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Bella Coola Courier 1916-10-28

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 ���������kk  "It  #  i  5  Li-  (''������?���������.  -!������#  W  la*?..  .t i  ;*'<?���������:  yf7  ^^^S^^Ill^MUUl^|^llUUlUg^ftlUrfl������7i)('|'(tUXUM������mj^  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR SEPT.  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature.- Maximum, 65.   Minimum, 42.  Highest Max. i'15th)84. Lowest Min. (27th) SO  Rainfall, 1.95 inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915) 34.33 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 3  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY; OCTOBER 28,, 1916.  $1.00 a Year  French Attacking  on Verdun Front  .Capture Forts and 3500 Men  ���������.���������. ��������������������������� m  London, Oct. 26.���������The French  maintained the important ground  they won yesterday north of Verdun.    Last night, parts fii the  regained territory which includes  Fort Douamount and stretches  along a front of more than four  miles and ut points nearly two  miles inside the former German  lines, were subjected to counter  attacks���������but we held the ground  repuhung all   German  assaults  which were delivered chiefly on  the forts.     French troops recaptured Handromant quarries,  west of Douamont, and Domlop  batteries   southeast   of   Vaux.  Commander of Fort Douamont  was among the prisoners taken  by the French, who in their preliminary report, placed at 3500  men.   Fort Vaux is still in Ger-  man'hands, but Erench lines run  beyond it on both sides.   Rain is  interfering in the operations on  the Somme front.  Berlin, Oct. 26.���������War office announced that ih the attack on the  Verdun front by FrencYyester-  day, the enemy gained sonie  ground from them. French assaults on the Somme front were  unsuccessful. -  Roumanians Evacuate  Tchernavoda  , Petrograd, Oct. 26.���������Roumanians and Russians evacuated  Tchernavoda in Dobrudja, Mac-  kensen's army continuing attack  alongDobruja front. Russo-Rou-  manian position on lake Tachaul  ���������near Black Sea coast, 12 miles  north Constanza, also evacuated.  Berlin, "Oct. 26.��������� In Dobruja,  the pursuit of-Russians and Roumanians continue, Tchernavoda  captured this morning, depriving  the enemy of her la3t railroad  connections in Dobrudja.  Bucharest, Oct. 26.���������Further  retirement by Roumanian forces  on Transylvania front. Roumanians near Predeal and Kim-  polongwere forced back slightly.  Berlin, Oct: 26.-���������Vulcan pass,  Transylvanian front, captured  by Von Falkenhayn's army.  Petrograd, Oct. 26.���������South of  Dorna Watra near frontier, junction of Bukowina, Transylvania  and Roumania, Russians dislodged Austro-German forces from  series of heights taking prisoners and two machine guns.  London, Oct. 27���������Lloyd George  in the House of Commons said:  "We and our Allies doing everything possible to help Roumania.  Paris, Oct. 26���������Italian cavalry  from Southern Albania formed  junction yesterday with cavalry  and artillery of entente forces  on Macedonian front.''  Roumanians Drive  Enemy Over Frontier  Petrograd, Oct. 27.��������� Pressure  of Mackensen's army in Dobrudja against the Russian and Roumanian forces weakened somewhat; On Transylvania front,  Roumanians arrested the progress,of superior enemy forces.  London, Oct. 27.���������Is reported  from Bucharest that after evacu-,  ation of Tchernavoda by Russo-  Roumanian troops the bridge over  the Danube at that place was  blown up by Roumanians.  Bucharest, Oct. 27.���������Roumanian,troops captured Mount Kerev-  haras, Oitu valley, fighting continues beyond Roumanian frontier. Austro-German forces are  now being driven everywhere  beyond western frontier of Moldavia, their losses very heavy.  Nothing new reported from Dobrudja.    i ������������������  Paris, Oct. 27���������French cavalry  on the Macedonian front, supported by infantry, occupied two  villages southwest of Lake' Doi-  ran yesterday. Serbians threw  back German and Bulgarian  forces in. the region of Cerna.  Villages occupied now by French  are Golobrvda and Laisitsa, our  troops also took the bridge of  Zvezda.      "���������''"  London, Oct. 27.���������Attacks on  Constantinople-Saloniki railroad  by British aeroplanes inflicted  considerable damage.'   . i  Petrograd, Oct. 27.���������Russian  troops in wooded Carpathians  successfully withstanding, all  Teutonic assaults. Attacks on  the heights northwest.of Capul  mountain haye been repulsed.  Paris, Oct. 27.���������German artillery shelled positions captured  by French in region of Vaux and  Douamount on the Verdun front.  German's undertook no infantry  attacks.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  S. S. Camosun arrived at 5 o'clock on Sunday afternoon and  was met by the usual concourse  of sightseers. She brought a  considerable lot of merchandise  goods for the merchants and  others, and some passengers,  among whom were noticed T..G.  Garrett, B. W. Fleming, A. C.  Christensen, Tom and Charles  Crawford, and Miss Bengtson.  Among the outgoing passengers were J. G. Walker, Thorv\ald  Jacobsen, Hans Casperson, and  Paul Olson.  to Bella Coola.  Berlin's Report  of Vessels Sunk  Berlin, Oct. 27���������Admiralty announces that during September  141 hostile merchantmen, aggregating a tonnage of 182,000, were  sunk or brought in1 by our submarines. Thirteen captains of  hostile ships were taken prisoners. In addition, 39 neutral merchant ships, aggregating 72,600  tons, were sunk carrying contraband.  Norwegian Vessels Sunk  London, Oct. 26.- Five more  Norwegian steamships, valued at  five million , krones, have been  sunk by German submarines.  Norwegian Officials Arrive  This community is having the  pleasure of a visit from Anton  Smitt and'Wilfrid Gabrielson, of  the Forestry Department of the  government of Norway.  They came to the coast.in July  for the purpose of collecting  seeds from several kinds of coniferous trees to be used in reforesting the western coast of  Norway, which offers conditions  similar to those obtaining on this  northern coast.  They arrived here last week  and at the present writing are  off on a- goat hunt, accompanied  by 1: Fougner and Torger Olsen.  They have expressed themselves as delighted with the valley and the favorable impression  will no doubt be enhanced on a  mountaineering expedition under the able guidance of T. Olsen,  ' The different Ladies Aid Societies in the settlement have now  begun to hold their'annual sales  of articles made during the year.  The first in the field was the  Hagensborg Society which is the  largest and oldest in the valley.  Its sales were held at the Colony  Hall, Hagensborg. on October 14,  and netted the society the sum  of $125, which will be used for  the prosecution of the work of  the church.  The Lysdahl Sewing Circle  came in a week later with an  auction held, at the Lower Bella  Coola School, Saturday, Oct. 22.  Their sale amounted to $88;00.a  large part "of which will be donated to patriotic purposes. ;  Miss Bengston arrived from  Bella Bella last" Sunday to take  up work as a nurse at our hospital.       :  \  Gunnar Saugstad and Hjalmar  Schulstacl came in Sunday on the  Dominion launch Merlin after  spending the summer at Rivers  Inlet in their capacity as fishery  officers. ;   It is hoped that no one will  forget to patronize the concert  given this evening at the Hotel  Hall for the benefit of the Red  Cross Fund. '    ���������-  B. W. Fleming of Vancouver,  is spending a week in town looking up business foi; the National  Biscuit Co. Ltd. Mr. Fleming  informs us that business conditions along the coast are on the  upward grade. The reason for  this is that so many new industries-are springing up, especially  The Courier is in receipt of a  very interesting letter from our  townsman Rev. T. C. Colwell,  who enlisted with the 102nd as  chaplain, and is now in France  with the 8th Brigade, 2nd C. M.  R. Capt. Colwell, though within the European war area, speaks  of his church work as interestingly as if at home and the world  was at, peace. . Of, the recent  election, prohibition of the liquor  traffic, votes for women, and in  general, the, soldier thinks that  British Columbia will see an era  of prosperity and that its opportunity for> advancement was  never better..  "This morning," says the writer, "I had a chat with Corporal  Fred Grant (since wounded), he  is looking well and is a credit to  his home and Bella Coola."  Speaking of the German army  Capt. Colwell says the morale of  the ;enemy is lowering, though  Prussianism is far from beaten  yet. He also states the condition of the Allied troops has  never been better, the artillery  is splendid and closes with the  observation that "we command  the air." .  L Thorwald E. Jaeobsenrsorrof  B. F. Jacobsen one of the earliest settlers of the valley, after a  successful "season in the fishing  industry found himself unable to  resist his adopted land's call for  defenders and left last Sunday  for'the purpose of enlisting. Our  best wishes and hopes for his  safe return go with him.  To Oar Readers and Advertisers  The Courier has now completed its Fourthyear  and in order to keep pace with the times it is  necessary to make some alterations to the plant.  We crave our patrons indulgence in our unavoidable suspension, but will have all repairs  COMPLETED BY JANUARY FIRST  when we trust for a continuance of your support.  Two of our settlers aired their  differences in justice of peace W.  H. Gibson's court last Saturday.  They had in the earlier stages of  their differences tried to settle  their troubles by rather striking  argument in a different manner,  but failed of success. Mr. Gibson gave, them the benefit of his  riper experience in the form of  good advice and one of them as  a reminder to be more calm in  the future was made to pay a  fine of one dollar and costs.  J. H. Lunos after an arduous  season's work as forest guard,  took a well earned rest by going  Six young people, namely:  Lille Gorden, Elma Gorden, Edna Widsten, Ella Livelton, Carl  Peterson and Otilius Hanson,  after having been examined by  the minister in the fundamentals  of the christian religion were  confirmed according to the usages of the Lutheran Church.  