BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Bella Coola Courier Mar 31, 1917

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xbellacoo-1.0170100.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xbellacoo-1.0170100.json
JSON-LD: xbellacoo-1.0170100-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xbellacoo-1.0170100-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xbellacoo-1.0170100-rdf.json
Turtle: xbellacoo-1.0170100-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xbellacoo-1.0170100-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xbellacoo-1.0170100-source.json
Full Text
xbellacoo-1.0170100-fulltext.txt
Citation
xbellacoo-1.0170100.ris

Full Text

Array 7>  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR FEBRUARY  Compiled Ly Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 31.   Minimum, lfi.  Highest Max. (16th) 49.   Lowest Min.-(lBl) 3  below zero.  Rainfall, 1.74. Snow 25in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.S9 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 16  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SAWRDAY, MARCH 31, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  French Are Progressing  Paris, Mar. 27.���������Despite the  driving rain and every obstacle  of a broken* ground the French  forces are progressing ��������� against  the Germans. General Nivelle's  troops reached Holmbray, south  of Coucy forest. During night  the enemy unsuccessfully attacked the new French positions between Oise and Somme, they  lo3lheavily. Fire of French guns  exploded munition depots behind the German lines.  Call Up National Guards  Washington. Mar. 28. - The  National Guard organizations  called into Federal service today  in eighteen states are, to be used  for police protection purposes.  The new organizations ordered  out today comprise twenty-five  /thousand men and the government is taking every precaution  against German spying or German ruthlessness. Pacific coast  units ordered to mobilize, president Wilson signed the order  making the maximum strength  of the navy (87,000 men)'be increased to one hundred thousand.  If plans of Congress are carried  out it is believed that every national guardsman will be under  ���������' arms within a week.- .r...._...,._ _  , Representative Harrison of the  Foreign Affairs' Committe, believes that Congress will pass a  flat declaration of war against  Germany.  The government today granted  safe conduct to German officials  from China to pass through the  country, they will probably land  at San Francisco'in a few days. '  American liner St. Louis/the  first U. S. vessel equipped to fight  submarines, arrived, at her destination unmolested.  . Men of the American tanker  Healdton were either suffocated,  frozen or drowned when their  vessel was torpedoed.  Brutality by Germans  London, Mar. 27.���������More than  three hundred women, children  and aged men known to have  succumbed to hardship and exposure through the brutality and  starvation methods which the  Germans "had imposed on the  French civil population immediately preceding and during the  retreat. Ruthless spoilation of  orchards and crops carried out  by official orders even disgusted  the German soldiery. Torch and  dynamite used to destroy whole  villages.  * General Nivelle is evidently  sharpening the point of "his wedge  near Moy and Venedeuil between  St. Quentin and Lafere, with'a  flood of men. Allies advanced  farthest against Germans at this  point being north of St.,Quentin.  Gsneral Haig's forces forgrmgVa  wedge above St. Quentin, city  now menaced from three sides.  Believed to be one of the strongest positions in Hindenburg's  line. British advance slower,  but methodical. Fighting of the  most desperate character marking every inch of advance."     v  4000 Huns Cross Into  Holland Seeking Food  The Hague, Mar. 28���������Seeking  food, four thousand German soldiers crossed the line into Holland and wereintemed atZwoile.  French Occupy Coucy Forest  Paris, Mar. 28���������French-troops  have occupied the village Coucy  le Chateau and are progressing  against Germans in the forest of  Coucy, having occupied entire  northern part of that tract.  Berlin's Version  Berlin, Mar. 28.���������On account  of xainy weather little fighting  ori the whole front. In forest  between Oise and Coucy le Chateau stronger French forces encountered our protecting'troops,  which inflicted heavy losses on  the enemy .before giving way on  account of a threatningoutflank-  ing movement.  Amsterdam���������Von Hollwegstill  seeking peace, he is expected to  make further overtures to Russia  Riots Reported in Berlin  .London, Mar. 28���������British captured Equaricourt ten miles south  east of Bapaume/also Longaves-  nes, ,tliree miles northwest of  Roisel. Allied pursuit continued  hotly today and was marked by  violent, fighting, both open and  of a massed character at half a  dozen points along the fifty mile  front now rapidly nearing the  permanent Hindenburg line.  French are within a mile of the  Hindenburg line and progressing  steadily despite inunendations  and the increasing strong resistance of the enemy. "Nearest approach of British to the line is  around Dagnicourt. Bitter fighting in this neighborhood yesterday, German massed forces desperately attempted to retake  village, but British held on and  beat off all attacks.'        ,'  '  Riots reported in Berlin. Ru������.  mors of a revolutionary movement in Germany gained curren-'  cy in Switzerland.  , The hospital ship Asturia.of  12,000 tons, torpedoed by German  submarine, thirty-one lives lost,  U. S. to Declare War  i Washington, Mar. 28���������A resolution to be introduced to Congress  on April 3, immediately after President Wilson concludes address,  will declare time has come when the United States must vindicate  decisively its honor and rights. It will declare that by acts of  Germany a state of war exists, and Congress places at^diiposition  of the president the means for vigorously prosecuting the war.  . President Wilson is completing  his indictment of Germany this  Germans Flee to Mexico  '��������� Washington, Mar. 28.���������Many  Germans are fleeing to Mexico,  it is believed, however, they are  not going to join a German army  but'to dodge internment. Pub-  liclyannoiinced that government  does,not. plan to molest alien  residents if they obey the iaws  pf the country.  Philadelphia���������200 marines belonging1 to the interned, cruisers  .Krojti Prinz Wilhelm and Prinz  Eitel Freiderich, were loaded on  trains today and started for internment camps in Georgia.  ,twelye still missing.  '   Two British destroyers sunk,  one^struck a mine and the other  sank as a rasu'lt of a collision. ,  week. Foreign Affairs Committee preparing the war resolution.  Plans are under consideration to  ask Congress for a bond issue of  a billion dollars to be used 'for  purchasing French bonds.  Thanks, From Our Soldiers.  6t  lire  AM assured that  -B> my people will re-  . spond to every call  necessary to the, success of our cause���������with  the same indomitable  ardour and devotion  that have filhd me with  Pride and gratitude  since the war began."  His Majesty King George  UR soldiers must be fed; the people at  home must be fed. And���������in."spite of  Germany's murderous campaign to  cut off the Allies' Food supply, by sinking  every ship on the High Sea$���������an ample and  unfailing flow of food to England and  France must be maintained.  Not to the farmer only���������  Butto YOVr���������to everybody-���������  This appeal is directed  'E must unite as a Nation to SERVE  -to SAVEand to PRODUCE; Men, ���������  women and children'; the young, the middle  aged and the old-���������all can help in the  Nation's Army of Production.  EVERY pound of FOOD raised^ help*  reduce the cost of Hying and adds to  the Food Supply for Overseas. ^  For information oh any subject relating  to the Farm and Garden, write:  INFORMATION BUREAU     .  Department ^pf AgrioiltUrp;  "'    -      *  OTTAWA   0 ::?:^:,  Dominion Department of Agriculture  PLANT a garden���������small or large.  Utilize  your own back yard.    Cultivate the  vacant lots.   Make them all yield food.  WOMEN pf towns can find no better  , or more? important outlet for their  energies than [in cultivating a  vegetable  garden.'     ��������� .  Be patrioticf iri act as  well as in thought,  ���������..���������'' ���������'-:������������������'I- '." ������������������.."������������������'��������� '���������-������������������ '������������������������������������������������������ -.:. ������������������������������������.'���������  Use evei'jy means availabkr -  Overlook nothing.  OTTAWA, CANADA.  HON. MARTIN BURRELL, Minister.  Russians Fall Back  Petrograd, Mar. 28.���������It has  been discovered that the ex-minister of the interior, Protopopoff,  wasin secret communication with  Berlin by the aid of a wireless  station at the Czar's Tsarskoe  Selo palace.  New Russia,, budding forth,  steady improvement in general  conditions. .Ministry working  indefatigably, spies arrested.  A German gas attack on the  western bank of the Chara river  compelled Russian forces to fall  back in an easterly direction.  Only Two Hundred. Voters  Bat 1000 Votes Were Cast  Vancouver, Mar. 28���������Counting  of soldiers votes resumed yesterday. Over one thousand votes  were polled at Epsom although  there were only two hundreo  British Columbia men there. Prohibition ballots missing in 'return.  Jottings  ���������  Has it ever struck you, that if  this valley was inhabited by a  real, live community they would  have electric light in their homes.  It cannot be done. Why not?  They have a plank sidewalk at  the Indian village.  The Camosun arrived somewhere around noon hour lasl  Friday and after a rather lengthy  stay left forthe south.  Mr. B. F. Jacobsen came up  from Vancouver after an absence  of one month, during which he  visited several of the coast points  on business.  ' ������  According to reports the total  quantity of halibut landed at  Prince for the month of February is 809,000 pounds, being an  increase iof 231,000 pounds over  January figures.  We do not wonder why that  pretty harbinger of spring, robin  re breast;fails to put in an appearance, as the weather we are  having would deter a braver  spirit than" bold robin. Snow,  and then- well, they are still at  it counting the soldier votes on  Prohibition.  Mr. M. W. Marvin of Atnarko,  was in town during the,1,week'.  He reports things are very satisfactory, the cattle.are in good  shape though the winter has  been longer than is usual,  Perhaps very few communities  in Canada were more thoughtful'  last Christmas in remembering  the. boys, who have enlisted than  the settlement of Bella, Coola.  