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Bella Coola Courier Mar 3, 1917

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Array IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR JANUARY  Compiled  by Mr. C. Ii. (Jrseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory,  Temperature: Maximum, 33.   Minimum, 24.  Highest Max. (9th)45. Lowest Min. i30th) 12  below zero.   Rainfall, 3.51. Snowl6in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 12  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 1917.  $1.00-a Year  American Lives Lost When Laconia Sunk  May Precipitate War Between U.S. and Germany  "Overt Act" Committed  U. S. Action Awaited  _ M.������������������������ ��������� ������������������i,��������� '*������������������1���������  Washington, Feb. 28. ��������� The  sinking of the Cunard liner Laconia with the loss of American  lives is, according to highest officials interpretation, a clear cut  case and no, investigation necessary. This became known by  the administration's attitude'fol-  lowing a conference at the White  House between Secretary Lan-  sing and President Wilson.  Many officials believe that Ger-  many committed "qvert act"  against the United States and  .declare that the situation is now  in the hands of Congress. Quick  and positive , action should be  forthcoming.  .President and his cabinet will  have.all facts available before  them when they go into session  this afternoon. . ,''  *��������� No decision reached, Senate  wrangle over President's request  giving him power to arm American ships carrying' munitions.  Committee meet again at 4 p. m.  today. Five hundred million  dollars naval bill threatened with  delay and defeat through one-  man filibuster, Senator LaFol-  lette.  Washington, Mar. 1.���������United  States closer to war today-than;  of war a filibusting spirit is brewing in the Senate and threatens  the destruction of the bill giving  British Advance���������  Bapaume May Fall  London; Feb. 28.- The British  advance along the Ancre river  attained a depth of two miles  and extends along a front about  eleven miles, according to official  reports.  Bapume, which has been declared .would fall only after the  "greatest price had been paid"  by the victorious army, is now  directly threatened owing to the  greatest German retirement that  has taken place since-"stationary  warfare" began more than two  years ago. The newly, occupied  ground opens up many possibilities to British forces. Hostile  attack. on the Somme was repulsed with heavy losses.  British steamers Headly, 4953  tons, and the Aries, 3071 tons,  have been sunk.  Official figures in the Laconia  disaster are:- total  number of  passengers and crew 294; survi-j��������� ��������� ��������� ��������� -..-...������ ��������� ""\  vors landed at Queenstown 267; the running and taking care of  Danger of United States Being Involved in the War  the president authority to protect American rights.  However,  past weeks.   Despite the danger, it is expected that Congress will  give President Wilson what' he  wants. Germany still holds Americans on board the Yarrowdale.  S. S. Camosun managed to lose  another two hours on her last  trip. She arrived in Bella Coola  four o'clock Saturday afternoon.  But considering the gale that  blowed during the whole week  and at her arrival it was quite  an accomplishment to arrive at  all.' The fury of the wind was  responsible for the wrecking of a  corner of the wharf which is undergoing extensive repairs.  We shall have more to say of  this new organization next week.  , As the fishing-industry is one  of the-important assets of Bella  Coola, together with the rest of  the Coast, we deem it of interest  to our readers to publish the results of a visit to Ottawa by a  delegation from Prince Rupert  to interview the Minister of Marine' and Fisheries in regard' to  some needed changes in the fish-  ing regulations.  >**j������ttvfcheirreport to the'citizens'  government to agree to such of  these changes as concerned the  regulations ordered by the Province.  Germany Says U. S.  Action Without Parallel  Berlin, Feb. 28.���������Von Beth-  mann Hollweg in the Reichstag  today said President Wilson's  action was without parallel, he  had yet to be informed why relations had been broken off., The  chancellor's statements in the  Reichstag em braces old argument  Britain all to blame. Germany  demands reparation and guaran:  tees for the future.  survivors landed at Bantry 14; the sanitary system of canning  Tollef Saugstad arrived after  a stay>of-a^few-weeks^t^Vafrr  couver familiarizing himself with ���������-?* prince Rupert, the delegation  express their gratitude to Mr.  -Hazen, the minister of Marine  drowned 5; died from exposure  and buried;.at sea 8; in hospital  6. Two American women among  the thirteen killed. ���������  Austin Hoy, an American business man whose mother and sister were killed by the sinking of  the Laconia, wired President  Wilson demanding him to avenge  the deed, otherwise he would enlist in the British army.  London papers construe the  sinking of. the Laconia as an  "overt act" against the States.  Will Congress Declare War?  New York, Mar. 1.���������Senator  Col.F. Hale, who arrived from  England on board the Finland today, says Allies are jubilant over  United States break with Germany for its moral effect.  ���������Survivors tell stories of sinking of Laconia by Huns. Passengers heard muffled noise like  slamming of a door when first  '���������"torpedogot. home. ANegroand  a,.fireman.nearly caused a panic  when they yelled''get away from  ship, when water hits boiler she  will blow up and there's tons of  shrapnel in the hold." Officers  quickly assumed command and  the departure was'quite orderly.  Passengers spoke to submarine  commander, brutal indifference  shown by U boat officer to, plight  of isuryivors..- , ^..''::^|^;fe.'^'; y*$]  Leading Anierican: papers declare President Wilson is compelled to make his words good.  Bound in honor to seek declaration of war from Congress; ���������...'���������  Chancellor Hollweg's belligerent speech in the Reichstag is interpreted as being against the  United States.  London, Mar. l.--Gen. Haig's  troops still closing in on Bapaume  they are less than two miles today. German retreat has slowed  down considerably, strong resistance now being encountered in  forward sweep of British troops.  Ground is sea- of mud from recent thaws and stretching across  this ocean of slime are crisscrossed mile upon miles of barbed wire. Apparently Germany  counted upon this slippery; footing and barbed wire .obstacles to  hamper the British advance after  their retreat. Patrols have not  yet found indications of line selected by Germans in their retreat for next stand.  Turks on theRetreat  London, Mar. 1.��������� British forces giving the retreating Turks  beyond jKut-El-'Amarano chance  to reform their columns. Pursuit  continuing and retreating enemy  forces are being engaged on three  sides; Enerpy forced to abandon  sto1ces*;;gi4^������? thrown into Tigris'  nverij includinghowitzers.-British gunboat recaptured. ���������  Paris, Mar. 1.��������� Double event  British victories and progress at  Kut-El-Amara and on the Ancre  front are welcomed here. French  military experts still doubt exact military-importance.     -  which is installed at the ".local  cannery.  There will be no hitch in the  running of the machinery at the  cannery this season if Tollef has  full swing.  Dr. E. M. Sutherland left for  a two weeks absence to Victoria.  As her husband, Wm. Sutherland, having enlisted in the naval  service, is stationed at Esqui-  mault.it is presumed she went to  bid him farewell prior to his departure for active service on the  Atlantic patrol.  The unusually high wind prevailing during the last week made  it impossible to proceed with the  work repairing the wharf. The  weather at the beginning of this  week' has moderated, however,  and everybody having work to  do in the open air have resumed  their cheerfulness. '"  Albert Hammer, leading rancher in the Noosatsum settlement,  paid bur burg a short visit at the  beginning of the week. i  We are indebted to H. C.'Hel-  gesen, Metchosin, for,an article  Re organization of Farmers, pub-,  lished on the third page.  ,, As an outcome of the work done  by Mr. Helgesen and othei-s there  has, since this article was written, been formed a. Provincial  Assaeiatipn.oJ Farmers for mutual help and co-operation. Cooperation among the farmers is,  and Fisheries, H. L. Clements,  M. P., Mr. Cunningham, chief  inspector of fisheries for British'  Columbia, and Mr. Mclntyre,  deputy-minister of fisheries, for  the cordial and sympathetic attention given to them and assistance rendered. ,  The chief changes effected by  the able presentation of the case  by the delegation may be summarized as follows:  The license for the taking of  herring by gill net will be good  for any part of ���������District No. 2,  and the fee for such license reduced to $1.00.  Arrangements will be' made  with the cannery operators to  supply those engaged in fishing  for halibut with salmon for bait  at the price salmon are worth  for canning purposes.  Licenses for new canneries  within certain areas will be granted at the rate of one each season  until all applications are met.  (This will probably insure' another cannery for Bella Coola.)  There will be no limit to the  number of lines "that might be  used for trolling for salmon.  The minister hoped to arrange  during the coming season for  the starting of investigations for  the discovery of halibut banks,  herring and other fish grounds.  After this year all those receiving licenses will be permitted  to dispose of their fislias they  may see fit. .' :  After this year motor boats  will be allowed,, in aH,parts of  District No. 2.  It is the policy of the department to establish and erect hatch-  as speedily as. conditions  outside the war, the great ques  tion at present and it is satisfac-! eries  tOryto know that the farmers in .generally will permit.  this vicinity are alive to its im-     At a subsequent meeting held  portance and will give it a fair in Prince Rupert  a resolution  trial. ; \'   ��������� ��������� was passed asking the provincial  Ocean Falls News.  The Ocean Falls Red Cross  Society did itself justice, last  week by the holding of a concert  in aid of the Red Cross Material  Fund, which proved to be the  great success of the season.  