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Bella Coola Courier Oct 14, 1916

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 1J>  >'fe  w  in  [t  ^^^pUJlMOiUaf^fJlM������llllUlg^)|Ut������UllUj|[>|UtMMM������l^  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR SEPT.  Compiled  by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 65.   Minimum, 42.  Highest Max. (15tfij84, Lowest Min. (27th) CO  Rainfall, 1.95 Inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915)34.33 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 1  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1916.  $1.00 a Y,  ear  French Capture  Village of Bovent  Paris, Oct. 12. ��������� Last night  south of the river Somme French  troops gained'more ground. Germans attacked heavily at Scho'e-  nhae/.in in Vosges, after violent  shelling the enemy succeeded in  penetrating our trendies at certain points, hut were thrown  buck by the grenade corps. In  the fighting soulli of the Somme  yesterday French troops captured the villageof Bovent, also the  north outskirts of Abaincourt  and the greater part of Chaulnes  Wood. Over 1200 prisoners were  taken during the day.  General Attack Began   .  By Italian Forces  Vienna, Oct. 12���������Italian forces  yesterday after eight days of  strong artillery and mining preparations began a general attack against Austro-Hungarian  positions on coast district front.  Italians marching  Towards Trieste  Capture Trenches and 5,000 Men  Rome, Oct. 13.���������Italian troops  fighting in the Carso region,  southeast Gorizia, resumed the  march towards Trieste, capturing  several lines of Austrian trenches and more than 5,000 prisoners.  In addition they occupied strongly defended heights between  Vipaco river and Hill 208, taking  quantitiesof arms and munitions.  Through successes on two other  fronts the Italians captured 1400  additional prisoners.  Joltings of Bella Coola and District  Germans Suffer Heavy  losses by Artillery Fire  London, Oct. 12.���������The- enemy  infantry in the open neighborhood of Grandcourt were caught  under our artillery fire and suffered heavy casualties. Another  ' successful raid was made by us  '     o '     l  last night southwest of Givenchy,  many casualties were inflicted on  the enemy:    German Troops Surrounded  a Berlin, Oct. 12.���������Bill for new  credit of 12,000,000 marks will  shortly be submitted totheReich-  stag, but the new loan is not expected to be floated before next  spring.  German troops in the salient  projection toward the town of  Vermandovilliers on the battle  front south of the Somme, have  been cut off by French forces.  Still Gathering in Prisoners  Paris, Oct. 13.���������In yesterday's  operations south of Somme the  French took more than 1700 prisoners.   London, Oct. 13.���������Uneventful  night along the British lines on  the Somme. In region south of  Ancre, nothing to report. , In  Messines region in course of attack we took many prisoners arid  inflicted heavy casualties on the  enemy.  Must Have Reinforcements  Dublin, Oct. 12.���������The Irish  division at the front will need  reinforcement before Christmas  according to the statement of  Lord Winberne in his address  last night.  London, Oct. 12.���������Allied aeroplanes dropped bombs on Stuttgart yesterday, causing very  little damage.  German Submarine  Torpedoes Ships This  Side of Atlantic  Newport, Oct. 12.���������U. S. destroyers have been searching for  the crew of. the*British;steamer  Kingslonian, reported , to have  been sunk by a German subma-  rineoff Nantucket returned here  today and reported no trace of  the missing crew. Sea very  heavy, rough weather and intensely cold. No trace of submarine since completion of her  raid, but; Allied warships have  increased the vigilance of their  patrols off the coast.  Submarine U-53 Still  > ��������� *  ������    Unaccounted For  Steamers Waiting to Leave for Europe  New. York, Oct. 13.���������Eight or  more steamship's flying flags of  Entente Allies are awaiting advices as to whether it is now safe  to leave port for Europe in view  of the possible danger from the  German submarine U-53. No information concerning the whereabouts of the undersea boat has  so far been received.  Washington, Oct.. 13.���������Whole  submarine situation, both as to  recent raid off the New England  coast and the broader question���������  the agitation in Germany for  the ruthless resumption of warfare, shows signs, in official quarters of being practically over.  London, Oct. 13.���������Norwegian  steamer Berk,715 tons, was sunk  yesterday by German submarine,  the crew being saved.  Paris, Oct. 13.���������Greece has accepted the demands of Allies.  S. S. Camosun arrived at 11  o'clock Sunday forenoon. A number of passengers arrived among  whom were B. Robb, O. Drange,  Geo. V. Chambers, E. O. Doctor,  Mr. Walker and John B. Sylvester.  Mr; and Mrs. A. It. Neale and  Harry Evans were among the  departures.  John B. Sylvester returned  after a season's work as manager  of the Beaver Cannery, Rivers  Inlet. During the fall and winter he will be looking after his  farm and sawmill interests at  Hagensborg. ,'"   '  Q. -V. Chambers, representing  the Royal Financial Corporation  Ltd:, general insurance agents,  Vancouver, spent a few days in  our midst this week. He lefl  Wednesday afternoon for Ocean  Falls.   '    i\  O. Drange of Seattle, came in  for the purpose of looking over  some promising mining claims in  the Saloomt Valley.  B. Robb, representing Kelly,  Douglas & Co.;' Vancouver, spent  a few days in town in the interests of his firm.,  E. O. Doctor, representative  of Papham Bros., manufacturers  of biscuits and confectionery,  Victoria, spent this week in town  calling on the merchants in th*  interests of his house. This it  Mr. Doctor's first visit to this-  section of the coast and he expresses himself as wpII pleased  with his visit.  List of Prize Winners at the Bella Coola Agricultural  Exhibition Held at Hagensborg, October 6  Pat Down to I. W. W.'s  Sydney, N. S. W., Oct. 13.���������A  treason plot, believed to be the  work of the organization known  as the Independent Workers of  the World, understood to come  originally from United States,  was discovered by the police as  a result of a number of outrages  and at least one murder.  Baseball Champions  Boston, Oct. 13���������By the defeat  of Brooklyn by 4 to 1 Boston became the world ch%mpions of  baseball..  Unable to Reach a Decision  on Submarine Question  Berlin, Oct. 13.���������Major Erns  Basseman, leader of National  Liberals in the Reichstag, said  the Buget committee were unable  to reach a decision on the submarine question, but voted 24 to  4'against discussion of the subject in open session.  Class  Cow  Hen  Cock  Butter  Plant in flower  Sweet peas   -  Geranium  Foliage plant  Fuchsia .  Asters  White bread  Brown    "  Buns  Cake   ,        ,   "  Beans  Sweet corn  Cucumbers  Pointed cabbage -  Red     .       -"     '  Celery  Tomatoes  Peas   .   .     k    "  Crab apples  Pears  Plums  Prunes  Apples, Mcintosh Red  Wolf River  Suffolk  Bismark  Baldwin >  -Stark  Russett  Ben Davis  Jonathan  Wealthy  Northern Spy  Gravenstein  King  Alexander        _  '  Mixed variety  Preserves, Plums  Strawberries   ,  Raspberries  Cherries  Pickles  Candy  Green beans  Red cabbage .  Yellow onions  Red  Bushel of potatoes  White potatoes  Pink  Swede-turnips  Mangels'  Crooked squash  Vegetable marrow  Hubbard squash  Pumpkin'       ",  White carrots.,  Sugar beets ���������  Field corn  Wheat in sheaf  Alfalfa  Clover  1st  Ole Oveson  J. Widsten  O. Schulstad  Mrs E. Gorden.  Mrs A. K: Oveson  Mrs A. Hammer  Mrs A. K. Oveson  Mrs W. T. Roland  ���������  Mrs M. Saugstad  Mrs Ole Oveson  Mrs. O. J. Nygaard  A. Hammer  V. J. Carlson  B. Brynildsen  V. J. Carlson  W. T.. Walker  W. D. Stephenson'  -r    "  Mrs E. C. Clayton  E. Gorden  A. K.,Oveson  O.  A.  R. N.  A. K  Schulstad  K. Oveson  Livelton  Oveson  O. Schulstad'  A. K.. Oveson  H. O. Hanson '  A. K. Oveson  P. Lauritson  O. T. Kellog  P. K; Peterson-'  A. K.vOveson  O. J. Nygaard  H. Haakenson  Mrs Olaf Gorden  <<  Mrs Ed. Gorden  - <<  Mrs Olaf Gorden  Miss-K. B. Hallowes  Mrs E. C. Clayton  <       <���������  W. D. Stephenson  P. Lauritson  A. K. Oveson  H. Haakenson  V. J.:Carlson  M. Hammer  A. Hammer  V. J. Carlson  W. T Walker  B. A. McBeth.7 .^  P. K. Peterson  P. Lauritson  O. J. Nygaard'      _  H. Haakenson  A. Hammer  2nd  Ed. Gorden  O. Schulstad  J. Widsten  C. Allertson  Mrs O. Fosbak  Mrs A. Hammer  Mrs Gallienne  Mrs Ole Oveson  Mrs A. K. Oveson  W. D. Stephenson  W. T. Walker  C. Allertson'  P. K. Peterson  O. J. Nygaard  V. J. Carlson  A. K. Oveson  H. 0. Hanson  Mrs Clayton  P. K. Peterson  0. T. Kellog  P. K. Peterson  H. 0. Hanson  A. K. Oveson  0. Schulstad  A. Hammer  P. Lauritson  H. 0. Hanson  J. Widsten  A. K. Oveson  P. Lauretson   .  W. T. Roland  Mrs Ed. Gorden  Mrs W. T. Roland  Mrs A. K. Oveson  W. D. Stephenson  P. K. Peterson  E. Gorden  A. C. Christenson  C. Allertson  W. T. Walker  0. Schulstad  A. Hammer  0. J. Nygaard  0. C. Olsen  Mrs E. C. Clayton  R.N. Livelton   '  V- J. Carlson  Mrs E. C. Clayton  A. Hammer  H. D. Brown with a crew of  men is now engaged in buildinp  a road up the Necleetsconnay  River. Several hundred acres  of valuable agricultural land,  close to salt water, will become  accessible when . this road ' oi  about two miles in length is completed.        Capt. W. D.,Stephenson conducted the evening services at  the Mackenzie school last Sun  day. A large congregation was  in attendanee.(  ��������� t  We learn from Prince Rupert  that our former .representative  in the legislature, Wm. Manson,  has moved from Prince Rupert  to devote his time to farming on  Vancouver Island.  B. F. Jacobsen and Torger Olsen have already returned from  their prospecting expedition.  Their smiling'faces and loads of  specimens of ore were evidences  of the success of the trip. They  called at the cattle ranch at the  head of South Bentink Arm and  found the new managers, Mr.(  and Mrs. Anderson, highly pleased with their surroundings.   .  