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Bella Coola Courier Oct 7, 1916

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 J  1   .   .1   \  k   /  /6  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR AUGUST.  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 74.   Minimum, 45.  Highest Max. <25tli)93. Lowest Win. (������0th) 45  Rainfall, 0.62 inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915) 34.33 inches.  VOL. 4���������NO. 52  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1916.  $1.00 a Year  British Capture  Eaucourt L/Abbee  After Days of Heavy Fighting  London, Oct. 5.-The town of  Euucourt L'Abbee, on Somme,  for possession of which heavy  fiKilling has boon in progress for  several days, is now entirely in  the hands of the British. During  last, night considerable shelling  took place on our front south of  Ancre. No change otherwise,  heavy rain falling since morning.  French Capture Line  of German Defences  British Red Cross Steamer Blown Up  Paris, Oct. 5.���������A strongly fortified ^ine of German defences  . between Morvale and St. Pierre  Vaast wood on Somme front, has  been captured by the French,  over two hundred prisoners were  taken.         Calais, Oct. 5.���������A British Red  Cross steamer blew up Sunday,  morning in the straits of Dover,  details lacking:' '  Roumanians Cross Danube  Sofia, Oct. 5���������Roumanians who  ' crossed the Danube and invaded  Bulgaria are described as "considerable units of troops."   No  clash between^ Bulgarians   and  . the invaders reported. ���������  Russians on Offensive  Petrograd, Oct. 5. ��������� Russian  troops are continuing the offensive against the forces of the  Central Powers and their Allies  in the province of Dobrudja.  A Russian gunboat on the river  Danube bombarded the left flank  of the Bulgarian army, near Rac-  hova, which lies fourteen miles  south of Tchschernav. Our offensive in the region of Rachova,  Tsopadin and Terveli continues.  Berlin Claims to Have  Sunk 35 Vessels in 9 Days  Berlin, Oct. 5.-35 vessels belonging to countries at war with  Germany of a total tonnage of  14,600 tons were sunk by German  submarines in the North Sea and  English Channel, between Sept.  20th and 29th.  Is It Peace or Submarine  Warfare Contemplated?  Long Branch, N. J., Sept. 5.���������  Count Bernstorff, the German  ambassador to the United States*  will call on President Wilson today. The contemplated visif of  Count Bernstorff revives the reports of a possible move for peace  in Europe or a resumption of  Germany's submarine-warfare;,-'  Paris, Oct; 5.���������It is officially  announced that'.Commander Au-  bin de Planpre has been appointed naval attache to the French  embassy at Washington.  Russians Resume  Offensive and  Smash Turks  Petrograd, Oct. 6.���������Suddenly  resuming their offensive in Turkish Armenia west of Trebizond,  the Russians with co-operation  of their Meet inflicted a severe  defeat to the Turks moving forward along a wide front. A,fortified position on the river in the  Karabumum region has been  captured, great losses inflicted  on the Turks. Progress for the  Russian army in their attacks on  Austro-German forces from Vol-  hynia to south of Dneister is reported. During a raid on Tuesday by enemy seaplanes in the  Baltic one hostile aircraft landed  and was captured by us near the  island of Runoin, gulf of Riga.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  French Capture Guns  Paris, Oct. 6.���������In the course  of the advance on the Somme  front east of Morvale, yesterday,  the, French captured nine 31-2  inch guns. Night calm on the  entire front. Notwithstanding  very bad weatheV ,our airmen  bombarded aviation grounds at  Colmar. * In night flight ninety  bombs,were dropped on searchlights,and military buildings at  Zeebrugge.  Paris, Oct. 6.���������Allied troops on  western end of Macedonian front  continue to press back the Bulgarian forces before Monastir.  More ground.gained and town of  Buf, twelve miles south of Monastir, been occupied.  Scotch and Irish Distinguish Themselves  London, Oct. 6.���������British troops  yesterday morning captured the  entire town of Yenikeuis, Greek  Macedonia, which lies two miles  east of Struma. Scottish and  Irish battalions especially distinguished themselves. In the  fighting for this position the Bulgarians suffered heavy losses.  Serbians crossed Tcherna river  and defeated adversaries on Tize  mountain, Serbia. Serbian territory recaptured now embraces  230 square kilometres, including  seven towns. French and Russians also continue forward  movement.  Greek government suspended  payments.because of shortage of  money.  Great Britain is in urgent need  of m'en; for her armies and also  her munition factories,  Washington; Oct. 5.- Justice  Strafford rendered his decision  todaljjf���������requiring Milton H. Smith  the presi'den't and other officials  of the Louisville and Nashville  railway to answer questions propounded by the Interstate Com-;  merce Commission regarding its  political contributions.  S. S. Camosun came in on time  Sunday morning, 9 o'clock. The  average number of passengers  disembarked and a smaller number went away.   *  The cannery offered the weekly quantum of salmon to the  cargo.       ���������  Harry Evansi thepopularpiano  tuner of Prince Rupert, is here  shedding his sunny smiles among  friends and customers.  Everybody and everything are  in better tune after one of his  visits.          '  Ned Allan of Lynn Valley, is  another visitor. He is one of  Bella Coola's.native sons, being  born here. He has resided with  his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thos.  Allan, near Vancouver since their  removal from the valley eleven  years ago.  During his stay he will.divide  his time between his grandmother, Mrs. Saugstad, and other  relatives. His father is still the I  owner of a ranch in the valley  and Ned will be looking after his  interests while here.  Andrew Netzell and Sven  Svenson came home after spending the summer at Beaver Cannery, Rivers Inlet. , . '   ���������  i/        ��������� "7"  ' The dairy industry of Bella  Coola has attained sufficient proportions to tempt a representative of the Magnetic Separator  Co., Mr. Curry, to pay the valley  a visit. He brought a number  of separators with him.  H. M.' Burritt of Mackay,  Smith, Blair & Co. and Geo. E.  Bennett of Leeson, Dickie, Gross  & Co., both of Vancouver, after  enjoying the^ fine climate, surroundings, society , and other  good things of Bella-Coola took  a reluctant leave - on Sunday.  They will no doubt be able to  persuade their respective firms  to send them for another week's  vacation to Bella Coola. They  both improved their time by placing the usual large orders with  the merchants.   Mrs. J. W. MacFarlane was  another outgoing passenger. She  will spend the winter among the  lofty peaks of the Rockies at  Denver, Colorado. ��������� '  Last'week, a party consisting  of John D. Galloway, provincial  mineralogist, and D. A. McKen-  non, second in command, Barney  Mulvany, packer, and Jas. Morgan, cook, came down from the  interior with a train of horses in  .their wake.  The expedition is out exploring  the mineral deposits of the country. It landed in Prince Rupert  July 1 and have examined the  general geological character of  the province from the Skeena  River down through the Omine-  ca, Francois Lake, Ootsa Lake  and surrounding territory.  The country around Hazelton  M'r.^Ga'ltoArVay found to be pretty  weir' explored by prospectors,  and considerable development  work and mining operation's in  progress; but further south there  has been very little prospecting  done, and as indications were  found to be very:promising for  mineral deposits Mr. Galloway  found that the crying need oi  this, part of the province was  prospectors. ���������  From Bella Coola the parly-  last, Monday to Kleena Kleene  and Tatlioka Lake where some  iron,deposits will be examined.  Mr/ Galloway expressed the  opinion that he would be back  here next summer for the purpose of making a geological survey of pur immediate surroundings.           Mr. A. R. Neale^assistant provincial horticulturist, accompan-  by Mrs. Neale, is again in the  valley. He came in''Friday of  last week for the purpose of aiding in the preparation of exhibits  for the fair held yesterday.  B. F. Jacobsen and Torger Olsen have left on ah extensive  prospecting trip into the regions  at the head of the South Bentink  Arm. As they are boJLh of the  very foremost in- the mysteries  of woodcraft, mountaineering  and kindred subjects we look  forward to their return with  great anticipations' of wealth  discovered.  We have received a letter from  A. H,, Tomlinson, whom we all  learned to know and respect during his incumbency of the position of provincial horticulturist  for this district. His manj  friends will be glad to know that  in his new field as lecturer in  forestry and landscape gardening at the Ontario Agricultural  College, he stilkrerhembers Bella  Coola and feels interested in  what is going on in what he calls  our "beautiful valley."  He tells of meeting Vincent  Clayton at Ottawa and found  him looking very well. We learn  with regret that Mr. Tomlinson  has met with the sorrow of losing  his brother Lieut. T. H. Tomlinson, who was killed at the front.  He has three other brothers with  the colors.  Garden Magazine  Subscribe now, the Magazine  for one year and Five Ornamental Trees, free by parcel  post, for One dollar.   .  Garden Magazine, Vancouver, B. C..  i 1  With the permission of Mrs.  Saugstad we publish a few extracts of a letter she has received  from her son Corporal Randolph  Saugstad, with the 102nd Battalion now on active service  "somewhere in France." Itis  dated September 8th.  "Well, here I am again back  within n*nge of the guns after  spending a week at a machine  gun school. I was sent from No.  1 Company to take,a course at a  place near Calais, right on the  coast of France, and believe me  the country is fine down there.  "Harry Burt came over to our  camp shortly after we got to  France and told us Ed. Grant had  been killed a few 'days before.  He was making good fast, but  was un fortunate. Our casualties  have been very light so far.  None of the boys from home are  hurt yet, only Inpvald Urseth  has got a little touch of "shell  Germans Tail to Enter  ~   British  Trenches  General Sir William Robertson,  chief of the British Imperial  '  staff.  London, Oct. 6.'