That the residents of thetown  at this time expected to enjoy  something unusual was evident  by the way they turned out en  masse for the occasion.  The concert was held in the  new Red Cross building erected  by the company, and it was filled  to the very doors.  The difficult problem of keeping the enthusiasm of this crowd  within bounds was. delegated to  Dr. Christie who, as chairman,  looked over the audience assisted  by the" three superintendents,  J. S. Connell, R. S. Nevin and  C. R. Lewthwaite,' who were at  his side to the close of the program.  <   In order to do justice to the  very excellent program it is,necessary to give it in full:  First Part.  Chorus   -   "Tenting on the old  Camp Ground"  ��������� The ladies of the Red Cross.   ���������  Song   -   "The Vale of Dreams"  Mr. I. R. Cox.  Reading       - ' .���������   -       Selected  Miss Griffiths.  Pianoforte duet  a. "The Minstrel Boy"  b. "The Men of Harlech"  ' Mrs. F. Morrell, Miss Gibbons.  Song     -     "Un Peu D'Amour"  Mrs. Whittington.  Song    --   "The Bonnie, Bonnie  Heather" ,  Master A. Whittington.  Reading       -       -       Selected  Mrs. Ratten bury.  Song    -    "Sunshine and Rain"  Mrs. De Boyne.  Song       -      -      -      Selected  Mr. Moxon.  Reading       -       -       Selected  Mr. T. Hamilton.  Song   -   "The Young Brigade"  Mr. Penn.  Song      -      "Mother Machree"  Mr. Tobin.  Chairman's remarks.  ���������   The Ladies.  "God Save the King." '  Mrs. F. Morrell, L. L: C. M.,  took on the role of accompanist.  That the chairman went through'  his part of the ordeal creditably  was testified to by, a vote of  thanks at the end pf the concert.  The proceeds netted oyer $70.  The'success of the performance  will be the incentiye for the en-:  terprising members of the Red  Cross Society co have another'  equally successful in the near  future.  Second Part.  Pianoforte solo  ' Mr. Penn.  Song   -.  "The Sunshine of Your.  ..:-,;; Smile'*,; ���������';,.'  ,"-��������� Mrs. Whittington/  :  Stump speech     -      -      -      -  Mr. Graham.  Song;������������������:;'���������   "Toilers of the Deep"  Mr. Rattenbury. .  Ventriloquist:       Mr. I. R. Cox,  Mandoline solo       -      Selected  Mr. Scribner.   ���������  Song     ; -.     -      -      Selected  Mr. Whittington. ;  Recitation'      -���������   ������������������.-'������������������-  ���������   Mr.T. Hamilton.  Violin solo.       -       Humoreske  Mr. Carpenter.  Song -  "The Deathless Army"  Mr. Penn.  Speech by Mr. Connell.  .-���������  Chorus    -    "The Maple Leaf"  Indians Wanted for Forestry Battalion  Iver Fougner, Indian agent,  has received from Mr. A. M;  Tyson, inspector of Indian agencies, the following self-explanatory, letter, dated Vancouver.  January 20th, asking that it be,  published:  "I have been requested by the  department of Indian affairs to  take charge of the recruiting of  Indians arid Half-breeds throughout the Province of British Columbia for the Forestry and Railway Battalions now being organized. I have consented to take  lip this'work'and"am now preparing for an active recruiting  campaign.  "The Indians and Half-breeds  will not be required to go into  the firing line, but will be confined to Forestry and Railway  work.  "The remuneration that'these  Indians and- Half-breeds will receive will be $1.10 per day,' food,  clothing and bed. In the'ease of  "married men, their wives will receive $20.00 per month separation allowance from the Government.    They  will  also receive  from the Patriotic Fund as follows:  For a childless wife, married before enlistment -   -   -  For wife with children:  Grant to wife      -   -   -   -   -   -  For 1 child, between 10 and 15  -  "   1 5 and 10  -  "   1      "   under 5      -   -   -   -  And for all other children (irrespective of age) each child -  Maximum grant, -------  NOTE.���������'All children over 15 years  of age are considered self-supporting:  "In addition to the above, each  married man will be expected to  assign to his wife not less than  $15.00 per month.  "Transportation will be provided these Indians and Half-  breeds from the place of enlistment to headquarters at Vancouver or other point designated.  "The status of the Indians,and  and Half-breeds who enlist will  be the same as white men, and,  I understand, they will receive  the same benefits and consideration after the war as white.men  who enlist."  ?10,00  17.50  7.50  4.50  ' 3.00  3.00  42.50  (Hfturrij Nrriirc  Sunday School  ' Church Service I  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p. m.  1  Y ' 'Preacher:  t Rev. Hans Sageng, A. B.  A All Are Welcome. BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, March 3,  19)7  Tl  le Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year  $1-00  6 Month.    r-    ������-75  3 Month.   0.50  United States  1 Year $1-50  United Kingdom  ,1 Year.... $1-00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  Bt once. Changes in address should Be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,  ���������    Office.  Apply at  To Correspondents��������� While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be given to the editor.  The Editor reserves the riRht to refuse publi-  ctitiun of any letter. All manuscript at writer s  risk.  "&ali������ papuli fluprwtra vet Itx."  SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 1917.  No False Peace.  An Important Expression  of Neutral Opinion.  When the pacifists or the peace-  .at-any-price people, accuse the  Entente powers of being war  mad, actuated by hate and many  other evil things, it is refreshing  to read', what some of .the fore:  most clergymen and other prominent religious leaders in the  United States say about a pre-  mature peace based on unrighteous terms.   ���������'  We publish below a declaration  signed by some seventy of these  men of the foremost clergymen  and other religious leaders in the  United States,, which they have  issued to the world on the subject of making peace before victory for the right has been attained.  We have not the space to publish their names; but we would  point out as they are learned in  the scriptures' and the laws of  righteousness their words should  have more than ordinary weight:  "When war drenches Europe  in blood, it is natural that we  Americans should shudder at the  sight. To call upon the combatants to stop the carnage is an  impulse so strong that it even  tends to displace judgment and  distort values. We are apt to  forget, at any rate for the time  being, that there are conditions  nnder which the mere stopping  of warfare may bring a curse instead of a blessing. We need to  be reminded that peace is the  triumph of righteousness and not  the mere sheathing of the sword.  Tx> clamor for an ending of the  present war without.insuring the  vindication of truth, justice and  honor is not to seek peace.but to  sow disaster.     ::  "Because it is so easy to. lose  sight of these essential principles, we, the undersigned, view  with some concern the organized  and deliberate effort now being  made so-to stampede Christian  .sentiment as to create a. public  opinion blindly favorable to stopping hostilities without adequate  consideration of the issues which  the war involves.  "We are Christians, and, as  such, deem that truth and righteousness are to be maintained  inviolate, even at the sacrifice.of  physical life. We are citizens of  the United States, and, as such,  are conscious of the solemn re-  ture to direct the attention of  our fellow-Christians to a few of  the vital issues which are making  their mute appeal for final decision.  "The ravage of Belgium and  the enslavement of her people:  was it right or wrong?!  "The massacre of a million  Armenians: was it a permissible  precaution or an unpardonable  crime?  "The desolation of Serbia and  Poland: was this a regrettable  necessity or a frightful injustice?  The destruction of life through  the sinking of the Lusitania and  of other merchant ships: was  this an ordinary incident, of warfare or was it deliberate and premeditated murder?  "The starvation of Jews and  Syrians in the Holy Land: is this  an accident of economics or a  violation of the laws of God and  man?.  "The attempt to array Moslems  against Christians in a 'Holy  War': was it a laudable act^oi  imperial statemanship or was,it  the treachery of a Christian  monarch,?   ��������� ,  "The intimidation of small  nations and the violation of international agreements: are these  ihings'excusable under provocation or damnable under all circumstances?  "In the presence of these pending1 and as yet unsettled issues  we  feel impelled to  warn" our  brethren against those wIig cry  'Peace, peace,' when there is no  peace.   The just God, who withr  held not' his own .Son from the  ci-oss, would not look with'favor  upon a people who put their fear  of pain and death, their dread of  suffering and loss, their concern  for comfort and ease, abovothe  holy claims of righteousness and  justice and freedom and'mercy  and truth.   Much as we mourn  the   bloodshed   in   Europe,   we  lament even more that supine-  ness of spirit, that indifference  to spiritual values, which would  let mere  physical   safety take  precedence of loyalty to truth  and duty.   The memory of all  the saints'and martyrs cries out  against such backsliding of mankind.   Sad is our lot if we have  forgotten how to die for a holy  cause.  "We solemnly declare to you  our conviction that the question  of all-questions for our immediate consideration is this: 'Shall  the ancient Christian inheritance  of loyalty to great and divine  ideals be replaced by considerations of mere expediency?'" "  DECLINE SUBSTITUTES  The British in Earnest.  The British people have again  declared in no uncertain tones  their determination to carry on  the war and to make still further  sacrifices to gain a decisive victory.  It may have been with some  fear   and   trembling ��������� that - the  authorities given the task of furnishing the enormous amounts  .lecessary to carry on the war  from day to day undertook the  seemingly herculean or almost  impossible task of raising another  loan; this time of an unlimited  amount,   but desiring it to be  about equal to two and one half  billion dollars.    