto
$1.00
1.50
$2.50
Both papers
for  .   .   $2.00
The Courier   ..... $1.00
Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal . . i.oo
$2.00
Both papers
for   .   .   $1.75
vk.
The four papers may be had for $4.50.
Paints -   Oils  - Varnishes   -  Stains
Crockery and Glassware of all kinds
Patent Medicines of all descriptions
Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts
kept on hand.    Prompt service
1 Best Goods—Lowest Prices   Largest Stocky
RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD
B.BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.
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