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Bella Coola Courier Mar 10, 1917

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 n  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR FEBRUARY  UrBeth, of the  Compiled by Mr. C. II.  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature:'Maximum, 81.   Minimum, 16.  Highest Max. (ICth) 19.   Lowest Min. ilsl) 3  below ze.ro.   Rainfall, 1.74. Snow 25 in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 13  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 1917.  $1.00  ear  Why Germans Retreated  Were Fast Becoming a Garrison  '. of Gibbering Lunatics  London, Mar. 7.���������British aviators dropped bombs on German  blast furnaces at Brebach.  One reason why Germans re-  ' treated along the Ancre was because they were fast becoming a  garrison of gibbering lunatics.  Their position had 'become more  hideous than scuppers of hell:  mud, bottomless in places, and  : ceaseless pounding of . British  guns turned .their positions into  stench pits too horrible for human nerve to stand.  German government sends a  wireless to Count' Berristorff at  sea asking him to explain how  the German note in regard to  bringing Mexico and Japan into  war with the United States was  divulged, also warned him not to  grant newspaper interviews on  the situation. ���������  Bonar Law replies to critics  and says government will not  withdraw the Saloniki expedition  nor was Roumania forced to enter the war.  Swedish government has resigned following the refusal of  thirty million crowns appropriation for preserving Sweden's  neutrality."' Mirii'stry'now^faces  a crisis.      "' ,  After Saturday, Holland' will  be compelled to prohibit the export of bread to- Belgium on account of the German submarine  warfare.  U-Boat Menace a Failure  New York, Mar. 7.���������Dr. C.'  Chakiaberty, Hindu physician,  and Dr. E. Sckunner, a German,  are under arrest charged with  setting on foot a military' expedition against a friendly nation.  They will be arraigned today before Federal authorities. The  arrests reveal a fresh German  plot in India. Both the accused  admit having received sixty  thousand dollars^ to start a revolution. This sum was paid by  Wolff Von Igel, notorious Hun  agent who is now aboard the  Frederick VIII travelling with a  safe conduct pass.  Two million dollars propaganda  fund left by Count bernstorif in  the United States.  Concrete evidence that the U-  boat menace is a rank failure. -  U. S. Not Justified in  Getting Excited  Amsterdam, Mar. 7.���������United  States is not justified, in becoming ixcitod. After considering  the matter for several days this  is foreign secretary,- Zimmerman's -defense of the German  plot against the Republic. He  only regrets that the scheme was  found out.  Tokio, Mai*. 7.���������Japanese press  attacks the United States for the  treatment accorded to Japanese  in the States. The press remains  u hconcerned oy e^^i������elpsur^  of ^the German pJ^t^|$pHcate  Japan and Mexico in a-war with  the United States;  .  ^   ���������>:. ���������''������������������!���������  Havana��������� Direct evidence of  Teutonic efforts to stir up a rebellion on the island' is discovered  U. S. Senate Reject  Armed Neutrality Bill  _ ri  Washington,^Mar. 7.���������United  States supreme court awards, the  steamer Appam to her British  owners.  Senator Lodge, Republican,  this afternoon introduced the  Armed Neutrality Bill in the  Senate.' JSenator Owen amoved  the introduction of the Bill not  in.order, that Bill had died'with  the sixty-fourth Congress last  Sunday.. Vice-president Marshall  in chair, sustained Sen. Owen.,  The president is in a quandry,  but will not attempt to arm merchant ships unless a loop-hole in  law, is found.'  Austria's reply re-unrestricted  submarine warfare declares she  cannot give up the right to sink  "enemy", "merchant ships, but  does not include neutral merchant shipsj "under these rights,  hence the authorities are inclined  to feel she- has 'stretched a point  in order.to meet American efforts, to avert a break.  ��������� Werner Horn, alleged German  array officer, charged " with ^responsibility, in a plot to blow up  the C. P. R. bridge crossing Canadian .border at Vanceborro,  Maine, must face trial: Supreme  court.dismissed Horn's appeal.~  Hold Captured Trenches  Paris, Mar. 7���������Desperate fighting continues in the region ol  Cauriers wood and Douamont,  but the French' troops,, refuse to  be dislodged from the-captured  trenches.   Paris, Mar. 8.���������French forces  raided German trenches and took  prisoners between the Disne and  the Aisne.  Action U.S. Senators Condemned as Treasonable  Washington, Mar. 8.���������"Wilful  men" arouse a storm of protest  and Senator Stone may be deposed as chairman of foreign relations. Democrats in St. Louis  demand his resignation from the  Senate. Cleveland press say  Stone is one of "Kaiser'sdozeri"  and can no longer be trusted, also urges the other eleven Senators be not forgotten, and publish ..pictures of the filibusters  along side that of Benedict Arnold. State legislature denounce  course as treasonable.  Merchant ships will be armed.  President Wilson now - satisfied  he has power to take action without approval jof Senate.  Washington Times says Senator Stone's action is treasonable.  St. Louis���������Democratic organizations here last night denounced  Senator Stone as a traitor.      \  Lincoln, Neb. ��������� A resolution  branding-Senator Norris as trai-  tor-to his,staterand the United  States was taken up by the state  senate today.  Portland���������Petition demanding  resignation Senator Lane was  circulated throughout Oregon today. Petition says, "No words  can describe our chagrin that  State of Oregon should ���������be so  mis-represented and disgraced  by your action."  ��������� St. Paul���������Large number German-Americans who constitute  one-fourth of Minnesota National Guards are under suspicion  after the conviction of private  Scharfenberg of treason. He'  wrote to his mother in Germany  ridiculing the American army  and attacking President Wilson,  he also asserting that ten million  Germans in the States would revolt-in event of war with Germany.; His letter was intercepted  by British censors and returned  to U; S; government.  ,  Wheeling���������Senator LaFollette  lecture here today was cancelled.  His'^filibustering tactics being  condemned.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  4985 Ships Entered and  Left British Ports Last Week  London, Mar. 8���������British troops  have approached almost within  range of Bagdad.  British troops made further  progress northwest of fries and  north of Puissieux au Mont.  Twenty-six vessels sunk during past week, while 2508 ships  arrived, sailings totalled 2477.  New York- Cunard liner Car-  mania docked yesterday, reports  British captured 48 submarines  between Feb. 1 arid 16.  Hotel Fire at Hope,  ���������Guests Cremated  Hope, B. C, Mar. 7.���������Eight or  ten men were cremated by fire  which destroyed the famous old  hostelry, Coquahala Hotel, here  at 3:30 this rooming. The flames  spread with lightning rapidity,  sleeping guests given little warning an'dvfled jn nightclothes, several women-were rescued,in a  thrilling manner. Hotel valued  between twenty-five and. thirty-  five thousand dollars.  The known dead are: Thomas  '*^f^tiKii^ncialh6rticul|iarist;i  ^ffciouier; 'Bert Ready, miner;  Bill ^cEeever, miner; Thomas  Taylor, liirnberman, Vancouver;  George, Atkins, K. V. Ry.; Tom  Kehoe; lumberman, Vancouver;  and an unknown Serbian; ;,  S. S. Camosun arrived on Saturday last .at 11: a. m.... Among  the arrivals' were Mr. and Mrs.  W. Linnell and E.'B. Dawe.  The passengers leaving were  Mr. and Mrs. W. E.* Gallienne,  Mrs. - J. R. Morrison, Mrs. ' A,  Wood, Messrs. I. Fougner and  F. Broughton. ���������  Mr. and Mrs. W.'E. Gallienne,  and Mrs. J. R. Morrison left  Bella Coola for Ocean Falls,  where they intend to make their  homes for a season at least.  But the attractions of Bella  Coola are such that they hope  o r  their" stay ' away' will only be  temporary.  Mrs. A. Wood left for her home  at Ocean Falls after having spent  a few weeks here visiting among  friends.    ���������  Iver Fougner, Indian agent,  took a trip to Bella Bella in the  interests of the progressive Indians of that beautiful village.   :  Frank Broughton, provincial  constable, does not advertise his  goings and comings so we cannot tell the reason for his flight  at this time. But it is safe to  conclude that-as a consequence  of his trip somebody will be  brought to grief.  W. Linnell and E. B. Dawe are  like the migratory denizens of  the air.1." They stay here through  the summer, but in the fall depart for.-warmervdimes to spend  the'winter months. They are  now back again at the cannery  where they will run engines arid  carr^.on.o&'eMntricate work.j  *-0*^mtf^      '    :: .   J   .  "��������� ��������� vXvW'^^'Vi.k"?-,'^**-''-' ���������������������������        '.  "''     'j  '  ;. Last Sunday the Hagensboirg  church>;\vas-well filled .by an ap-  preciatiye audience , which ^had  gathered to listen and take part  in a discussiori of how to make  the work of the church more ef-  fectitye: The usual Sunday-service-in the forenoon had given  way for the occasion:  Rev. Mr, Sageng opened the  discussion emphasizing the necessity for every Christian to  engage in some activity for the  extension of the Kingdom, and  not leave all the work to be done  by the pastor.  The rest of the speakers followed in the same strain,-but as  an [outcome of the proceedings  there was no resolution adopted  or plan formulated by which this  worthy object could be carried  out.  Although the church has done  good work in the past it is felt  that it does not reach the young  people adequately, they on whom  its hopes are centered for the  future.  In the eveningof Saturday last  week a large crowd of friends  and relatives of Ole J. Nygaard  gathered at his house at Hagens-  borg to offer him their congratulations and good wishes in honor  of his fortieth birthday.  The function took the form of  a surprise party, which is certainly the most pleasing way in  which friends can make a social  gathering most enjoyable. We  can imagine our friend Nygaard  just in from wading in the snow  and slush all day having thrown  off outer, wet garments, pulled  off his foot-gear and enjoying  the genial warmth from the stove  in comfortable dishabille when  a crowd in their best clothes suddenly, bursts; into the house,  crowds up arid1sjiak6i'^hdi|ith'  him in the most joyous mariner.  It seems that in a situation such  as that his cup of enjoyment  must nearly overflow. 'Under  such circumstances  some  men  would take to the attic, but Ok  would not be disconcerted even  under such an ordeal.  