A large audience was- in attendance witnessing the examination and subsequent ceremony.  The lectures given by J. G.  Walker at the Mackenzie school  in the evenings of Thursday,  Friday and Saturday last week  proved to be of more than ordinary interest. The speaker dealt  with one aspect of the most absorbing topic of the day,"which  might be designated as the significance of this war in the light  of prophecy.  He elucidated the subject from  theadventist point of view and  it may be stated without flattery  that he brought strong and elaborate arguments to bear in proof  of his contentions.  An ever increasing audience  greeted him from night to night.  -<"���������  GARDEN MAGAZINE  Tells just what to do in the  garden every month. Special  articles on Bees, Poultry, Market Gardening, etc.  Subscribe how. 50c a year.  2335 Granville St., Vancouver, B. C.  ON'T forget to bring in your Subscription  to the Courier���������The more support you  give us, the better paper we will give you.  on 'a trip to the cities of the  south. He will return in two  weeks.  in lumbering and mining, and he  is looking for great activities in  the coming year.  T. G. Garrett, representative  of the Vancouver wholesale dry-  goods firm of Gault Bros. Ltd.,  is here in the interests of his  firm. Mr. Garrett has just returned from a trip along the G.T.  P. and finds things looking up in  that section of the province.  ���������A-: C.. Christensen returned  from a several weeks stay' at  Takush Harbor. He brought to reach the firing line,  back with him several heads of  cattle and some pigs. These importations seem to indicatethat  Mr.vQhristenson intends to extend his activities in raising stock  Private Odin Peterson, now  with thel03rd at Bram shot camp,  England, in a letter to his parents writes them saying that  measles has entered their camp  and a strict quarantine is being  kept. Outside of this the condition of the'troops is excellent.  Odin enlisted with his regiment  at Victoria and like the rest of  the Canadian soldiers is anxious  >��������� Confirmation services were con-  ducted by Rev^JI: Sageng at the  Hagensborg Church on Sunday,  October 15th.  THE TWENTY-SECOND ANNIVERSARY  On Monday next it will ��������� be  twenty-two years since the first  contingent of colonists arrived  in Bella Coola. They landed at  a,������ime when the autumn's rain  and slush were at the highest;  and what with the state of the  weather, the flood in the river,  the' density of the forest, the  distance from other settlements  and numerous other obstacles,  the outlook for the successful  settlement of the valley was not  very bright. And the outside  world, from which the Colonists  were then so far removed, criticized the settling of the valley as  premature and predicted its early  and dismal failure.  But in spite of the discouraging outlook the settlement has  become firmly rooted and has  prospered, and it is no exaggeration to state that it will be hard  to find a community more contented and generally prosperous  than Bella Coola.  Its development, as has been  stated so many times in our columns,, has not progressed at the  rate the climateand soil warrant,  and without reiterating the many  reasons advanced for the cause  of .this, we at this time would  point out that the settlers in the  earlierhistory of the settlement  met frequently and discussed  their common interests.  In that way the community  spirit was fostered and each settler received a certain amount of  encouragement from intercourse  with those similarly situated.  ' But we are sorry to say that in  later years this custom of meeting together to' discuss the common problems has come to an  end. Very few meetings, if any,  of that character are ever held.  But the need of such-are just  as urgent now as ever. We do  not think the" settlers have become so reluctant to attend these  meetings that it,will be without  'result to try to resume them.  We are rather of the opinion that  the fault lies with' those men  who by virtue of their positions  shouid be leaders and as such  have become negligent of their  public duties.  And when we speak of leaders  in this connection we refer to the  officers of the local Farmers',  Institute.  As it seems that the frequent  appeals made to them to hold  meetings regularly meet with no  response; we confess to have  reached the conclusion that they  are opposed to the getting together of the people. There may  be other reasons, but be that as  itmay in order to overcome this  hindrance to the development of  the valley it has finally become  apparent to us that the Executive  of the Farmers' Institute needs  an infusion of new blood; and  we hope that the settlers will,  as soon as, opportunity offers,  rouse themselves and- see to it  that this operation is effected.  We hope that the next year  will see the community spirit developing and co-operation began  and in that event there will be  no doubt of the future prosperity  of Bella Coola and the Colony  founded in the year 1894 under  adverse circumstances will prove  a grand success.  (Elmrrh Jfuttr*  Sunday School    -  Church Service , -  10:45 a.m.  7:30 p.m.  9  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  \.r W. H. Gibson. :  All Are Welcome.  $7  eO<A<J)li>>4*������_i������<&XJI<L>-<J(4>"<^8 I;  BELLA  COOLA  COURiER  Saturday, October 28,  19)6  r.  The Courier  1'lJBMSHKIi WlJKKI.Y AT llKI.I.A 1'ool.A J!Y  TDK liEU.A COULA I'l.'HUKHINC C<>. LTD.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1   Year   $1-00  G Month*    ...:    0.75  3 Months         '..!..   0.50  United States  , 1   Year     $1.50  United  Kingdom  1  Year $1-00  Subtcriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in addre.sn should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For  Advertising  Uates,  Api-i.y at  ij . ��������� Office.      '"  To Coiihespondents���������Whilo unolijcctioiiuljli' anonymous communications will hv nublishi'il, the  mime und nddruasof every writi'rof such lelleiH  must lie Kiven to the eiliior.  The Editor reserves the ritrht to refuse puhli-  cntiuii of any letter. All munuscripl at writer's  risk.  "g>itliw ^npitli au^rpuia nU Irx.  SATURDAY, OCT. 2S.; 191G.  \Y/e beg to remind our readers that the Courier having'completed its fourth year  the''subscriptions ��������� of all our  early subscribers are now dup  for renewal. ;  The management wishes to  thank our numerous readers  for their support during the  past and trusts to a continuance of the same in the future.  The subscription rate remains at $1  per year, payable strictly in advance.  A Moral Principle Involved.  Considerable ..irritation h as  been felt on our part because of  the position assumed by the government of the United States in  questions arising out of the7war.  The policy as announced by the  President,,was virtually to the  effect that no matter what the  provocation might be the United  States must keep out of thewar;  that they wereitoo proud to fight;  that they would not interfere in  European affairs, etc..  . This policy may seem the wisest  to maintain from a materialistic  point of view, but if. it does not  conform to the moral principles  involved it will fail.in.the end.  . In questions of right and  wrong; where justice is trampled  under foot, 'where treaties are  violated, contracts broken and  international crimes committed  there can be no neutral nations.  This.principle has been enunciated lately by no less a personage  than President Wilson. Yet at  the same time' he declares that  the United States is the strongest  neutral country today and', as  such, is protecting the interests  of neutral nations.  From a materialistic stand  point it may seem prudent to use  all means at command in order  to keep out of trouble; but if  moral principles are violated,, the  old saying���������"Be sure your sins  ���������'will find you out"���������will be found  absolutely true. The United  States is already realizing this  truth and it is being pointed out  to the people of that nation in  forcible language by Republican  leaders in" the presidental campaign. .  Colonel Roosevelt expresses  the belief that it is President  Wilson's submissive policy that  has brought the war to the coast  of America. "The first mistake,"  he said, "was made when President Wilson permitted the violation of the neutrality of Belgium  without even a protest and this  i had been  added to .since Ly the  'Lusitania and other incidents  I    "The boldness of the Germans''  j in sending a submarine to way-  Jay shipping oil'  the  American!  coast  was , the   culmination  of  European contempt for the United States.  "President Wilson avoided  taking any stand for the right.  He stated that the war and its  issues were no concern of ours,  lie was silent when Belgium  suffered terrible wrong. ' Mis  statement that"' United States  will use her strength to protect  the neutral nations is in the light  of this event the most hollow of  mockeries.  "President Wilson's ignoble  shirking of responsibilities has  been clothed in an utterly misleading phrase- the' phrase' of a  coward ���������'J Jo kept us out of war.'  In actual reality war has been,  creeping nearer and. nearer until  it stares at us from just beyond  our three-mile limit, and wo face  it'without policy, plan', purpose  or preparation. When the United States, as the leading neutral,  refused to protest against, (.he invasion of Belgium, the cornerstone of the structure of inter-  national law was removed.  Neutral nations were left leader-  less and helpless and'their rights  open to attack from all belligerents.   , ' .  "The futility of adroit'shirking of our responsibility must be  evident to all; Our shameful  abandonment of the duty that  we owe our own people in the,  case of the Lusitania was really  a giant stride in the policy, of  impotent submission to the brute  policy of the strong  . o  >���������  Germany's Methods.  ���������Germany's idea in regard to  the ' rules   of  modern warfare  seems to be to kill not only the  soldiers of the enemy but also  n ���������  as many of the non-combatants  as possible.  Those who defend Germany  upon' nearly all points find no  fault with her for sinking passenger ships with fatal results  or the dropping of bombs on unfortified towns, killing women  and children. This, they declare,  is perfectly permissible because  it is the object of the war to kill,  no matter whether the victims  are soldiers or not.  ���������   But, nevertheless, warfare of  this nature is against the rules  and .usuages of , the :'civilized  world.  Germany has by her unnecessary cruelty and acts of fright-  fulness drawn upon herself the  just condemnation of a horrified  world. When the war is over  and its history written, Germany's warfare will be viewed in  a light of such a nature that  .Germans 'for' all time, will be  ashamed of their country.  It has been thought that England was Lhe only nation which  had so incurred Germany's hatred  that the murder of her innocents  was' to be carried on by Zeppelins dropping bombs on cities  whose inhabitants were resting  in sleep.  But since Roumania has entered thewar the same'hatred  and the same treatment have  been extended to her.  These murders committed by  Germany might be defensible if  itcould.be shown that they would  hasten the end of the war. ��������� But  .they have no such effect and so  far we have failed to find a single  defender of. Germany that has  held such opinion." The death of  these, non-combatants does not  reduce the military strength of  the country thus attacked; but it  does increase its hatred against  the perpetrators of such dastardly deeds and makes the final negotiations for peace more.difficult; in fact, instead of shortening the war these murders will  have a tendency to lengthen it.  King Ferdinand of Roumania,  in an interview with Stanley  Washburn, an American war  correspondent, has this to. say  in regard to the killing of. hundreds of women and children in  Bucharest by German Zeppelins:  "The effect.of these acts has  been such as the enemy might  well have fought battles to prevent. The enemy has, almost  overnight, created a bitterness  which has enlisted against him  the whole nation, which.makes  peace without victory an utter  impossibility to Roumania."  We"firmly hold to the opinion  it is not against the spirit of  Christianity to conduct war in  defense of liberty and of the  weak-, and that it is under such  contingencies a sacred duty to  fight; but the war must he waged  in a manner to inflict only.the  injury necessary to attaiii the  object sought for.  Germany has sinned against  both these principles. She started a war of conquest and she is  conducting it against the accepted rules of the civilized nations.  Therefore, she will stand condemned on all counts before the  court, of civilization.  Subscribers and Advertisers  Please Note:  Qwinc; to the fact that our  press needs overhauling  and repairs and the, fact that  we have to.send East, for the  necessary part, we'shall be  obliged to suspend publication  for a period not to exceed two.  months.  t,, On January first next, we  shall again be on deck ready  to tell our readers tne happenings in this neck of the woods,  and to give our opinion on the  problems of the. day.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,  OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE   IN    B. C."  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN to ,.enresent  of 1493 SEVENTH AYE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in different parts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917),.delivery<lw The,work is pleasant and reniunera-.  five. Honest, energetic men only are needed. We particularly  want a good man on the G, T. P. Railway.- '���������.'.'  Planters should write at once for our 80 page Catalogue.  The Need of Thrift.  The idea has long been prevailing that the circulation of  money adds to the prosperity of  the people., We are willing'to  admit that it may be a sign of  prosperity, . but that it fosters  prosperity we hold to be a fallacy.  As an illustration of how people  look upon the mere spending of  money, it'may be stated that a  man of means who spends his  money lavishly on luxuries and  foolish things is regarded as  an asset to the^community. One  of the arguments in favor of the  liquor traffic for������ instance, has  been that it is a great business  and therefore valuable and as  such ought to be fostered and  protected.  It is not the aim of. this article  to advance   any arguments* in  support of our contention that  the mere circulation of money  does not promote the general  welfare; but content ourselves  by stating our belief that one of  the outcomes of this war will be  the recognition of the fact that  the spending of money for needless things is a waste.  And if this proposition is true  it becomes necessary for individuals as well as organizations  of all kinds during these trying  times to practice economy in order that nothing be wasted but  as many of our resources be saved  and utilized for the prosecution  of the war now being waged for  the preservation of the independence of nations.  Jn support of the above statements we quote the", following  extract from the Toronto Globe:  "It is often necessary in dealing with problems of war expenditure to speak in terms of  money; but thinking of those  problems exclusively in terms of  money often leads people, very  much astray; For example, I  have heard it said that the more  money that is spent on  home  products the better, because lhe  more money that is circulated  the greater the prosperity. This  is a profound error. What the  nation needs is goods, labor, and  services for the successful prosecution of the war. Everyone's  work is wanted either directly or  indirectly for this . purpose; of  supplying our fighting forces or  for making goods for export  with which to pay for necessary  imports. Expenditure on nonessentials, whether- produced at  home or abroad, diverts capital  and labor that can ill be. spared  to purposes which do not help us  to win the war. ���������  "The great essential need in  this third'year of the campaign  is to supply the sinews of-".war.  In this Canadians may aid materially by applying their surplus  savings���������savings not only from  ..surplus revenue, but savings  effected by abstaining.from needless expenditure' on non-essentials���������in taking up the war loan  stock. . . .. There are few .in  Canada who do not yearn for  some opportunity of helping to  smash the enemy.   Itisnotgiven  Let the Tea Pot tell you���������  GREAT  WEST  TEA  IS   BEfTER  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  a c  HOE  3 ��������� C  30E  ]&  THe Puke and DMM&Q8 W$^$hx������������>.  ^  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  . REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  >       BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  5. b.      L&mOSUIl     Leaves  Vancouver  every  Thursday at 9 p. m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S.'S.. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply, to  Head Office, Garrall St., Vancouver ��������� or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria. ..'���������''  IOC  39 C  hoc  w  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  Vi'  <>\  ii-  m  *y,.  frj  'XI  f.-V  \ -i  wsr  ^  li't;  'V'i  ������'���������'*  Mi  M  [..'..  ';' '1  Iv  ''-   1  7;i  <i  r '���������"'  t.'l  <ry,  ,i*-l  fe  hi  ' 't\  Vf /  Saturday, .October 28,  1916  " BELLA, COOLA COURIER  3  L'r  rfr������  Simply a little rub with a cloth keeps the highly burnished cooking top always glistening, dustless clean, without blacking; in four pieces it cannot warp or bulge.  \  It won't be hard to decide what range you want In your  kitchen after I show you the Kootenay's special features.  ear  "    Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  to everyone to do this on the  held of battle.   But by the hus-  vestments of this character.   In  this way, if in no other, Canadi-  banding of all our national re- ans may feel the conscious pride  sources, by a rigid policy of  thrift, governments and "people  may do much to ease the burden  of war in the days to come by  applying available savings to in-  that comes to every man who is  'doing his bit' in this war  Now.'let,the long evenings be  used to bring the people together  for their mutual benefit.  ������1  CLUB OFFER  ^  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of, the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.-  The Courier   .       .       .  '   .       . $1.00   fi   ,  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50   ,������   Papers   for .  $2.50  $1.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00.  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for . .  $1.50  The Courier   Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  . 1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for .  .  $1.75  \s  The four papers may be had for. $3.75.  J  ���������������������������;\*>  lV-k  Aid to Land Clearing.  As has been pointed out at  many different times, one of the  first things required for the development of our agricultural  resources is the clearing of the  land.   "  ��������� "    ������  In other parts of the province  the settler is aided' in this work  by the sale of the timber on the  land, the proceeds of which in  the form of fuel or saw logs help  to keep the pot boiling during the  clearing operations.  The Bella Coola settler has not  had this aid. He has been obliged to pile and burn valuable  timber for want of a market.  This has proved one of the greatest of handicaps to development,  but happily this state of affairs  can now be ended if certain arrangements can be made.  The Ocean Falls Company is  the holder of nearly all the crown  timber lands in Bella Coola and  the surrounding country. It has  now, after a long delay, began  operations on a large scale and  logging is carried on along the  shores of the inlets.    (.  It will be to the interest of  the settlers and very likely also  to that of the,company for it to  log their holdings in the settlement at the earliest date possible  and at the same time acquire the  timber encumbering the agricultural lands for a fair price and  have it removed.  It is hoped Mr. Pattullo's aid  will be enlisted to bring this  about.