But in a campaign of about five weeks the response was so hearty that, not  only was-the amount expected  raised, but one billion dollars in  excess.'   The exact amount is not  yet known but it is estimated to  be ������700,000,000 or three and one  half billion dollars.  . And the ease with which this  loan was made and the inyest-  ments still being made in other  securities make it seemingly safe  to predict that within a reasonable length of time a similar loan  can ba raised says the London  Times.  This vast amount just raised  is equal to the entire debt of  Great Britain before the war. It  is raised at a timewhenthe government is levying a taxation'of  2 1-2 billion- dollars. And, furthermore, the loan was made  without any special appeal to  the banks or great financial institutions. ' It was in every sense  a popular '.loan, to which the  many small subscriptions abundantly testify.  The spirit evinced by the British people in this war, indicating  determination, I perseverance,  self-sacrifice and patriotism,  each of the highest order, goes  far to explain why Great Britain  is a world power'in matters essential to the world's progress.  And let it be said right here that  this power has not in late years  at leasTbeen abused^by^pppress-  ing the weaker people, but in  establishing justice, ameliorating economic conditions, in the  spreading of the blessings of  Christianity- and civilization.  If this great Tpower of democracy should go'down before Teutonic autocracy the world'would  indeed be relegated backward  for centuries both as to condition and progress. , Should not  the Neutrals also try to prevent  such a calamity?  Maekay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  olesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,  OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  'MADE   IN   B. C  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN lo reDresent  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W.f VANCOUVER, B. C, thern in Afferent parts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest, energetic men only are needed. We particularly  want a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should write at once for our 80 page Catalogue.  Bella Coola Experimental Plot.   Report for 1916  S. Le C. Grant, Experimenter.  .Section 2 and 3.   South end.  Leeks���������Italian: sown (in frame) April 1.   Results, good crop.  Peas���������Potlatch: sown April 29.    Results, excellent crop of large,  well-filled pods.   Vine 5 feet.  Lettuce���������New York: sown 3,successions during year.  Results, all  produced excellent heads.  Mignonette: sown 3 successions in year.    Results, New  York firmest and largest.  Chinese cabbage���������Wong Bok.   Results, New York firm-  1   est and largest.,  Celery- White Plume and New Rose.   Results, both varieties have  -   excellent quality.  Remarks, soil is a black muck and well suited to vegetable  ���������    growing.   Was flooded in early summer for two days, but  did little damage.    Fertilized with stable manure in Fall  Complete applied in Spring to whole area.   Harvested, in  season for table use and for sale.  A Weak Government.  The Borden government is supposed to mean well and trying to  do the right thing,,but it is nevertheless a government which is  weak because it is timid. The  premier, has promised 500,000  men for overseas service, but  this number is still more than  100,000' short with almost.no  prospects of raising the number  promised. The govern ment dare  not take any steps that will* ensure the full quota; but tries  measures which,, in the eyes of  the world, is known from the  very outset to be vain.  We notice that even supporters  of the government are getting  tired of thisshillyshally ing which  brings no results. One measure  which was loudly heralded as'the  acme of practicability was The  National Service Enrollment, but  it proved only a make-shift which  .will bring no practical results.  ������,    o     o    o    o    o  The government is urging production and thrift upon others,  but in������its own management is  ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR  (<The Flour With the Guarantee"  1  Your money refunded if not  the ' equal "of any "other'"flour  manufactured, irrespective of  price. .  MADE IN  BRITISH COLUMBIA  NEWTON  Rupert    Empire  is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Rid-  The    Prince  man, who  While others stand for what  ..... .will benefit their party, he stands  sponsibihtes  of   our   Christian for what will benent these dis-  citizenship. We accordingly ven-'tricts.  Section 4.   Plot 1.  Parsnip���������Guernsey: sown May 1; germinated May 28; harvested  November 7.   Results, set back in cold, dry weather. Yield  3-4 ton.  Potatoes���������Table Talk: sown 5 lbs. May 1; germinated May 20; harvested'November 7.   Results, yield 104 lbs.  Gold Coin: sown 5 lbs. May 1; germinated May 20; harvested November 7.   Results, yield 152 lbs.     : :-,  Whole plot had light application Nitrate Soda before planting.  ;';'-'Piot:.2.'-,!;." ;'.'.. ',.���������'/'.'.  Sugar, Beet���������Royal Giant: sown 2 oz. April .29; germinated May  10; harvested October'9; yield 196 lbs. Results, fair size,-  good quality. ,    '.':'.,.���������.:.'  . ��������� '-.���������'.'���������.'  Danish; sown 2 oz. April 29;,geminated May 12; har;  vested October 9; yield;309 lbs. Results, good crop. Better  size and shape,than former.  Mangel���������Rennie's Giant: sown 2 oz. April 29; germinated May 10;  harvested October 10; yield 494 lbs. Results, soil somewhat  poor, and season too dry for mangels, i  Kale���������Thousand Headed: sown 1-4 oz. April 29; germinated May  12; harvested October.6. Results, fair yield, season rather  unfavorable.; / ; ,  Potatoes���������Dreer's Standard :%6wn 3 !bs. April 29; germinated May  20; harvested November 6; yield 28 hilis 112 lbs.  Empire State; sown 3 lbs. April 29,; germinated May 20;  harvested November 6; yield 29 hills 85 lbs.  Irish Cobbler: sown 3 lbs. April 29; germinated May 20;  harvested November 6; yield 20 hills 80 lbs.  Remarks, all the potatoes were more or less scabby.  Ground is run out and wants renewing.   Sugar beets and  mangels received Thomas Phosphate and Nitrate of Soda  about 50 lbs. before sowing.      ...  Let the Tea Pot tell you  GREAT   WEST  TEA  is Better  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  HOE  DWC  HOE  &;  To be concluded in three issues.  m  UNION STEAMSHIP CO, OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  ^BETWEEN    :    '  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  ��������� S. S.     CafflOSUn     Leaves  Vancouver every  Tuesday at 9 p. m,        (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p.m.  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails/from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, "Fares and other',ijiforrnation, apply to  Head Office, Cakrall St., Vancouver ;v6r Geo." McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  HOE  30E  W  Advertise your Wants in the </  Saturday, March 3,  1917  BELLAi COOLA  COURIER  |HOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  IN SUMS OF $500 OR ANY MULTIPLE THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from the date of  purchased"                                                        '   ' '        *  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issuo  in Canada other than an issue of Treasury Bills or other, liko, short date security.  Proceeds of this stock aro for war purposes only. ' '  i. A commission of one-quarter, of one per cent will be allowed to  recognized bond und  stock brokers on allotments made in respect of applications for this stock which bear their  stamp. ������ ��������� n  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA, '  OCTOBER 7th, 191G. '  unable to curb the'extravagances  of its officials and hangers-on.  ;A case in point is the Ross rifle  which has been condemned as  being unfit for use in the war as  it jams so easily. It is no longer  used at all; but still the government is buying them at the rate  of 1000 per day to be put on the  'scrap pile as soon as received.  1'his may be production all right  enough, but it is not thrift by a  long ways.       ���������  ,   . ,  o    &    o    o    oi  1 As compared with last year  the tables are entirely turned as  regards Dominion politics.  ' Then it was the Conservatives  who wanted an election and the  Liberals opposed, now it is exact  ly the other ���������way about; this  change o* attitude is due to'a  change in the opinion as to the  result."  ������������������ And that it is not, confined to  this country alone iray be gathered from the fact that an influential New York paper recently  made the statement that the  Borden government was only a  "stop-gap" until the Liberals  took possession.   /   ���������:  Re Organization of Farmers  As one who is keenly interested in this timely movement.for  the union of the farmers I would  like to point out that it is one of  the most important steps the  farmers can take and therefore  should be joined by them all.  I believe"thatif the fanners do  not make an effort to improve  their conditions as they are and  have been many of" them will gc  under! To save them this can  only be' brought about by cooperation and organization.  Now, the time has comewhen  we should organize our forces  for mutual benefit; and by. organization become the greatest  power in the world today.   The  farmer has labored diligently and  honestly, and in doing so he has  been conscious of the necessitj  to be active in one sense; but  while he expended his strength  in manual labor, the workshop  of his brain became dull and cob-  webbed, in so far as the proper  guarding and distribution of the  fruits of his labor were concerned.- ,     ���������  He has all along' been ��������� shortsighted in the-rnarketing of his  products.      He  has  ploughed,  sown, reaped,.,and then dumped  the fruits of ,his labor into the  lap of the conscientiousless speculator, who has not hesitated to  manipulate to his own selfish interests after allowing the farmer  an inequitable portion.  Thus has come about the holdup of labor's portion, this being  only one of the many instances  that ��������� the producers have been  subjected to for centuries, until  now after a realization of the unfavorable conditions, an awakening in the hear,t of the farmers  themselves appears to be becoming general. Co-operation and  organizstion is beginning to obtain where it should have been  in existence years and years ago;  (Continued on pnpe A, column 2.)  