���������South of An-  cre, on Somme front, intermittent shelling took place during  the night and north of Schwaben  redoubt our artillery caused many  casualties among the enemy infantry on the move. The Germans attempted unsuccessfully  to enter our trenches east of St.  Elo^ ,__  Serbians Capture  Important Position  Athens, Oct. 0. ���������Serbian military officers report desperate ef-,  forts being made by Bulgarians  to recapture Kaimakcalan plateau  which is key to Monastir, has  been frustrated. Serbians assaulted and captured the important fortified Bulgarian position  of Kocobey. *  shock," he will be alright in a  few days. _ Our major was killed  the other night, a chanceQnillet  happened to get him in the head.  "When I see the people over  here'(within range of the guns)  harvesting their crops, it makes  me homesick in a way. Anyway,  the war will be over, in a short  while and then we will all feel  the better for it."  Join the Forces  The 143rd Overseas Battalion  ���������the B. C. Bjfntams���������want one  hundred men to fill up the battalion, and any men in this district who is willing to serve his  King and Country in the field is  asked to communicate without  delay to Capt. J. Gorden Smith,  recruiting officer of the Bantams,  Victoria, B. C. He will arrange  for transportation of any man  who is physically fit to join the  Bantams at Victoria.  The 143rd ��������� Battalion is one  which is likely to make a glorious name for itself. It is one of  the two Bantams Battalions  formed in Canada on the lines of  the many formed in the United  Kingdom���������the other having its  headquarters at Toronto, and it  is commanded by an officer of  much experience in the fighting  in France���������Lieut.-Col. A. Bruce  Powley, who has been twice  wounded when serving with the  noted Seventh Battalion, and  with him are four other officers  who were wounded, in'.. France  and are experienced.in this war,  while other officers have served  in many other, campaigns.   The  Will take place at the Bella Criola  Hotel on Fridayevening, Oct. 13.  , Admittance���������Gentlemen,  one dollar.. Ladies, free.  Refreshments will be served.  Thoi-w. E. Jacobsen.  band of the battalion is considered one of the best that has been  formed in British Columbia.  II is expected that the Bantams will be ready to leave for <������������������  overseas in October, and efforts  are being made to have the necessary hundred men required to  bring the unit up to full strength  enrolled as quickly as possible. -  Largest Salmon Pack in the  //* tory of Bella Ccola.  The local cannery closed down  for the season this week w ith a  total pack of 38, ������00 cases of salmon. The 1914-15 seasons showed  increases of fish canned-here,  but this year's pack creates a  record-.  The sockeye salmon showed a  small fulling off over last year,  as also did the cohoes, but spring  salmon showed an increase over  previous seasons and the balance  was made up of other varieties.  ~Of this year's pack already-  over twenty thousand cases have  been shipped and the remaining  will be sent out as quickly as it  can be made ready for the market. In former years a certain  amount nf the fish was kept in  the canneries along the coast,  pending sale, but the ready demand .caused by the world war  enables the fish to be sent out  practically as soon as it is canned.  All the Indian population of  the local village have now returned from the different fish,  canning establishments on the  coast, where they have been employed for the past months. They  are now taking a well deserved  holiday. ,  In days past, the whole tribe  would be busy at this time'of the  year making ready their food  supply, drying fish, berries and  other delicacies for the coming  winter. It is not so now, as Poor  Loo has adopted the system of;  his white brethren, "enough for ,  the day is the evil thereof." \  *   (HlmrriT Nottn>    r  Sunday School    -    10:45 a.m.  Church Service    -   7:30 p.m.  Preacher:  Rev. Hans Sageng, A. B.  All Are Welcome.'  .?  >  S&>"<������ <J&>>cJ&> t>"><-81> -<j:<t> S-9 o, BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, Octoler 7,   19iC  i every year in such a manner that  the payments will be reduced as  PublishicdVVekklyatI'.ici.laCoolaijy ^m0 passes and with  the last  The Courier  tub U������:m.a Ccioj.a Piiiii.isiiiMJ Co. Ltd.  SUflSCKlP TION RATES:  Canada  1   Year   G Month*      3 Month*        Unilrd Stalei  1   Year   United Kingdom  1  Year   payment, which is the smallest  I he whole debt is paid.  Those (if our farmers who be-  *i.oo,liev<.'  they can   use  the  money  .   0.75  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the muniigemtnt  at ot>ee. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  "���������^profitably should now decide if  they wish lo'benefit hy the Act,  and simultaneously send in their  applications all together so that  tho inspection of the properties  by the government inspector  could be done in one trip.  Get together and co-operate.  .$1.50  .$1.00  For Advertising Kates,   Aiti.y  Office.  at  To CouiiEsi'ONnBNTS���������Wliili* unolijcctioriiiljlo anonymous communications will Iju imliltalK'ti. llu1  nanin nrol iiddifisof i-vory wnlorcil 'uicli lold'i"  must be uiven to the iilitor.  The Kditor reserves tlif riirht to lufuw imljli-  citluit of any letter. All mnmncniit ������t vritor'i)  rink.  '&alufl jJiipuli Hiturotiut v&i lex.  SATURDAY, OCT. 7, Ml (5.  \Jf/E beg to remind our readers that the Courier having completed its fourth year  the subscriptions of all our  early subscribers are now dm3  for renewal.  The management wishes to  thank our numerous readers  for their support during the  past and trusts to a continuance of the same in the future.  The subscription rate remains at $1  per year, payable strictly in advance.  The Wisdom of Borrowing  Capital.  The Agricultural, Credits Act  passed by the last legislature  should prove of great value to  the farmers. It'has generally  been held and advocated by most  men that it is very dangerous for  a person to, plunge into debt.  And on the whole this is good  advice, especially so to people  who do not handle money judiciously. But it must also be borne  in mind that the successful busi-  ness men have no hesitation in  t  adding to their capital by using  other people's money, and they  find that the profits derived from  such use amply compensate them  for the outlay in interest and  other expenses.  The farmer is also a business  man. He is both a manufacturer  and a merchant. He manufactures his products from the  ground and his live-stock and  places them upon the market as  best he can.  If he is able to raise his produce at a profit it is good business for him to increase production by enlisting additional capital.  He may increase the cultivated  area by the clearing of more land;  he may procure better dairy  stock, and derive a greater yield  of milk and butter.  For these and kindred purposes  the borrowing of money would  be advisable if followed up by  energetic and judicious management.  Hitherto the farmers have  found themselves handicapped  in the borrowing of money, by.  the high, interest demanded and  expenses connected with the obtaining of the loan. All this has  now been done away with by the  passing of the Agricultural Credits Act. :=-     .    ���������  Money can now be loaned at a  comparatively low rate of interest and on long time. Interest  and part of the principal are paid  Doubly Subscribed.  It is a matter for gratification  that the last Dominion War Loan  of $100,000,000 was doubly over:  subscribed. We remember at the  beginning of the war that some  papers in the United States professed   surprise   that   Canada  would'takc part in the war at all.  But the conception of the Canadian people of the questions at  issue was that they wercof equal  importance to the countries on  this side of the Atlantic as to  those in Europe.   And as the war  has been going on, this conception has been more deeply impressed,  and  today instead of  being discouraged over the prolonged,  fearful   struggle,  they  show their deep determination,  unflinching courage, and-firmer  faith of victory, by their continued sacrifices and support of  the government.   The dawn of  victory is rising; since last May  our"prospects have taken a decided turn for the better.  While we ought not to exult over  the misfortunes of any nation,  yet under the circumstances it is  pardonable to be glad to note  that the last German war loan  seems to be a failure.   Some hundreds of millions of francs had  i to be taken by force from a Belgian bank with the promise that  the forced loan would be repaid  with interest of 5 per cent two  years after the end of the war.  In spite of the censor, the following significant item appears  in the Cologne Gazette:  "However important and valuable are subscriptions by <the  million, our war loans would  never have been a great success  without small single' subscriptions.  "The farmers are afraid that  Germany must suffer bankruptcy  owing to the gigantic and,ever-  increasing cost of the war."  o    c     o     o    o  Resign 1  The taking of the civilian vote  in this province was completed  on the 14th inst., and the counting of the ballots was practically  completed the same day. Polls  for receiving the soldiers' vote  were opened about ten days earlier, and closed on the same day  as the civilian polls. All the  votes in British "Columbia were  counted and reported in a single  day. Three w.eeks have elapsed  since election day, and the counting of the soldiers' votes has not  yet begun. What is the reason?  With the circumscribing of the  area within which the ballot box  was to circulate so,as to include  only the United ' Kingdom and  Franco, the reason for delaying  Lhe count entirely disappeared.  The whole oversea soldier vote  will probably not exceed that^of  one of the successful candidates  in Vancouver. It could easily  have been counted and announced' on Sept. 14. Then, why the  month's delay?  The Liberal representative in  London has impressed upon Sir  Richard McBride the advisability  of having .an order-in-council  passed under section 17 of the  Act to hasten the taking of the  vote, the original reason for delay having entirely disappeared.  Nothing has been done. \What  is the reason for this extraordinary and contemptuous treatment of the electors? .  