The 242nd Forestry Battalion  is nearing full strength and a  wire received from Montreal has  i  closed all but two classes of men,  mill men and loggers. It is making very tempting offers to men  of a class which Bella Coola can  say nearly everyone of its young  men belong. Here is a chance  to see foreign countries at wages  beyond that offered by employers of labor in this part of the  province. The kind of men still  wanted will receive pay as follows:- Filers, $2 to $2.50 per day;  edgermen, $2.25 to $2.50 per day;  sawyers, ������2.50 to $3.00 per day;  saw filers and hammermen, $5.50  to $6.00 per day.  In addition to this pay the men  enlisting will be supplied with  food, lodging, clothing, bedding,  boots, medical and dental services free.'.  The headquarters of the British Columbia company is at 521  Pender Street West, Vancouver.  A Series of  LECTURES  will be given by  J. G. WALKER  in the Mackenzie'School on .  THURSDAY, FRIDAY and  SATURDAY, Oct. 19-20-21.  Meetings open each evening at  8 p. m. prompt.  Subject for Thursday:  "Signs That Mark Our Times in the  World's History."  Subject for Friday:  "What is Millenium and What Are the  Events That Mark Its Beginning and  Its End."     k  v   Subject for Saturday: '   '  "The Near Eastern Question or the Fate  of the Saltan."  EVERYBODY   WELCOME  The Fair.  0 ,  As  we predicted - in our announcement, the Fair vied with  Empire Day in its popularity and ,  success.   Both nature and>man  were in league to bring about this  happy result.   Nature furnished  weather of the most superb kind'  and man didjiis share by bring- ':  ing together an abundance and  large variety of the finest products of the settlement arid by  making the attendance of the  largest.  A. R. Neale, assistant provincial horticulturist, and A. Hammer, secretary of the Farmers'  Institute, were busy many days  before the Fair in stimulating  interest and arranging the exhibits. The greatest credit is due'  their energetic and capable management of the exhibition. But  there was another feature of "the  Fair which'in'directly made for  success as much as the exhibition proper, and that was the  capable manner in , which, the  ladies, managed the service of  refreshments.  v- Great credit is also due to the  Red Cross committee and etptci-  allv to lhe ladies of Hagensborg  for their untiring efforts arid  business-like manner in providing the food necessary for the  p.ccasion arid in making this part  of tbe program a source of considerable income to the Red Cross  .fund, amounting'to over $.100.00.  After supper a meeting was  held which was addressed by Mr.  Neale and Mr. Hammer. The  speakers laid special stress upon ���������  the necessity of improved farming. A resolution was passed requesting the executive of- the  Farmers' Institute to hold meetings of the Institute at least once  every month.  BELLA COOLA AND DISTRICT RED  CROSS AND PATRIOTIC FUNDS  STATEMENT FOR SEPT.  Red Cross Fund  Collected by Miss R.  Nordschow the sum of..,$ 25.00  Collected by Miss A:  Livelton the sum of      8.00  Collected by Mr. A.  Atkins the sum of        4.00  Collected by Mr. F.  Broughton the sum of.. -,   24:50  Total...' $"~ 61.50  Patriotic Fund.  .  Collected by Mr. A.  Atkins the sum of .'  $ 5.00  Collected by Mr. F.  Broughton the sum of ..   ��������� 7.50  ��������� Collected by Rev. H.  Sageng the sum of      5.00  Total  $17.50  ���������Snouu  By request the September donations are to be donated to the  "Prisoners of War Fund" of the  Red Cross Society.  I - ffilturrit Nflttce    I  a,     Sunday School     -    10:45 a. m.      h  A      Church-Service    -   7:30 p.m.      A  t > "���������        '' 3  7       Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.     . i  ������ W. H. Gibson. ?  G  ' '        ���������   - - ' 9  K All Are Welcome. : k BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday,  Ocloler 14,   19)6  ourselves on the back and cbn-  gratulaleourselves upon the line  ��������� Published Wkkki.y atI'.ki.i.aOoiii.ais*   spirit w<������ are showing in thecir-  ciimstaiices; !>ut rather'let us  ivalize we must doit for our self-  preservation, for our own wel-  The Courier  the Bella Coola I'iiiilisiiinc Co. Lti������.  SUBSCRIP IION RATES:  C Mfcntlu  3 Month*  1  Year.  1 Year.  United States  United Kingdom  .   0.75  .   0.50  .$1.50  .$1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving tlicir copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising  Rates,   Aiti.y at  Officio.  To Correspondents��������� While unobjectioniib.e nn-  onymoua eommunii-utiona will 1>������ published, the  numo and nddrosaof every writer of such lutters  must be jfiven to the editor.  Tin- Editor reserves the riuht to refuse iiuuli-  cutiun of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  GILLETT'S-LYE  EATS DIRT"  "&ulun unuult aujirrma rat lex.'  Saturday, oct. n, loin,  AY/E beg to remind our read-  ers that the Courier having completed its fourth year  the subscriptions of all our  early subscribers are now due  foe renewal.   .-  ' The, management wishes to  thank our numerous readers  for their support during the  past and trusts to a continuance of the same in the future.  The subscription rate remains at $1  per year, payable strictly in advance.  Canada ��������� ,     .  Ye*,- $1.00 lure as well as that of the community. Hut do not let us stop  at making the resolve only, let  us carry it into action.        ��������� (  If we want to cultivate charitableness and god3 feeling towards each other even if it is  for the purpose of helping ourselves or working together we  must "get together," meet oft-  ener. This can be best effected,  through the Farmers' Institute,  as it was pointed out by Mr.  Neale at the meeting held at  Hagensborg during the Fair, of  last week, meetings should be  held at least once a month. In  making those meetings well attended the community spirit  would be kindled and fostered  and' co-operative undertakings  be made possible.  These meetings ought to be  made of a social character also,  where old and young of both  sexes may meet for entertain-  ment as well as instruction.   ,  We have noticed that the politi-  , Cj  cal campaign just ended has  caused bitterness to rankle in  the bosoms of some of our citizens. In the words of, the most  prominent of Conservative  papers in the province, The Colonist, in speaking on the subject  of pulling together:  ' "What.we as a'community  ought to concern ourselves about  is how we can develop that spirit  of harmony which will contribute  more than anything else to the  welfare-of us all. Let'us all  therefore forget politics as much  as we can or if we are forced to  think about them, resolve that  they shall interfere as little as  possible with co-operation in promoting those things that make  for.,general prosperity."  *"*������UC������ OPIKinO-'U.L bIMtt 0������������ ������"" *"**1  2&LLETTC0MPANYUMrg  Ft������     10R0NT0 ONT.        fl  A Hindrance to Development.  ' This week we have occasion to  point to one more reason why  farming in Bella Coola has not  developed at a more satisfactory  rate these many years after its  settlement. - ,    ,  There has been a lack of "pulling together.',. It_has been  every man for himself."  There has been no lack of well  attended meetings, neither have  the meetings been dull or improperly conducted as the people  of Bella Coola are well able to  exDi'ass themselves intelligently, properly and according to  parliamentary rules whenever  occasion requires.'  But the great hindrance to cooperative action has been jealousy, a fear of some one getting  an advantage over the other; unworthy suspicion of each other  and an unwillingness to yield to  the wishes of the majority.  In short, there has existed a  spirit of stubborness and un-  chiritableness which makes cooperation impossible.  It is not an agreeable task to  ���������point out the faults of ourselves  and those with whom we come  In daily contact; but we believe  if there is to be a change wrought  for the better, the obstacles to  be removed must be pointed out,  and it devolves,upon the local  paper to perform this public  duty.  The weaknesses of the people  obstructing the work of pulling  together cannot  be cured in  day or just by pointing them out.  The first step to be taken is to  recognize what the trouble really  is. We must, as the doctors say,  diagnose the case. Wheja. the  trouble is found each one df-us  must try to realize kbat he has  been guilty as .well as the other  and resolve to do differently in  the future.  It is not necessary when we  make this resolve that ..we pat  Recruiting.  The demand for men to enlist  for the war is still as great as  ever. A despatch from London  dated October 6 reads: "Great  Britain is in urgent need of men  for her armies and also her munition factories." *  Canada has, through her pre  mier, promised to send 500,000  soldiers to the front. Up till the  end of August about 362,000 had  responded to the country's call.  We are glad to note that British Columbia has furnished a  larger percentage of her population to the army than any other  province of the Dominion.  British Columbia and Alberta  have recruited ten per cerit, Ontario about five per cent, the  Atlantic provinces three per  cent and Quebec two per cent of  the,total population.   '  We believe it will ��������� not be for  the best interests of our province  to deflect any more men from out-  domestic industries to go to the  war. There is certain work to  be done at home of almost equal  importance to that of fighting  the enemy along the battle front.  The army must be maintained in  food and equipment and the  army at home has that important task to perform. There seems  to be a scarcity of labor in British Columbia at present and this  condition would be still more accentuated by further enlistment.  The recruiting as it has-been  carried on in Canada has not  been satisfactory. It has been  carried on under the voluntary  system. This system' may give  an opportunity for pride in pointing out the unprecedented size  of the voluntary army, as distinctive from the armies raised  by conscription in other countries. This expression of pride  so frequently heard on all.sides  is ah unworthy reflection upon  the patriotism of the soldiers  of the countries where conscription prevails, and therefore  should not be indulged in.  