For a small population we have  furnished quite a few brave boys  willing to do their "little bit."  And that "little bit" to some has  meant the supreme sacrifice.  Therefore, in remembering the  boys who are ready to do their  duty the ladies of the valley were  also honoring our dead heroes. .  The Lysdahl Sewing Circle,  who have done so much in the  valley both in. church and'social  work, availed themselves of the  privilege to show their apprecia-  to our soldiers by sending them  presents at Christmas. In return'  ihe recipients have sent glowing  letters of gratitude, but space  prevents us quoting all of them.  The general inference is thatour  soldier boys take off their hats  to the women of the valley for  their loving kindness.  The annual   meeting of  the  Bella Coola Liberal Association  was held in the Colony Hall on-  Monday last.    Quite a few-new  members were enrolled.  Among the many matters to be  laid before' the government was  the-cleaning out of log. jams in  the Bella Coola river, where such  destroy land' and. roads. .The-  early construction' of the wagon  road to connect up with the existing road .at. Chilanco Forks  was most urgently dwelt on by  different members. ' Recommendation for a gi-ant to the local  hospital was also passed on.  Officers elected for the ensuing-  year were as follows: President,  W. D. Stephenson; vice-president, B. F. Jacobsen; sec.-treas.,  T. Livelton. Executive committee: B. Brynildsen, C. Brink. A.  Hammer, T. Thorsen, R. N. Livelton and H. Haakinson.  Alfred Blakemore came in from  Kimsquit last week and spent  the day in town interviewing old  friends. Mr. Blakemore informs  us that the winter over there has  been quite severe, the snowfall  being considerably over the average.     .   Mr. B. F. Jacobsen had a meeting with the local fishermen at  Hagensborg during the week,  they discussed the building of a  new cannery: It is thought that  the Dominion government will  issue a license for an extra cannery for the year 1917.  Has it ever struck you, that on  steamboat day we always have  ���������some kind of weather. There  must be a malign (or otherwise)  influence following the boat or  crew, as previous to the day of  its arrival we had basked in sunshine. In. fact the ladies had  commenced working overtime  on their summer suits, but now,  winter again.  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a.m.  7:30 p.m.  V       Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  L ..   W. H. Gibson.  n ' AH Are Welcome. 2  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,  March 31,   19)7  The Courier  publishep wekki.y, at bki.la coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1  Year $1.00  6 Month*   .....v...............,..' 0.75  3 Month*   0.50  United States  1  Year     $1.50  United Kingdom  1 Year $1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,  Office.  Apply  at  To CoRiiEsroNDENTS���������While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name iind address of every writer of such letters  must be [riven to the editor.  ' The Editor reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter. I' All manuscript at writer's  risk.  'j������>aiuo jjopult mtpraita pat lex."  SATURDAY, MARCH 31,-1917.  Borden Government Discard  Ross Rifle At Last.  So many of our brave soldiers  have died because of defects in  the Ross rifle that it is not any  too soon'that the Dominion government has at last seen fit to  cancel the contract. Upon the  Borden government alone must  rest the responsibility of supplying our soldiers with a rifle not  adaptable'for war purposes. The  facts about the ��������� Ross rifle are in  need of careful restatement, so  that the public mind will harbor  no confusion in regard to such a  vital matter."  The fundamental fact to bear  ��������� in mind is that 'the Ross rifle  Mark Three, with which our soldiers were provided in this war,  is the Borden government's own  child.    It is of their authorization and is   built according to  plans submitted by their experts  since they came  into office in  1911.    The Ross rifle of the Liberal regime was known as Mark  Two, and is said to have been a  much sturdier and more serviceable weapon than its successor  which was given a longer barrel  and finer sights.    It was a very  fine target rifle���������none better���������  but too delicate for active service where the shooting is naturally rough and ready.  With this fact in view the attempt of the Borden government  to shift  responsibility  for the  Ross  rifle  Mark   Three   to the  Laurier   government would  be  laughable if it were not dastardly.    Solicitor-general Meighen's  theory is that the Borden government was bound "in perpetuity" by a contract made by the  Laurier   government   in   1902.  The words "in perpetuity" are  of co'ure fallacious.. No contract  can  be  "in'perpetuity."    But  outside of that this "perpetuity"  inregard to Ross rifles was sharply defined.    It could be terminated by giving a year's notice..  That is to say, it could have been  terminated in 1912 or in 1913���������  p,ne year, two years 'before'.-the  . war started���������or ag'ain in 1914 or  any  time within   the last two  years and a half.    As a matter  of fact there hasn't been a minute since the war began that the  Borden ������overnmen t, acting within the terms of   the contract,  couldn't have stopped the manufacture of Ross rifle Mark Three  and had a better one made.  asty and the changes in the constitutional .government opens up  a new era for Russia. The events  have happened so l'apidly that  one can scarcely believe that the  great empire has become a Republic. There is no doubt that  Russia was dominated by Czar-  ism as Germany is by Prussian-  ism. The yoke had to be thrown  off sooner or later. Coming  as it does, when rumors of a plot  in Germany to throw over the  Hohenzollern regime are so prev-  alen t, may lead the German people to revolt against Prussianism  and thus bring about an earlier  settlement of this war.  The full   significance of  the  wonderful' changes   which will  ensue in  Russia's  conquest of  herself, the greatest victory in  her history, is hard to foretell;  but it will give the Russian parliament, consisting of the Duma,  or Lower House; and the Council  of the.Empire, which was the  product of the revolutionary disturbances following the war with  Japan,   absolutely   full   power.  Previously   it   was   an elective  body enjoying only the shadow  of authority: ��������� The group of reactionaries, or apostles of despotism, who surrounded the Czar  and who up to the rocent startling, developments   completely  dominated him, took good care  to retain the substance.   Thus  parliament was little, better.than  a debating ' society.   It had no  say'in the administration of the  army and navy "or in matters of  policy.   The control of Jegisla  tion was in the hands of minis  ters who were not responsible to  it.   It had partial control of the  budget, it is true, but the procedure made its~authority in that  respect more apparent than real.  The changes in Russia's internal affairs will not embarrass the  Allies in the carrying on of the  war.   One of the leaders of the  new administration declared that  the succesful termination of this  war was one of the reasons for  taking the step they did, he said:  "We assumed control of the Government of Russia in order to  bring victory  to   the   Russian  let him plant two this. He owes  it to himself, his family, and his  country to help make the,production this year over the high-  water mark.  ������  O       O    ' O      :0-'.  ,0  Road Superintendent System Abolished.  arms."  o    o    o.   o;.   o  Peace Casualties.  There were 1083 applications  made for indemnity under the B.  C. Workmen's Compensation Act  .luring the months of January  and February, and others are  still coming in' from victims of  industrial mishaps that occurred  prior to March 1.  O      0      O      O      0  The Hun food controller says  only the Almighty can. be held  responsible for the small bread  ration daily doled out to the German people. We were ^'wonder-  ing why the Kaiser of late has  refrained from offering any compliments to the ' 'good old German God." It may be a case of  strafing heaven yet, putting it in  the good old German way. j  A New Era for Russia.  The end of the Romanoff dyn-  Farmers, Attention!  Our farmers attention is directed to the fact that the Dominion  Government is advertising largely the necessity of greater food  production. The.greater the crop  yield the,surer of ultimate victory in this war we are. The  farmer plays no unimportant  part in this great struggle, and  it is up to him to do his very best  in utilizing ever inch of ground.  If he planted one acre last year,  Radical changes in the system  of public works construction  throughout the province are foreshadowed in the public works  department by recent orders  coming from the minister, Hon.  Dr. J. H. King.  It is plainly intimated that the  road superintendent'system will  be abolished on the ground that  to have a road superintendent in  each district, the official being  practically the appointee of the  member, savored .too much of  political patronage., It is claimed by the administration that  many of the road superintendents  have not been practical men at  the time of appointment and that  they gained their experience at  the expense of the provincial  treasury. It is also maintained  that in many of the ridings read-  work under the superintendent  has been patronage pure and  simple.    ,  The plan'which it is said Hon.  Dr. King will bring into effect  will mean the appointment of a  number of qualified civil engineers who with their staffs will be  under the civil service act and  who will each have charge.of a  section of the province. They  will have i'oad foremen for each  section. Instead of a road-superintendent for each constituency  the scheme will mean a road engineer for three or four, or possibly more, ridings. He will be  able to do his own engineering  work and his road foremen; will  carry out construction under his  direction.  The Courier believes that this  method will mean economy and  efficiency, particularly in getting  roads built to a standard on the  best grades. The building of  roads up a mountain side in one.  direction and down in some other,  going nowhere, will be a thing  of the past. v Bella Coola is full  of the class of roads that cost a  lot of money and will now have  to be reconstructed in order that  they can be used.  :.   ..  Controls Dominion  Government.  