BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Bella Coola Courier Nov 6, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xbellacoo-1.0170130.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xbellacoo-1.0170130.json
JSON-LD: xbellacoo-1.0170130-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xbellacoo-1.0170130-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xbellacoo-1.0170130-rdf.json
Turtle: xbellacoo-1.0170130-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xbellacoo-1.0170130-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xbellacoo-1.0170130-source.json
Full Text
xbellacoo-1.0170130-fulltext.txt
Citation
xbellacoo-1.0170130.ris

Full Text

Array c  m  %���������'��������� /,-"V-'"��������� :f.:,' ������-'i,;,/^^'*V.  /  jjj^gj^iimiiginnf^HuiiuuMigynutmmi^iniiiiiiiini^  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER.  Compiled by Mr. C. II. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 6G.   Minimum, 44.  Highest Max. (11th) 76. Lowest Min. (11th) 34  Rainfall, 2.12 inches.  VOL. 4���������NO. 4  BELLA COOLA^B. C, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1915.   ,,  $1.00 a Year  Gas Being Employed  Against Germans  London, Nov. 3.���������The principal points in Premier Asquith's,  great address delivered in the  House of Commons on Tuesday  were: "There are nearly one  million British troops on the  Franco-Belgian front. The total  British casualties in France and  Flanders up to date are 377,000.  The Germans have not gained  one foot of ground since last  April. In the Sea of Marmora  the British submarines have sunk  or disabled ,two battleships, five  gunboats, one torpedo boat, eight  ��������� transports and 197 supply ships.  The government's'bf Great Brit-  ��������� airi and France have signed an  agreement to maintain Serbia's  independence. The financial situation is becoming serious' and  the nation must prepare to make  even greater sacrifices."  The premier believed that Lord  Derby's plan for recruiting would  succeed and conscription be  found unnecessary; but he added,  "that this war must be won, and  if necessary he would have no  hesitation in presenting, fresh  proposals to the House.,",  The situation in Dardanelles  was receiving the government's  most anxious consideration.l He  was confident, however, that the  Allies would come out victorious,  and it was not prepared to surrender the difficult task as long  as the government retained the  confidence of the king and  country.  Referring to the navy, he said  the men of the grand fleet were  performing their all-important  work unnoticed, unadvertised,  with efficiency and a brilliancy  beyond description. These men  had cleared the high seas of German . warships and merchant  marine. Altogether, Britain employed 2,500,000 officers and men  in this part of the service.  In addition to this, 320,000 sick  and wounded were being cared  for; 2,500,000 tons of supplies  furnished and an army of 800,000  horses and mules kept in service.  The loss in life in the whole of  the gigantic operations over-seas  were less' than one-tenth of one  per cent. Never in the whole  hiftory of the world was there  found anything comparable to  this record.  General French reported that  gas had been employed against  the Germans, and in the fighting  taking place at Loos the casualties of seven German battalions  averaged as high as eighty per  cent of their strength.  To Raise Haifa Regiment  Ottawa, Nov. 3���������Commissioner  of Yukon, Mr. Black, asked the  minister of militia for permission  to raise one-half of a regiment  in the Yukon. '.  Teutons Hurled Back  With Heavy Losses  Paris, Nov. 3.���������The centre of  tho Teutons was hurled back  with great losses after havinp  approached to within five hundred metres of the Serbian positions. On the remaindor of the  front severe engagements were  in progress.  In the Champagne district on  the whole front between Hill 193  and" Tahure the Germans bombarded our positions.  Jottings of Bella Cqola and District  Russians Assume Offensive  Petrograd, via London, Nov.  2.���������-The Russians have assumed  the offensive on the Dvinsk,  -Styr/Stripa, Niemen and upper  Syozora rivers, making marked  progress.  Italians Make Progress  Rome, Nov: 3c���������Our army is  making progress on the'Isonzo  river;   -,  Austro-Hungary is arming Albanians who harrass the rear of  the Serbian army.  Russians Land Large  Forces at Varna  Bucharest, Nov. 2. ��������� Official  bulletin received by Reuters Telegram Company reported that  Russians have successfully landed larges forces at the Bulgarian  port, Varna.  47th Battalion for the Front  New Westminster, Nov. 3.���������  The 47th Battalion has been ordered to the front, the entire  battalion is celebrating (he occasion.  Wireless Telephone Works  New York, Nov. 2 -Arlington,  Virginia, talked by wireless telephone with Paris, France, on  October 21. Honolulo also heard  the operator talking from Arlington, 4,800 miles away.  In the wireless plant of the  navy at Arlington,. Mr. Webb,  telephone engineer, asked the  wireless operator to signal the  Eiffel Towerin Paris. The wire  less snapped out the signal and  soon there came a response. Mr.  Webb shouted into the mouthpiece, <"Hello, Shreen! one, two,  three, four, two, three, four.  Good-bye." This was distinctly  heard by the engineer and French  army officers in Paris and that  portions of the test figures had  been picked up.  \:������������������>/��������� ':;������0RSEs. ,'���������.';;  A    wintered at the Constan-  p    tia Ranch, Atnarko River,  on the best upland timothy hay. ' "���������  Charges, $25 for six  months ��������� November to  April, inclusive; or $5  per month.  No horses delivered without full  settlement of charges. ���������Apply  S Mi W. MARVIN.  V   ���������'   ��������� W  S. S. Camosun came in on her  northbound trip last week on  Thursday eveningabout8o'clock.  On her passenger list for .this  port were: Mr. H. S. Clements,  M. P., Mr. Cameron, Ingvald  Urseth, and Mrs.C. Carlson with  lier five sons.  Mr. H. "S. Clements, M. P., is  paying rfiis constituents here a  very welcome visit. -It is conceded by political opponents even;  that he comes here without ulterior motive as he does not seek  re-election from this district'in  the next election. He, with Mr.  S. Cameron, went up the valley  on, a bear .hunt. On the way  down to catch the outgoing steam-  he-had meetings with his constituents, giving an account of  his stewardship.  He has proved to be a very  good representative of the district, and we predict it will be  hard for his successor to, be able  to measure up to him.  Ingvald Urseth comes home  after several months sojourn in  Minnesota and Alberta. He finds  that Bella Coola is averaging,.up  pretty well with thejest of'the  world. ,���������-""���������  Jf^^ffg-  Mrs. C Carlson and;.'family  came in to join Mr. Carlson who  has preceded them several  months.1 They have taken up  their residence at their old home  adjoining the town, and are now  sufficiently, settled' to announce  that they are "at home" to their  friends.   The younger element of Rev.  H. Sageng's congregation made  adescentupon his home on Friday  afternoon last week. The visitation was wholly unexpected on  the part of Mr. and Mrs. Sageng  although it could not very well  be called a surprise, because they  must be aware of their favorable  standing with the members bf  their church.  The visitors brought refreshments with them, and when they  had arrived at the proper pitch'  of enjoyment the director of the  proceedings, Mr. J. Widsten,  cleared his throat and announced  that they had brought with them  a horse which they asked. the  pastor to accept as a token of  their'respect and goodwill.  The collection of the funds for  the purchase of the horse had  met with such ready response  that there was a surplus of $18  which Mr. Widsten handed to  the minister. This sum will come  handy when the feed bill will  have to be paid. That they all  had a good time goes without  saying.   As the Courier, on account of  the departure of ,the mail on Friday, is printed the day previous  to the published date of issu6,  we are able to announce two  events to take place on Friday  the 5th instant.  Mr. H. S. Clements speaks at  the Mackenzie School on Friday  evening at 7:30.  Everybody must come and hear  his account of the parliament's  vvork at Ottawa in this the most  eventful year in Canadian history.  Mr. A. C-Christensen, presi  doc oi" the .hospital board, air  nounces that on Friday all -the  young menand big boys in town  and vicinity are asked to come to  come tothe hospital and help to  cut"and saw the winter's supply  of wood for that institution.  Wi������h the number of patients at  present it is necessary to keep  six'( stoves going. A ,hearty re-'  sponse will be appreciated.  I/er 'Fougner,' Indian agent,  left last Wednesday on a month's  tou:* of his district. His trip will  probably extend to Prince Rupert.  r Dominion-constable Tucker has  returned from a two weeks' trip  to fhe Indian villages between  here and China Hat. As there  have been no,blood curdling  stories in circulation- since his  return it is presumed it is "all  quiet on the Potomac."  Frank Broughton, provincial  constable, announces the amount  of the contributions to the British Red Cross Society received  by him is $54.50. This amount  vyas.. "raised,, by,.subscription at  BeJl^Coolaand Hagehsborfei" *.-; ���������  The ja.mwmt" realized ���������' ftt ^the  Bella, Coola Fair held at Hagens-  boi'g, October 5th,-for the-Cana-  dian branch of the Red Cross is  $73. This brings the different  amounts raised' for Red Cross  work within one month to $158.-  70. _y,   We learn that three more of'  the Bella Coola men have enlisted. Rev. T. C. Colwell and H.  Grainger will leave in a few days  to join the ambulance corps. Mr.  Chas. Lord has, after arriving in  Vancouver, joined the medical  corps.         The heavy rains of the last two  weeks have assumed proportions  almost sufficient to call them unprecedented. The (watercourses  have not been unusually large,  however, so the inconvenience  caused has been of a minor nature  Opening of the Hospital.  Saturday afternoon, October  30th, saw the friends of the  hospital, at the invitation of Dr.  Mrs. Sutherland, gather at her  residence on the hospital grounds.  Everyone was made welcome by  the host and hostess and ushered  into the beautifully furnished  rooms of their house.  The visitors were too many to  be comfortably accommodated  within, and soon spread into the  adjacent hospital and other buildings. It became apparent to  everyone, that a. new spirit was  reigning on the premises, that  there was efficient management,  was made manifest by the spick  and span appearance of everything, and the contentment  shown by the patients.  The arrangements made for  the entertainment of the visitors  were perfect. On arrival and at  any other time, they were served  with coffee, tea, cakes and sand  wiches. Mrs. Clayton presided  at the table, ably ��������� assisted by  Mr. Phibbs and several young  ladies.    ' -  The young ladies, true to their  nature, would not allow the occasion pass without making their  charms rof practical value by  pressing moneyfrom their gen tie-  men friends. MissA'ddieGibson,  Miss Susie Christensen and Miss  Beatrice- Grant, were seen button-holing the men and entreating them to buy tickets at one  dollar each, in a chance of winning a Dulcetonc (a sortof piano  in minature) to be raffled for  when the proceeds are sufficiently large to warrant it. How much  booty they secured is not known  to us. Mr. A. C. Christensen,  president of the hospital board,  presided over the, subscription  list and gathered in $32. ,  The following sent donation.1  in the nature of linen and othci  articles needed in the hospital:  Mesdames, J. It. Morrison, E.  C. Clayton, ,W. F. Roland, B. P.  Jacobsen, G. SaugKlfid, A. K.  