There is no doubt  that the  people of all the warring nations,  friends and foes alike, are equally willing to make the sacrifices  necessary to bring the' conflict  to a victorious issue. '  The voluntary system is nothing to be proud of. It gives the  slackers opportunity to shirk an  obvious duty, it subjects those  who for one reason or another  feel they cannot enlist to unfavorable comment and even  persecution. In short, the system is lacking in effectiveness  and dignity and should be abandoned at once.  Let properly constituted authorities point out who shall go  and who shall remain at home  and thus put a stop to all innuendo and sarcasm brought to  bear upon those who,have not  recruited.  As somebody has pointed out,  the four provinces east of the  Ottawa River, that is, Quebec,  New Brunswick, Nova Scotia  and Prince Edward Island, with  a population exceeding 3,000,000,  have enlisted a little over71,000.  This large field, therefore, has  been scarcely scratched and if  properly cultivated should be able  to recruit'easily, on a seven per  cent basis, over 210,000, or 140,-  000 more than they have recruited and the exact figure required  to bring the total of the nation  to the half million maximum.  o    o    o    o    o  Pledges Will Be Kept.  ��������� In a few days the leader of the  Liberal party; H. C. Brewster,  will be called upon by. the Lieutenant-Governor to- form a new  cabinet and take over the administration of the province.  Some of the more bigoted partisans opposed to the new government whom we have met are  full of apprehensive fears-that  now "comes the deluge.",_ According to these wiseacres, the  Liberal party is composed of the  worst kind of politicians, who  now after a period of starvation  in the shades of opposition find  themselves in the public crib  will begin an orgie of grafting  unequalled even in the palmy  days of the Bowser-McBride and  the Roblin rule.  All the fair promises made-by  the Liberals during the campaign, these same prognosticated of the political future, pro-  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B:C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for. Catalogue  "MADE   IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Order*  /*  CLUB OFFER  ^  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications ������  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.*  The Courier   . '    . ���������    .      .       . $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1���������50  $2.50  The Courier  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  The Courier k     .   ,   .  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  . 1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for  .   .   $1.75  \-  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  nounce as mere claptrap, made  only to catch votes and to be forgotten as soon as they have  served, their,ends.  That the promises made have  not been put away never to be  redeemed is clear from an after-  election speech made by Mr.  Brewster at a party banquet"to  the party workers in Victoria,  at which Mr. Brewster and the  other candidates delivered speeches of congratulation to those  who had been instrumental, in  their return. ���������  The remarks of Mr.' Brewster  and carry it on. The people have  placed behind me a body of men  than whom there can be no higher type, men of high character,���������-  clean record' and .tried business  ability. We are pledged to give  to'this province clean and honest  government, and abolish the  patronage system, and our pledge  shall be carried, out to the utmost. The people have declared  that they must have men of higher ideals in'charge of their.af- '  fairs. The'days of the professional politician are past, never,  I hope, to return.   To the past,-  were of especial interest, because also, belongs the spoils system  it was his first deliverance since  the election. The Liberal leader  was careful to reiterrfte'his stand  upon certain matters which he  emphasized during the fight.  "We must realize the responsibility," said Mr. Brewster,  "but we are not afraid to.face it  "The.fight is only beginning,  for there is much to be done in  order to straighten -out the affairs of the. province. The new  government will need your earnest co-operation, and sympathy  and some patience in the almost  herculean task which has to be  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN to represent  of 1493 SEVENTH. AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in different parts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery.- The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest, energetic men only are needed.' We particularly  want a good man at Bella Coola and for coast points, also a man  on the G. T. P. Railway.    ��������� ���������  ���������iiwii iiiiimmiihw iit  iiiiiw mi  rmmm   i n ���������nwmmmii miiiiwiiMirMiTinni mmtm���������-w ���������rrwin���������nrninr iMirmmri r in ittiii   -  HOC  D*  HOI  3^  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  - BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. b.     CstXHOSUIl     Leaves Vancouver every  Thursday at 9 p. m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S. " COQUITLAM" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, Carrali. St.,, Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St.,.Victoria. 7'  nor:  D������C  HOE  ������  Advertise  ants in the Courier  >jb  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY, -u  Saturday, Odober 14, 1916  BELLAj COOLA COURIER  Designed this year it will ornament and. enhance the  good appearance of the tidiest kitchen in all Canada.  Come in and I'll show you why the Kootenay stays as  good as new long after other ranges have to be repaired  or replaced.  Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  tea  undertaken, but there is no doubt  as to the result. We have a magnificent heritage in British Columbia, with resources which  have been thrown away, but with  efficient administration of our  agricultural, mineral, Umber,  fishing and other'natural riches  we shall find our province occupying the place it ought in the  confederation. We intend that,  every citizen shall share in the  opportunities offered hy these  resources."  War Against War.  1 r  Mr. Lloyd George says in regard to one object sought for by  this war:" ' This ghastliness must  never be re-enacted on this earth,  and one method at least of assuring that end is the inflicting  of such punishment of the perpetrators of this outrage against  humanity that the temptation to  emulate their exploits will be  eliminated from the hearts of  the evil-minded amongst the  rulers of men."  A few lines we specially  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs���������  ,    Jams and Jellies  Griffen & Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������:  Canned and dried  ' ��������� ,fruits  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers . Vancouver, B; C.  ^;&>-<iS^ ���������     ���������  The Annual Fall Fair.  By A. R. NEALE. Aahtanl Provincial  Harlicullutiit.  The season of nineteen-sixteen  taken all through has not been  as favorable in many ways for  farming as it might have been,  and so there is great credit due  *  to the people of Bella Coola for  such a commendable showing as  was made at Hagensborg, Oct. 6.  Many of the exhibits were got  into place the day before and on  Friday morning, the openingday,  produce of all kinds arrivedin  such quantities that the exhibition shed was soon full and space  had to be found on a ' table^out-  side for a large part of the exhibits.  Taken as a general averaga,  the produce compared favorably  with any that the writer has so  far seen in Northern B.C., and  the way it was selected proved  that the farmers have profited  year by year from exhibiting in  competition. But even now there  is a noticeable tendency, in the  case of garden produce for'lhe  table, to select for size rather  than quality. It is a very rare  thing that an extra large product  is desirable, because it is usually  indicative of coarse quality. In  dealing with stock vegetables,  however, the most desirable article in this case is one which  shows as much size as possible  accompanied by a certain smoothness and good quality.  Competition was very keen,  and owing to a most congenial  "Weather Man'-',the number of  spectators was large and the interest shown indicated that the  Fall Fair still holds its usefulness.  The Fruit exhibit was especially fine and the number of different varieties of apples exhibited  shows that although this is not  a district where commercial  fruit growing should be encouraged on a large scale yet the  climate is such that it permits  the farmer to grow an excellent  variety ,of fruits for home use  and to sell a good number of  boxes over and above the home  requirements to pay expenses.  The color and uniformity of the  plates of apples was all that  could be desired, especially considering the late season.  In the vegetable classes competition was very keen and the  manner in which the exhibits  were selected showed good judgment.  It is to be regretted that the  grains, grasses and stock classes  were not better represented. The  latter class is especially valuable  in that it affords the best incen-  tive for the improvement of the  livestock in the district. It is  most important that the farmers  should realize the value of high-  grade as comparedj with scrub  cattle and by bringing the stock  together for'competitio'n a desire  for improvement.is stimulated,  with the result that each year a  general increase in quality will  be noticed. '���������  It has been stated by many  critics that local Fall Fairs are  losin'gtneir value. No doubt in  some ways there may be a small  amount of truth in this statement, but I think this only applies in the case where the essential object of the Fair, that of  increasing the' farmer's efficiency, is forgotten and the interest allowed to sag. It stands to  reason that where farmers have  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAI. MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ^ Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Tchritorv, the North-west Terki-  toriks und in a portiou of the Province of  UKITlSli Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one ye&ra at an annual rental of SI an  acre. Not more than 2,66(1 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Atcent  ot the district in which the rixhls applied for  are situated.  