The party, among a lot of good  things to cater to the innermost  parts of men, brought as a birthday gift a fine roller-top desk,  which Ole will find especially  useful now being the secretary  of the Farmers' Institute.  A poem composed for the occasion expressing the sentiments  of the visitors was read and listened to with admiration and un-  der deep emotion.  After a protracted stay extending into the wee sma hours  the visitors departed after spending one of the most enjoyable  evenings of the winter.  And now Mr. Nygaard wishes  he could have birthdays come at,  least once a week.  The Indians caught a large  octopus in the bay last week.  Everybody at the wharf "on  steamboat.day had a good look  at the ugly object.  Christmas at the Front.  The boys at the front far removed from the gentle influences  of peaceful homes,'have an appreciation of the kiridriess.shown  them which we who dwell in our  accustomed surroundings do not  altogether grasp.  The slight sacrifice made by  the ladies of the valley in send-  ing Christmas parcels to the  front has met with such a chorus  of thanks from our boys that we  know our readers will enjoy the  reading of extracts from their  letters received by Mrs. Morrison as the secretary of the W.  C. T. U.    \  It will be noticed that the recipients shared the good things  they received with those who  were less fortunate and thereby  extended the happy Christmas  spirit.   "Thanks for your letter from  W. C. T. U. wishing me a Merry  Christmas and a Happy New  Year.  "I spent my Christmas coming  across on the boat and my New  Year in quarantine in England.  "Walter E. Ratcliff."  "Allow me to thank you very  much for the parcel received in  time for Christmas. The cake,  which was a large one, I divided  among thirty patients and I fancy had you been able to see the  boys' faces and to have heard  their expression of thanks to the  'Canadian women,' you would  have felt amply repaid for the  expense, etc., entailed.  "Henry G. Grainger."  "I am writing to thank the  ladies for their extreme kindness  and forethought in remembering  the boys at the front in the generous way in which they did.  My own parcel!was most."welcome and highly appreciated.  Its'arrival, was timed to the minute, as'it arrived on Christmas  Day. It brought back very pleasant memories of sunny days in  the valley���������days when such a  thing as war was unknown. It  brightened the Christmas prospects for several of us. Again  I thank you from the bottom of  my heart for the comforts and  pleasure that you have given us  all this Christmas.  "Bob Lees."  "Just aline to say I have received your Christmas parcel.  Please accept sincerest thanks  for it and your many- kind wish'-  es. Ladies like the members of  the W. C. T. U. at home' do more  to make, things easier for us here  than you will ever know. Please  convey to'the rest of the ladies  my heartiest appreciation. ;  _.'."-     "Ingyajd Urseth."  "Many thanks for the ,Xmas  box.   It was O. K. and I shared,  it out to my comrades.so we all  enjoyed it.  "I really don't think this war  will last very much longer now,  say the end of July or August.  I will .tell you all the news when "  1 come home. Give my.love and  season's greetings to all the  ladies in the valley., ,'' .  "P. J. Kenyon."  "I thank you and the W.;C. T.  U. .very much for your kindness.  I can assure you that the parcel  was appreciated very, very highly. 1 am getting along alright.  Kind remembrances to all.  ���������   ������������������'-_ "J. Dawe."X  "Only a few lines to let yoii' ������������������  know thatl received the welcome  parcel of cake and chocolate on  Christmas night. " Ihad -given  up hope of getting anything that  evening when' along comes ono  of the boys through the trench  asking for Sam Grant. He'did  not have very far to go for me,  especially with a cake from Bella  Coola. I handed it around to  some of the boys���������Arthur Goth:  ard, Pete Marren, Randolph  Saugstad and those that I saw  the next day. The cake and  chocolates could not have tasted  better. I thank the W. C. T. U.  again for their kindness.  "Sam Grant."   '  ������������������������������������������������������ ^ .  "I got the parcel from the W.  C. T. U. I reall do think it was  very kind and thoughtful of you  all. It is fine to think that you  still look upon me as a Bella Coola  fellow. Accept my best wishes  for a very happy New Year to  you all.  "H. L. Harris."  "I must thank you for the  lovely, bigparcel that arrived on  the 23rd. It was very kind indeed of you to send so much.  Please thank the rest of the ;.  ladies of the W. C.T.U. and tell  them I enjoyed the contents immensely and am very grateful to  them all for their kindness. .;'.  "Christmas day we spent in  the support trenches and thanks  to the W. C. T. U. parcel.and one  from my sisters, we were able  to have, a very enjoyable Xmas  dinner. .   .  "Fred Grant.";  Sunday School'  Church Service  ���������^lO^fi luza.  -7:30 p.m.  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W. H. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  9^^<&1&<Jr%>&?*i&&i><&&>-<VQ BELLA. COOLA COURIER  \9\7  .   The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year $1.00  6 Monthi       0.75  3 MonJlu    0.50  United State*  1 Year $1.50  United Kingdom  1 Year $1.00  Subscription* payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  Fob ' Advertising Rates,  Apply at  Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published .the  name anil address of every writer of such letters  must be triven to the editor.  The Editor reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter.; , All manuscript at writer's  risk.  'Pallia pinjuli auprrma rat lex.*  'SATURDAY, MARCH 1*), 1917.  The Purpose of Germany.,  An onlooker is, as a rule, in a  better position to form a more  correct judgment upon the actual  state of affairs in a contest than  the participants themselves. It  is therefore just now very interesting to know the opinion of  competent neutral authority on  the outlook of the war under its  present stage of development.  ��������� The Youth's Companion, one  of the'best weeklies published in  United States, in its last issue at  hand, has an article on the purpose of Germany in carrying'on  an unrestricted submarine warfare and.thus provoking the neutral nations. It believes there  are only two possible interpretations to, be found to account for  Germany's action:  "The first is that the German  government sincerely believes  that through ruthless submarine  warfare it is possible to starve  England before England through  its control of the seas can starve  Germany. If the German submarines can practically annihilate  all shipping to and from England,  Germany will win an unqualified  victory within a few months.  England will be compelled to accept whatever terms Germany  dictates���������and we must suppose  that they would include the surrender of the British fleet. Russia "and France will inevitably  collapse with England; and Germany will be free, if ifchooses,  to send its enormously augmented fleet and its seasoned troops  across the Atlantic to try to extort from America a settlement  vast, enough to compensate the  German people for the tremendous financial cost of the war.  "On the other hand���������and this  is from the evidence the more  probable  supposition���������the German government has embarked  on the submarine adventure with  no real hope of success, but with  the object of saving itself in the  eyes of the German-people.   If  the German government knows  th^t virtual starvation is imminent throughout the Empire, that  there is a scarcity of materials  for munitions and for.clothing,  and that the British and French  and Russians are planning offensives that promise to overwhelm  the Teutonic������ resources, what is  the most logical course, after the  failure of peace overtures, for it  to pursue?   It has encouraged  its people to believe that the submarines are invincible and can  sweep British shipping from the  sea. The German people, daily  pulling their belts together, will  not be satisfied unless the government uses its weapon. The  government knows that the results that the people expect are  not likely to be reached; but it  must use the weapon in order to  show the people that it has tried  everything. ' It understands that  the unrestricted use of the submarine is likely to bring the  United States and probably other  neutral nations into the war, and  it is not unwilling that it.should  be so, for it sees in the addition  .of new enemies a possibility of  saying to its people 'We are overmatched; we cannot, fight the  world. We must make peace.'  Convinced that the government  has done all it could, the German  people may be willing to accept  a peace ,that was wholly unacceptable so longas the submarine  weapon had not been tried, and  may be willing to retain in power a government that surrendered only under the pressure of  overwhelming force.  "The-German note is an indication that the end of the war is  near."  O       0       O       O       O (  The New Brunswick Election  The tide which has been run-  ���������  i  ning against the Conservatives  of Canada for the past year or  more has not turned, as the result of the New Brunswick election held February 24 abundantly  bears witness.   >  The Liberals in this election  have carried another' Conservative stronghold by a sufficient  majority to effect a needed house-  cleaning.  Although the Liberal majority  is not large, still it is a fair work-  ing majority and the opposition  will be strong enough to have a  substantial and beneficial effect  upon legislation and the new administration.  Out of forty-eight seats the  Liberals carried twenty-seven,  giving-them a majority of six.  This may not seem veryjnuch to  be proud of as compared to the  majority obtained in our provincial election; but as the Liberals  in the last election' held in that  province only elected two members the turnover is sufficient to  make the Conservatives sit up  and take notice.  The campaign was very short;  only one week from the day of  NO  ALUM | U  BAKIN&P0WB1R  nomination till the day of election. The administration, aided  by the force3 of the Dominion  government, did its utmost to  carry the election, and we know  from our own experience thatthe  parly in power has a tremendous  advantage in an election as  against the opposition, both in  funds and influence. But in this  instance it seems that the aid of  the Dominion -government;"did  their Conservative friends more  harm than good. All along the  Intercolonial Railway, which is  owned and controlled by the  Federal government, the vote  was especially heavy in favor of  the Liberals. The employees of  the government and their friends  were embittered because the  railway as run by the Dominion,  officials hud shown preference in  their appointments to Ameri  cans, and showed their resentment by voting for Liberal can:  didates. And thus there is another province added to the Lib-  eral column.    ���������  Now all the provincial goyern-  ments of Canada are Liberal  with the exception of Ontario  and Prince Edward Island.  In view of the result in New  Brunswick it will certainly be in  the interest of the Conservative  party to call a Dominion election  as soon as possible because the  longer the election is postponed  the less likely the Conservatives  will be of carrying it.  Last year, the chances of, the  Borden government being returned were very good and therefore the Liberals opposed an  election at that time, but after a  year has passed public feeling is  steadily growing thatthe Federal government is not equal to the  responsible position it holds in  these troublesome, times.  If the' election comes off this  spring there is a possibility of  the Conservatives being returned  but if it is:delayed another-six  months-their case, will become  hopeless. ,'(  ,000,00  , The esteemed Colonist publishes a fairy tale almost daily dilat-  ing with evident relish upon the  alleged conflict between the Liberal executive of Victoria and  the Brewster Government in the,  matter of appointments to the  provincial service. Cannot our  contemporary understand that if  the stories it prints are true, all  the more' credit attaches to the  Government for making appointments according to merit, rather  than in accordance with the demands of politicians?     -   ���������' ���������  O       0     0      o     o '  Last week we stated that the  subscription to Britain's last war  loan  amounted to' 3 1-2 billion  Maekay Smith, Biair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,  OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  DRY  OF  Send for Catalogue  'MADE   IN    B. C." ,',  Prompt Attention Given Letter^Orderi  dollars; this time we are able to'  tell that the Rt. Hon. Andrew  Bohar Law, chancellor of the exchequer, announced in the House  of Commons on February 26 that  it totalled the colossal sum of  ������1,000,321,950, or five billion, one  and one-half million dollars.  ' O       O   ;   O .'  O       O  'The cold snap'lately experienced in Europe has wrought great  damage to the stock of potatoes  in Germany.  This of course will increase the  distress caused by the shortage'  of food, but it is not likely that  there is any danger of actual  starvation. ' The German people  will continue to endure the privations with as good grace as  they can muster, but they will  survive.    But what will  have  more effect upon the duration of  the war than the shortage of  food is lack of material for the  manufacture of munitions of war'1  and for clothing, which is now  really serious. The British blockade of Germany is more telling  than the German1 blockade of  Britain will ever be. Even the  journals friendly to the Teutons  state that the. submarines will  never starve out Britain.  O       O      0:.<v O       O  ��������� In a note to the Brazilian.government Germany says it is determined to maintain the submarine blockade, to abandon it  would involve national annihilation.  Which admission' shows that  Germany no longer puts her trust  in the strength of her armies. ���������  "HP  Bella Coola Experimental Plot.   Report for 1916  S. Le C. Grant, Experimenter;  .--   '''    - ���������       Section 4.' Plot3. '' .'.������������������'  Sugar Beet���������Leviathan:'-sovvh'1-30 acre May 11;.germinated,May  22; harvested October 7; yield 2738 lbs. .Results, excellent  crop. Good shape.  Potatoes���������Rochester Rose: spwn'34'sets May 11; germinated June  1; harvested October 7; yield 72 lbs. Results, deep eyed, but  clean and good quality. ..        ��������� .,' '.-..''  "  Irish Cobbler: sown 35 sets May 11; germinated June 1;  .   harvested October 7; yield 141 lbs.   Results, fair crop,- clean  and good quality.  Plot 4. -   "  Kaffir Corn: sown May 22; germinated June 2. Results, failure,  nights too cold. Remarks, ploughed under in August and  sown to Crimson Clover,'which made good growth for green  manure in September.  Potatoes���������Mortgage Lifter:' sown 3 lbs. June 8; germinated June  " 22; harvested October 7; yield 105 lbs. Results, fair yield  for this, ground.  Royal Russet: sown 3 lbs. June 8; germinated June 22;  harvested October 7; yield 57 lbs. Results, poor crop. Thjs  variety seems to require rich soil.   Quite early.  Remarks, plot.loses most of early sun, due to proximity  of bush nearby.  Royal Standard Flour  Makes'The Big, Clean Loaf  A loaf of Bread baked with ROYAL  STANDARD FLOUR cannot.be  otherwise than big,'clean, light and  tasty, because you are putting.into  it the cleanest and purest; Flour it  is possible to make., '     -:  .Made from the hearts only of the choicest Canadian wheat and made CLEAN���������absolutely free frcm  dirt, fluff or lint. '        ,     .���������  Next time order ROYAL STANDARD. ���������  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  in  =01  Section 5. Plot 5.���������Gravel knoll.  Clover- Alsike: sown, April, 1916. Height 20 in., cut July 2.  Height 24 in., cut August 8. 'Height 22 in. cut September  20. Results, three good'.crops in blossom. Very useful on  dryland. Remarks, good growth and Bod ploughed under  in October. .   .  GREAT  WEST  TEA  The New Tea, with the old-time  flavor  PACKETS   ONLY  ~LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers - Vancouver, B. C.  NEWTON''  The , Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  Mouse of Commons;.for this Rid-  . While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these districts.  Plot 6.  Wheat (Marquis) and peas (Pruss. blue)���������sown May 1; germinated May 12; headed July 3; ripe August 15; days ripening  114; height, wheat 48 in., peas 46 in.; cut August 25.    Re  ' suits, fine heavy stand of both'and well filled*  . No smut or  rust. f  Plot 7.  Barley���������Manchurian: sown May 2; germinated May 13; headed  July 3; ripe August 15; days ripening 106; height 3 ft. 5 in.;  cut August] 5.   Results, heads well filled.  Oats���������Banner: sown May 2; germinated May 15; headed July 14;  ripe August 22;  days ripening 112;  height '4 ft. 5 in.:/ cut  '   August 25.   Results, good crop, clean and well filled heads.  Wheat���������Marquis: sown May 2; germinated May16; headed July  16; ripe August 25; days ripening 114; Height 4 ft.; cut Aug.  25.   Results, good crop, clean and plump.  Peas���������Arthur: sown May 2; germinatedMay ,16; headed July 16;  .        ripe August 25; days ripening 114; height 5 ft.; cut August  30., Results, good yield, well-filled pods.  Remarks, considerable grain lost',in many handlings and  poor threshing by neighbor's machine. Very little cmut or  rust on grain.   Treated with Formalin 1-40.  30C  ������  30E  To be cbriciuded in three issues."  ]&  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA GOOLA and VANCOUVER *  S. S.      CaiHOSllIl      Leaves  Vancouver every  Tuesday at 9 p.m. (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p.m.  S. S. "CoQUiTLAM" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement;. ������������������  For rates of Freights, Fares, and other information; apply to  Head Office, Carrall St., VANcouvEft ;^pr. Geo. McGregor,.  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.-    '       '  30E  DIOIC  hoe  W.  your Wants in;" the Courier  wjiii^wfritt^i^wwiat^iwwwU)^ nJ>  Saturday, March JO,  1917  BELLAi COOLA COURIER  3  I HOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  AT PAR  ION OF CANADA DEBENTURE  IN SUMS OF $500 OR ANY MULTIPLE THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payablo half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  ,ahy chartered, Bank in Canada) at the rato of five per cent per annum  from  the date of  purchase. ' . '  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as tho equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any, future war, loan issue  in Canada other than an issue of Treasury Bills or other like short date security.,  Proceeds of this stock aro for war purposes only. ���������  A commission of one-quarter of'one per cent will be>allowed to recognized bond and1  stock brokers on allotments made in respect of application's for this stock which bear their  stamp. ��������� f/   '  .;  For application forms apply to tho Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA, "  OCTOBEH 7th, 1916. ' '  , Germany will soon find out that  he who digs a j>rave of another  will himself fall into it.  The graves planned for Serbia  and France will ere long be occupied by Germany".  ��������� Germany's penalty for aggression will we hope be a lasting  lesson to all unduly ambitious.  United Farmers'of British Columbia  The farmers'of British Columbia have come to a realization of  the fact that in order to make  'the best out of their situation  they must unite and work for  the interest of each other as a  class by combining their strength  Almost all other classes have  seen the need of organizing for  mutual protection,and advancement, and found that it is efforts  well "expended. "  Two weeks ago(at Convention  Hall," Parliament Buildings, Victoria, a meeting of farmers from  Vancouver Island and the southern part of the Mainland metand  organized the United Farmers  of British Columbia.  The movemenjt which has crys-  talized in this'organization took  its beginning last'fall atCowich-  an, Vancouver Island. A general dissatisfaction relative to  artificial conditions inducing a  labor shortage, the continued increase in the cost of manufac  tured articles and the absence of  arfy^eornpensating return to the  farmers, decided the directors oi  the Cowichan Creamery'Association to call a mass meeting of the  farmers of the Cowichan district  to consider what steps might be  taken to improve'cmTditibrfsr-^--  The meeting was held November 4 and decided that an association be formed "to be called a  Farmers'Union, or similar name,  and*that efforts be made to bring  in other' districts of the province."  The committee appointed to  carry out this resolution, of which  Mr. H. C. Helgesen was a leading member, did such effective  work during the winter that  their,object has already been  realized by the organization of  the; United Farmers of British  Columbia, as stated above.  The objects of the "United  Farmers'! may be briefly stated  as follows:  1. To effect united action and  resistance when unfair taxation  affects the farmers interests.  , 2. To support only such candidates for legislature that will  support and defend, the objects  of the association.  