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ^ Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ai.ukkta.  the Yukon Teriutoky. the North-west Tkbki-  "TOH1E3 and in a portion of the Province of  lilUUSH Columbia, may be leaned for a trrm of  twenty-one years at an annual rental uf $1 an  acre. Not more thun 2.GG0 acres will be teased  \o one BUplicunt.  Application for a lease imiat be made by the  applicant in person to the A Kent orSub-Aittnt'  of the district in which the null!8 applied for  . are situated.  ' In uuivcyed territory the Innd must be described by sections, or legal subJivinions of sections, and in unsurvey<xi teiritory the truct applied fur shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded il the rittlits  upplied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns ucco'iating for the  full quantity of merchantable coul mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mininx rights  are not beinK operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  ' The lease will include the coal mining rights'  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawu, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of LViminion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  '   N.U.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30090.  BUSINESS CARDS  ������ H  nor  H������  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our, sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  jf the biggest' fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individu-  jl house assures the highest market  . jrice always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale:  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST.; VANCOUVER, B. C.  ���������nn  30E  Dealers and Trappers  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BAKOE   III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C. occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20 chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less. ^  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30, 1916. Jan. 6���������Muruh  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  p).6B������0SEraro>4K������04anM)<<BBaB4)4HaiM8j  Comfort and luxury assured at a  minimum cost. Many Prince Rupert testimonials prove its worth  Have You Got $20 ?  If not your credit is good  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented in Canada)  Installed in your kitchen  range  will give you all the hot water  you can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started.     121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  user a booster.   You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  seen these results.   $20.00 is the  Cost.   Absolutely no charge un-  ������������������' lesSvSatisfactory. jf  J?*ifeK($;itBfipfy within twenty minut<js  " affer~fire?is-sitiricd and then a new sup-  p/jfevery' twenty minutes thereafter.  Wall radiators can also be run frorh  your hot water boiler and other rooms  healed with no extra cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surprise You  Investigate!       ,  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BANGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Mark Smaby, of  Ocean Falls, B. C, occupation timber]  cruiser, intend to apply for permission!  to   purchase   the   following  described'  lands: I  Commencing at a post planted at the '  southwest corner of Pulp Lease 205;  thence North 20 chains; thence East 20  chains; thence North 20 chains; thence  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20  chains; thence" East 20 chains; thence  South 7 chains more or less to high  water mark of Cousin's Inlet; thence  following along said high water mark  in a westerly direction to a point due  east of this post; thence West 12 chains  more or less to this post, containing  140 acres more or less.  (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 26, 1916.  Jan. 27-Mar. 24  JGL.:  ^lz^zl  / heMason & RischPiano  of to-day will maf(e plain our  privilege to slate with authority:  "NO  FINER  PIANO MADE!"  sold Dinner uv the manufacturers  f:  Let. us attend your Victor Record  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  aeasi  ~_*������r.;"f j������r-=-"^-_=- ;*���������'������- ~'~zT -T"C"  ^)|7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \S/HAT person so independent?  ^j|7HAT ambition more, noble than'to  be a producer of the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  THE REASONS for this enviable condition of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This ��������� fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  \;  i  CZD  ELLA COOLA and the. surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill, at Bella Coola.  CZ3  ������  CZD  Reliable  r  Harry Hanson^JjSgS  P. 6. Box 395  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable 'in Aid-Vance.  ��������� ���������!/ ���������      CANADA. .  One Year ... /.'. ;...,<���������..  Six Months   Three Month's .. .......  UNITED STATES.  One Year...... ;....  ..$1.00  .. 0.75  .. 0.50  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year ..........;...$ 1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK,  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  "' ������������������;;:  BELLA "COOLA/B.C.  Enclosed please find............  for Bella Coola Courier for.........  . subscription  Name...................;   .'  .      P. Cv. .........."..I.'...........  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, March 3,  19)7  (3  non  0  or  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A. distance of six hundred miles.  ��������� // will he to your interest to keep wett *"-  formed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section 0}  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS -  Now is the time to keep  your name ��������� before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford, tor let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. . Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  nnting  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  Re Organization of Farmers  (Continued from column 3, page 3.)  and a demand is being made by  the farmers for a release of  labor's portion, and the equitable  distribution of the reward of  honest industry and thrift.  In obtaining this righteous purpose, it is necessary for the farmer to present to the. world a  strength greater than that represented by any single individual.  He must add to his individuality  that of his neighbor, and of his  neighbor's neighbor; and so on  all along the line of co-operation,  until there shall be at the back of  the one farmer, and in touch,  and in harmony with him, a  great phalanx of farmers, a line  too long, and too deep and too  strong to be injured by the most  powerful influences; and then  and only then will the individual  farmer be dealt with equitably.  To bring this about is only a  question of organization, of unity  of purpose. Let the farmer be  thoroughly rooted in co-operation  and the branches that will spring  rrom such an entrenchment will  be fruitful of mutual' benefits:  and advantages, financially, socially and morally.  . The question now is one of organization and co-operation, and  if the farmers of British Columbia are successful in the feature  of, self protection and advance-  ment they may then readily obtain success in their other projects.  What it needs in order to gain  the victory is the' hearty support  of the individual member. If you  are a farmer���������you should be interested in'the movement and  come out from under cover and  join the ranks, putting your  shoulder to the wheel and helping us on.  In conclusion I would like to  add that there can be no hope  for the farmers if their salvation  must come from others. Believe  me it will never come thus: There  must be a power within to do and  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  U TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries���������talk is  cheap. The best way .to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.   ������      .  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  apd your community.  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  THE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are ; the only  brands produced in  B.C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"'  0'  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioners  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  thus will he conquer.  , It is also, tunes.    Farmers of British Co-  true that it is not the power you j lumbia it is time to awaken and  possess, but the power you exert,' exert it now.    Will you ?  that makes you a living force,    j - Hionhy C. Helgesen,  The farmers have the force,! Farmer,  but it has been dormant for cen-: Metchosin, B. C.  (T  CLUB OFFER  We have pleasure in. announcing that we have made arrangements with two of theJead[ng_w.eekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier  $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg l. 50  $2.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1:00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for  .   .   $2.00  Both papers  for  . :  $2.00  The Courier   .       .  Family ^Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $L0������    Both papers  . 1.00  $2.00  for  .  .   $1.75  ^  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Will You Help?  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  Ogilvie's  Household Flour  gives satisfaction  a bag now  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  <?i���������.  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    ������  Tents-Pack asid Reding Saddles  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the most suitable articles are, kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints - Oils - Varnishes - Stains  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS.  IT'S  CANADA'S  BEST FLOUR  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.   Prompt service  Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  ���������wmjwmjBMtBtf '9i7  ,  ������r**.