Jn surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or lecal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed teiritory the tzact applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.     ',  Kach application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The iwrbon operatinK the mine shall furnish  the Audit with sworn returns ucco"ntin(j for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not beiiiK operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but lhe lissee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights muy be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 un acre.  For full information application should be  made (o the Secretary of the Department of the  liiti'iior, Oituwa. or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Pominion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N.H.-Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������3GCD0.  BUSINESS CARDS  o    c  3on  n m  Fur Sales Agency  o ,  GOO dealers ami trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold Bifles monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission i3 only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  HI  l< ������OI= 'I   0  Dealers and Trappers  GET THE  HIGHEST  PRICE FOR YOUR  FURS/&/  at the  *.*1I3 *r*       ���������*-**> "H������w"jg.-  TheMason &Rischriano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to stale with authority:  "NO FINER  PIANO MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  33  II  I"!,  tfjl Let us attend your Victor Record  jl  mail orders--our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  >*Tf. *f j*. -=~-  We pay all express and  mail charges.  to send their produce a long way  to a large fair and are not able  to go'themselves'they cannot  derive any benefit beyond the  possible prizes they may win.  Therefore, the small local Fair  rather than losing value is becoming more important all th"e  time and should be given all the  support that it merits, so that it  becomes larger each year, competition becomes keener, and the  general tone and prosperity of  the district is heightened accordingly.,.  DISC BEFORE PLOWING.  It has been pointed out by some  experts that land on which hoed  crops have been, grown should  not be plowed.  ��������� Before plowing sod land it  should be thoroughly dis'ked as  that will ensure a deep, well pulverized seed bed in the spring.  .  Help the community by supporting the home paper.  3   CZ3  \X7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  W/HAT person so independent?  \X7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  THE REASONS  for'this enviable  condition of affairs1-are  obvious to  anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley, o  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  .crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley cairied away  "over twenty first prizes.       ' '  o  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  , country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  a  o  ilEflltg)  Gef'More Money" ior your Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected In your section  SHIP YOUR FURS DIRKCT ������o "SUUBEIlT"Uie l������njCJt  house In Hie World dealing exclusively li. NORTU AMERICAS KAW FlikS  a reliable���������responsible���������safe Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more than a third of a ������MW." a lony sue-  cessfulrecord of sending Fur snippers prom pt.S ATI SbAL.1 UK V  AND PROFITABI.K returns. Write for ITte &t>mitrt febtpptr  the only reliable, accurate marker, report, and price list published.  Write for it-NOW-ifo FREE  A. B. SHUBERT, Inc. ySSSSS^SRSk.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscription* Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0... ?   Tear out and mail today, with amount of aubscription enclosed ['&'  BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, Odoler 14,  1916.  0  non  a  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance o( six hundred miles.  fi  It Will be to your interest to keep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of\  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  AYRSHIRE CATTLF.  One of the things which Air.  :N<-ale made reference to in his  ! speech at the Bella Coola Fair,  : was that the dairy animals in  Ithe valley were deteriorating;  I the reason of which he said was  inbreeding.  It is to be hoped the farmers  .will give this important matter  more than a.passing thought,  but deal with it at an early meeting of the Farmers'Institute. '  The government is fully alive  to the situation and in order to  remedy the evil furnished the  community for more than a year  a thoroughbred Ayrshire bull  free of charge. 'It is to be regretted that for various reasons  most of the farmers found it not  convenient to avail themselves  of this means lo improve their  Jje,rd. But in spile of this fact  it is hoped that in due course  another bull or rather two of th<  same���������breed be secured.  According to reports received,  it will be lo the best interest of  Ramsay Bros. & Co, Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS  OF  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Will You Help?  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford., to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  -Biscuits :: Candy :: Macaroni  Milk and Nut  Chocolate Bars  Also Refiners of Syrup and  Packers of Molasses  If so, Mr. Francis It. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas,Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, 'Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist.  the farmers in this place to stick I flushing is' that when the ewas  'WE STAND BEHIND OUR GOODS"  j to the Ayrshire breed as the best  adapted for our conditions. The  Ayrshire cattle are, hardy, excellent rustlers, and the calves  strong and healthy.  ,  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  ��������� cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all/ Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  . BISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BANGE   III.  Take Notice that 1, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation contractor, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following1  described land:  Commencing al a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  half a mile within the western entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20chains, thence  South- 20 chains, to the shoie, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing '10 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Oalud, AuBust 22, 1911. ,       Sept. 2-Nov. -1  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. , Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The .best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  FLUSHING EWES.  The practice of feeding the  ewes some form of succulent  green crop immediately prior to  the breeding season is known as  flushing. This is done with the  idea of putting them in the best  condition for the service of the  ram. Very often the ewes, after  being treated in this manner,  take the ram only once. When  this,is the case the lambs all  come at about the same time in  the spring, thus relieving the  shepherd of much of his spring  work, as taking care of a large  number of ewes in a short space  of time is considerably prof erable  to having the lambs strung out  over a long space of time.  Another argument in favor of,  are in good physical condition  they are more' likely to have  twins than when they are thin  and weak.  There are many crops that are  adaptable for ewe-flushing, some  of the more commonly used ones  being rye, rape, blue-grass, and  clover.  A heavy growth of "blue-grass  pasture, when it is available, is  considered to be one of the very  best .things for ewes at flushing-  time. Timothy is'not considered  good, as it does not contain the  necessary nutriment.  ��������� Many farmers find that .by  pasturing down the rye-field in  the fall they are provided with  a simple means of flushing, while  others sow a special crop of rape  for this purpose.  That the flushing of ewes is a  very profitable investment is the  conclusion that has been reached  by most shepherds.  6Su  cheers and refreshes  at any hour of the day.  [You get the most delicious tea when you  use  ^sesssssssss������Si.  WetmrSolcf  BnBulfc.  TEA  m  ������ <  $1 a Yea  Published every  Saturday at  LA COOLA, B. C.  30������C  51'������  "THE two principal reasons  1   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  OgilvieV  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better Order a bag now  From  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  ,    Packers and Provisioners   ,  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  ALL GOOD GROCERS.  IT'S  CANADA'S  BEST FLOUR  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  rymldsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  f*\  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  /?  Large and well assorted stock  ��������� of'Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes-   &    ������  Settlers, v Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosl suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils - Varnishes -  Stains  it  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  BELLA COOLA, B.C.  '14 <V  '��������� it;  ���������'���������:r^.rii-si&^?v:x'rfr.~J.*'-:&.x^?