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Bella Coola Courier May 12, 1917

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 yi  '���������* ^  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  ���������������������������������|H>","������M*SI t fttmHUUiglfcui_muin)  WEATHER REPORT FOR APRIL  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 55.   Minimum, 32;  Highest Max. (27th)C9. Lowest Win. (,17th; 26  Rainfall, 1.68.  Rainfall for the year (191G) 40.89 inches.  ___  VOL. 5���������NO. 12  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  War News for the Week  Saturday: Petrograd-Virtuai armistice existirg along almost  , entire Russian front today. Not a shot been fired on Austrian  front for over a,month.' Been no real activity on the German  front, in many places Russian and German soldiers fraternizing,  meeting unharmed in no man's land.1' Open rupture between the  provisional government heads and workmen and soldiers. Tensity  of situation growing hourly. How seriously it threatens Russia's  future in the war is shown by the soldiers and workmen's counsel  formally declaring they would not approve of any loans to Russia  until fully informed of complete war aims of Entente Allies, and  all details of compacts entered into by the czar and Ins ministers.  Dramatic speech appealing to patriotism of workmen" and soldiers  delivered by Premier Miliukoff has sobering influence. Government will never consent to lone peace.  London--Another day closes with fierce, difficult fighting in'progress. At many points-British .succeeded splendidly in spite of  fresh German regiments and intense artillery fire. ' Most important gains of the day were the villages of Cheersyand Bullcourt.  At Fontaine les Croisilles British found it dffficult to get'forward  because of strength'of German defenses south of the village and  the barrage of heavy shell fire. 'Lens is three-fourths encircled  by today's fighting. British grip on the coal city now twists from  Loos to around Achevelle, Girenchy and Fresnoy.  , Paris-Further progress northeast of Rheims, the combat was  featured by violent cannonading.-  Copehagen-Emperor Karl of Austria, is anxious to drop out of  Wilhelm's game. Reports received here indicate grave dissension  betwen the two chiefs of the Central Powers. Trouble brewing  for Chancellor Hollweg in the reichstag. Conservatives inquire  if the annexation program is' to be abandoned. -.  " Washington-German Socialists in this country who attempt to  influence separate peace between, Russia and" Germany will be  dealt with"to the full extent of the American law if their acts be  proved. Congress attempts to speed up passage of war legislative  measures! wants to adjourn before end of May. Fight expected  over passage of food law. Prohibition of liquor may also become  centrS of debate. Four prominent railroad engineers will accompany J. F. Stevens, consulting engineer, one of the original engineers engaged in the Panama Canal construction, to Russia  shortly. 'Germany is turning out submarines at the rate of three  a week.   Jews are being slaughtered by Turks in" Palestine.  London-Fighting quiet on British front. Fighting in the air  resulted in our favor, five German machines being brought down  yesterday. General Smuts, commander of British forces in Africa,  believes peace will come before the winter. Asserts Germany i's  now defeated. Electricity may provide a solution of the food  problem! Recent experiments indicate that large crop increases  are to be obtained through new scientific methods. Cm-rent from  overhead wires sent into ground results are astonishing at the response from growing plants.  Rome-It is reported that the Austrians have been heavily defeated by the Italians on the Carso front. Heavy artillery fighting still going on.  Monday: Paris-French capture German positions on a front of  six kilometres, important strategical position forming plateau in  region of Cerny, En Lanenois and Carronne, besides four thousand prisoners, were taken. Intrepid troops surge through almost  insurmountable obstacles.- .Violent counter attacks were beaten  back and the assaulting waves of Germans everywhere were  broken. Last forty-eight hours the struggle has been most sanguinary since the battle of Marne. Deadly combat will continue  until decision is reached says commander. Germany seizes property  owned by French people. Recent Imperial decree orders liquidation of the property held by alien subjects,-step toward confiscation, action styled as a measure in reprisal.    ,  Tuesday: New York-Secretary of the naval committee declares  that several important-devices have been discovered. Great hopes  are entertained that Edison will produce an offensive weapon  which will be tremendously effective. Secretary Daniels is con.  fident that a way to stop the submarine activity will be found  shortly. It is announced that the latest American dreadnoughts  are to be equipped with special armor, it will require at least  three torpedoes to sink them.   New armor almost impregnable.  Persecution of the Jews continues. Turks pursue the Israelites  with merciless cruelty in driving them out of holy land.  -Paris-Allies greatest concerted'effort to stamp out the German  submarine menace is being planned with American naval officers.  American navy to play a great-part in organized co-ordinated plan.  Most vigorous anti-submarine campaign is'to be expected.  German Retirement From France  Forehadowed Unless Hindenburg  Puts a Stop to French Drive  Flower of Teuton Army Being Sacrificed���������Being Slaughtered Like Sheep  ���������Paris, May 8.���������German retire-  ment from France must' cptne  unless Hindenburgcansoon stop  the French drive. Today's fighting brought proof complete of  the necessity of such reh-eat by  German commander is foreshad^  owed in supreme efforts which  enemy is making to save Rheims  salient, Germanyls picked troops  being hurled into breach made  by the French. Flower of Teuton army which Von Hindenburg  was saving for final decisive offensive is now being sacrificed.  Entirely aside from Franco-British offensive between Aisne and  Lens, Germans are facing equal  menace in Champagne the French  offensive between Aisne and  Moronvilliers threatens to force  their evacuation of Rheims sali-  t      T I  ent, Mounts Brimont and Ber-  rauhd, forts Nogent, Labeuse  arid Vitry Les Rheims, which  constitute the keystone supporting the superstructure of entire  German front. Six thousand  prisoners taken yesterday. '.The  enemy are being slaughtered  like sheep. Twenty-nine thousand prisoners have been captured  by'Gen. Nivelle's forces since  April 16.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  When the 223rd, Battalion,  commanded by Lieut.-Col. H. M.  Hanson, passed'through Ottawa  it was .inspected by his excellency the Duke of Devonshire  and staff, as well'as represent-  tatives from the military headquarters in the capital. In this  battalion are "some of- the Bella  Coola boys and it is likely that  this regiment was one of the  western units mentioned in last  week's despatches as having ar-  arrived in England. There were  something like 1800 men that  left Winnipeg ���������t the same, time  and these evidently have crossed  the Atlantic in safety.-  Australians Force Big  Gap in Enemy Defenses  London, May 8.���������Continuous  German" counter attacks since  Saturday have, so far, failed to  shake' British grip, on .Hipden-  burg line around Bullcourt.. The  position has been improved and  prisoners taken. Gallant Australians force a big gap in defenses of the enemy, mile-thrust  achieved. Riencourt now hemr  med in on three sides.  Rationing to be compulsory in  Britain, but people to be given  until July to comply, with, the  mandate to conserve foods, the  ministry perfecting restrictions  machinery. Alfred Butt, theatrical magnate, becomes chief food  director under the new scheme.  Crop returns and imports will  have bearing on final result.  A German aeroplane dropped  bombs northeastern outskirts of  London, one person being killed  and two injured, slight damage  to buildings.     >.. '  Russia Seeks Peace  Petrograd, May 8. ��������� Russia  seeks peace without annexation  or any indemnities. Workmen  and solders' delegates declare  Russia does not aim to dominate  other nations or deprive them of  national patrimony, but desires  to establish durable peace on the  basis of the rights of nations to  decide their own destiny. "Extraordinary session of Duma to  be convened; immediately.   ;  Melbourne, May 8.���������Hughes'  party victorious. Early returns  indicate that ; Premier, Hughes  controls the lower house. Constitution of Senate usettled.  Paris, 'May 8.���������French ambassador expresses regret to Switzerland for the  attack  made' by  U.S. Will Call Single  I and Independent  Married Men Up First  '���������C .     ������������������   Washington,- May 8.- Single  arid independent married men to  be first" called- up by- selective  system;  United States turned over today an additional loan of twenty-  five million dollars to England.  . Nine regiments expect to go  to France soon.  Riots in Germany  Amsterdam, May 8. ��������� Grave  riots are reported throughout  Germany. It is stated that hundreds took part in demonstrations  because, of scarcity of food.  Number of shops were looted and  many 'persons were killed and  wounded.in the different sections;   .  The cannery tender "Chuck-  walla" has made two trips here  bringing up empty salmon tins  from the can factory at Wad-  hams. This new power boat is  one of the latest from the Vancouver shipyards and was built  for the British Columbia Packers' Association, who are also the  owners of the local cannery.  " The Chuck'wafla is 76 feet'long,  over all, with 1G ft. beam and a  draught of 7 ft. when loaded.'  The engine is of 100 horsepower,  four cycle and of the Imperial  make, designed to burn heavy  fueLoils. Freight hold is especially arranged for' the carrying of fresh salmon collected  from the different fishing camps  for the company's plants at Rivers Inlet, and will operate from  Wadhams cannery during the  coming season.  and installing new.  A large pack of salmon is what  is uppermost in the minds of all  those connected with theofishing  industry on this coast.  Rev. W. H. Gibson left during  the week for Ocean Falls. After visiting his daughter, Mrs. J.  R. Morrison, there for a few  days will go on to Victoria to attend the Methodist annual conference before returning home.  He expects to be away a month  or six weeks. :  -  Mr. L. Richardson, fire adjus-  tor, came up on the Camosun to  look into the matter of loss  caused by the fire which destroyed Mr. O. J. Lokkons house at  Saloomt last month. Mr. Richardson Jeft for Ocean Falls on  Sunday and will take steamer  from there south.  -Peking, May-8.���������China's tea  trade has, been greatly affected  by the submarine campaign of  Germany.  Empire Pay Celebration  , The program for Empire,Day  celebration,' May 24lh, is now in  the course of preparation.  The Red Cross committee hope  to do as well, if not better, than  at last year's celebration when  something like two hundred  dollars were realized by the sale  of.food and other articles.  It js expected that quite a  number of people from outside  points will visit Bella Coola for  Empire Day besides those who  have made a practise of partaking in this annual  celebration  h'erijiduring the past decade.  .. ffi?- ,���������";,[_; r-v>; ���������'   ��������� ���������' ���������������������������'���������  ':v-:     ;: ,���������  ���������vC  ?Dr. Sutherland and Mrs. H. G.  Anderson are having a  'Progressive Whist Party  French aviator on the town of at their home on Saturday/May  Porrentrui.  "Ottawa, May 8���������Hull goes dry-  by one thousand majority.^  12th, at 7:30 p. m. Everyone is  cordially invited. ' Red Cross collection.   25c. and upwards.  Mr. G. T. McAnn of Vancouver, was in tpwn last-week representing his firm, the Leeson,  Dickie, Gross Company, wholesale grocers of Vancouver."-'Mr.  McAnn informs us that he finds  business satisfactory throughout  this territory, although this is  his first visit to this section of  the coast he is very favorably  impressed with the outlook for a  good season.  Latest from Kimsquit is that  at the two fishing establishments  all hands are busy getting the  plants in shape for the season's  operations. There is a likelihood  that actual fishing may start a  little earlier this year than has  been the pratise in the. past.  Manager Chas. Dr'aney is doing  some remodelling of the old'plant  and.is installing new machinery  for the more efficient handling  of the salmon pack.: At' the  Manitou there is considerable  throwing out of old machinery  The tug Quinitsa. Capt. H. B.  Babbington, from Ocean Falls,  called here during the wctk at.d  brought up. a scow for the removing of Mr. F. A.'Johnson and  his logging crew to Nootum Bay*,  where Mr. Johnson is operating  a logging camp: . Considerable  lumber was also taken away to  be used in the construction of  the necessary buildings.  The last month was the dryest  known here for many years. The  actual record shows that only  1.68 inches of rain fell during  the month. < The rainfall for  April, 1912, was 2.38, and for  1913,2.64. The same month in  1914-15, we had 2.85 and 2.43 re-  0  spectively, while 1916 totalled  2.55 inches. The total rainfall  for Bella Coola during the year  1915 was 34.33 inches. Last year  was a wet orfe for this district,  the weatherman claiming we had  40.89 inches. Showers have been  plentiful on the coast, Vancouver  complains of "having had 8.20 in.,  the heaviest for the month of  April since the year 1907, when  4.13 inches fell in that city.  Mr. E. Gyllenspitz is now  down from Towdistan where he  has had some of his horses wintering. He reports the snow all  gone in that part of the interior,  feed for cattle is now plentiful.  9C>-<*>-"'V<-J������">^<_0 ���������<^tT>r<W><,%9  (ttlturrlj Nflttre  ��������� 3  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  '., ...���������   Preacher: '������������������  Rev. Hans Sageng, A. B.  All Are Welcome.   V  r  ;_  ��������� _s> <JKML>^M.>0>~<_������0'<_>0*^' a  T forget to bring in your Subscription  to the Courier-���������-The more support yoii  give us, the better paper we will give you. BELLS COOLA COURIER  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada"  1 Year $1-00  6 Month.       0.75  3 Month.  0.50  United State.  1 Year $150  United Kingdom  1 Year $100  Subscription, payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the, management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon' as possible.  For Advertising  Rates,  Office.  Ari'LY at  To Correspondents��������� While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be (riven to the editor.  The Editor reserves the riffht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  '^alitfl jinuuli flttpr.ma rat l.x."  SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1917.  Horse Famine Is Coming.  ��������� At least over two million horses  and mules have gone to Europe  from the United States and are  being destroyed.in vast numbers.  The war is not over, and horses  are still being shipped. When  the warends every country across  the sea will need horses to work  its farms and replenish its depleted breeding stock. With our  surplus gone, American breeders  asleep at the switch, and the  States enormous consumption of  horses for farm and city going  steadily on, a horse famine is  sure to ensue.  * At the beginning of the war  the French had   about 525,000  horses, and the Germans approximately 720,000.   The Allies, of  course,  have   been  purchasing  horses in the United States and  Canada continuous.   The supply  used by Germany coming mostly  from Austria-Hungary, Norway  and ^Sweden.   The French government has paid to exporters  through New   York   for these  animals   since   October,   1914,  something like 380 million dollars.   The United States still has  . a supply of good horses left���������  not the cavalry kind, but for  field and heavy artillery purposes.   America goinginto the war  will naturally have a dampening  effect on the exportation of horses from the States.   ~~  We in British Columbia have  the best horse country on ��������� the  American continent,-the whole  of the Cariboo-Chilcoten country  has hundreds of miles of range  that is now infested with wild  horses that are comparatively of  no value. In'the region of Ana-  ham Lake there are at present  something like six hundred cay-  uses running over that section,  and there is room for that many  thousands. If this war goes on  much longer it is probably there  will be a world-wide shortage of  horses, yet in British Columbia,  with its many advantages, there  is no attempt being made to  breed horses that will be suitable  for either military or farm use.  The people of this province  have been given to go in the  past to the government for assistance in everything' that they  have lost initiative, but we suggest to those interested in breeding horses to make a thorough  inquiry into the possibility of  using this vast northern country  for this purpose. The world supply of these much needed ani  mals is getting le=  dav of the war.  with every  Hon. Duncan Marshall, Minister of Agriculture in the Alberta  government, told the farmers of  that province that his government intended to make Alberta  the greatest live stock province  in the Dominion.  o    o     o     o     o  The Submarine Campaign.  Despite the fact that the food  situation in Great Britain is becoming alarming through the  sinking of merchant ships, can  the German submarine campaign  (of sinking anything from hospital ships to fishing boats) in any  way be called a success? We  think not when "one remembers  that Britain cannot send one  ounce of food to her armies in  France but by sea. She cannot  forward a single unit of reinforcement except by sea. She  cannot receive the aid of a single  man from Canada. Australia or  India except by sea. She could  not have stayed in this war three  months if Germany had been able  by means "of submarines to prevent her transporting troops and  military supplies by water. She  probably could not remain in the  war three months longer if Germany could cut off this military  transport now. Anything approaching a blockade of Britain  would cut off this-military use of  the sea, and there would not be  the slightest need for encroaching on a single neutral right. If  however,, Germany cannot prevent Great Britain from using  the sea to, reinforce and supply  her armies, if she cannot even  prevent Great Britain from closing access to Germany by sea,  what possibility can there be of  forcing Britain to terms by sinking neutral or even enemy merchant ships?  o    o    o     o    o  Reinstating Poll Tax.  The government has decided  that it is wise that all and sundry  shall help in carrying the financial burden of the province.  Sir Richard McBride, along  with pal Mr. Bowser, saw a great  opportunity in getting votes by  taking off the poll tax some years  ago, and the Chinaman, Japan-  anese, Austrians, Hindus, were  all relieved of taxation  HAS BEEN  CANADA'S  FAVORITE  YEAST FOI  MORETHAN  30 YEARS  Mlffi  ^HAKt PERFECT;,  |^BRWC>^0  MADE IN CANADA [  TOROrfro.0^1  Sfica  was saddled on to the already  overburdened taxpayer to carry  the whole load. The poll tax  which the government intends  to levy from now on will be $5  instead of the $3 at the time of  its abolition.  Persons who pay no, municipal  or provincial taxes amounting to  five dollars will now be required  to pay poll tax. The lax is designed to catch the foreigner  who makes his money here but  has no stake.in the country,  though he has all the privileges  as the person who is a heavy taxpayer in the province.    -  o    o    o    o     o ,  Clear Them Out.  . J. S. Cowper, the sixth Liberal  member of Vancouver, told the  House some time ago that he  knew of the Hon. M. A. Ma~c-  donald,  attorney-general,   had  obtained money from some railroad company for campaign purposes during the.past election.  Sometimes Mr. Cowper'says it is  $25,000 and at other times lesser  amounts, according to the humor  he is in, but now his honor "Justice Gregory, is inquiring into  this matter and it will be interesting for the public.to  know  where this money came irom and  who was handling it.     ���������    ���������  .' Large cities are a curse to any  state or province, and it is.in  these as a rule that political rot-  teness flourishes.   It is however  to be hoped that there will be  an end put to this political corruption within our province.    If  it be proven that the attorney-  general had the handling of this  money he should go, and if it be  proven   that   Mr.  Cowper. ��������� has  made charges that are not substantiated by facts then it is the  duty of ,the legislature to rid it-  make unfounded statement's. It  is not elevating to visit our legis  lative gallery and listen to a member ' blackguard another across  the floor of the chamber. It is  high time that persons who indulge in that class of oratory  are cleaned out of our legislative  hall.  o    o     o    o    o  The Farmer Gets It.  Flour sells here for four dollars the 49-pound bag, or $16 per  barrel. The price may be $5 per  bag next week. Three years ago  Hour was selling at $1.65 per bag.  