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Bella Coola Courier 1916-06-10

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 ���������$M%  r  *-'}  fei^;  _-.  <*;.". >.��������� >-������������������&:.-  .'T. ��������� T:  ���������������������������������  '.-  ^7^  >_������!-:���������?���������.���������  ���������v.  f" ������.-. ���������  L:_������<  ���������1-"-l:.������-/ti?/-f'7.'.A '.'.:/>,������������������.���������.  o ���������  I^IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  /  WEATHER REPORT FOR MAY.  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth; of the  Bella,Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 61.   Minimum, 41.  Highest Max. (25th) 80. Lowest Min'. (9th. 30  Rainfall, 0.57'inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915) 34.33 inches.  VOL. 4���������NO. 34  BELLA COOLA, B. C,; SATURDAY, JUNE 10, 1916.  $1.00 a Year  Sails for Three Hours  Among Dead Bodies  London, June 8. ���������Tlie Swedish  steamer Vanda reports passing  the wreck of a gigantic war ship  on Saturday, the nationality of  which it was unable to ascertain,  hundreds of bodies were floating  around the wreck and for three  hours the Vanda steamed among  dsad, floating bodies of sailors.  Near the spot where the derelict  was encountered the wreck of a  big sailing vessel, apparently the  innocent victim uf the'Jutland  naval battle, was sighted.  The British losses in the big  naval battle off Jutland were 1  battle-cruiser, 3 cruisers of old  type and several destroyers.  German losses as known were:  3 new hattleships, several, destroyers and 1 submarine. The  loss in life was about equally  divided, totalling in all some  15,000 men.  Powerful Attack on  Fort Vaux Repulsed  Paris, June 8.���������The repulse of  a powerful German attack on  Fort Vaux on the Verdun line,  with heavy losses to the enemy,  was reported by the war office  in the official statement today,  also that a violent bombardment  of the fort is still being carried  out by the Germans without effect. West of Soissons two German patrols which were endeavoring to cross the Aisne  ���������were easily dispersed by us. In  Argonrie, at Lemor1 te de Homme  we caused the explosion with  success of three mines. On the  left bank of the Meuse there has  been artillery duels in sector of  Hill 304 and sector of Caurettes  Wood. In' the Vosges intense  bombardment, is in progress.  Nothing of importance at other  sectors of our fronts.  Beyond the finding of a small  boat with-four dead men in no  further tidings of the_fate of all  those on board the cruiser Hampshire has been received. The  Hampshire, with Lord Kitchener  and his staff on board on their  way to Russia, struck a mine  on June 5th off-the north coast  of Scotland and presumably went  down so quick that there was no  time to save a single soul. ���������  Berlin, June 9.��������� (Official German statement.) The loss in the  high sea forces during the battle  off Jutland up to the present  time is, one battle cruiser, one  ship of line of old construction,  four small cruis.vs, and five torpedo boats, Of these losses are,  battleship Pommern, launched in  1905, cruisers Wiesbaden, Elbi-  eng, and Frauenlob, with the  five, torpedo boats already reported in the official statement.  Acknowledging Kitchener as  being organizer of great ability  German papers devote much  space to comments on him now  he is dead, but there is no disposition to aggregate the importance of his death to base particular hopes thereon.  London, June 9.���������-For military  reasons, the Germans' have not  yet made public, the loss of the  battle-cruiser Litzow and the  cruiser Rostock, although known  in official circles that, both sank.  ��������� Amsterdam, June 9.���������A German destroyer struck a mine and  went down off Zee Bruges May  31st. All but two of .the crew  were lost.      '   :      '.  London, June 9.���������Condition of  Major Hamilton Gault is critical,  gunshot, wounds in both thighs  along.with.less serious wounds  in the shoulder. \  David Lloyd Gebrgeronly prevented from accompanying Lord  Kitchener by.the Irish crisis.  A memorial servics^tn memory  of Lord Kitchener.will'beheld in  St. Pauls Cathedral on June 13.  The king and queen will attend  the service.  An allied air squadron .successfully'bombarded the wharves at  Hoboken, near Antwerp. Germans are said to be building destroyers at Hoboken. Squadron  was fited on by Garman batteries  but.all returned to their base in  safety.  