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Bella Coola Courier May 5, 1917

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Array /  '������^^^^^^'H'i''i^'^'^.iPrr,7^'S'T  r*  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING "AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR MARCH  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 43.   Minimum, 25.  Highest Max. (l?th)5G. Lowest Min. (2nd) 12  Rainfall, 1.36.    Snowl8in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 21  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, WCAY 5, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  War News for the Week  ii>���������,tT  London: Friday, April 27.���������Two British patrol boats give battle  to six German boats off Dover on the 20th. Germans put to ignominious flight after sharp engagement. British poured broadsides  into enemy flotilla, rammed one vessel and sank another. Depletion of merchant shipping growing daily worse, forty vessels were  sunk by German submarines last week. Vessels were over sixteen  hundred tons each. Food controller utters solemn warning to the  public, must be prepared for privations.  Saturday: London-Capture quarries on the eastern outskirts  of Hargicourt, Germans fleeing, hurriedly abandon rifles and equipment. From north of Arras down to Champagne, Franco-British  offensive and German defense developed,into titanic "push of  war," huge bodies of men of both sides grappled in hand to hand  conflict. Most |moderh. weapons, perfected artillery pieces, still  gave barrage fire, but actual movement British forces forward  was almost always by the use of that most ancient weapon, the  steel blade... General Haig is adopting plan of keeping the whole  front "steadily pushing in great concerted movement. Meanwhile  Von Hindenburg is rushing up great bodies of reserve troops and  - pouring these into the lines to interpose human barriers to British  advance.   Enemy losses have been colossal.  Victory becoming increasingly assured states Lloyd-George, the  premier sounds confident note in an address delivered at historic  Guildhall.   He also emphasized the seriousness, of the submarine  omenace and urges more economy, record harvest planned.   Three  million additional acres available for harvest next year.  Paris-Gen. Nivelle's troops? gained more ground around the  blood-soaked fields of Hartebis and Cerny, captured German trenches and heights of Moronvillers. .Since April 16, in the district  between Soissons and'Auberive, French troops captured one hundred and thirty cannon and' many more of a smaller type.' French  fliers brought down twenty-two German aeroplanes in past 2 days.  Petrograd-The enemy has from 150 .to 155 divisions of infantry  and cavalry on Russian front.  Monday: London-British troops in desperate attempt to turn  northern wing of Drocourt Quesnt line, advanced on a front of  nearly ten miles and captured village of Arleaux-en-Gohelle, nine  miles west of Douai. Most violent fighting marked the battle and  successive German counter attacks, although making heavy sacrifices, failed to check British in the fierce encounters in which the  bayonet and rifle butt were used. Soldiers sprang at throats of  foe fn hand-to-hand fight, wave after wave of grey-coated Germans were shattered by deadly British fire. Canadians in brilliant  , assault capture important village. Progress made everywhere and  German line again pierced. Wurtemburgen division literally cut  to pieces, battle still progressing in an easterly direction from  Vimy ridge southward to Scarpe. So called Oppy-Mericourt line  which protects Drocourt switch to the Hindenburg line pierced.  All nations of Europe feeling pinch of hunger. Neutrals and  belligerents in common are faced by shortage of necessities of  life, due to the blockades. England on honor not to eat too much,  but if system fails the scheme of rationing will be adopted. No  sign of chastened spirit can be noted in the speeches of leaders in  the German agrarian junker party, who declare Germany must  have the coal fields of Longwy and Briey. Government in difficult  position between Socialists and reactionaries. .Junkers believe  ' submarines will win victory for Huns. They oppose the return of  any occupied territory.  Tuesday: Paris-Forecasting the probable resumption,of Gen.  Nevelle's concerted offensive, the war office detailed violent artillery actions south of St. Quentin, around Tryonne, Craonne and  regions of Hurteboise.  Petrograd--Russian soldiery plan striking army reforms. May  Day celebrations in new Russia will mark distinct epoch in the  country's history. Individualism of soldiers admitted. Military  rules changed, "sir"- no longer compulsory, salute and corporal  punishment abolished.  Ottawa-Canadian casualties at Vimy Ridge 12,303, it is expected that greater losses will have been sustained in Arleux advance.  New York-Col. Roosevelt offered to raise not one, but four  army divisions to be rushed to the fighting line in France.  Wednesday: Paris-Germany closing her frontier tight andis  suppressing newspapers because of an epidemic of typhus now  raging in many big industrial centres, epidemic is attributed to  malnutrition. T. P. O'Connor writes graphic description of terrible conditions in French territory lately wrested by Allies from  -devastating grip of Hun invaders. Destruction and atrocity reduced to a science and carried out with sanction of ^German government, abominations practiced which cannot be told in print.  ' Buenos Aires���������Germany and Chile negotiated a secret .treaty  guaranteeing to Germany a foothold in Sbuth America. Treaty  was made in 1913 when Prince Henry of Prussia visited Chile.  ..   Rome-According to the dean of the Swedish diplomatic corps,  Baron de Bildt, Sweden is close to starvation.    Neutrals plight is  worse than any of the belligerents says the baron.  Petrograd-Notably increased activity by enemy on all fronts,    i  Canadians Take Arleux  at Point of Bayonet  America Loses First Fighting Force  London, May 1.���������As an indication that the British offensive  is not taking all the strength out  of the army on the Arras-St.  Quentin front, General Haig  staged a strong raid north oi  Ypres last night. The raid was  successfully carried out and 18  prisoners and machine guns were  captured. Ypres is nearly fifty  miles north of Arras sector where  the British push is being power-  fully exerted against remnants  of northernmost end of Wotan  line. Between Monchy Le Preux  and Scarpe, took prisoners'and  improved our positions. Prisoners taken by us since Saturday  number 976, including 16 officers.  Fighting in rounded sector front  of Gavrelle, Roux, .Mo'nchy and  Guemappe is apparently - at a  deadlock.  Demand complete facts of the  submarine situation.'-British Ad-  miralty again under fire' from  the public' and in the House.  Lord Northcliffe - again . leading  critics that full facts of the submarine operations should be made  public.  Canadians drive more than a  mile into the enemy's lines in the  big advance. A large slice and  2500 yard front being held despite determined councer attacks.  Canadian troops in a desperate  fight, lasting 16 hours, took'the  village of Arleux at the bayonet-  point.' Manitoba regiment hard  hit.  America lost her first fighting  force in the war with Germany  when a submarine torpedoed the  tanker Vacuum last Saturday.  Lieutenant and nine of the gun  crew perished. The vessel had  discharged a cargo of oil at Liverpool and was en route for home  when sunk..  French Launch  Powerful Attack  Paris, May 2.���������In a powerful  attack in the Champagne region  French troops captured several  fortified trenches in the neighborhood of Mont Carmillet to a  depth of five hundred to, one  thousand metres.  Autocracy Tottering  Amsterdam, May 1.���������German  heads are greatly alarmed, tomorrow may, be a fateful day in  German history. Autocracy is  trembling in the balance. Russian revolution been a great example to the masses. Fren'ziedly  worked placards issued at Berlin  factories show the high tension  of the situation.  Conscription Bill Doubtful  Washington, May 1.���������United  States will send one thousand  doctors to the French front. Appropriation of $2,699,485,281 for  army, navy and extra governmental expenses asked for today.  Rules of Congress have precipitated the tangle and throws the  Conscription Bill into douDtful  stage. Senate faces possibility  of further prolonged debate on  the bill before it passes. Democratic leaders are confident of  success. Senator Lafollette is  the stumbling block. , Senator  Gronna's amendment providing  the stopping of grain distribution  to breweries and distilleries is  subject to take many hours to  debate.  Deadlock Along  'British Front  London, May 2.���������A deadlock  is apparent along the British  front today. General Haig'sonly  report of'fighting was the night  raid successfully carried out by  his forces north of Ypres where  a few Germans were taken prisoners. Elsewhere ' he reported  nothing special. Both sides deadlocked,, from   Arleux,' south of  t  Monchy. " The tremendous fighting of Saturday and Sunday  seemingly has brought about a  period of temporary abatement,  during which both sides are  hurrying up ��������� fresh troops and  materials for later on. Half of all  munition workers in the Rhine  province of Germany joined the  general strike today. London  newspapers predict drastic alter  ations in the Admiralty submarine statements.  ,   Dutch Village Bombed  Amsterdam, May 2.--Dutch  village of Zierikzee, near Belgian  frontier, was laid waste Sunday  night by bombs dropped from  aeroplane. Aviators nationality  and the reason fordroppingdeath  dealing missels on neutral unprotected village has not been  established. There were five  casualties and more than three  hundred houses smashed.  National Guardsmen  May Train in Europe  Washington,. May 2.���������Troops  may go to France soon. Former  premier Viviani urges uponPresi-  dent Wilson the expediency of  despatching Americans to the  front. Guardsmen may train in  European countries. France  could prepare men for war conditions very speedily.  Ship tonnage is falling off.  Lord Percy informed the American government that the losses  through submarines is appalling.  Combined maximum ship output  required, balancing factor may  be the tonnage-that is available  in the United States.  ���������  Qonstantine Coming Round  Athens, May 2��������� The Greek  throne is tottering. French are  furious at the perfidious King  Constantine, who now appears  anxious to appease the Allies.  Ex-premier Venizelos speaks his  mind on pro-Germanism, he says  it.is useless to exile evil officials  when the royal palace houses  Germans.  Robert Grant is now nursing a  broken rib, the result of being  jammed against the side of the  stall by a frightened horse while  engaged in feeding the animal.  