^**<'Z*: Tr    1 jp��������������� 'Ola   I *������1���������*~     i \ ��������� >\X>-f i ��������� *. ��������� ��������� ��������� VI mttJ.  ,  Li i n-rqg=gyn i i i i i i i i i i  i I i'I  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND  FISHING.  gniiiiMiiu^|j^tM������������uMugY^iiimMiij(|mumniii^  WEATHER REPORT FOR SEPT.  Compiled  by  Mr. C. H.  Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 65.    Minimum, 42.  Highest Max. (I5thj84. Lowest Min. (27th) ������0  Rainfall, 1.95 inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915)  34.33 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. I  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14,  1916.  French Capture  Village of Bovent  Paris,   Oct.   12. ��������� Last night  south of the river Somme French  troops gained more ground. Ger-  ���������  mans attacked heavily at Schoe-  nhaezin in Vosges, after violent  .shelling the enemy succeeded in  , penetrating our trenches at certain points,   but   were   thrown  back by the grenade corps.   In i  the fighting south of the Somme  yesterelay French troops captured the village of Bovent, also the  north outskirts   of   Abaincourt  and the greater part of Chaulnes  Wood.   Oyer 1200 prisoners were  taken during the day.  $1.00 a Y  ear  Italians Marching  Towards Trieste  Capture Trenches and 5,000 Men  Rome, Oct. 13. ���������Italian troops  fighting in the Carso region,  southeast Gorizia, resumed the  march towards Trieste, capturing  several lines of Austrian trenches and more than 5,000 prisoners.  In addition they occupied strongly defended heights between  Vipaco river and Hill 208, taking  quantities of arms and munitions.  Through successes on two other-  fronts the Italians captured 1400  additional prisoners.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  General Attack Began  By Italian Forces  ��������� Vienna, Oct. 12-"-Italian forces  yesterday after eight days of  strong artillery and mining preparations began a general attack^ against Austro-Hungarian  pDsitions on coast district front.  Germans Suffer Heavy  Losses by Artillery Fire  London, Oct. 12.���������The enemy  infantry .in the open neighborhood of Grandcourt were caught  under our artillery fire and suffered heavy casualties. Another  successful raid was made by us  last night south west of Givenchy,  many casualties were inflicted on  the enemy.  German Troops Surrounded  Berlin, Oct. 12.���������Bill for new  credit of 12,000,000 marks will  shortly be submitted totheReich-  stag, but the new loan is not expected to be floated before next  spring.  German troops in the salient  projection toward the town of  Vermandovilliers on the battle  front south of the Somme, have  been cut off by French forces.  Must Have Reinforcements  Dublin, Oct. 12.���������The Irish  division at the front will need  reinforcement before Christmas  according to the statement of  Lord Winberne in his address  last night.  London, Oct. 12. ���������Allied aeroplanes dropped bombs on Stuttgart yesterday, causing very  little damage.  German Submarine  Torpedoes Ships This  Side of Atlantic  Newport, Oct. 12.���������U. S. destroyers.have been searching for  the crew of the British steamer  Kingslonian, reported to have  been sunk by a German submarine off Nantucket returned here  today and reported no trace of  the missing crew. Sea very  haavy, rough weather and intensely cold. No trace of submarine since completion of her  faid, but Allied warships have  increased the vigilance of their  Patrols off the coast  Still Gathering in Prisoners  Paris, Oct. 13.���������In yesterday's  operations south of Somme the  French took more than.1700 prisoners.  London, Oct. 13.���������Uneventful  night along the British lines on  the Somme. In region south oi  Ancre, nothing to report. In  Messines region in course of attack we took many prisoners and  inflicted heavy casualties on the  enemy.  S. S. Camosun arrived at 11  o'clock Sunday forenoon. A number of passengers arrived among  whom were B. Robb, 0. Drange,  Geo. V. Chambers, E. 0. Doctor,  Mr. Walker and John B. Sylvester.  Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Neale and  Harry Evans were among the  departures.  John B. Sylvester returned  after a season's work as manager  of the Beaver Cannery, Rivers  Inlet. During the fall and winter he will be looking after his  farm and sawmill interests at  Hagensborg.  the Royal Financial Corporation  Ltd., general insurance agents,  Vancouver, spent a few days in  our midst this week. He left  Wednesday afternoon for Ocean  Falls.          O. Drange of Seattle, came in  for the purpose of looking over  some promising mining claims in  the Saloomt Valley.  B. Robb, representing Kelly,  Douglas &Co., Vancouver, spent  a few days in town in the interests of his firm.  calling on the merchants in th(  interests of his house. This if  Mr. Doctor's first, visit to thit  section of the coast and he expresses himself as well pleased  with his visit.  E. O.   Doctor,  representative  of Papham Bros., manufacturers  of- biscuits  and   confectionery,  G. V. Chambers, representing' Victoria, spent this week in town  List of Prize Winners at the Bella Goola Agricultural  Exhibition Held at Hagensborg, October 6  Submarine U-53 Still  Unaccounted For  Steamers Waiting to Leave for Europe  New York, Oct. 13.���������Eight or  more steamships flying flags of  Entente Allies are awaiting advices as to whether it is now safe  to leave port for Europe in view  of the possible danger from the  German submarine U-53. No information concerning the whereabouts of the undersea boat has  so far been received.  Washington, Oct. 13. ���������Whole  submarine situation, both as to  recent raid off the New England  coast and the broader question���������  the agitation in Germany for  the ruthless resumption of warfare, shows signs in official quarters of being practically over.  London, Oct. 13.���������Norwegian  steamer Berk, 715 tons, was sunk  yesterday by German submarine,  the crew being saved.  Paris, Oct. 13.���������Greece has accepted the demands of Allies.  Pat Down to I. W. W.'s  Sydney, N. S. W.. Oct. 1 3.-A  treason plot, believed to be the  work of the organization known  as the Independent Workers of  the World, understood to come  originally from United States,  was discovered by the police as  a result of a number of outrages  and at least one murder.  Baseball Champions  Boston, Oct. 13 -By the defeat  of Brooklyn by 4 to 1 Boston became the world champions of  baseball.   Unable to Reach a Decision  on Submarine Question  Berlin.  Oct. 13. Major Ems  Basseman. leader of National  Liberals in the Reichstag, said  the Buget committee were unable  to reach a decision on lb*' submarine question, but voted 21 to  4 against discussion of the subject in open session.  Glass  Cow  Hen  Cock  Butter  Plant in flower  Sweet peas  Geranium  Foliage plant  Fuchsia  Asters  White bread  Brown  Buns  Cake  Beans  Sweet corn  Cucumbers  Pointed cabbage  Red  Celery  Tomatoes  Peas  Crab apples  Pears  Plums  Prunes  Apples, Mcintosh Red  Wolf River  Suffolk  Bismark  Baldwin  Stark  Russett  Ben Davis  Jonathan  Wealthy  Northern Spy  Gravenstein  King  Alexander  Mixed variety  Preserves, Plums  Strawberries  Raspberries  Cherries  Pickles  Candy  Green beans  Red cabbage  Yellow onions  Red  Bushel of potatoes  White potatoes  Pink  Swede turnips  Mangels  Crooked squash  Vegetable marrow  Hubbard squash  Pumpkin  White carrots  Sugar beets  Field corn  Wheat in sheaf  Alfalfa  Clover  1st  Ole Oveson  J. Widsten  O. Schulstad  Mrs E. Gorden  Mrs A. K. Oveson  Mrs A. Hammer  Mrs A. K. Oveson  Mrs W. T. Roland  Mrs M. Saugstad  .Mrs Ole Oveson  Mrs. O. J. Nygaard  A. Hammer  V. J. Carlson  /Q. Brynildsen  V. J. Carlson  W. T. Walker.  W. D. Stephenson  Mrs E. C. Clayton  E. Gorden  A. K. Oveson  O. Schulstad  A. K. Oveson  R. N. Livelton ���������  A. K. Oveson  O. Schulstad  A. K. Oveson  H. O. Hanson  A. K. Oveson  P. Lauritson  O. T. Kellog  P. K. Peterson  A. K. Oveson  O. J. Nygaard  H. Haakenson  Mrs Olaf Gorden  Mrs Ed. Gorden  4 i  Mrs Olaf Gorden  Miss K. B. Hallowes  Mrs E. C. Clayton  W. D. Stephenson  P. Lauritson  A. K. Oveson  H. Haakenson  V. J. Carlson  M. Hammer  A. Hammer  V. J. Carlson  W. T. Walker  B. A. McBeth  P. K. Peterson  P. Lauritson  O. J. Nygaard  H. Haakenson  A. Hammer  2nd  Ed. Gorden  O. Schulstad  J. Widsten  C. Allertson  Mrs O. Fosbak  Mrs A. Hammer  Mrs Gallienne  Mrs Ole Oveson  Mrs A. K. Oveson  W. D. Stephenson  W. T. Walker  C. Allertson  P. K. Peterson  O. J. Nygaard  V. J. Carlson  A. K. Oveson  H. O. Hanson  Mrs Clayton  P. K. Peterson  0. T. Kellog  P. K. Peterson  H. 0. Hanson  A. K. Oveson  0. Schulstad  A. Hammer  P. Lauritson  H. 0. Hanson  J. Widsten  A. K. Oveson  P. Lauretson  W. T. Roland  Mrs Ed. Gorden  Mrs W. T. Roland  Mrs A. K. Oveson  W. D. Stephenson  P. K. Peterson  E. Gorden  A. C. Christenson  C. Allertson  W. T. Walker  0. Schulstad  A. Hammer  0. J. Nygaard  0. C. Olsen  Mrs E. C. Clayton  R. N. Livelton  V. J. Carlson  Mrs E. C. Clayton  A. Hammer  H. D. Brown with a crew oi  men is now engaged in building  a road up the Necleetsconnay  River. Several hundred acreE  of valuable agricultural land,  close to salt water, will become  accessible when this road ol  about two miles in length is completed.   Capt. W. D. Stephenson conducted the evening services at  the Mackenzie school last Sun  day. A-large congregation was  in attendance.  We learn from Prince Rupert  that our former representative  in the legislature, Wm. Manson,  has moved from Prince Rupert  to devote his time to farming on  Vancouver Island.  B. F. Jacobsen and Torger Olsen have already returned from  their prospecting expedition.  Their smiling faces and loads of  specimens of ore were evidences  of the success of the trip. They  called at the cattle ranch at the  head of South Bentink Arm and  found the new managers, Mr.  and Mrs. Anderson, highly pleased with their surroundings.  