3. To teach and encourage cooperative efforts among its members.  4. To promote the best methods of farming; to enlarge our  markets; to secure, best and  cheapest transportation.  5. " To secure by vigilant efforts legislation promoting the  interests of the farmers.  6. To promote social intercourse.  7. To settle disputes.without  "recourse to law.  ' 8. To take into consideration  any member's case of grievance,  hardship or* litigation, and defend our members as far as possible.  9. To carry on any business  deemed, advisable and authorized  by act of parliament.  The secretary of the association is George Sangster, Vancouver, to whom all communications  should be directed.  It organized with a membership of nearly 1000 and is now  fairly.launched to carry out its  objects, and with good leadership  we predict it will prove of great  benefit to'the farmers-of the  province.  ,We hope the enterprising farmers of this community as well  as the rest of the northern country will join the organization and  work for the common welfare.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  fOAL MINING RIGHTS or the Dominion, in  v' Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Territory, the North-* est Terri-  ��������� TORIES und in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of }1 an  acre. Not more than 2,500 acres wiil be lcaavd  to one applicant, ������������������  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the nichta applied for  are situated,  * In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of {5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise,  A royalty shall be paid on thu merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with bworn returns accenting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  tho royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returrm should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surlace rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10,00 an ucre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.        >  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the interior.  N.B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will nut be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  o   c  30E  5     O  Fur Sales Agency  ,600 dealers and trappers of B. C.,'  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sale* Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  i. We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  un  30E  3   H]  Dealers and Trappers  GET THE HIGHEST  PRICE FOR YOUR.  P. O. Box  . 863  , 157 McDougall  Ave.,  EDMONTON, Alta.  We pay all express and  mail charges.  Comfort and luxury assured at a  minimum cost.. Many Prince Ru-  pert testimonials prove its worth  HayeYouGot$20?  If not your credit is good  Harry Hanson  Special* Water Heater  ���������'*;���������* ,..'.;��������� (Patented in Canada)  Installed in your kitchen range  will give you all the hot" water  you can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started. . 121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  us"er a booster. Ytiu' don't know,  hot water, comforts, till you have  seen these/results. $20.00 is the  Cost. Absolutely no charge un>-  less satisfactory. ��������� ���������.'���������'  A bath supply within twenty minuiei-  afU&$re,is'started and then a new supf  ply cpiiy ttiye'niy minutes thereafter. j  ;f Wall radiators can also be run from  your hot water boiler and other rooms  heated niith no extra cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surprise You   :  Investigate! ".  Harry Hanson^JSUJ;?-'  P. O. Box 395  139 2na Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTRICT   OF   COAST���������BANGE   IZX.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver. B. C, occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land: (  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (i-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West 20 chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  ',   THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Oitted, November 30, 1916.  Jan. 6--March  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������RANGE  III.  Take Notice that I, Mark Srnaby, of  Ocean Falls, B. C, occupation timber  cruiser, intend to apply for permission  to  purchase   the   following  described:  lands: i  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Pulp. Lease 205;  thence North 20 chains; therice East 20  chains; thence North 20 chains;, thence  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20  'chain's;1 (hence East 20 chains; thence  South 7 chains more or less to'high,  water mark,of Cousin's Inlet; thence  following along said high water mark  in a westerly direction to a point due  east of this post; thence West 12 chains  more or less to this post, containing  140 acres more or less. ���������      ���������   j  (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 26, 1916, .   |  Jan. 27--Mar. 21.  TherAason QpRischriano  of la-Jay will make plain our  privilege to slate with authority:  "NO FINER  PIANO MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  tfjT Let us attend your Victor Record  jJ  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue'  hm-ason & Risch Ltd.  |   738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  im^ri  Y&/HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  " W^^" Person so independent ?  \)L7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  c=d  -rpHE REASONS for this enviable condi-  .. ���������*���������   tion of affairs  are   obvious to  anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild "winters make for excellent crops.  ��������� Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact ' was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  ,.*"- country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  i���������i  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable-in'ASvance.  ������������������'   CANADA.  One Year ���������  Six Months ..���������...',.  Three Months ..... .......  '������������������     UNITED STATES.  One Year..   ....$1.00  .... 0.75  .... 0.50  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year. .................... 1 .$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING 'CO., ,LTD.  .BELLA CGOLA, B. C  Enclosed please find:............  for Bella Coola Courier for........  .subscription  Name .���������.......,........:....>.  P. O. ���������;..-...'..'.   '      '.   '     " .    .���������.-"���������   ���������   "'   I'!',        ������������������  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed '?  BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday", March 10/191?  ol  c  hoe  21 11  iubscribe  for the  ouner  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasT: between Vancouver arid  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  It Will he to your interest to ������eep Well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"     *>  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before, the  public. , No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the. country. The" NorthrWest  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by,reading the "Courier."  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right.  Growing Rhubarb;  Now, when markets are obtainable near at baud one crop which  our farmers no doubt.would find  quite profitable is Rhubarb.  A quick way of getting results  is to purchase 2 or 3-year-old  roots, or dividing large ones.  Large ones may be divided into  as many plants as there are buds,  provided each bud has some roots  attached. The old plants may be  dug up and cut into pieces by  means of a sharp spade, or parts  may be cut off without digging  up the whole root.  The quickest way. to get a  plantation % is to buy selected  roots of good varieties and plant  them out in rows 4 feet apart,  the roots being planted 2 feet  apart in the rows for the small  | early kinds and 3 feet for the  large growing varieties, such as  Victoi'ia. In planting, leave the  bud nearly level with the ground.  Planting may be done at any  time from' autumn until spring.  Spring is the best time however.  Firm planting is,'necessary,  and when this has been properly done the tops of the crowns  will just' show above the soil. .  During trj.e first year after  planting, very few, if any, leaves  should be pulled from any plant,  and these only in' mid-season so  that the plant has a.chance to  make a good start and also to lay  up its store of food for the following year.  Rhubarb likes plenty'of manure. A good top dressing of  farmyard manure immediately  after planting would be good for  the plants, and every year afterwards, laying it on in the fall and  forking it in in the spring. Those  who live near-the sea might use  seaweed for the purpose.  If barnyard manure is scarce  and seaweed cannot be obtained,  give superphosphates in the  spring, or where the landis light  use kainit in the autumn. On  heavy land a spring application of sulphate of potash will be  beneficial.  Many English growers consider dung alone tends'to make rhubarb stringy. A good application would be 121-2 tons of dung,  400 lbs. of superphosphate, and  100 lbs. of sulphate of Potash  (or 400 lbs. of kanit) per acre.���������  Garden Magazine.  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Will You Help  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist.  RUILD  U TOWN.  UP YOUR HOME  Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is io  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  Our farmers are not particularly distressed over the soaring  prices of potatoes. But as the  present prices are the highest  ever known it is probably the  part of prudence to sell any surplus on hand as soon as possible.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  ie tour] _  $la Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  TPHE two principal reasons  1   why  you  should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon;  Lard, etc., are: ������������������" '  FIRST���������  There is none better.-  SECOND���������  They   are   the   only  -. '* brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Ogilvie's  Household Flour  s gives satisfaction  and keep your money at home  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packen and Proyiaionera  Calgary    Vancouver     Edmonton  order a bag now  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Bbys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    ������  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosT: suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  - Varnishes - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.   Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock J  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  '>:<���������'!  '  B.BRYNILDSEN& CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  EiaSEE  5S3E  miMWJMMJBaiMMBMIUIMIMIt se  :k  i's  ir  st  I  s,  s-  lies  p-  ill  er  it-  al  is  jtion������  sorts  ick  B.C  ^>i  im  m  m  iE  ^  %  H  Ms  fof  YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  'ISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR FEBRUARY  Compiled   by Mr. C.  H. Ursethvof the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 31.   Minimum, lfi.  Highest Max. (16th)-19.   Lowest Min. tlst) 3  below zero.   Rainfall, 1.74. Snow25in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  )L. 5���������NO. 13  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  jhy Germans Retreated  k Fast Becoming a Garrison  of Gibbering Lunatics  .ondon, Mar. 7.���������British avi-  ������rs dropped bombs on German  1st furnaces at Brebach.  )ne reason why Germans related along the Ancre was be-  ise they were fast becoming a  trison of gibbering lunatics,  jeir position had 'become more  leous than scuppers of hell:  jd, bottomless in places, and  iseless pounding of British  is tui*ned their positions into  |nch pits too horrible for hu-  fn nerve to stand,  ierman government sends a  reless to Countf Bernstorff at  asking him to explain how  German note in regard to  [nging Mexico and Japan into  Ir with the United States was  mlged, also warned him not to  int newspaper,interviews on  situation.  Jonar Law replies to critics  says government will  not  Ithdraw theSaloniki expedition  was Roumania forced to en-  the war.  Swedish government has re-  led following the refusal of  rty million crowns appropria-  for . preserving Sweden's  ltrality".^Ministry' now-faces  crisis.    -  ,fter Saturday, Holland will  compelled/to.prohibit the ex-  -t of bread to- Belgium on ac-  mtof the German submarine  irfare.  Boat Menace a Failure  lew  York,   Mar. 7.���������Dr.   C.  iakiaberty,   Hindu  physician,  fd Dr. E.Sckunner, a German,  under arrest charged with  tting oh foot a military expe-  fcion against a '-friendly nation,  ley will be arraigned today.here Federal authorities. The  rests reveal a fresh German  )t in India.    Both the accused  Jmit   having   received    sixty.  iousand dollars to start a revo-  tion.   This sum was paid by  |olff Von Igel, notorious Hun  [ent who "is  now aboard  the  federick VIII travelling with a  fe conduct pass,  'wo million dollars propaganda  jnd left by Count Bernstorff in  |e United States.  IConcrete evidence that the U-  >at menace is a rank failure.  S. Not Justified in  Getting Excited  [Amsterdam, Mar. 7.���������United  bates is not justified in becom-  fg excited. After considering  lie matter for several days this  foreign secretary Zimmerman's .defense of the German  |ot against the Republic. He  dy regrets that the scheme was  >und out.  Tokio, Mar. 7.���������Japanese press  ttacks the United States for the  reatment accorded to Japanese  the States. The press remains  iconcerned ove^^ti<ft^i?closur^  the German plpfll^it^plicaie  ipan and Mexico in a war with  ie United States.  Havana���������Direct evidence of  ������eutonic efforts to stir up a rebellion on the island is discovered  U. S. Senate Reject  Armed Neutrality Bill  Washington, Mar. 7.���������United  States supreme court awards the  steamer Appam to her British  owners.  Senator Lodge, Republican,  this afternoon introduced the  Armed Neutrality Bill in the  Senate. jSenator Owen moved  the introduction of the Bill not  in.order, that Bill had died with  the sixty-fourth Congress last  Sunday. Vice-president Marshall  in chair, sustained Sen. Owen.  The president is in a quandry,  but will notattempt to arm merchant ships unless a loop-hole in  law is found.  Austria's reply re-unrestricted  submarine warfare declares she  cannot give up the right to sink  '.'enemy" merchant ships, but  does not include neutral merchant ships .'under these rights,  hence the authorities are inclined  to feel she'has'stretched a point  in order .to meet American efforts, to avert a break.  ���������> Werner Horn, alleged German  army' officer, charged " with responsibility, in a plot to blow up  the C. P.,R. bridge crossing Canadian .border at Vanceborro,  Maine, must face trial. Supreme  court dismissed Horn's appeal.. ...  Hold Captured Trenches  Paris, Mar. 7���������Desperate fighting continues in the region of  Cauriers wood and Douamont,  but the French troops refuse to  be dislodged from the captured  trenches.   Paris, Mar. 8.���������French forces  raided German trenches and took  prisoners between the Disne and  the Aisne.  4985 Ships Entered and  Left British Ports Last Week  London, Mar. 8���������British troops  have approached almost within  range of Bagdad.  British troops made further  progress northwest of Irles and  north of Puissieux au Mont.  Twenty-six vessels sunk during past week, while 2508 ships  arrived, sailings totalled 2477.  Action U. S. Senators Condemned as Treasonable  New York- Cunard liner Car-  mania docked yesterday, reports  British captured 48 submarines  between Feb. 1 and 16.  Washington, Mar. 8.���������"Wilful  men" arouse a storm of protect  and Senator Stone may be deposed as chairman of foreign relations. Democrats in St. Louis  demand his resignation from the  Senate. Cleveland press say  Stone is one of "Kaiser'sdozen''  and can no longer be trusted, also urges the other eleven Senators be not forgotten, and publish pictures of the filibusters  along side that of Benedict Arnold. State legislature denounce  course as treasonable.  Merchant ships will be armed.!  President Wilson now satisfied  he has power to take action without approval of Senate.  Washington Times says Senator Stone's action is treasonable.;  St. Louis���������Democratic organizations here last night denounced  Senator Stone as a traitor.       V  Lincoln, Neb. ���������A resolution  branding Senator Norris as traitor to his state and the United  States was taken up by the state  senate today.  ,, Portland���������Petition demanding  resignation Senator Lane was  circulated throughout Oregon today^ Petition says, "No words  can describe our chagrin that  State of Oregon should .be so  mis-represented and disgraced  by;your action."  .'.-....St,- Paul���������Large number German-Americans who constitute  one-fourth of Minnesota National Guards are under suspicion  after the conviction of private  Schar fen berg of treason. He  wrote to his mother in Germany  ridiculing the American army  ahd;attacking President Wilson,  he^jso asserting that ten million  Germans in the States would re-  voltfin event of war with Germ-  artylj- His letter was intercepted  .by British censors and returned  to IJi S. government.  ^heeling���������Senator LaFollette  lecture here today was cancelled.;  His {filibustering tactics being  condemned.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  S. S. Camosun arrived on Saturday last -at 11 a. m..^. Among  the arrivals' were Mr. and Mrs.  W. Linnell and-E./B. Dawe.     ���������;  The passengers leaving were  Mr. and Mrs. W. E." Gallienne,  Mrs. > J. R. Morrison, Mrs. A.  Wood, Messrs. I. Fougner and  F. Broughton. ���������  Hotel Fire at Hope  ���������Guests Cremated  Hope, B. C, Mar. 7.���������Eight or  ten men were cremated by fire  which destroyed the famous old  hostelry, Coquahala Hotel, here  at3:30 this morning. The flames  spread with lightning rapidity,  sleeping guests given little warning ahd:fled in nightclothes, several -women-were rescued in a  thrilling manner. Hotel valued  between twenty-five and thirty-  five thousand dollars.  The known dead are: Thomas  $ilson;Ipfo^incial horticulturist,  Vanc'ouvel-f'Bert Ready, miner;  Bill McKeever, miner; Thomas  Taylor, lumberman, Vancouver;  George Atkins, K. V. Ry.; Tom  Kehoe, lumberman, Vancouver;  and an unknown Serbian.  Mr. and Mrs. W.-E. Gallienne  and Mrs. J. R". Morrison left  Bella Coola for Ocean. Falls,  where they intend to make their  homes for a season at least.  But the attractions of Bella  Coola are such that they hope  their stay away will only be  temporary.  Mrs. A. Wood left for her home  at Ocean Falls after having spent  a few weeks here visiting among  friends.     .  Iver Fougner, Indian agent,  took a trip to Bella Bella in the  interests of the progressive Indians of that beautiful village.  Frank Broughton, provincial  constable, does not advertise his  goings and comings so we cannot tell the reason for his flight  at this time. But it is safe to  conclude that as a consequence  of his trip somebody will be  brought to grief.  W. Linnell and E. B. Dawe are  like the migratory denizens of  the air.'. {They stay here through  the summer, but in the fall depart for warmer climes to spend  the winter months. They are  now back again at the cannery  where they will run engines and  carry,on other intricate work. {���������  Last" Sunday the Hagensbofrg  church-.Was well filled by an appreciative audience which had  the work of the church more ef-  fect^e. / The.usual Sunday-service in the forenoon had given  way for the occasion.  Rev. Mr. Sageng opened the  discussion emphasizing the necessity for every Christian to  engage in some activity for the  extension of the Kingdom, and  not leave all the work to be done  by the pastor.  The rest of the speakers followed in the same strain,-but as  an [outcome of the proceedings  there was no resolution adopted  or plan formulated by which this  worthy object could be carried  out.  Although the church has done  good work in the past it is felt  that it does not. reach the young  people adequately, they on whom  its hopes are centered for the  future.       r  In the eveningof Saturday last  week a large crowd of friends  and relatives of Ole J. Nygaard  gathered at his house at Hagensborg to offer him their congratulations and good wishes in honor  of his fortieth birthday.  The function took the form of  a surprise party, which is certainly the most pleasing way in  which friends can make a social  gathering most enjoyable. We  can imagine our friend Nygaard  just in from wading in the snow  and slush all day having thrown  off outer, wet garments, pulled  off his foot-gear and enjoying  the genial warmth from the stove  in comfortable dishabille when  a crowd in their best clothes suddenly bursts into the house,  crowds up arid'sliakefliahd with  him in the most joyous manner.  It seems that in a situation such  as  that  his cup of enjoyment  would take to the attic, but Ole  would not be disconcerted even  under such an ordeal.  The party, among a lot of good  things to cater to the innermost  parts of men, brought as a birthday gift a fine roller-top desk,  which Ole will find especially  useful now being the secretary  of the Farmers' Institute.  