French Lose Fort Vaux  Paris, June 9.���������Fort Vaux has  been captured by the -Germans  after superhuman defense by the  French when it had been demolished by artillery-fire. West of  Meuse,intermittent cannonading  took place during the night. In  Argonne, a German mine explo  ded this morning near Hill 285,  but without causing any damage.  We occupied southern tip of the  crater thereby created.  Russians Capture Lutsk  and Over 50,000 Men  Petrograd, June 9 -Our,troops  captured Lutsk, also series of  powerfully organized Austrian  positions according to the official  communication. In addition to  to 40,000 Austrians previously  captured were 58 officers and 11,-  000 men captured in yesterday's  fighting also a large amount of  war materials taken.  S. S. Camosun arrived at ,the.  early hour of 8 o'clock, Sunday  morning. Her passenger list1"for  this port contained only the  names of Rev. W. H. Gibso'n,  Morley Shiers and Mrs. F. Tarn.  The influx to our population was  more than balanced by the exodus of H. G. Anderson, Ingvald  Urseth, W. Barlow and R. A.  Teebay. -   ���������  Rev. W. II." ��������� Gibson/'returne1  after an absence of three ,w'eek_  attending the annual conference  of the Methodist Churchheld jatv>  Victoria.' He reports that las  nearly 25 per cent of the Methodist clergy stationed in the pro  .for "their departure overseas,  Tiey are impatiently waiting  :i(T, 'the order to go, and hope  trat the war will not be over un-  ,ti< they have had,a whack at bur  ccmmon foe.  . .* ___ .    *  .>'!  4R._A.-Teebay has been so inconspicuous during his week at  borne that we almost forgot that  hihad'been here at all. It is in-  h^rred > he had to stay pretty  V/^-ady at home in order to renew  lift'acquaintance- with his family  aiter a lengthy separation.  i.the impression of one who has  watched the work at Ocean Falls  sihceits early developmentstage  vince have enlisted there i_-a'������that now,' more than ever be-  shortage.of ministers and there-;������ore- jt looks.hke business. The  fore no'���������immediate prospect of ,s������irit of each a"d everyone in  having any assigned to Bella' *#e .Place 1S enthusiasm in the  Coola.  Cecil M. Lancaster has been  appointed to officiate temporarily  at Ocean Falls.  Morley Shiers, representing  the Vancouver- wholesale hard-  ware house. Wood, Vallance &  Leggat, Ltd., is in town booking  orders for his house. Mr. Shiers.;  informs  ness very satisfactory all along  the coast.  ,r his house.    Mr.Shie^^rjJ^^de'of'the pulp mill  us that he found bu������i.; $$ffi*the Waterfront has been  --i ���������-.__.���������_���������-.....���������    '_11      r.l_ViV_       .     ���������      .���������*', . . ,  Bulgarians Suffer Heavily  Saloniki, June 9.���������French and  Bulgarian forces engaged in a  violent encounter at Kupa Hill,  in Greek Macedonia. It is reported that the Bulgarians withdrew after suffering enormous  losses.'; ,.,,  Mrs. Tarn is here in the interests of The World, the popular  daily newspaper of Vancouver.  If energy"and tact count in securing subscribers, we bespeak  for her a successful week here.  She expresses the opinion that  Bella Coola is not as well known  to the outside world as it should  be. As a summer resort she  speaks of our valley very highly.  Privates H. G. Anderson" and  Ingvald Urseth left to rejoin the  Comox-Atlin regiment after  spending the week with their  families and friends here. They  told of the eagerness of the boys!  work.  ,:.iAfter experiencing considerable difficulty in, the filling-in  job by the dredge, by which process' thp'harbor is being deepened  'aricl\*the; yard space being increased, they have >iow got it  running' successfully pumpirga  'continuous stream of mud and  gravel-about one foot in diame  inspector of fisheries for.this district with headquarters at Prince  Rupert. He was on a tour of his  district, but as no difficulties or  troubles are found at Bella Coola  under tlie scrupulous and efficient  supervision of John Widsten our  fishery officer in charge, he did  not find it necessary to prolong  his visit beyond the stay of the  steamer in port. He came here  from Rivers.Inlet to which place  he also returned. He finds conditions for the fishing industry  quite satisfactory throughout his  4. Who was the person supervising this work?  5. What was the total amount  paid for inspection?  