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING KiqiiTS of the Dominion, in  *���������' Manitoba, Saskaichcwan and Albkkta,  Hit- Yukon 'i'tuuiroiiv, the NoiiTH-wissr Tkkki-  ' TOItii:n and in a portion of the 1'IIOVINCE uf  Hhitish Coi.umuia, may lie leased for a term of  twenty-one yen��������� ut an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2.SCU acres will be leased  lo one applicant. -     '  Application for a lease muat be made by the  applicant in Person to the Aicenl or Sub-Ajrent  of the district in which tho HkIiLh applied for  are situated.  in surveyed territory the land muat be de-  acribod by flections, or It-ical subdivisions of sections, and in unuurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  ; Each application muat be accompanied by a  fee of *0 which will ln������ refunded if the riirhts  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall he puid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The- person operating th������ mine ahull furnish  the A Rent with sworn returns acro'intinir for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  tho royalty thereon. If the coal mining riifhts  aie not beiiiir operated, such leturns should be  furnished al least once a year,  -The lease will include the coal mininir rlRhts  only, hut the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface riirhlsmay be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 un acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Scci clary of the Department of the  Intelior. Ottawa, or to any Accent or Sub-AKent  of Dominion Lauds.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N,U,��������� Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will nut be paid for,���������SUU1K).  BUSINESS CARDS  30E  Snap Judgment.  In theJBritish Isles during this  war a great many women have  been "helping recruiting" ' by  walking the streets and putting  a white,feather into the buttonhole of every man they met who  was not wearing the khaki.  I was standing just outside the  central station in Glasgow,  writes* an American, when a  woman walked up to a man who  was standing near me, and without a word pulled a white feather through his buttonhole. He  was a great big fellow, and she  had to do 'some reaching to get  at him.  He smiled when he saw what  she had done and said, "Thank  you, madam," very politely."  That was like waving a red  rag before a bull, and she grew  crimson and started to tell him  what she thought of him. He  listened until she had finished,  and then asked, "Have you another of these feathers, by any  chance?"  "Yes, I have, you coward!"  she snapped, and she put another feather on him. As she did  so, he pulled a Victoria Cross  from his pocket and pinned it  right under the feathers.  That woman gasped and stuttered and stammered, trying to  make an apology, and she reached  out and tried to take the feathers back, but he stopped her.  "No, madam," he said, "I'll  keep these as souvenirs, if you  don't mind; but I'd like to say a  few words to .you about what you  are doing.  "The fact that I am in civilian  clothes does not necessarily mean  that I am a coward. For all you  knew, I might have been physi;  cally unfit for service. I might  have been a married man with  ten or a dozen small children depending on me.. There are any  number of  things that, might  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon mid Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agmcy for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 6r 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  fbl |< ioi >l fol  Dealers and Trappers  HIGHEST  PRICE  have prevented me from joining  the army.Jbut you didn't wait  even to inquire. ~  "You thought that because I  was not in khaki I was a coward.  As a matter of fact, I have been  at home, recovering from wounds  I,received when I won this little  cross; and I shall shortly be on  my way back to join my regiment.  "If you will accept a.suggestion from a man who knows men,  you will stop this silly business,  for you will do more harm than  anything else. If I were a civilian, after what you did to me  then, I would have faced a firing  party before I would have joined  the army. I trust you have learned something. Good afternoon."  I found out later that he is a  sergeant piper in one of the most  famous Scottish regiments, and  that he won the cross for saving  three officers when wounded  himself. L  / heJvlason & Tiisch Piano  of to-day will maf{e plain our  privilege la slate with authority:  "NO FINER  PIANO MADE!  SOW DIRECT HY THE MANUFACTURERS  -3U  >3  CI Let us attend your Victor Record  -*l   mail orders���������nnr srrv'tre. is inlplllornt  and guaranteed.  -our service is intelligent  Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  fiit[ ���������*"'-v*~������T" -*^fT~k ��������� * - -������������������r"i.   _ ������������������������f,(������r."ii- ��������� '     - -^r,������i       -   --   'ir,-,--,   " **.  .IE  czzillc  \17HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \X/HAT person'so independent?  \JL7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?,  ��������� Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  TTIE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ���������������������������-tion.of affairs  are   obvious to  anyone  who knows the .Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. Tlie climate is mild and enjoyable; long warm summers .with suflicient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This. factc was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year'when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  oyer twenty first prizes.  OELLA GOOLA and the surrounding  *"* country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for at remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  Get "More Money" for your Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and oilier Fur bearers collected in yoor section  SHIP YOUR I-'UIIS DTKECT to "SHUriERT"the largest  bouse In the World dealing exclusively lis NORTH AMERICAN RAW FUES  a reliable���������responsible���������safe I-ur House with an unblemished reputation cxistinir for "more than atnird of a century." a lonsr successful record of sending Fur Shippers prompt,SATISFACTORY  AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for'Tte &bub������t Utiwvtt."  the only reliable, accurate mark et report and price list published.  Write for H-NOW-ICh FREE  AR   CT-ITTRFBT   I���������,.   25-27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.  . 15. SriUbiLKI, inc. Dcpt.c 67 Chicago. U.3.A.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.        \  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year.  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year.......... ..$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   , p. o...,.k.;.  ..........���������.���������':..'���������.',  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed nM  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, Ocloler 28, *9\6  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  // will be to your in  terest to ������eep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������:  THE "COURIER"  ,      GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  tr"  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  POVERTY DESIRABLE.  In his exhortation at class  meeting the other night, Deacon  Jones spoke thusly:  "'Happy art thou, 0 man, who  was not horn amidst the luxuries  of life.  . ''Lucky devil art thou who  canst oal the simple fare and live  the simple life down on the farm;  whose nose turneth not' up at a  boiled dinner, or bacon and eggs,  or pork and beans.  "Health waketh thee at morn,  and accompanieth theslumbeis  of night.  "Art thou an alderman, and  putefh pounds of roast turkey  and goblets of wine into thy  paunch, thou devourest'an apoplexy. Swallowest thou hot  sauces? Thou gulpest' rheumatism and gout.  "Say not wickedly, 'I will not  repeat the Lord's prayer,'as it  is beneath a.gentleman to pray  for bread. ���������  "Curse not, clams, crabs or  flounders; peradventure they  might blush'to enter the doors  of thy gullet. ,  "Consider thyself not down  and out, because thou possesscst  not more than thou oughtest in  reason for thy use.  "Fortunate are thousands in  never having been favorites of  fortune.  "Content.sigh'eth not for roast  goose or turkey, or pheasant, or  quail, or bear, or venison, or  moose, or such like meats; she  lifteth not her eye not for champagne, or other very old vintages, or trout, or gold fish, or  white fish.  ' "She hateth not the sight of  the sun at dinner time, but prefer reth his radiance to the glare  of an incandescent light."  REAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The' North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on develop  m Mits by reading the "Courier.'  Ramsay Bros. & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS    '  OF  Biscuits :: Candy :: Macaroni  Milk and Nut  <    Chocolate Bars  Also Refiners of Syrup and  Packers of Molasses  rVE STAND BEHIND OUR GOODS"  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk-support home industries���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  _um_nni ant." <Tiiimf'i~*~"  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B.C.  THE two principal reasons  *   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST��������� .  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd,  Packers and Provinionera  Calgary     Vancouver (   Edmonton  The Coffee of Distinction  because   of   its   exquisite  flavor  Packed in our new hygienic  AIR-TIGHT TIN  The W. H. Malkin Company, Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Will You Help  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any en-,  quiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club  Room 28,-Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books,  Contribution Cards," Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  pan* vi���������jTi h*~~ '  Otfilvies1-  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  etter order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS.  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men?s,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    S    G  Settlers, Prospe&ors, Hunters/Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the moft suit-,  able articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods-Lowest Prices -Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  '���������'������  *.