A statement published states  that it costs no more to produce  Hour now than before the war  may be partly correct, but it is a  mistake to say that difference  does not go to the chief producer.  In April, 1914, the price of wheat  in Vancouver was 90 to 96 cents.  The Winnipeg price for the highest grade was 91 cents,, and the  prairie farmer was selling for 80  to 90 cents, according to his lo-  cality. Prices in Winnipeg today for the same, grade is $2.45  per bushel, or nearly three times  the price before the' war. The  farmers who have tens of millions of, bushels in their hands, or  unsold in the elevators, are selling for $2.30 to $2.50 per bushel.  The farmer   who  grows  this  S. M. NEWTON  The ��������� Prince Rupert Empire  man, who i*s a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, hestands  for what will benefit these dis-  and it'self of the class of men who'tricts.    .  Saturday, May 12,  t9>7  ������������������_WM���������___MM_������__MB_������������������������������������������������������������������������~~���������B_������������������������1  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  WhoiesaSe  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,  PANTS,  OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  'MADE    IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Order*  wheat is a working man. He  ploughs and sows; he harvests  and threshes the grain, and four-  fifiHirof "tlre~presen t price of a  bag of flour is the price at the  farmers' elevators of the wheat  from which it is made.  "He's Surely Robbed the  Peepul."  If you build a line of railway  over hills and barren lands, giving, lucrative employment to  about a million hands; if you  cause a score of cities by your  in the home has no  terrors for the cook  who uses  ROYAL  STANDARD is scientifically"  perfect..  It is made from No. 1 Canadian Hard  Wheat ��������� pure ��������� strong ��������� cream ��������� white���������  thoroughly dependable ���������never changes.  Our own daily laboratory tests guarantee absolute uniformity:  Get it at your grocers ���������look for the  Circle "V" trade mark on every sack;  Milled in British Columbia  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  m  Let the Tea Pot tell you  GREAT  WEST  TF"*   ii  fc_*/\-  Is Better.  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B.C  IOE  HOE  _]___  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  ���������   BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      C&IHOSiin      Leaves Vancouver every  Tuesday at 11 p.m.       (Victoria day previous;)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays a.m.  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly-,: carrying Gasoline andl Explosives, ; will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.   ���������  For rates of Freights! Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, CarrajLL St., Vancouver ; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.   ,  Q  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY  LA  _____A#fc&fe_A  ������:& 11  'Saturday; May 12,  1917  BELLAJ COOLA COURIER  right of way to rise, where there  formerly was nothing but some  rattlesnakes and flies; if when  -bringing kale to others you acquire,a little kale, then you've  surely robbed the peepul and  you ought to be in jail.    If by  planning and by toiling you have  won some wealth and fame, it  will make no odds how squarely  you have played your little game;  your success is proof sufficient  that you are a public foe, you're  a soulless   malefactor,  to   the  dump you ought to go; it's a  crime for you to prosper where  so many others  fail;  you have  surely robbed the peepul ari_ you  ought to be in jail.,  Be a chronic  politician,   deal  in superheated  air; roast the banks and money  barons, there is always safety  there; but to sound the note of  business is a crime so mean and  base that the fellow guilty of it  should  go   and  hide   his  face;  change the builder's song, triumphant, for a politician's wail, or  we'll think you've robbed the  peepul, and we'll pack you off to  jail.  Walt Mason must have studied  most of the communities, not  forgetting the Bella Coola Valley,  as it is,nearly the way that most  people feel if someone attempts  to do anything.  FOR SALE.  Eighty per cent of the world's  supply of nickel is produced in  Canada.  FARM LANDS  Oregon & California Railroad Co.  Gran. (Lands.���������Title to same revested in United States by Act of Congress dated June 9, 1916. Two million three hundred thousand acres to be  opened for homesteads and sale. Timber and agricultural lands. Containing some of the best land left in the  United States. Now is the opportune  time. Large map showing lands by  sections and description of soil, climate, rainfall, elevations, etc.     Post-  ., paid One Dollar.  Grant Lands Locating Co., Box 610,  Portland, Oregon.  PACIFIC MILK  Should be. used for coffee,  tea, pudding, whipped cream  and all cereals..  YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC",  FOOD PRODUCTS  CO., LTD., Manufacturers  Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.     ��������� '  Wear the "Dayfoot"  Solid Leather  Shoe  MADE FOR B.C. WEATHER  G. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y 303 Mercantile Building  Georgetown, Ont. and        Vancouver, B. C. I  The joys of digging in the  garden���������  ALF the satisfaction in  gardening is in   having  the proper tools.  And good ones at that  We carry an excellent line of  spades,  hoes,   shovels,   rakes,.  pruning knives���������in fact everything   necessary  to  keep the  garden in first class condition,  ortsmen's  REMINGTON  "������,?!,������?  We carry the   famous Remington  Oub^-~t used hy leading Sportsmess  everywhere. We also carry all Re___������  ington UMG Arms and [Ammunition.  B. Brynildsen & Co.  Saw Mill and Lumber Men,  attention. I have for sale a  small saw mill and logging  equipment, as follows:  One Robbtublar boiler, 125 lbs. pressure.  1 H. S. & G. engine,. 12 x 16 inches.  1       " " 9x12 inches.  1 North West planer and matcher.  1 Three saw eager and 1 husk frame.  Equipment for saw carraige.  Bearing blocks for shafting.  Logging equipment and camping outfit.  Great quantity shafting,, belting, pulleys, 2 saws, hu3k frame, and carriage  One other planer.  A quantity of mill and logging tools and  accessories.  Plant Recently Closed Down.  Situated at DEERHOLME, near Duncan, Vancouver Island.  There is plenty of good timber close  to this mill which can be secured at a  low price and favorable terms. There  is also about 90 acres of land and timber or. which mill stands which is offered at a sacrifice. Mill site can be rented  very nominally for long term, renewable. Canadian Northern right of way  passes within a few feet of the mill.  I am open to receive bids for this lot  of equipmentand the privileges attached thereto.    Will sell at low price.  THOMAS PLIMLEY, Victoria, B.C.  Watch Repairs  Send your watch to us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.  A price given before proceeding wj^i work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.'  O. B. ALL'AN  Diamond Merchant���������Optician  Granville and Pender,Vancouver.B.C.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  fOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominioo, in  *������������������������ Manitoba, Saskatchewan and*A_B_RTA,  the Y ukon Territory, the North-west Tebri-  . TOBIES Etna in a portion of the PROVINCE of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of tl an  acre.'-Not more than 2.5W) acres wili be leased-  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sec-,  tions, and in uns-rveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  - himself.  , Each application must be'accompanied by a  ..fee of S5 which will be refunded if, the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be (.aid on the merchantable out-  . put of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accenting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon.   If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a your.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the, lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.    .  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the ���������  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W.. W.CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  Hi  non  _������    o  Fur Sales Agency  Comfort and luxury assured at a  minimum cost. Many Prince Rupert testimonials prove its worth  Have You Got $20 ?  If not your credit is'good .  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented in Canada)  Installed in your kitchen range  , will give' you all the hot water  , you can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started.    121 now in  use in1 Prince Rupert and every ���������  user a booster.    You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  1 seen these results. - $20.00 is,the  Cost. " Absolutely no charge unless satisfactory.  A bath supply within twenty minutes  after fire is started and then a new supply eoery twenty minutes thereafter.  ���������  Wall radiators' can also be run from  your hot water boiler and other rooms  heated Kith no extra'cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surprise You  Investigate!  . Harry Hanson ^^j,'^'0  P. 0. Box 395    ., '    "  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  600 dealers' and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage" of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual1 house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FJUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST.  , VANCOUVER,  B.C.  lol. \r -  foi >  I loi  t^  WATER NOTICE.  3H3_  (Diversion and Use.)  Xake . Notice that Frederick  *��������� Adolphus Futcher, whose address is Vancouver, British-Columbia, will apply for a license  to take and use One hundred  (100) miners inches of water,  seventy-five (75) inches for power, and twenty-five (25) inches  for domestic purposes, out 'of  Nummamis River, which flows  in a' southerly direction, and  drains into North Bentinek Arm,  about three miles from the head  of the said North Bentinek Arm,  the water will be diverted from  the stream at a point about half  a mile from its mouth, and will  be used for power and domestic  purposes upon the land described  as Lot Sixteen (16), Range Three  (3), Coast District, and for the  purpose of operating a cannery,  which it is proposed to erect on  the said lands. This notice was  posted on the grounds on the  17th day of March, 1917.     -  A copy of this notice and an  application pursuant thereto under the "Water Act, 1914," will  be filed in the office of the Water  Recorder, at Vancouver, British  Columbia. Objections totheapplication may be filed with the  said. Water Recorder or with the  Comptroller of Water Rights,  Parliament, Buildings, Victoria,  .within thirty days after the first  appearance of this" Notice in a  local newspaper. The date of  the first application of this notice  is the 28th day of April, 1917.  Frederick Adolphus Futcher,  Applicant.  By Tupper & Bull (Solicitors),  "   '     ' - His Agents.  Ap. 28-May 19.  WATER NOTICE  "Take Notice that George S.,  A:;McTavish, whose address is  733  Lampson Street,  Victoria,  B.C., will.apply for a license to  take and use 600 cubic feet per  day of water out of an unnamed  creek, which flows into Victoria  Cove and drains into-Rivers Inlet,  B. C,  about three miles in a  westerly direction from Wannuck  River.   The water will be diverted from the stream at a "point  .about 1800 feet from the northwest corner post of Lot 1061 and  will be used for domestic and  cannery purposes-upon the land  described as Lot 1061, Range 2,  Coast District.   This notice was  posted on the ground on the 6th  day of. April 1917.  A copy of this .notice and an  application pursuant thereto and  to the "Water Act, 1914," will  be filed in the office of the Water  Recorder at Vancouver. Objections to the application may be  filed with the said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller  of. Water Rights, Parliament  Buildings, Victoria, within 30  days after the first appearance  of this notice in a local newspaper. The date, pf the first  publication of this notice is April  21st 1917.  G. S. McTAVISH, Applicant.  April 21-May 1_.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������ZsAHOS   III.  Take notice that I,  Frank Inrig, of  Wadhams, B. C, occupation cannery-  occupation  ?  the following" described  man,  intend to  apply" for   permission   ollc   to   purchase  land:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Lot 1041 on Goose  Bay, Rivers Inlet, thence east20 chains,  whence south 20 chains, thence west 20  chains to the shore, thence following  the shore line to the place of commencement.  FRANK INRIG.  Dated, March 28, 1917.     Ap. 7--J'ne 2  iheLyiason & Fxisch Piano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to slate with authority:  "NO FINER  PIANO MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  S2������  ������fj Let us attend your Victor Record  jl mail orders��������� our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  ;t ���������.���������...;}������/:  ���������"st-������������������������������������*���������������������������.#������������������;.. ,���������������������������'���������'���������:;: CANADA. ���������'.���������:��������� -^ ���������.;.'��������� ���������  v, One .Year-. ... .���������................. ;$1.00  . Six Months ��������� 0.75  f: Three. Months .;  0,50  ?:-'���������'     UNITED STATES.     <<  :    One Year.....;...........;...:.;$!.50  .:���������'.-���������  United Kingdom and the Continent.  'V. One Year.  .$1.00  r_z_  ������  \J&7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  11/HAT person so independent ?  IS/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent,  they are strangers to hard times.  (r������*(_'   __���������!.      i1    * _& ^-        >-f    '_ ���������?#_���������!_.._       *     _M_'Jw .   \i        ll.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  .A t 1  '"THE REASONS' for this enviable condi-  ���������*���������   tion of affairs are  obvious to anyone'  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation.    The climate is mild and enjoyable;-long warm summers  with  sufficient  ' rainfall and .mild winters make  for excellent; crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops k are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was, established at the Prince  ���������Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Cooja Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  |ELLA COOLA and the, surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  CZ3  @  c__>  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  ; subscription  :t ���������  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C. .  Enclosed please find..: .'.'.'���������:......  for Bella Coola Courier for..........  Name........................... .'���������'.  .    i p. o.;..............;.......:.  Tear, out and mail toddy, with amount of subscription enclosed BELtA COOL/A COURIER  Saturday, May 12,  \9\7  E_KdM-_n_ae_s  ������  s  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert..  A distance of six hundred miles.  . It will be to your interest to keeP WQtt m~  formed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity or increased  sales that public advertising brings. <���������'  Not Yet Awake to the War.  We are well aware that too  many do not realize the war, but  have the feeling that no matter  what happens-in Europe Canada  will be all right. They feel that  this country has done well in the  war, vastly more than anybody  either here or in England ever  imagined this country could do.  That is true. But it is necessary  to remember that this is true,  not of us alone, but of Australia,  New Zealand, England, Ireland,  Scotland and Wales. They, too,  have done vastly more that any  man living had ever imagined  would be possible-Daily Star.  " Canada is eighteen times larger than Germany. It has 111,-  992. more square miles than the  whole of the United States, including Alaska, and it constitutes one-third of the area of the  British Empire.  HE WAS PREPARED.  The minister came to Jansen's  house one afternoon to a christening party; he was to christen  Jansen's little son, John, Jr.  "Jansen," said the minister  solemnly, taking his host aside  before the ceremony, "Jansen,  are you prepared fortius solemn  event?"  "Oh, yes indeed, sir," Jansen  beamed. ."I've got two hams,  three gallons of, ice cream, pick-  ,les, cake���������"  "No, no," said the minister  with an indulgent smile. "No,  no, my friend, I mean spiritually  prepared."  "Well. I guess yes! Two demijohns of whiskey and three cases  of beer!" cried Jansen; triumphantly. '���������"  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country! The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  "Am I good enough for you?"  sighed the fond lover.'"  "No," the candid girl replied,  "you're not; but you're too good  for any other girl."  You can never help others by  climbing onto the hill of self-  righteousness.  iK-tft-MMWM-riMW  Cost of Bad Roads.  A company in Stanislaus county, California, thatbuysskimmed  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  ������ TOWN. Do not talk-support home industries ���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B.  ID H  non  _3 _H  "THE two principal reasons  1 why you should buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND-  .. They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  milk from the farmer has demonstrated to the rural residents in  an emphatic manner the- value  of good roads to them. ��������� This  company sends trucks'directly to  the farms to collect the skimmed  milk, but it pays higjier -prices  to farmers living on good roads  than on bad roads.' On poor roads  the company pays 17 1-2 cents  per 100 pounds, but on good  roads it pays 20 cents. Of course  the farmer always has been paying this tax on every hundred  pounds he hauled on baa\rdads  and he has been relieved of-it'on  every hundred pounds he had  hauled over good roads, but lhat  fact has not been brought to his  notice as in the case cited. When  he measures his distance from  town in minutes instead of miles  he will realize the profit of good  roads.���������American Lumberman.  HOW TO FIGHT SOW THISTLE.  In fighting sow thistle we must  recognize that this weed spreads  from both seeds and roots. We  must therefore, prevent the plant  from producing seed, kill the  perennial root stalk and sow absolutely clean seed grain if'we  are to control this terrible pest.  Various methods ofattack have  been advocated such as crowding  out the weed by a persistent pe  rennial, smothering the plant  with tar paper, straw, manure,  or by a quickly growing crop,  or by starving the plant by preventing it from forming green  leaves., The crowding out method often fails because the thistle  proves to be more persistent than  the crop employed to displace it.  The smothering plan succeeds  on small patches, but it is not  practicable.on large areas. Many  authorities advocate the,starvation plan or summerfallow as by  far the best for eradicating this  troublesome weed.  ��������� Plough'sjx to eight inches deep  in the autumn, but if pressureof  work prevents autumn ploughing,  the"n plough the same depth  about the middle of June. After  a few days begin the use of the  duckfoot cultivator crosswise on  the land, and repeat whenever  the tiniest shoots are; ready to  show, until the land, freezes in  autum. Where the soil is loose  loam the land may not need to  be ploughed and the cultivator  can be used from the start.  Never allow the thistle to show  a.leaf above the ground and by  autumn it will be killed. -The  cultivation must be thorough. '  Manhood is one thing that cannot be preserved in alcohol.  _&.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  t  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioner*  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  CLUB OFFER  5S%  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at,  substantially reduced rates?  The Courier  ; $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg 1.50  ���������      $2.50  Both papers  or  $2.00  The Courier   .       . ,   ,.���������  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  . $1.00  $2.50,  Both papers  for  $2.00  J^tViV.     V    ',    ���������$L00    Both papers  Family Heiald &;Weekly Star, Montreal . .1.00   | $175  ' ;'���������;���������" . . $2.00'." *.'��������� '���������  %=  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  j  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA,. COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COQK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing; Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    &  Settlers, Prospedtors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock!5 Nothing but-the mo_t suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition. ,  in.s - Oils - Varnishes  - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.   Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B.BRYNILDSEN& CO., BELLA C00LA, B.C. m������  ������*w  ������m  i:  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR APRIL  Compiled  by Mr. C.  