Oveson, H. Sageng, H. O. Han-  ,son, E.--Nygaard, B. Brynildsen;  toe Misseo.,Gi,bsor>, and..the..Lys-  daLSewfrig Circle.   . , ,'  ;As the hour of darkness approached, the guests wended  their several ways homeward  well pleased with the visit and  the entertainment received.  It should not be forgotten that  Mrs. M. Saugstad is Dr. Sutherland's chief lieutenant in' the  management of the hospital, and  no small amount of credit is,due  to her intelligent and active rer-  vice.         '  The Concert and Lecture.  Last Monday evening at the  hall of the Bella Coola Hotel the  people from the town and several from the other part of the  valley, gathered in goodly numbers with expectations of receiving both entertainment and information. In this they were  not disappointed.  ��������� The program opened with the  singing by the audience of "It's  a Long Way to Tipperary." The  singing was rather weak at the  start and gave evidence that the  boys present had not served in  the trenches; but when the chorus  was reached they all found their  voices and rendered it with a  will.  At the opening of the meeting  the chairman suggested that inasmuch as the progamme was  lengthy and the lecture would  be of more than ordinary interest, the andience restrain their  expressions of approval by not  insisting on encores. And this  suggestion was followed throughout Wjith one exception. Mr.  Lindsell's rendering of a humorous song was so effective that he  had to give another.       ,  Mr. Harry Grainger in a reading paid a fine tribute to the flag  of our Empire. At the close of  the reading the audience rose in  a silent salutation of that^flag  which represents what is dearest  to us all.,.  The orchestra, which on this  occasion was composed of only  three members: Mr. and Mrs. T.  Saugstad and J. Nygaard; then  gave a selection in their usual  superior style. . -      "    .-���������  Mr. Herbert' Sutherland, accompanied on the piano by Miss  Mildred Gibson, played the manr  dolin of which he is a master.  Then followed the song by Mr. Gv  R. Lindsell, the effect of which  upon the audience was tco strong  to be restrained.  After the orchestra had given  mother selection the speaker of  the evening, Roy. W. H. Gibson,  ascended the Rostrum and in his  inimitable style gave a'graphic''  account of war conditions as he.  had'observed them on his recent  trip to Er.glai.d.    The nest ti.t-  slanding ftaluie of the speech  in our mind was the expression  of cheerfulness everywhere prevalent among the English people.  Wives and mothers see their dear ���������  )nes i>o .to the war with fcmilirrg  face?.   Wounded soldiers returning with smiling faces and.eager  co go back to the firing line. The  ipiritof sacrifice is abroad in..the  land and will bear, fruit, the effect of vyhich. will; regenerate,  the nation and be productive of  much 'good -'/or'������������������ gener&tiawi~m?-  ''    ' -~'     i     *  .'"       " ���������     ia ���������'  come. , ��������� -   , .  ������������������' A Zeppelin passed'over Newcastle, while "the speaker~"was-  there, but caused no alarm only  simple curiosity to see it; people  crowding out in the streets to  watch the aerial en<-my instead  of seeking places of safely.  In spite of the length of the  conflict and its many reverses",  the people are firmly convinced  of final victory. And it is true,  that when the cause is righteous,  the people willing and eager to  make every sacrifice and they  are animated by a supreme faith,  there can be no doubt of the successful issue.  The speaker at the conclusion  read the names of.the many who, -  from Bella Coola and vicinity,  had already enlisted, and who  are at the point of going to the  war, paying special tribute to  Herbert Barnard Green, Archi,-'  bald Richard Leese and S. G,  Chrichton, who have given their  lives for-their country.      __      ;  The speaker was listened fo  throughout with wrapt attention.  Applause was frequent as the  speaker's humor became too effective to be resisted.  At the end of the speech a collection was taken up, which  amounted to $31.20, and will be  forwarded to the Red Cross  Society.  The Misses Gibson now gave  a song which marked the er.d of  lhe program. The audience rose  and gave the National Anthem,  after which'the chairman proposed three cheers for Mr. Gibson, which were given with a  will and the meeting.closed.  |    OUmrrl|_N0ttr^  Lower Bella Coola: Church  Service, 11 a. m.  Bella Coola: Sunday School,  10:45 a. m.  Church Service, 7:30 p. m.  Mr. C- Carlson will conduct  the service.  ������   . Reo.T. C Colwell, a A., Palor     ������  4  IMMtflKMMjag������I������Wrg!!fW.M.Lili������MIIWl i T  /'   -  BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, Nt&emlcr 6t  19l5  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  this Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year $1.00  6 Month.       0.75  3 Month. , 0.50  ������    '           United State*  1 Year $1.50  .United Kingdom  1  Year..... $1.00  Sub.cription* payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving Uieir copy  regularly please notify the m:in;igement  at once. Changes in 'address should be  eent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,  Aitly at  Office. - ������������������  To Correspondents��������� While unobjectionable un-  onymoua communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such lctteis  must be given to the editor.  -" The Editor reserves the richt to iefuse publication of any letter. All manuscript ut writer's  riBk.  Vancouver Office - - 317-323 Cambie St.  '&al������0 pojntli suprrtna cal lex."  SATURDAY,  NOV. 6, 1915.  YJJ/e beg to remind our read-  , ers that the Courier having completed its third year  the subscriptions of all our  early subscribers are now due  for renewal.  The management wishes to  thank our numerous readers  for their support during the  past and trusts to a continuance of the same in the future.  The subscription rate remains at $1  per year, payable strictly in advance.  Germany's Failures.  To many minds .it seems that  Germany has so far had the best  of the war and while there may  De some truth in this, yet' her  position from a pro-German-  point of view is certainly not en-  encouraging. She has accomplished certain things without  reaching the objects of her efforts.,  ^ She overran Belgium and is  now occupying that country and  a considerable portion of French  territory; she has advanced quite  a distance into Russia, and what  she will be able to do in the Balkans is not so easy to say at this  writing. These accomplishments  go to show a wonderful strength  and ability to carry on war.  While all these facts are before  us do not let us forget that all  the objects she has fought for  have not been reached in a single  instance. She overran Belgium  to reach Paris and crush France  before Russia could gather  her full strength, in this she  failed. She has made herculean  efforts to reach Calais from there  to dominate the English channel  preparatory to an invasion of  England, here she failed. She  is strenuously occupied in disabling the Russians and probably  trying to reach Petrograd; another failure. She is now turning toward th'e'south in an effort  to reach Constantinople, and we  have good reason to believe that  in this she will also fail.  She has a strong navy which  she hoped would be able to whittle  down'that of her opponents by  degrees until finally she could  cope with the bulk"of it in open  battle, beat it and become mistress of the sea; in this she has  failed completely. She tried to  cripple Britain's commerce by  submarine raids with no adequate  success, and now she finds herself obliged to curtail her subma  rine activities to a great extent;  another failure. She expected  her Zeppelins to so terrorize  England that the English people  would compel their country to  sue for peace, in this effort she  has not only failed but drawn  upon herself the scorn and ridicule of neutrals and foes. She  has until recently maintained  control of the' Baltic Sea and  across this water been able to  secure some of her needed supplies from neutral countries, but  now the submarines of Britain  have penetrated into this inland  sea, and together with those of  Russia are playing havoc with  German shipping to such an extent that her ports are becoming  practically blockaded.  She is surrounded by a ring of  steel which as time passes will  become harder and harder to  break.' The enormous expendi-  tures for war purposes have been  c  going on so long that the country  is on the brink of financial ruin.  Her only hope in this respect is  that by a favorable turn of affairs  she may be able to induce her  enemies to.accept terms of peace  and pay her large indemnities.  But it is fair to assume that Ger-  many and her allies are a great  deal nearer exhaustion than their  foes. So take it altogether things  are not1 coming out according to  Germany's calculations when she  started out upon her world conquest.  ooooo  The King's Call.  ���������The king has issued the following call to men of the Empire:'  "To my people:  ."At'this grave moment in the  struggle'oetween my people and  a highly organized enemy who  has transgressed the laws of  nations and changed the ordinance that binds civilized Europe  together, I appeal to you.    -  "I rejoice in my Empire's effort arid I feel pride in the volun-  tary response from my. subjects  all over the world, who have sacrificed home and fortune^and  life itself in order, that afiother  may not inherit the free empire  which their ancestors and mine  hav"e built. I ask you to make  good these sacrifices.  "The end is not in sight.  More  'iiiiliiiiii  .S^I^S^DlSiNFECTSti?  keep my armies in the field, and  through them to secure victory  and ah enduring peace. In ancient days the darkest moment  has ever produced in men of our  race the strongest resolve. I  ask you, men.of all classes, to'  come forward voluntarily and)  take your share,in these figh"ts.  "In freely responding to my  appeal you will be giving your  support to our brothers who  have long since upheld Great  Britain's past traditions and the  glory of her arms."  The Comox-Atlin Regiment.  Our country is in need of more  men for the war. It is of the  highest importance that'the flow  of men to the colors continue undiminished. This war is waged  against no ordinary foe;v it has  disclosed an enemy with a character which for cruelty staggers  humanity. It is a war not confined to the soldiers of its enemies, but it also murders in cold  blood non-combatants, men,  women and children on land and  sea.' Never before among civilized nations has anything .like  the f rightfulness of German warfare been known.  The continued practice of its  horror from the invasion of and  murder of the innocents in Belgium till the shooting of Miss  CflvPl!-..the other day, makes.it  impossible within the'.spaceM a  short, article" to ���������enumerate1 the  hundreds of cases, similar* in  character reported and confirmed  The latest incident in this long  list of murder and rapine is the  shooting of Miss Cavell, an English nurse engaged in caring for  the wounded of both friend and  foe at the,city of Brussells. She  was accused of the awful crime  of helping Belgians to escape  from their own down-trodden  land. For this she received the  .sentence of death and was executed. ,,  To mark the great difference  and Germany, let it be noted that  an English court pronounced a  sentence of imprisonment for  six,months on a woman found  mi <;guilty of sending information to  the enemy.  II c  The country which is countenancing, defending and ordering  waYvfare of this,dastardly nature  is now trying to get the mastery  of the world!  ,The appeal comes to the able-  bodied men of our beloved nation  to throw aside their everyday  tasks and engage in the task,  the most supreme, of delivering  this country and the world from  the dominance of this monster.  