6. How  many miles of road  were built?  The Hon. Mr. Taylor replied as  follows:  1. $911.75.,  "2. Road Superintendent.  3. J. W. Macfarlane, foreman,  ,45 days; J. W. Macfarlane, team,  45.days; G. Turner, laborer, 38,  days;  B. .Thomson,   laborer, 27  district.   Earlier in the season ;da>s; E. Gyllenspitz, laborer, 16  fear was expressed that there.'days;   A.   Schilling,   laborer,  8  , . ,     .���������_.. ___���������i_ ' days'; F. Chandler, 3 days.  would'be a scarcity of fishermen  this season, but he finds.that this  was groundless as; the applications for licenses are more than  can be granted.  The Good Hope cannery of  Rivers Inlet has been the victim  of a theft of considerable proportions. Last week seven of  its new nets were stolen, valued  about $1700. A reward of $500  is offered for information that  will lead to arresting the party.  rerqdved and the machine shop  Has-been' taken down to make  room' for' the new paper mill  which will butt up against the  present pulp mill and extend  seven hundred and fifty feet  toward the water front. When  the work of remodeling the store  is-finished Ocean Falls will have  one of'the largest inland stores  in the province, and it will be  up-to-date'too with its elevator  and refrigerating'plant.  . .Chief constableE. Gammon" of  Prince Rupert, is at Bella Coola  on a tour of his district.'  We regret to relate that Albert  Brynildsen has been confined to  the house for nearly two weeks  suffering from an attack of inflammatory rheumatism. He is  in the way of recovery.  Mrs. F. A. Johnson'spent last  week visiting her home at Firvale. She and1 her family are  again to be found encamped under canvas hear Mr. Johnson's  mill.*   Although reluctantly w<; are  forced to admit that the season  for raising crops is rather backward this year.' Cool weather-  is the rule nearly every day.  Something unprecedented in thet  history of the settlement of the  valley was" the "forming of a thin  sheet of ice on the morning of  May 23rd.  _,_.._..-^   _,..._-. ���������.. .    dbola.people and nearly every  to depart for the front and that b'pdy else on the coast of Briti'.h  everything seemed to be ready Columbia was J.  T.   Willianis;  Dr. Sutherland in her capacity  ;One of the passengers on thejas .medical   examiner   of   the  Sunday steamer familiar to Bella | schools made  her  rounds last  week.    Jury Disagree  Victoria, June 9.���������In the trial  of Gqsden the jury disagreed and  were discharged. Nine were for  conviction and three1 for acquittal., It is believed the jury lined  up on political lines. Case traversed until next assizeSi,  THE VIKINGS OF CANADA  Oyster Bay, June 9.��������� It is believed that if Justice Hughes is  nominated as Republican candidate Colonel Roosevelt himself  will become a candidate:  JACKSON1. ASSAGE FISHErtY ,  I hereby give notice as owner  of above Fishery that I will not  be responsible for any debts incurred in connection with the  working of same, unless given  on my own personal written  order.  Dated, May 23rd, 1916.  CHARLES I. SMITH.  P. O. Box 730, Vancouver, B. C.  SCANDINAVIANS ENLIST IN THE 197th.  ���������A battalion recruited and commanded by Scandinavians is now  being-formed at Winnipeg. During the Civil War in the United  States there were regiments composed of Scandinavians only who,  like the celebrated 15th Wisconsin's for instance, distinguished  themselves on many a hard fought field in the,South; and the  Vikings of Canada, when given an opportunity, will also show the  bravery of their illustrious ancestors after whom they are named.  The Winnipeg Free Press has, the following���������, to say_jibout the  Battalion: ' -^  Although comparatively little  has been heard about the 197th  Overseas���������  Battalion;   popularly>!mnd good food and plenty of it is  known as the Vikings of Canada;  it has been  making rapid pro  Particular  attention   has  been  .eiven to the culinary department  *rlAV*. _>_-w_  . w _. rP..^.r ir- ��������� -��������� -.,   ���������  -- ���������  served at every meal, while the  motto  "Cleanliness is   next to  gress/'With all.-ranks filling iip| Godliness" is strictly observed.  mi    .   t. _ __ _i; __._.,.��������� _U._,     ! fpl.n. "_tl���������i<___i     _r    nilQV.ovU   ___     fflll.-  rap.dly.   .The Battalion has chos  en for its crest the many oared  boat of the Vikings.  