The 242nd Forestry Eattalicr  is nearing full strength and a  wire received from Montreal has  closed all but two classes of men,  mill men and loggers. It is making very tempting offers to men  of a class which Bella Coola can  say nearly everyone of its young  men belong. Here is a chance  to see foreign countries at wages  beyond that offered by employers of labor in this part of the  province. The kind of men still  wanted will receive pay as follows:- Filers, $2 to $2.50 per day;  edgermen, $2.25 to $2.50 per day;  sawyers, $2.50 to $3.00 per day;  saw filers and hammermen, $5.50  to $6.00 per day.  In addition to this pay the men  enlisting will be supplied with  food, lodging, clothing, bedding,  boots, medical and dental services free.  The headquarters of the British Columbia company is at 521  Pender Street West, Vancouver.  The Fair.  As we predicted in our announcement, the Fair vied with  Empire Day in its popularity and  success. Both nature and man  were in league to bring about this  happy result. Nature furnished  weather of the most superb kind  and man did his share by bringing together an abundance and  large variety of the finest products of the settlement and by  making the attendance of the  largest.  A. R. Neale, assistant provin--  cial horticulturist, and A. Hammer, secretary of the Farmers'  Institute, were busy many days  before the Fair jn stimulating  interest and arranging the exhibits. The greatest credit is due  their energetic and capable management of the exhibition. But  there was another feature of the  Fair which indirectly made for  success as much as the exhibition proper, and that was the  capable mar.ner in which the  ladies managed the service of  refreshments.  Great credit is also due to the  Red Cross committee and especially to the ladies of Hagensborg  for their untiring efforts and  business-like manner in providing the food necessary for the  occasion and in making this part  of .the program a source of considerable income to the Red Cross  fund, amounting to over $100.00.  After supper a meeting was  held which was addressed by Mr.  Neale and Mr. Hammer. The  speakers laid special stress upon  the necessity of improved farming. A resolution was passed requesting the executive of the  Farmers' Institute to hold meetings of the Institute at least once  every month.  BELLA COOLA AND DISTRICT RED  CROSS AND PATRIOTIC FUNDS  STATEMENT FOR SEPT.  Red Cross Fund  Collected by Miss R.  Nordschow the sum of.. $ 25.00  Collected by Miss A.  Livelton the sum of ...  Collected by Mr,  Atkins the sum of.  A.  A Series of  LECTURES  will be given by  J. G. WALKER  in the Mackenzie School on  THURSDAY, FRIDAY and  SATURDAY, Oct. 19-20-21.  Meetings open each evening at  8 p. m. prompt.  Subject for Thursday:  "Signs That Mark Our Times in the  World's History."  Subject for Friday:  "What Is Millenium and What Are the  Events That Mark Its Beginning and  Its End."  Subject for Saturday:  "The Near Eastern Question or the Fate  of the Sultan."  EVERYBODY    WELCOME  Collected by Mr. F.  Broughton the sum of.  8.00  4.00  24.50  Total $   61.50  Patriotic Fund  Collected by Mr. A.  Atkins the sum of  $ 5.00  Collected by Mr. F.  Broughton the sum of ..      7.50  Collected by Rev. H.  Sageng the sum of       5.00  Total  $17.50  By request the September donations are to be donated to the  "Prisoners of War Fund" of the  Red Cross Society.  It  i  (Slwrrli -Nutto  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  ?  a  Preacher for Sunday-- Kev.  VV. H. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  e������>^ <^0������J^ -<JMU ������L> ^-6������L������''<JO'<J>0 '  &���������  ������������������tf-Vr1  ���������J J!  ��������� -rti  ������&���������������  m  m  ���������Si  ife������sa  ���������"*���������'!  fc'&r ;  8iW  fes- ���������  te-r-  fete r  &.*  BELLA COOLS  COURIER  Saturday,   Octoler 14,   19) G\  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1  Year , ..'   6 Months      3 Month*   United States  1  Year. .- .$1.50  'United Kingdom  1 Year.... $1-00  $1.00  0.75  0.50  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once.' .Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  Fob Advertising Hates,  Office.  Apply at  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable an-  ' onymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be iriven to the editor.. ���������  The Editor', reserves the. riirht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer s  risk.  'S>aliw papuli miprema est lex.  SATURDAY. OCT. 14, 1916.  VY7e beg to remind our rea'd-  . ers that the Courier having completed its fourth year  "the subscriptions of all our  early subscribers are now du������  for renewal.- . ���������  The management wishes to  thank .our numerous readers  for their support during the  past and trusts to a,continuance of the same in the future.  The subscription rate remains at^$l  per year, payable strictly in advance.  m>  A Hindrance to Develop-  .    ment. .  This week we have occasion to  . point to one  more reason- why  farming in-Balla Coola has not  developed at a more satisfactory  ' rate <these many years after its  settlement.  There has been a lack of "pulling together.', It has been  every man for himself."  There has been no lack of. well  attended meetings, neitherjiave  the meetings been dull ������or improperly conducted as the people  of Bella Coola are well able to  express themselves intelligently,- properly and according to  parliamentary rules whenever  occasion requires.  But the -great hindrance to cooperative action has b.een jealousy, a-fear of some one getting  an advantage over the other; unworthy suspicion of each other  and an unwillingness to yield to  the wishes of the majority.  In short, there has existed a,  spirit of stubbqrness and un-  charitableness which makes cooperation impossible.  It is not an agreeable task to  point out'the faults of ourselves  and those with whom we come  in daily contact; but we believe  if there is to be a change wrought  for the better, the obstacles to  be removed must be pointed out,  and it devolves upon the local  paper to perform this public  duty.  The weaknesses of the people  obstructing the work of pulling  together cannot. be cured in a  day or just by pointing them out.  The first step to be taken is to  recognize what the trouble really  is. We must, as the doctors say,  diagnose the case. When the  trouble is found each one of us  must try to realize that he has  been guilty as well as the other  and resolve to do differently in  the future.  It is not necessary when we]  make  this resolve that we pat1  ourselves on the back and con-  gratulateourselves upon the. fine  spirit we are showing in the circumstances:, but rather let us  realize we must doit for our self-  preservation, for our own welfare as well as that of the community. But do not let us stop  at making the resolve only, let  us carry it into action.  If we want to cultivate chari-,  tableness and good feeling towards each other even if it is  for the purpose of helping ourr  selves or working together we  must "get together," meet oft-  ener. - This can be best effected  through the Farmers' Institute,  as it was pointed out by Mr.  Neale at the meeting held at  Hagensborg during the Fair of  last week, meetings should be  held at least once a month. In  making these; meetings well attended the'. community spirit  would :be kindled and fostered  and co-operative undertakings  be made possible.  These ^meetings ought to be  madeof-a social character also,  where old and young of ..both  sexes may' meet for* entertainment as well as instruction.   .  We'haye noticed that the political campaign just ended has  caused bitterness to rankle in  the bosoms^ of some of our citizens. In the words of the most  j prominent of Conservative  papers in the,province, The Colonist, in speaking on the subject  of pulling together:  "What we as a community  ought to concern ourselves about  is how we-can develop that spirit  ofliarmony which will contribute  more than anything else Lo the  welfare of us ��������� all. Let us all  therefore forget politics as much  GIL LETT'S  LYE  Ei^S DIRT"  ""lUill 8CI0KC OPINING -rull OI������l_yW I**" " "*  ['  KfONED  SLGJ llett company uj������2  l*il     TORONTO ONT.  as we can or if we are forced to  think about them, resolve that  they shall interfere as little as  possible with co-operation in promoting those things that make  for general prosperity."  Recruiting.  The demand for men to enlist  for the war is still as great as  ever. A despatch .from London  dated October 6,-reads: "Great  Britain is in urgent need of men  for herarmiesand also her munition factories." . ,   c  Canada has, through; her pre  mier, promised to send 500,000  soldiers to the front. Up till the  end of August about 362,000 had  responded to the country's call.  We are glad to note that British Columbia has furnished a  larger percentage of her population to the army.than any other  province of the Dominion.  British Columbia and Alberta  have recruited ten per cent, Ontario about five per cent, the  Atlantic 'provinces three per  cent and Quebec two" per, cent of  the total population.  We believe it., will not be for  the best interests of our/province  to deflect anymore men from our  domestic industries to go to the  war. There is certain, work to  be done at home of almost equal  importance to that of fighting  the enemy along the battle front.  The army must be maintained in  food and equipment and the  army at home has that important task to perform. There seems  to be a scarcity of labor in British Columbia;at present and this  condition would be still more accentuated by.furtjher.en,listment.  The recruiting'as-it has been  'carried on' in Canada has not  been satisfactory. It has been  carried on under the voluntary  system. This system may.give  an opportunity for pride in pointing out the unprecedented size  of the voluntary army, 'as distinctive from the armies raised  by conscription in other countries. This expression of pride  so frequently heard on all sides  is an unworthy reflection upon  the patriotism of the soldiers  of the countries where conscription prevails, and therefore  should not be indulged in.  