This appeal which has gone  forth for more than a year and  which throughout the Empire  has met a response unequalled  in the world's history,- comes  very close to us at this ^ime. The  King himself is sending out a  personal call which is, indeed,  significant and will be heeded.  Mr. H. S. Clements, M. P., for  the Comox-Atlin district, has  made arrangements for the organization of a regiment made  up of residents of the Comox-Atlin and Yukon districts. The recruiting for this regiment will  take place at Prince Rupert and  Comox, and it will be commanded  by Major W. J. Warden.  Let Bella Coola honor herself  By being strongly represented  in this regiment from the farthest  western frontier of the Empire.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  MADE   IN    B. C.  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Order*  Gault Brothers Limited  IVHOLESALErVRY GOODS'  361 Water Street       Vancouver, B. C.  ���������J Qaull Brothers for over 60 years haOe successfully  maintained wholesale warehouses throughout Canada  ^ ' The Vancouver stocli is the largest and best assorted  stock on the Coast, in some cases the best west of Toronto  STAPLES '  ,  SMALLWARES  RIBBONS  Rcady-to-Wear  MEN'S FURNISHINGS  House Furnishings  CARPETS������  LINENS  DRESS GOODS1  MAIL ORDERS EXECUTED THE DAY RECEIVED  men and yet more are wanted to between the- spirit of England  Practice of Frugality Is  Needed.  It is hard for people as a rule  to re-adjust their way of living  to conform to a reduced income.  That is what causes most of the  grumbling about hard times.  People which have no income  whatever, if they have no fund,  laid by for a rainy day, are of  course hit about as hard as they  can be when the hard times strike  them. But as long as the earth  and sea yield their abundant increase there Is not any danger of  starvation in a well regulated  society. &  There is a discipline in the  close figuring to make both ends  meet, which will prove of benefit to the future of those who are  to practice the same. And it  will also be found of benefit to  the society as a whole. We are  noft sufficiently philosophical to  enter into a discussion of all the  benefits which may result from  frugal living,1 combined with hard  thinking; but we can think of  one at least which will have lasting effect.  In prosperous times, people's  attention is called only to the  obvious and easiest way of making a living and-accumulating  wealth, while resources in the development of which perseverance  and leng experience is necessary  to bring to the stage of an as-  sured income are'neglected and  despised because of the small  returns they seem likely to yield  at the beginning or for a long  time. But when the hard times  come, people will turn to the  picking up of crumbs formerly  overlooked orthrownaway. And  because hard times have such  an effect it will be found that it  is the hard times that lay the  solid foundation for the prosperous times which are sure to  follow, where the people are  sober, honest and industrous.  In  reading  the   later Prince  Rupert papers of how the fishing  industry of the northern coast is  being attracted to that young  city, we are led to believe that  Prince Rupert's convenient location will be one of the means of  further developing the fisheries  of adjacent waters.  Our experience along these  lines is not sufficient to warrant  us in advisingihow this industry  may be further developed, and  how many of those who are now  stranded in the cities might  find a way of obtaining a livelihood from exploiting the waters  teeming with food fishes.  We were inspired to write this  article by reading in one of our  exchanges a report first published  in the Prince Rupert Journal,  from its correspondent on one of  the. islands of the Queen Charlotte group. He says it is a good  centre for the salmon and halibut  fisheries of Hecate Strait. He  appeals to any men in Prince  Rupert to come there without  delay and help them out with a  prodigious"harvest of the deep.  The fishermen are on the water  for fourteen hours a day trolling  ttg><Ttr>^'M*>^ri!������rr^<i>g'^<TM*^<*������ oo g^<������y><f������y>^������g>^r������<r>>r������<n������������  The Best Known and Popular Lubricant for  SViotor Boats  its use assures freedom from Carbon deposit  on valves, spark plugs, or In cylinders  WlPEm&l OIL CO. LTD.. VANCOUVER, B.C.  etX3<Jl5"<K>'4������(lX*S^"i* &>"<* 0^?~<J&4^<^&>^<JtC^-<J>^2s*<J4l>:<JtS  HOE  D������C  30E  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B^e.,LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  ;. ;between/;"'���������.���������������������������'i;,v^.;.;,/������������������.'.���������  Vancouver* Bella Coola and Princa Rupert  s. s, "gamosunt       :  Leaves Bella Coola for Prince Rupert at 6 p.m. Thurs-:  day Sept. 30; Oct. 14; 28; Nov. 11, 25; Dec^S,;;;2|, ��������� ;-  Leaves Bella Coola for Vancouver at"id p; hi.' ���������Friday :  Oct. 8, 22; Nov. 5, 19; Dec. 3, 17; 31:     ' v   -  S. S. ���������'" Coquitlam" or S. S. ������������������" Capilano " sailing  from Vancouver every week, carrying Gasoline and ,  Explosives, will call at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply.to  Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St.; Victoria.  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC &,HUDSON BAY RAILWAY.  301  3*|C  ITOE  w  Jw'  ,/3  '���������3  V-  I,  58  1 T  m  41'  -k  31  I  -? 1  I  *  T!*?FZ&.,-->'![ ���������if  MM  ���������m:  f  ���������I-  ������������ ���������  : m  "'I  |  i;  V  Saturdayf^November 6,  1915  BELLA COOLA COURIER  with spoons or herring bait.  If the beginners will be satisfied with, small returns at the  start, the getting acquainted',  gaining experience and efficiency,  the practising of. perseverance,'  will gradually bring about results  which should prove satisfactory  to ordinary men.      - *     -  ,  p    o     o    o    o  The Most Intemperate of the  i Classes.  It is not to be wondered at that  the laboring classes resent the  almost   universal   tendency' of  dragging them in every time the  evils of the liquor traffic is being  discussed.; . The prohibitionists  argue that because of their use  of liquor the laboring classes do  not obtain their just demands;  the drink ^cripples their morals,  intelligence, economic standing  and endurance.    The defenders  of the traffic maintain that the  workers drink because of the sc-  vere toil, .their uninviting homes,  long hours and physical-state.  Improve their conditions,  they  cry, and the jiquor evil .will become of .no moment.   Far from  us to deny ther truth contained  in both  these contentions; but  what is uppermost in our mind  at this moment is: that men and  women under no physical strain,  in easy circumstances, are as a  class just as much' under the  sway of the liquor demon as the  much talked about laboring classes.'  The reason why the sins of  these higher in the scale of  society are-not the targets of the  arguments in a prohibition campaign, is that they are less conspicuous, do not bring about  hunger and rags and other visible  evils, as do those same sins  among,the poorer members of  society. Who have not heard of  the, lavish banquets, wine suppers, the life in modern clubs  whit;h" make up to such a great  extent the leisure of the gilded  youths and older sinners?  We maintain that the indulgence in,strong drink is proportionately as great, if not greater,  among the upper classes as  among those that are classed as  the lower; and that therefore  the contention,: that poverty _and  hard work is the great cause of  intemperance is open to sincere  doubt.' "    '  We believe it has been proven  by actual demonstration through  years of experience in prohibition states, that poverty with all  its evils are greatly reduced  where the open bar is abolished.  Distribution of Seed Grain  and Potatoes  From the Dominion Experimental  ' Farms.  ���������1915-16.  \\ 'J'rJ^m  ',",At..--;;<v .:' ' V -^  M    ^HwmHBH  fSBBa^it '���������'''���������'���������"''."���������''���������*  jWKKHHyi*) ���������  v-VVo ���������" Js������$Big|  ^\������L*dKBWi  Pc5^jaf^&B������|'  ivy ^E&K������Z3&wm  V-* tmSsstJuJJs11  .' i- B9nrt?B4KKS^  jKj  ayjjl^JBijpiHBr  ?���������?,' I  'S'l  HifyTffWfewteBi���������"��������� "^'  v\.:l  HSH^  rT*t^DBwt������nnc^Slk - - "'* m *I  "jfflVSj HBitorfiftfeS  UlSsSS  ������iiS$lia;  jtfSHppCTBy^  ^*ff*ijwSlJL -  ItSttW^RSH  A xfew lines we specially;  recommend  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  Huntley & Palmers  ���������Biscuits  Griffen & Skelleys,  famous gold and  ,i >,   silver,bar���������  Canned and dried  ' '; . fruits  LEESON, DICKIE,, GROSS. & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  r  . W. Peck & Co. Ltd.  Manufacturers of  CLOTHING, SHIRTS,  CAPS and OVERALLS  v.  .i-X-.  in  We carry a complete stock of Men's Furnishings  and all the best English and- American Hats  JOHN W. PECK & CO., LTD.  MONTREAL       WINNIPEG      VANCOUVER  By instructions of the Hon.  Minister of Agriculture a free  distribution of superior sorts of  grain and potatoes will- be made  during the coming winter and  spring to Canadian farmers. The  samples will consist' of spring  wheat (about 5 lbs.), white oats|  (about 4 lbs.), barley (about'5  lbs.), and field' peas (about '5  lbs.) These will be sent out  from Ottawa.  A distribution of potatoes (in  31bs. samples) will be carried on  from several of the Experimental Farms, the Central Farm at  Ottawa supplying only the-provinces of Ontario and Quebec.  Each application 'must be separate and must be signed by the  applicant. Only one sample of  grain and one bf potatoes can be  sent ,to each farm. If both samples are asked for in the same  letter only one will be sent. Ap:  plications on any kind of printed  form cannot be accepted.  The destruction by.fire of the  cereal building at Ottawa, which  contained grain-cleaning machinery and a large stock of seed  grain for distribution, may make  it necessary to curtail the distribution' to a certain extent. We  shall fill as many as possible of  the applications which conform  to the rules; but requests received after the end of September  will probably be too late. Samples cannot be sent in response  to applications (no. matter when  received) which fail to state  clearly the needs of the applicant, his experiences in crop-  raising, and the character of the  soil on which he intends to sow  the seed.  All applications for grain (and  applications from the provinces  of Ontaria and Quebec for potatoes) should be addressed to the  Dominion Cerealist,  Central Experimental Farm,  Ottawa.  Such applications require no postage. If otherwise addressed,  delay and disappointment may  occur.  Applications for potatoes from  farmers in any other province  should be addressed (postage prepaid) to the Superintendent of the  nearest branch Experimental  Farm in that province.  J. H. GRISDALE,  Director, Dominion Experimental Farms.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  ' f GAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  *" Manitoba, Saskatchewan und alberta.  the Yukon Territory, the North-west Tkrki-  Tonibs unci in a portion of the PROVINCE of  Bkitisr Columhia, may be leased, for,a term of  twenty-one yeiirs at an annual rental of Jl an  acre. Not more than 2.5UU acres will be leased  to one applicant. '  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in: person" to the Auditor Sub'-Aecnt  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the" land muat be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sec-.  