The tug Pronative, Capt. J. P.  Tate, of the Progressive S.S. Co.  Vancouver, came up last week  with a logging outfit to be operated on account of the Draney  Fisheries, Ltd.', to log off some  timber lands that they have obtained from B. F. Jacobsen and  others on the south side of the  North Bentinek Arm. Thesuper-  intendentof the operation is Mr.  E. Sande, who has been for  years connected .with lumbering  in this province.  Mr. Fred Hendricks and his  fellow partners in the logging  business on Dean Channel, after  spending a few days in town  have left for a prolonged stay at  their camp. This concern expects to have'two million feet of  logs ready in booms by' the first  of July.    J -  Mr. A. R. Lord, inspector of  public schools for the northern  section of the province, visited  the valley on his .annual tour of  inspection. Mr. Lord makes his  home in Prince Rupert.  Mr. Harry Hanson, the plumber, came south from Prince Rupert and is now engaged in looking over all damages done to  water pipes during the past severe winter. It is likely that  Mr. Hanson will spend some time  in Bella Coola and vicinity work-  ink at his trade before returning  home.       ;   The proverbial "spud" is still  moving, a considerable shipment  was taken away last week. This  wijl pretty nearly be all that will  be shipped out before^ seeding  is over, what is left over after  planting is done will be exported.  Manager J. B. Saint of the local  cannery made a trip to Hagensborg during the week to'consult  with the fishermen as to price of  fish and other matters pertaining  to this year's cannery operation.  The S. S. Camosun had quite  a passenger list and also heavy  shipment : of freight for this  port last week. Among the new  arrivalswere Mrs. E. Sande and  family. Mrs. Sande came up to  join her husband here.  Among the many that visited  here during the past two weeks  was; Mr. E.- Gardener Smith of  Duncans; B. C., appraiser of land  values under the agricultural'  commission, who is making a tour  of this district during the month.  Mr. Smith took occasion to look  over the upper part of the valley  and went as far east as Atnarko.,  He expresssed himself, as, well  pleased with what he saw of this  ,  section of British Columbia before returning south on the Friday night's steamer from Jiere.  The Courier is in receipt of a  letter from our former townsman  Frank G. Hagan, who is how  with the Forestry Battalion do-  ing his bit, somewhere in France.  Pte. Hagan's letter is very interesting in niany respects, and it  is a mystery to us'that this missive evaded the eagle eye of the  censor, who was described by  Pte. H. L. Harris a short time  ago as a person of "little sense  of humor."  The soldier observes that he  has seen a great deal of' what is  going on, but what impresses  him the most is the great sacrifices being made all round in order to win this war, more particularly the part women are playing for the good of the Empire.  He observes, "we are sending  out pine and oak,timber in lots,  and one wonders where it all  goes and ftfr what itis used, yet  the" cfy is for more, and still  more." Pte. Hr.gan wishes to-  be remembered to all friends  and says there is no place like  Bella Coola, to which'he hopes  to return when this awful war  is over.  Latest to hand is that ,Pte.-C.  Woods, who enlisted from here  in the 102nd Battalion and now  serving with his company in  France, has been wounded. The  parents of Pte. Woods are living  at Ocean Falls.  Pte. B. M. Brynildsen writes  from Portage La Prairie that his  battalion is making ready toleave  for the Atlantic coast, and very  likely are now on the way to old  England. From the "Sniper;"  a publication of the 223rd, we  givs the following: ��������� -.  AS WE SAIL ACROSS  THE SEA.  We'll be going across the sea, Boys  Where the war boom loud is heard,  They'll remember the day that we  sailed away,  We Hoys of the Two Twenty Third.  We'll  be  flitting acrcss  the foam  soon, Boys,  To realize hopes deferred,  And we'll fight in our might for God  and Right,  We Boys of the Two Twenty Third.  We'll be sailing across the ocean,  Boys,  We'll be sailing across the sea,  And many a proud mother's heart  . beats high  ��������� For her boy in the Two Two Three.  There's many a proud mother's heart  beats high -, ��������� ���������;.  As she thinks of you and me,;      e    .  As the foe we defy, and we do or die,  -   We Boys of the Two Two Three.' ?  WITH THE ALLIED  ARMIES  Dr.-Joseph T. Mandy will exhibit  MOVING PICTURES OF THE WAR  in Bella Coola.    Date of arrival  to be announced later. BELLA COOLA COURIER  ���������."**-������  i Saturday, A/ay 5,  I9l7  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola uy  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1  Year $1.00  ���������6 Month*     '.  0.75  3 Month*....,   0.50  United State*  1 Year..-. $1.50  United Kingdom  1  Year $1.00  Subicription* payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon'as possible. ,'  For Advertising Rates,  Apply, at  ��������� Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be given to the editor.  The Editor reserves the rifrht to refuse publication uf any letter. All manuscript at writer's  ri.lc.  'Pallia pnjwli awprwna cat kx."  SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1917.  A Sane Policy.  For the first time in years the  expenses of the province are to  ���������be defrayed by income. ��������� The  Brewster government has adopted the policy of, which any sane  businessman could not fail todoi  keeping the expenditure within  the income.  Hon. H. C. Brewster, minister  of finance, in delivering his budget speech placed the true con-  ��������� dition of the province finances  before the people, and it is safe  to say that very few of the taxpayers had any idea that a con-  .dition'very nearly bordering on  bankruptcy was staring them in  ��������� the face. ���������>  ' Under the new order of things  there will be this year a saving  in all departments of $1,466,000.  - Taxation will, be increased,  this, of course, had, to come;  owing to the practise in past  years'of running the provincial  affairs on borrowed money. To  arrive ac such a.balance it was  necessary to decrease expenditures in the various departments  and seek increases in taxes  wherever possible, keeping in  view conditions as they are now  found to exist. Every right-  thinking person will approve  with the idea of extricating the  province out of the mire that it  has been put into by unwise past  governments. Premier Brewster and his government must  be congratulated on the stand  that they have taken in this all  important matter.  Wood Bottoms.  Shipbuilding is all the go now  and British Columbia, with its  vast resources of suitable timber,  should materially benefit. Evidently there is going to be a  great boom in the building of  wooden ships, and there is no  reason why a number of these  vessels should not be built at  different points, operating sawmills, on this northern coast.  Bella Coola with its three sawmills and other facilities should  be able to do something as at the  present moment tonnage is as  important to the Allies as shells,  and we would be furnishing our  quota to the munitioning of the  Allied forces. The provincial  government, has expressed its  willingness to give all facilites  in its power.  The question of developing  wood shipbuildings Canada has  been under investigation and it  has been presented to the Impe  rial government that a substantial tonnage of suitable wooden  vessels could be obtained. The  Dominion government, in order  to assist the development of shipbuilding in Canada, has offered  to make a specialloan (and the  offer has been accepted) to the  Imperial Munitions Board of ten  million dollars for this purpose.  Specifications and designs of the  type of wooden vessels are almost  complete and will be available as  a standard pattern of design.  There is no doubt that wood  bottoms could be made as cheap  and as well in Bella Coola as in  any other port on the coast if  only the financial assistance was  forthcoming, and it would, we  think, facilitate progress if the  work was distributed in places  such as this and not congested in  a prescribed area.  According to official statement  orders have been placed for steel  ships in Canada up to the full  limit of the steel plants available  for the next fifteen months.  ooooo  On the Right Track. ,  Premier Brewstei seems to be  on the right track. In delivering his budget speech he had  this to say: "The government on  taking office decided that it  should conduct affairs as one who  has private business. An. effort  has been made to do this. To  arrive at a report upon our actual condition the government engaged a firm of international accountants beyond the reach of  any political influence. I feel  sure that the changes in the system to be inaugurated and worked out finally will save the people  of this province not' thousands  of dollars but millions in the  years to come."  .'->#-;-*'  year 1916. $17,820"was spent out  of last year's appropriation for  road superintendents. This item  alone will be more than cut in  two. Then another item "general", which may mean anything  from an anchor to a haystack, of  $12,500 is likely to be materially  reducedif not altogether cutout.  With all this considered, the  amount of money for roads will  be about the same as,last year  although in the estimates the  total appears to be considerably  less. There is also in the appropriations the sum oi* $196,190 for  bridges, ferries, etc., and of  course the north country will  have something out of this total.  Hon. T. D. Pattullo, as minister of lands, has found that he  could save in his own department  5108,000; some saving that for  twelve months and yet it is claim-  ad that the efficiency of his department has increased one hundred fold. ' Who is it that will  argue that'it does not pay to  change the office staff.  ooooo  The money available for public  -vorks in the northern districts  for the year 1917 will be $115,-  The new district engineer is  calling for applications from competent men that wants to be the  district road superintendent.  Evidently there is only one person wanted for this work now,  though we usually had them by  sixes and sevens in the past.  Bella Coola is full of Conservative road bosses, and naturally  there will be a like number of  Liberals that will come forward  and claim thst they also are competent for this and that position.  We, of course, has not seen any  one that has built any roads here  as yet. and from now on it must  be road builders and not the class  of men that spend their time" in  building up this or that political  party that we Want placed in  charge of road construction, or  any other undertakings in the  public service. The people are'  thoroughly tired of the loafer  and the incompetent, from now  on it will be efficiency that is  demanded.  