Hon. John Oliver, minister of  railways, in his address on the  P.'G. E. construction, had this  to say in respect to" the Mackenzie and Mann interests:  ' 'It was the same with the Canadian Northern Pacific, and in  the action of that road we have  another reason why investigation  in this case should be prompt and  thorough. On February 16th 1  served notice on the Canadian  Northern Pacific to produce certain books and. papers.' The an-  .swer'of Sir William Mackenzie  was a Dominion order-in-council  dated four days later, placing  the, line in the province under  the ' Railway Commission and  taking it away from our control.  We there have the fact demonstrated that we have railway corporations in this province which  can get the government to do its  own bidding."  o ���������  .0.   o   ,,o     o  Some Difference.  Ex-postmaster, member of parliament; city mayor and councillor, Noah Shakespeare of Victoria,  makes these observations:  "To my mind the methods of  running elections in these days  are not as clean as they were in  trTe old times. The first election  in which I rah for Ottawa cost  me $50. The next election things  were getting closer to party  lines.' My election that year cost  me close on $250. This showed  the trend-of things. It has now  grown tothe point that no poor  man can run. an election. The  consequence is that'we are closing- out the poor man and instituting a. government by autocracy. Today we hear about elections costing as much as $50,000,  of course this is in the east. We  never heard a word about graft  in British   Columbia  until the  Mackay Smith, Biair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,  OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE   IN    B.C  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Order*  PACIFIC MILK  Should be used for coffee,  tea, pudding, whipped  cream and all cereals.  'YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC"  FOOD PRODUCTS CO., LTD., Manufacturers  Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.  politicians from the east began  to come in."  O ���������    O' . 'O    so' *':0  This may be one of the reasons  why the people of British Columbia a few years ago resorted  to introducing native sons as the  most fit to run the goverment.  But one of those! bad politicans  from the East, in the person of  Mr. Bowser, got into the government and at once upset the high  hopes of British Columbia being  governed by native son's,,in fact  judging from our indebtedness  !���������  Royal Standard Flour  Makes The Big, Clean Loaf  A loaf of Bread baked with ROYAL  STANDARD FLOUR cannot' be  otherwise than big, piean,.light and  tasty, because you are putting into  it the cleanest and purest Flour it  is possible to make.  Made from the hearts only of the choicest Canadian whieat and made CLEAN���������absolutely free from  dirt, fluff or lint.  Next time order ROYAL STANDARD.  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  D  GREAT   WEST  EA  The Prince 'Rupert,', Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.- ;;   ,:;'. ���������,  " ' . ;.'...;;.  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will /benefit these districts;  ..       \'y  The New Tea, with the old-time  flavor  PACKETS   ONLY  LEESONJ)ICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C. |  HOE  D|������|C  30E  ]&  r  MADE FOR EC WEATHER  ���������   ' '.;    '   .'      ���������<:".   " i ���������'   '   ������������������ .-, ,'    '.    '?  G. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y 303 Mercantile'Building  Georgetown, Ont. and        Vancouver, B. C.  ^  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  ������������������   BETWEEN .-..���������.���������.-.-. ��������� ,'  ,  BELLA COOLA anp VANCOUVER  S. S.     CamOSUIl     Leaves Vancouver every  Tuesday at lip. m.      (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays a.m.  S. S. " C.OQUITLAM" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  O  For rates of Freights,' Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver ; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  30E  HOC  W  Advertise your Wants in tKe" Courier  ;:������ws  ^m������t^������^^<i������i������i������j^tjMlt,WIM,IJ,J.������V',l.l-l[tU8JUI������.Utl!JMIIJl.'^^ n������  Saturday, March 31,  1917  BELLA COOLA COURIER  JHOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  AT PAR  HON OF CANADA DEBENTURE  IN  SUMS OF $500 OR ANY.MULTIPLE THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st Octobor, 1919. '  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by chequo (free of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from the date of  purchase. u  Holdors of this stock will havo the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  ' as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war. loan issue  in Canada other than an issuo of Treasury Bills or other like short date security.  Proceods of this stock are for war purposes only.  A, commission of one-quarter of one por cont will be allowed to recognized bond and  stock brokers on allotments made in rospect of applications for this stock which bear their  stamp. '  For application forms apply to tho Deputy Ministor of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA, ,  OCTOBER 7th, 1916.  we couldn't have been governed  any worse by the real natives.  O      O      0      o      o  Encouraging.  A Britisher of high military  authority says the Allies will  most assuredly destroy Germany's menace to World peace.  The strength of the Allies, he  says, is increasing, while1 the  Teutonic powers are declining.  The defeat of the Teutonic forces  is>therefore inevitable. TheAl-  ' lies are better equipped, both in  men, money and munitions, to  wage a successful final drive.  This sounds encouraging. The  ,. latest news from France bears  out this that the war cannot last  much" longer; also not forgetting  that the boys from Bella Coola  all say'.that they will be home  for Christmas.  O     O      O     0     o '  The Germans have discontinued the construction of, Zeppelins, say reports from Zurich,  Switzerland, and in the same  issues of the papers which report  this news appears a report, credited to an American traveller  returning from- England that  England will go into the manufacture of* dirigibles. England  already has, or will shortly have,  the control of the air, as well as  the sea. The Germans will have  to hide underground. This may  have something to do with the  Germans    busying   themselves  ���������i���������.���������".���������������������������..V���������������������������.��������������������������� ������������������ ��������� ���������-^All-'-  ���������������������������������������������������������������   .-������������������ ������������������ ������������������....7  ^#*&^  along the border, so that when  the time comes for the final settling up'of the struggle, they may  be close by and can ask God to  let the Alps fall on them.        (i  1       ������    o    o     o    o  Dawn of Hope for Russia],  Russia's new cabinet will base  its policy on the following principles:  First: an immediate general  amnesty for all' political and religious offenses, including terro-  ist acts and military and garrison  offenses.  Second: liberty of speech and  of the press; freedom ior alliances, unions and strikes, with the  extension of these liberties to  military officials within the limits  admitted by military require--  ments.' <>  ' Third: abolition of all social,  religious and national restrictions  Fourth: to proceed' forthwith  to the.preparation and convocation of a constitutional assembly,  based on universal suffrage,,  which will establish a governmental regime.  Fifth: the substitution of the  police by a national militia, with  chiefs to be elected.and respon1  sible to the government.  Sixth:-communal elections to  be based on universal suffrage.  Seventh': the troops which participated in the revolutionary  movement will not be disarmed,  but will remain in Petrograd.  Eighth: while maintaining strict  military discipline for troops on  active service, it is desirable to  abrogate for soldiers all restrictions in the enjoyment of social  rights accorded other citizens.  ;  o    o    o     o    o \  Tubers as Cash.  The settlers of Bella Coola are  selling their potatoes at sixty  dollars a ton.   Of course this is  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  a/-"0AL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ^ Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Tekkitory, the North-west Territories and in a portion of the Province of  Bkitibh Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at au annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased  to one applicant.   Application for a lease muat be made by the  applicant in person to the Amntor Sub-Aitenl  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated, .,  In surveyed territory the land mual be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, end in unsurveycd territory the ti act applied for shall be Btaked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco'mtingrforthe  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining riglitu  are not being operated, such icturns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may bo permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  "    For full information application should be'  made to the Secretury of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands,  .      i   ' W, W. COKY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. H.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������80690.1  BUSINESS CARDS  o   c  HOE  5     O  Fur Sales Agency  I 600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage Of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  :Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  ' - We hold sales monthly, but will advance, 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Qiir commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  O     C  hoc  3    o  Comfort and luxury assured at ft  minimum cost. Many Prince Rupert testimonials prove its worth  Have You Got $20 ?  If not your credit is good  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater,  (Patented In Canada)  Installed in your kitchen range  will give-you all the hot water  you can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started. 121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  user a booster. You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  seen these results. $20.00 is the  Cost. -Absolutely no charge unless" satisfactory.  A bath.supply within twenty minutes  after fire is started and then a ncu) supply/ eoery twenty minutes thereafter.  Wall radiators can also be run from  your hot water boiler  and other rooms  heated Kith no extra cost for fuel.   '���������'  :    The Result Will Surprise You  Investigate!  