tions, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall bo staked our by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $D which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available!, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating tho mine shall furnish  : the Aftent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal'mining rights  are,not being operated, such, returns should be  furnished at leant once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may!be permitted to pur-  ichace whatever available, surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of f 10.00 an acre:  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of-iAmimion Lands. ���������  W. VV. COHY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior,  N.I!;~Unauthorized publication of this ad-'i  vertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS,  'Geoffrey K. Burnett   D. J. McGugan  C.E., U.C.L.S.,       ' ���������  II.A.S.C, U.C.1..3.,  ,ASS. M. CAN/30C. CE.  r-  t f ''  Burnett & McGugan  (Successors to Geoffrey K. Burnett)  i    (Late Hill & Burnett)  CIVIL ENGINEERS and  B. C. LAND SURVEYORS  Grand View Hotel, Bella Coola; B.C.  City address���������New Westminster, B.C.  P. 0. Box 88C. Telephone 232.  30E  Fur Sales Agency  ' 600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the .world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on-receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per, cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  o    AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  \6\ |T ' ZIOI   ZZZ  To Ensure a "Good Catch"  Get One of the Famous  An Emisiary of Peace.  An American lady missionary  returned after her work amonp;  the Armenians had been broken  up by the Turks, in writing* to a  friend says:  "I want to shout into the ears  of every man I see,. 'Go fight  against Turkey, and make no  peace until she is wiped off the  face of the map!' I would also  say, 'Despoil Germany of half  her possession, because she is  responsible, for all these mis*  eries. And also punish Bulgaria  for entering into a hellish allir  ance.' Doesn't this sound like  a missionary? Oh'.! I would gladly be a warrior if I could and  give my life for the ransom of  miserable Armenia. The whole  nation is being assassinated by  the Turkish government���������a silent  massacre they call it."  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO.,  Stock Only the Best Fishing Tackle  3ELLA COOLA, B.C.  Dealers and Trappers  We pay highest price for  lyour furs and castorium,  also handle goods on  commission, advancing  2-3 of value, our charges  being 5 per cent, for  handling. =���������  THE EDMONTON HIDE 1 FUR CO.  (P. O. Box 863  1     EDMONTON, Alta.  157 McDougall Ave.    .  SHSK1S2SS38  TheMason & fxischPiano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO FINER  PIANO MADEl"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS,,  ft  tf|[ Let us altend your Victor Record  ������������������     J mail orders���������our service is intelligent  Write for Catalogue  and guaranteed.  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  I  ������  ilBfftffilBlE  "^/HAT person so happy and conten-  ted as the prosperous farmer?  "W/HAT person so independent?  .IJiT'HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of the necessaries <  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent',  they are strangers to hard times.  THE REASONS for this enviable condition of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ;��������� long warm summers, with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops. \  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the, best advantage.  This fact was established at',the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  \c=>  (ELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  C���������1||[D  Get"MoreMoney" for your Foxes  MusVcrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected in your section  SHIP YOUB FUKS DIKKCT <o"SIIUnE!tT"the tarjtsJ  bouse In tbe World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMUHCAN SAW FUkS  a reliable���������responsible���������safe Kur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more than a third of a century," a lontr successful record of sendin B I'ur Shippers prompt.SATlSFACTORY  AND PROFITABLE returns.\ Write for"Tt*&btititrt ftWoixr,"  . the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.  Writ, lor t<-NOW-W������ FREE  AR  CUTTRFRT  In**   25-27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.  . D. OriUD&K.l, inc. Dept.C������7 CHICAGO,UJA.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Sub*cription$ Payable in Advance.  CA3SADA.  One Year   Six.Months   Three Months .._.���������;...........  UNITED STATES:  One Year  ;.;.-.���������...  ....$1.00  ...: 0.75  ...0.50  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year.............,......��������������������������� .$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELIIA COOLA PUBLISHING CQ., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find.......'....,  for Bella Coola Courier for........  : a        Name.... ........  . subscription  p. a...   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  0  ������B&3 3  %>  BELLA COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, Novemher 6,r !9t5  o   c  HOI  >    a  subscribe'  QWEDQLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  // Will be to your interest to keep ioell informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section oj  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted'on developments by reading the "Courier.' \  "���������'   ���������'.'   '   .3  :;   . :���������'..''.''������������������.-. ������������������������������������������������������,   :    '.���������'.....  "The Fair Npme of the  Province."  Sir Richard McBride has writ-  ton to the Toronto Globe protesting against the publication  of certain articles on conditions  in British Columbia contributed  by Mr. Norman Lambert. Sir  Richard expresses great surprise  that the Globe should "go out of  its way to malign the fair name  of one of the provinces of the  Dominion, especially at a time  like this, when our efforts should  be mutual in sustaining the credit  of the country, and by standing  by each other for that purpose/'  Mr., Lambert's articles dealt  with official figures showing how  the lands of this province had  been handed over, to the speculator, and that writer went to  the trouble to procure the facts  at first hand. -' Sir Richard McBride and his followers keep confusing the "fair name of British  Columbia" with the reputation  of the Conservative parly of the  province. TJie McBride-Bowscr  gang have shattered the credit  of the province, and to ask the  Globe or any' oilier reputable  paper to refrain frcm stating the  fact is not going to help matters  in the slightest. The "faimame  of British 'Columbia" must be  cleared, and that can only be ac-  complished by allowing, fresh  air and the light of day to play  around the affairs of the province.  Sir Richard raised the same old  whine when the Dominion Trust  corruption was shown up. According to our premier the fault  lies, not in the commission of the  wrong, but in the discovery of it.  Doubtless the Conservatives  would be perfectly salisfied that  the "fair, name" of the province  would be fairer had the Dominion  Trust scandal been covered up  and kept "irom public gaze.   It-is  TAXIDERMIST  All kinds of Game Heads  mounted, "true to nature,"  and also some fine specimens for sale, by-  evident that Sir Richard considers that land-grabbing is perfectly just, so long as nobody  but the speculator knows about  it. This is typical of the attitude of the'Conservative party  in this province towards the welfare of the country. It is just as  logical to argue that' a bank,  which has been looted of all its  reserves, remains perfectly sound  so long as the fact is not made  public. Following the same line  of argument, the Germans are  not responsible for the horrors  committed in Belgium, as the  whole fault lies with the British  press for making the facts public.  Covering up the truth may be  good Conservatism, but it is deplorably immoral.��������� The Daily  News, Prince Rupert.  SEED POTATOES.  ��������� It has been quite generally believed that a small potato seed  will yield just as large a crop as  large tubers. This theory is not  true in practice.' In the experiments made the'use of sizeable  seed produced a greater proportion of potatoes of desirable size  than the uec of culls. . The'type  bf potatoes produced from culls  used as seed,is measurably smaller, in the first generation, from  those produced from selected  tubers. The use of culls r for  seed causes potatoes to run put.  Not only is the type of potatoes  produced from selected seed larger than from culls, says the experimenters, but also the average  weight of tubers produced is  greater.  You1 are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������Support home industries'��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is: to  practise it.- \  ��������� Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.   ���������<���������  Hans Allertson  HAGENSBORG, B. C.  We buy from the Factory and  sell to YOU direct. Largest  Plumbing Showroom West of  Toronto. Let us quote you.  ���������        KYRD BROS., LIMITED  Vancouver, B=���������G,  ?$1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  mm  TPHE two principal reasons  .   ������������������ why   you   should   huy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:   ;  ; first���������;/���������;���������'. ;;'V. ;.������������������'';  There is none better.  SECOND-- "  They are the only  brands produced in  B..-C. under government inspection.        .  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  For Sale by  The Clearing of Land.  We will again call the farmers  attention to the very great importance of the clearing of as  much land as possible. This is  the first essential in a course of  successful farming. All farmers  acknowledge the need of cleared  ground for the raising of crops,  but yet they do not bend their  energies with all their might towards that end. As a" rule they  will find plenty of work which  needs attention and devote their  time during tht winter season  in a more or less desultory manner to something which could be  put off to a, more convenient  season. The winter months do  not lend themselves readily to  getting the ground cleared to a  finish; but there arc very few  days that cannot be devoted to  slashing and, if necessary, cutting the trees up into lengths  suitable for handling. Then  when the sunny days of spring-  arrive, a good team will haul the  stuff together and then during  the month of April burning oi  the slashing can as a rule be accomplished successfully.  _  Even if the ground cannot be  made ready"' for seeding in the  month of May, it has been found  tHat potatoes "and roots planted  in June turn out about as well as  those planted earlier. If the  farmer finds ihe will not have  time to put any of these crops in  at all,' let him sow clover in the  ashes before any rain has wet  them and the ensuing crop will  enrich the soil and also afford  pasture.  The owners of land must  awaken to the fact that although  there may not be quite as much  ready cash to be derived from  close attention to the soil, as can  be had from fishing and other  side issues yet; in the long run,  the time devoted to the increase  of the cleared area and the practice of up-to-date' methods of  raising crops, will be found to  lay the foundation of an independence which no other pursuit  can give.  While we are discussing things  pertaining to farming allow us  to remind the officers of the Farmers' Institute that now is the  proper time to call the people  together for the discussion of  timely topics. There are scores  of such, and frequent meetings  throughout the winter'should be  held, and they, will be found, to  (be/bf; high value and promoters  of the welfare of the community.'  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER'?  Royal Household flour  Bufes:  BACON  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Prbvisionerii  Calgary     Vancouver    Edmonton  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS.  