ooooo  A saving in public works this  year will be effected to the ex-  One of the many prr$IJms.tqi  be dealt with by the new gio^eirt-  ment on,assuming office was how  best to overcome the require-  ments of public works. The, minister of public work has divided  the province up into districts,  each district to be in charge of a  qualified engineer, in an attempt  to obtain better service than in  the past. ���������    "  ooooo  Get Busy.  From time to time the press of  Canada has drawn the attention  of farmers to the necessity of increasing the acreage under cultivation, more and more farm  produce is wanted. The Dominion government has done considerable advertising to arouse the  farmers to the necessity of greater production. In England there  is going on a great forward movement in tilling the soil.' As a result of the government's appeal,  farmers are plowing up grass  land it is estimated that already  300,000 acres have been added to  the grain-growing area in England and Wales. The acreage in  Scotland has been increased by  50,000 and in Ireland by 500,000.  The Courier again draws the  attention of the ranchers of  Bella Coola and Northern British  Columbia to the importance of  doing their "little bit."���������  300, as against $186,753 for the'tent of $1,220,000.  NEWTON  , The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who. is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these dis-,  tric'ts.    .  Mackay Smith, Biair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.Q  Wholesale'"  GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,  OVERALLS,  MACKINAW  DRY  OF  Send for Catalogue  "MADE   IN    B. C  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  PACIFIC MILK  Prepared from pure, healthy,  fresh, cows milk. Nothing  is added, only water is taken  away.  'YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC"  FOOD  PRODUCTS  CO., LTD., Manufacturers  Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.  The Finest  Wheat in  the World  ���������plus millingskill���������plus millingex-  perience���������plus:modern mill plant  ���������plus many, other important factors and you have the answer���������  &****  WTXL STANDARD y  "XMl I mI'IT i--*7"-"  lour  ���������without a peer in the whole world.' .  ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR is born in Canadian  Wheat Fields���������the best wheat producing lands  on earth.  The net result when*ROYAL STANDARD is used-  Bread, Biscuits, Buns, etc., bigger in volume-  finer in texture���������greater in food value���������cleaner  and whiter in body.  The trademark, the Circle V on the sack assures you.  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  m  Compare���������price for price���������  GREAT  WEST  I tA  with the tea you are now using.  It's Better.  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  30E  DO  HOE  ]&  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      CaMOSUSl     Leaves Vancouver every  Tuesday at 11 p. m.      (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays a. m.  S. S.' " Goquitlam ���������'.'.' sails from Vancouver 'fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.    \ ;   i        V  ' For rates of Freights; Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  n  30E  ������C  HOE  w  Advertise ^  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE 'PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY. -3'  Saturday, May 5,  1917  BELLA] COOLA COUfciEI*  Should America Take Over  a Sector on West Front?  An American correspondent,  writing from France, says that  the idea of an American army  taking over a sector of the western battlefront is absurd.. He  says that France is as full of  troops as it can stand, and that,  if Washington wants to help the  Entente Powers in the field,  that the only way to do so is to  despatch men across Siberia to  take over a part of the Russian  line. It is as well to remember  that it is an American correspondent to whom this breezy advice  to his own countrymen is credited; so if Col, Roosevelt wants to  take a division or even an army  . corps of American Wideawakes  over to France, as he is reported  to be anxious to do, there is no  reason to believe that he would  not be welcomed as a gallant  comrade-in-arms on the western  battlefront, and initiated into the  latest wrinkles in the war game.  He will find, according to all accounts, no less than fifty thous-  and Americans, first-rate fight-  1 ing men, already at the front in  various branches of the service  with Cansdian, French and British battalions.  o ��������� o\   o    o ;  o  Victory Over Wounds.  Canada should be, as proud of  her wounded soldiers' victory  over their wounds as she is of  the glorious fights in which they  fell. Their struggle up from the  depths of disablement is often  as hard, and even as heroic, as  their desperate defense of Ypres  or.their dashing capture of Vimy  ridge.  We hear little, altogether too  little, of these hard-won victories  won by disabled men, ,because  they are fought out in the seclusion of a hospital, not in the  theatre of war with the whole  world looking on. But such victories equally deserve public recognition. They show the same  spirit, the same pluck, and still  more indomitable perseverance.  A preacher . in Vancouver on  Easter morning was thanked for  the inspiring sermon he had just  preached on the resurrection.  He said: "I had my text sitting  in front of me--a man in khaki,  with an empty sleeve. He has  had two resurrections already.  He was buried by a shell explosion, and was dug out only just  in time to save his life.   That  FARM LANDS  was the first. He spent months  in hospital, fighting his way  back to life. That was the second. Doctoring and nursing did  much for him; so did the exercises and occupations that they  provide nowadays- perhaps the  best part of the treatment: ���������' But  the man himself was working  out his own resurrection, by  resolutely putting his own willpower into the task. Now he  is almost ready to go out into the  world, a better and abler man,  he says, than he was before, in  spite of his lost arm. While the  rest of us are thinking of a res-  0  urrection beyond the grave, he  has won a resurrection this side"  of it, to a new life of activity  and independence among his fellow-countrymen."  Oregon & California Railroad Co.  Grant Lands.���������Title to same revested in United States by Act' of Congress dated June 9, 1916. Two million three hundred thousand acres to Le  opened for homesteads and sale. Tim-  bar and agricultural lands. Containing some of the best land left,in the  United States. Now is the opportune  time. Large map showing lands by  sections and description of soil, climate, rainfall, elevations, etc. Postpaid One Dollar.  Grant Lands Locating Co., Box 610,  Portland, Oregon.  Watch Repairs  Send your watch to us for guaranteed repuirs at lowest prices.  A price given before proceeding with work.   If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.   tj   O. B. ALLAN  Diamond Merchant���������Optician  Granville and Pender,Vancouver,B.C.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  *-" .Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Tebkitory, the North-west Te������ki-  ; Tories and in -a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one yean at an annual rental of $ 1 art  acre. -Not more than 2.5C0 acres will be leased  to one .applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Ascm or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated. ���������"  .In surveyed territory". the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and inunsurveyed territory, the tract applied' for ahull be staked but by the "applicant  himself.       -   .  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $6 which will be refunded if, the rights  upplieti for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco" nting for the  f ull.qmintity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished ut least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surfuce rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  mode to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  c W. W. CORY,  ���������i Deputy Minister of the Interior,  N. U.���������Unauthorised publication of, this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30C90.  BUSINESS CARDS  ioe  o  Fur Sales Agency  ear the "Dayfoot"  Solid Leather  Shoe  MADE FOR B. C. WEATHER  G. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y  Georgetown, Ont. and  303 Mercantile Building  Vancouver, B. C.   ,  The joys  of digging in the  garden���������-  ALF the satisfaction in  gardening is in   having  the proper tools.  And good ones at that.  We carry an excellent line of  spades,   hoes,.' shovels,   rakes,  pruning knives���������infact:, every-  Comfort and luxury assured at a  minimum cost. Many Prince Rupert testimonials prove its worth  Have You Got $20 ?  If not your credit is good  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented in Canada)  Installed in your kitchen range  will give you all the hot water  you can use'within thirty minutes  after fire is started. 121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  user a booster. You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  seen these results. $20.00 is the  Cost. Absolutely no charge unless satisfactory.  A hath supply within twenty minutes  after fire is started and then a new sup- '  p/y eoery twenty minutes thereafter.  Wall radiators can also he run from  your hat water boiler and other rooms  heated with no extra cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surprise You -  Investigate!  Harry Hanson TIJ?,������sL,S,e  P. O. Box 395   ,  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage' of our Fur Sates Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always. ,  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent,  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  (ol k -, ' ������������������    ioi.        ���������  thing  necessary  to  keep the  garden in firct class condition.  REMINGTON  We carry the famous Remington  UMC Speed Shells-"Arrow"and"Nitro  Club7'���������used by leading Sportsmen  everywhere. We also carry all Rem������  ington UMC Arms and [Ammunition.  B* Brynildsen & Co.  WATER NOTICE.  (Diversion and Use.)      <  'Take Notice that Frederick  1 Adolphus Futcher, whose address is Vancouver, British Columbia, will apply for a license  to take and use One hundred  (100) miners inches of water,  seventy-five (75) inches for power, and twenty-five (25) inches  for domestic purposes, out of  Nummamis River, which flows  in a southerly direction, and  drains into North Bentinek Arm,  about three'miles from" the head  of the said North Bentinek Arm,  the water will be diverted from  the stream at a point about half  a mile from its mouth, and will  be used for power and domestic  purposes upon the land described  as Lot Sixteen (16), Range "Three  (3), Coast District, and for the  purpose of operating a cannery,  which it is proposed to erect on  the said lands. This notice wae  posted on the grounds on ths  17th day of March, 1917.  