-i  ���������S  I  m  77ft  !!���������������������������&  f  ���������-'-���������'.-vi  ' <v 7  ������������������������������������������������������"Vji  I  I  r  7?l  if.  k  pi  i>-ti  \ ������ IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR SEPT.  Compiled   by  Mr. C. H.  Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, G5.   Minimum, 42.  Highest Max. (15th) 84. Lowest Min. (27th) SO  Rainfall, 1.95 inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915) 34.33 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 3  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28,  1916.  $1.00 a Year  Roumanians Drive  Enemy Over Frontier  Petrograd, Oct. 27.���������Pressure  of Mackensen's army in Dobrud-  Loridon, Oct. 26.���������The French ja against the Russian and Rou-  maintained theimportantground  manian forces weakened  some  French Attacking  on Verdun Front  Capture Forts and 3500 Men  they won yesterday north of Ver  dun.    Last night,  parts of th  dun.      .UctSl,    lliynu,    [.mi la   ui    uuc  ,'.''..         ,. , ���������    ,   ,      gress of superior enemy forces  regained territory which includes k_   Fort Douamount and stretches  along a front of more than four  miles and at points nearly two  miles inside the former German  lines, were subjected to counter  attacks, but we held the ground  repulsing all German assaults  which were delivered chiefly on  the forts. French troops recaptured Handromant quarries,  west of Douamont, and Domlop  batteries southeast 'of Vaux.  Commander of Fort Douamont  was among the. prisoners taken  by the French, who in their preliminary report placed at 3500  men. Fort Vaux is still in Ger-.  man hands, but French lines run  beyond it on both sides. Rain is  interfering in the operations on  the Somme front.  Berlin, Oct. 26.���������War office announced that in the attack on the  Verdun front by French yesterday, the enemy gained some  ground from them. French assaults on the Somme front were  unsuccessful.  Roumanians Evacuate  Tchernavoda  Petrograd, Oct. 26.���������Roumanians and Russians evacuated  Tchernavoda in Dobrudja, Mackensen's army continuing attack  along Dobruja front. Russo-Rou-  manian position on lake Tachaul  near Black Sea coast, 12 miles  north Constanza, also evacuated.  Berlin, Oct. 26.���������In Dobruja,  the pursuit of Russians and Roumanians continue, Tchernavoda  captured this morning, depriving  the enemy of her last railroad  connections in Dobrudja.  Bucharest, Oct. 26.���������Further  retirement by Roumanian forces  on Transylvania front. Roumanians near Predeal and Kim-  polongwere forced back slightly.  Berlin, Oct. 26.- Vulcan pass,  Transylvanian front, captured  by Von Falkenhayn's army.  Petrograd, Oct. 26.-South of  Dorna Watra near frontier, june-  tion of Bukowina, Transylvania pleasure of a visit Iro.m.^nt0ftnf  and Roumania, Russians dislodg- Smitt and Wi fnd Gabnelaon of  ed Austro-German forces from the Forestry Department of the  series of heights taking prison- government of Norway  BLIU.H    Ul fa They came  tQ  ^g  Cpagt  m  July    for  the   purpose   of  collecting  London, Oct. 27���������Lloyd George seeds from several kinds of coni-  in the House of Commons said: ferous  trees  to be used in re-  "We and our Allies doing every- foresting the western coast of  thing possible to help Roumania. Norway, which offers conditions  - "-���������:   ,:  i      similar to those obtaining on this  Paris, Oct. 26-Italian cavalry ������ n ^  from Southern Albania formed ,;Th6 ;^ived here iast week  junction yesterday With cavalry ^ ^ ^ present writing are  and artillery of entente forces off on a goat nunt, accompanied  on Macedonian front. by L Fougner an(] TorgerOlsen.  They have expressed themselves as delighted with the valley and the favorable impression  will no doubt bo enhanced on a  mountaineering expedition under the able guidance of T. Olsen.  what.    On Transylvania front,  Roumanians arrested   the   pro-  London, Oct. 27. ���������Is reported  from Bucharest that after evacuation of Tchernavoda by Russo-  Roumanian troops the bridge over  (the Danube at that place was  blown up by Roumanians.  Bucharest, Oct. 27.���������Roumanian troops captured Mount Kerev-  haras, Oitu valley, fighting continues beyond Roumanian frontier. Austro-German forces are  now being driven everywhere  beyond western frontier of Moldavia, their losses very heavy.  Nothing new reported from Dobrudja.   Paris, Oct. 27���������French cavalry  on the Macedonian front, supported by infantry, occupied two  villages southwest of Lake Doi-  ran yesterday. Serbians threw  back German and Bulgarian  forces in the region of Cerna.  Villages occupied now by French  are Golobrvda and Laisitsa, our  troops also took the bridge of  Zvezda.   London, Oct. 27.���������Attacks on  Constantinople-Saioniki railroad  by British aeroplanes inflicted  considerable damage.  Petrograd, Oct. 27.���������Russian  troops in wooded Carpathians  successfully withstanding all  Teutonic assaults. Attacks on  the heights northwest of .Capul  mountain have been repulsed.  Paris, Oct. 27. ���������German artillery shelled positions captured  by French in region of Vaux and  Douamount on the Verdun front.  Germans undertook no infantry  attacks.  Berlin's Report  of Vessels Sunk  Berlin, Oct. 27���������Admiralty announces that during September  141 hostile merchantmen, aggregating a tonnage of 182,000, were  sunk or brought in by our submarines. Thirteen captains of  hostile ships were taken prisoners. In addition, 39 neutral merchant ships, aggregating 72,600  tons, were sunk carrying contraband.  Norwegian Officials Arrive  This community is having the  Norwegian  Vessels Surdi  London, Oct. 20.~ Five more  Norwegian steamships, valued at  five million krones, have been  sunk by German submarines.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  S. S. Camosun arrived at 5 o'clock on Sunday afternoon and  was met by the usual concourse  of sightseers. She brought a  considerable lot of merchandise  goods for the merchants and  others, and some passengers,  among whom were noticed T. G.  Garrett, B. W. Fleming, A. C.  Christensen.. Tom and Charles  Crawford, and Miss Bengtson.  Among the outgoing passengers were J. G. Walker, Thorv. aid  Jacobsen, Hans Casperson, and  Paul Olson.  The different Ladies Aid Societies jn the settlement have now  begun to hold their annual sales  of articles made during the year.  The first in the field was the  Hagensborg Society which is the  largest and oldest in the valley.  Its sales were held at the Colony  Hall, Hagensborg. on October 14,  and netted the society the sum  of $125, which will be used for  the prosecution of the work of  the church.  The Lysdahl Sewing. Circle  came in a week later with an  auction held at the Lower Bella  Coola School, Saturday, Oct. 22.  Their sale amounted to $88.00 a  large part of which will be donated to patriotic purposes.  Miss Bengston arrived from  Bella Bella last Sunday to take  up work as a nurse at our hospital.    Gunnar Saugstad and Hjalmar  Schulstad came in Sunday on the  Dominion launch Merlin after  spending the summer at Rivers  Inlet in their capacity as fishery  officers.   It is hoped that no one will  forget to patronize the concert  given this evening at the Hotel  Hall for the benefit of the Red  Cross Fund.  B. W. Fleming of Vancouver,  is spending a week in town looking up business for the National  Biscuit Co. Ltd. Mr. Fleming-  informs us that business conditions along the coast are on the  upward grade. The reason for  this is that so many new industries are springing up, especially  to Bella Coola.  The Courier is in receipt of a  very interesting letter from our  townsman Rev. T. C. Colwell,  who enlisted with the 102nd as  chaplain, and is now in France  with the 8th Brigade, 2nd C. M.  R. Capt. Colwell, though within the European war area, speaks  of his church work as interestingly as if at home and the world  was at peace. Of the recent  election, prohibition of the liquor  traffic, votes for women, and in  general, the soldier thinks that  British Columbia will see an era  of prosperity and that its opportunity for advancement was  never better.  "This morning," says the writer, "I had a chat with Corporal  Fred Grant (since wounded), he  is looking well and is a credit to  his home and Bella Coola."  Speaking of the German army  Capt. Colwell says the morale of  the enemy is lowering, though  Prussianism is far from beaten  yet. He also states the condition of the Allied troops has  never been better, the artillery  is splendid and closes with the  observation that "we command  the air."   Thorwald E. Jacobsen, son of  B. F. Jacobsen one of the earliest settlers of the valley, after a  successful season in the fishing  industry found himself unable to  resist his adopted land's call for  defenders and left last Sunday  for the purpose of enlisting. Our  best wishes and hopes for his  safe return go with him.  Two of our settlers aired their  differences in justice of peace W.  H. Gibson's court last Saturday.  They had in the earlier stages of  their differences tried to settle  their troubles by rather striking  argument in a different manner,  but failed of success. Mr. Gibson gave them the benefit of his  riper experience in the form of  good advice and one of them as  a reminder to be more calm in  the future was made to pay a  'fine of one dollar and costs.  J. H. Lunos after an arduous  season's work as forest guard,  took a well earned rest by going  rjON'T forget to bring in your Subscription  to the Courier���������The more support you  give us, the better paper we will give you.  in lumbering and mining, and he  is looking for great activities in  the coming year.  T. G. Garrett, representative  of the Vancouver wholesale.dry-  goods firm of Gault Bros. Ltd.,  is here in the interests of his  firm. Mr. Garrett, has just returned from a trip along the G.T.  P. and finds things looking up in  that'.section of the province.  A. C. Christensen returned  from a several weeks stay at  Takush Harbor. He brought  back with him several heads of  cattle and some pigs. These importations seem to indicate that  Mr. Christenson intends to extend his activities in raising stock  on a trip to the cities of the  south. He will return in two  weeks.   