Lieut. ^Colonel A. G. Fonseca'  has surrounded himself with an  efficient staff of officers, and  nothiVig is being left undone in  the training of the Battalion to  make it,one��������� of the best of the  Canadian Army, while neither  has anythinig been left undone to  The sleeping quarters are comfortable and clean, and the sanitary conditions have been  brought strictly up-to-date.  For information in regard to  pay and pension to a Soldier, his  wife and children, or widowed  mother,, also in regard to free  transportation to Winnipeg, apply to Officer Commanding 197th  Battalion, Exhibition Barracks,  A. R. Neale, assistant horticulturist^ arrived from Prince .Rupert on Thursday and will spend  a couple of weeks in the valley.  In the votes and proceedings  of the Legislative Assembly of  British Columbia, Nos. 72 and  ��������� ���������    .. _  73 are found some questions relating to the public works done  in Bella Coola and at Anaham  Lake last year. We give them  below for the benefit of our readers who no doubt will read them  with interest:  Mr. Brewster asked the Hon,  the Minister of Public Works the  followingquestions; '���������.....  1. What amount of money was  expended at Anaham Lake during the year 1915? ,  _  2. Who recommended this work  to be done?  3. Who were the,persons and  for what length of time was each  person employed on this work?  provide comforts for the men. j Winnipeg  4. R. O. Jennings.  ' -5. Nil.  6. Cleared 22 miles; grubbe'4  212 miles; graded 11-8 miles.  Mr.'Brewster asked the Hon.  the Minister of Public Works  Works'the following questions:  1. What was the total amount  of money expended in th.e Bella  Coola Valley in 1915?  2. Who were the forc-mtn em-  ply ed on road-work in the Bella  Coola Valley in 1915?  3. What was the amount of  money expended under each foreman upon: (a) Repairs: (������) new  work ?  4. What wras the mileage of  new road constructed under each  foremen?  5. What was the cost per mile  for road construction under each  foreman?  6. What was the cost of Mr. J.  Falls' locating work throughout  the Bella Coola Valley?  7. Did Mr. J. Falls make any  reports to' the Government In  respect of location' of roads as  above?  8. If so, what action did the  Government take on such reports?  9. What was the amount expended on the wharf at Bella  Coola during each of the year?  1914 and 1915?  10. What was the; amount allowed to  Road Superintendent  Jennings for travellingexpen&tsr  during each of the years 1914s-  and 1915 in connection with'work  in the Bella Coola Valley?''  The Hon. Mr. Taylor repJiediSs  follows: \ ;;' ' : ���������'..,.;.. .    *������  1. 1915-16, $12,906.05 on roads,  bridges, etc. .;,';���������;;  2. H. D. Brown, $1,482.75; F.  A. Johnson, $1,733.62; W. ;E.  Rateliffe, $991.53; A. Svisdahl,  $1,320.17; all general repair work  .on roads.. ��������� .     ; ,/;'....���������'.���������;'.���������  3. Answered by'No. 2. ^;  4. Answered by No. 2.  ,5. Answered by No. 2. >  6. $206.35,  including  trip   to  Chilcotin.  ^ ,7. Yes/'...  8. No. action taken.   9. 1914-15, $2>24.10; 1915-16,  $661.74.  ' 10. 1914-15, $308.75; 1915-16,  $451.10; including other,sections  of the Bella Coola Division.  Bella Coola Farmers' Institute  The Ayreshire bull will be found  at the ranch of T. R. Astleford  for three weeks, beginning June  9th.  A. Hammer, Secretary.  ���������������������>.<_ ������r>-<ir> ^Tt������"* <%9>'?i���������>*\*  .  t  (Hlwrrii Notto  9.  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a.n_.  7 :30 p. m.  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W."H. Gibson.  \ All Are Welcome. *__*  2  LA COURIER  The Courier  poisonous Rases  should  not be  used in  modern warfare.    We  Published Wekkly at Bella Coola by ! know that Germany has violated  the 1.1.LLA Coola Publishing Co. Ltd. '���������, ,   , ,, .  i her pledge m ,this respect for a  \0  Saturday, June 10,   I9l6  longtime. These poisonous gases  are produced from the seed of  SUBSCRIPTION RATES: i  i  Canada I  l Year $1.00 the sabadilla plant which grows  C Months      0.75  '3 Month* ?   0.50  United States  1  Year..'. $1.50  j  United Kingdom  1  Year $1.00  EATS DIRT"  " Subscription, payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should bo  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising  Rater,   Apply  at  Office: "  To CortitESPONOENTS��������� While unobjectionable ���������n-  1   onymoua communications will be published, the  name mid address of every writer of such letters  inu .t be Riven to the editor.  