A poem composed for the occasion expressing the sentiments  of the visitors was read and listened to with admiration and under deep emotion.  After a protracted stay extending into the wee sma hours  the visitors departed after spending one of the most enjoyable  evenings of the winter.  And now Mr. Nygaard wishes  he could have birthdays come at  least once a week. ;  The Indians caught a large  octopus in ��������� the bay last week.  Everybody at the wharf "on  steamboat .day had a good look  at the ugly object.  Christmas at the Front.  The boys at the front far removed from thegentleinfluences  of peaceful -homes, have an- appreciation of the kiridness.shown  them which we who dwell in our  accustomed surroundings do not  altogether grasp.  The slight sacrifice made by  the ladies of the valley in sending Christmas parcels to the  front has met with such a chorus  of thanks fi-om our boys that we  know our readers will enjoy the  reading of extracts from their  thing as- war was unknown. It  brightened the Christmas prospects for several of us. Again  I thank you from the bottom of  my. heart for the comforts and  pleasure that you have given us  all this Christmas.           "Bob Lees."  "Just a line to say I have received your Christmas parcel.  Please accept. sincerest thanks  for it and your many kind wish--  es. Ladies like the members of  the W. C. T. U. at home do more  to make things easier for us here  than you will ever know. Please  convey to'the rest of the ladies  my heartiest appreciation.  .-      "Ingvald Urseth."  "Many thanks for the Xmas  box. It was 0. K. and I shared  it out to my comrades, so we all  enjoyed it.  "I really don't think this war  will last very much longer now,  say the end of July or August.  I will tell you all the news when  I come home. Give my,.love and  season's greetings to all the  ladies in the valley.  "P. J. Kenyon."  "I thank you and the W.;C T.  U. very much for. your kindness.  I can assure you that the parcel  was appreciated very, very highly. 1 am getting along alright.  Kind remembrances to all.  -'  "J. Dawe." %  "Only a few lines to let yoil  know that I received the welcome  parcel of cake and chocolate on  Christmas night. I had given  up hope of getting anything that  evening when along comes one  of the boys through the trench  asking for Sam Grant. He did  not have very far to go for me,  especially with a cake from Bella  Coola. I handed it around to  some of the boys���������Arthur Goth-  letters received by Mrs. Morri-iard,    Pete   Marren,    Randolph  son as the secretary of the W.I Saugstad and those that I saw  C. T. U.  gathered to listen and take part must nearly overflow.     Under  in a discussion of how to make such circumstances  some   men  It will be noticed that the recipients shared the good things  they received with those who  were less fortunate and thereby  extended the happy Christmas  spirit.    "Thanks for your letter from  W. C. T. U. wishing me a Merry  Christmas and a Happy New  Year.  "I spent my Christmas corning  across on the boat and my New  Year in quarantine in England.  "Walter E. Ratcliff."  "Allow me to thank you very  much for the parcel received in  time for Christmas. The cake,  which was a large one, I divided  among thirty patients and I fancy had you been able to see the  boys' faces and to have heard  their expression of thanks to the  'Canadian women,' you would  have felt amply repaid for the  expense, etc., entailed.  "Henry G^rainger."  "I am writing to thank the  ladies for their extreme kindness  and forethought in remembering  the boys at the front in the generous way in which they did.  My own parcel was most welcome and highly appreciated.  Its arrival was timed to the minute, as it arrived on Christmas  Day. It brought back very pleasant memories of sunny days in  the valley���������days  when  such  a I  the next day. The cake and  chocolates could not have tasted  better. I thank the W.. C. T. U.  again for their kindness.  "Sam Grant."  "I got the parcel from the W.  C. T. U. I reall do think it was  very kind and thoughtful of you  all. It is fine to think that you  still look upon me as a Bella Coola  fellow. Accept my best wishes  for a very happy New Year to  you all.  "H. L. Harris."  "I must thank you for the  lovely, big parcel that arrived on  the 23rd. It was very kind indeed of you to send so much.  Please thank the rest of the  ladies of the W. C. T. U. and tell  them I enjoyed the contents immensely and am very grateful to  them all for their kindness.  "Christmas day we spent in  the support trenches and thanks  to the W. C. T. U. parcel and one  from my sisters, we were able  to have a very enjoyable Xmas  dinner.  "Fred Grant."  ���������r>-<ir><ir> <xr> <r������o^rso<������r������i  c  (Ulwrrli Nflitrf  Sunday School  Church Service  ���������S>������'  7 : 30 p. m.  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W. H. GibsQn.  ,\ All Are Welcome.  i'h i'A  ix '.-  ���������������i' I(si'1 Si  18. ������  '111! Hi   f'''i>!'"l?^tl  I I IMS i * ���������'  I'-Vmf  1 H   '������������������"���������< Hm  K V'3SM  iff fr*-'*1  ill hs,:jv  I.  mi  im  if ' vmSS  ' i *fe ft  1  **?  H1 w  r  I!  fell  'Jr^-i  3]|grl  .. .. fp  p������S"������.*"r-5f--.  I  /tHr"* H  If?  i * '  ^'1  7   * j    ^  !f^  ��������� \  ii  J-  r,  ' *  i  $���������  iff  i  ^^]1l"  fiELtS. COCLA COURl������R  1   The Courier  Published Weekly a.t Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year .������������������  sweep British shipping from the  sea. The German people, daily  pulling their, belts^together, will  not be satisfied unless the government uses its weapon. The  government knows that the re-  .$i.oo suits that |he people expect are  NO  lALUMi  IAKIN6P0WDER  6 Month*. ������ ������-75!not likely to be reached; but it-nomination till the day of elec  3 Months  1 Year.  United States  United Kingdom  1 Year.  .$1.50  .$1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly.please notify the management  at once. ���������.Changes' in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.,  -Fob- Advertising Rates,  Office.  Apply at  To CoaRKsyoOTEX-TS���������While tumluecoonabte an-  o_ymoa3 conimunic������tions mtQI be puWishea. use  P.n��������� and address of every writer of such tetters  - caast be siven to the editor. ,  The Editor reserves the rurht to refu=* puWi-  eatkm of any letter. All manuscript at w-nter-a  risk.  "Dalits {mpitlt Hitprrms rst lix'  SATURDAY, MARCH n.1917.  The Purpose of Germany.  ���������   Ah onlooker is, as a rule, in a  .better'position-to form a more  correct judgmentupon theactual  state of aifairs in a contest than  , the participants themselves., It  is therefore just now very interesting to know the opinion of  competent neutral authority on  the,outlook of the war underits  present stage of-development.  , The Youth's Companion, one  of the best'weeklies published in  United States, in its last issue at  hand, has' an article on the purpose of Germany in carrying*on  an unrestricted submarine war-  fai;e. and.thus provoking the neu-  traV;nationsV-.->:lt believes -there  are only-two possible interpreta-  tions;to bviound-to'- account for.  Germany's action: '    -  ���������  " '"The first is''that the-German  government   sincerely   believes  that through ruthless submarine  . warfare it is possible to starve  England before England through  its control of the seas can starve  Germany.    If the German submarines can practically annihilate  all shipping to and from England,  Germany will win an unqualified  victory within a  few  months.  England will be compelled to accept whatever terms Germany  dictates���������and we must suppose  that they would include the surrender of the British fleet  Russia "knd France will  inevitably  coHapse.wkh England; and Germany will be f reet if it chooses,  to send its enormously augmented fleet and its seasoned troops  across the Atlantic to try to extort from America a settlement  vast enough to compensate the  German people for -the. treroen  dous financial cost of the war.  "On the other hand���������and this  is from the evidence the more  probable supposition���������the Ger  man government has embarked  on the submarine adventure with  no real hope of success, but with  the object of saving itself in the  eyes of the German people. If  the German government knows  that virtual starvation is immin  ent throughout the Empire, that  there is a scarcity of materials  for munitions and for clothing,  and that the British and French  and Russians are planning offensives that promise to overwhelm  the Teutonic resources, what is  the most logical course, after the  failure of peace overtures, for it  to pursue? It has encouraged  its people to believe that the submarines are invincible and can  must use the weapon in order to  show the people that it has tried  everything.   It understands that  the unrestricted use of the submarine   is   likely  to  bring the  United States and probably other  neutral nations into the war, and  it is not unwilling that itshould  be so, for it sees in the addition  jpf new enemies a possibility of  saying to its people 4 We are overmatched;   we cannot, fight the  world.    We must make peace.'  Convinced that the government  has done all it could, the German  people may be willing to accept  a peace 4that was wholly unacceptable so long as the submarine  weapon had not been tried, and  may be willing to retain in power a government that surrendered only under the pressure of  overwhelming force,  "The^erman note is an indication that the end of the war is  near."  o   .Cf    o    e     o i  The New Brunswick Election  The tide which has been running against the Conservatives  of Canada for the past year or  more has notfturaed, as the result of the New Brunswick elec-  tion held February 24 abundantly  bears witness���������  The-Liberals, in-this election  have carried another" Conservative stronghold /by ra- sufficient  ''   .,���������-.���������'   -- v-" i .--.*���������,'  ihaioritv to effect aneeded house-  cleaning.  -AIthough' the 'Obefal majority  is not large;, still it is a fairrwork-.  ing majority and the opposition  will be strong enough to have a  substantial and benefieial.effect  upon legislation and the new administration.  Out of forty-eight seats the  Liberals carried twenty-seven,  giving them a majority of six.  This may not seem very .much to  be proud of as compared to the  majority obtained in our provincial election; but as the Liberals  in the last election held in that  province only elected two members the turnover is sufficient to  make the Conservatives sit up  and take notiee.  The campaign was very short;  onlv one week from the dav of  tion.   