ITS  CANADA'S  BEST FLOUR  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  ������  rynuasen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  erchandise  o  J  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price, Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    9    Q  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Ifarid-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosT: suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils - Varnishes - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines- of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.   Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  v.,*���������;���������;&..  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  csaa  frwTaiWWWtiintafflniHIWWIS^Ei  jwmm- r 4  \U  V.   ';.."      ''fa-.:  "V'^n---.  <���������-/���������  .YOU WANT GOOD   SPORT  LlT BELLA COGL A.   EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER.  Compiled  by  Mr. C.  H.'Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 6G.    Minimum, 44.  Highest Max. (11th) 76. Lowest Min. (11th) 84  -Rainfall, 2.12 inches.  BELLA.COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6,  1915.  |s Being Employed  1     Against Germans  iLondon^Nov. 3,-The prind-  \L points in Premie^ Asquith-8  Weak address delivered in the  House of Commons on Tuesday  ������<ere:  "There are nearly one  |jilion British   troops   on   the  Iranco-Belgian front   The total  British casualties in France and  ganders up to date are 377,000.  Germans have not gained  |,e foot of ground since last  [Ipril.  In the Sea of Marmora  fjhsBritfch submarines have sunk  J disabled two battleships, five  '^ nboats, one torpedo boat, eight  nsports and 197 supply ships,  ie government's of Great Brit-  and France have signed an  igreement to maintain Serbia's  Independence.   The financial situation is becoming serious and  lie nation must prepare to make  feren greater sacrifices."  | The premier believed that Lord  Darby's plan for recruiting would  Fneeeed  and    conscription    be  |found unnecessary; but he added,  f'ttatthis war must be won, and  fjf necessary he would" have no  ^hesitation/ fri -presenting  fresh  '^jtyrials to the House."  ilhe situation in Dardanelles  $1.00 a Year  Teutons Hurled Back  With Heavy Losses  Paris, Nov. 3. The centre of  the Teutons was hurled back  with great' losses after having  approached to within live hundred metres of the Serbian positions. On the rcmaindorof th<  front severe engage mi tits were  ���������in'progress.  In the Champagne district on  the whole front between Hill H.i.'j  and Tahure the Germans bombarded our positions.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  ^. S. Camosun came in on her  northbound, trip last week on  Hiursday eveniiiKaboutSo'clock.  On her passenger list for this  port were: Mr. H. S. Clements,  M. IJ., Mr. Cameron, Ingvald  Crseth. and Mrs. C. Carlson with  Her five sons.  Russians Assume Offensive  Petrograd, via London, Nov.  2.���������--The Russians have assumed  the offensive on the Dvinsk,  Styr, Stripa, Niernen and upper  Syozora rivers, making marked  progress.  1st-  was receiving the government's  pinost arikious consideration. He  pas confident, however, that the  Hi?  ^Allies would come out victorious,  Mad it was not prepared to su I'll render the difficult task as long  as the government retained the  confidence of the king and  country.  Referring to the navy, he said  f the men of the grand fleet were  performing  their all-important  ['work unnoticed,   unadvertised,  with efficiency and a brilliancy  beyond description.'.   These men  |* had cleared the high seas of German  warships   and   merchant  Marine.   Altogether, Britain employed 2,500,000 officers and men  r in this part of the service.  J   In addition to this, 320.000 sick  and wounded were* being cared  f; f������r; 2,500,000 tons of supplies  furnished and an army of 800,000  torses and mules kept in service.  M loss in life in the whole of  tne gigantic operations over-seas  *ere less than one-tenth of one  Italians Make Progress  Rome,   Nov. 3.- Our army is  making progress on the Isonzo  river.  Austro-H ungary is armi ng A1 ba-  Mr. H. S. Clements, M. P.,  paying his constituents here a  very welcome visit. It is conceded by political opponents even,  Lhat he comes here without ulterior motive as he does not seek  re-election from this district in  the next election.. He, with Mr.  S. Cameron, went up the valley  un a bear hunt. On the way  down to catch the outgoing steam-  he had meetings with his constituents, giving an account of  his stewardship.  He has proved to be a very  good representative cf the district, and we predict it will be  hard for his successor to be able  to measure up to him.  Mr. A. C. Christensen, president of the hospital board, announces that on Friday all the  young men and big boys.in town  and vicinity are asked to come to  come to the hospital and help to  cut and saw the winter's supply  of wood for that institution.  With the number of patients at  1S| present it is necessary to keep  six stoves going. A hearty response will be appreciated.  Iver Fougner. Indian agent,  left last Wednesday on a month's  tour of his district. His trip will  probably extend to Prince Rupert.  nians who harrass  the Serbian army.  the   rear of  Russians Land Large  Forces at Varna  Ingvald Urseth comes home  after several months sojourn in  Minnesota and Alberta. He finds  that Bella Coola is averaging up  pretty well with the rest of the  world.  Mrs. C. Carlson and family  came in to join Mr. Carlson who  has   preceded   them   several  Bucharest.   Nov.   2.     Oflicial! '^ths-. /hey fhf���������  ta,k'e"  up  .     . .    ��������� rn ,    ! their residence at their old home  bulletin received by keuters lele-! a(,joining the town> and are now  gram Company reported that j sufficiently settled to announce  Russians have successfully land-' that they are "at home" to their  ed larges forces at the Bulgarian   friends.        port, Varna. j    The younger element of Rev.         -  H. Sageng's congregation made  47th Battalion for the Front a descent upon his home on Friday  \ afternoon last week. Thevisita-  New Westminster, Nov. 3.--  The 47th Battalion has been ordered to the front, the entire  battalion is celebrating the occasion.  Dominion-constable Tucker has  returned from a two weeks' trip  to the Indian villages between  here and China Hat. As there  have been no blood curdling  stories in circulation since his  return it is presumed it is "all  quiet on the Potomac."  Frank Broughton, provincial  constable, announces the amount  of the contributions to the British Red Cross Society received  by him is $54.50. This amount  was raised by subscription 'at  Bella Coola and Hagensborg.  tion was wholly unexpected on  the part of Mr. and Mrs. Sageng  although it could not very well  be called a surprise, because they  must be aware of their favorable  standing with the members of  their church.  The visitors brought refreshments with them, and when they  had arrived at the proper pitch  phone with Paris. France, on ()f enjoyment the director of the  October21. Honolulu also heard pl.0Ct,edings, Mr. J. Widsten,  the operator talking from Arling-; c]oareci hjs throat and announced  ton, 4,800 miles away.  In the wireless plant  Wireless Telephone Works  New York. Nov. 2    Arlington.  Virginia, talked by wireless tele-  of the  navy at Arlington. Mr. Webb,  telephone engineer, asked the  wireless operator to signal the  Eiffel Tower in Paris. The wire  less snapped out the signal and  soon there came a resp.-mse  that they had brought with them  a horse which they asked the  pastor to accept as a token of  their respect and goodwill.  The collection of the funds for  the purchase of  the  horse had  The amount realized at the  Bella Coola Fair held at Hagensborg, October 5th, for the Canadian branch of the Red Cross is  $73. .This brings the different  amounts raised for Red Cross  work within one month to $158.-  70.   We learn that three more of  the Bella Coola men have enlisted. Rev. T. C. Colwell and H.  Grainger will leave in a few days  to join the ambulance corps. Mr.  Chas. Lord has, after arriving in  Vancouver, joined the medical  corps.          The heavy rains of the last two  weeks have assumed proportions  wiches. Mrs. Clayton presided  at the table, ably assisted by  Mr. Phibbs and several young  ladies.  The young ladies, true to their  nature, would not allow the occasion pass without making their  charms  of   practical   value   by  pressirigmoney from theirgentle-  men friends.  Miss AddieGibson,  Miss Susie Christensen and Miss  Beatrice Grant, were seen  button-holing the men and entreating them to buy tickets at one  dollar each, in a chance of winning a Dulcetone (a sortof piano  in minature)   to   be  raffled  for  when the proceeds are sufficiently large to warrant it.   How much  booty they secured is not known  to us.     Mr. A. C. Christensen,  president of the hospital board,  presided  over   the subscription  list and gathered in $32.  The following sent donations  in the nature of linen and othei  articles needed in the hospital:  Mesdames J. R. Morrison, E.  -C. Clayton, W. F. Roland, B. F.  Jacobsen, G. Saugstad, A. K.  Oveson, H. Sageng, H. 0. Hanson, E. Nygaard, B. Brynildsen,  the Misses Gibson, and the Lys-  dal Sewing Circle.  As the hour of darkness approached, the guests wended  their several ways . homeward  well pleased with the visit and  the entertainment received.  It should not be forgotten that  Mrs. M. Saugstad is Dr. Sutherland's chief lieutenant in the  management of the hospital, and  no small amount of credit is due  to her intelligent and active rer-  vrce.  The Concert and Lecture.  Last  Monday evening at the  hall of the Bella Coola Hotel the  almost sufficient to call them un- people from the town and sever-  precedented. The watercourses  have not been unusually large,  however, ;so the inconvenience  caused has been of a minor nature  M r  Opening of the Hospital.  Saturday afternoon, October  30th, saw the friends of the  hospital, at the invitation of Dr.  Mrs. Sutherland, gather at net-  residence on the hospital grounds.  Everyone was made welcome by  Webb shouted  ii.lo   the   mouth-  per cent.   Never in  the  whole piece, "Hello, Shiven! oiu  three,   four,   two.   three-.  Good-bye."   This was dislinc  heard by the engineer am  n,I������"7 of the world was there  found anything comparable to  this record.  General French reported that  ?" had been employed against  ne Germans, and in the fighting  ak>ns place at Loos the casual-  'esof 3(3Ven German battalions  averaKed as high as eighty per  Cent of their strength.  r������ Raise Half a Regiment  Ottawa, N  of Yukon, M  minister of  iov. S���������Commissioner  r. Black, asked the  ,  )# militia for permission  0l"a,se one-half of a regiment  "UheYuk  on.  t wo.  'our.  v  met   with   such   ready   response  , ... n ���������,,������������������],������ nf <U8 the host and hostess and ushered  that there was a .siupiusor $10(  Mr.   Widsten   handed   to into  This sum will come  nau  reneh  army officers in Paris and that, sav;nu:.  portions of the test figures had  been picked up.  wtucii  the ministei  hnmlv when the feed bill will  have* to be paid. That they al'  a good time goes   without  3  j - HORSES  wintered at the Constan-  tia Ranch. Atnarko River,  on the best upland tnno-  thv hay.  Charges. $2f> tor six  months November t'_>  April, inclusive: or ���������������������������'  per month.  settlement of char*.-.      MM")  M. W. MARVIN-  ��������� l_- ������U   4JH-J  ^4^  <JKJ>t^  Jt   i-������������  the   beautifully  furnished  rooms of their house.  