H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature .-Maximum, 55.    Minimum, 32.  Highest Max. (27th) 69. Lowest Min. U7th) 26  Rainfall, 1.68.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  JuL  K  VOL. 5���������NO, 22  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  1  War News for the Week  |m  "���������;r-'-V.'--;' '������r.  m  _������������������*���������*  |0  m  mi  RJTpJ  .3  <M  Saturday: Petrograd-Virtual armistice existirg along almost  [entire Russian front today. Not a shot been fired on Austrian  [front for over a month. Been no real activity on the German  [front, in many places Russian and German soldiers fraternizing,  beeting unharmed in no man's land.' Open rupture between the  roviaional government heads and workmen and soldiers. Tensity  f situation growing hourly. How seriously it threatens Russia's  ffuture in the war is shown by the soldiers and workmen's counsel  ormally declaring they would not approve of any loans to Russia  ,_ntil fully informed of complete war aims of Entente Allies, and  [all details of compacts entered into by the czar and his ministers.  [Dramatic speech appealing to patriotism of workmen and soldiers  [delivered; by Premier Miliukoff has sobering influence. Govern-  ent will never consent to lone peace. ���������  London--Another day closes with fierce, difficult fighting in process.   At many points British succeeded splendidly in spite of  _resh German regiments and intense artillery fire.    Most import-  [ant gains of the day were the villages of Cheersy and Bullcourt.  _t Fontaine les Croisilles British found it difficult to get forward  .ecause of strength of German defenses south of the village and  he barrage of heavy shell fire.   Lens is three-fourths encircled  [by today's, fighting.    British grip on the coal city now twists from  loos to around AchevelJe, Girenchy and Fresnoy.  Paris-Further progress northeast of Rheims, the combat was  ffeatured by violent cannonading.  Copehagen-Emperor Karl of Austria, is anxious to drop out of  ilhelm's game.    Reports received here indicate grave dissension  [betwen the two.chiefs of the Central Powers.   Trouble brewing  'or Chancellor Hollweg in the reichstag.    Conservatives inquire  f the annexation program is to be abandoned. .  Washington-German Socialists in this country who attempt to  , nfluence separate peace between Russia and Germany will be  Idealt witlvto the full extent of the American law if their acts be  s ----- ������������������������������������ -        -    -  roved. Congress attempts to speed up passage of war legislative  easures, wants to adjourn before end of May. Fight expected  ver passage of food law. Prohibition of liquor may also become  [centrfof debate. Four prominent railroad engineers will accom-  any J. F. Stevens, consulting engineer, one of the original engineers engaged in the Panama Canal construction, to Russia  hortly. Germany is turning out submarines at the rate of three  a week. Jews are being slaughtered by Turks in Palestine.  London-Fighting quiet on British front. Fighting in the air  esulted in our favor, five German machines being brought down  [yesterday. General Smuts, commander of British forces in Africa,  ciieves peace will come before the winter. Asserts Germany is  ow defeated. Electricity may provide a solution of the food  roblem'. Recent experiments indicate that large crop increases  re to be obtained through new scientific methods. Current from  verhead wires sent into ground results are astonishing at the re-  ponse from growing plants.  Rome-It is reported that the Austrians have been heavily debated by the Italians on the Carso front.    Heavy artillery fight-  ling still going on.  Monday: Paris-French capture German positions on a front of  iSix kilometres, important strategical position forming plateau in  [region of Cerny, En Lanenois and Carronne, besides four thous-  nd prisoners, were taken. Intrepid troops surge through almost  insurmountable obstacles. Violent counter attacks were beaten  back and the assaulting waves of Germans everywhere were  broken. Last forty-eight hours the struggle has been most sanguinary since the battle of Marne. Deadly combat will continue  "Until decision is reached says commander. Germany seizes property  owned by French people. Recent Imperial decree orders liquidation of the property held by alien subjects,-step toward confiscation, action styled as a measure in reprisal.  Tuesday: New York-Secretary of the naval committee declares  that several important-devices have been discovered. Great hopes  are entertained that Edison will produce an offensive weapon  which will be tremendously effective. Secretary Daniels is con.  fident that a way to stop the submarine activity will be found  shortly. It is announced that the latest American dreadnoughts  are to be equipped with special armor, it will require at least  three torpedoes to sink them.    New armor almost impregnable.  Persecution of the Jews continues. Turks pursue the Israelites  with merciless cruelty in driving them out of holy land.  -Paris--Allies greatest concerted'effort to stamp out the German  submarine menace is being planned with American naval officers.  American navy to play a great part in organized co-ordinated plan.  Most vigorous anti-submarine campaign is to be expected.  German Retirement From France  Forehadowed Unless Hindenburg  Puts a Stop to French Drive  Flower of Teuton Army Being Sacrificed���������Being Slaughtered Like Sheep-  ��������� Paris, May 8.���������German retirement from France must coftie  unless Hindenburg can soon stop  the French drive. Today's fighting brought proof complete of  the necessity of such retreat by  German commander is foreshadowed in supreme efforts which  enemy is making to save Rheims  salient, Germany's picked troops  being hurled into breach made  by the French. Flower of Teuton army which Von Hindenburg  was saving for final decisive offensive is now being sacrificed.  Entirely aside from Franco-British offensive between Aisne and  Lens, Germans are facing equal  menace in Champagne the French  offensive between Aisne and  Moronvilliers threatens to force  their evacuation of Rheims sali-  ent, Mounts Brimont and Ber-  raund, forts Nogent, Labeuse  and Vitry Les Rheims, which  constitute the keystone supporting the superstructure of entire  German front. Six thousand  prisoners taken yesterday. The  enemy are being slaughtered  like sheep. Twenty-nine thousand prisoners have been captured  byj'Gen. Nivelle's forces since  April 16.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  Australians Force Big  Gap in Enemy Defenses  London, May 8.���������Continuous  German counter attacks since  Saturday'have, so far, failed to  shake British grip....on Hraden-  burg line around Bullcourt; The  position has been improved and  prisoners taken. Gallant Australians force a big gap in defenses of the enemy, mile thrust  achieved. Riencourt now hemmed in on three sides.  Rationing to be compulsory in  Britain, but people to be given  until July to comply with, the  mandate to conserve foods, the  ministry perfecting restrictions  machinery. Alfred Butt, theatrical magnate, becomes chief food  director under the new scheme.  Crop returns and imports will  have bearing on final result.  A German aeroplane dropped  bombs northeastern outskirts of  London, one person being killed  and two injured, slight damage  to buildings.  Russia Seeks Peace  Petrograd, May 8. ��������� Russia  seeks peace without annexation  or any indemnities. Workmen  and solders' delegates declare  Russia does not aim to dominate  other nations or deprive them of  national patrimony, but desires  to establish durable peace on the  basis of the rights of nations to  decide their own destiny. Extraordinary session of Duma to  be convened immediately.  Melbourne, May 8.���������Hughes'  party victorious. Early returns  indicate that Premier Hughes  controls the lower house. Constitution of Senate usettled.  U, & Will Call Single  : and Independent  .Married Men Up First  Washington, May 8.- Single  and independent married men to  be first called- up by selective  system.  ' United' States turned over today an additional loan of twenty-  five million dollars to England.  Nine regiments expect to go  to France soon.  When    the   223rd    Battalion, (  commanded by Lieut.-Col. H. M. j  Hanson, passed through Ottawa;  it was inspected   by his  excel-i  lency the  Duke of  Devonshire;  and staff, as well as represent-!  tatives from the military headquarters in the capital.    In this  battalion are some of the Bella  Coola boys and it is likely that  this regiment was  one  of the  western units mentioned in last  week's despatches as having ar-  arrived in England.    There were  something like   1800  men  that  left Winnipeg at the same, time  and these evidently have crossed  the Atlantic in safety.'  and installing new.  A large pack of salmon is what  is uppermost in the minds of all  those connected with the fishing  industry on this coast.  Riots in Germany  Amsterdam, May 8. ��������� Grave  riots are reported throughout  Germany. It is stated that hundreds took part in demonstrations  because of scarcity of food.  Number of shops were looted and  many -persons were killed and  wounded in the different sections.  Peking, May 8.���������China's tea  trade has- been greatly affected  by the submarine campaign of  Germany.  Paris, May 8.���������French ambassador expresses regret to Switzerland for the attack made by  French aviator on the town of  Porrentrui.  Empire Day Celebration  The program for Empire Day  celebration, May 24th, is now in  the course of preparation.  The Red Cross committee hope  to do as well, if not better, than  at last year's celebration when  something like two hundred  dollars were realized by the sale  of food and other articles.  It is expected that quite a  number of people from outside  points will visit Bella Coola for  Empire Day besides those who  have made a practise of partaking in   this  annual   celebration  tierkduring the past decade.  .. fc$ :;;.t���������._-.: : ���������  The cannery tender "Chuck-  walla" has made two trips here  bringing up empty salmon tins  from the can factory at Wad-  hams. This new power boat is  one of the latest from the Vancouver shipyards and was built,  for the British Columbia Packers' Association, who are also the  owners of the local cannery.  The Chuckwalla is 76 feet long  over all, with 16 ft. beam and a  draught of .7'ft. when loaded.  The engine is of 100 horsepower,  four cycle and of the Imperial  make, designed to burn heavy  fueUoils. Freight hold is especially arranged for the carrying of fresh salmon collected  from the different fishing camps  for the company's plants at Rivers Inlet, and will operate from  Wadhams cannery during the  coming season.  