The Editor reserves the rijrht to lefuse publi-  ���������    cr.tiun of any letter.    All manuscript at writer's  risk.  'Pallia jiupuli suprrnta wit Uw."  SATURDAY, JUNE 10, 1916.  i in Venezuela. For thirty years  this has been exported to Hamburg in small quantities. In 1913,  the year before the war, the exports to Germany jumped to  2.7,226 kilos, or about one half  a million pounds; and in 1914 the  record was 112,826 kilos. There  were virtually no exports to  other countries. '  This is proof positive that  Germany-intended to violate this  pledge long before the war started, and it is not only a violation  of a pledge but also a violation  of the broad dictates of humanity, even between enemies. It  is a depth of infamy never reach-  ed in the modern world, and yet  she professes to believe in God.  The Treachery of Germany.  It is rather interesting to speculate of how Germany expected  to hold the respect of the family  of nations and have her promises  a.o'iipied'in the near future after  violating her treaties and pledges  in the manner she has done since  -    the war began.  ' Now she pleads that necessity  knows no law, that she was so  hard pressed by her enemies that  in order to preserve her very  existence she had to resort to  .  illegal measures, while this sort  of pleading  may   be  sufficient  justification in the eyes of pro-  ~   Germans it will not hoodwink  any wh<5 consider honor of more  ������  value than even  life itself.   A  nation whose leaders at all times  appeal to God as their chie.f helper cannot deceive honest and intelligent people into the belief  that they rely on God, when their  illegal actions show  that they  .have no confidence in Him at all.  Those who rely on  God know  that lie can  and  will   protect  them   in   any   righteous  cause  ' without they having to resort to  sinful means.  Germany's loud protestations  that she is particularly strong  in her faith in the Ruler of the  Universe can in the light of her  violations of the laws of nations  and humanity be put down as  sheer rTypocrisy.  Furthermore, while she in her  folly believed that she could se-  , cure   success   through   illegal  methods, she would riot have reported to, them'if she had not  lelt so supremely confident of  victory that wheh. the war was  ' over her.position among nations  would be of such overwhelming  strength that no combination of  nations would dare to oppose her  decrees, and in the security and  pride of this strength she would  dictate   her  vyill to   the other  nations and they would have to  submit whether they believed in  her promises or not.   In.short,  she could defy the opinion of the  world. ���������      ���������  But that it was not the unexpected and the unprovided for  exigencies of the war that caused  her to violate her obligations  may be proven by trade reports  lately published. They prove  that she had decided to violate  her pledges a whole year or more,  before.the war started.  The rations represented at  The Hague conference, of which  Germany was one, agreed that  Mr. Bowser's Bid for Votes.  The provincial legislature at  Victoria dissolved on May 31st,  and it was announced that elections would be held in September.  The proceedings of this legislature have created more than  ordinary interest, because of the  rebuke received by the government at the by-elections; the  well-nigh universal' dissatisfaction with the state of affairs in  the province and the great effort  made by the government to reinstate itself in the favor of a  majority of the electors.  Bills calculated to appeal to the  approval of the voters have been  passed, and it is hoped that al-  though they are the fruits of a  i  deathbed repentance they will  prove of benefit to the province.  Some of them were subjected to  strong criticism and seme wercr  acquiesced in, by the opposition,  but it is our belief that if an  honest government tries to enforce them they will be found,  in spite of defects, to be for the  common good; the defects can be  eliminated by a legislature in  sympathy with their objects.  That Mr. Bowser in his anxiety  to get voles has tried to become  all things to all men can be shown  by his attitude towards prohibition.    