A copy of this notice and an  application pursuant thereto under the "Water Act, 1914," will  be filed in the office of the Water  Recorder, at Vancouver, British  Columbia. Objections to the application may be filed with the  said Water Recorder or with the  Comptroller of Water Rights,  Parliament Buildings, Victoria;  within thirty days after the first  appearance;'pf-;this Notice in a  local newspaper. :The date of  the first application of this notice  is the 28th day of April, 1917-.  Frederick Adolphus Futcher,  Applicant.  :   By Tupper & Bull (Solicitors),  His Agents.  Ap. 28--May 19.    '  WATER NOTICE  TTake Notice that George S.1  A  McTavish, whose address is  733   Lampsqn Street,   Victoria,  B. C.,',will apply for a license to  take and use 600 .cubic feet per  day of water out of an unnamed  creek, which flows into Victoria  Cove and drains into Rivers Inlet,  B. C.,' about three miles in a  westerly direction from Wannuck  River.-  The water will be diverted from the stream at a point  about 1800 feet from the northwest corner post of Lot 1061 and  will be used for domestic and  cannery purposes upon the land  described as Lot 1061 ���������, Range 2,  Coast District.   This notice was  posted on the ground on the 6th  day of April 1917.  A copy of this notice and an  application pursuant thereto and  to the "Wafer Act, 1914," will  be filed in the office of the Water  Recorder at Vancouver. Objections to the application may be  filed with the said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller  of Water Rights, Parliament  Buildings, Victoria, . within 30  days after the first appearance  of this notice in a local newspaper. The date of the first  publication of this notice is April  21st, 1917.  G. S. McTAVISH, Applicant.  April 21-May 12.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT  OF   COAST���������BANGS   III.  Take notice that I, Frank Inrig, of  Wadhams, B. C, occupation cannery-  man, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  land:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Lot 1041 on Goose  Bay, Rivers Inlet, thence east20 chains,  thence south 20 chains, thence west 20  chains to the shore, thence following  the shore line to the place of commencement. ,  FRANK INRIG.  Dated, March 28, 1917.   , Ap. 7-J'ne 2  / helvlason (yRisen Piano  of lo-Jay will make plain our  privilege lo state with authority:  "NO FINER  PIANO  MADE!  SOLD. DIRECT, BY THE MANUFACTURERS  "P  a.  tflf Let us attend  your- Victor Record  Jl mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  -~-Ji  ^  I���������I  r���������i  \X/HAT person so happy and contented, as the prosperous farmer?  .  WHAT person so independent?  .13I7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  C=5  T^HE REASONS for this enviable "condi-  ���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  >ELLA COOLA and the. surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill al Bella Coola.  ]||[o]||cz=)||[  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subtcriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year  Six Months  Three Months ...,...........  UNITED STATES.  One Year. .':.  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year. ......'}..:'............ .$1.00  $1.00  0 75  .0.50  $1.50  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  . .subscription  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find.:,.........  for Bella Coola Courier for :.'.......  Name. ............,...-...���������������������������������������������������������������  ���������  ; p. -o.;.....-.;.:., ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������  Tear out and mail today, with amount of. subscription enclosed '4  BELLS COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, May 5, 1917  ONEDOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the-mainland-coasT: between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  It will be to your interest to ^eep Well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"    ,  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS -  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  Up and Doing.  One of the most pressing and  immediate problems is as to the  best means of taking advantage  of the opportunity accruing  through the war to consolidate  the purchase and sale, and establish the use of Canadian goods  by .the Canadian people, and to  procure the new' business offering in foreign countries. Our  neighbors to the South of us, and  Canadians in Eastern Canada,  are taking time by the forelock,  and have applied themselves to  this problem. They haveformed.  Export Associations with large  capital to exploit foreign markets. They have formed in the  various large towns of the Pacific  Coast, Commercial and Industrial Associations to exploit the  home markets, and have organized subscriptions to a fund to be  used in, placing before the large  manufacturers of the world information as to markets, rates,  power, sites, labor conditions,  etc., to induce them to open factories in the respective towns  on the'American Pacific Coast,  Other problems of great importance and magnitude are  coming toward us. At' the termination of the war there will  be a general influx of new settlers from Europe, and the return  of 370,000 soldiers for whom employment must be found. The  proper solution of our immediate  problem will' assist in solving the  others. Increased production  and markets for existing industries, the establishment of new  industries, the utilization of our  natural resources, and settlement on the land are the only  solutions.  since many of the small farmers  look,to a local consumption free  fiom the peculiar transportation  problems of this province. ��������� If  mining operations are good, the  settlers in the districts contiguous to the mines will have a market to hand for their produce.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. ' Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing., We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  U TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries--talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  People are beginning to realize  that mining and agriculture  should run hand in hand, and  that prosperity of the two are  morely closely interwoven than  is generally admitted. Where  mining has languished, the agricultural industry is depressed,  ���������; $l:a Year  Published every  Saturday at  "THE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND-  They   are   the   only  brands   produced  in  B. C. under goyern-  ,   ment inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Appropriate.  The following true and appealing' utterances   by  that  chief  spokesman and guide of the Empire in the war, the Rt. Hon.  David Lloyd-George, are most  appropriate:   ' 'You can not have  absolute equality of sacrifice in  wai���������it is impossible���������but you  can have equal readiness of sacrifice from all.   There are hundreds of thousands  who have  given their lives; there' are millions who have given up comfort:  able homes and exchanged them  for-daily communion with death.  Multitudes have given up those  they love best.   Let the nation,  as a whole, place its comforts,  indulgences, and elegances on a  national "altar,  consecrated "by  such sacrifices as these men have  made.    Let us proclaim .during  the war a national Lent.    The  nation will be the better for it  ���������stronger mentally, morally and  physically.   It would strengthen  its fibre and ennoble its spirit."  COMPLEX.  Mrs. Wayupp: Where did Mrs.  De Style get her new hat?  Mrs. Blase: that's a problem.  She bought; it with the money  which her" husband borrowed  from her-uncle, who had won it  in a poker game from her brother, to whom she had loaned it  shortly after her mother had  taken it from her father's pockets and given it to her fbr a  birthday present.  SUPERFLUOUS.  ' Dr. Wilse Robinson, of Kansas  City, declares that the trouble  with most ,of us is the lack of  "attentive control." The one  aim of all true education, says  Dr. Robinson, is to fix the attention on one thing, and then do it.  But why should anybody need  the power of attentive control  when 'everything is being done  for us? We no longer have to  think, because through a vast  number of mechanical appliances  everything is thought out for us.  We can buy any political opinion  we want at any newstand for  two cents. Our motor cars run  by touching a button. Our children are brought up before our  eyes by the movies the drama  and,the dance halls. Our literature is rewritten-by skilled  hands. ' Our religion is manufactured by a syndicate. We  are independent of that old fetish, "attentive control."  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  e  HOE  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioneri  Calgary     Vancouver    Edmonton  CLUB OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg 1.50  ";     '.'   ''���������'���������,���������.'':��������� ",   '���������;''���������'.���������: $2.50  The Courier   . ."��������� ;.   '... .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  -31.00  J. 50  '���������i-'j ��������� -  $2.50'  Both papers  for  .   .  $2.00  Both papers  for  $2.00  The Courier / .,     .   !   ...   :.  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $L0������    Both papers   V  ���������_M?   for  .   .   $1.75  $2.00  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General .Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  fapBe and Fancy  Groceries1  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    S>  ^  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosl suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints - Oils - Varnishes - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of "all sorts  kept on hand.   Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  MIMalttmMMjaaMMffiMnMIIIB  o  LV ie.*vj  IF YOU WANT hoOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA CPOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTINGIJSSb FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR MARCH  Compiled  by  Mr. C.  H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Obsei-vatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 43.   Minimum, 25.  Highest Max. (17th) 5G. Lowest Min. (2nd) 12  Rainfall, 1.36.     Snow 18 in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  IVOL. 5���������N0..21  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, MAY 5,  1917.  $1.00 a Year  War News for the Week  London: Friday, April 27.