There is  no  doubt   that  the  people of all the warring nations,  friends and foes alike, are equally willing to make the sacrifices  necessary to bring the conflict  to a victorious issue.  The voluntary system is nothing to be proud of. It gives the  slackers opportunity to shirk an  obvious duty, it subjects those  who for one reason or another  feel they cannot, enlist to unfavorable comment and ' even  persecution. In short, the system is lacking in effectiveness  and dignity and should be abandoned at once.  Let properly constituted authorities point out who shall go  and who shall remain at home  and thus put a stop to all innuendo and sarcasm brought to  bear upon those who have not  recruited. ,  As somebody has pointed out,  the four provinces east of the  Ottawa Riveri that is, Quebec,  New Brunswick, Nova Scotia  and Prince Edward Island, with  a population exceeding 3,000,000,  have enlisted a little over 71,000.  This large field, therefore, has  been scarcely scratched and if  properly cultivated should be able  to recruit easily, on a seven per  cent basis, over 210,000, or 140,-  000 more than they have recruited and the exact figure required  to bring the total of the nation  to the half million maximum.  00000  Pledges  Will Be Kept.  In a few days the leader of the  Liberal party, H. C. Brewster,  will be called upon by the Lieutenant-Governor to form a new  cabinet and takeover the administration of the province.  Some of the more bigoted partisans opposed to the hew government whom we have met are  full of apprehensive fears that  now "comes the deluge." According to these wiseacres, the  Liberal party is composed of the  worst kind of politicians, who  now after a period of, starvation  in the shades of opposition find  themselves in the public crib  will begin an orgie of grafting  unequalled even in the palmy  days of theBowser-McBride and  the.Roblin rule.  All the fair promises made by  the Liberals during the campaign, these same prognosticated of the political future, pro-  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND  MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE  WEST"  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS;- OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  MADE    IN    B. C.  Send for Catalogue  wamsBmummmm  Prompt Attention Given Letter Order  It  CLUB  OFFER  We have'pleasure in announcing that we have nunte arrangements with two of the leading weekly publicoi<ii,s  so that our subscribers may have the best of readily at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier   .       .       .   ���������   .       . $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50  $2.50  The Courier   .       .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  The Courier   .       .       ^  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  .  1.00  $2.00  Both  for   .  Both  for   .  Both  for'.  papers  ��������� ' $1.50  papers  ���������   $1.50  papers  .   $1.75  %>  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  J  nounce as mere claptrap, made  only to catch votes and to be forgotten as soon as they have  served their ends. ������������������    "  That the promises made-have  not been put away never to be  redeemed is clea'r from an after-  election speech made by Mr.  Brewster at a party banquet to  the party workers in Victoria,  at which-Mr. Brewster and the  other candidates delivered speeches of congratulation, to those  who had been ^instrumental in  their return.  The remarks of Mr. Brewster  and carry it on.   The people have!  placed behind me a body of n:en|  than whom there can he no higher type, men of high character,!  clean record and  tried businc/sj  ability.    We are pledged to give|  to this province clean and honest  government,   and   abolish   t hel  patronagesystem, and our i>ia%  shall be carried out to the \iu  most."   The people have declared!  that they must have men of high-l  er ideals in charge of their sfj  fairs.    The days of the professional politician are park river,  I hope, to return.    To the past,  wereof especial interest, because also, belongs the spoils <\ium  it was his first deliverance since  the election. The Liberal leader  was careful to reiterate his stand  upon certain matters which he  emphasized during the fight.  "We must realize the responsibility, " said Mr. Brewster,  "but we are not afraid to face it  ' "The fight is only Li-jrinninp,  for there is much to be done in|  order to straighten out the affairs of the province.    The new 1  government will need your earn-j  est co-operation, and sympathy  and some patience in tie almost!  herculean task which has to be|  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MFN t(, r,nrtsir,ti  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B: C, them in diffe.������ u 1 ^is of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remumjra-|  tive. Honest, energetic men only are needed. We particularly  want a good man at Bella Coola and for coast points, aisn a man  on the G. T. P. Railway.  /*][������  IOC  31  ��������� c  HOE  D  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SEli\'l������'l':  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA'AND VANCOUVER  S. S.      CamOSUn"   Leaves   Vancouver  every  Thursday at 9 p. m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S.   "COQUITLAM"   sails   from   Vancouver  nightly, carrying Gasoline  and   Explosives,   will  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information. i'I'I'-  Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. Me'-'o-.  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  ori-  c.ill  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  I  iff! * Saturday, Utoher 14,   1916  Designed this year it will ornament and enhance the  good appearance of the tidiest kitchen in all Canada.  McClaryS  0  r BELLA5 COOLA COURIER  The Annual Fall Fair.  By A. li. NEALE, Assistant Provincial  Horticulturist.  ThPSPflsnrwif ~      ��������� ���������   4.        \ SYNOPSIS OF GOAL MINING  lneseason of mneteen-sixteen 1 REGULATIONS  [. POAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, ii.  ~ Manitoua, Saskatchewan and alberta,  trie Yukon Territory, the North-west Terri-  Come in and I'll show you why the Kootenay stays as  good as new long after other ranges have to be repaired  or replaced.  Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  MQ  undertaken, but there is no doubt  as to the result. We have a magnificent heritage in British Columbia, with resources which  have been thrown away, but with  , efficient administration of our  agricultural,    mineral,    timber,  War Against War.  Mr. Lloyd George says in regard to one object sought for by  this war: "This ghastliness must  never be re-enacted on this earth,  and one method at least of as  suring that end is the inflicting  fishing and other natural riches j0r sucn punishment of the per-  we shall find our province occu-i petrators of this outrage against  ' pying the place it ought in the! humanity that the temptation.to  confederation. We intend that;emulate their exploits will be  every citizen shall -share in the;eliminated from the hearts of  opportunities offered   by  these j the   evil-minded . amongst   the  resources.  i rulers" of men.  ���������A few lines we specially*  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  Griffen & Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������  Canned and dried  fruits  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  ���������/  taken all through has not been I  as favorable in many ways for  farming as it might have been,  and so there is great credit due  to the people of Bella Coola for  such a commendable showing as  was made at Hagensborg, Oct. 6.  Many of the exhibits were got  into place the day before and on  Friday morning, the openingday,  produce of all kinds arrived in  such quantities that' the exhibition shed was soon full and space  had to be found on a table outside for a large part of the exhibits.  Taken as a general average,  the produce compared favorably  with any that the writer has so  far seen in Northern B. C, and  the way it was selected proved  that the farmers have profited  year by year from exhibiting in  competition. Buteven now there  is a noticeable tendency, in the*  case of garden produce for the  table, to select for size rather  than quality. It is a very rare  thing that an extra large product  is desirable, because it is usually  indicative of coarse quality.   In  i  dealing with stock vegetables,  however, the most desirable article in this case is one which  shows as much, size as possible  accompanied by a certain smoothness and good quality.  Competition was very keen,  and owing to a most congenial  "Weather Man" the number of  spectators was large and the interest shown indicated that the  Fall Fair still holds its usefulness.  The Fruit exhibit was especially fine and the number of different varieties of apples exhibited  shows that although this is not  a  district   where    commercial  fruit growing should be encouraged  on   a large scale yet the  climate is such that it  permits  the farmer to grow an excellent  variety of fruits for home use  and  to  sell  a  good number of  boxes over and above the home  requirements to  pay expenses.  The color and uniformity of the  plates  of   apples   was  all   that  could be desired, especially considering the late season.  In the vegetable classes competition was very keen and the  manner in which the exhibits  were selected showed good judgment.  It is to be regretted that the  grains, grasses and stock classes  were not better represented. The  latter class is especially valuable  in that it affords the best incentive for the improvement of the  livestock in the district. It is  most important that the farmers  should realize the value of high-  grade as compared with scrub  cattle and by bringing the stock  together for competition a desire  for improvement is stimulated,  with the result that each year a  general increase in quality will  be noticed.  