Before the Vancouver by-  election, when he believed himself-to be fairly popular with Ihe  voters, he held to the evasive  utterances of ex-premier Uc-  Bride. But after the crushing  defeat of his candidates, whichhe  attributed to the dissatisfied prohibitionists he,_out of respect jto  their .strength, promised th.m  everything that they asked .or.  But after awhile 'the alanvnd  liquor interests began to brjtg  strong'pressure to bear u$fn  him that in the event of pr _#_-  bition beingadoptcd they receive  compensation. How to please  both the Prohibitionists and t^ie  liquor interests at the same time  taxed the astuteness even of a  lawyer of Bowser's ability-.- He  solved the problem at last, by  announcing that a royal comniis-  sion be appointed to ascertain  what amount the liquor interests  will be entitled to as compensation for their loss of business.. .  In legislation it will therefore  t  be seen that he, in his humble  way, has tried to please as many  as possible. , ���������  The next thing he has tried.to  do that he may be returned to  power is to blacken the character  of the opposition. Without dealing witlrlhat part of his endeavors in this article we will conclude by saying, that it is not  very hard for a person even if  he is no prophet or the son of  one, to predict that intryingto  serve two masters he will signally fail. He will not be able to  fool the people all the time.  .coo.  The Piling Up of Debts.  But whatever the record of the  session may disclose in n positive  the negative side. The public  cannot forget that the government majority in the legislature  deliberately voted a deficit of  more than $5,000,000, making a  total of expenditure over revenue in six years of something.like  $22,000,000. At such a time as  tnis, when our income ,is declining; when thrift and "economy  Should be practised by the gov-,  ernment to the utmost, when  money can be borrowed only at  a heavy discount, and when it is  vitally necessary that we should  conserve all our resources for the  trying period that must follow  the war, the adoption of that  budget was an act of criminal  folly. It was without a parallel  anywhere else in the \voriel. Its  purpose of course is as clear as  daylight. The motive which  prompted it was the same motive  as that which has been behind  every move Mr. Bowser has made  since he succeeded to the Pre-,  miership. He must have power  at all costs, anel he thinks that  .-Hie cannot coax the electors to  his side by attractive-looking  legislation he can gain his end  by ruinously exploiting the public  treasury and credit. What effect  his actions will have upon future  generations concerns him no  more than the same consideration concerned Sir Richard McBride when he brought down his  disastrous policy. Sir Richard  is now snugly sheltered in a London palace built with our taxpayers' money virtually behind  their backs and drawing a higher salary than the Prime Minister of Canada receives.' Mr.  Bowser, we presume, will expect to find a similar haven when  he considers it expedient to get  out.���������Victoria Times.  o     o     o     o      .  Aid to Clients.  The government majority obediently voted a $10,000,000 loan  mainly in order that Mr. Bowser's clients, the Pacific Great  Eastern Railway Co., might receive $6,000,000. This will make  more than $25,000,000 contributed to that road by the people of  the province, who now are paying- the interest on the bonds  guaranteed by them. Nearly  $7,000,000 has been released to  s. J  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER,, B. C.  -if  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,, MACKINAW  r.5end for Catalogue  "MADE   IN   B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  J  M i  Spend Your Vacation in Bella Coola  where is found scenery unsurpassed  Mountaineering Amiditt Etcrnni Snow*  GRIZZLY BEARS, BLACK BEARS,  Goats and Deer in abundance  The reward of a three ____' hunt in nature's wilds al __.7/<i Coola.  Trout in all the Streams Camping in a Fine Climate  Mr." Fred Hendricks, who1 has  had a wide and varied experience  throughout the continent in search  of large and"small game, offers  his services as1 guide and guaran-'  tees "game, or no pay."  Bella Coola can be reached by  Union Steamship Co.'s steamers  from Vancouver every Thursday.  Two days' sail through scenery  rivalling the coast of Norway. A  bus meets the steamer.  