The administration, aided  by the forces of the Dominion  government,   did  its utmost to  carry the election, and we know  from our own experience that the  party in power has a tremendous  advantage   in   an   election   as  against the opposition, both in  funds and influence.   But in this  instance it seems that the aid of  the Dominion - government did  their Conservative friends more  harm than good.    All along the  Intercolonial Railway, which is  owned   and   controlled   by the  Federal government; the   vote  was especially heavy in favor of  the Liberals.   The employees of  the government and theirfriends  were , embittered   because   the  railway as run by the Dominion,  officials had shown preference in  their  appointments' to   Americans, and showed their resentment by voting, for Liberal candidates.   And thus there is an-  other province added to the Liberal column. -  , Now all the provincial-governments of Canada 'are Liberal  with* the excepuoh.of Ontario  and Prince Edward Island.  In view, of the result in New  Brunswick it will certainlybe m  the interest of the Conservative  party to call a Dominion election  as soon as possible because the  longer the election is postponed  the less likely the Conservatives  will be of carrying it.  Last year, the chances of the  Borden government being returned were very good and therefore the Liberals opposed an  election at that time, but after a  year has passed public feeling is  steadily growing thatthe Federal government is not equal to the  responsible* position it holds in  these troublesome times.  If the* election comes "off this  spring there is- a' possibility of  the Conservatives being returned  but if it is?delaye'd another-six  monthsHheir case will become  hopeless. ,* '        >  o    o     o    o    o  . The esteemed Colonist publishes a fairy tale almost daily dilating with evident relish upon the  alleged conflict between the Liberal executive of Victoria and  the Brewster Government in the  matter of appointments to the  provincial service. Cannot our  contemporary understand that if  the stories it prints are.true,-all  the more credit attaches to'-thY  Government for making appoint-  raehts according to merit rather  than in accordance with the demands of politicians?     *  :. *  e ~ s    o    o    o  Last week, y*e stated thatthe  subscription to Britain's last war  loan "* amounted to 3 1-2 billion'  Bella Coola Experimental Plot   Report for 1916  .JS.-Le C. Grant^ Experimenter;  -^Segtion,^, Plot 3.     _, -v.  Sugar Beet���������Leviathan:-sown~l-30 acre JIay. 11;^ germinated-.May  22; harvested October 7; yield 2738 lbs. . Results,^excellent  crop..'Good shape.       "       . J        *    :-'.  Potatoes���������Rochester Rose: sown 34 sets May'11; germinated June  1; harvested October 7; yield 72 lbs. Results, deep eyed, but  clean and good quality. ,      ,. -.'      "  Irish Cobbler: sown 35 sets May 11; germinatecLJune 1;  harvested October 7;' yield 141 lbs. Results; fair crop; clean  and good quality.       -      .  Plot 4.  Kaffir Corn: sown May 22; germinated June 2.     Results, failure,  nights too cold;"   Remarks, ploughed tinder in August and  sown to Crimson Clover, which made good growth for green  manure in September.  Potatoes���������Mortgage Lifter: sown 3 lbs. June 8; germinated June  22; harvested October 7; yield 105 lbs. Results, fair yield  for this ground. \  Royal Russet: sown 3 lbs. June 8; germinated June 22;  harvested October 7; yield 57 lbs. Results, poor crop. Thjs  variety seems to require rich soil.   Quite early.  Remarks, plot.loses most of early sun, due to proximity  of bush nearby.        "        .-  Maekay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER,  B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF '"PRIDE OF THE WEST'   BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE   IN    B. C  Prompt Attention Given Letter Ord  Scad for Catalogue  dollars; this time we are able to  tell that the Rt. Hon. Andrew  BohVr Law, chancellor of the exchequer, announced in the House  of Commons on February 26 that  it totalled the colossal sum of  ������1,000,321,950, or five billion, one  and one-half million dollars.  o     o     o     o     ������  "The cold snap'lately experienced in Europe has wrought great  damage to the stock of potatoes  in Germany.  This of course will increase the  distress caused by the shortage  of food, but it is not likely that  there is any danger of actual  starvation. The German people  will continue to endure the privations with as good grace as  they can muster, but they will  survive.     But  what will  have  iff  more/effect upon the ,3urat"i(  the war than the shorug  food is lack of material f0,  s*i  manufacture of  munitionsof- >]  and for clothing,, which is  really serious. The Brstishb! .  ade of-Germany is more te ���������  than   the  German   blockad  Britain will evv-r be.   Evei  journals friendiy to the'Tei  state that  the submarine? .  never starve out Britain.  In a note lothe Brazilian  ernment Germany says iti  termined to maintain the  marine biockado, to abandi  would involve national anni  tion.  Which admission shows  Germany no longer puts her! .  in the strength of her armit  m  Royal Standard Flour  Makes The Big, Clean Loaf  A loaf of. Bread baked with ROYAL  STANDARD FLOUR cannot be  otherwise than big, clean, light and  tasty, because you are putting into  it the cleanest, and purest Flour it  is possible to make. ;       ��������� *   ��������� ���������  .���������Made from the hearts only of the chokn st Canadian wheat and made CLEAN���������absolutely  dirt, fluff or lint.  Next time order ROYAL STANDARD.  .���������_ :ri  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  Section 5. Plot 5.���������Gravel knoll.  Clover- Alsike: sown April, 1316. Height 20 in., cut July 2.  Height 24 in., cut August 8. Height 22 in. cut September  20. Results, three good: crops in blossom. Very useful on  dry land. Remarks, goodjgrowth and ^od ploughed under  in October. ;  Plot6.  Wheat (Marquis) and peas (Pruss. blue)���������sown May 1; germin  ated May 12; headed July 3; ripe August 15; days ripeninp  114; height, wheat 48 in.,"peas 46 in.; cut August 25.    Re  suits, fine heavy stand of both" and well filled.    No smut or  rust  NEWTON;  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  . While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these districts.  Plot?.  Barley���������Manchurian: sown May 2;  germinated May 13; headed  July 3; ripe August 15; days ripening 106; height 3ft. 5 in.;  cut August 35. ^Results, heads well filled.  Oats���������Banner: sown May 2; germinated May 15; headed July 14;  ripe August 22; days ripening 112;  height"4 ft. 5 in.;  cut  August 25.   Results, good crop, clean and well filled heads.  Wheat���������Marquis: sown May 2; germinated May 16; headed July  16; ripe August 25; days'ripening 114; Height 4 ft.; cut Aug.  25.   Results, good crop, clean and pluriip.  Peas���������Arthur: sown May 2; germinated May 16; headed July 16-  ripe August 25; days ripening 114; height 5 ft.; "cut August  30.   Results, good yield, well-filled pods.  Remarks, considerable grain lost in many handlings and  poor threshing by neighbor's machine.   Very little rmut or  rust on grain.   Treated with Formalin 1-40.  GREAT   WEST  TEA  The New Tea, with the old-tin^ [  flavor  PACKETS   ONLY  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO, Ltd.  ������  Wholesale Grocers - Vancouver, B.*-  mc  30E  0  o  0  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD. ;[���������  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGKK SHKVK'k  BETWEEN  BELLA GOOLA and VANCOUVER '  S. S.  UCamOSUn"   Leaves   Vancouver every     \<  Tuesday at 9 p. m. (Victoria day previous]  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p. m.  K-;:r'v;J;-;^;-  S. S. "COQUITLAM" sails from Yam  nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosive  at Bella Coola by arrangement!  For rates of Freights, Fares and other in form.".-  Head OmcE, Carrall St., A'ancouveh;, or Gk<  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  ���������ort-  1 cali  Hi  To be concluded in three issues.  Advertise your Wants in the Coiinet -^j  ���������������rffl :  5������  are  ifii  "a  fb/ur</aj/,  M* rc/i / 0;  / 9//  BELLAi COOLA COURIER  ****r-**y**������ ���������**"ffTr'*"|lllf  INVESTORS  |HOSE Who, from time to time, have funds requiring  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  ' AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  IN   SUMS  OF  $500  OR ANY  MULTIPLE  THEREOF. .'''���������-  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from the date of  purchase.  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any,future war loan issue  in Canada other than an issue of. Treasury Bills or other like short date security.  Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.  A commission of one-quarter of one per cent will be allowed to recognized bond and  stock brokers on allotments made; in respect of applications for this stock which bear their  stamp.  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA,  OCTOBER 7th. 1916.  Germany will soon find out that  |e who digs a jirave of another  rill himself fall into it.  The graves planned for Serbia  |nd France; will ere long be oc-  fupied by Germany.  Germany's penalty for aggression will we hope be a lasting  lesson to all unduly ambitious.  nited Farmers of British Columbia  1 The farmers of British Colum-  ia have come to a realization of  he fact that in order to make  he best out of their situation  hey must unite and  work for  he interest of each other as a  lass by combining their strength  Almost all other classes have  en the need,of organizing.for  iutual_ protection.and advancement, and found that it is efforts  ell expended. '  Two weeks ago at Convention  Iall; Parliament Buildings, Vic-  oria, a meeting of farmers from  Vancouver Island and the south-  rn part of the Mainland met and  rganized the United Farmers  f British Columbia.  The movemenjt which has crys-  alized in this organization took  is beginning last* fall at Cowich-  iin, Vancouver Island. A gen-  ral dissatisfaction relative to  rtificial conditions inducing a  .ibor shortage, the continued in-  rease in the cost of manufac  tured articles and the absence of  any compensating return to the  farmers/decided the directorsoi  the Cowichan Creamery Association to call a mass meeting of the  farmers of the Cowichan district  to consider what steps might be  taken to improve conditions.  The meeting was held November 4 and decided that an association be formed "to be called a  Farmers'Union, or similar name,  and that efforts be made to bring  in other districts of the province."  