���������Two British patrol boats give battle  ) six German boats off Dover on the 20th. Germans put to ignominious flight after sharp engagement. British poured broadsides  into enemy flotilla, rammed one vessel and sank another. Depletion of merchant shipping growing daily worse, forty vessels were  3unk by German submarines last week. Vessels were over six teen  lundred tons each. Food controller utters solemn warning to the  niblic, must be prepared for privations.  Saturday:   London-Capture quarries on the eastern outskirts  jf Hargicourt, Germans fleeing, hurriedly abandon rifles and equipment.   From north of Arras down to Champagne, Franco-British  )ffensive and German defense developed into titanic "push of  (war," huge bodies of men of both sides grappled in hand to hand  jonflict.    Most {modern weapons, perfected artillery pieces, still  rave barrage fire, but actual movement British forces forward!  Ivas almost always by the use of that most ancient weapon, the  steel blade.    General Haig is adopting plan of keeping the whole  front steadily pushing in great concerted movement.    Meanwhile  fon Hindenburg is rushing up great bodies of reserve troops and  )ouring these into the lines to interpose human barriers to British  idvance.    Enemy losses have been colossal.  Victory becoming increasingly assured states Lloyd-George, the  )remier sounds confident note in an address delivered at historic  guildhall.    He also emphasized the seriousness of the submarine  lenace and urges more economy, record harvest planned.   Three  lillion additional acres available for harvest next year.  Paris-Gen. Nivelle's troops gained more ground around the  )lood-soaked fields of Hartebis and Cerny, captured German trenches and heights of Moronvillers. ,Since April 16, in the district  )etween Soissons and Auberive, French troops captured one hun-  Ired and. thirty cannon and many more of a smaller type. French  liers brought down twenty-two German aeroplanes in past 2 days.  Petrograd-The enemy,has from 150 to 155 divisions of infantry  ind cavalry on Russian front.  Monday:   London-British troops in desperate attempt to turn  lorthern wing of Drocourt Quesnt line, advanced on a front of  learly ten miles and captured village of Arleaux-en-Gohelle, nine  liles west of Dpuai.    Most violent fighting marked the battle and  successive German counter attacks, although making heavy sacri-  ices, failed to check British in the fierce encounters in which the  )ayonet and rifle butt were used.    Soldiers sprang at throats of  foe in hand-to-hand fight, wave after wave of grey-coated Germ-  ins were shattered by deadly British fire.    Canadians in brilliant  issault capture important village.   Progress made everywhere and  "erman line again pierced.     Wurtemburgen division literally cut  io pieces, battle still progressing in an easterly direction from  "imy ridge southward to Scarpe.    So called Oppy-Mericourt line  fhich protects Drocourt switch to the Hindenburg line pierced.  All nations of Europe feeling pinch of hunger. Neutrals and  )elligerents in common are faced by shortage of necessities of  life, due to the blockades. England on honor not to eat too much,  )ut if system fails the scheme of rationing will be adopted. No  sign of chastened spirit can be noted in the speeches of leaders in  the German agrarian junker party, who declare Germany must  lave the coal fields of Longwy and Briey. Government in difficult  )osition between Socialists and reactionaries. Junkers believe  submarines will win victory for Huns. They oppose the return of  my occupied territory.  Tuesday:   Paris-Forecasting the probable resumption of Gen.  evelle's concerted offensive, the war office detailed violent ar-  illery actions south of St. Quentin, around Tryonne, Craonne and  egions of Hurteboise.  Petrograd-Russian soldiery plan striking army reforms.    May  ay celebrations in new Russia will mark distinct epoch in the  ountry's history.    Individualism of soldiers admitted.    Military  ules changed, "sir" no longer compulsory, salute and corporal  punishment abolished.  Ottawa-Canadian casualties at Vimy Ridge 12,303, it is expected that greater losses will have been sustained in Arleux advance.  New York-Col. Roosevelt offered  to raise  not one, but four  army divisions to be rushed to the fighting line in France.  Canadians Take Arleux  at Point of Bayonet  America Loses First Fighting Force  London, May 1.���������As an indication that the British offensive  is not taking all the strength out  of the  army on  the  Arras-St.  Quentin    front,   General   Haig  staged a strong  raid  north oi  Ypres last night.    The raid was  successfully carried out and 18  prisoners and machine guns were  captured.    Ypres is nearly fifty  miles north of Arras sector where  the British push is being powerfully exerted against remnants J  of northernmost end of Wotan  line.   Between Monchy Le Preux  and Scarpe, took prisoners and  improved our positions.    Prisoners taken by us since Saturday  number 976, including 16 officers.  Fighting in rounded sector front  of Gavrelle, Roux, Monchy and  Guemappe   is  apparently   at, a  deadlock.  Demand complete facts of the  submarine situation.-British Admiralty again under fire from  the public and in the House.  Lord North cliff e again leading  critics that full facts of the submarine operations should be made  public.  Canadians drive more than a  mile into the enemy's lines in the  big advance. A large slice and  2500 yard front being held despite determined councer attacks.  Canadian troops in a desperate  fight, lasting 16 hours, took'the  village of Arleux at the bayonet  point. Manitoba regiment hard  hit.  America lost her first fighting  force in the war with Germany  when a submarine torpedoed the  tanker Vacuum last Saturday.  Lieutenant and nine of the gun  crew perished. The vessel had  discharged a cargo of oil at Liverpool and was en route for home  when sunk.  Autocracy Tottering  Wednesday:    Paris-Germany closing her frontier tight and is  {suppressing newspapers because of an epidemic of typhus now  paging in many big industrial centres, epidemic is attributed to  "rmlnutrition.    T. P. O'Connor writes graphic description of ter-  '*Sftrible conditions in French territory lately wrested by Allies from  ^devastating grip of Hun invaders.    Destruction and atrocity re-  ^���������duced to a science and carried out with sanction of German gov-  ���������ISjjfern merit, abominations practiced which cannot be told in print.  .^$ Buenos Aires-Germany and Chile negotiated a secret treaty  ^guaranteeing to Germany a foothold in South America. Treaty  .v.f.v/as made in 1913 when Prince Henry of Prussia visited Chile.  Rome-According to the dean of the Swedish diplomatic corps,  Baron de Bildt, Sweden is close to starvation.    Neutrals plight is  j[worse than any of the belligerents says the baron.  Petrograd-Notably increased activity by enemy on all fronts.  Amsterdam, May 1.���������German  heads are greatly alarmed, tomorrow may be a fateful day in  German history. Autocracy is  trembling in the balance. Russian revolution been a great example to the masses. Frenziedly  worked placards issued at Berlin  factories show the high tension  of the situation.  Conscription Bill Doubtful  Washington, May 1.���������United  States will send one thousand  doctors to the French front. Appropriation of $2,699,485,281 for  army, navy and extra governmental expenses asked for today.  Rules of Congress have precipitated the tangle and throws the  Conscription Bill into doubtful  stage. Senate faces possibility  of further prolonged debate on  the bill before it passes. Democratic leaders are confident of  success. Senator Lafollette is  the stumbling block. Senator  Gronna's amendment providing  the stoppingof grain distribution  to breweries and distilleries is  subject to take many hours to  debate.  French Launch  Powerful Attack  Paris, May 2.���������In a powerful  attack in the Champagne region  French troops captured several  fortified trenches in the neighborhood of Mont Carmillet to a  depth of five hundred to one  thousand metres.  Deadlock Along  British Front  London, May 2.���������A deadlock  is apparent along the British  front today. General Haig's only  report of fighting was the night  raid successfully carried out by  his forces north of Ypres where  a few Germans were taken prisoners. Elsewhere he reported  nothing special. Both sides deadlocked from Arleux, south of  Monchy. The tremendous fighting of Saturday and Sunday  seemingly has brought about a  period of temporary abatement,  during which both sides are  hurrying up fresh troops and  materials for later on. Half of ail  munition workers in the Rhine  province of Germany joined the  general strike today. London  newspapers predict drastic alterations in the Admiralty submarine statements.  Dutch  Village Bombed  Amsterdam, May 2.���������Dutch  village of Zierikzee, near Belgian  frontier, was laid waste Sunday  night by bombs dropped from  aeroplane. Aviators nationality  and the reason for dropping death  dealing missels on neutral unprotected village has not been  established. There were five  casualties and more than three  hundred houses smashed.  National Guardsmen  May Train in Europe  Washington, May 2.���������Troops  may go to France soon. Former  premier Viviani urges uponRresi-  dent Wilson the expediency of  despatching Americans to the  front. Guardsmen may train in  European countries. France  could prepare men for war conditions very speedily.  Ship tonnage is falling off.  Lord Percy informed the American government that the losses  through submarines is appalling.  Combined maximum ship output  required, balancing factor may  be the tonnage that is available  in the United States.  Constantine Coming Round  Athens, May 2. ���������The Greek-  throne is tottering. French are  furious at the perfidious King  Constantine, who now appears  anxious to appease the Allies.  Ex-premier Venizelos speaks his  mind on pro-Germanism, he says  it is useless to exile evil officials  when  the royal   palace   houses  Germans.  Robert Grant is now nursing a  broken rib, the result of being  jammed against the side of the  stall by a frightened horse while  engaged in feeding the animal.  The tug Pronative, Capt. J. P.  Tate, of the Progressive S.S. Co.  Vancouver, came up last week  with a logging outfit to be operated on account of the Draney  Fisheries, Ltd., to log off some  timber lands that they have obtained from B. F. Jacobsen and  others on the south side of the  North Bentinek Arm. The superintendent of the operation is Mr.  E. Sande, who has been for  years connected with lumbering  in this province.  Mr. Fred Hendricks and his  fellow partners in the logging-  business on Dean Channel, after  spending a few days in town  have left for a prolonged stay at  their camp. This concern expects to have two million feet of  logs ready in booms by the first  of July.  