Modern Hotel, accommodation, with hot and cold water, baths, etc., and  last but not least Guides that will "guarantee" game.  Write to F. Hcndrlch. P. O. Box. 63, !J)ella Coola, B. C, at lo the heat time to hunt the narious game.  sense is much over-balanced by | the company beyond the amount  it was entitled to under the act,  a gross betrayal of trust on the  part of the government and one  which violates a well-known section of the criminal code. This  outrageous transaction is a glaring exhibition of Mr. Bowser's  contempt for the law when "it  pleases him to show it.' It is a  costly specimen of the illegality  which has cursed this province  for years and indicates that no  matter what a statute may expressly provide the Premier will  administer it to suit himself.  What prospects are there of a  proper administration of the  workmen's compensation act or  any other legislation, sound in  itself, with a politician of the  Bowser stripe in charge of the  government?���������Victoria Times.  o    o    o     o    o  Manitoba went dry on June 1;  and by that event one of the  chief sources of corruption in  politics will be dried up in that  province.  er Treat���������Baked Custard  Beat two eggs until light, add 3 tablespoons sugar, '_���������  cup "Canada First" (Evaporated) Milk, one cup v?atcr.  Mix well.     Pour into buttered dish, grate nutmeg b. er  top, s������t this in pan ojF hot water, place in moderate hot  : oven and bake.  Say "Canada First.-"    Your Grocer Knows.  AYLMER  CONDENSED  MILK CO., Ltd.  AYLMER,   ONTARIO  IOL  ][__  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY;  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD,  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  -$���������'__.".    Lelh-OSUn      Leaves  Vancouver  every  Thursday at 11 p.m.    (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays 9 a.m.  S. S. "Coqu.tlam';' sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Of. ice, Cakhall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., ���������Victoria;  HOC  W  5.   .  /.  I  tin  ii  ^  '-__  j������___,-i  I.*. V.  _* _������������������ ��������������� _.SK  -,m  o���������  isei  si  IF YOU WANT GOOD $PORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR MAY.  Compiled  by Mr. C. H.  Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 61.   Minimum   41  Highest Max. (25th) 80. Lowest Min. (9th) 30  Rainfall, 0.57 inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915) 34.33 inches  IVOL, 4���������NO. 34  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, JUNE 10,  1916.  $1.00 a Year  Sails for Three Hours  Powerful Attack on  Among Dead Bodies      Fort Vaux Repulsed  London, June 8.���������The Swedish j    Paris, June 8. ���������The repulse of  fsteamer Vanda reports passing a powerful  German   attack  on  .the wreck of a gigantic war ship  [on Saturday, the nationality of  [which it was unable to ascertain,  (hundreds of bodies were floating  Wound the wreck and for three  {hours the Vanda steamed among  fyead, floating bodies of -sailors.  fNear the spot where the .derelict  [was encountered the wreck of a  [big sailing vessel, apparently the  (innocent victim of the Jutland  [naval battle, .was sighted.  The British losses in the big  fnaval battle off Jutland were 1  battle-cruiser, 3 cruisers of old  'type   and    several   destroyers.  German losses as known were:  ;3 new  battleships,   several  de-  [ stroyers and 1 submarine.    The  lo3S  in  life  was about equally  divided,   totalling   in   all   some  15,000 men.  Beyond the finding of a small  boat with four dead men in no  further tidings of the fate of all  those on board the cruiser Hamp-  -shire has  been received.    The  Hampshire, with Lord Kitchener  and his staff on board on their  way to Russia,   struck  a  mine  : cm June 5th off the north coast  |of Scotland a.nd presumably went  down so quick that there was no  time to save a single soul.  Fort Vaux on the Verdun line,  with heavy losses to the enemy,  was reported by the war office  in the official statement today,  also that a violent bombardment  of the fort is still being carried  out by the Germans without effect.    West of Soissons two German   patrols   which    were   endeavoring   to   cross   the Aisne  were easily dispersed by us.   In  Argonne, at Lemorte de Homme  we caused  the explosion   with  success of three mines.    