Harry Hanson^S?10  P. O. Box 395  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert.B.C.  not so bad, but is nothing to a  curious Chicago reporter, who,  with a basket as a purse and  some, nice potato specimens from  Idaho as'"money," had no difficulty, in ".negotiating the gate."  The tubers.,in one case passed  current, at 3 1-2 cents each. The  cashier of a moving picture show  accepted three of them for a  ticket.- A taxicab chauffeur took  six for a ride of two blocks, and  at a five-and-ten-cent store .the  reporter bought two "diamonds"  and a picture frame, with the  same "legal tender."  ^    O      O      O      O      O  How They Do It.  According to the San Francisco  Bulletin, the onions that are now  befog sold by the dealers of that  city at $12.50 per hundred pounds  were bought from the growers  at$2 per hundred. This not only  throws a valuable light upon the  high cost of living, but incidentally an illuminating sidelight upon the manner in which wealth  accrues to the horny-handed agriculturist of the commission  house district.  Watch Repairs  Send your watch to us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.  A price given. before proceeding with,work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.  O. B, ALLAN  Diamond Merchant���������Optician    :  Granville and Pender,Yanconver.B.C.  i^>U  TheMason &RischPiano  of to-day will mat\e plain our  privilege io slate with authority:  "NO FINEF   PIANO MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  I  ts  ������j[ Let us attend your Victor Record  jJ mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  i  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  ���������BELLA^OOLA COURIER.  t Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year   Six Months ....:.:   Three Months..���������  ..$1.00  .. 0.75  ,. 0.50  UNITED STATES.  ,  One Year............ '���������'.. $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year .........:.$1.00  '=x^  I 1  C  r <  \]|7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  t  HAT person so independent?.  \%7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times. ���������  as-*,...*>'w,   >_. - v1";."1'^^^^  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  t���������>  THE REASONS for this enviable condition of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long -warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden arid field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was_ established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  ELLA GOOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  i czd rnj czd c  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B.C.  Enclosed please find.' .- ��������� ��������� ��������� .subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for .....v.......;..  ;  Name , ������������������'.,' ..:..... '.  P. O   Tear out and mail, today, with amount of subscription encloted BELCS-COOLTA COURIER  Saturday,- March 3t, l9iT  Subscribe  for the  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  // will be to your interest to fccp WeU informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  . Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  11T1 ~~ --.-.-wMir  Government Should Clean Up the  Salmon Streams.  Editor,  Uella Coola Courier.-  We all have been reading a lot  about the increased demand for  B. C. Salmon, especially since  the great war started. It is one  of the chief assets of this province and whilst it has brought  in many millions of dollars very  little has been done towards increasing the output, especially  towards seeming and protecting  the spawning grounds. The  future and continued success of  the fishing industry, chiefly the  salmon, can - be secured only by  clearing the obstructions and  otherwise facilitate the access to  the spawning grounds of the  "silver horde."  Take for instance, amongst  many others, the spawning  grounds of the Bella Coola river.  Living as I do in the immediate  vicinity I have been impressed  for many years by the amount  of fish not reaching the spawning grounds and dying by the  ton before fulfilling their useful  purpose. Although the government removed some log jams  during the past few years, yet  the work will never be effective  without"keeping it up,'especially  where the obstructions are so  complete as to bar all ways up  the river. There are several of  them up the Atnarko river, one  of the two main "tributaries to  the Bella Coola river���������how many  up the other, the longer and larger, White Water river, Talchako,  1 don't know, not having visited  that locality for years. But at  least, where the access-to the  Atnarko is comparatively easy-  something should be done in  time and at the proper time, that  is at low water, and I feel confident the money thus spent will  come back a hundredfold to our  province.  Old Timer.'  REAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep 'posted on developments by reading the "Couriei*."  The Russian revolution was the  shortest and least bloodless of  any revolution in history.  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right.  DU1LD UP YOUR HOME  U TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries ���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.'  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  oiirie  Year  Published every  Saturday at !  ;B.C.  @n  -'THE two principal reasons  why   you   should  buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are, the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Proviiioner*  Calgary    Vancouver    Edmonton  sassMBsas&^ms^^  General Sir Beauchamp Duff;  commander of the British.  army in India.  Dwarf Peas Are a Good Crop  Dwarf peas are often avoided.  There is a common idea that they  do not., bear profitably. This is  a mistake. They produce surprising quantities. Tall-growing  peas' do not produce any pods  near the ground. The lower  pods are often two feet from the  ground. This is. a, great waste  of space and straw. The dwarf  ones begin ,to bear a few inches  up from the ground, and the pods  cluster on top. They only attain  a'height of one foot or 15 inches.  They cah be grown at those distances apart in the rows, but tall  varieties must be kept five or  six feet asunder. There are,  therefore, four or five rows in  the place of one tall one, and  this number will produce more  pods than the tall. The latter do  miich harm to neighboring crops  by shading them. . Labor and  expense are gone to in staking  them, while the dwarfs require  none. There are early and late  varieties amongst them, and  marrowfats as well.  t  CLUB OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications,  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier   .       .       .       .       .$1.00   g^ papers  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg 1.50   f  $2.00  $2.50  The Courier  Canadian Coimi  dan;  Toronto.  $1.00   D\,  ,     ������������������������������������������������������ Both papers  1.50    f  ���������'���������   for  .  $2.50  $2.0Q  The Courier   .       .       .       ���������  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  .'��������� 1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for  . ..' $1.75  \,  The four papers may be had for, $4.50.  "O. it camp o'er mymlrld like tlia sweet South  Blowing upon a bed of violets, stealing and  v giving odor."  If the world's greatest poet  can  clothe  this  modest,' little  flower in such beautiful language  it surely behooves us to give it  a corner in every home garden.  The banks and roadsides of northern B. C. testify its willingness, in its wild state at any rate,  to do its share ,of making this  world more fair, and sweet.   We  t regret, perhaps,' that it does not  ! here shed forth its delicious fragrance that its-wild cousins of  European   countries   do which  enjoy the genial influence of the  .Gulf Stream and the climatic influence' so favorable to its development.  Here, scientific floriculture comes to our aid and gives  us the real article clad in royal  purple and loaded with the sweetest perfume.   Unfortunately the  beauties refuse to flourish without special attention and care.  For over twenty' years the  writer has , grown (or tried to  grow) the standard varieties of  violets, but only within the last  two years with complete success  At Rivers Inlet in the spring of  1900, our'first great reward was  in a large bed of the Czar type  which, in early' spring, was so  profuse in bloom one could hardly  see a leaf, the whole plot being  smothered in thousands of purple  blooms scenting the air for hundreds of yards, so that everyone  remarked on their fragrance.  Mext fall, this bed, was extended and special care taken to  protect it from cold, but,> alas!  the following spring hardly one  violet, lifted its head and the  whole bed was a failure, the erratic winter weather had destroyed the roots. In Bella Coola  much the same results were experienced until 3 years ago we  tried the'simple method of a 3 x 6  foot frame, with glass sash, for  winter protection, with the extra  cover of two empty bran sacks  over the plants and about a foot  of dry-strawon top of the sacks  on the approach of cold weather,  leaving the frame entirely alone  till spririg'returned.  Nothing could be more encouraging; every tiny plant wintered through, hundreds of-large  blooms,- exceedingly,sweet, covered the bed and .through the  kindly auspices of the ladies Mrs.  Grant was able to give them sufficient flowers from that bed to  realize from sale by auction $6.50,  to buy wool for sox for the brave  lads that left thi.s valley, for overseas.  .,  1917 is just as encouraging:  three days ago (17th) I removed  the straw and'sacks, and there  the young buds, in clusters, are  awaiting a chance to give their  share of joy and sweetness to all  who come their way, and invite  the ladies once more to send them  in any way .they choose on an  errand of love and remembrance.  Come along friends in two or  three weeks and enjoy their  beauty and fragrance with us.  Personal experience is not transferable, but violets are; and as  far as possible we will, give to  our neighbors a strongs plant  from this plot and they can have  their own experience therefrom.  This present bed is the Princess  Louise variety,, and are grown  from one roqt planted three  years ago, and everyone can have  violets by the hundred around  their homes if they see to it that  they have the winter protection  that this climate calls for.  S. Le C.Grant.  J  /���������!.'���������  South Africans being developed as a great orange producing  country. Nearly a half-million  orange trees have been planted  there in recent months. Many  large groves are planned. When  the new groves begin to produce,  South Africa may figure as,another California. About 45,200  boxes are exported each year.  