On the day following the election, we called Premier Bowser's  attention to the universal de-  mand for his retirement, as v,oiced  by the votes of the people. We  pointed out that any attempt to  hang on to office in face of the  demand for his withdrawal, could  only add to the general disapproval and disgust. We urged that  even a show of magnanimity on  his part by accepting his defeat  manfully and promptly retiring  from office, was his onlv chance  of winning back an atom of poplar approval. Instead of profiting by our advice, he instructed  his solicitor to ask for a recount  in Vancouver, which had the  effect of adding several hundreds  of votes to the total of one of his  opponets, and increasing that of  another very considerably. The  last grasp for power thus ended  disastrously. But even yet there  has been no indication of a change  (71  of front, no undertaking to shorten by a day even the four blank  weeks of suspense before the  vote so long taken will be counted. What is the reason for this  four weeks of cold storage treatment of the soldiers' ballots?  There must be some reason,  and a weighty one at that. ' It  cannot be imagined that the public is being deprived of the right  to takeover the government of  the country through a madman's  whim. Mr. Bowser should resign at once or" complete the  count without a day's further  delay. Even the Victoria Colonist demands that he resign the  premiership "as soon as he conveniently can." There is much  to be accomplished if British Columbia is to be saved from the  results of so many years of misrule, and every day's delay in  the assumption of office by Mr.  Bowser may produce- serious results.   It has been decided that  i  Mr. Bowser should go.   Let him  go at once.���������Vancouver Sun.  ,00000  . To the people of the North we  say���������Get down and work. You  y/ill now get a run for your  money. No obstacles will be put  in your way. Brewster will soon  be at the helm and will' steer  the ship safely into port where  the reward for the producer will  be great and satisfying. You  have placed your confidence in  Brewster. Do not be impatient.  The 'Bowser government tried  the get-rich-quick idea and it  was a sad and costly failure.  Brewster is out for production  from the citizens of the province  ���������the farmer, the miner, the  lumberman, the fisherman and  the manufacturer. Brewster  has a dirty mess to clean 'up at  Victoria. He will clean it up  right. It will take a little time  and in the meantime it is the  duty of every one to produce.���������  Omineca Herald. ���������   ���������  'ssms^aBsssssasaa  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd,  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  "MADE   IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  /"  CLUB OFFER  "\  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg   1. ,10  $2. no  The Courier   .'  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  The Courier   .       .       .'      .  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  l.'CO  $2.50  $1.00  . 1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  Both papers  for   ., .   $1750"  Both papers  for  .   .   $1.75  ^  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  -J  The Coffee of Distinction  because   of   its   exquisite  flavor  Packed in our new hygienic  AIR-TIGHT TIN  The W. H. Malkin Company, Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.c:  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN to repre*ent  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in different parts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known,hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest, energetic men only are'needed. We particularly  want a good man at Bella Coola and for coast points, also a man  on the G. T. P. Railway.  ���������wm���������niiTfcMiiiMiiiiwiii 11���������iiiwiwwmrni nnnnririT"mma 1 mimih iiii iwii himiii ibimiiii������������������iw ������������������������������������  HOE  HOE  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY*,  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      CamOSUn      Leaves  Vancouver  every  Thursday at 9 p. m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S.   "Coquitlam.". sails.;.from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and .Explosives,   will call  .at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, CArrall St., Vancouver ; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria. ���������...,���������. ���������'.,-  hoe  DO  HOE  !I  n  11  i'i  3$  w  :-M-:- 11  Saturday, October 7,   1916  BELLA) COOLA COURIER  No rust can attack the flues because they are so thoroughly alumiuized, and they economize nearly every bit  cf heat.  fenjfe  Before you invest in a new range let me show you the  Kooteuay's sensible ideas for saving time aitd labor.  Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  868  Reorganization of the  Conservative Party.  It is with considerable satis-  faction the Liberals of this Province and of the Dominion as a  whole contemplate the groat victory achieved in tho last election.  It was an almost complete turnover from no representation of  the Liberal party at all as tho result of the general election four  years ago and tho near annihila-  fioivof=Conservative representation in the next legislature. This  emphatic decision of the people  came as a surprise to a great  many; butundar the circumstances it is hard for us to understand how the result could be  Gany other.  Although the victory on the  whole was gratifying, yet it is  not without its regrettable features! One of these is the weak-  ness of the Opposition in the  legislature. We may have every  confidence in the integrity of the  men elected; 'but experience  teaches, and ouFlastgovernment  is.,an exemplification,, that too  much power will cause any party  to allow abuses to ��������� creep in and  weaken the good it may accomplish and finally, as in the government before'us, bring disaster.  The graceful thing for the Lib  erals to do under the circumstances would be to allow the  Conservatives to elect unopposed  their, candidate in the vacancy  occurring by the resignation of  II. C. Brewster from the seat of  the district of Albemi.  In view:.,, of the strenuous efforts made by the Conservatives  in the election of 1912 to wipe  out all Opposition and especially  so in the case of the Liberal  leader in that very constituency,  this^vould certainly be retribution with a vengeance.  It would not be just to charg<  the Conservative party with the  many sins of the McBride-Bow-  ser government, although it must  be admitted that the party press  defended the government until  the last. This may have been  done more in a sense of duty to  its party than because it approved of the actions of the administration.  The Conservative party is composed of members as loyal, capable and honest as the Liberal  party, and it is to be hoped it  will shake itself free from the  partnership of Bowserism. We  are glad to.note voices are raised  among the Conservatives to have  a convention called to reorganize  the. party.  The Conservatives would, in  our opinion, have made a far  better showing in the last election if they had had the convention six months ago and then  expressed their disapproval of  some'of the more flagrant of the  acts of the administration and  elected anew leader.  The result would have been the  election -j of a strong Opposition  J in the next legislature and that  would have been in the interest  of the province.  There is a probability that before long there will be a Dominion election and looking at the  results of the several by-elections and general elections held  lately throughout Canada, the  indications point to the return of  the Liberal party into power.  The defeat of the Conservatives in our province has had a  weakening effect upon the fortunes of their party not only in  this province but throughout the  whole of Canada. It^therefore  behoves it as well as the Liberal  party to boon their best behavior  in the days to come in order to  win in the trial of strength which  is before them.  The last election was a storm  purifying the political atmosphere and its beneficient effects  will be felt for years, not only  in our province but far beyond  its borders.  o  Not a Carpenter's Job  f.   It Is More Like a Watchmaker's  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  COAL MINING RIGHTS of (he Dominion, in  Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ai.bkkta,  the Yukon TeuritoUy. the North-west Tebki-  ���������TOKIES oiiil in u portion of' the I'KOVINCK of  HtUTIHH Comjmuia, may ho leased for a (orm of  twenty-one yoara at an annual rentul of SI un  acre. Not more than 2.KW acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in pcraln to the Aifcnt or Sub-Aireiit  of the district in which the nidus applied for  are aituuiwi,  Ir. surveyed territory the land inu������t be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unuurveyed teiritory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the.applicant  himself.  Ench application must be accompanied by a  fee of J5 which will be refunded if the riithts  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royally shall be paid on the merchant able output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The perbon operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with .sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royulty thereon.,. If, the coal mining riftht3  ore not being operated, such leturns should be  ���������.furnished at least once u year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to pur-  pliuse whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  At the rate of $10.00 an acre.  Tor full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Depaitmcntof the  Interior, Otlawu, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent.  of Dominion LumiH.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Intciior.  iN.n,���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.--30C90.  BUSINESS CARDS  non  Fur Sales Agency  COO dealers and trappers of U. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sates Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always. "  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  iol [^  -JJLOZ  21 121  Dealers and Trappers  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  V  ^^^^^^^s  ffisl3flBHBfiyfBif ^isli  wScVrkL^TISIgIhi i)^ftfinl  fis^p  SaShSS sjSffflBs8Sg  m l* HMfflffffnB^K^BfiB  SEOffiSHfyEgS^  1 A few lines we specially  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  Griffen & Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������  Canned and dried  fruits  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  Putting Soldiers Into Repair ���������  In a pioneer Western town,  about twenty years ago, writes  a correspondent, my watch stopped. .Neither winding nor shaking would make it go on again.