-'. jnr  Era  ''M  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  j|Sg^ffii������iimiii^rf^������^iuuit������gT^i������������iiMijJYl^wiiMiifJ  WEATHER REPORT FOR JANUARY  Compiled   by Mr. C. H.  Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 33.    Minimum, 24.  Highest Max. (9th) 45. Lowest Min. (30th) 12  below zero.   Rainfall, 3.51. Snow 16 in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  'OL. 5���������NO. 12  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, <MARCH 3,  1917.  $1.00'a Year  'Overt Act" Committed  U. S. Action Awaited  Washington,   Feb.  28. ��������� The  jinking'of the Cunard liner La-  Ionia with the loss of American  fives is, according to highest of-  icials interpretation, a clear cut  lase and noJnvestigation necessary.     This  became  known by  the administration's attitude following a conference at the White  [ouse between. Secretary Lansing and President Wilson.  Many officials believe that Germany   committed   "qvert  act"  igainst.the United States and  fdeclare that the situation is now  in the hands of Congress. Quick  1'and positive   action   should  be  forthcoming.  President and his cabinet will  lave all facts available before  ?them when they go into session  'this afternoon.  No decision reached, Senate  fwrangle over President's request  [giving hira power to arm American ships   carrying   munitions.  'Committee meet again at 4 p. m.  r ^  ijtoday. Five hundred million  [dollars naval bill threatened with  [delay and defeat through one-  1 man filibuster,   Senator LaFol-  ghette.     V ___  Germany Says U. S.  Action Without Parallel  Berlin, Feb. 28.���������Von Beth-  mann Hollweg in the Reichstag  today said President Wilson's  'action was without parallel, he  had yet to be informed why relations had been broken off. The  chancellor's statements in the  Reichstag em braces old argument  Britain all to blame. Germany  demands reparation and guarantees for the future.  British Advance���������  Bapaume May Fall  London, Feb. 28.- The British  advance along the Ancre river  attained a depth of two miles  and extends along a front about  eleven miles, according to official  reports.  Bapume, which has been declared would: fall only after the  "greatest price had been paid"  by the victorious army, is now  directly threatened owing to the  greatest German retirement that  has taken place since"stationary I  warfare'' began more than two  years ago. The newly occupied  ground opens up many possibilities to British forces. Hostile  attack,on the Somme was repulsed with heavy losses.  British steamers Pleadly, 4953  tons, and the Aries, 3071 tons,  have been sunk.  Official figures in the Laconia  disaster are:   total   num  passengers and crew 294; survi  vors  Danger of United States Being Involved in the War  Washington, Mar. 1.���������United! the president authority to pro-  States closer to war today thanvtect American rights. However,  past weeks. Despite the danger^ it is expected that Congress will  of war a filibusting spirit is brew-j give President Wilson what he  ing in the Senate and threatens j wants. Germany still holds Am-  the destruction of the bill giving) erieans on board the Yarrowdale.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  S. S. Camosun managed tolose  another two hours on her last  trip. She arrived in Bella Coola  four o'clock Saturday afternoon.  But considering the gale that  blowed during the whole week  and at her arrival it was quite  an accomplishment to arrive at  all. The fury of the wind was  responsible for the wrecking of a  corner of the wharf which is undergoing extensive.repairs.  We shall have more to say of  this new organization next week.  .. As the fishing industry is one  of the important assets of Bella  Coola, together, with the rest of  the Coast, we deem it of interest  to pur readers to publish the results of a visit to Ottawa by a  delegation from Prince Rupert  to interview the Minister of Marine and Fisheries in regard to  some needed changes in the fish-  Tollef Saugstad arrived after'ing regulations.  rw"4J������. a stay -of^a-few "wefeks* at^ate^^^ir^fPort to the:citizens  ^  ������ 'couver familiarizing himself with\?f Prince Rupert, the delegation  Vanded^tQueenstown^eTi'the running and taking care of 'express their gratitude to Mr.  survivors landed at Bantry 14;j the sanitary system of canning pazen> the minister of Marine  drowned 5; died "from exposure j which is installed at the "local [an^' Fisheries, H. L. Clements,  and buried.at sea 8; in hospital'  6. Two American women among j  the thirteen killed.  Austin Hoy, an American business man whose mother and sister were killed by the sinking of  the Laconia, wired President  Wilson demanding him to avenge  the deed, otherwise he would enlist in the British army.  London  papers   construe   the  i cannery.  There will be no hitch in the  running of the machinery at the  cannery this season if Tollef has  full swing.  Dr. E. M. Sutherland left for  a two weeks absence to Victoria.  As her husband, Wm. Sutherland, having enlisted in the naval  sinking of the   Laconia as an | service,   is stationed at Esqui  "overt act" against the States.  Will Congress Declare War?  New York, Mar. 1.���������Senator  Col.-F. Hale, who arrived from  England on board the Finland today, says Allies are jubilant over  United States break with Germany for its moral effect.  Survivors tell stories of sinking of Laconia by Huns. Passengers heard muffled noise like  slamming of a door when first  torpedo got home. A Negro and  a fireman nearly caused a panic  when they yelled ''get away from  ship, when water hits boiler she  will blow up and there's tons of  shrapnel in the hold." Officers  quickly assumed command and  the departure was'quite orderly, j  Passengers spoke to submarine  commander, brutal indifference  shown by U boat officer to plight  of survivors.        / ���������;.'���������:��������� >''C '      '"���������'(  Leading American papers declare President Wilson is compelled to make his words good.  Bound in honor to seek declaration of war from Congress.  Chancellor Hollweg's belligerent speech in the Reichstag is interpreted as being against the  United States.  London, Mar. 1.���������Gen. Haig's  troops still closing in on Bapaume  they are less than two miles to-!Atlantic Patro1-  day. German retreat has slowed  down considerably, strong resistance now being encountered in  forward sweep of British troops.  Ground is sea- of mud from recent thaws and stretching across  this ocean of slime are crisscrossed mile upon miles of barbed wire. Apparently Germany  counted upon this slippery footing and barbed wire obstacles to  hamper the British advance after  their retreat. Patrols have not  yet found indications of line selected by Germans in their retreat for next stand.  mault it is presumed she went to  bid him farewell prior to his departure for active service on the  M. P.,'"'Mr! Cunningham, chief  inspector of fisheries for British  Columbia, and Mr. Mclntyre,  deputy-minister of fisheries, for  the cordial and sympathetic attention given to them and assistance rendered.  The chief changes effected by  the able presentation of the case  by the delegation may be summarized as follows:  The-license for the taking of  herring by gill net will be good  for any part of-District No. 2,  and the fee for such license reduced to $1.00.  Arrangements will be made  with  the cannery  operators to  government to agree to such of  these changes as concerned the  regulations ordered by the Province.  The unusually high wind prevailing during the last week made  it impossible to proceed with the 'supply those engaged in fishing  work repairing the wharf. The for halibut with salmon for bait  weather at the beginning of this'at the price salmon are worth  week' has moderated, however,  and everybody having work to  do in the open air have resumed  their cheerfulness.  Albert Hammer, leading rancher in the Noosatsum settlement,  paid our burg a short visit at the  beginning of the week.  Turks on the Retreat  London, Mar. 1.���������British forces giving the retreating Turks  beyond Kut-El-Amarano chance  to reform their columns. Pursuit  continuingandretreating enemy  forces are being engaged on three  sides. Enemy forced to abandon  stores, gttns- thrown into Tigris  river/ including howitzers. British gunboat recaptured.  Paris, Mar. 1.���������Double event  British victories and progress at  Kut-El-Amara and on the Ancre  front are welcomed here. French  military experts still doubt exact military-importance.  We are indebted to H. C. Hel-  gesen, Metchosin, for an article  Re organization of Farmers, published on the third page.  As an outcome of the work done  by Mr. Helgesen and others there  has, since this article was written, been formed a Provincial \may see fic-  Association of Farmers for mutual help and co-operation. Cooperation among the farmers is,  outside the war, the great ques-  for canning purposes  Licenses for new canneries  within certain areas will be granted at the rate of one each season  until all applications are met.  (This will probably insure another cannery for Bella Coola.)  There will be no limit to the  number of lines that might be  used for trolling for salmon.  The minister hoped to arrange  during the coming season for  the starting of investigations for  the discovery of halibut banks,  herring and other fish grounds.  After this year all those receiving licenses will be permitted  to dispose of their fish as they  After this year motor boats  will be allowed in all parts of  District No. 2.  It is the policy of the department to establish and erect hatch-  tion at present and it issatisfac-jeries as speedily as conditions  tory to know that the farmers in generally will permit,  this vicinity are alive to its im-      At a subsequent meeting held  portance and will give it a fair ,i"  Prince  Rupert   a resolution  trial.  was passed asking the provincial  Ocean Falls News.  The Ocean Falls Red Cross  Society did itself justice last  week by the holding of a concert  in aid of the Red Cross Material  Fund, which proved to be the  great success of the season.  Thatthe residents of the town  at this time expected to enjoy  something unusual was evident  by the way they turned out en  masse for the occasion.  