Ottawa, May 8-Hull goes dry  by ons thousand majority.  ?br.'gutherland and Mrs. H. G.  Anderson are having a  'Progressive Whist Party  at their home on Saturday, May  ' 12th, at 7:30 p. m.     Everyone is  ; cordially invited.    Red Cross col-  [lection.    25c. and upwards.  Mr. G. T. McAnn of Vancouver, was in town last week representing his firm, the Leeson,  Dickie, Gross Company, wholesale grocers of Vancouver. '��������� Mr.  McAnn informs us that he finds  business satisfactory throughout  this territory, although this is  his first visit to this section of  the coast he is very favorably  impressed with the outlook for a  good season.  Latest from Kimsquit is that  at the two fishing establishments  all hands are busy getting the  plants in shape for the season's  operations. There is a likelihood  that actual fishing may start a  little earlier this year than has  been the pratise in the, past.  Manager Chas. Draney is doing  some remodelling of the old plant  and is installing new machinery  for the more efficient handling  of the salmon pack. At the  Manitou there is considerable  throwing out of old  machinery  Rev. W. H. Gibson left during  the week for Ocean Falls. After visiting his daughter,.Mrs. J.  R. Morrison, there for a few  days will go on to Victoria to attend the Methodist annual conference before returning home.  He expects to be away a month  or six weeks.  Mr. L. Richardson, fire adjus-  tor, came up on the Camosun to  look into the matter of loss  caused by the fire which destroyed Mr. O. J. Lokkens house at  Saloomt last month. Mr. Richardson -left for Ocean Falls on  Sunday and will take steamer  from there south.  The tug Quinitsa, Capt. H. B.  Babbington, from Ocean Falls,  l called here during the week aid  brought up. a scow for the removing of Mr. F. A. Johnson and  his logging crew to Nootum Ba$?,  where Mr. Johnson is operating  a logging camp. , Considerable  lumber was also taken away to  be used in the construction of  the necessary buildings.  The last month was the dryest  known here for many years. The  actual record shows that only  1.68 inches of rain fell during  the month. The rainfall for  April, 1912, was 2.38, and for  1913,2.64. The same month in  1914-15, we had 2.85 and 2.43 respectively, while 1916 totalled  2.55 inches. The total rainfall  for Bella Coola during the year  1915 was 34.33 inches. Last year  was a wet one for this district,  the weatherman claiming we had  40.89 inches. Showers have been  plentiful on the coast, Vancouver  complains of having had 8.20 in.,  the heaviest for the month of  April since the year 1907, when  4.13 inches fell in that city.  Mr. E. Gyllenspitz is now  down from Towdistan where he  has had some of his horses wintering. He reports the snow all  gone in that part of the interior,  feed for cattle is now plentiful.  t  ������  t  J  (Ulutrrh Nntin?    ?  "9  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7 : 30 p. m.  Preacher:  Rev. Hans Sageng, A. B.  All Are Welcome.  T^ON'T forget to bring in your Subscription  *"^ to the Courier���������The more support you  give us? the better paper we will give you.  >\ '  *r"f  ���������������*v ��������������������������� f f sswi*  -rfifr'f __r_9_**r_?*j_*  111 #!kffiP#  ;Ift  ���������J  ���������B S:*i'5r-saS,s,.'%  ti������fP������i#t  wMmmk:  m  m  'Sra  lit-  m  mm  it  gii  _wjfc  SasJjfU;  '���������4.  MP  I������  I  swi  _&������3B_  till *'. ^ ������  101  C{#&  S_fi  1  fit-  mm  ���������    ���������w&tiz  :!  K.V  ' 'ft '**- ���������_*!&  t <  *]A:  Is.''  i  i  '!  '?/���������  m .������  j > ii  t*'1  ������������������> 1*  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Pctbushisg Co. Ltd.  Tm_ds is getting less with every  t  j day of the war.  o     ������  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  1 Hon. Duncan Marshal!, Minis-  i ter of Agriculture in the Alberta  ! government, told the farmers of  si no'that province that his govern  1 Year ' **-MWt * ,        . ,,       ,  6 Month,  o.75|merit intended to make Alberta  3Mo___.  a-50  m  BELLS COOL'S COURIER  YEftSTCAKESIK  1 Year.  United State*  Unite-; Ki���������E-om  1 Year,  .$1.50  .$1.00  S__*cript_*_ payable in a-Tanee.  Subscribers oot receiving their copy  regularly please notify the __a_ag_ment  at oDce. Chaiges in address shoold be  sent in as soon; as passable.  the greatest live stock province  in the Dominion  Fob Advek-ISEs'G Rates,  Office.   ;  Applt at  ToCo__s-osro_~s-W_iB ^*)������^*,S  ____ sod eddress of ererr ~nterof sse_. tetters  mast be _*������_ to the editor. ' ���������.  __^T__Bwr reserres the riefat to r-fase po^-  eatiooof-nyW-ter. AH n-ncsczipt������-ntet's  rude  '0alits ^rqmli HMjnrma ^st lesc*  SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1917.  Horse Famine Is Coming.  < At least over two million horses  and mules have gone to Europe  from the United"' States and are  being destroyed.in vast numbers.  The war is Dot over, and horses  are still being shipped. When  the war ends every country across  the sea will need horses to work  its farms and replenish its" depleted breeding stock. With our  surplus gone, American breeders  asleep at the switch, and the  States enormous consumption of  horses for farm and city going  steadily on, a. horse famine is  sure to ensue. -'���������  * At th_ beginning of the war  the French' had about 525,000  horses, _iid the Germans approximately^720,000; ��������� The* Allies, of  course, ,,haye^, been, purchasing  . horses in the.-United States and  Canada continuous. The supply  used by Germany coming mostly  from Austria-Hungary, Norway  and ^Sweden. The French government has paid to exporters  through New York for these  animals since October, 1914,  something like 380 million dollars. The United States still has  a supply of good horses left���������  not the cavalry kind, but for  field and heavy artillery purposes. America goinginto the war  will naturally have a dampening  effect on the exportation of horses from the States.   ~~  We in British Columbia have  the-best horse country on the^  American continent,*the whole]  of the Cariboo-Chilcoten country ���������  has hundreds of miles of range;  that is now infested with wild  horses that are comparatively of j  no value.   In the region of Ana-  ham Lake there are at present ���������  something like six hundred cay-  uses running over that section,  and there is room for that many I  thousands.    If this war goes on  much longer it is probably there  will be a world-wide shortage of  horses, yet in British Columbia,  with its many advantages, there  is no   attempt  being made  to  breed horses that will be suitable  for either military or farm use.  The people of this province  have been given to go in the  past to the government for assistance in everything that they  have lost initiative, but we suggest to those interested in breeding horses to make a thorough  inquiry into the possibility of  using this vast northern country  fpr this purpose. The world supply of these much needed ani-  The Submarine Campaign,  Despite the fact that the food  situation in Great Britain is becoming alarming through the  sinking of merchant ships, can  the German submarine campaign  (of sinking anything from hospital ships to fishing boats) in any  way be called a success? We  think not when one remembers  that Britain cannot send one  ounce of food to her armies in  France but by sea. She cannot  forward a single unit of reinforcement except by sea. She  cannot receive the aid of a single  man from Canada. Australia or  India except by sea. She could  not have stayed in this war three  months if Germany had been able  | by means of submarines to prevent her transporting troops and  military supplies by water. She  probably could not remain in the*  war three months longer if Germany could cut off this military  transport now. Anything approaching a blockade of Britain  would cut off this military use of  the sea, and there would not be  the slightest need for encroaching on a single neutral right If  however,. Germany cannot pre-  vent Great Britain from using  the sea,to reinforce and supply  her armies, if she-,cannot even  prevent Great Britain from closf  ing access to Germany by sea,  what possibility can -there be of  forcing Britain to terms by sinking neutral or even enemy merchant ships?  HAS BEEN,  CM4AD'fCS\  FAVORITE  YEASTFOR  MORETHAH  30 YEARS  EfEFTC-BSU  li^si  MAKE PERFECT  ��������� v bread ;-:/: ���������  ���������������ADE'iN:CANADi  ^aotaofitSoi  was saddled on to the already  overburdened taxpayer to carry  the whole load. The poll tax  which the government Intends  to levy from now on will be $5  instead of the S3 at the time of  its abolition.  Persons who pay no municipal  or provincial taxes amounting to  five dollars will now be required  to pay poll tax. The tax is designed to catch the foreigner  who makes his money here but  has rip. stake in the country,  though he has all the privileges  as the person who is_ a heavy taxpayer In the province.       -  . Clear Them Oat.  J. S. Cowper, the sixth Liberal  member of Vancouver, told the  House some time ago that he  knew of the Hon; M. A:l Mcdonald, attorney-general, had  obtained money from some railroad company for campaign purposes during the.past election.  Sometimes MrrCowper says it is  125,000 and at other times lesser  amounts, according to.thehumor  he is in, but now his honor.'Jus-  tice Gregory, is inquiring into  this matter and it will be lihter7  esting for the public to :know  where this money c^me i rom .and  who was handling it  Large cities are a curse to any  state or province, and it Is in  these as a rule that political rot-  teness flourishes. It is however  to be hoped that there will be  an end put to this political cor-  shall help in carrying the finan-|ruption within our province. If  cial burden of the province. :ifc ������e proven that the attorney-  Sir Richard McBride, along5 general had the handling of this  with pal McBowser, saw a great-money he should go> and if it be  -opportunity in getting votes byj proven that Mr. Cowper has  taking off the poll tax some years j made charges that are not sub-  ago, and the Chinaman, Japan-[stantiated by facts thenitls the  anese, Austrians, Hindus, were' duty of the legislature to rid it-  all relieved of taxation, and it'self of -the class of men who  Reinstating PoU. Tax.  The government has decided  that it is wise that all and sundry |  make unfounded statements,  is not elevating to visit our legis-j  tive gallery and listen to a mem- j  t blackguard another across j  the floor of the chamber. It Is  high time that persons who indulge in that class of oratory]  are cleaned out of our legislative j  hall  The Farmer Gets It.      j  Flour sells here for four dol- j  lars the 49-pound bag. or?16per j  barrel. The price may be ������5 per j  bag next week.   