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-toidate stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    Q  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the most suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  ils - Varnishes -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.   Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYMLDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA^ B.C.  a.  ^ra^KWWJjfleWJMSSl [F YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  rISIT BELLA COOLA. .EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR FEBRUARY  Compiled  by Mr. C. H.  Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 31.   Minimum. 16.  Highest Max. (16th) 49.   Lowest Min. (l'st> 3  below zero.   Rainfall, 1.74. Snow25in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  )L. 5���������NO, 16  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, MARCH 31,  1917.  $1,00 a Year  renchJLre Progressing  'aris, Mar. 27.--Despite the  living rain and every obstacle  la broken ground the French  rces are progressing against  fe Germans. General Nivelle's  pops reached Holmbray, south  " Coucy forest. During night  e enemy unsuccessfully attack-  * the new French positions be-  leen Oise and Somme, they  St heavily. Fire of French guns  ploded munition depots be-.  id the German lines.  ill Up N ational Guards  ,. /ashington,   Mar.  28. ��������� The  ational   Guard   organizations  jled into Federal service today  |eighteen states are to be used  I police protection purposes,  le new organizations ordered  ft today comprise twenty-five  pusand men and the govern-  ������nt' is taking every precaution  linst German spying or Ger-  in ruthlessness.    Pacific coast  i ts ordered to mobilize. Presi-  fht Wilson  signed   the  order  iking the-maximum strength  ith'e navy (87,000 men) be incased to one hundred thousand,  (pisin's of Congress are carried  ft it "is believed that every na-  |nal guardsman will be under  * is ^iihjih^^ejjc.^ rr^riv~  tepresentatiye Harrison of the  5reigh? Affairs  Committe,  be-  lves that Congress will pass a  ft declaration of war against  Br many.  The government today granted  fe conduct to German officials  im China td pass through the  Suntry, they will probably land  [ San Francisco in a few days.  imerican liner St. Louis, the  1st U. S. vessel equipped to fight  fbmarines, arrived at her des-  lation unmolested.  JMen of the American tanker  fealdton were either suffocated,  fozen or drowned when their  |ssel was "torpedoed.  brutality by Germans  London, Mar. 27.���������More than  tree hundred women, children  d aged  men  known  to have  ccumbed to hardship and ex-  sure through the brutality and  iarvation   methods which   the  rmans *had   imposed   on  the  ench civil population immedi-  ely preceding and during the  treat.   Ruthless spoliation of  chards and crops carried out  official orders even disgusted  e German soldiery.   Torch and  namite used to destroy whole  llages.  General   Nivelle is  evidently  arpeningthe point of his wedge  ar Moy and Venedeuil between  . Quentin and Lafere,  with a  ������>od of men.    Allies advanced  rthest against Germans at this  fcint being north pf St. Quentin.  aneral Haig's forces fo'rgingVa  edge above St. Quentin, city  pw menaced from three sides,  elieved to be one of the strong-  It   positions   in   Hindenburg's  e.     British advance slower,  [ut methodical.    Fighting of the  ost desperate character mark-  S every inch of advance.  4000 Huns Cross Into  Holland Seeking Food  The Hague, Mar. 28���������Seeking  food, four thousand German soldiers crossed the line into Holland and wereinterned atZwolle.  French Occupy Coucy Forest  Paris, Mar. 28���������French troops  have occupied the village Coucy  le Chateau and are progressing  against Germans in the forest of  Coucy, having occupied entire  northern part of that tract.  Riots Reported in Berlin  , London, Mar. 28���������British captured Equari court ten miles south  east of Bapaume, also Longaves-  nes, three miles northwest of  Roisel. , Allied pursuit continued  hotly today and was marked by  violent fighting, both open and  of a massed character at half a  doz.������n points along the fifty mile  front now rapidly nearing the  permanent Hindenburg line.  French are within a mile'of the  Berlin*s Version  Berlin, Mar. 28.���������On account  of .rainy weather little righting  on the whole front. In forest  between Oise and Coucy le Chateau stronger French forces encountered our protecting troops,  which inflicted heavy losses on  the enemy ..before giving way on  account of a threatn ing outflanking movement.  Amsterdam���������Von Hollweg still  seeking peace, he is expected to  make further overtures to Russia  . Washington, Mar. 28.���������Many  Germans are fleeing to Mexico,  Hindenburg line and progressing jit isbelieved, however, they are  steadily   despite  inunendations not going to join a German army  and the increasing strong resistance of the enemy. Nearest approach of British to the line is  around Lagnicourt. Bitter fighting in this neighborhood yesterday, German massed forces desperately attempted to retake  village, but British held on and  beat off all attacks.  Riots reported in Berlin. Ru-.  mors of a revolutionary movement in Germany gained current  cy in Switzerland.  The hospital ship Asturia: of  12,000 tons, torpedoed by German  submarine, thirty-one lives lost,  |U. S. to Declare War  \ Washington, Mar. 28���������A resolution to be introduced to Congress  on April 3, immediately after President Wilson concludes address,  will-declare time has come when the United States must vindicate  decisively its honor and rights. It will declare that by acts of  Germany a state of war exists, and Congress places at disposition  of the president the means for vigorously prosecuting the war.  vv r*i *m    ��������� President Wilson is completing  Germans Flee to Mexico    hisindictment of Germany this  week. Foreign Affairs Committee preparing the war resolution.  Plans are under consideration to  ask Congress for a bond issue of  a billion dollars to be used for  purchasing French bonds.  but to dodge internment Pub  liclyannounced that government  does not plan to molest alien  residents if they obey the laws  pf the country.  Philadelphia���������200 marines belonging to the interned cruisers  Krop Prinz Wilhelm and Prinz  Eitej Freiderich, were loaded on  trains today and started for internment camps in Georgia.  twelve still missing.  ; Two British destroyers sunk,  brie struck a mine and the other  sank as a result of a collision.  and Help  Make Victory  Sure  *r  ������Aftf-. assvr*td  - that  my people will respond to every call  necessary to the success ojourcause���������-with  the same indomitable  ardour and devotion  that have filled me with  pride and gratitude  since the war began."  His Majesty King George  UR soldiers must be fed; the people at  home must be fed. And���������in spite of  Germany's murderous campaign to  cut off the Allies' Food supply, by sinking  every ship on the High Seas���������an ample and  unfailing flow of food to England and  France must be maintained.  'This is National Service-  Not to the Farmer only���������  But to YOU���������to everybody  This appeal is directed  WE must unite as a Nation to SERVE  ���������toSAVEand to PRODUCE. Men,  women and children; the young, the middle  aged and the old���������all can help in the  Nation's Army of Production.  EVERY pound of  FOOD  raised, helps  reduce the cost of living  and adds to  the Food Supply for Overseas.  For information on any subject relating  to the Farm and Garden, write:  INFORMATION BUREAU  Department of Agriculture:-  OTTAWA  PLANT a garden���������small or large.  Utilize  your own  back yard.     Cultivate the  vacant lots.    Make them all yield food.  W'OMEN of towns can find no better  or more important outlet for their  energies than in cultivating a vegetable  garden.  Be patriotic in act as  well as in thought.  i  Use every means available���������  Overlook nothing.  Russians Fall Back  Petrograd, Mar. 28.���������It has  been discovered that the ex-minister of the interior, Protopopoff,  was in secret communication with  Berlin by the aid of a wireless  station at the Czar's Tsarskoe  Selo palace.  New Russia budding forth,  steady improvement in general  conditions. Ministry working  indefatigably, spies arrested.  A German gas attack on the  western bank of the Chara river  compelled Russian forces to fall  back in an easterly direction.  Only Two Hundred Voters  Vancouver, Mar. 28���������Counting  of soldiers votes resumed yester:  day. Over one thousand vote?  were polled at Epsom although  there were only two hundreo  British Columbia men there. Prohibition ballots missing in return.  a  a  Jottings  D  Has it ever struck yoi\ that if  this valley was inhabited by a  real, live community they would  have electric light in their homes.  It cannot be done. Why not?  They have a plank sidewalk at  the Indian village.  Dominion Department of Agriculture  OTTAWA, CANADA.  HON. MARTIN BURRELL, Minister.  The Camosun arrived somewhere around noon hour last  Friday and after a rather lengthy  stay left forthe south.  Mr. B. F. Jacobsen came up  from Vancouver after an absence  of one month, during which he  visited several of the coast points  on business.  According to reports the total  quantity of halibut landed at  Prince for the month of February is 809,000 pounds, being an  increase of 231,000 pounds over  January figures.  We do not wonder why that  pretty harbinger of spring, robin  rebreast, fails to put in an appearance, as the weather we are  having would deter a braver  spirit than bold robin. Snow,  and then- well, they are still at  it counting the soldier votes on  P roh ibition.   Mr. M. W. Marvin of Atnarko,  was in town during- the week.  He reports things are very satisfactory, the cattle are in good  shape though the winter has  been longer than is usual.  Thanks, From Our Soldiers.  Perhaps very few communities  in Canada weremore thoughtful  last Christmas in remembering  the boys who have enlisted than  the settlement of Bella Coola.  For a small population we have  furnished quite a few brave boys  willing to do their "little bit."  And that 'Tittle bit" to some has  meant the supreme sacrifice,  Therefore, in remembering the  boys who are ready to do their  duty the ladies of the valley were  also honoring our dead heroes.  The Lysdahl Sewing Circle,  who have done so much in the  valley both in church and social  work, availed themselves of the  privilege to show their appreciate our soldiers by sending them  presents at Christmas. In return  the recipients have sent glowing  letters of gratitude, but space  prevents us quoting all of them.  