The concert was held in the  new Red Cross building erected  by the company, and it was filled  to the very doors.  The difficult problem of keeping the enthusiasm of this crowd  within bounds was delegated to  Dr. Christie who, as chairman,  looked over the audience assisted  by the three superintendents,  J. S. Connell, R. S. Nevin and  C. R. Lewthwaite, who were at  his side to the close of the program.  In order to do justice to the  very excellent program it is necessary to give it in full:  First Part.  Chorus   -    "Tenting on the old  Camp Ground"  The ladies of the Red Cross.  Song   -   "The Vale of Dreams"  Mr. I. R. Cox.  Reading        -        -        Selected  Miss Griffiths.  Pianoforte duet  a. "The Minstrel Boy"  b. "The Men of Harlech"  Mrs. F. Morrell, Miss Gibbons.  Song     -      "Un Peu D'Amour"  Mrs. Whittington.  Song     -     "The Bonnie, Bonnie  Heather"  Master A. Whittington.  Reading        -        -        Selected  Mrs. Ratten bury.  Song    -     "Sunshine and Rain"  Mrs. De Boyne.  Song        -       -       -       Selected  Mr. Moxon.  Reading        -        -       Selected  'Mr. T. Hamilton.  Song   -    "The Young Brigade"  Mr. Penn.  Song       -       "Mother Machree"  Mr. Tobin.  Chairman's remarks.  Second Part.  Pianoforte solo  Mr. Penn.  Song   -    "The Sunshine of Your  Smile"  Mrs. Whittington."  Stump speech      ...       -  Mr. Graham.  Song    -    "Toilers of the Deep"  Mr. Rattenbury.  Ventriloquist:       Mr. I. R. Cox.  Mandoline solo       -      Selected  Mr. Scribner.  Song        -       -       -       Selected  Mr. Whittington.  Recitation  Mr. T. Hamilton.  Violin solo.        -        Humoreslce  Mr. Carpenter.  Song  -   "The Deathless Army"  Mr. Penn.  Speech by Mr. Connell.  Chorus     -     "The Maple Leaf"  The Ladies.  "God Save the King."  Mrs. F. Morrell, L. L. CM.,  took on the role of accompanist.  That the chairman went through  his part of the ordeal creditably  was testified to by a vote of  thanks at the end of the concert.  The proceeds netted over $70.  The success of the performance  will be the incentive for the enterprising members of the Red  Cross Society co have another  equally successful in the near  future.        Indians Wanted for Forestry Battalion  Iver Fougner, Indian agent,  has received from Mr. A. Mv  Tyson, inspector of Indian agencies, the following self-explanatory letter, dated Vancouver. ,,  January 20th, asking that it be  published:  "I have been requested by the  department-of Indian affairs to  take charge of the recruiting of  Indians and Half-breeds throughout the Province of British Columbia for the Forestry and Railway Battalions now being organized. I have consented to take  up this"work" and" arri now preparing for an active recruiting  campaign.  "The Indians and Half-breeds  will not be required to go into  the firing line, but will be confined to Forestry and Railway  work.  "The remuneration that these  Indians and Half-breeds will receive will be $1.10 per day, food,  clothing and bed. In the case of  "married men, their wives will receive $20.00 per month separation allowance from the Government.     They  will  also  receive  from the Patriotic Fund as follows:  For a childless wife, married before enlistment ----- $10.00  For wife with children:  Grant to wife        17.50  For 1 child, between 10 and 15  -     7.50  "    1     " "5 and 10   -     4.50  "1      "    under 5       -    -    -    -     3.00  And for all other children (irrespective of age) each child -     3.00  Maximum grant, -   -   -    - ' -   -   42.50  NOTE.���������All children over 15 years  of age are considered self-supporting.  "In addition to the above, each  married man will be expected to  assign to his wife not less than  $15.00 per month.  "Transportation will be provided these Indians and Half-  breeds from the place of enlistment to headquarters at Vancouver or other point designated.  "The status of the Indians and  and Half-breeds who enlist will  be the same as white men, and,  I understand, they will receive  the same benefits and consideration after the war as white���������men  who enlist."  ������������r>-  ������  3  Qllmrrit Nnife  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  'Preacher:  Rev. Hans Sageng, A. B.  All Are Welcome.  ���������������L> <^<JNLV^<U?������^^Ml>XJML><*������  ^!  % ''i*'  >.& J ?  r  ?������  tilt fete  Juris;? is  :iiAv\ 'U- '���������'i'-S'  tWi ������M    -^V'-   l.lcBj  Pi  I'll  L"    *h 11-If!  {Urn \0 ^M  $*'  il  ;    i  mt.  !    !  ������?  MM  I  'Pit  ������   i '   l 'll', f KJi .  i  '-Fit ,i* '*bl  t*?^  i ?? if 1  t  ^"  >\<  It!" '{  It  I  nf  BELLA  COOLA COURIER  Saturdt  March 3  The Courier  ture to direct the attention of  I our fellow-Christians' to a few of  Published Weekly at Bella Goola by ! the vital issues which are making  the Bella CoolaPublishlng Co. Ltd! thdr mute appeal for final de  cision.  "The ravage of Belgium and  the enslavement of her people:  ?������  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1  Year *!���������<������, .       .   _ ...  6 Month.   0.75, was it right or wrong.',  3 Month*   $1.50  United Kingdom  1 Year.   United Stale*  .$1.00  Subscription* payable in advance  - Subscribers not receiving their copy  gularly please notify the management  nw.fi.    Chances in address should Be  ut������once.* 'Changes in" address  &int in as soon as possible.  Fob  Advertising ' .Rates,  .    "Office.  Apply at  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable anonymous comjnunications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be given to the editor. .  The Editor reserves the nirht to refuse pnoii-  catiun of any letter. All manuscript at writer s  risk.  ���������j^alua prijmlt supnnm sst lex.  SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 1917  No; False Peace.  An Important Expression  .   of Neutral Opinion.  When the pacifists or the peace-  at-any-price people, accuse the  Entente powers of being war  mad, actuated by.hate and many  other evil things, it is refreshing  to read what some bf the foremost clergymen and other prominent religious leaders in' the  United States say about a premature peace based on unrighteous terms.  T  We publish below a declaration  signed by some seventy of these  men of the foremost clergymen  and other'religious leaders in the  United States^which'-they have  issued t<������>the.' wopld-ondihe subject of making-'peace' before vic>  tory for the'^right has-been.at  tained. ������������������������������������������ ���������������������������--,  We have not the space to publish their names; but we would  point out as they are learned in  the scriptures and the laws of  righteousness their words should  have more than ordinary weight:  "When^war drenches Europe  in blood, it is natural that we  Americans should shudder at the  sight. To call upon the combatants to stop,the carnage is an  impulse so strong that it even  tends to displace judgment and  distort values. We are apt to  forget, at any rate for the time  being, that there are conditions  nnder which the mere stopping  of warfare may bring a cunse instead of a blessing. We need to  be reminded that peace is the  triumph of righteousness and not  the mere sheathing of the sword.  To clamor for an ending of the  present war withoutansuring the  Vindication of truth, justice and  honor is not to seek peace but to  sow disaster.  "Because it is so easy to lose  sight of these essential principles, we, the undersigned, view  with some concern the organized  and deliberate effort now being  made so to stampede Christian  .sentiment as to create a public  opinion blindly favorable to stopping hostilities without adequate  consideration of the issues which  the war involves.  "We arje Christians, and, as  such, deem that truth and righteousness are to be maintained  inviolate, even at the sacrifice of  physical life. We are citizens of  the United States, and, as such,  are conscious of the solemn re-  sponsibilites  of   our   Christian  0.50 t.The mas-sacre of a million  Armenians: was it a permissible  precaution or an unpardonable  crime?  "The desolation of Serbia and  Poland: was this a regrettable  necessity or a frightful injustice?  The destruction of life through  the sinking of the Lusitania and  of other merchant ships: was  this an ordinary incident of warfare or was it deliberate and premeditated murder?  "The starvation of Jews and  Syrians in the Holy Land: is this  an accident of economics or a  violation of the laws of God, and  man?.  "The attempt to array Moslems  against Christians iri a 'Holy  War': was it a'laudable act of  imperial statemanship or wras it  the treachery, of a Christian  monarch?  "The intimidation of - small  nations and the violation of international agreements: are these  things'excusable under provocation or damnable under all cirr  cumstances?  "In the presence of these pending and as yet unsettled issues  we feel impelled to warn" our  brethren against those who cry  'Peace, peace,' when there is no  peace.   The just God,, who withheld notv his own .Son from the  cross, would not look with favor  upon a people who put their fear  of pain and death, their dread of  suffering and loss, their concern  for comfort and ease, above-the  holy claims of righteousness and  justice and freedom and-mercy  and truth. " Much- as -we*mourn  the   bloodshed/ in - Europe,   we  lament even more that supine-  ness of spirit, that indifference  to spiritual values, which would  let mere   physical   safety take  precedence of loyalty to truth  and duty.    The memory of all  the saints and martyrs cries out  against such backsliding of mankind.   Sad is our lot if we have  forgotten how to die for a holy  cause.  "We solemnly declare to you  our conviction that the question  of all questions for our immediate consideration is" this: 'Shall  the ancient Christian inheritance  of loyalty to great and divine  ideals be replaced by considerations of mere expediency?'"  DECLINE SUBSTITUTES  The British in Earnest.  The British people have again  declared in no uncertain tones  their determination to carry on  the war and to make still further  sacrifices to gain a decisive victory.  