-  Seeing "jeweller, and watchmaker" over a store, I went in.  The man opened my watch',  turned his head first on one side  and then on the otherr,and said  he thought he could put it all  right. When I got it back, it  went for half an hour, then stop-  ped'again. He had done it more  harm than good. It cost twice  as much to repair, in the end, as  if he had never touched it.  That man, I found, was a carpenter by trade. He had done  his best-but a carpenter's'best' On the care we take now de-  for a disabled watch is not quite pends the answer to the question  so curative as   his best for a whether our returning soldiers  are to be a burden or a help to  themselves and their "*fellow-  citizens.  Mere quacks and theoretical  cure-alls are mischievous enough  at any time, and especially at  times of great emergency like  ours.  This is no carpenter's job, and  not even a watchmaker's.  man's capacities have to be carefully studied, to avoid putting  round pegs into square holes.  rickety chair.--��������� --^=^===,  It was not a carpenter's job.  When a soldier comes home  "out of repair," we have got to  remember that a man is a more  delicate and complicated piece of  mechanism than even a watch.  Also, he is infinitely more valuable to his country than the  most marvellous chronometer  ever invented.  The country naturally insists  that the most skilful surgeons  and physicians shall be employed  to heal the soldier's physical ills.  But that is only the first stage  of the disabled soldier's treatment. Equal skill and thoroughness must be employed,to equip  hin educationally with technical knowledgeand practice for  rejoining the ranks of industry.  Even then we cannot turn him  adrift. We must exert continued and sytematic care to see  that he gets work suited to him,  or trouble is sure to follow.  The Military Hospitals Commission of the Dominion Government, and the Provincial Commissions and local Committees  in co-operation with it, are trying to do this. If any one can  help them, either with practical  suggestions or offers of steady  work, it is his duty to do so.  No two leaves on a tree have  precisely the same shape, and no  two men are exactly alike. Each  THIS, THE LAST WAR.  Secretary of War Baker predicts that the last world war is  being fought ^and that in the  future reason and not force would  settle disputes of nations.  "And when this war is ended,"  he continued,   "let us form a  league of all nations making it'  impossible for any nation again'  to disturb the peaceof the world.:  Then the best insurance policy;  the world has ever known will  have been taken out."  FheMasonCy LxischPiano  of lo-Jay will mal\e plain bur  privilege lo stale with authority:  "NO EINER  PIANO MADE!"  nSOlM DIRECT HY THE MANUFACTURERS       ���������''���������  tf]l Let us attend your Victor Record   ���������  Jj mail orders-���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, ,B. C.  ���������= _ _)������'.<������ ������k.*_  \JL7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  VXT^HAT person so independent?  \ft/HAT ambition more noble than lo  be a producer of  the necessaries'  of life?  7  7 (I l  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  THE REASONS for this enviable condition of. affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or r.o  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable; long warm "summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm pio-  duce from Bella Coola Valley "caiiicd cwsy  over twenty first prizes.  ELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses -wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  c~>  .Gef'Morc Money" for your Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected layout section  SHIP YOUR FtJIiS DIRECT <o"SHUIlERT"the largest  house In the World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMERICAN RAW Fl'kS  . n reliable���������responsible���������safe Fur House with an'unblemished reputation existing for "more than a third of a century." alone successful record of sending Fur Shippers prompt. SATISFACTORY  AND PROFITABLE returns: Write for "Tbt fc&aStrt fchlpptr."  the only reliable, accurate'��������� arlcet report and tirice list published.  Write, for ������-NOW-if������ FREE  AD   CUITRFRT   Inr   25-27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.  . Jts. onuaxL.ts.I, inc. Deptcc7 Chicago.u^jl  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year ..................:.. .'.$1.00  Six Months .........: 0.75  Three Months ................ l. 0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year. .'. $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year. .....  $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA. B. C.  Enclosed please find..: subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, October 7,   1916  Subscribe  or  ouner  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance o[ six hundred miles.  // will be to your interest to ������eep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip,the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  Stick to the Land,  We mentioned in our last issue  thatone of the reasons why agriculture in Bella Coola had not  developed as fast as climate and  soil warranted was that the  clearing of land was slow and  expensive,   c  , Today we call attention to another reason almost equally responsible for this regrettable  state of affairs, and that is the  ease of making money from  other sources.  The fishingof salmon has lured  the farmers away from their legitimate calling. The earning of  sevdral hundreds of dollars in the  summer mont lis has been a temptation too strong to resist. One  effect of this, which is apparent  to every traveller through the  valley, is the comparative,handsome residences placed in clearings of less than ten or twenty  acres.  Even (hough the fanners make  i  a larger immediate profit by thus  turning their energies to other  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Ramsay Bros. & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS  OF .  Biscuits :: Candy :: Macaroni  Milk and Nut  Chocolate Bars  Also Refiners of Syrup and  Packers of Molasses  "WE STAND BEHIND OUR GOODS"  Will You Help?  pEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  j   DISTRICT   OP   COAST���������BANGE   III.  'Pake Notice that 1, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, 13. C, occupation contractor, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  half a mile within the western entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to' the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less,  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Da'pel, Augustan. 1915.     Sept. 2-Nov. ���������!  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones \villobe pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to,supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist  occupations, yet it is only a hand  to mouth policy that will not  bring the permanent income,  a large area of cultivated fields  and herds of well-bred -'stock  would yield.  There is no occupation which  to the ordinary endowed man  furnishes a safer livelihood than  intelligent farming. It must be  admitted that some years ago  the prices of farm produce were  so low that the returns the farmers received for his labor were  neither satisfactory nor just.  But all that has changed now,  prices are high and still rising,  the population of the world is  increasing in spite of the slaughter on the fields of battle. lhe  growth of the urban population  is greater than that of the country. The production of food  from the land does not keep  pace with the increased mouths  to be fed.  Arid this disproportion of the  population will not be readjusted  'or a long time, and in the mean-  fr*M  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  U TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk' is  cheap. The best way to show-  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" arid you  are doing something for yourself  and youp community.  ^  ^  Never Sold  InBulk.  cheers and refreshes  at any hour of the day*  LYou get the most delicious tea when you  use  time the demand and prices of  farm produce will be such that  the farmers can do no better than  devote their undivided efforts  to the production of' food.  Our attention .has just been  called to the fact that the well-  known firm of wholesale'butchers, Pat Burns & Co., has received an order to provide $3,-  000,000 worth of cured meats,  hams and pork for the, French  army. It is estimated it will  take 350,000 hogs to fill the first  contract which must be delivered  from November to March.  But Bella.Coola will not have  to go very fdr to find' a market  for all it can raise. It is right  at our doors and it will be a serious reflection upon the character  of our community if it cannot  supply this market adequately  and in ever-increasing quantities from now on. ���������     ,  The  farmers should   get together and discuss these matters  | during the winter months under  | the auspices of the local Farm-  1 ers' Institute.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  <������&���������������������������������������  TEA  1  TIE two principal reasons  T  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  0  HOC  why you should buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They   are   the   only  brands   produced  in ,  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Can'^.-imraiffillHMtYWIMii ���������  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and  Provi������ioner������  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Ogilyie's  ftoyal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  rynildsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing? Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    Q    Q  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the moft suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition. .  Paints -  Oils - Varnishes -  Stains  Crockery and.Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service '"���������-  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  ���������>;, IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR AUGUST.  Compiled  by  Mr. C.  H.  Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 7<1.    Minimum, 45.  Highest Max. {25th) 93: Lowest. Min. (J.Oth) 15  Rainfall, 0.62 inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915)  34.33 inches.  V0lk4-NO. 52  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7,  1916.  $1.00 a Year  British Capture  Eaucourt L'Abbee  After Days of Heavyjighting  London, Oct. 5.���������The town of  Russians Resume  Offensive and  Smash Turks  Petrograd, Oct. 6.��������� Suddenly  - Eaucourt  LvAbbee, on  Somme, j resuming their offensive in Tur-  for possession of which heavy ! kish Armenia west of Trebizond,  fighting has been in progress for Uhe  Russians with co-operation  several days, is now entirely in jof their fleet inflicted  a severe  the hands of the British.   During! defeat to the Turks moving for-  last night considerable shelling! ward along a wide front.    A for-  t3o!c place on our front south of Uified position on the river in the  Ancre.    No  change  otherwise, | Karaburnum   region   has   been  heavyrainfallingsince morning, j captured,  great  losses inflicted  on the Turks. Progress for the  Russian army in their attacks on  Austro-German forces from Vol-  hynia to south of Dneister is reported. During a raid on Tuesday by enemy seaplanes in the  Baltic one hostile aircraft landed  and was captured by us near the  island of Runoin, gulf of Riga.  French Capture Line  of German Defences  British Red Cross Steamer Blown Up  - Paris, Oct. 5.��������� A strongly fortified line of German defences  between Morvale and St. Pierre  Vaast wood on Somme front, has  been captured by the French,  over two hundred prisoners were  taken.  Calais, Oct. 5.--A British Red  Cross steamer blew up Sunday  morning in the straits of Dover,  details lacking.  Roumanians Cross Danube  . .   . _ .  Sofia, Oct. 5���������Roumanians who  crossed the Danube and invaded  Bulgaria are described as "considerable units of troops." No  clash between Bulgarians and  the invaders reported.  Russians on Offensive  Petrograd, Oct. 5.��������� Russian  troops are continuing the offensive against the forces of the  Central Powers and their Allies  in the province of Dobrudja.  A Russian gunboat on the river  Danube bombarded the left flank  of the Bulgarian army near Rac-  hova, which lies fourteen miles  south of Tchschernav. Our offensive in the region of Rachova,  Tsopaclin and Terveli continues.  Berlin Claims lo Have  Sunk 35 Vessels in 9 Days  Berlin, Oct. 5.-35 vessels belonging to countries at war with  Germany of a total tonnage of  14,600 tons were sunk by German  submarines in the North Sea and  English Channel, between Sept.  20th and 29th.  French Capture Guns  Paris, Oct. 6.���������In the course  of the advance on the Somme  front east of Morvale, yesterday,  the French captured nine 3 1-2  inch guns. Night calm.on the  entire front. Notwithstanding  very bad weather, our airmen  bombarded aviation grounds at  Colmar. In night flight ninety  bombs were dropped on searchlights and military buildings at  Zeebrugge.  Paris, Oct. 6.���������Allied troops on  western end of Macedonian front  continue to press back the Bulgarian forces before Monastir.  More ground gained and town of  Buf, twelve miles south of Monastir, been occupied.  Scotch and Irish Distinguish Themselves  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  London, Oct. G.���������British troops  yesterday morning captured tho! vacation to Bella Coola.    They  S. S. Camosun came in on time  Sunday morning, 9 o'clock. The  average number of passengers  disembarked and a smaller number went away.  The cannery offered the weekly quantum of salmon to the  cargo.          Harry Evans, the popularpiano  tuner of* Prince Rupert, is here  shedding his sunny smiles among  friends and customers.  Everybody and everything are  in better tune after one of his  visits.          Ned Allan of Lynn Valley, is  another visitor. He is one of  Bella Coola's native sons, being  born here. He has resided with  his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thos.  Allan, near Vancouver since their  removal from the valley eleven  years ago. ,.  During his stay he will divide  his time between his grandmother, Mrs. Saugstad, and other  relatives. His father is still the  owner of a ranch in the valley  and Ned will be looking after his  interests while here.  Andrew Netzell and Sven  Svenson came home after spending the summer at Beaver Cannery, Rivers Inlet.  > The dairy industry of Bella  Coola has attained sufficient proportions to tempt a representative of the Magnetic Separator  Co., Mr. Curry, to pay the valley  a visit. He brought a number  of separators with him.  H. ' M. Burritt of Mackay,  Smith, Blair & Co. and Geo. E.  Bennett of Leeson, Dickie, Gross  &Co., both of Vancouver, after  enjoying the fine climate, surroundings, society and other  good things o*f Bella Coola took  a reluctant leave on Sunday.  They will no doubt be able to  persuade their respective firms  to send them for another week's  mineral deposits Mr, .Galloway  found that the crying need oi  this part of the province was  prospectors.  From Bella Coola the party  last Monday to Kleena Kleene  and Tatlioka Lake where some  iron deposits will be examined.  Mr. Galloway ' expressed the  opinion that he would be back  here next summer for the purpose of making a geological survey of our immediate surroundings.    Mr. A. R. Neale, assistant provincial horticulturist, accompan-  by. Mrs. Neale, is again in the  valley. He came in Friday of  last week for the purpose of aiding in the preparation of exhibits  for the fair held yesterday.  Is It Peace or Submarine  Warfare Contemplated?  Long Branch, N. J., Sept. 5.--  Count Bernstorff, the German  ambassador to the United States,  will call on President Wilson today. The contemplated visit of  Count Bernstorff revives the re-  Ports of a possible move for peace  in Europe or a resumption of  Germany's submarine warfare.  Paris, Oct. 5.���������It is officially  announced that Commander Au-  bin de Planpre has been appointed naval attache to the French  embassy at Washington.  entire town of Yenikeuis. Greek-  Macedonia, which lies two miles  east of Struma. Scottish and  Irish battalions especially distinguished themselves. In the  fighting for this position the Bulgarians suffered heavy losses.  Serbians crossed Tcherna river  and defeated adversaries on Tize  both improved their time by placing the usual large orders with  the merchants.   Mrs. J. W. MacFarlane was  another outgoing passenger. She  will spend the winter among the  lofty peaks of the Rockies at  Denver, Colorado.  I/ist week, a party consisting  momikkkk Serbian ten-i-jof John 1)  Galloway. pvovmeM  i minora ogist, and D. A. JMelven-  tory   recaptured  now  embraces, 2"%Jni} in command. Barney  Mulvany, packer, and Jas. Morgan, cook, came down from the  interior with a train of horses in  their wake.  The expedition is out exploring  the mineral deposits of the country. It landed in Prince Rupert  July 1 and have examined the  general geological character of  the province from the Skeena  River down through the Omine-  ca, Francois Lake, Ootsa Lake  and surrounding territory.  The country around Hazelton  Mr. Galloway found to be pretty  well explored by prospectors,  and considerable development  work and mining operations in  progress; butfurfhersouththere  has been very little prospecting  done, and as indications were  found to be very promising for  B. F. Jacobsen and Torger Olsen have left on an extensive  prospecting trip into the regions  at the head of the South Bentink  Arm. As they are both of the  very foremost in the mysteries  of woodcraft, mour.taii'.eciir.g  |and kindred subjects we look  forward to their return with  great anticipations of wealth  discovered.  We have received a letter from  A. H. Tomlinson, whom we all  learned to. know and respect during his incumbency of the position of provincial horticulturist  for this district. His main  friends will be glad to know that  in his new field as lecturer in  forestry and landscape gardening at the Ontario Agricultural  College, he still remembeis Bella  | Coola and feels interested in  what is going on in what he calls  our "beautiful valley."  He tells of meeting Vincent  Clayton at Ottawa and found  him looking very well. We learn  with regret that Mr. Tomlinson  has met with the sorrow of losing  his brother Lieut. T. H. Tomlinson, who was killed at the front.  He has three other brothers with  the colors.  Gener  chie  Germans Fail to Enter  British  Trenches  London, Oct. 6.���������-South of Ancre, on Somme front, intermittent shelling took place during  the night and north of Schwaben  redoubtour artillery caused many  casualties among the enemy infantry on the move. The Germans attempted unsuccessfully  to enter our trenches east of St.  Eloi.  Serbians Capture  Important Position  Athens, Oct. 6.���������Serbian military officers report desperate ef-  i forts being made by Bulgarians  j to recapture Kaimakcalan plateau  which  is  key to  Monastir,  has  been frustrated.      Serbians as-'  ���������al Sir William Robertson, 'saufted and captured the import-  f of the British Imperial    ; ant fortified  Bulgarian  position  staff. of Kocobey.  shock," he will be alright in a  few days. Our major was killed  the other night, a chance bullet  happened to get him in the head.  "When I see the people over  here (within range of the guns)  harvesting their crops, it makes  me homesick in a way. Anyway,  the war will be over in a short  while and then we will all feel  the better for it."  230 square kilometres, including  seven towns. French and Russians also continue forward  movement.  Greek government suspended  payments because of shortage of  money.  Great Britain is in urgent need |  of men  for her armies and also  her munition factories.  Washington, Oct. 5. - Justice  Strafford rendered his decision  today, requiring Milton H. Smith  the president and other officials  of the Louisville and Nashville  railway to answer questions propounded by the Interstate Commerce Commission regarding its  political contributions.  ! Garden Magazine  Subscribe now, the Magazine  for one year and Five Orna-  : mental Trees, free by 'parcel:  post, for One dollar.  :  Garden Magazine, Vancouver, B. C.  ��������� ���������-   --  ���������  With the permission of Mrs.  Saugstad we publish a few extracts of a letter she has received J  from her son Corporal Randolph!  Saugstad, with the 102nd Bat- j  talion now on active service;  "somewhere in France." Itisj  dated September 8th.  "Well, here I am again back-  within range of the guns after  spending a week at a machine  jrunschool. I was sent from No.  1 Company to take a course at a  place near Calais, right on the  coast of France, and believe me  the country is fine down there.  "Harry Burt came over to our  camp shortly after we got to  France and told us Ed. Grant had  been killed a few days before.  He was making good fast, but  was un fortunate. Our casualties  have been very light so far.  None of the boys from home are  hurt yet. only Ingvald Urseth  has got a little touch of "shell  Join the Forces  The 143rd Overseas Battalion  ���������the B. C. Bantams���������want one  hundred men to fill up the battalion, and any men in this district who is willing to serve his  King and Country in the field is  asked to communicate without  delay to Capt. J. Gorden Smith,  recruiting officer of the Bantams,  Victoria, B. C. He will arrange  for transportation of any man  who is physically fit to join the  Bantams at Victoria.  The 143rd Battalion is one  which is likely to make a glorious name for itself. It is one of  the two Bantams Battalions  formed in Canada on the lines of  the many formed in the United  Kingdom- the other having its  headquarters at Toronto, and it  is commanded by an officer of  much experience in the fighting  in France- Lieut.-Col. A. Bruce  Powley, who has been twice  wounded when serving with the  noted Seventh Battalion, and  with him are four other officers  who were wounded in France  and are"experienced in this war,  while other officers have served  in many other campaigns.    The  A Dance  band of the battalion is considered one of the best that has been  formed in British Columbia.  It is expected that the Bantams will be ready to leave for  overseas in October, and efforts  are being made to have the necessary hundred men required to  bringtheunit up to full strength  enrolled as quickly as possible.  Largest Salmon Pack in the  HLtory of Bella Ceo la.  The local car.nery closed down  for the season this week with a  total pack of 38,������00 cases of salmon. The 1914-15 seasons showed  increases of fish canned here,  but this year's pack creates a  record.  The sockeye salmon showed a  small falling off over last year,  as also did thecohoes, but spring  salmon showed an increase over  previous seasons and the balance  was made up of other varieties.  Of this year's pack already  over twenty thousand eases have  been shipped and the remaining  will be sent out as quickly as it  can be made, ready for the market. In former years a certain  amount of the fish was kept in  the canneries along the coast,  pending sale, but the ready demand caused by the world war  enables the fish to be sent out  practically as soon as it is canned.  All the Indian population of  the local village have now returned from the different fish  canning establishments on the  coast, where they have been employed for the past months. They  are now taking a well deserved  holiday.  In clays past, the whole tribe  would be busy at this time of the  year making ready their food  supply, drying fish, berries and  other delicacies for the coming  winter. It is not so now, as Poor  Loo has adopted the system of  his white brethren, "enough for  the day is the evil thereof."  Will take place at the Bella Coola j  Hotel on Friday evening, Oct. 13. !  Admittance- Gentlemen,  one dollar.    Ladies, i'we.  Refreshments will be served.  Thorw. E. Jacobsen  (Hlutrrit Nhttre  Sunday School     -     10:45 a.m.  Church Service     -    7:30 p.m.  Preachor:  L Rev. Hans Sageng, A.  H.  a All Are  Welcome.  19  1  1 BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,   Ocioler 7,  e  ourier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada     \-.  1 Year $1.00  6 Month*"        0.75  3 Months      0.50  United States  1  Year..: $1.50  United Kingdom  ���������  1 Year.. ? '.. .$1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularlyjplease notify the management  at once. ^Changes in address should be  sent in as. soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,   Apply at  Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable anonymous jpommunications will be published, the  name and/address of every writer of such letters  muat be (fjven to the editor.  The Editor reserves tho rifsht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript al writer's  risk.  every yearin such a manner that  the payments will be reduced as  time passes, and with the last  payment, which is the smallest  the whole debt is paid.  Those of our farmers who believe they can use the money  profitably should now decide if  they wish to benefit by the Act,  and simultaneously send in their  applications all together so that  the inspection of the properties  by the government inspector  could be done in one trip.  Get together and co-operate.  Germany must suffer bankruptcy  owing to the gigantic and ever-  increasing cost of the war."  '&alua'jmpult mtprrma rst icx."  SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 1916.  i  \Y/e beg to.remind our readers that the Courier having completed its fourth year  the subscriptions of all our  early subscribers are now due  for renewal.  The 'management wishes to  thank oar numerous. readers  for their support during the  past and trusts to a continur  ance of the same in the future.  The subscription rate remains at $1  per year, payable strictly in advance.  The Wisdom of Borrowing .  Capital.  The Agricultural Credits Act  , passed -by the last legislature  should prove of great value to  the farmers. It has generally  been held and advocated by most  men that it is very dangerous for  a person to" plunge into debt.  And on the whole this is good;  advice, especially so to people  who do not handle money judiciously. But it must also be borne  in mind that the successful business men have no hesitation in  adding to -their capital by using  other people's money, and they  fi nd that th e p rofi ts d erived from  such use amply compensate them  for the outlay in interest and  other expenses/.      ���������  The farmer is also a business  man. He is both a manufacturer  and a merchant. He manufactures his products from the  ground and his live-stock and  places them upon the market as  best he can.  If he is able to raise his produce at a profit it is good busi-  nesM for him to increase production by enlisting additional capital.  He may increase the cultivated  area by the clearing of more land;  he may procure better dairy  stock, and derive a greater yield  of milk and butter.  For these and kindred purposes  the borrowing of money would  be advisable if followed up by  energetic and judicious management.  Hitherto the farmers have  found themselves handicapped  in the borrowing of money by  the high interest demanded and  expenses' connected with the obtaining of the loan. All this has  now been done away with by the  passing of the Agricultural Credits Act.  Money can now be loaned at a  comparatively low rate of interest and on long time. Interest  and part of the principal are paid j  Doubly Subscribed.  It is a matter for gratification  that the last Dominion War Loan  of $100,000,000 was doubly oversubscribed. We remember at the  beginning of the, war that some  papers in the UniLed States professed surprise that Canada  would take part in the,war at all.  But the conception of the Canadian people'of the questions at  issue was'lhat they were of equal  importance to the countries on  this side, of the Atlantic as to  those in Europe. And as the war  has been going on, this conception'has been more deeply impressed, and today instead-of  being discouraged over the prolonged, fearful struggle, they  show their deep determination,  unflinching courage, and firmer  faith of victory, by their continued sacrifices and support of  the government. The dawn of  victory is rising; since last May  our prospects have taken a decided turn for the better.  While we ought not to exult over  the misfortunes of any nation,  yet under the" circumstances it is  pardonable to be glad to note  that the last German war loan  seems to be a failure. Some hundreds of millions of francs had  to be taken by force from a Belgian bank with the promise that  the forced loan would be repaid  with interest of 5 per cent two  years after the end of the war. "  In spite of the censor, the following, significant item appears  in the Cologne Gazette:   .  "However important and valuable are   subscriptions   by the  million, our war. loans would  never have been a great success  without small single subscriptions.  '-'The farmers are afraid that  Resign! .  The taking of the civilian vote  in this province was completed  on the 14th inst., and the counting of the ballots was practically  completed the same day.    Polls  for receiving the -soldiers' vote  were opened about ten days earlier, and "closed on the same day  as the  civilian  polls.     All  the  votes in British Columbia were  counted and reported in a single  day."   Three weeks have elapsed  since election day, and the counting of the soldiers' votes has not  yet begun.- What is the reason?  With the circumscribing of the  area within which the ballot box  was to circulate so as to include  only  the ..United  Kingdom and  France, the reason for delaying  the count entirely disappeared.  The whole oversea soldier vote-  will probably not exceed that of  one of -the successful candidates  in Vancouver.    It could  easily  have been counted and announced on Sept. 14.    Then, why the  month's delay?  The Liberal representative in  London has impressed upon Sir  Richard McBride the advisability  of having an order-in.-council  passed under section 17 of the  Act.to hasten the taking of the  vote, the original reason for delay having entirely disappeared.  Nothing has been done. What  is the reason for this extraordinary "and contemptuous treatment of the electors?  .On the day following the election, we called Premier Bowser's  attention to the universal demand forhis retirement, as voiced  by the votes of the people. We  pointed out that any attempt to  hang on to office in face of the  demand forhis withdrawal, could  only add to the general disapproval and disgust. We urged that  even a show of magnanimity on  his part by accepting his defeat  manfully and promptly retiring  from office, was his only chance  [of winning back an atom of poplar approval. Instead of profiting by our advice, he instructed  his solicitor to ask for a recount  in Vancouver, which had the  effect of adding several hundreds  of votes to the total of one of his  opponets, and increasing that of  another very considerably. The  last grasp,for power thus ended  disastrously., But even yetthere  has been no indication of a change  of front, no undertaking to shorten by a day even the four blank  weeks of suspense before the  vote so long taken will be count-  ed. What is the reason for this  four weeks of'cold storage treat-  ment of the soldiers' ballots?  There must be some reason,  and a-weighty one at that. It  cannot be imagined that the public" is being deprived of the right  to take over the government of  the country through a madman's  whim. Mr. Bowser should resign at once or complete , the  count without a day's further  delay. , Even' the Victoria Colonist demands that he resign .the  premiership "as soon as he conveniently can." There is much  to be accomplished if British Co-  lumbia is to be saved from the  results of so many years of misrule, and every day's delay in  the assumption of office by Mr.  Bowser may produce serious results. It has been decided that  Mr. Bowser should go. Let him  go at once.���������Vancouver Sun.  o    o     o    o     o  To the people of the North we  say���������Get down and work. You  will now get a run for your  money. No obstacles will be put  in your way. Brewster will soon  be at the helm -and will steer  the ship safely into port where  the reward for. the producer will  be great and satisfying. You  have placed your confidence in  Brewster. Do not be impatient.  The Bowser government tried  the get-rich-quick idea and it  was a sad and costly failure.  Brewster is out for production  from the citizens of the province  ���������the farmer, the miner, the  lumberman, the fisherman and  the manufacturer. Brewster  has a dirty mess to clean up at  Victoria. He will clean it up  right. It will take a little time  and in the meantime it is the  duty of every one to produce.���������  Omineca Herald.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND  MEN'S  FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE  WEST"  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  MADE    IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Order  (t  CLUB  OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have mado arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of readinj.. ul  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier $1.00  Fanners Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  The Courier   .       .       .,  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  The Courier   .       . .   ,.  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  .  1.00  $2.00  Both  for   .  Both  for   .  pap'crs  .   $1.50  papers  .   $1.75  ���������V  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  J\  COFFEE  The Coffee of Distinction  because   of   its   exquisite  flavor  Packed in our new hygienic  AIR- TIGHT TIN  The W. H. Malkin Company, Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  ������2Sy������i3B&rf  IfHHQ^���������fffvB^USS- oLT?- WANT MEN .0  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in differed  f pros i fit  w���������w   ���������...���������.-..t 1 arts of  the Province in the sale of their' wel 1-kn'own hardy nuivery slock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and rvmiinira-  tive.    Honest, energetic men only are needed.    We i������  want a good man at, Bella Coola and for coast poii  on the G. T. P. Railway.  its, a  !���������!!<���������!!  jiriy  man  HOE  =3\9\C  30E  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SEKV'K'K  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  &��������� S.       CamOSlHl"   Leaves   Vancouver   every  Thursday at 9 p.m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY.  S. S. "COQUITLAM" sails from Vancouver  nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, wil  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  f.irt-  cali  In  For rutes of Freight, Fuiva and other infonn������ti������ii, ;;|'l  - (3k<>.  Mi'<iiiM''   '  Hkad Office, Carkai.l St.',   Vancouvku  "Bent,  1003 Govkknmknt St., Victoria.  or Saturday. Ocioler 7,   1916  BELLA COOLA  COURIER  ^^^^^aaagawwcfflBgBa  No rust can attack the flues because they are so thoroughly;, aluminized, and they economize nearly every bit  of heat.  5^/yfe  Before you invest in a new range let me show you the  Kootenay's sensible ideas for saving time and labor.  Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  808  Reorganization of the  Conservative Party.  It is with considerable satis-  erals to do under the circumstances would be to allow the  Conservatives to elect unopposed  faction the Liberals of this Pro-itheir candidate in the vacancy  vince and of the Dominion as a  whole contemplate the great victory achieved in the last election.  It was an almost complete turnover from no representation of  the Liberal party at all as there-  suit of the general election, four  years ago and the near annihilation of Conservative representation in the next legislature. This  emphatic decision of the people  came as a surprise to a great  many; but under the circumstances it is hard for us to understand  how the result could be  any other.  Although the victory on  the  whole was gratifying, yet it is  not without its regrettable features.    One of these is the weakness of  the  Opposition   in the  legislature.    We may have every  confidence in the integrity of the  men   elected ;   but   experience  teaahes, and our last government  is  an   exemplification   that too  much power will cause any party  -to allow.abuse's to creep in and  weaken the good it may accomplish and finally, as in the government before us, bring disaster.  The graceful thing for the Lib-  occurring by the resignation of  M. C. Brewster from the seat of  the district of Alberni.  In view of the strenuous efforts made by the Conservatives  in the election of 1912 to wipe  out all Opposition and especially  so in the case of the Liberal  leader in that very constituency,  this would certainly be retribution with a vengeance.  It would not be just to chargc-  the Conservative party with the  many sins of the McBride-Bow-  ser government, although it must  be admitted that the party press  defended the government until  the last. This may have been  done more in a sense of duty to  its party than because it approved of the actions of the administration.  The Conservative party is composed of members as loyal, capable and honest as the Liberal  party, and it is to be hoped it  will shake itself free from the  partnership of Bovvserism. We  are glad to note voices are raised  among the Conservatives to have  a convention called to reorganize  the party.  The Conservatives  would,  in  our opinion, have made a far  better showing, in the last election if they.had had the convention six months ago and then  | expressed their disapproval of  some of the more flagrant of the  acts, of the administration and  elected a new leader.  The result would have been trie'  election of a strong Opposition  in the next legislature and that  would have been in the interest  of the province.  There is a probability that before long there will be a Domini-  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  v- Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Albekta,  the Yukon TEHKiTOitr. the North-west Terki-  1 Tories and in a portion of the Province of  British Columhia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of H an  acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Ascent  of the district in which the rsschla applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land mu3t be described by sections, or lexal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of. JO which will be'refunded'if. the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  Not a Carpenter's Job  It Is More Like a Watchmaker's  .  . _,. , ������������������w.. .eturns should be  I furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 nn acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of fominion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.- Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������3065O.  BUSINESS CARDS  non  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  On    election    and    looking   at   the,   lhf* r������yaky thereon.    If the eoal mining rights  I.?1'1' '}0.1 ***'"*{ operated, such iei  results of the several by-elections and general elections held  lately throughout Canada, the  indications point to the return of  the Liberal party into power.  The defeat of the Conservatives in our province has had a  weakening effect upon the fortunes of their party not only in  this province but throughout the  whole of Canada. It therefore  behoves it as well as the Liberal  party to be on their best behavior  in the days to come in order to  win in the trial of strength which  is before them.  The last election was a storm  purifying the political atmosphere and its beneficient effects  will be felt for years, not only  in our province but far beyond  its borders.  1 heivlasoncr ixischriano  of to-day will mak.e plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  EINER   PIANO MADE I"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  hi  I  tf]T  Let us attend  your Victor Record  jl   mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  ason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B, C  M,  ill  Fur Sales Agency  C00 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  o"  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  "��������� ';,k'k; *'���������-'. ���������' k  : ��������� :^dL  ��������� 7 JBf&g&fEhvsi:  W&jgESk  3������3H^i������l������i91n  KSfff  ���������A *fS  I*. 9*  ���������i'-'J hit  -fJi'tl'C^S".'''  ���������g5?f?v.k  ^:j'tik^5!s;fei;.v:  "���������"S-'lfit   ?- .: '" -   "'St':  999 .H * "?'-���������* Iv  itmV  *������.��������������� "-������"���������- ���������-'  jSBH 'j'if'iSf &?���������:���������  &s**i  sty���������~>  ���������   *,-��������� ���������������k-.- I'itiS ,;EV...������i..*...  ''k;'':k*l;y:^  '    \   -      . **-J . . .'V  IS!;-  if" ���������.'