Three years ago j  Mackay Stmth, Blair & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER,  B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S  FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST'   BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  MADE    IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given l.ttt  Ord  en  i-  aour was selling at $1.65 per bag  A   statement   published  states t  that it costs no more to produce! wheat is a  working man.    He|   "He s Surely Robbed  _ . _ _ i _. _ ,_1. _,   _-. --. ,3   .- j-������ *_- *_���������     l_^_    V--"--������<? ___? 4 c_ ; __}_____       lit  *        r  ���������*'������!  flour now than before the war  may be partly correct, but it is a  mistake to say  ploughs and sows; he harvests  and threshes the grain, and four  Pee put.  If you build a ;.-.  tk  that difference fifths of the present price of a|over hi}ls ard  mi-ruin--   w   *������������*J    ������.-._- .     i . ,~._ _. _..,_   _.t  does not go to the chief producer,  bag of flour is the price at the |ing   }ucrative  In April, 1914, the price of wheat farmers' elevators of the wheat I'about' a  million  in Vancouver was 90 to 96 cents.  The Winnipeg price for the highest grade was 91 cents, and the  prairie farmer was selling for 80  to 90 cents, according to his locality. Prices in Winnipeg today for the same grade is ������2.45  per bushel, or nearly three times  the price before the' war. The^  farmers who have tens of millions of bushels in their hands, or  unsold in the elevators, are selling for $2.30 to $2.50 per bushel..  The farmer   who   grows, this  from which it is made.  [cause a score  Oi  r^ rail*.,  <&r.ds,gj  -v'rneru  h: if y.  *--s by vo/  : U  t_.l-c|  !   ���������������*?  ������������������-_������  Bread '.JJaking  !    fi  in the home has no  terrors for the cook  who uses  . S. M. NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these districts.    . ;  Royal Standard  Flour  ROYAL  STANDARD  is  scientific..  perfect.,  It is made from No. 1 Canadian H_  Wheat ��������� pure ��������� strong ��������� cream - w h -  thoroughly dependable ��������� never chang 5.  tests iiuara  Our own daily laboratory  tee absolute uniformity.  Get it at your grocers ~  Circle *'V" trade mark on ever,  ook  sac  lor  Milled in British Columbia  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  >)������������ ;  3f  -ws  tne  MS  ���������<;  Let the Tea Pot tell you  GREAT   WEST  TEA  Is Better.  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO, Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B.C.  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY  1  0  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C, LTD.  t t  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SKi  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.   "CamOSUn"   Leaves   Vancouver  every  Tuesday at 11 p.m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays a. m.  S.  S.   "COQUITLAM"   sails   from   Varum.  nightly, carrying Gasoline  and 'Explosives,  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other informal  Head Oppice, Carball St., Vancouvek ; or Ge<->.  agent, 1003 Government St., Victorja.  y  r'.-ri-  : call  !'V,  ���������'4$  a  Advertise your Wants in the Couri^  . w  tf'.  it j [*'?  V  ���������*n  S  w :  'Saturday^ May 12,  191?  BELLA! COOLA COURIER  right of way to rise, where there  formerly was nothing but some  rattlesnakes and flies; if when  bringing kale to others you acquire a little kale, then you've  surely robbed the peepul and  you ought to be in jail. If by  planning and by toiling you have  won some wealth and fame, it  will make no odds how squarely  you have played your little game;  your success is proof sufficient  that you are a public foe, you're  a soulless malefactor, to the  dump youought to go; it's a  crime for you to prosper where  so many others fail; you have  surely robbed the peepul anfl you  ought to be in jail. Be a chronic  politician, deal in superheated  air; roast'.'.the; banks and money  barons, there is always safety  i there; but to sound the note of  business Is a crime so mean and  base that 'the fellow guilty of it  should   go   and   hide   his  face;  ������������suifaatttrrf-*as-aaoc-i_Mi  change the builder's song, triumphant, for a politician's wail, or  we'll think you've robbed the  peepul, and we'll pack you off to  jail.  Walt Mason must have studied  most of the communities, not  forgetting the Bella Coola Valley,  as it is nearly the way that most  people feel if someone attempts  to do anything.  Eighty per cent of the world's  supply of nickel is produced in  Canada.  - FARM LANDS  Oregon & California Railroad Co.  Grant Land*.���������Title to same revested in United States by Act of Congress dated June 9, 1916. Two million three hundred thousand acres to be  opened for homesteads and sale. Timber and agricultural lands. Containing some of the best land left in the  United States. Now is the opportune  time. Large map showing lands by  sections ana description of soil, climate, rainfall, elevations, etc. Postpaid One Dollar.  Grant Lands Locating Co., Box 6 10,  Portland, Oregon.  PACIFIC  MILK  Should be used for coffee,  tea, pudding, whipped cream  and all cereals.  YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC"  FOOD  PRODUCTS   CO., LTD., Manufacturers  Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C.      *  Wear the "Dayfoot"  Solid Leather  Shoe  MADE FOR B. G. WEATHER  6. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y 303 Mercantile Building  Georgetown, Ont. and        Vancouver, B. C. I  The joys   of  digging  in  the  garden���������  HALF the  satisfaction  in  gardening  is  in   having  the proper tools.  And good ones at  that.  We carry an excellent line of  spades,   hoes,   shovels,   rakes,.  pruning knives���������in fact everything   necessary   to   keep the  garden in first class condition.  Sportsmen's  Headquarters  We carry the famous Remington  UMC Speed Shells-" Arrow"and "Nitro  Club"��������� used by leading Sportsmen  everywhere. We also carry all Remington UMC Arms and lAmmunition.  REMINGTON  UMC  B. Brynildsen & Co.  FOR SALE.  Saw Mill and Lumber Men,  attention.   I have for sale a  small saw mill   and   logging  equipment, as follows:  One Robbtublar boiler, 125lbs. pressure.  1 H. S. & G. engine, 12 x 16 inches.  1       " " 9 x 12 inches.  1 North West planer and matcher.  1 Three saw edger and 1 husk frame.  Equipment for saw carraige.  Bearing blocks for shafting.  Logging equipment and camping outfit.  Great quantity shafting, belting, pulleys, 2 saws, hu3k frame, and carriage  One other planer.  A quantity of mill and logging tools and  accessories.  Plant Recently Closed Down.  Situated at DEERHOLME, near Duncan, Vancouver Island.  There is plenty of good timber close  to this mill which can be secured at a  low price and favorable terms. There  is also about 90 acres of land ancj timber on which mill stands which is offered at a sacrifice. Mill site can be rented  very nominally for long term, renewable. Canadian Northern right of way  passes within a few feet of the mill.  I am open to receive bids for this lot  of equipment and the privileges attached thereto.    Will sell at low price.  THOMAS PLIMLEY, Victoria, B. C.  Watch Repairs  Send your watch to us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.  A price given before proceeding wj^i work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.  O. B. ALLAN  Diamond' Merchant���������Optician  Granville and Pender,Yancouver,B.C.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  /^OAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  *���������*' Manitoba, Saskatchewan and*Alberta,  the Yukon .Territory, the North-west Tekri-  i tobies and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre."- Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased*  , to one applicant.  ;������������������ Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  ; In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  ... Each application must be'accompanied by a  ..fee of $5 which will be refunded if, the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable out-  . put of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  ���������The person operatinf? the mine shall furnish  the Ajrent with sworn returns accenting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.     .  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  [OE  Fur Sales Agency  Comfort and luxury assured at a  minimum cost. Many Prince Rupert testimonials prove its worth  I! Have You Got $20 ?  If not your credit is good  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented in Canada)  Installed in your kitchen range  will give you all the hot water  you can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started. 121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  user a booster. You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  seen these results. $20.00 is,the  Cost. Absolutely no charge unless satisfactory.  A bath supply within twenty minutes  after fire is started and thin a new supply eoery. twenty minutes thereafter.  Wall radiators can also be run from  your hot water boiler and other rooms  healed aiih no extra cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surprise You  Investigate!  Harry Hanson^^L'.?'0  P. 0. Box 395  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Far Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FJUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST_ VANCOUVER, B. C.  O  30E  WATER NOTICE.  (Diversion and Use.)  HTake Notice that Frederick  1 Adolphus Futcher, whose address is Vancouver, British Columbia, will apply for a license  to take and use One hundred  (100) miners inches of water,  seventy-five (75) inches for power, and twenty-five (25) inches  for domestic purposes, out of  Nummamis River, which flows  in a southerly direction, and  drains into North Bentinek Arm,  about three miles from the head  of the said North Bentinek Arm,  the water will be diverted from  the stream at a point about half  a mile from its mouth, and will  be used for power and domestic  purposes upon the land described  as Lot Sixteen (16), Range Three  (3), Coast District, and for the  purpose of operating a cannery,  vvhich it is proposed to erect on  the said lands. This notice was  posted on the grounds on the  17th day of March, 1917.  