It may have been with some  fear and trembling that the  authorities given the task of furnishing the-enormous amounts  ������ -  necessary to  carry, on the war  from day to day undertook the  seemingly herculean or almost  impossible task of raising another  loan; this time of an unlimited  amount, but desiring it to be  about equal to two and one half  billion dollars. But in a campaign of about five weeks the re- J  loan was made and the investments still being made in other  securities make it seemingly safe  to predict that within a reasonable length of time a similar loan  lean be raised says the London  j Times.  This vast' amount just raised  is equal to the entire debt of  Great Britain before the war. It  is raised at a time when the government is levying a taxation of  2 1-2 billion dollars. And, furthermore, : the loan was made  without any special appeal to  the banks 6r grerit financial institutions. 'It was in every sense  a popular Joan, to which the  many smalljsubscriptions abundantly testify. ��������� ,  The spirit evinced by the British people in this war, indicating  determination,   I perseverance,  self-sacrifice   and   patriotism,  each of the highest order, goes  far to explain why Great Britain  is a world power in matters essential to the world's progress.  And let it be said right here that  this power:has not in late years  at least been abused by oppressing the  weaker people, but in  establishing justice,  ameliorating economic conditions, in the  spreading of  the   blessings of  Christianity and civilization.  If this greatix>wer of democ  Maekay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd  -    VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND  MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE  WEST'   BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  '���������MADE    IN    B. C  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given letter Ord  en  ts  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT Mpv i  of 1493 SEYENTH AVE. W.f VANCOUVER, B. C, them \n\m>nn[*^  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardv mirserv??  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and re "  tive. Honest, energetic men only are needed. We  want a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should write, at once for our 80 page Catalogue  remunera-  Particularly  sponse was so hearty ~ that not  only was-the amount expected  raised, but one billion dollars in  excess. The exact amount is not  yet known but it is estimated to  be ������700,000,000 or three and one  half billion dollars.  And the ease with which this  racy should go^down before Teutonic autocracy the world would  indeed be relegated backward  for centuries both as to condition and progress. Should not  the Neutrals also try to prevent  such a calamity?  Bella Cibola Experinifiitai Plot   Report for 1916  S. Le.C. Grant, Experimenter.  -Section 2 and 3.    South end.  Leeks���������Italian: sown (in frame) April 1.    Results, good crop.  Peas���������Potlatch: sown April 29.     Results^ excellent crop of large,  well-filled pods.    Vine 5 feet.  Lettuce���������New York: sown 3vSuccessions during year.  Results, all  produced excellent heads.  Mignonette: sown 3 successions in year.     Results, New  York firmest and largest.  Chinese cabbage���������Wong Bok.    Results, New York firmest and largest:        f  Celery- White Plume and New Rose.   Results, both varieties have  '  excellent quality. .  Remarks, soil is a black muck and well suited to vegetable  growing. Was flooded in early^summer for two days, but  did little damage. Fertilized with stable manure in Fall  Complete applied in .'Spring to whole area. Harvested, in  season for table use and for.sale.  NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these dis-  citizenship. We accordingly ven-tricts.  Section 4.   Plot 1.  Parsnip���������Guernsey: sown May.1; germinated May 28; harvested  November 7.   Results, set back in cold, dry weather. Yield  3-4 ton.      '  Potatoes���������Table Talk: sown 5 lbs. May 1; germinated May 20; harvested" November 7.   Results, yield 104 lbs.  Gold Coin; sown 5 lbs. May 1; germinated May 20; harvested November 7.   Results, yield 152 lbs.  Whole plot had light application Nitrate Soda before planting.  Plot 2.  Sugar.Beet���������Royal Giant: sown 2 oz. April .29; germinated May  10; harvested 0ctober"9; yield 196 lbs.     Results, fair size,  good quality.  Danish; sown 2 oz. April 29; germinated May 12; har;  vested October 9; yield 309 lbs. Results, good crop. Better  size and shape than former.  Mangel���������Rennie's Giant: sown 2 oz. April 29; germinated May 10;  harvested October 10; yield 494 lbs. Results, soil somewhat  poor, and season too dry for mangels.  Kale���������Thousand Headed: sown 1-4 oz. April 29; germinated May  12; harvested October 6. Results, fair yield, season rather  unfavorable.  Potatoes���������Dreer's Standard: sown3 lbs. April 29; germinated May  20; harvested November 6; yield 28 hills 112 lbs.  Empire State; sown 3 lbs. April 29; germinated May 20-  harvested November 6; yield 29 hills 85 lbs.  Irish Cobbler: sown 3 lbs. April 29; germinated May 20-  harvested November 6; yield 20 hills 80 lbs.  Remarks, all the potatoes were more or less scabby.  Ground is run out and wants renewing.   Sugar beets and  mangels received Thomas Phosphate and Nitrate of Soda  about 50 lbs. before sowing.  A   Weak Government.  The Borden government is supposed to mean well and trying to  do the right thing, but it is nevertheless a government which  is  weak because it is timid.   The  premier  has   promised   500,000  men /or overseas  service,  but  this numbar is still more than  100,000  short   with almost. no  prospects of raising the number  promised.   Thegovernmentdare  not take any steps that will- ensure the full quota;   but tries  measures which,, in the eyes of  the  world, is  known'  very outset to be vain.  We notice thatcv.n  of the. govern ment  from the  supporters  ar* getting  tired of thisshilly.sijaljyinjru.hid,.  brings no results.   Qne m&m  which was loudly h^raldtdasth?.  acme of practicability was Tfce  National Service Enrollment,let  it proved only a make-shift which"'  will bring no practical results.  o     e     s     o    s  The government is urging production and thrift upon others.  but in its own  management is  ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR  t(The Flour With the Guarantee"  Your money'refunded if not  the*equal *of any other flour  manufactured, irrespective of  price. -  MADE IN  BRITISH COLUMBIA  w  o Let the Tea Pot tell you  GREAT   WEST  TEA  is Better  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B.C.  M  To be concluded in three issues.  30E  D*H  nor.  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SEKVK't:  BETWEE*  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.  "CamOSUn"   Leaves  Vancouver  every  Tuesday at 9 p.m. (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p. m.  S. S. "COQUITLAM" sails from Vancouver  nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, wil  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  fort-  I call  to  For rates of Freights,  Fares and other information. ������I  Head Office. Carrall St.,   Vancouver ;" or Geo. Mc(������k!'"()1"  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  ������H  id  !'l^/  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  if  it   11  j***  !J������5S?!at������*!Ji4S3:W.  r/rrrrrr.ra'.w������������������tw-*<..���������'.T,,-.., day, March 3,   1917  BELLAi COOLA  COURIER  TO  INVESTORS  HOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  ,  IN  SUMS OF *SOO  OR ANY  MULTIPLE THEREOF.  vas!  ent,  ft wh  ingp  oihe-  ment  lot  >ur  of  B.C.  V  K  IWSm  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  any chartered -Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from the date of  purchase.  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issue  in.Canada other than an issue of Treasury Bills or other like short date security.  Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.  A commission of one-quarter of one per cent will be allowed to recognized bond and  stock brokers on allotments made in respect of applications for this stock which bear their  stamp. ''���������';..������������������.    <.' , ��������� .  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA,  OCTOBER 7th, 191C.  fable to curb the'extravagances  its officials and hangers-on.  ase in point is the Ross rifle  uch has  been  condemned as-  ng unfit for use in the war as  ijj ims so easily.    It is no longer  eiatall; but still the goverh-  ���������nt is buying them at the rate  1000 per day to be put on.the  -up pile as soon as received,  us may be production all right  Sough, but it is not thrift by a  g ways.  O      Si      O      O      O  \s compared with  last year  e tables are entirely turned as  girds Dominion politics.  El hen it was the Conservatives  u wanted an election and the  ly the other way about; this  change o" attitude is due to a  change in the opinion as to the  result.  And that it is not confined to  this country alone rray be gathered from the fact that an influential New York paper recently  made the statement that the  Borden government was only a  "stop-gap" until the Liberals  took possession.     "'  ���������;.  Re Organization of Farmers  As one who is keenly interested in this timely movement for  the union of the farmers 1 would  like to point out that it is one of  the most important steps the  farmers can, take and therefore  [berals opposed, now it is exact- should be joined by them all  I believe-that if the farmers do  not make an effort to improve  their conditions as they are and  have been many of "them will go  under. To save them this can  only be' brought about by cooperation and organization.  Now, the time has come when  we' should organize our forces  for mutual benefit; and by. organization become the greatest  power in the world today. The  farmer has labored diligently and  honestly, and in doing so he has  been conscious of the necessity  to be active in one sense; but  while he expended his strength  in manual labor, the workshop  of his brain became dull and cob-  webbed, in so far as the proper  guarding and distribution of the  fruits of his labor were concern-.  ed. :.���������'���������;.' ���������'  He has all along been shortsighted in the marketing of his  products. He has ploughed,  sown, reaped, and then dumped  the fruits of his labor into the  lap of the conscientiousless speculator, who has not hesitated to  manipulate to his own selfish interests after allowing the farmer  an inequitable portion.  