The general inference is that our  soldier boys take off their hats  to the women of the valley for  their loving kindness.  The annual   meeting of   the  Bella Coola Liberal Association  was held in the Colony Hall on"-  Monday last.    Quite a few.new  members were enrolled.  Among the many matters to be  laid before the government was  -tke_,eJeaj]ing out of log jams in  the Bella Coola river, where such  destroy land and roads. . Th:e-  early construction' of the wagon  road to connect up with the. existing road .at Chilanco Forks  was most urgently dwelt on by  different members. Recommendation for a grant to the local  hospital was also passed on.  Officers elected for the ensuing  year were as follows: President,  W. D. Stephenson; vice-president, B. F. Jacobsen; sec.-treas.,  T. Livelton. Executive committee: B. Brynildsen, C. Brink, A.  Hammer, T. Thorsen, R. N. Livelton and H. Haakinson.  Alfred Blakemore came in from  Kimsquit last week and spent  the day in town interviewing old  friends. Mr. Blakemore informs  us that the winter over there has  been quite severe, the snowfall  being considerably over the average.   Mr. B. F. Jacobsen had a meeting with the local fishermen at  Hagensborg during the week,  they discussed the building of a  new cannery. It is thought that  the Dominion government will  issue a license for an extra cannery for the year 1917.  Has it ever struck you, that on  steamboat day we always have  -some kind of weather. There  must be a malign (or otherwise)  influence following the boat or  crew, as previous to the day of  its arrival we had basked in sunshine. In fact the ladies had  commenced working overtime  on their summer suits, but now,  winter again.  (Uhurrh Ntfttn*  C  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p. m.  l'reHcher for Sunday���������Rev.  W. H. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  >%>%  ?���������''"��������� i -'-'Li:  .:   ���������������������������������  -v <S������  ���������A. Urn i fc,'::Ji>!||i'1Me  -wif?fY-;!H������ tl������  ������i',  i \U   id  Hi  3 1  if  to  trf  a&  ���������! ������ J-  I  iff"  M  ������  HE  ill!  i (J? i  J$!3!JISTO#  "���������J!lit  *WlW������  !  <5>     ''I  4  1*11   ������<���������  *  ' ��������������������������� &  i  >*<!  ,"!  ���������*80! ''I  1 !  ft  v4r  ...������  !  wf.  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  5aWfli/l   March 31.1* J M  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year.... *���������������<������  6 Months   1    ������-75  3 Mentha    ������-50  United State*  1  Year -" *1S0  United Kingdom  1 Year -   .$1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible..  For Advertising Rates,  . Office.  Apply at  onymoua communications will be published. Uie  nan* and address of every wmer of such letters  must be {riven to the editor. ���������.,uj;  The Editor reserves the rijrht to refuse pubh-  citionofMyietter.    All manuscript at wnteCs  ��������� risk. '  ^aiuH ^opultjauprpma est lex."  SATURDAY, iMARCH 31,* 1917.  Borden Government Discard  Ross Rifle At Last.  So many of our brave soldiers  have died because of defects in  the Ross rifle that it is not any  too soon that the Dominion government has at last seen fit to  cancel the contract. Upon the  Borden government alone must  rest the responsibility, of supplying our soldiers with a rifle not  adaptable for war purposes. The  facts about the Ross rifle are in  need of careful restatement, so  that the public mind will harbor  no confusion in regard to such a  vital matter.  The fundamental fact to bear  in  mind is that the Ross rifle  Mark Three; with which our soldiers were provided in this war,  -Ts^ri^^TttBn'gBTeYmireTiTTsnovm  child. -It is of their authorization" and is   built according to  plans submitted by their experts  since they came into office in  1911. The Ross rifle of the Liberal regime was .known as Mark  Two, and is said to have been a  much sturdier and more serviceable weapon than its successor  which was given a longer barrel  and finer sights. It was a very  fine, target rifle���������none better���������.  but too delicate for active service where the shooting is naturally rough and ready.  With this fact in view the attempt of the Borden government  to shift responsibility for the  Ross rifle Mark Three to the  Laurier government would be  laughableif.it were not dastardly. Solicitor-general Meighen's  theory is that the Borden government-was bound "in perpetuity" by a contract made by the  Laurier government in 1902.  The words "in perpetuity" are  of coure fallacious. No contract  can be "in'perpetuity." But  outside of that this "perpetuity"  in regard to Ross rifles was sharply defined. It could be terminated by giving a year's notice.  That is to say, it could have been  terminated in 1912 or in 1913���������  pne year, two years before*-the  war started���������or again in 1914 or  any time within the last two  years and a half. As a matter  of fact there hasn't been a minute since the war began that the  Borden government, acting within the terms of the contract,  couldn't have stopped the manufacture of Ross rifle Mark Three  and had a better one made.  o     o     o     o     o  A New Era for Russia.  asty and the changes in the constitutional government opens up  a new era for Russia. The events  have happened so rapidly that  one can scarcely believe that the  great empire has become a Republic. There is no doubt that  Russia was dominated by Czar-  ism as Germany is by Prussian-  ism. The yoke had to be thrown  off sooner, or later. Coming  as it does, when rumors of a plot  in Germany to throw over the  Hohenzollern regime are so prevalent, may lead the German people to revolt against Prussianism  and thus bring about an earlier  settlement of this war.  The full  significance of  the  wonderful" changes   which  will  ensue in  Russia's conquest of  herself, the greatest, victory in  her history, is" hard to foretell;  but it will give the Russian parliament, consisting of the Duma,  or Lower House,'and the Council  of the Empire, -which was the  product of the revolutionary disturbances follow-irig the war with  Japan,   absolutely * full   power.  Previously .it   was   an elective  body enjoying only the shadow  of authority.    The group of reactionaries, or apostles of despotism, who surrounded  the Czar  and who up to the rocent startling   developments   completely  dominated him, took good care  to retain the substance.    Thus  parliament was little better than  a debating society.   It had no  say in the administration of the  army and navy^or in matters of  policy.   The control of legislation was in the.hands of ministers who were not responsible to  it.   It had partial control of the  budget, it is true, but" the pro-  ~fce'6?ure~mTa^fts^an  respect more apparent thanureal.  The changes in Russia's internal affairs will not embarrass the  Allies in the carrying on of the  war. One of the leaders of the  new administration declared that  the succesful termination of this  war was one of the reasons for  taking the step they did, he said:  "We assumed control of the Government of Russia in order to  bring victory   to   the   Russian  NO ALUM  PRINTED <  I PLA1NL.V  S^EWHITCST.  arms.  o     o     o     o     o  Peace Casualties.  There-were 1083 applications  made for indemnity under the B.  C. Workmen's Compensation Act  luring the months of January  and February, and others are  still coming in from victims of  industrial mishaps that occurred  prior to March 1.  o     o    o    cl  o  The Hun food controller says  only the Almighty can be held  responsible for the small bread  ration daily doled out to the German people. We were wonder-  ing why the Kaiser of late has  refrained from offering any compliments to the "good old German God." It may be a case of  strafing heaven yet, putting it in  the good old German way.  Farmers, Attention!  Our farmers attention is directed to the fact that the Dominion  Government is advertising largely the necessity of greater food  production. The. greater the crop  yield the surer of ultimate victory in this war we are. The  farmer plays no unimportant  part in this great struggle, and  it is up to him to do his very best  in utilizing ever inch of ground.  let him plant two this. He owes  it to himself, his family, and his  country to "help make the. production this year over the high-  water mark.  ������     o     o     o      ������  Road Superintendent System Abolished.  Radical changes in the system  of public works construction  throughout the province are foreshadowed in the public works  department by recent oilers  coming from the minister,.Hon..  Dr. J. H. King. ..  It is plainly intimated thatJhe  road superintendent/system will  be abolished on the ground that  to have a road superintendent in  each district, the official being  practically the appointee of the  member, savored too. much of  political patronage. It is claimed by the administration that  many of the road superintendents  have not been practical men at  the time of appointment and that  they gained their experience at  the "expense of the provincial1  treasury. It is also maintained  _that!in. joaany-of.-tlwweiJinflsi.rqa''*-  work under.the superintendent  has been patronage ������pure and  simple.  The plan'which it is said Hon.  Dr. King will bring into effect  will mean the appointment pf a  number of qualified civil engin-  eers who with their staffs will be  under the civil service act,and  who will each have charge of a  section of the province. They  will have road foremen for each  section. Instead of a road-superintendent for each constituency  the scheme will mean a road engineer for three or four, or���������pos-  sibly more, ridings. He wijl be  able to do his own engineering  work and his road foremenj,will  carry out construction under his  direction.  The Courier believes that- this  method will mean economy and  efficiency, particularly in getting  roads built to a st&ndard on the  best grades. The building of  roads up a mountain side in ore  direction and down in some other,  going nowhere, will be a thing  of the past. t Bella Coola is full  of the class of roads that cost a  lot of money and will now have  to be reconstructed in order that  they can be used.  Controls Dominion  Government.  Hon. John Oliver, minister of  railways, in his address on the  p.G. E. construction, had this  to say in respect to the Mackenzie and Mann interests:  "It was the same with the Canadian Northern Pacific," and in  the action of that road we have  another reason why investigation  in this case should be prompt and  thorough. On. February 16th 1  served notice "on the Canadian  Northern Pacific to produce certain books and; papers. The answer of Sir William Mackenzie  was a Dominion order-in-council  dated- four days later, placing  the line, in the province under  the Railway Commission and  taking it away from our control.  