The visitors were too many to  be comfortably accommodated  within, and soon spread into the  adjacent hospital and other buildings. It became apparent to  everyone, that a new spirit was  reigning on the premises, that  there was efficient management,  was made manifest by the spick  and span appearance of every-  Mr H. S. Clements speaks at ^thing, and the contentment  the Mackenzie School on Friday'shown by the patients,  evening at 7:30. j    The  arrangements   made  for  Everybody must come and hear the entertajnmentof the visitors  his account  of the parliament's rfect>    On arrival and at  ..1- -t Ottawa in this the most 1 # ���������  Wl)IKlU ���������    r.in,wi;.,n   his- any other time, they were served  eventful ye'ar in Canadian   nib ,  lory.  As the Courier, on account of  l!u. departure of the mail on Friday, is printed the day previous  to the published date of issue,  Wl. are able to announce two  events to take place on Friday  the 5th instant.  with coffee, tea, cakes and sand  al from the other part of the  valley, gathered in goodly numbers with expectations of receiving both entertainment and information. In this they were  not disappointed.  The program opened with the  singing by the audience of "It's  a Long Way to Tipperary." The  singing was rather weak at the  start and gave evidence that the  boys present had not served in  the trenches; but when the chorus  was reached they all. found then-  voices and rendered it with a  will.  At the opening of the meeting  the chairman suggested that inasmuch as the progamme was  lengthy and the lecture would  be of more than ordinary interest, the andience restrain their  expressions of approval by not  insisting on  encores.    And this  suggestion was followed throughout with one exception. Mr.  Lindsell's rendering of a humorous song was so effective that he  had to give another.  Mr. Harry Grainger in a reading paid a fine tribute to the flag  of our Empire. At the close of  the reading the audience l'bse in  a silent salutation of that flag  which represents what is dearest  to us all.  The orchestra, which on this  occasion was composed of only  three members: Mr, and Mrs. T.  Saugstad and J. Nygaard, then  gave.a selection in their usual  superior style.  Mr. Herbert Sutherland, accompanied on the piano by Miss  Mildred Gibson, played the man-'  dolin of which he is a master.  Then followed the song by Mr. G.  R. Lindsell, the effect of which  upon the audience was too strong  to be restrained.  After the orchestra had given  mother selection the speaker of  the evening, Rev. W. H. Gibson,:  ascended the Rostrum and in his  inimitable style gave a graphic  account of war conditions as he  had observed them on his recent  trip to England. Ihe most eut-  stariding fe-atuie of the speech^  in our mind was the expression  of cheerfulness everywhere prevalent among the English people.  Wives and mothers see their dear  ones'go to the war with smiling  faces. Wounded soldiers returning with smiling faces and eager  to go back to the firing line. Th'6  spirit of sacrifice is abroad in the  land and will bear fruit, the effect of which will regenerate  the nation and be productive of  much good for generations to  come.  A Zeppelin passed over Newcastle, while the speaker' was  there, but caused no alarm only  simple curiosity to see it; people  crowding out in -the streets to  watch the aerial enemy instead  of seeking places of safety.  In spite of the length of the  conflict and its many reverses,  the people are firmly convinced  of final victory. And it is true,  that when the cause is righteous,  the people willing and eager to  make every sacrifice and they  are animated by a supreme faith,  there can be no doubt of the successful issue.  The speaker at the conclusion  read the names of the many who,  from Bella Coola and vicinity,  had already enlisted, and who ^  are at the point of going- to the  war, paying special tribute to  Herbert Barnard Green, Archibald Richard Leese and S. G:  Chrichton, who have given their  lives for their country.        7  The speaker was listened to  throughout with wrapt attention.  Applause was frequent as the  speaker's humor became too effective to be resisted.  At the end of the speech a collection was taken up, which  amounted to $31.20, and will be  forwarded to the Red Cross  Society.  The Misses Gibson now gave  a song which marked the er.d of  lhe program. The audience rose  and gave the National Anthem,  after which the chairman proposed three cheers for Mr. Gibson, which were given with a  will and the meeting closed.  (Elutrrlt Nntto  >      >  Lower Bella Coola: Church  Service, 11 a. m.  Bella Coola: Sunday School,  10:45 a. m.  Church Service, 7:30 p. m.  Mr. C. Carlson will conduct  the service. *)  Rev.   T. C. Colwell. B. A., Paster      ������ ausM  BELLA COOLA COURIER  j. ���������> ��������� ���������' ������  Saturday, November C   /Q,  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year $1.00  6 Month*       0.75  3 Months ...: .*.....   0^50  United States  1 Year $r.50  '  United Kingdom  1 Year.., , $1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving- their ^copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon'as possible. ,  For  1.  overtiming rates,  apply . at  Office.  4 *  To Correspondents���������While, unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name ind address of every writer of such letters  must be given to the editor. ,  The -Editor reserves the rijrht ,to refuse publication.of any letter, All manuscript at writer's  rJBlc. ���������"  Vancouver Office - - 317-323 Carabie St  '^alua papitH jsuprrma est lex."  SATURDAY,  NOV.. 6, 191$.  B beg to remind our read.-  ers that the Courier having .'completed its third year  the (subscriptions of all our  early subscribers are now.due  for renewal. ._;   ���������.  The management wishes to  thank our numerous readers  for their support during the  past and trusts to. a continu-  anceof the same in the future.  The Subscription rate" remains at $1  per year, payable strictly in advance.  rine activities to a great extent;  another failure.     She expected  her  Zeppelins   to   so   terrorize  England that,the English people  would  compel  their country to  sue for peace, in this' effort she  has not only failed but drawn  upon herself the.scorn and ridicule of neutrals and foe's.    She  has   until   recently   maintained  control  of   the- Baltic Sea0and  "across this  water been able, to  secure some of her needed supplies from neutral countries, but  now the submarines, of Britain  have penetrated into this inland  sea, and together with those of  Russia are. playing havoc with  German shipping to such an extent that her ports are .becoming  practically blockaded.  She is surrounded by a ring of  steel which as time passes^ will  become harder   and   harder .to  break.    The enormous expendi-  tures for war purposes have been  going on so long that the country  is on the brink of financial .ruin.  Her only hope in this respect is  that by a favorable turn of affairs  she may, be able to induce her  enemies toaecept terms of peace  and pay .her large "-indemnities.  But it is fair, to assume that Ger-  many, and her allies are a great  deal nearer exhaustion than their  foes.   So take it altogether things  are not coming outaccqrding to  Germany's .calculations when'she  started out upon her world con-  \ quest.. '  muwmm  rGLEANSr DISINFECTS  keep my armies in the field, and  through them to secure victory  and an enduring peace.    In ancient days the darkest moment  has ever produced in men of our  race  the strongest resolve.     I  ask you, men of all classes, to  come   forward   voluntarily and  take your share in these fights.  "In_ freely responding to my  appeal you will be giving your  support   to   our   brothers   who  have  long   since upheld   Great  Britain's past traditions and the  glory of her arms."  ooooo  The Comox-Atlin Regiment.  Our country is in need of more  men for. the war. It is of the  highest importance that the flow  of men to the colors continue undiminished., ^This war is "waged  Germany's Failures.  To rnany minds it seems that  Germany has so far had the best  of thef.war and while there may.  be sonie truth in this, yet her  position from a pro-German  point of view is certainly hot en-  encouraging. She has.accomp-  lished certain things without  reaching the objects of her efforts.  She overran Belgium and is'  now occupying that country and  a considerable portion of French  territory; she has advanced quite  a distance into Russia, and what  she will be able'to do in the Balkans is not so easy to say at this  writing. .These accomplishments  go to sliow a wonderful strength  and ability to. carry on war.  While all these facts are before  us do not let us forget that' all  the objects she has- fought for  have not been reached in a single  instance.   She overran Belgium  to reach Paris and crush France  before   Russia   could   gather  her full strength,   in this she  failed.   She has made herculean  efforts to reach Calais from there  to dominate the English channel  preparatory  to  an invasion of  England, here she failed.   She  is strenuously occupied in disabling the  Russians and probably  trying to reach Petrograd; another failure.   She is now turning toward the south in an. effort  to reach Constantinople, and we  have good reason to believe that  in this she will also fail.  She has a strong navy which  she ho#ed would be able to whittle  down ^hat of her opponents by  degrees until finally she could  cope with the bulk of it in open  battle, beat it and become mistress of the sea; in this she has  failed completely. She tried to  cripple Britain's commerce by  submarine raids with no adequate  success, and now she finds herself obliged to curtail her subma-  The King's Call.  The king has issued the follow-  ing~call to men of the Empire:  "To my people:  '  "At this grave moment in the  struggle between my people and  a highly organized .enemy who  has- transgressed the^laws of  nations and c hanged the "ordinance that binds.civilized Europe  together, I appeal to you.  "I rejoice in my Empire's effort and I feelpride in the voluntary response from my subjects  all over the world, who have sacrificed home and fortune and  life itself in order that another  may not inheritthe free empire  whichtheir ancestors and mine  against no ordinary foe; it has  disclosed an enemy with a character which for cruelty staggers  humanity. It is a war not confined-to the soldiers of its. enemies, but it also murders iri cold  blood n on-combatants, men,  women and children on Jand and  sea. Never before among, civilized nations has' anything like  the f rightfulness of German warfare been known.  The continued practice of its  horror from" the .invasion of and  murder of-the innocents in Belgium -till the shooting of Miss  Cavell the other day, makes it  impossible'within the space^of a  and Germany, let it be noted that  an English court pronounced a  sentence of imprisonment for  six months on a woman found  guilty of sending information to  the enemy.  The country which is countenancing, defending.and ordering  warfare of this dastardly nature  is now trying to get the mastery  of the world!  The appeal comes to the able-  bodied men of our beloved nation  to throw aside their everyday  tasks and engage in the task,  the most supreme, of delivering  this country and the world from  the dominance of this monster.  This appeal which has gone  forth for more than a year and-  which throughout the Empire  has met a response unequalled  in the world's history, comes  very close to us at this time. The  King himself is sending out a  personal call which is, indeed,  significant and will be heeded.  Mr. H. S.. Clements, M. P., for  the Comox-Atlin district, has  made arrangements for- the organization of a regiment made  up of residents of the Comox-Atlin and Yukon districts. The recruiting-for this,, regiment will  take place at Prince Rupert and  Comox, an4.it will be commanded  by Major W-. J- "Warden.  _ Let Bella Coola honor herself  by- being strongly represented-  in this regimen tfrom the farthest  western~frdntier of the Empire  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS  AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE  OF THE WEST"  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  MADE    IN    B. C  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orde  Gault Brothers Limited  WHOLESALE <DRY GOODS  361 Water Street        Vancouver, B.C.  *l Gault Brothers for over 60 years have successfully  maintained wholesale Warehouses throughout Canada  CJ The Vancouoer stock " the largest and best assorted  stock on the Coast, in some cases the best west of Toronto  STAPLES  SMALLWARES  RIBBONS  Ready-to-Wear  MEN'S FURNISHINGS  House Furnishings  CARPETS  LINENS  DRESS GOODS  MAIL.ORDERS EXECUTED THE DAY RECEIVED  short-article to enumerate the  hundreds of cases similar*in  character reported and confirmed  The latest incident in this long  list of murder and rapine is the  shooting of Miss Cavell, an English nur^e engaged in caring for  the wounded of both friend and  foe- at the city of Brussells. She  was'accused of the awful crime  of helping Belgians to escape  from their own downtrodden  land.   For this she received the  Practice of Frugality Is  Needed.  have built.    I ask you to make, sentence of death and was exe-  good these sacrifices. ���������  ' 'The end is not in sight.  More  men and yet more are wanted to  cuted.- ;���������'���������:-"',  To mark the great difference  between the spirit of England  It is-hard, for people as a rule  to re-adjust theirway of living  to conform ,to a reduced income.  That is what causes most of the  grumbling, about hard times.  People which have no income  whatever, if they have no fund  laid by for ai rainy day; are~of  course hit- about as hard as they  can be when the hard times strike  them.' But as long, as the earth  and sea yield their abundant increase there is not any danger of  starvation i n a wel 1 regulated  society. ���������    ."  There is a discipline in.; the  close figuring to make both ends  meet; which will prove of benefit to the future of those who are  to practice the same. And it  will also be found of benefit to  the society as a whole. We are  not sufficiently philosophical to  enter intoa discussion of all the  benefits which may result "from  'frugal living, combined with hard  thinking; but^we can think of  one at least which-will have lasting effect. ��������� *'  In prosperous times, people's  attention  is called only to the  obvious and easiest'way of making a living and accumulating  wealth, while resources in the development of which perseverance  and long experience is necessary  to bring to the stage of ah assured income.are neglected and  'despised  because of  the small  returns they_seem likely to yield  at the beginning or for a long  time. -But when the hard times  come,  people will -turn  to the  picking up of crumbs formerly  overlooked or thrown away. And  because  hard times have such  an effect it will be found that it  is the hard times that lay the  solid foundation   for the .prosperous times which are sure to  follow1,   where   the   people  are  sober, honest and industrous.  v In reading  the   later  Prince  Rupert papers of how tho fishing  industry of the northern coast ii  being- attracted to that younf  city/we are led to believe the  Prince-Rupert's convenient loca  tion will be one of the means ol  further developing the fisheriel  of adjacent waters.  Our   experience   along  thesl  lines is not sufficient to warranj  us in advising how this industr  may be further developed, an^  how many of those who are noq  stranded  in  the cities mighj  find a way of obtaining a livelj  hood'from exploiting the water!  teeming with food fishes.  We"were inspired to write thil  article by reading in one of out  exchanges a report first published  in the Prince Rupert Journal!  from its correspondent on oneoj  the islands of the Queen Charf  lottegroup. He says ii is a go  centre forlhe salmon and halibut  fisheries of Hecate Strait. Hq  appeals to any men in Prind  Rupert to come there without  delay and help them out with  prodigious harvest of the deepl  The fishermen are on the wateij  for fourteen hours a day trolling  c^r������ r>^r������r>^r������o^-������r>- <7������^ ^^  "POL A RINE  If  The Best Known and Popular Lubricant for  Motor Boats  Its use assures freedom from Cerbon deposit  on valves, spark plugs, or In cylinders  IMPERIAL OIL CO. LTD., VANCOUVER, B.C.  1  'J  HOI  D������H  S^S?)&!  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT. AND PASSENGER SEKVK'K  BETWEEN  Vancouver, Bella Coola and Prince Rupert  S. S.    CAMOSUN"  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE'PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY^  Leaves Bella Coola for Prince Rupert at 6 p. m. Thurs-  ' day Sept. 30; Oct. 14, 28; Nov. 11, 25; Dec. 9, li>.  Leaves Bella Coola for Vancouver at 10 p. m.  Oct. 8, 22; Nov. 5, 19; Dec. 3, 17, 31.  1'Yulay  S. S. "Coquitlam" or S. S.  "Capilano  from  Vancouver every week,  carrying Gasoline  Explosives, will call at Bella Coola by arrang<'i���������';,t-  sailinjr  and  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, ������  Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver ; or CJko. m<<.  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  to  ������[>i'iy  k<;i������i(i  IZJOE  4������^^li^l.1$Wiws^^;i4������&^  UTJtL^���������a,ft.,yi,aiaC*.  "'Mil S$tf^:C  m  tfooemfor 6,  I9f5  nnc or herring bait.  goners will be satis  lwithsn.aH returns at the  ������ the getting acquainted,  ^experience and efficiency.  practising of perseverance,  !l6 dually bring about result.  |0 should prove satisfactory  (dinary  m  men.  10J5-1G.  0.  o  g^ost Intemperate of the  we        Classes.  ^notto be wondered at that  laboring classes resent the  L universal   tendency   of  f&'ng'thern in every time the  'of the liquor traffic is being  ,CUSsed.    The prohibitionists  -jje"that because of their use  iquor the laboring classes do  I obtain their just demands;  idrink cripples their, morals,  |teliigence' economic standing  id endurance.    The defenders  the traffic maintain that the  ^kers drink because of the seat loil, their uninviting homes,  g hours and physical  state.  prove their conditions, they  J;and the liquor evil will be-  e o! no moment.    Far from  lto deny the truth contained  jjiwth these contentions;  but  lit is uppermost in our mind  m easy circumstances, ar.- a- tH"   r 'i    j-  "  class just as much ,u,w .'i,',! ulstnbution of Seed Grai  sway of the liquor demon as the j and   Potat06S  much talked about laborii:}, (la>:. I  ses. ' |  Ff(W th* Dominion Experimental  The  reason   why   i.ho sins of! arms-  these higher in the scale of  society are not the targets of the  arguments in a prohibition  paign, is that they an  spicuous, do not bring about  hunger and rags and other visible  evils, as do those same sin.-  among the poorer members oi  society.    Who have not  _J^LLA  COOLA  COURIER  n  '.V  instructions .of the  Hon.  fll..^m"!:VIi"i-:l'"r of Agriculture a free  '"-distribution of situerior sorts of  grain and potatoes will be made  'l.'u-ing ihe corning winter and  spring to Canadian farmers. The  samples   will   consist of  spring  earei o  v'l>- j (about 4  ,,     ,     ... .wheat (about 5 lbs.), white oats  the lavish   banquets, wine s  pers,   the life  in modern clubs  which make up to such a groat  extent the leisure of the gilded  youths and older sinners?  We maintain that the indulgence in strong drink is proportionately as great, if not great<.'i\  among the upper classes as  among those that are classed as  the lower; and that therefore  the contention that poverty and  hard work is the great cause of  intemperance is open to sincere  doubt.  js. ),. barley (about 5  lbs.), and field peas (about 5  lbs.) These will be sent out  from Ottawa.  A distribution of potatoes (in  ilbs. samples) will be carried on  from several of the Experimental Farms, the Central Farm at  Ottawa supplying only the provinces (if Ontario and Quebec.  Fach application must be separate and must he signed by the  applicant. Only one sample of  grain and one of potatoes, can be  sent to each farm.    If both sam-  We believe it has been proven j pk,s are asked  for in the same  by actual demonstration through  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  C������uIj ���������''"Kl'-UItlCHTS oi the Dominion, in  Makiiuha, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  tne Yukon I KiauroKY, thoNuicrii-wKHTTeuui-  ���������IOK1E;-; iinij it. a portion of the i'ltoviNCB of  I.KI'ilKii Coi.i.mhia, may be li-asod for u term of  twonty-on,. y,.ai-H at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. ,v,t more than 2.5I/.1 ucrea will be leased  toorif ainjlicarit.  A;j|j|ici,iiofi foe a lease rnout be made by the  applicant,,, |J(.rK(,��������� Lo the AKeritorSub-AKt-nt  ol the district in which the ritfhta applied for  are Biiuaied.  In smv.yed territory the land must be described by seeiioriii, or le������al aubdiviaioiiH of aec-  ll,?njJ. ������'"! in onaiirveyed territory the tract ap-  plH-xl for <hall be ataked out by the upplicnnt  himself.  Eaoh Application must be accompanied by a  fee of JJ which will be refunded if the rijrhts  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royally shall be paid on the merchantableoiit-  U"\-u  lt": m'nL- al l,le rutl'' of tivL' centB Ijer to".  Inn ijcriion operating the mine shall'furnish  the A>;cnt with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal minim? rights  are not Immiik operated, such returns should be  f urniBhwl at least once a year.  '1 lie lease will include the coal mining rifjhtB  only, but the leasee may be perrhitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessajy for the working of the mine  at the rati, of JlO.uu an acre.  For full information application should be  made io tl���������. Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Atfent or Sub-Atfent  of Ooruiriion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N, li. I'nauihorized publication of this ad-  vorliseni<r:( will not be paid for.���������30690.  IUS1NESS CARDS  years of experience   in prohibition states, that poverty with all  this moment is: that men and its  evils   are   greatly   reduced  uen under no physical strain,  where the open bar is abolished.  A few lines we specially  recommend  Duerrs  Jams and Jellies  Huntley & Palmers  ��������� Biscuits  Griff en & Sk el leys  famous gold and  silverbar ���������-������������������  Canned and dried  fruits  fLEESON, DICKIE," GROSS & CO., Ltd.  (Wholesale Grocer* Vancouver, B. C.  J  ���������W.Peck&Co.Ltd.  .,"  Manufacturers of  CLOTHING, SHIRTS,  CAPS and OVERALLS  We carry a complete stock of Men's Furnishings  and" all the best English  and American  Hats  JOHN W. PECK & CO., LTD.  MONTREAL       WINNIPEG      VANCOUVER  %  letter only one will be sent. ' Ap-  plicatiuns on any kind of printed  form cannot be accepted.  The destruction by lire of the  cereal building at Ottawa, which  contained grain-cleaning machinery and a large stock of seed  grain for distribution, may make  it necessary to curtail the distribution to a certain extent. We  shall fill as many as possible of  the applications which conform  to the rules; but requests received after the end of September  will probably be too late. Samples cannot be sent in response  to applications (no matter when  received) which fail to state  clearly the needs of the applicant, his experiences in crop-  raising, and the character of the  soil on which he intends to sow  the seed.  All applications for grain (and  applications from the provinces  of Ontaria and Quebec for potatoes) should be addressed to the  Dominion Cerealist,  Central Experimental Farm,  ' Ottawa.  Such applications require no postage. If otherwise addressed,  delay  and  disappointment  may  occur.  