Mr. A. R. Lord, inspector of  public schools for the northern  section of the province, visited  the valley on his annual tour of  inspection. Mr. Lord makes his  home in Prince Rupert.  Mr. Harry Hanson, the plumber, came south from Prince Rupert and is now engaged in looking over all damages done to  water pipes during the past severe winter. It is likely that'  Mr. Hanson will spend some time  in Bella Coola and vicinity work-  ink at his trade before returning  home.   The proverbial "spud" is still  moving, a considerable shipment  was taken away last week. This  will pretty nearly be all that will  be shipped out before seeding  is over, what is left over after  planting is done will be exported.  pleased with what he saw of this  section of British Columbia before returning sooth on the Friday night's steamer from .here.  The Courier is in receipt of a  letter from our former townsman  Frank G. Hagan, who is now  with the B'orestry Battalion doing his bit, somewhere in France.  Pte. Hagan's letter is very interesting in many respects, and it  is a mystery to us that this missive evaded the eagle eye of the  censor, who was described by  Pte. H. L. Harris a short time  ago as a person of "little sense  of humor."  The soldier observes that he  has seen a great deal of what is  going on, but what impresses  him the most is the great sacri-'  fices being made all round in order to win this war, more particularly the part women are playing for the good of the Empire.  He observes, "we are sending  out pine and oak timber in lots,  and one wonders where it ��������� all  goes and fdr what it is used, yet  the* cry is for more, and still  more." Pte. Hagan wifhes to  be remembered to all friends  and says there is no place like  Bella Coola, to which he hopes  to return when this awful war  is over.  Latest to hand is that,Pte. C.  Woods, who enlisted from here  lin the 102nd Battalion and now  S serving with his company in  j France, has been wounded.    The  parents of Pte. Woods are living  at Ocean Falls.  Manager J. B. Saint of the local  cannery made a trip to Hagensborg during the week to'consult  with the fishermen as to price of  fish and other matters pertaining  to this year's cannery operation.  The S. S. Camosun had quite  a passenger list and also heavy  shipment of freight for this|  port last week. Among the new!  arrivals were Mrs. E. Sande and  family. Mrs. Sande came up to  join her husband here.  Among the many that visited  here during the past two weeks  was Mr. E. Gardener Smith of  Duncans, B. C., appraiser of land  values under the agricultural  commission, who is making a tour  of this district during the month.  Mr. Smith took occasion to look  over the upper part of the valley  and went as far east as Atnarko.  He expresssed  himself   as well  Pte. B. M. Brynildsen writes  from Portage La Prairie that his  battalion is making ready toleave  for the Atlantic coast, and very  likely are now on the way to old  England. From the "Sniper;"  a publication of the 223rd, we  givs the following:  AS WE SAIL ACROSS  THE SEA.  We'll be going across the sea, Boys  Where the war boom loud is heard,  They'll remember the day that we  sailed awav,  We Boys of the Two Twenty Third.  We'll   be   Hitting  across   the foam  soon, Boys,  To realize hopes deferred,  And we'll light in our might for God  ami Right,  We Boys of the Two Twenty Third.  We'll be sailing across the ocean,  Boys,  We'll be sailing across the sea,  Ami many a proud mother's heart  beats high  For her boy in the Two Two Three.  There's many a proud mother's heart  beats high  As she thinks of you and me,        t  As the fov we defy, and we do or die,  We Boys of the'Two Two Three.' ;  WITH THE ALLIED  ARMIES  Dr. Joseph T. Mandy will exhibit  MOVING PICTURES OF THE WAR  in Bella Coola.    Date of arrival  to be announced later.  )'������������������  '���������������������������H  ���������?r"::  m  .#'! &?*  m.  l m  3*5S'������  u  m  jlivf*' E���������  Ki  Hfsj  :���������/&���������  K1 f S  life  K3&  ass  i ������ <  (Ij,    ,  1 5 J    *- -r J ->  J  IV.     *'      u    '  Pi  "*������.  ���������*    **   -*������-  BELLA COOLA CQ-URIEK  TheCourier  Published Weekly- at Bella Coola by  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Yea,  ^  6 Month.       ������'7S  3 Months    aS0  United Statei  1 Year..-. I....:....1.' $1-50  United Kingdom  1 Year :::.'..: 91-00  Subscription* payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please, notify the management  at once. Changes-in address should be  sent in as soon "as possible.  For Advertising" Rates,  : Office..  Apply at  To COBRBSPONDENTS-While anobjecnonaWe anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be eiven to the editor.  The Editor reserves the riscbt to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer s  risk.  Pallia jwpult auprwrm pat Iwe."  SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1917.'  rial government that-a substantial tonnage of suitable wooden  IUDuSn.u..-, ~     vessels could be obtained.    The  the Bella Coola "Publishing Co. Ltd.  Dominjon government, in order  " to assist the development of shipbuilding in Canada, has offered  to make a special loan (and the  offer has been accepted) to the  Imperial Munitions Board of ten  million dollars for this purpose.  Specifications and designs of the  type of wooden vessels are almost  complete and will be available as  a standard pattern of design.  There is no doubt that wood  bottoms could be made as cheap  and as well in Bella Coola as in  any other port on the coast if  only the financial assistance was  forthcoming, and it would, we  think, facilitate progress if the  work was distributed in places  suchasthisand not congested in  a prescribed area.  According to official statement  orders have been placed for steel  ships in Canada up to the full  limit of the steel plants available  for the'next fifteen months.  ooooo  On the Right Track.  Premier Brewster seems to be  on the right track. In delivering his'budget speech he had  this to say: "The government on  taking office decided that it  should conduct affairs as one who  has private business. "An effort  has been made to do this.. To  arrive at a report upon, our actual condition the government engaged a firm of international accountants beyond the reach' of  any political influence. I- feel  sure that the changes" in the system to be inaugurated and work-  ed out finally will save the people  of this province not thousands  of dollars but millions in. the  years to come."  ooooo  Hon. T. D. Pattullo, as minister of lands, has found that he  could savein his own department  5108,000; some saving that for  twelve months and yet it-is claimed that the efficiency of his department hasincreased one hundred fold. -Who is it that will  argue that it does -not pay to  change the office staff.  o_. ���������. o    o;' o    o  The money available for public  works in the northern districts  ^^^^-V^M-tt Afa, 5_ ,  A Sam Policy.  For the first time in years the  expenses of the province are to  be defrayed - by income. The  Brewster government has adopted the policy of, which any sane  *  businessman could not fail to do,  keeping the -expenditure within  the income.  Hon. H, C. Brewster, minister  of finance, in "delivering his budget speech placed the true condition of the province finances  before the people, and it is safe  to say that very few of the taxpayers had any idea that a condition'very nearly bordering on  bankruptcy was staring them in  the face.  Under the new order of things  there will be this ygar a saying  in all departments of $1,466,000.  * Taxation will be increased,  this, of' course; had ' to come;  owing to the practise in past  years of running the provincial  affairs on borrowed money. To  arrive at such a balance it was  necessary to decrease expenditures in the various departments  and seek increases in taxes  wherever possible, keeping in  view conditions as they are now  found to exist. Every right-  thinking person will approve  with the idea of extricating the  province out of the mire that it  baa been put into by unwise past  governments. Premier Brewster and his, government must  be congratulated on the stand  that they have taken in this all  important matter.  ooooo  Wood Bottoms,  Shipbuilding is all the go now  and British Columbia, with its  vast resources of suitable timber,  should materially benefit. Evidently there is going to be a  great boom in the building of  wooden ships, and there is no  reason why a number of these  vessels should not be built at  different points, operating sawmills, on this northern coast.  Bella Coola with its three sawmills and other facilities should  be able to do something as at the  present moment tonnage is as  important to the Allies as shells,  and we would be furnishing our  quota to the munitioning of the  Allied forces. The provincial  government has expressed its  willingness to give all facilites  in its power.  The question of developing  wood shipbuilding in Canada has  been under investigation and it  has been presented to the Impe-  year 1916. $17,820 was spent out  of last year's appropriation for  road superintendents.. This item  alone will- be more than cut in  two. Then another item "general", which may mean anything  from an anchor to a haystack, of  $12,500 is likely to be materially  reduced if not altogether cut out.  With all this considered, the  amount of money for roads will  be about the same as last year  although in the estimates the  total appears to'be-considerably  less. There is also in the appropriations the sum of $196,190 for  bridges, ferries, etc., and of  course the north country will  have something out of-this total.  ooooo  The new district engineer is  calling for applications from competent men that wants to be the  district road superintendent.  Evidently there is only one person wanted for this work now,  though we usually had them by  sixes and sevens -in the past.  Bella Coola is full of Conserva-  tive road bosses, and naturally  there will be a like number of  Liberals" that will come forward  and-claim thst they also are com-;  petent for this and that position.  We, of course, has not.seen any  one that has built any roads here  as yet. and from now on it must  be road builders and not the class  of men that spend their time in  building up this or that political  party that we Want placed in  charge of road construction, or  any other undertakings in the  public service. The people are  thoroughly "tired of the loafer  and the incompetent, from now  on it will be efficiency that is  demanded.  '-."���������' ooooo  A saving in public works this  One "'"of the many problems.tQ  be dealt^with by the new government on assuming office was how  best to overcome the require-  mentsof public works. The minister of public work has divided  the province up into districts,  each district to be in charge of a  qualified engineer, in an attempt  to obtain better service tfian in  the past.  ���������    o     o     o     o     o  Get Busy.  From time to time the press of  Canada has drawn the attention  of farmers to.the necessity of in-  creasing the acreage under cultivation, more, and more farm  produce is wanted. The Dominion government has done considerable advertising to arouse the  farmers to the necessity of gr.eat-  erproduction. In England there  is going on a great forward movement in tilling the soil. As a result of the government's appeal,  farmers are plowing up grass  land it is estimated that already  300,000 acres have been added to  the grain-growing area in England and Wales. The acreage in  Scotland has been increased by  50,000 and in Ireland by500,000.  The Courier again draws the  attention of the ranchers of  Bella Coola and Northern British  Columbia to the importance of  doing their "littlebit." '���������,  ... .  .. , >  for;the year 1917 will be $115,-| year will be effected to the ex-  300, as against $186,753 for the? tent of $1,220,000.  W. NEWTON  The ... Prince-...Rupert"' Empire  man, who. is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.        '  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these districts. '   -'  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY  ���������  Mackay  Smith, Biair & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER,  B. d  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S  FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE  OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  MADE   IN    B. C  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orden  PACIFIC MILK  it  Prepared from pure, lu-alihv,  fresh, cows milk: Nothing-  is added, only water is taken  away.  YOU'LL/LIKE PACIFIC  FOOD   PRODUCTS   CO., LTD., Manufacturers  Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.  ft.  !,*  C "1  i.  >.���������#  fA?3  i-i  m  The Finest  Wheat in  the World  ���������plusmillingskill���������plus milling experience���������plus-.modern mill plant  ���������plus many other important factors  and  you  have the answer���������  Royal Standard  Flour  ���������without a peer in the whole world.  ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR is born in Cana  Wheat Fields���������the best wheat producing ;  on earth.  The net result when*ROYAL STANDARD is us  Bread, Biscuits, Buns, etc., bigger in vol;;:  finer in texture���������greater in food value f-U  and whiter in body.  The trademark, the Circle V on the sack assmvs  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  v'.ian  amis  *-fiat   aner  YOU.  =s@  ������a  k *���������.'  Compare���������price for price���������  GREAT   WEST  TEA  with the tea you are now using.  It j>;Better.  LEESON^^ CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers *      Vancouver, B.C.  ���������St*.  '   14  &  0  o  0  HOE  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SKKVIfK  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.   "CamOSUn"   Leaves   Vancouver  every  Tuesday at 11 p.m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays a. m.  S.  S.   "COQUITLAM"   sails   from   Vancnnw���������-' ^  nightly, carrying Gasoline  and   Explosives,   v. .;i l'a  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  rates of Freights, Parca and other informatu-::.    Pi  Dffice, Carrall St., Vancouver; or ciko. M'  '���������  Por  Head Office^  agent,  1003 Government St., Victoria  :,,|y io  l-.C'iK,  hoe  ���������������������������m  i)M  'i  !  w  :>��������� c  Advertise your Wants in the Countf  ��������� r  [���������'  it  <  i  liJ  -....������������������mwKftflfll MBS���������  '9j;  Saturday, May 5, 1917  BELLA) COOLA COURiEft  (  m  6-1  ���������������  di  SgaS  m.  RCj  Should America Take Over  a Sector on West Front?  An American  correspondent,  writing from France, says that  the idea of an American army  taking over a sector of the western battlefront is absurd.    He  says that France is as full of  troops as it can stand, and that,  if Washington wants to help the  Entente,Powers   in   the   field,  ! that the only way to do so is to  despatch men across Siberia to  take over a part of the Russian  line.   Itris as well to remember  that it is an American correspondent to whom this breezy advice  to his own countrymen is credited; ������o if Col. Roosevelt wants to  take a division or even an army  corps of American Wideawakes  over to France, as he is reported  to be anxious to do, there is no  reason to believe that he would  not be  welcomed as  a gallant  comrade-in-arms on the western  battlefront, and initiated into the  latest wrinkles in the war game.  He will find, according to all accounts, ',.no less than fifty thousand Americans, first-rate fighting men, already at the front in  various branches of the service  with Cansdian, French and British battalions.  ooooo  Victory Over Wounds.  Canada should be as proud of  her wounded soldiers' victory  over their wounds as she is of  'tt^amar-iirrinn-utaaatmeau,  jaarawarcr'"*"���������"na���������a  m^fttryr'^ ,r~,*rnr",*,j"-Tt.Taa  the glorious fights in which they  fell. Their struggle up from the  depths of disablement is often  as hard, and,even as heroic, as  their desperate defense of Ypres  or their dashing capture of Vimy  ridge.  We hear little, altogether too  little, of these hard-won victories  won by disabled men, because  they are fought out in the seclusion of a hospital, not in the  theatre of war with the whole  world looking on. But such victories equally deserve public recognition. They show the same  spirit, the same pluck, and still  more indomitable perseverance.  A preacher in Vancouver on  Easter morning was thanked for  the inspiring sermon he had just  preached on the resurrection.  He said: "I had my text sitting  in front of me���������a man in khaki,  with an empty sleeve. He has  had two resurrections already.  He was buried by a shell explosion, and was dug out only just  in time to save his life.    That  FARM LANDS  Oregon & California Railroad Co.  Grant Lands.���������Title to same revested in United States by Act' of Congress dated June 9, 1916. Two million three hundred thousand acres to Le  opened for homesteads and sale. Timber and agricultural lands. Containing some of the best land left in the  United States. Now is the opportune  time. Large map showing lands by  sections and description of soil, climate, rainfall, elevations, etc. Postpaid One Dollar.  Grant Lands Locating Co., Box 6 10,  Portland, Oregon.  was the first. He spent months  in hospital, fighting his way  back to life. That was the second. Doctoring and nursing did  much for him; so did the exercises and occupations that they  provide nowadays- perhaps the  best part of the treatment; But  the man himself was working  out his own resurrection, by  resolutely putting his own willpower into the task. Now he  is almost ready to go out into the  world, a better and abler man,  he says, than he was before, in  spite of his lost arm. While the  rest of us are thinking of a resurrection beyond the grave, he  has won a,resurrection this side  of it, to a new life of activity  and independence among his fellow-countrymen."  Watch Repairs  Send your watch to us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.  A price (riven before proceeding with work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.  O. B. ALLAN  Diamond Merchant���������Optician  Granville and Pender,Vancouver, B.C.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  fOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ^ Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  . the Yukon Terkitgry, the North-west Terri-  ' Tories und in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may he leased for a term of  twenty-one yeara at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,5fX) acres will be leased  to one.app!icant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district iir which the rights applied for  are situated. *.-'  In surveyed territory the land muat be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for- shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if, the risrhts  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable out- .  put of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco"atinsr for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are,, not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  .considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N.B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������20690.  BUSINESS CARDS  o    c  30E  3!   IO  Fur Sales Agency  Wear the "Dayfoot"  Solid Leather  Shoe  MADE FOR B. C. WEATHER  G. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y 303 Mercantile Building  Georgetown, Ont. and        Vancouver, B. C.  Comfort and luxury assured at a  minimum cost. Many Prince Rupert testimonials prove its worth  Have You Got $20 ?  If not your credit is good  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented in Canada)  Installed in your kitchen range  will give you all the hot water  you.can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started. 121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  user a booster. You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  seen these results. $20.00 is the  Cost. Absolutely no charge, unless satisfactory.  A bath supply within twenty minutes  after fire is started and then a new supply eoery twenty minutes thereafter.  Wall radiators can also he run from  your hot water boiler and other rooms  heated rsilh no extra cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surpriie You  Investigate!  !  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage' of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will ad-'  vance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  O     C  301  51   IO  Reliable  jer  The joys   of  digging  in   the  garden���������  HALF the satisfaction in  gardening is in having  the proper tools.  And good ones at that.  We carry an excellent line of  spades, hoes, 8 shovels, rakes,  pruning knives in fact everything necessary to keep the  garden in first class condition.  REMINGTON  UMC  Sportsmen's  Headquarters  We carry the famous Remington  UMC Speed Shells-0Arrow"and' Nitro  Club"���������used by leading Sportsmen  everywhere. We also carry ail Kent-  ington UMC Arms and [Ammunition.  B* Brynildsen & Co.  ,i..x'<;Mp,iv   ';.'������������������ ������  ! Harry Hanson ^^H  P. O. Box 395  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  i I mrriTrarrr������������������"���������"-* "-'������������������"������������������  WATER NOTICE.  (Diversion and Use.)  