We there have the fact demonstrated that we have railway corporations in this province which  can get the government to do its  own bidding."  Some Difference.  Ex-postmaster, member of parliament, city mayor and councillor, Noah Shakespeare of Victoria,  makes these observations:  "To my mind the methods of  running elections in these days  are not as clean as they were in  the old times. The first election  in which I ran for Ottawa cost  me $50. The next election things  were getting closer to party  lines. My election that year cost  me close on $250. This showed  the trend":of things. It has now  grown to"the point that no poor  man can run; an election. The  consequence is that we are closing out the poor man and insti  tutilnig"a7government by au toe-  racy. Today we hear about elections costing as much as $50,000,  of course this is in the east. We  never heard a word about graft  in  British   Columbia  until  the  The end of the Romanoff dyn- If he planted one acre last year,  Th������  S. M. NEWTON  Pi  e Frince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these districts.  Wear the "Dayfoot"  Solid Leather  Shoe  MADE FOR B. C. WEATHER  G. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y 303 Mercantile Building  Georgetown, Ont. and        Vancouver, B. C.  T  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER,  B.C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE  OF THE  WEST'   BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   M ACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  "MADE    IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given  Letter Ord  en  ������SS  PACIFIC MILK  Should be used for cotfY-e,  tea, pudding, w h i pned  cream and all cereals.  44  YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC  FOOD   PRODUCTS   CO.,  LTD., Manufacturers  Office; 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.  3  politicians from the east began  to come in.''    ,  o     o    o     o    o  This may be one of the reasons  why the people of British Columbia a few years ago resorted  to introducing native sons as the  most-.-.fit to run the govern* .  But one of those, bad politics.  from the East, in the person.  Mr.'Bowser, got into thefrovt-  ment and at'bnce upset the hiu  hopes of British Columbia be ;  governed by native sons, info,  judging from our indebted^  m  ^  Royal Standard Flour  Makes The Big, .Clean Loaf  BEST  ���������n^JS\  A loaf of Bread baked with ROYAL  STANDARD. FLOUR cannot be  otherwise than big, cleanrJig;htand  ta3ty, because you are putting into  it the cleanest and purest Flour it  is possible to make.  Made from the hearts only of the choicer Canadian wheat and made CLEAN���������absolutely f'ce frcm  dirt, fluff or lint.  Next time order ROYAL STANDARD.  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  05  -F  PS  1  GREAT   WEST  TEA  Id-time  o  The New Tea, with the  flavor  PACKETS   ONLY  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO, Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B.  HOE  J ��������� C  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGKK SKI^'ICK  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.   "CamOSUIl"   Leaves  Vancouver  every  Tuesday at 11  p.m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays a. m.  *���������  ^  I  S.  S.   "COQUITLAM"   sails    from   Vanc'i  nightly, carrying Gasoline and  Explosives.  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  ���������ft  fort-  1 call  For rates of Freights, Fares and other ii)furm������'"':t  Head Office, Carball St., Vancouver; or r,K<>. m-  agent,  1003 Government St., Victoria.  .���������ij.i'iyt0  \m  v ofc������$S  A?  Advertise your Wants in the Cob*^ BELLA* COOLA  COURIER  r  V  1  K  I  J*  -   H  ���������rrnet  liticii  rsom  rover:  ie felt  abcis  in h  Leant  w  ^  fl  B5SI3Ss3  41  r  imefil  ,*  w  TO  INVESTORS  !hose who, from time to time, have funds requiring  investment may purchase  AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  IN   SUMS  OF $5O0 OR ANY  MULTIPLE THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from the date of  purchase.  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war. loan issue  in Canada other than an issue of Treasury Bills or other like short date security.  Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.  A commission of one-quarter of one percent will be allowed to recognized bond and  stock brokers on allotments made in respect of applications for this stock which bear their  stamp.  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA,  OCTOBER 7th, 1916.  iffe:;:^;'  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  GOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Territory, the North-west Terhi-  ��������� Tories and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 in  acre. Not more than 2,560 acrea will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Atrent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  .  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco-mting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N.B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  30E  couldn't have been governed  i\ worse by the real natives.  o     o     o     o     o  Encouraging.  A Britisher of  high  military  jpthority says  the  Allies   will  ���������-t  assuredly destroy Germ-  i> 's  menace  to World  peace.  n> strength of the Allies, he  l>s,   is   increasing,   while the  ju ionic powers are declining.  ie defeat of the Teutonic forces  therefore inevitable.    TheAl-  ���������^ are better equipped, both in  ?n, money and munitions,  to  pure a successful final drive.  Tnis sounds encouraging. The  t������Mt news from   France bears  i*" this that the war cannot last  fcudi longer; also not forgetting  that the boys from Bella,Coola  all say/that they will be home  for Christmas.  o     o    o    o    o  The Germans have discontinued the construction of Zeppelins, say reports from Zurich,  Switzerland, and in the same  issues of the papers which report  thisnews appears a report credited to an American traveller  returning from England that  England will go into the manufacture of dirigibles. England  already has, or will shortly have,  the control of the air, as well as  the sea. The Germans will have  to hide underground. This may  have something to do with the  Germans    busying    themselves  Fur Sales Agency  along the border, so that when  the time comes for the final sett-'   . ���������;;. . .. ,    ��������� , ���������  _  I 600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  ling Up of the struggle, they may Yukon and Alaska have taken advant-  , , , , ,     _,    ,   , ���������������������������    age of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  be Close by and  can  ask  God  to     ;Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  ' of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  ] We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Oiir commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  jo  o  HOE  ~^&v������*  L?  ���������*Tt-  irief  let the Alps fall on them. ������  O       O       O        O       O '[  Dawn of Hope for Russia.  Russia's new cabinet will base  its policy on the following principles: )  First: an immediate general  amnesty for all political and religious offenses, including terro-  ist acts and military and garrison  offenses.  Second: liberty of speech and  of the press; freedom ior alliances, unions and strikes, with-the  extension of these liberties to  military officials within the limits  admitted by military requirements.  Third: abolition of all social,  religious and national restrictions  Fourth: to proceed forthwith  to the preparation and convocation of a constitutional assembly,  based on universal suffrage,  which will establish a governmental regime. ���������  Fifth: the substitution of the  police by a national militia, with  chiefs to be elected and responsible to the government.  Sixth: communal elections to  be based on universal suffrage.  Seventh: the troops which participated in the revolutionary! Bulletin, the onions that are now  movement will not be disarmed, bemg sold by the dealers of that  but will remain in Petrograd.  Eighth: while maintaining strict  military discipline for troops on  active service, it is desirable to  abrogate for soldiers all restrictions in the enjoyment of social  rights accorded other citizens.  not so bad, but is nothing to a  curious Chicago reporter, who,  with a basket as a purse and  some, nice potato specimens from  Idaho as'"money," had no diffi-  culty_in "negotiating the gate."  The tubers ;in one case passed  current at .3 1-2 cents each. The  cashier of a moving picture show  accepted three of them for a  ticket. A taxicab chauffeur took  six for a ride of two blocks, and  at a five-and-ten-cent store ..the j  reporter bought two "diamonds"  and a picture frame, with the  same "legal tender."  o     o     o     o     o  How They Do It.  According to the San Francisco  Tubers as Cash.  The settlers of Bella Coola are  selling their potatoes at sixty  dollars a ton.    Of course this is  Comfort and luxury assured at &  minimum cost. Many Prince Rupert testimonials prove its worth  j Have You Got $20 ?  I If not your credit is good  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented In Canada)  Installed in "your kitchen range  will give you all the hot water  you can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started. 121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  user a booster. You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  seen these results. $20.00 is the  Cost. Absolutely no charge unless' satisfactory.  A bath supply within twenty minutes  after fire is started and then a new sup-  plv every twenty minutes thereafter.  Wall radiators can also be run from  your hot water boiler and other rooms  heated rvith no extra cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surprise You  Investigate!  Harry HansonThPeluR^,e  | P. O. Box 395 |  I   139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.   I  city at $12.50 per hundred pounds  were bought from the growers  at$2 per hundred. This not only  throws a valuable light upon the  high cost of living, but incidentally an illuminating sidelight upon the manner in which wealth  accrues to the horny-handed agriculturist of the commission  house district.  Watch  Repairs  Send your watch to us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.  