A copy of this notice and an  application pursuant thereto under the "Water Act. 1914," will  be filed in the office of the Water  Recorder, at Vancouver, British  Columbia. Objections to the application may be filed with the  said. Water Recorder or with the  Comptroller of Water Rights,  Parliament Buildings, Victoria,  within thirty days after the first  appearance of this Notice in a  local newspaper. The date of  the first application of this notice  is the 28th day of April, 1917.  Frederick Adolphus Futcher,  Applicant.  By Tupper & Bull (Solicitors),  His Agents.  A p. 28-May 19.  WATER NOTICE  "Take Notice that George  S.  -iMcTavish, whose address is  733 Lampson Street, Victoria,  B. C., will apply for a license to  take and use 600 cubic feet per  day of water out of an unnamed  creek, which flows into Victoria  Gove and drains intoRivers Inlet,  B. C, about three miles in a  westerly direction from Wannuck  River. The water will be diverted from the stream at a point  about 1800 feet from the northwest corner post of Lot 1061 and  will be used for domestic and  cannery purposes-upon the land  described as Lot 1061, Range 2,  Coast District. This notice was  posted on the ground on the 6th  day of. April 1917.  A copy of this notice and an  application pursuant thereto and  to the "Water Act-, 1914," will  be filed in the office of the Water  Recorder at Vancouver. Objections to the application may be  filed with the said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller  of Water Rights, Parliament  Buildings, Victoria, within 30  days after the first appearance  of* this notice in a local newspaper. The date of the first  publication of this notice is April  21st, 1917.  G. S. McTAVISH, Applicant.  April 21-May 1_.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OP   COAST���������BANQE   III.  Take notice that I, Frank Inrig, of  Wadhams, B. C, occupation cannery-  man, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  land:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Lot 1041 on Goose  Bay, Rivers Inlet, thence east20 chains,  ���������thence south 20 chains, thence west 20  chains to the shore, thence following  the shore line to the place of commencement.  FRANK INRIG.  Dated, March 28, 1917.      Ap. 7-J'ne 2  .������_.���������..-.. -^ ,.-,���������_., .._J_^_._J._.-...i.-_t,-*.-i-----������-j----i_-.-���������-.  -..-���������-/>. B������-B.^.���������w ���������--_-- -,���������r-^-.  1 helvlason CFixischriano  of to-day will make plain out  privilege to stale with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  3HS_  ���������t  IE1  ^JT Let us attend  your Victor  Record.  jJ  mail orders-���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE. ST.,  VANCOUVER, B. C.  i  __-r_;_-__~_2 iVii"._ __V_v_r  1  _____   fDj  ____][  \X7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  XHWAT person so independent?  ll^HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola  farmers are independent',  they are strangers to hard times.  ��������� >i :T>  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  HTHE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ��������������������������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent, crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  ���������*"'.; ;:r  "DELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA  COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA   One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  urn ii inwir���������r-i ���������-���������-*������������������--���������-���������������������������-i-wir n-ii n-ii i    iinnmT -m ���������������������������������������������ur-M-Tanaim  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  csa-B-������M 'MS  m  nit  Mm  '!&_���������* '?���������������_, tjtr.  &  ���������W  -*s-^  %h.3  he:.  Si  rjiti  'it " W>>  I  1  /^M#i  I J' ������$#?  ^'  i  f H  i  It  I   ''  t       t  .'������i bb !  8  BELEX COOLS COURJ-R  Saluiic  '"��������� A/* ;-'. #917  Subscribe  for the  "Courier"  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  I Not Yet Awake to the WarA  \    We are well aware that too  \ many do not realize -he war, bat  : have the feeling' that no matter  j what happens-in Earope Caaadai  < will be all right.   They feel that \  i  \ this country has done well in the-  jwar, vastly more than anybody,  } either here or in England ever  I imagined this country couid do. j;  I That is true.   But it is necessary  fto remember that this is true,  j not of us alone, but of Australia,  j New Zealand, England, Ireland,  Scotland and Wales.   They, too,  have done vastly more that any  man living had  ever imagined  would be possible.-Daily. Star.  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  Canada is eighteen times larger than Germany. It has 111,-  992 more square miles than the  j whole of f he United States, including Alaska, and it constitutes one-third of the area of the  British Empire.  // will be to your in-  terest to \eep Well in-  formed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM  ADVERTISERS  How is the time to keep  your, name before the  public No manuf actur -  er or .whblesalehouse can  affori to let slip the opportunity o)F increased  sales that public advertising brings.  HE WAS PREPARED.  The minister came to Jansen's  house one afternoon to a.cbris-  tenfng party; he was to christen  Jansen's little son, John, Jr.  "Jansen/' said the minister  solemnly, taking his host aside  before the ceremony, "Jansen,  are you. prepared for this solemn  event? ;  "Oh, yes indeed, sir," Jansen  beamed. . "I've got two hams,  three gallons of ice cream, pickles, cake���������"  "No, no," said the minister  with an indulgent smile. "No,  no, my friend, I mean spiritually  prepared."  "Well. I guess yes! Two demijohns of whiskey and three cases  of beer!" cried Jansen, triumphantly.        '.."',-.>  a.  Am I good enough for you?"  sighed the fond lover.  "No," the candid1 girl replied,  "you're not; but you're too good  for any other girl."  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock: to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the ' 'Courier.r  You can never help others by  climbing onto the hill' of self-  righteousness.  Cost of Bad Roads.  A company in Stanislaus county, California, that buys skimmed  milk from the farmer has demon-'rennial,   smothering  strated to the rural residents in  an emphatic manner the- value  of good roads to them. This  eompany sends trucks'directly to  the farms to collect the skimmed  milk, but it pays higher prices  to farmers living on good roads  than on bad roads. On poor roads  the company pays 17 1-2 cents  per 100 pounds, but on good  roads it pays 20 cents. Of course  the farmer always has been paying this.tax on every.hundred  pounds he hauled on bad'jrdads  and he has been relieved 6f-,i������ on  every hundred, pounds he'had  hauled over good roads, bat that  fact has hot been brought to^his  notice as in the case cited. When  he measures his distance from  plant  with tar paper, straw, manure,  or by a quickly growing crop,  or by starving the plant by preventing it from forming green  leaves. The crowding out meth-  od often fails because the thistle  proves to be more persistent than  the crop employed to displace it.  The smothering plan succeeds  on small patches, but it is not  practicably on large areas. Many  authorities advocate the starvation plan or summerf allow as by  far the best for eradicatingthis  trouBlesome weecl.  Plougb*six to eight inches deep  in- the autumn, but if pressureof  workprevents autumn ploughing,  the*i plough the same depth  about the middle of June.    After  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right  town in minutes instead of miles ��������� a few days be^gin the use of the  he will realize the profit of good'duckfoot cultivator crosswise on  roads.���������American Lumberman,   -the land, and repeat whenever   Z :      Sthe tiniest shoots are ready to  HOW 10 FIGHT SOW THISTLE.   jshow, anti| the land freezes in  In fighting sow thistle we must' autum. Where the soil is loose  recognize that this weed spreads j loam the land may not need to  from both seeds and roots. "We be ploughed and the cultivator  must therefore, prevent the plant  from  producing  seed,  kill -the  perennial root stalk and sowjab- a leaf above the ground and by  solutely clean seed grain if r we  are to control this, terrible jeesL  Vanbus methods of attack have  | been advocated such as crowding  ont the weed by a persistent pe  can be used from the start.  Never allow the thistle to show  autumn it will be killed. -The  cultivation must be thorough.  Manhood is one thing that cannot be preserved in alcohol  DUILD UP YOUR HOME]  U TOWN. Do not talk���������sup- ]  port home industries���������talk is-  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  m  HpHE two principal reasons  1   why   you   should   b u y  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Burns'  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provitioners  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  f*  CLUB OFFER  :%  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates*  The Courier  $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Jooraal, Winiupei  1.50   ,  ��������� ���������.���������    lor  ���������;:V,. $2.50  Both papers  .   $2.00  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  . $1.00  ..-1.50    ��������� papers  Both  --   for  $2.50  $2.00  The Courier   .  '    .       .        .        . $j..w    n .i  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal . . 1.00   f������    ^���������       tor  . $1.00  .  1.00  $2.00  .  $1.75  ^  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  -'���������       S_=====  J  i  j  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN ;,^  .Brynildsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP, HEATING AND COQK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  v <��������� i  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price.     Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������  S  Te'itts-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospedtors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock/' Nothing But-the most suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition. ���������  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all description*  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods   Lowest Prices-Largest Stoc*  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C  s**-.^  il'-  &  m  i������  Acs  ���������_f*  i  *&  i'".ji\  real  Lay  font  i _K  "A  Wedr  Jfperatii  .^British  ,t#gg Rome  -iBVom 1  , 'V New  ��������� .-> ^pril 2  <   '���������"today.  ������t___narine'

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