HTake Notice that Frederick  Adolphus Futcher, whose address is Vancouver, British Columbia, will apply for a license  to take and use One hundred  (100) miners inches of water,  seventy-five (75) inches for power, and twenty-five (25) inches  for domestic purposes, out of  Nummamis River, which flows  in a southerly direction, and  drains into North Bentinek Arm,  about three miles from the head  of the said North Bentinek Ann,  the water will be diverted from  the stream at a point about half  a mile from its mouth, and will  be used for power and domestic  purposes upon the land described  as Lot Sixteen (16), Range Three  (3), Coast District, and for the  purpose of operating a cannery,  which it is proposed to erect on  the said lands. This notice wae  posted on the grounds on ths  17th day of March, 1917.  A copy of this notice and an  application pursuant thereto under the "Water Act, 1914," will  be filed in the office of the Water  Recorder, at Vancouver, British  Columbia. Objections to the application may be filed with the  said Water Recorder or with the  Comptroller of Water Rights,  Parliament Buildings, Victoria,  within thirty days after the first  appearance of'this Notice in a  local newspaper. The date of  the first application of this notice  is the 28th day of April, 1917.  Frederick Adolphus Futcher,  Applicant.  By Tapper & Bull (Solicitors),  His Agents.  Ap. 28-May 19.  WATER NOTICE  "Take Notice that George  S.  . McTavish, whose address is  733: Lampson Street, Victoria,  B. C, will apply for a license to  take and use 600 .cubic feet per  day of water out of an unnamed  creek, which flows into Victoria  Cove and drains into Rivers Inlet,  B. C, about three miles in a  westerly direction from Wannuck  River.- The water will be diverted from the stream at a point  about 1800 feet from the northwest corner post of Lot 1061 and  will be used for domestic and  cannery purposes upon the land  described as Lot 1061, Range 2,  Coast District. This notice was  posted on the ground on the 6th  day of April 1917.  A copy of this notice and an  application pursuant thereto and  to the "Water Act, 1914," will  be filed in the office of the Water  Recorder at Vancouver. Objections to the application may be  filed with the said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller  of Water Rights, Parliament  Buildings, Victoria, within 30  days, after the first appearance  of this notice in a local newspaper. The date of the first  publication of this notice is April  21st, 1917.  G. S. MCTAVISH, Applicant.  April 21--May 12.  I  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OP   COAST���������BANGE   III.  Take notice that 1, Frank Inrig, of  Wadhama, li. C, occupation cannery-  man, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  land:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Lot 1041 on Goose  Bay, Rivers Inlet, thence east^Ochams,  thence south 20 chains, thence west 20  chains to the shore, thence following  the shore line to the place of commencement.  FRANK INRIG.  Dated, March 28, 1917.      Ap. 7-J'ne 2  TheMason&> Risch Piano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to state wilh authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE/"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  IS  ������    Let us attend  your Victor Record  JJ   mail orders-���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  ^L7JWic^^.i^^.:":'.-.-"i:i;iit. ���������."���������;������������������v-  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  Onr Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Yiiar  $1.50  United Kincidom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  ���������" " '~" "v i in T't -T*a������r - f t *-��������������������������� ��������� ��������� ���������r" ~-    ' ���������   ���������' ���������--������������������-~-~~������������������������...  [=]||CD]i|CZ=l||C  \JL7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  Al/HAT person so independent?  "W/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  t >  rT'HE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ���������"��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B, C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. O   Tear out and mail todny, with amount of subscription encloted   - -  ii       i ��������� ���������   ���������        ���������      i      ���������    ���������      -      i ���������������������������-������������������ -i        - ���������    r"-1 rrTn- --rr  v'ii;;  .. /i    .1  y-   >l;S  M  dif'l m  M  A ISP  ilM  I III  K'ft  *   I  if, I  m  Em  nm  } i  |������fftj  life  -������ - -    "  ������H  18-rt .  hi    '1 ilJ'*-*  ���������<Bt    'i*   T.'.Tii   *   '  ii;  ftfe  &  i *   i  n '  )   i" '  't  -(rf  ?  ;  r i  ���������#������$������  ';.*!;������  BELLS COOLA  CO-URIErl  Subscribe  for the  ONESDOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coaft between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  It will be to your interest to keeP wett *n~  formed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  Advertisers-  Now is die time to keep  your l name . before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right,  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  U TOWN. Do ndt talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  Up and Doing.  One of the most pressing and  immediate problems is as to* the  best means of taking advantage  of    the   opportunity    accruing  through the war to consolidate  the purchase and sale, and establish the use of Canadian goods  by ^the Canadian people, and to  procure the new business offering in foreign countries.    Our  neighbors to the South of us, and  Canadians-in Eastern Canada,  are taking time by the forelock,  and have applied themselves to  this problem.  They have formed,  Export Associations with large  capital to exploit foreign markets.    They have formed in the  variops large towns of the Pacific  Coast, Commercial and Industrial  Associations   to   exploit the  home markets, and have organized subscriptions to a fund to be  used in placing before, the large  manufacturers of the world information as to-markets, rates,  power,   sites,   labor conditions,  etc., to induce them to open factories in the 'respective  towns  on the American Pacific Coast.  Other problems of great importance and magnitude, are  coming toward us. At the termination of the war there will  be a general influx of new settlers from Europe, and the return  of 370,000 soldiers for whom em-  ployment must be found. The  proper solution of our immediate  problem will assist in solving the  others. - -Increased production  "and markets for existing industries, the establishment of new  industries, the utilization of our  natural .resources, and settlement on-the land are the only  solutions.  " Peoplearebeginning-torealize  that mining and agriculture  should run hand in hand, and  that prosperity of the two are  morely closely interwoven than  is generally admitted. Where  mining has languished, tfie agricultural industry is depressed,  The C ourier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  un  30E  ei m  HTHE two principal reasons  1   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Burns;  BUTTER  BACON  HAMS  LARD  EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioners  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  since many of the small farmers  look to a local consumption free  from the peculiar transportation  problems of this province. If  mining operations are' good, the  settlers in the districts contiguous to the mines will have a market to hand for their produce.  Appropriate. ���������  The following true and appealing utterances by that chief  spokesman and guide of the Empire in the war, the Rt. Hon.  David Lloyd-George, are most  appropriate: "You cannot have  absolute equality of sacrifice in  war���������it is impossible���������but you  can have equal readiness of sacrifice from all. There are hundreds of thousands who have  given their lives; there are millions who have given up comfortable homes and exchanged them  for-daily communion with death.  Multitudes have given up those  they love best. Let the nation,  as a whole, place its comforts,  indulgences, and elegances on a  national altar,; consecrated ���������*by  such sacrifices as these men have  made. Let us proclaim during  the war a national Lent. The  nation will be the better for it  ���������stronger mentally, morally and  physically. It would strengthen  its fibre and ennoble its spirit."  COMPLEX.  MrsrWayupp: Where did Mrs.  De Style get her new hat?  Mrs. Blase: That's a problem.  She. boughf it with the money  which her'! husband borrowed  from herunele, who had won it  in a poker game from her brother, to whom she had loaned it  shortly after her mother had  taken it from her father's pockets and-given it to her fbr a  birthday present.  SUPERFLUOUS.  Dr. Wilse Robinson, of Kansas  City, declares that the trouble  with most of us is the lack of  "attentive control." The one  aim of-all true, education, says  Dr. Robinson, is to fix the attention on one thing, and then do it.  But why should anybody need  the power of attentive control  when everything is being done  for us? We no longer have to  think, because through a vast  number of mechanical appliances  everything is thought out for us.  We can buy any political opinion  we want 'at any newstand for  two cents. Our motor cars run  by touching a button. Our children are brought up before our  eyes by the movies the drama  and the dance halls. Our literature is rewritten by skilled  hands. Our religion is manufactured by a syndicate. We  are independent of that old fetish, "attentive control."  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  r  CLUB  OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  ^  The Courier  . $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  l. 50  $2.50  Both  papers  tor  $2.00  The Courier   .       .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  . $1.00  .   L50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .  .   $2.00  The Courier $1.00    R .i  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal . . 1.00   ,       P&PT, JL       tor   .   .   $1.75  $2.00  \>  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  =J  f^^v May, 5, /9/;  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COQLA IN I895  B.Brynildsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  Gen e f a r M e r c h a n cf i s e  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock-of Mens,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price.     Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������  fr  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mo������ suitable articles are kept at prices thai  invite competition.  Paints -   Oils  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock^  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B.BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  m  ',''/M  '��������� it tyi  '4i  ..Mnsowra

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