Private  Odin   Peterson,   now  ��������� with the 103rd at Bramshot camp,  "England, in a letter to his par-  1 ents  writes   them   saying that  measles has entered their camp  and a strict quarantine is being  kept.    Outside of this the condition of the troops is excellent.  Odin enlisted with his regiment  at Victoria and like the rest of  the Canadian soldiers is anxious  to reach the firing line.  t  ��������� Confirmation services were conducted by Rev. H. Sageng at the  Hagensborg Church on Sunday,  October 15th.  To Our Readers and Advertisers  The Courier has now completed its Fourth year  and in order to keep pace with the times it is  necessary to make some alterations to the plant.  We crave our patrons indulgence in our unavoidable suspension, but will have all repairs  COMPLETED BY JANUARY FIRST  when we trust for a continuance of your support.  Six young people, namely:  Lille Gorden, Elma Gorden, Ed-]  na Widsten, Ella Livelton, Carl  Peterson and Otilius Hanson,  after having been examined by  the ministerin the fundamentals  of the christian religion were  confirmed according to the usages of the Lutheran Church:  A large audience was in attendance witnessing the examination and subsequent ceremony.  The lectures given by J. G.  Walker at the Mackenzie school  in the evenings of Thursday,  Friday and Saturday last week  proved to be of more than ordin- ���������  ary interest. The speaker dealt  with one aspect of the most absorbing topic- of the day, which  might be designated as the significance of this war in the light  of prophecy.  He elucidated the subject from \  the adventist point of view and j  it may be stated without flattery  that he brought strong and elaborate arguments to bear in proof  of his contentions.  An ever increasing audience  greeted him from night to night.  j   GARDEN MAGAZINE  | Tells just what to do in the  ! garden every month. Special  ! articles on Bees, Poultry. Mar-  ; ket Gardening, etc.  ; Subscribe now. 50c a year.  j 2335 Granville St., Vancouver, B. C.  THE TWENTY-SECOND ANNIVERSARY  On   Monday   next  it  will   be  twenty-two years since the first  contingent of  colonists arrived  in Bella Coola.    They landed at  a time when the autumn's rain  and slush  were at the highest;  and what with  the state of the  weather, the flood  in  the river,  the density   of   the  forest,   the  distance from other settlements!  and  numerous  other  obstacles, ;  the outlook   for   the successful j  settlement of the valley was not j  very bright.     And   the outside  world, from which the Colonists  were then so far removed, criticized the settling of the valley as  premature and predicted its early  and dismal failure.  But in spite of the discouraging outlook the settlement has  become firmly rooted and has  prospered, and it is no exaggeration to state that it will be hard  to find a community more contented and generally prosperous  than Bella Coola.  Its development, as has been  stated so many times in our columns, has not progressed at tit  rate the climate and soil wanar.t,  and without reiterating the many  reasons advanced for the cause  of this, we at this time would  point out that the settlers in the  earlier history of the settlement  met frequently and discussed  their common interests.  In that way the community  spirit was fostered and each settler received a certain amount of  encouragement from intercourse  with those similarly situated.  But we are sorry to say that in  later years this custom of meeting together to discuss the common problems has come to an  end. Very few meetings, if any,  of that character are ever held.  But the need of such are just  as urgent now as ever. We do  not think the settlers have become so reluctant to attend these  meetings that it will be without  result to try to resume them.  We are rather of the opinion that  the fault lies with those men  who by virtue of their positions  should be leaders and as such  have become negligent of their  public duties.  And when we speak of leaders  in this connection we refer to the  officers of the local Farmers'  Institute.  As it seems that the frequent  appeals made to them to hold  meetings regularly meet with no  response; we confess to have  reached the conclusion that they  are opposed to the getting together of the people. There may  be other reasons, but be that as  it may in order to overcome this  hindrance to the development of  the valley it has finally become  apparent to us that the Executive  of the Farmers' Institute needs  an infusion of* new blood; and  we hope that the settlers will,  as soon as opportunity offers,  rouse themselves and see to it  that this operation is effected.  We hope that the next year  will see the community spirit developing and co-operation began  and in that event there will be  no doubt of the future prosperity  of Bella Coola and the Colony  founded in the year 1894 under  adverse circumstances will prove  a grand success.  Ollutrrli Nniirr  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  9  Preacher for Sunday    Rev.  VV. II. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  3 BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,  October 28,   19)0  ���������\  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  l'Year  $100  C Months   ..'.    0.75  3 Month.    0.50  United States  1  Year ' $1-50  United Kingdom  1  Year. :....*. $100  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscriber^ not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising "Rates,   Apply at  ���������*    Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable nn-  onymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of-such letters  must be given.to the editor. ,  The Editor reserves the rijrht to refuse publi-  cution of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  N&ahta pa'puli fliiprrma rst hx"  SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 1916.  \Y/e beg to remind our readers that the Courier having completed rts. fourth year  the subscriptions of all our  early subscribers are riow-du������  for renewal.  The management wishes to  thank our numerous readers  for .their, support during the  past and trusts to a continuance of the same in the future.  The subscriptioivrate remains at $1  per year, payable strictly in advance.  A Moral.Principle Involved.  Considerable irritation has  been felt on our part because of  the position assumed by the government of the United States in  questions arising out of the war.  The policy'ias announced by the  President was virtually to the  effect that no matter what the  provocation might be the United  States must keep out of the war;  that they were too proud to fight;  that they would not interfere in  European affairs, etc.  This policy may seem the wisest  to maintain from a materialistic  point of view, but if it does not  conform to the moral principles  involved it will fail in the end.  In questions of. right and  wrong; where justice is trampled  under foot, where treaties are  violated, contracts broken and  international crimes committed  there can be no neutral nations.  This principle has been enunciated lately by no less a personage  than President Wilson. Yet at  the same time he declares that  the United States is the strongest  neutral country today and, as  such, is protecting the interests  of neutral nations.  From a materialistic stand  point it may seem prudent to use  all means at command in order  to keep out of trouble; but if  moral principles are violated, the  old saying���������"Be sure your sins  will find you out"���������will be found  absolutely; true. The United  States is already realizing this  truth and it is being pointed out  to the people of that nation in  forcible language by Republican  leaders in the presidental campaign.       ;  Colonel . Roosevelt expresses  the belief that it is President  Wilson's submissive policy that  has brought the war to the coast  of America. "The first mistake,"  he said, "was made when President Wilson permitted the violation of the neutrality of Belgium  without even a protest and this  jiad been added to since by the  Lusitania and other incidents.  "The boldness of theGermans  in sending a subniarine to waylay shipping off the American  coast was the culmination of  European contempt for the United States.  "President Wilson .avoided  taking any stand for the right.  He stated that the war and its  issues were no concern of ours.  He was silent when Belgium  suffered terrible wrong. His  statement that United States  will use her strength to protect  the neutral nations is in the light  of this event the'most hollow of  mockeries.  "President Wilson's ignoble  shirking of responsibilities has  been clothed in an utterly misleading phrase���������the phrase of a  coward���������'He kept us out of war.'  -In actual reality war has .been  creeping nearer and nearer until  it stares at us from jusfbeyond  our three-mile limit and we face  it without policy, plan, purpose  or preparation. When the United States, as the leading neutral,  refused to protest against the invasion of Belgium, the cornerstone of the structure of international ' law . was removed.  Neutral nations were left leader-  less and helpless and their rights  open to attack from all belligerents.  "The futility of adroit shirking of our responsibility must be  evident to all. Our shameful  abandonment of the' duty that  we owe our own people in the  case of the Lusitania was really  a, giant stride in the policy of  impotent submission to the brute  policy of the strong.".  o    j>     o     o     o  Germany's Methods.  Germany's idea in regard to  the, rules of modern warfare  seems to be to kill not only the  soldiers of the enemy but also  as many of the non-combatants  as possible.  Those who defend Germany  upon nearly all points find no  fault with her for sinking passenger ships with fatal results  or the dropping of bombs on unfortified towns, killing women  and children. ��������� This, they declare,  is perfectly permissible because  it is the object of the war to kill,  no matter whether the victims  are soldiers or not.  But, nevertheless, warfare of  this nature- is against the rules  and usuages of the civilized  world.  