It has been stated by many  critics that, local Fall Fairs are  losing their value. No doubt in  some ways there may be a small  amount of truth in this statement, but 1 think this only applies in the case where the essential object of the Fair, that of  increasing the farmer's efficiency, is forgotten-and the interest allowed to sag. It stands to  reason that where farmers have  Tories and in a portion of the Province of  British Colombia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,f>������0 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a leaae must be made by the  applicant in person to the Ascent or Sub-Anent  of the district in which the riKhts applied for  are situated.  In nurveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or lethal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco-'ntinf? for the  full Quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  . furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever availuble surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  VV. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  TheMason S'Risch Piano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege lo stale with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  ^    Let us attend  your Victor Record  jJ  mailorders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.      . Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd,  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  ^^  I 1  nor:  0  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C, j  Yukon and Alaska have taken advant-!  age of our Fur Sales.Agency for 3 years, f  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20 j  of the biggest fur buyers in the world j  bid on your fur instead of one individu- \  al house assures  the  highest  market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  HOE  Dealers and Trappers  \X7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \X/HAT person so  independent?  \KTHAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  HTHE REASONS for this enviable condi-  *- tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  / The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact Was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  to send their produce along way  to a large fair and are" not able  to go themselves they cannot  derive any benefit beyond the  possible prizes they may win.  Therefore, the small local Fair  rather than losing value, is becoming more important all the  time and should be given all the  support that it merits, so that it  becomes larger each year, competition becomes keener, and the  general tone and .prosperity of  the district is heightened accordingly.  DELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  DISC BEFORE PLOWING.  it has been pointed out by some  experts thafland on which hoed  crops have been grown should  not. be plowed.  Before plowing sod land it  should be thoroughly disked as  that will ensure a deep, well pulverized seed bed in the spring.  1 1  ������  <���������>  Help the community by supporting the home paper.  Get"Morc Money" for your Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected in yonrsection  SHIP YOWl I'lTKSS DIHECT to "SIIUHE11T" the laraest  house in the World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMERICAN RAW FUttS  a reliable���������responsible���������sale l-'ur House with an unblemished reputation e.-.istinK for "more than n third of a century." a lonsr successful record of sending Fur Shippers proinpt.SATISFACTORY  AND PROFITABLE returns. Write fur "iFtjr l&buutrt febtPP".  the only reliable, accurate market report and price lidt published.  Write for it-NOW-lfs FREE  AD   CUITHPRT   !������,>    25-27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.  . D. OMUBLKl, inc. Dept.C 67 CHICAGO, U.S.A.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1-00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   . Name   P. O   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed g������������B5^S������aK5S������M  mmmmwBBmimmtMm.  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,  October 14,   I9j&  w  1%  o   c  IJOE  ���������y   ���������  scribe  or me  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles:  AYRSHIRE CATTLE.  One of the things which Mr.  Neale made reference to in his  speech, at the Bella Coola Fair,  was that the dairy animals in  the valley, were deteriorating;  the reason of which he said was  inbreeding/  It is to be hoped the farmers  will give this important matter  more than   a  passing thought,'  but deal with it at an early meeting of the Farmers' Institute.  .  The government is fully alive  to the situation and in order to  remedy. the> evil   furnished  the  community for more than a year  a' thoroughbred   Ayrshire   bull  free of charge.    It is to be regretted that for various reasons  most of the farmers found it not  ���������convenient to avail themselves  of this means to improve their  herd.' But,in spite of this fact  it is hoped'that  in due course  another, bulTor rather twoof the  same breed be secured.  According toreports received,  it will be to the.best interest of  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  '%~ It Will be to your interest to \eep Well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIERS  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your (name before the  public. No manufactur-  ' er or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public adyer-  i  tising brings.  Ramsay Bros. & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.   "���������  -   MANUFACTURERS  OF ���������  j  Biscuits ::-Candy :: Macaroni  Milk and'jNuk  Chocolate Bars  Also Refiners of Syrup and  ���������Packers" of-..Molasses  "WE STAND BEHIND OUR GOODS"  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  D EAL ^ESTATE booms in the  "^ cities have come 7and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North:West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all.    Did not  ;>. know., is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted'on develop-  .ments by reading the "Courier. ���������'  J  g  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  fiUILD UP YOUR HOME  u TOWN." Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that,you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your; community.  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  o   c  hoc  0������  DISTRICT   OP   COAST���������BANGE   XXX.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C.��������� occur  pation contractor, intend to.-apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land: - ,  .Commencing at a post Situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  half a mile within the western entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20 chains, thence  South 20. chains, to the shore;.the.nce  following the shore-line to ..the point of  commencement, containing. 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.   ;  Dated, August 22, 1913.  Sept. 2--N6V. 4  'cheers and refreshes  at any hour of the day.  You get the most delicious tea when you  use  Will You Help?  If so, "Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed'to'the'Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Wind.sor;Hotel,;Montreal,.and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books,  Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who, are willing"to assist.  the farmers in this place to stick j  to the Ayrshire breed as the best  adapted for our conditions. The  Ayrshire cattle are hardy, excellent rustlers, and the calves  strong and healthy.  FLUSHING EWES.  The -practice of feeding the  ewes, some form of- succulent  green -crop immediately prior to  the breeding season is known as  flushing.- This is done with the  idea of putting'them in the best  condition for the service of the  ram. Very often the ewes,-'after  being treated in this manner,  take "the ram only oncev When  this is 'the case the lambs all  come at about the same time in  the "spring,; thus relieving the  shepherd of much of his spring  work, as taking care of a large  number of ewes'in a short space  of time is considerably preferable  to having the lambs strung out  'over a long space of time!  ���������    Another argument in favor of  flushing is that when the ewes  are in good physical condition  they are "more likely to have  twins than when they are thin  and weak.  There "are many crops that are  adaptable for ewe-flushing, some  of the more commonly used ones  being rye, rape, blue-grass, and  clover.  A heavy growth of blue-grass  pasture, when it is available, is  considered to be one of the very  best things for ewes at flushing-  time. Timothy is not considered  good, as it does not contain the  necessary nutriment.  Many farmers find that by  pasturing down the rye-field in  the fall they are provided with  a simple means of flushing, while  others sow a special crop of rape  for this purpose. .  That the-flushing of ewes is a  very profitable investment is the  conclusion that has been reached  by most shepherds.  ^^^^^  Mlfl  ttovarSold  InBulk,  TEA  ^Um^ttamm  '"THE two principal reasons  *   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:    .  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Burns  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and  Proviaioners  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  OgilvieY  Royal Household Flaur  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS.  IT'S  CANADA'S  BEST FLOUR  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  Brynildsen&Co.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandis  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������     &  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the moft suitable articlesare kept at prices thai  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all description*  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all s<"ts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  [Best Goods-Lowest Prices   Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B.BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B  X.  h)\%  i

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