Thus has come about the holdup of labor's portion, this being  only one of the many instances  that the producers have been  subjected to for centuries, until  now after a realization of the unfavorable conditions, an awakening in the heart of the farmers  themselves appears to be becoming general. Co-operation and  organizstion is beginning to obtain where it should have been  in existence years and years ago;  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  *" Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Territory, the North-west Terri-  ��������� TORIES and in a portion of the PROVINCE of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an,  acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Auent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  . are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described hy sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rijf.hta  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco"oting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year. '  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  ,  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  one  30E  5     O  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  jf the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individu-  )1 h6use assures  the  highest  market  ���������price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  O  o  HOE  Dealers and Trappers  ������������������������.  ���������nm  I hejvlason (y ixischPiano  of to-day will mafe plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  ������    Let. us attend  your Victor Record  JJ  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������EANGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation builder, intend to. apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30. 1916. Jan. 6���������March  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  0H  rier  0>  Comfort and luxury assured at a  minimum cost. Many Prince Rupert testimonials prove its worth  Have You Got~$20 ?  If not your credit is good  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented in Canada)  Installed in your kitchen range  will give you all the hot water  you can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started. 121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  user a booster. You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  seen these results. $20.00 is the  Cost. Absolutely no charge unless satisfactory.  ;,.A'b.aihtttppty Within twznty minutes  after"firc*is started and then a new supply}" cilery'twenty minutes thereafter.  Wail radiators can also he run from  your hot water boiler and other rooms  heated with no extra cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surprise You  Investigate!  Harry HansonThPeluRnl,e,r,������  P. O. Box 395  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  DISTBICT   OP   COAST���������BANGS   III.  Take Notice that I, Mark Smaby, of  Ocean Falls, B. C, occupation timber  cruiser, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Pulp Lease 205;  thence North 20 chains; thence East 20  chains; thence North 20 chains; thence  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20  chains; thence' East 20 chains; thence  South 7 chains more or less to high  water mark of Cousin's Inlet; thence  following along said high water mark  in a westerly direction to a point due  east of this post; thence West 12 chains  more or less to this post, containing  140 acres more or less.  (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 26, 1916.  Jan. 27--Mar. 24.  r^n  SJLCnJJl^l!  \)L7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  w  HAT person so independent?  \X7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch -in Bella Coola Valley.  ���������"THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ��������������������������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  F>ELLA COOLA and the. surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill.at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C. ,  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name '  P. O   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  ';-%  'V'llffi.  ���������M  !\h n  f  s^nao  *?  * IJJIH'.-Mfl  I U  ,;f,H   .1'll.t&t  i'jii-   'l!f.*  mm  ^  mi  111!  .nun| ' "  ?fij  fit  ������  : m Mm  "I* miidfe  gfj fiS.!i������B!  ������i  ite  8 W !liI'  fel'lf  iSft!  '������������������*���������  ill  Uif$i;  i  ft  jffeS  lft;"���������  Si!  ll.yjS'f ij;M  | l|f :'"*i!  #."'SW  { .  "^ "-���������;���������'?a:'  I    '.l       ���������<-    v'*'i  ^'  .'!) y,  it;  ;i!  IfM  li!'-'  u!  1 yvj  :7������,  - t4l  i'     ' i  f      V,} 1  ���������   f;f  . "J1  k ������  BELLS COOLA COURIER  Saturdi  Subscribe  for the  Courier"  DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A-distance of six hundred miles.  // will be to your interest to.keep* well informed regarding the  happenings. throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS  Now is the lime to keep  your name before the  public; No manufactur-  er or wnolesalehouse can  afford to let-slip the op-  portunity of. .increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to Sock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all.- Did not  know, is" no exeose. > Investors  shoaid keep posted on develop-  mants by reading Use "'Courier."  =ri (���������)|/?e Organization of Farmers  (Continued from column 3, p^ge S.)  and a demand is being made by  the farmers for a release of  labor's portion, and the equitable  distribution of the reward of  honest industry and thrift.  In obtaining this righteous purpose, it is necessary for the farmer to present to the. world a  strength greater than that represented by any single ind?\ idual.  He^must add to his indiviauality  that of his neighbor, and of his  neighbor's neighbor; and so on  all along the line of co-operation,  until there shall be at the back of  the one farmer, and in touch,  and  in   harmony   with  him,  a  great phalanx of farmers, a line  too long, and too deep and too  strong to be injured by the most  powerful influences;   and   then  and only then will the individual  farmer be dealt \vith equitably.  To bring this about is only a  question of organization, of unity  of purpose.   Let the farmer be  thoroughly rooted in co-operation  and the branches that will spring  from such an entrenchment will  be fruitful  of mutual  benefits  and advantages, financially, socially and morally.  "���������*��������� The question now is one of organization and co-operation, and  if the farmers'of British Columbia are successful in the feature  of self protection and, advance-  ment they may then readily obtain success in their other projects.  What it needs in order to gain  the victory is the hearty support  of the individual member. If you  area farmer you should ,be interested in the, movement and  come out from under.cover and  join the ranks,, putting your  shoulder to the wheel, and helping us on. ���������  In conclusion I would like to  add that there can be no hope  for the farmers if their salvation  most come from others. Believe  me it will never come thus. There  must be a power, within to do and  W,  March I  lm  thus wil.1 he conquer.   It is also' turies.    Farmers of Brig* Co-  true that it is not the power you lurab.a ,t is time to :awaken ana  possess but the poweryou exert.' esert ij������J. ^ W  that makes you a living force. hlnkx o. *^  The farmers have the force, ���������    x>  p  but it has been dormant for cen- Metchosin, B. u  Farmer,  /���������  CLUB OFFER  We have pleasure in, announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best ot reading at  substantially reduced rates.   The Courier   .       .       .       ���������       . |1.00  Fanaers Adrocate 4 Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50  $2.50  Bom papers  for  .   .   $2.00  The Courier   .  Canadian CocBbyman, Toreolo  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for  .  .   $2.00  The Courier   .       .  Family jferaid & Weekly Star, Montreal  S1'00    Both papers  ���������_L0������   for  .   .   $1.7S  $2.00  V  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  J  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA in  1895.  B.Brynildsen  LEADING   DEALERS  IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  .  J  tting  You are judged by, tbe  stationery that yon use.  Let us do your job printing.   We wifi do it right.  DUILD UP YOUK HOME!  TOWN. Do not talk���������sup- j  port home industries���������talk is I  cheap. The best way to show f  that yon are in earnest is to I  practise it j  Support the "Courier" and you l  are doing something for yourself \  and your community.  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  ELLA COOLA, B. C  "THE two principal reasons  why   you  should   buy  "Shamrock*' Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C tinder government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BtiRNS  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your meoey at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provmoiver*  Calgary     YaBcoarer     Edsontsfl  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  j ������  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys9 and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  Wifl You Help?  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the^CJanadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad-to supply  Collecting Books,, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist. ^  ADVERTISE  >>>  We carry the largest and most  up-to-dite stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. * Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ft  si  w K  **\ a.  e4|  'J  Tents-Pack anci Riding Saddles  Ogilviefs  Roy al Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the most suitable articles are. kept at prices that  incite competition.  ALL GOOD GROCERS.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all description*  Be*t brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices-Largest Stocky  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  s  3s  v%  f"&  fell  \ts>.  I"*  f  l  AH  1%  w  L'i

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