Germany has by her unnecessary cruelty and acts of fright-  fulness drawn upon herself the  just condemnation of a horrified  world. When the war is over  and its history written, Germany's warfare will be viewed in  a light of such a nature that  Germans for' all time will be  ashamed of-their country.  It has been thought that England was the only nation which,  had so incurred Germany'shatred  that the murder of her innocents  was to be carried on by* Zeppelins dropping bombs on cities  whose inhabitants were resting  in sleep.  But since Roumania has entered the war the same hatred  and the "same treatment have  been extended to her.  These murders committed by  Germany might be defensible if  it could be shown that they would  hasten the end of the war. But  they have -no such effect and so  far we have failed to find a single  defender of Germany that has  held such opinion. The death of  these non-combatants does not  reduce the military strength of  the country thus attacked; but it  does increase its hatred against  the perpetrators of such dastardly deeds and makes the final negotiations for peace more difficult; in fact, instead of shortening the war these murders will  have a tendency to lengthen it.  King Ferdinand of Roumania,  in an interview with Stanley  Washburn, an American war  correspondent, has this to say  in regard to the killing of hundreds of women and children in  Bucharest by German Zeppelins:  "The  effect of  these acts  has  been such as-the enemy might  well have fought battles to prevent. The enemy has, almost  overnight, created a bitterness  which has enlisted against him  the whole nation, which makes  peace without victory an utter  impossibility to Roumania."  We firmly hold to. the opinion  it is not against the spirit of  Christianity to conduct war in  defense of liberty and of the  weak, and that it is under such  contingencies;/a; sacred duty to  fight; but the war must be waged  in a manner to inflict only the  injury necessary to attain the  object sdughtifor.  Germany has sinned against  both these principles. "She star-,  ted a war of qonquest and she is  conducting it against the accepted rules of the civilized nations.  Therefore, she will stand condemned on all counts before the  court of civilization.  Subscribers and Advertisers  Please Note:  r\wing to the fact that our  press needs overhauling  and repairs and the fact that  we have to send East for the  necessary, part; we shaH be  obliged to suspend publication  for a period not to exceed two  months.k\;  On January first next, we  shall again be on deck ready  to tell our readers the happenings in this neck of the woods  and to give our opinion on the  problems of the day.  The Need of Thrift.  The idea has long been prevailing that the circulation of  money adds to the prosperity of  the people.; We are willing to  admit that it may be a sign of  prosperity, but that it fosters  prosperity we hold to be a fallacy.  As ah illustration of how people  look upon the mere spending of  money, it may be stated that a  man of means who spends his  money lavishly on luxuries and  foolish things is regarded as  an asset to the community. One  of the arguments in favor of the  liquor traffic for instance, has  been that it is a great business  and therefore valuable and as  such ought to be fostered and  protected.  It is not the aim of this article  to  advance   any  arguments in  aanDwaw xmcwtKmuim snuczm  Mackay Smith, Blair & Go. Ltd.  VANCOUVER,  B. C.  Wholesaie  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S  FURNISHINGS  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST"  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  THe Puke and D_U'eEe4g;Q������.I)eyoH2>Kii!e:,  Send for Catalogue  "MADE    IN    B.'C."  ^. Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  EH  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MKN t re_..M .  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE,W.f VANCOUVER, B.C., them in diiverent rarts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest, energetic men only are needed. We particular^  want a good man on the G. T..-P. Railway.  Planters should write at once for our 80 page Catalogue  support of our contention that  the mere circulation of money  does not promote the genera!  welfare; but content" ourselves  by. stating our belief that one of  the outcomes of this war will be  the recognition of the fact that  the spending of money for needless things is a waste.  And if this proposition is true  it becomes necessary for individuals as well as organizations  of all kinds during these trying  times to practice economy in order that nothing be wasted but  as many of our resources be saved  and utilized for the prosecution  of the war now being waged for  *  the preservation of the independence of nations.  In support of the above statements, we quote the following  extract from the Toronto Globe:  "Itjs often necessary in dealing with problems of war expenditure to speak in terms of^  money, but thinking of those  problems exclusively in terms of  money often leads people very  much astray. For example, I  have heard it said that the more  money that is spent on   home  products the better, because the  more money that is circulated  the greater the prosperity. This  is a profound error. Whut-tho  nation needs is goods, labor, and  services for the successful, prosecution' of the war. Everyone's  work is wanted either directly or  indirectly for this purpose, of  supplying our fighting forces or  for making goods for export  with which to pay for necessary  imports. Expenditure on nonessentials, whether produced at  home or abroad, diverts capital  and labor that can ill be spared  to purposes which do not help us  to win the war.  "The great essential need in  this third year of the campaign  is to supply the sinews of war.  In this Canadians may aid materially by applying their surplus  savings���������savings not only frcm  surplus revenue, but savings  effected by abstaining from needless expenditure on non-essentials���������in taking up the war loan  stock. . . . There are few in  Canada who do not yearn fulsome opportunity of helping to  smash the enemy.   11 is not given  Let the Tea Pot tell you���������  GREAT   WEST  TEA  IS   BETTER  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  ^  hoe  D������C  hoc  D  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT   AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.   "CaHlOSUll"   Leaves   Vancouver   every  Thursday at 9 p. m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver l������ri  nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will **������'  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, "pl'b '"  Hbad Office, Oakham, St., Vancouver; or (Ik������������. MeCitK'.'"'"  agent,  1003 Govkknmknt St., Victoria.  Advertise your Wants in the Courier Saturday,  October 28,   1916  "BELLA:  COOLA   COURIER  MH*m'!w,niffi  Simply a little rub with a cloth keeps the highly burnished cooking top always glistening, dustless clean, without blacking; in four pieces it cannot warp or bulge.  %^-mkw  It won't be hard to decide what range you want in your  kitchen after I show you the Kootenay's special features.  Sold by B. Brymldsen &. Co.  867  *4an**L*nmji,nima*i^ ���������t^.  to everyone to do this on the vestments of this character. In  ���������field'-of battle. But by the bus- this way, if in no other, Canadi-  banding of all our national  re- "������ may feel the conscious pride  sources,   by   a   rigid   policy  of !h'lL C0!nes lo ovel*y man.who is  ���������;,.-,.                     ,         t           ,     'doing his bit'in this war."  thrift, governments and. people.          may do much to ease the burden i Now, let the long evenings be  of war in the days to come hy ; used lo bring the people'together  applying available savings to in-   for their mutual benefit.  IT  CLUB  OFFER  ^  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading.weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier   .       .        .        .   ���������    . $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  The Courier   .       .        .        .       . $1.00  Canadian Countryman, Toronto        .       .   1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  The Courier   ,       .       .       .       .$.1.00  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal . .  1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.75  Vs  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  ���������J  Aid to Land Clearing.  As   has   been   pointed   out a  many different times, one of the-SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  first things required  for the de- j REGULATIONS  velopment   of   our   agricultural; C������'^'���������'1INI:'',; l:|,:11TS "f u"f l)("iniop''"  - MAMTiiliA, SASKA'irilKiVAN ;mrl   Al.llKliTA,  resources is 'the. clearing of the   land.  In other parts of the province  the settler is aided in this work  by the sale of the timber on the  land, the proceeds of which in  the form of fuel or saw logs help  to keep the pot boiling during the  clearing operations.  The Bella Coola settler has not  had this aid. He has been obliged to pile and burn valuable  timber for want of a market.  This has proved one of the greatest of handicaps to development,  but happily this state of affairs  can now be ended if certain arrangements can be made.  The Ocean Falls Company is  the holder of nearly all the crown  timber lands in Bella Coola and  the surrounding country.    It has  now, after a long delay, began  operations on a large scale and  logging is carried on along the  shores,of the inlets.  It will be to  the  interest  of  the settlers and very likely also  to that of the company for it to  log their holdings in the settlement at the earliest date possible  and at the same time acquire the  timber encumbering the agricultural lands for a fair price and  have it removed.  It is hoped Mr. Pattullo's aid  will   be  enlisted   to  bring this  about.  llu- VlJUiiN 'I jOltl'.l'iul'.y, tin: NoKTIi-WKKT'i KftKl-  ; Tokli::-: awl in u |mrii.,n uf tho 1'itiA'lNCK of  I l>111-J i> ic C(������i.i:.\!|',ia,��������� n::ij In-leaned for :t'term of  tweiUy-on'- .viir.-i at. an animal ri.-ntal of $1 an  acio. N'ot mart; ilian L',:<i;'j,acn-i; will bi: loasiid  to on-1 applicant.  Application f.,j- :i lease rru,;l I.'