A price given before proceeding with work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.  O. B. ALLAN  Diamond Merchant���������Optician  Granville and Pender, Vancouver, B.C.  1 hejylason & txisch Piano  of to-day will rnai\e plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  i  6 T  Let us attend  your Victor Record  jJ   mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd:  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  ���������BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  ���������WKHaWltiMABnUHMBMMaBtMIK  ^  \X/HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \^7HAT person so independent?  \X7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  HTHE REASONS for this enviable condi-  , ���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was_ established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  ove'r twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  <     ?  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  '���������-', .'-'ii;  ���������4'%  -:iiS  Wtf t.".-:  ml  h  hi  M  ?ii*'.  v,,'-  if*      '   ������ "  it*  ,i������  "^  3  BELCS- COOLS COURIER  Saturday,  March 3  !��������� ������IJ "  Subscribe  for the  ONEDOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  jhe mainland coait between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  ;   A distance of six hundred miles  %  It will be to your interest to ������eep well informed7 regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  ^THE "COURIER"    .  GIVES THEM...  ^ADVERTISERS  \ Now is the time to keep  :���������. your 7 name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  Government,Should Clean Up the  Salmon Streams.  Editor, .  Bella Coola Couwer. j  We all have been reading a lot j  about the increased demand forj  B. C.  Salmon,   especially since j  the great war-started.    It is one j  of the chief assets of__this pro- j  vince and whilst it has brought j  in many millions of dollars very  little has been done towards increasing the output, especially  towards securing and protecting  the  spawning   grounds.      The  future and continued success of  the fishing industry, chiefly the  salmon, can be secured only by  clearing   the   obstructions  and  otherwise facilitate the access to  the spawning grounds   of  the  "silver horde.";  'J  Take   for   instance,  amongst  many   others,   the   spawning  grounds of the Bella Coola river.  Living as I do in the immediate  vicinity I have been impressed  for many years by the'amount  of fish not reaching the spawn- j  ing grounds and  dying by thej  ton before fulfilling their useful  purpose.    Although the government removed some,   log jams  during the past few years, yet  the work will never be effective  withouTfceepTng il'up��������� especially  where the obstructions are so  complete as to bar all ways up  the river.'   There, are several of  them iipXthe Atnarko river, one  of the two main - tributaries to  the Bella Coola rivei���������how many  up the other, the longer and larger, White Water river, Talchako,  I don't know, not having visited  that locality for years:    But at  least where,-the access  to the  Atnarko ��������� is "comparatively - easy  something  should   be  done in  time and "at the proper time, that  is at low water, and I feel confident the"mohey, thus spent will  come back' a hundredfold -to our  province. ~: '��������� > - ~-  .:-.-. Old Timer.  ,.  - -r w rmmru**B^*miall!*s*e~s*yei,s  AawfeS  General Sir BeaiichampDuff,'  commander of the British- ,���������  army in India.  The Russian revolution-was the  shortest and least bloodless of  any revolution in history.  D EAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  Job Printing  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right  buiLD UP YOUR HOME  U TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you' are in earnest is to  practise it/  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  -"THE two principal reasons  *   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are. the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money al home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisionera  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Burns  Dwarf Peas Are a Good Crop  Dwarf ,peas are of ten avoided'.  Thereis a common jde^tltaftttiey  do not. bear,profitably:' This.is  a mistake. They produce sur-r  prising quantities; /Tall-growing  peas do not produce any ..'pods  near the., ground;, ^ The J lower  podsare often two feet from the  ground. This is -a great waste  of space and straw. The dwarf  ones begin to .bear a few'inches  up from the ground, and the pods  cluster on top. Xhey only attain  a height of one foot or )5 inches.  Thev cab be grown at those Sis-  tances apart in the rows, but tall  varieties. must be -kept five or  six feet asunder. , There are;  therefore, four or five rows in  the place of one tall one, and  this number will produce more  pods than the tall. ' The latter do  much harm to neighboring cropa  by shading them. . Labor and  expense are gone to in staking  them, while the dwarfs require  none. There are early and late  varieties amongst them, and  marrowfats as well.    /  I he Courier  !     $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA; B. C.  <r  CLUB OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications-  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier   .       .       ... $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  l. 50  $2.50  The Courier   .       .  Canadian teffl&yffitB/ Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $2.00  Both papers  for  .  .   $2.0Q  The Courier   .       .       .       .       . $1.00  Family Herald & Weekly Siar, Montreal . . 1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for  .   .   $1.75  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  -J  "O it cam- o'er my mind like t>* ������*eet South  BfcwU ������Pon . b^ of vfaleu. .t������bw ������d  giving odor.  If the world's greatest poet  can clothe this modest, httle  flower in such beautiful language  itsurelv behooves us to give it  a corner in every home garden.  The banks and roadsides of northern B. C. testify its willing-,  ness, in its' wild state at any rate,  to do its share of making this  world more fair.and sweet. We  regret, perhaps,' that it does not  ; here shed fcrth Jts delicious fragrance that its-wild cousins of  European countries do which  enjoy the genial influence of the  .Gulf Stream and the climatic influence so favorable to its development. Here, scientific floriculture comes.to our aid and gives  us the real article clad in royal  purple and loaded with the sweetest perfume. Unfortunately the  beauties refuse to flourish without special attention and care.  For over twenty years the  writer has , grown (or tried to  grow) the "standard varieties of  violets, but only within the last  two years with complete success.  At Rivers Inlet in, the spring of  1900, our-first great reward was  in a large bed of. the Czar type  which, in early spring, was so  profuse in bloom one could hardly  see a leaf, the whole plot being  smothered in thousands of purple  blooms scenting the air. forhun-  dreds of yards, so that everyone  remarked on their fragrance.  Mext fall, this bed was exr  tended and special care taken to  protect it from cold, but, alas!  the following spring hardly one  violet, lifted its head and the  whole bed was' a failure, the erratic-winter weather had destroyed the roots. In Bella Coola  much the same results were experienced until 3 years ago we  tried the simple method of a 3 x 6  foot frame, with glass sash, for  winter protection,- with the extra  cover of two: empty bran sacks  oyer the plants and about a foot  of dry.strawon top of the sacks  on the approach of cold weather,  leaving the*frame entirely alone  till gpririg returned.  Nothing could be more encouraging; every tiny plant-wintered through, hundreds of-large  blooms; exceedingly _.sweet, covered the bed and .through the  kindly auspices of the ladies Mrs.  Grant was able to give them sufficient flowers from that bed to  realize from sale by auction $6.50,  to buy wool for sox for the brave  lads that left this valley, for overseas.  . 1917 is just as encouraging:  three days ago (17th) I removed  the straw and sacks, and there  the young buds, in clusters, are  awaiting a chance to give their  share of joy and sweetness to all  who come their way, and invite  the ladies once more to send them  in any way .they choose on an  errand of love and remembrance.  Come along friends in two or  three weeks and enjoy their  beauty and fragrance with us.  Personal experience is not transferable, but violets are; and as  far as possible we will give to  our neighbors a strong-plant  from this plot and they can have  their own experience therefrom.  This present bed is the Princess  Louise variety* and are grown  from one root planted three  years ago, and everyone can have  violets by the?hundred around  their homes if they see to it that  they have the winter protection  that this climate calls for.  S. Le C. Grant.  South Africans being developed as a great orange producing  country. Nearly a half-million  orange trees have been planted  there in recent months. Many  large groves are planned. When  the new groves begin to produce,  South Africa may figure as another California. About 45,200  boxes are exported each yer.r.  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN ig<j5.  LEADING   DEALERS   !N  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING  AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Mens,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles; at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    \  4P  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the most suitable articles are kept at prices thai  invite competition.  Paints -  Oik  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glas������ware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods   Lowest Prices- Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYN1LDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  i*V  :r.*  *"������  *K$lV  <u  !" -"-OB  ���������*#������jfl  r  r.  A  l:m  Si  '.. u  t   JM  ������ V  r  ������-.  ; ,z  V'f  ��������� ij  ���������'*    &  I   - Tw  J ���������"������?.  i ���������  f A  i .-fii  *������������������:  -#  I  _  t /5C  ; ii i  1 ��������� qA  i - *-5  ���������   *������.������  i '-'SSI  . ��������������� 3|m mi  ,     ���������#'! it  "��������� r&m'n  > " *   -taik  'm.   *      *^T  ���������   \if  ...���������ftr6lli  AW  ��������� '"'���������VBSSB9H  smmaaaa  '*..

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xbellacoo.1-0170100/manifest

Comment

Related Items