���������  .J:^prr;r.-."  -���������-n 1: -j:' a"'  > ' ��������� *:'��������� ���������'���������  :&i^*ipmV*^rk*k  v>:.::,.1-''-jj'.:'������/X<,''-;'-'-'ir'.  k^.;-T^r-7Tkf.'k.  "'"."k'^7; ���������.'-.������������������;'' ?7~ ;'.���������''.'  A few lines toe specially  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  Griff en & Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������  Canned and dried  fruits  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd,  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C. |  Putting Soldiers Into Repair  In a pioneer Western town,  about twenty.years ago, writes  a correspondent, my watch stopped. Neither winding nor shaking would make it go on again.  Seeing "jeweller and watchmaker" over a store, I went in.  The man opened my watch,  turned his head first on one side  and then on the other, and said  he thought he could put it all  right. When I got it back, it  went for half an hour, then stopped again. He had done it more  harm than good. It cost twice  as much to repair, in the end, as  if he had never touched it.  That man, I found, was a carpenter by trade-. He had done  his best���������but a carpenter's 'best'  for a disabled watch is not quite 'pends the answer to the question  so curative as   his  best  for a  rickety chair.  \A/HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \7L7HAT person so independent?  Y^HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella   Coola   farmers are  independent)  they are strangers to hard times.  T^HE REASONS  for this enviable  condi-  ���������k tion of  affairs   are   obvious  to   anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.    .  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley can ltd away  over twenty first prizes.  man's capacities have to be carefully  studied,  to avoid putting  round pegs into square holes.  On the care we take now de-  ItMways  Pleases  ��������� 4  It was not a carpenter's job.  When a soldier comes home  "out of repair," we have got to  remember that a man is a more  delicate and complicated piece of  mechanism than even a watch.  Also, he is infinitely more valuable to his country than the  most marvellous chronometer  ever invented.  The country naturally insists  that the most skilful surgeons  and physicians shall be employed  to heal the soldier's physical ills.  But that is only the first stage  of the disabled soldier's treatment. Equal skill and thoroughness must be employed to equip  him educationally with technical knowledge and practice for  rejoining the ranks of industry.  Even then we cannot turn him  adrift. We must exert continued and sytematic care to see  that he gets work suited to him,  or trouble is sure to follow.  The Military Hospitals Commission of the Dominion Government, and the Provincial Commissions and local Committees  in co-operation with it, are trying to do this, if any one can  help them, either with practical  suggestions or otters of steady  work, it is his duty to do so.  No two leaves on a tree have  precisely the same shape, and no  two men are exactly alike.  Each  'whether our returning soldiers  are to be a burden or a help to  themselves and their fellow-  citizens.  Mere quacks and theoretical  cure-alls are mischievous enough  at any time, and especially at  times of great emergency like  ours.  This is no carpenter's job, and  not even a watchmaker's.  THIS, THE LAST WAR.  Secretary of War Baker predicts that the last world war is  being fought and that in the  future reason and not force would  settle disputes of nations.  "And when this war is ended,"  he continued, "let us form a  league of all nations making it  impossible for any nation again  to disturb the peaceof the world.  Then the best insurance policy  the world has ever known will  have been taken out."  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Co?;.st is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  ������  t    ���������>  1           1  Gef'More Money" for your Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected in jour section  SIIII* YOI!K Fl'IIS DIltKCT to"SHUUKKT"tlie largest  house in the World dealing exclusively in NOUTI1 AMERICAN RAW FU1.S  a ri'liiibk-���������responsible��������� sale Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more than n third of it century," a loni: successful record of sending l-'ur Shippers prompt,SATISFACTORY  AND 1'koKlTABLE returns. Write for"ITDr foOubrrt febipptr,"  the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.  Write for it-NOW-il'������ FKEE  A   R   <;HITRFRT   Inr    25-27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.  A'D.3nU DUIS. 1 , inc. Dopl.c 67 CHICAGO. U.S.A.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1-00  Six Months   ������-75  Three Months  ������-50  UNITKD STATUS.  One Ykak  *'-50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Yeau $'-������������  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISH INC, CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Relhi Coola Courier for   Name   P. O   Tear out and mail today, will, amount of subscription enclosed    B|| i,i���������iii.nri ^^nim-riiTT ���������-��������� -���������-.������t-i���������a������ f3  hoc  a  'iii  ibe  or me  e  ouner  ff  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl: between. Vancouver and  Prince Rupert,  A distance of six hundred miles.  It Will be to your interest to keeP weH *n~  formed regarding the  happenings throughout  thte Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  Stick'to the Land.  We mentioned in our last issue  that one of the reasons why agriculture in Bella Coola had not  developed as fast as climate and  soil warranted was that the  clearing- of land was slow and  expensive.  Today we call attention to another reason almost equally responsible for this regrettable  state of .affairs, and that is the  ease of making money from  other sources.  The fishingof salmon has lured  the farmers away from their legitimate calling. The earning ol  several hundreds of dollars in the  summer months has been a temptation too strong to resist. One  effect of this, which is apparent  to every traveller through the  valley, is the comparative handsome residences placed in clearings of less than ten or twenty  acres.  . Even though the farmers make  a larger immediate profit by thus  turning their energies to other  BEL LA  COOLA COURIER  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Saturday,  October 7,   19\ ������  Will You Help  ?  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising1 brings.  I Ramsay Bros. & Co. Ld.  , VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS  OF  Biscuits :: Candy :: Macaroni  Milk, and Nut  Chocolate Bars   .  Also Refiners' of Syrup and  Packers of Mojasses  WE STAND BEHIND OUR GOODS"  If so,. Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, ^Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  .Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist..  occupations, yet it is only a hand j time, the demand and prices of  to  mouth   policy  that  will   not: farm produce will be such,that  bring the permanent income,  a large area of cultivated fields  and herds of well-bred stock  would yield.  the farmers can do no better than  de\;ote   their   undivided   efforts  to the production of food.  Our attention  has just been  There is no occupation which j called to the fact that the well-  ! VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  to the ordinary endowed man  furnishes a safer livelihood thai>  intelligent farming. It must be  admitted that some years ago  the prices of "farm produce were  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of. British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  ob Printing  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DISTBICT   OP   COAST���������BA2TGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B.'C, occupation contractor, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson P.assage, about  half a mile within the western entrance  and near a small stream, thence North*  20 chains, thence West20chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Da'pd, August 22, 1911 Sept. 2-Nov. 4  known firm of wholesale butchers. Pat Burns & Co., has received an order to provide $3,-  000,000 worth of cured meats,  hams and pork for the French  so low that the returns the farm-! army.     It is  estimated  it will  ers received for his labor were i take 350,0G0 hogs to fill the first  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  U TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. G  0 n  HOC  cheers and refreshes  at any hour of the day.  [You get the most delicious tea when you  use  mg&S&BZ&m&i&Z:*  [Hi  fttovarSold  InBulfc.  TEA  HpHE two principal reasons  1   why you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and  Provisioncra  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  neither satisfactory nor just.  But all that has changed now,  prices are high and still rising,  the population of the world is  increasing in spite of the slaughter on the fi.eids.of battle. The  growth of the urban population  is greater than that of the country. The production of food  from the land does not keep  pace with the increase of mouths  to be fed.      .  And this disproportion of the  population will not be readjusted  contract which must be delivered  from November to March.  But Bella Coola will not have  to go very far to find a market  for all it can raise. It is right  at our doors and it will be a serious reflection upon the character  of our community if it cannot  supply this market adequately  and in ever-increasing quantities from now on.  The farmers should get together and discuss these matters  during the winter months under  the auspices of the local Farm-  "or a long time, and -in the mean-; ers' Institute.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  Ogilvie's  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  rymldsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING  AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������     ������  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing hut the moft suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes   -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices-Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO, BELLA COOLA, B.C.  wuuttumummmammm  am  jUBaKBraBHsanamna  wusumum

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