- made Ijy the  applicant in penum lo I ho Ai'eni or Suh-AjTwit  of I In.- lii.slriia in which tho i-ij.'.)il.s applied for  are situated.  Jii surveyed territory I hi.' land must, be de-  Ke.iiheri hy sections, or letrai subdivisions of see-  lion.;, and in uiiHiirveyed territory the tract r.p-  plie.l for shall be staked out by the applicant  him,;elf.  Kach application muM'. be accompanied by a  fee of_r:S which will be ref(inded if the rights  applied for are not. available, ImL not otherwise.  A ro;, ally shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine' at. the rate of five cents per ton.  'Iht' person operating; the mine shall f-..i-ni<jh  the Airenl with ;iv.orn rot urns accic'ntinK for the  full quantity of mercl.anl able coal rmned and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rifrhts  are im| beiiuc operated, such i ^-t.urns should be  furnished at least once a year.  'I he lease will include the coal mining rights  only, bin the lessee may be pr.rmiued to purchase whatever available surface rights may he:  cori;.:den <i necessary for the working of the mine  lit. tin' rale of .fln.W mi. sir re.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Depart ment of the  Interior. Ottawa, or to any A (rent, or Sub-Atfont  of I 'ominioii Lands.  W. W. CORY.'  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  ,\. !'.. Prriuthorizi'd publication of this advertisement wi!i not In.' paid fur.-������������������IJWJD.  BUSINESS CARDS  I heMason & RischPiano  of to-day will mal\e plain our ,  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  pi!  ������    Let us attend  your Victor  Record  JJ   mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C  ���������  o  :oe  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of R. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our .sealed hid plan whereby. 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance To'per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  HOE  O  **&9i  kit  ^Skfe  ^ ���������*^kj ii  ."C v���������" ������-��������� rk'V. i Pn i  & '' -*���������"'"������'..'"..*  fr.q  v������ ������;<.''?���������.-��������� H':;'    ^-%r * *.&���������&&  $?*$������ nebs;,  Mm      *j x:A  Snap Judgment.  In the British Isles during this  war a great many women have  been "helping recruiting" by  walking the streets and putting  a white feather into the buttonhole of every man they met who  was not wearing the khaki.  I was standing just outside the  central station in Glasgow,  writes an American, when a  woman walked up to a man who  was standing near me, and without a word pulled a white feather through his buttonhole. He  was a great big fellow, and she  had to do some reaching to get  at him.  He smiled when he saw what  she had done and said, "Thank  you, madam," very politely.  That was like waving a red  rag before a bull, and she grew  crimson and started to fell him  what she thought of him. He  listened until she had finished,  and then asked, "Have you another of these feathers, by any  chance?"  "Yes, I have, you coward!"  she snapped, and she put another feather on him. As she did  so, he pulled a Victoria Cross  from his pocket and pinned it  right under the feathers.  That woman gasped and stuttered and stammered, trying to  make an apology, and she reached  out ami tried to fake the feathers back, but he stopped her.  "No, madam," he said, "I'll  keep these as souvenirs, if you  don't mind; but I'd like lo say a  few words to you about what you  are doing.  "The fact that 1 am in civilian  clothes does not necessarily mean  that I am a coward.     Korall you j  knew. 1   might have been physically unlit  for service.     1 might j  have been   a  married   man   with '  i  Dealers and I rappers  V  GET  THE   H5GHEST  PRECE   FOR   YOUR     /  L4  VjrW'HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  .  \X7HAT person so independent?  \X/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers  are  independent)  they are strangers to hard times.  "THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  * tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  have prevented me from joining  the army, hut you didn't wait  even to inquire.  "You thought that because I  was not in khaki I was a coward.  As a matter of fact, I have been  at home, recovering from wounds  1 received when I won this little  cross, and 1 shall shortly be on  my way back to join my regiment.  "If you will accept a suggestion from a man who knows men,  you will stop this silly business,  for you will do more harm than  anything else. If I were a civilian, after what you did to me  then, I would have faced a firing  party before I would have joined  thoarmy. I trust you have learned something.  Good afternoon."  I found out later that he is a  sergeant piper inoneof the most  famous Scottish regiments, and  that he won tho cross for saving  throe ollicers when wounded  himself.  DELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  ������,  ' wi \ k; a/* ���������  Gct"MorcMoney" for your Foxes  Muskral, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected in your section  SHIP YOlllt FITHS IHUKCT <o"sniJHKKT"the largest  house In the World dealing exclusively in NORTH AMERICAN RAW FtlHS  a n-liable���������ri'SiMinsible���������siii'e !���������"ur House with an unblemisliedrep-  utation existing lor "more than a thirJ uf a century." a lont? successful reronl uf si'iulinff Fur Shippers prompt.SATISFACTORY  ANM) I'KOKlTAI'.Uv returns. Write for "JTi)t feljuitrt fefjtpP"."  the only reliable, luvurate market report and price list published.  Write for K-NOW-lt'ii PBEE  AR  QRTTRFRT T������^  25-27 west Austin ave.  . tS. oriUt5t.ivI, Inc. DeptC67Chicago,u.s.a.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  .! A  COOLA   COURIER.  RF  Subscriptions  Payable  in  Advance.  CANADA.  ( ini:  Yk \ r   Six  Months    Tnuia: Mn.vnis   .$1.00  . 0.75  . 0.50  fcli/.'iJ.K' fc'riAl   tiUA.  ten or a dozen small cutUir"i  pending on me. There are  nuniher  <  ue-  any  thing-   that    might iL.  IIN'ITKD STATKS.  onk Ykak  $1.50  UnITKD   KlNCIiOM  AND TI1K CONTINKNT.  Onk Yk.m: $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find   for Bella Coola Courier for   . .subscription  Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed %  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,  October 28,   19) ������  m  HOE  Subscribe  for the  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coa^t between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance.of six hundred miles.  It Will be to your interest to keep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name - before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse.- Investors  should keep posted on develop-  m nits by reading the "Courier."  J  ��������� m ���������  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  7 TOWN.' Do not talk-support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  (H  not  IrOaMKW  POVERTY DESIRABLE.  In his exhortation at class  meeting the other night, Deacon  Jones spoke thusly:  "'Happy art thou, 0 man, who  was not born amidst the luxuries  of life.  "Lucky devil art thou who  canst eat the simple fare and live  the simple life down on the farm;  whose nose turneth not up at a  boiled dinner, or bacon and eggs,  or pork and beans.  "Health waketh thee at morn,  and accompanieth the slumbers  of night.  "Art thou an alderman-, and  puteth pounds.of roast turkey  and goblets of wine into thy  paunch, thou devourest an apoplexy. Swaljowest thou hot  sauces? Thou gulpest rheumatism and gout.  "Say not wickedly, '1 will not  repeat the Lord's prayer,' as it  is bsneath a gentleman to pray  for bread.  "Curse not clams, crabs or  flounders;' peradventure they  might blush to enter the doors  of thy gullet.  "Consider thyself not down  and out, because thou posse'ssest  not more than thou oughtest in  reason for thy use.  "Fortunate are thousands in  never having been favorites of  fortune.  "Contentsigheth not for roast  goose or turkey, or pheasant, or  quail, or bear, or venison, or  moose, or such like meats; she  lifteth not her eye not for-champagne, or other very old vintages, or trout, or.gold fish, or  white fish.  "She hateth not the sight of  the sun at dinner time, but preferred his radiance to'the glare  of an incandescent light."  iw������ff������w���������iMM������gs������rea^^  COFFEE  The Coffee of  Distinction  because   of   its   exquisite  flavor  Packed in our new hygienic  AIR-TIGHT TIN  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  The W. H. Malhin Company, Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Ramsay Bros. & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS  OF    ���������  Biscuits :: Candy :: Macaroni  Milk and Nut  Chocolate Bars  Also Refiners  of Syrup and  Packers of Molasses  WE STAND BEHIND OUR GOODS"  rynildseii&Co  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  G e n e r a J M ere hand is e  ./"  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  GAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  ^  cheers and refreshes  at any hour of the day.  You get the most delicious tea when you  v use       ***        '  isSSS  N**9f Sold  inBulk,  mm  !��������� TEA ���������!  iiwr������ifr<iin^imVri*  "THE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Burns'  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioner*  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Will You Help?  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to .any who are willing to assist.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  ' .���������.,���������������--,���������.������������������.��������� .     i.^i ������������������������������������*������������������ i^ yi...ii-,..-    i     ,. ;i;;i[i"i,i,i'",,m -1���������"   We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men^s Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������     G  Tents-Pack arid Riding Saddles  Ogilvie's  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  Settlers, Prospe&ors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosl suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  ALL GOOD GROCERS  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -   Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.

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