The committee appointed to  carry out this resolution, of which  Mr. H. G. Helgesen was a leading member, did such effective  work during the winter that  their .object has. already been  realized by the organization of  the. United Farmers of British  Columbia, as stated above. ,  The objects of tho "United  Farmers" may be briefly stated  as follows:  1. To effect united action and  resistance when unfair taxation  affects the farmers interests.  2. To support only such candidates for legislature that will  support and defend the objects  of the association.  3. To teach and encourage cooperative efforts among its members.  4. To promote the best methods of farming; to enlarge our  ��������� i Q. I  u ?m  markets; to secure best and  cheapest transportation. .  5. To secure by vigilant efforts legislation; promoting the  interests of the farmers.  6. To promote social intercourse. :   '  7. To settle disputes without  recourse to law.  8. To take into consideration  any member's case of grievance,  hardship or- litigation, and defend our members as far as possible.  9. To carry on any business  deemed advisable and authorized  by act of parliament.  . The secretary of the association is George Sangster, Vancouver, to whom all communications  should be directed.  It organized with a membership of nearly lOOO and is now  cairly. launched to carry out its  objects, and with good leadership  we predict it will prove of great  benefit to; the farmers- of the  province.  .We hope the enterprising farmers of this community as well  as the rest of the northern country will join the organization and  work for the common welfare.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  COAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  *-' Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Territory, the North-we3T Terri-  ��������� TORIES and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one year3 at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,560 acrea will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are Bituated.  '" In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or lefjal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating-.the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  ,For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will net be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  0 d  HOE  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales'Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly; but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  "o  c  hoc  Dealers and Trappers  GET  THE  HIGHEST  PRICE  FOR YOUR  FURS  Oh  mm  Kxma������*Q  Comfort and luxury assured ac a  minimum cost. Many Prince Rupert testimonials prove its worth  HaveTo7Got $20 ?  If not your credit is good  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented In Canada)  Installed in your kitchen range  will give you all the hot water  you can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started. . 121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  us"er a booster. You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  seen these results. $20.00 is the  Cost. Absolutely no charge un1-  less satisfactory.  A bath supply within twenty minute)  afiprjire is started and then a new supl  pl\> every uifenly minutes thereafter.  Wall radiators can also he run from  your hot water boiler and other rooms  heated usiih no extra cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surprise Ycu  Investigate!  Harry HansonThPelu^U^'0  J P. O. Box 395  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupfert, B.C.  at the  P. O. Box  863  157 McDougall  Ave.,  EDMONTON, Alta.  We pay all express and  mail charges.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTRICT   OF   COAST���������RANGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated. November 30,1916.  Jan. 6���������March  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OP   COAST���������BANOE   III.  Take Notice that I, Mark Smaby, of  Ocean Falls,  B. C, occupation timber  cruiser, intend to apply for permission  to   purchase   the   following   described:  lands: I  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Pulp Lease 205;  thence North 20 chains; thence East 20  chains; thence North 20 chains; thence  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20  chains; thence East 20 chains; thence  South 7 chains more or less to high  water n'ark of Cousin's Inlet; thence  following along said high water mark  In a westerly direction to a point due  east of this post; thence West 12 chains  more or less to this post, containing  140 acres more or less.  (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 26, 1916.  Jan. 27--Mar. 21  2H3ili=ES^^8!  TheMason&RischPiano  of to-day will make, plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  tfj Let us attend your Victor Record  ^u mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue'  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  On.-: Year $1.00  \\THAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \\/HAT person so independent?  \XTHAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers  are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  "THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  *��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  ���������^ country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  \:-i.;r.  '������������������)<���������:  vfe  fi>  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA,  B. C. *  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. O   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed !;fv.  i>v.  fill  M  IM  '52  as  1      "Iv    ?   ���������     .������$5   t   ������  11..! '...',<���������������������.  {  fi'l  >  >������  )"*     ������*  'III  ? <  \Y  1*1   !  (  ���������'i.  ���������' 'A  J"' .   ^  j    (if ' V  3  Subscribe  for the  Courier  DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coaft between Vancouver arid  Prince Rupert.  A distance- of six hundred miles.  <;- It will be to your interest, to keep��������� well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM  ADVERTISERS  Now U the time to,keep  your, rname - before, the  public i No manufacturer orwholesalehouse can  afford, to let slip, the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  lob Printing  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right  Growing Rhubarb. .  Now when markets-are obtainable near at hand one crop which  our farmers no doubt-would find  quite profitable is Rhubarb. ,  A quick way of getting results  is to purchase 2'or 3-year-old  roots, or dividing Jarge ones.  Large ones may be divided into  as man}' plants as there are buds,  provided each bud has some roots  attached. The old plants may be  dug up and cut into pieces by  means of a sharp spade, or parts  may be cut off without digging  up the whole root, .  The quickest >ay to   get   a  plantation ^ is   to   buy   selected  roots of good varieties and plant  them out in rows .4 feet apart,  the roots being planted 2 feet  apart in the rows for the small  early kinds and 3 feet for the  large growing varieties, such as  Victoria.   In planting, leave the  bud nearly level with the ground.  Planting may be done at any  time from' autumn until spring.  Spring is the best time however.  . Firm planting  is ' necessary,  and'when this has been properly done the tops of the crowns  will j list show above the soil.    -;  ...During the   first   year, after;  planting, very few, if any, leaves  should be pulled from any plant  and these only in" mid-season so  that the plant has a chance to  make a good start and also to lay  up its store of food for the following y^ear. -  Rhubarb likes_,plenty *6f manure. A good top;dressing of  farmyard manure, immediately  after planItingiwould ;be good for  the plants, ,and everyyear after-  wards,4laying it on in the fall and1  forking.it injn the spring. Those  who live-near-. the;sea might use  seaweed for the. purpose. ���������  If barnyard manure is scarce  and seaweed cannot be obtained,  give superphosphates in the  spring, or where the land"is light  use kainit in the autumn. On  heavy land a spriag application of sulphate of potash will be  beneficial.  Many English growers consider dung alone tends"to make rhubarb stringy. A good applica-  tion would be 121-2 tons of dung,  400 lbs. of superphosphate, and  100 lbs. of sulphate of Potash  1 (or 400 lbs. of kanit) per acre.���������  l Garden Magazine.  j Our farmers are not particu-  | iarly distressed over the soaring  | prices of potatoes. But as the  ! present prices are the highest  \ ever, known it is probably the  {part of prudence to sell any surplus on hand as soon as possible.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME!  U TOWN. Do not talk���������sup- j  port home industries ��������� talk is;  cheap. The best way to show';  that you are in earnest is toj  practise it |  Support the ' 'Courier" and you j  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  The Courier  a Year  $1  Published every   t  Saturday at  BELLA C00LA, B. C.  ""THE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better/  SECOND���������  They   are   the   only  *   brands   produced  in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   ElGS  and ke������p your money &t home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packer* ami Provirionen  Calgary     Yascoarer     EdiBOBtoii  Burns  BELLS COOLA COURIER  Saturday,  March /{), /9j?  COFFEE  The Coffee of Distinction  because   of  its   exquisite  flavor ^  Packed in oar new hygienic  AIR-TIGHT TIN  The W. H. Malkin Company, Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Will You Help?  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution-.Qardsv Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist  ,  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  Ogilvie's  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and weU assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  ,*  We{QBLrry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    6  8  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  ALL GOOD GROCERS.  Settlers, Prospe&ors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the most suitable articles are kept at prices thai  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Gla������*ware of all kind*  "      Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Beat brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all *������rti  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods-Lowest Prices-Largest Stock_  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B.BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  <,,r  ii  HI  i  ������fi  is *���������  M  r  ���������   I '  ��������� *3  ������-fvm  U&7  f������$SS  -#  J02  ,p

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