Applications for potatoes from  , farmers in any other province  'should be addressed (postage pre-  ! paid) to the Superintendent of the  j nearest branch Experimental  I Farm in that province.  ! J. H. GRISDALE,  Director, Dominion Experimental Farms.  GEO! iRKY K. HURNETT     D. J. McGliCAN  C.E., B.C.L.S., B.A.S.C, B.C.I..S.,  ASS. M. CAN. SOC. CE.  Burnett & McGugan  (Successors to Geoffrey K. Burnett)  (Late Hill & Burnett)  CIVIL ENGINEERS and  B.C. LAND SURVEYORS  Grand View Hotel, Bella Coola, B. C.  City address��������� New Westminster, B.C.  I'. 0. Box SSfi. Telephone 232.  [OE  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  HOE  To Ensure a "Good Catch"  Get One of the Famous  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO.,  Stock Only the Best Fishing Tackle  SELLA COOLA, B.C.  Dealers and Trappers  JtMways 9leases  An  Emissary of Peace.  An American lady missionary  n.ti,rno������l at'tor her work anionjr  Ihr Armenians had been broken  u|, l,v the Turks, in writing to a  friend says:  ������������������1 want to shout into the ears  of t.Vi.,.y man 1 see, 'Go fight  gainst Turkey, and make no  '|H,;uv until she is wiped off the  the map!' 1 would also  ���������|),-spoil Germany of half  ssion. because she is  or all these mis-  (! a|so punish Bulgaria  lace c  say.  her   poss.  !���������,'Sponsible  cries.    A"  ���������UM.jntf into a hellish alli-  ���������    Doesn't  this sound  like  Oh ! 1 would glad-  I could and  or the ransom of  mis,ral,lo Armenia.    The whole  n:|tion  is  being assassinated by  ,!u. Turkish government a silent  inassacre they ca  We pay highest price for  your furs and castorium,  also handle goods on  commission, advancing  2-3 of value, our charges  being 5 per cent, for  handling.  THE EDMONTON HIDE & FUR CO.  P. O. Box 863  EDMONTON, Alta.  l.r>7 Mt-Dougall Ave.  XSS  ?i:5r3s-~83 jgiif������'Szgjjji gffigag'jgjij EjgftjyffiSS ������5gjjs.jj^55 fjjgEjggjgS! ;a  TtieMason & Risch Piano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  ������    Let us attend  your Victor Record  J*  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  w    738 GRANVILLE'ST., VANCOUVER, B. C  I 1  ������  I 1  \]W'HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \JL7HAT person so independent?  \XrHAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola  farmers are  independent]  they are strangers to hard times.  rT,HE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ���������"'���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Goola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from. Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  DELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  i 1  ������  <���������)  mmmim  Get "More Money" for your Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected la your section  SntP YOITH Flins DIRECT to"SIIUBERT"the largest  bouse In the World dealing exclusively in NORTH AMERICAN RAW FllkS  a reliable���������responsible���������safe Kur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more than a third of ft century." along buc-  cessf til record of sending Fur Shippers prompt.SATISFACTORY  AN'll PROFITABLE returns. Write for "Vbe fetontwrt fcblpjtft."  the only reliable, accurate market report and price liat published.  Write for it���������NOW���������ten FREE  AR ^HITRFRT Inr  zs" west Austin ave.  . D. DnUDCK. 1 , inc. DeptC 67 CHICAGO, U.S.A.  fill"   0  aiicc.  a missionary V  ]y  he a warrior i  L'iv<' iny life  it.  i   i  ��������� n������r    i']   ���������      *^ "~*���������-������������������"������������������������������������������������������������������������ ��������� mTf-  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Yeak $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Yeah  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed ,r  A  BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, No^emkr 6  :m  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The) Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland * coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles  . It will be to your interest to keeP WeH informed regarding the  happenings throughput  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER" "..  ; GIVES THEM.  /  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer, or'wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  t cities have come and gone.  People are -beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know," is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments; by reading the "Courier."  "The Fair Name of the  * Province."  Sir Richard McBride has written to the Toronto  Globe  protesting against,the publication  of certain article's on conditions  in British Columbia contributed  by Mr. Norman  Lambert.    Sir  Richard expresses great surprise  that the Globe should "go out of  its way to malign the fair name  of .one of the provinces of the  Dominion,  especially at a time  like this, when our efforts should  be mutual in sustaining the credit  of the country, and by standing  I5y each other for that- purpose."  Mr.   Lambert's articles- dealt  with official figures showing how  the lands of this province had  been handed over to the speculator,  and that writer  went to  the trouble to procure the facts  at first hand.    Sir Richard McBride and his followers keep confusing the "fair name of British  Columbia"   with the reputation  of the Conservative party of the  province.    The McBride-Bowser  gang have shattered the credit  of the province, and to "ask the  Globe  or any   other   reputable  paper to refrain from stating the  fact is not going to help matters  i n the si i gh test.    The' 'f ai r n am e  of British  Columbia"  must  be  cleared, and that can,only be accomplished , by  allowing ' fresh  air and 'the light of day to play  around the affairs of the province.  Sir Richard raised the same old  whine when the D.ominion Trust  corruption was shown up.   According to our premier the fault  lies, not in the commission of the  wrong, but in the discovery of it.  Doubtless   the   'Conservatives  would be perfectly "salisfied that  the'"fair name" of the province  would be fairer had the Dominion  Trust scandal  been covered up  and Jcept from public gaze.   It is  evident that- Sir Richard considers that land-grabbing is perfectly just, so. long as nobody  but the speculator knows about  it. This is typical of the attitude of the Conservative party  in this province towards the welfare of the country- It is just as  logical to argue that a bank,  which has been looted of all its  reserves, remains perfectly sound  so Jong as the fact, is not made  The Clearing of Land.  We will again call the farmers  attention to the very great importance of the clearing of as  much land as possible. This is  the first essential in a course of  successful farming. All farmers  acknowledge the need of cleared  ground for the raising of crops,  but yet they do not bend their  energies with all their might towards that end.   As a rule they  public. ��������� Following the same line wjjj gnd pienty of work which  of argument, the Germans are needs attention and devote their  not responsible for the horrors  committed in Belgium, as the  whole fault lies with the British  press for making the factfs public.  Covering up the truth may be  good,Conservatism, but it is deplorably immoral.���������The Daily  News, Prince Rupert.  SEED POTATOES.   .  It has been quite generally believed that a small potato seed  will yield just as large a crop as  large tubers. ���������This theory-is not  tuue in practice.    In the experiments made- the use of 'sizeable  seed produced a greater proportion pf potatoes of desirable size  than the-use of culls.   .The type  pf potatoes- produced from culls  'used.as seed is measurably-smaller., in the first generation,, from  those   produced   from _ selected  tubers.   -.The use of cul.ls for  seed causes,potatoes.to,run out.  .Not only js.the type, of potatoes  produced frcm selected seed larger than frbm .culls," says the ex-  .perimehters, but also the average  weight  of , tubers   produced is  greater;     ' .    -'.  Job Printing  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.'  We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  -rf.. tOWN;;- :l)o not talk���������support 'home ��������� in d us tries ���������-ita! k is  cheap;. . The best way to ��������� show  that you."are in' earnest is to  practise it   ���������  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  TAXIDERMIST  All kinds bf Game' Heads'  mounted7'"true to nature,"  and also some fine specimens for sale, by���������  Hans Allerteon  HAGENSBORG, B. C.  Plumbing  We buy from the Factory and  sell to YOU direct. Largest  Plumbing Showroom West of  Toronto. Let us quote $ou.  KYDD BROS., LIMITED  Vancouver, B. C.  e Courier  $1 a Tear  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  TTHE two principal reasons  ,���������*' why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  For Sale by '  time during the winter season  in a more or less desultory manner to something which could be  put off  to  a more   convenient  season.   The, winter months do  not lerfd themselves readily to  getting the ground cleared to a  finish; but there are very few  days that cannot be devoted to  slashing and, if necessary, cutting the trees  up into lengths  suitable   for   handling.      Then  when the sunny' days of spring  arrive, a good team will haul the  stuff together and then during  the month "of April burning of  the slashing can as a rule be accomplished successful^'.     '   ���������-  Even if the ground cannot be  made ready for seeding in the  month of May, it has been found  that potatoes' and roots planted  in June turn out about as well as  those planted earlier. If the  farmer finds he will not have  time to put any of these crops in  at all) let him'sow^ clover in the  ashes before any rain has wet  them and.the ensuing crop will  enrich the soil and also afford  pasture.  The owners of land must  awaken to the fact that although  there may'not be quite as much  ready cash to be derived1 from  close attention to the soil, as can  be.had from fishing and other  side issues yet, in the .long run,  the time devoted tothe increase  of the cleared area and the practice of up-to-date methods of  raising crops,- will be found to  lay the foundation of an independence which no other pursuit  can give.   '      "       ������, "  While we are discussing things  pertaining to farming allow us  to remind the.officers of the Farmers' Institute that now is the  proper time to call the people  together for the discussion-of  timely topics. There' are scores  of such, and frequent meetings  throughout the winter should be  held and they will be found to  be of high value and promoters  of the welfare of the community.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  Burns;  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioned  Calgary     Vancouyer ��������� Edmonton  . Ogfilvie's  Itoyal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS.  B������i  IT'S  CANADA'S  BEST FLOUR  ESTABLISHED AT,BELLA COOLA IN 1895  Brynildsen  LEApiNG   DEALERS   IN  General Me rch an disci  Dry Goods and Notions!  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE!  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVESJ  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    ������  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  ourstock. Nothing tut the mo������ suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicinesof all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stocky  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  *iSi^fe*#^/r|i^w^t-*i������'i^ Si'fcs.������i.iwi ^isManii  M^l^^&&h^A&&^tfg<fiimii*Mtx*i**������.  i  I,

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xbellacoo.1-0170130/manifest

Comment

Related Items