On the  left bank of the Meuse there has  been artillery duels in sector of  Hill 304 and sector of Caurettes  Wood.     In the  Vosges intense  bombardment   is   in   progress.  Nothing of importance at other  sectors of our fronts.  French Lose Fort Vaux  for their departure overseas.  They are impatiently waiting  for the order to go, and hope  that the war will not be over until they have had a whack at our  common foe.  R. A. Teebay has been so inconspicuous during his week at  home that we almost forgot that  ", S. S. Camosun arrived at the-  early hour of 8 o'clock Sunday  morning. Her passenger list for  this port contained only the  names of Rev. W. H. Gibson,  Morley Shiers and Mrs. F. Tarn.  The influx to our population was  more than balanced by the exodus of H. G. Anderson, Ingvald  Urseth, W. Barlow and R. A.  Teebay.  Rev. W. H. Gibson return?  after an absence of three week?  attending the annual conferencc-  of the Methodist Church held at  Victoria. He reports that as' The impression of one who ha?  nearly 25 per cent of the Metho- watched the work at Ocean Falls  dist clergy stationed in the pro-"since Nearly developmentstage  vince have enlisted there is a is that now, more than ever be-  shortage of ministers and there-' fore- jt looks like business. The  fore no immediate prospect of'*?1"1 of each and everyone in  having any  assigned   to   Bella the Place .is enthusiasm in the  inspector of fisheries for this district with headquarters at Prince  Rupert. He was on a tour of hi.  district, but as no difficulties or  troubles are found at Bella Coola  under thescrupulousand efficient  supervision of John Widsten our  fishery officer in charge, he did  not find it necessary to prolong  his visit beyond the stay of the  steamer in port. He came here  from Rivers Inlet to which place  he also returned. He finds conditions for the fishing industry  4. Who was the person supervising this work?  5. What was the total amount  paid for inspection?  6. How many miles of road  were built?  The Hon. Mr. Taylor replied as  follows:  1. $911.75.  2. Road Superintendent.  3. J. W. Macfarlane, foreman,  45 days; J. W. Macfarlane, team,  45 days; G. Turner, laborer, 38  he had been here at all.    Itisin- quite satisfactory throughout his ! days;   B. Thomson,   laborer, 27  ferred"1 he. had   to   stay   pretty  district.    Earlier in the season'days; E. Gyllenspitz, laborer, 16  teadyat home in order to renew  his acquaintance with his family  after a lengthy separation.  Paris, June 9.���������-Fort Vaux has  been captured by the Germans  after superhuman defense by the  French when it had been demolished by artillery fire. West of  Meuse jntermitfant cannonading  took place during the night. In  Argonne, a German mine explo  deb. this morning near Hill 285,  Coola.  Cecil M. Lancaster has been  appointed to officiate temporarily  at Ocean Falls.  Morley Shiers, representing  the Vancouver wholesale hardware house, Wood, Vallance &  Leggat, Ltd., is in town booking  orders for his house.    Mr. Shiers  Berlin, June 9. ���������(Official German statement.) The loss in the  high sea forces during the battle  off Jutland up to the present  time is, one battle cruiser, one  ship of line of old construction,  four small cruisers and five torpedo boats'. Of these losses are,  battleship Pommern, launched in  1905, cruisers Wiesbaden, Elbi-  eng, and Frauenlob, with the  five torpedo boats already reported in the official statement.  Acknowledging Kitchener as  being organizer of great ability  German papers devote much  space to comments on him now  he is dead, but there is no disposition to aggregate the importance of his death to base particular hopes thereon.  London. June 9.���������For military  reasons the Germans have not  yet made public the loss of the  battle-cruiser Litzow and the  cruiser Rostock, although known  in official circles that both sank.  Amsterdam, June 9.-A German destroyer struck a mine and  went down off Zee Bruges May  31st. All but two of the crew  were lost. _  London, June 9. ���������Condition of  Major Hamilton Gault is critical,  gunshot wounds in both thighs  along with less serious wounds  in the shoulder.  David Lloyd George only prevented from accompanying Lord  Kitchener by the Irish crisis.  A memorial service in memory  of Lord Kitchener will beheld in  St. Pauls Cathedr_.r>_n June 13.  The king and queen will attend  the service.  An allied air squadron successfully bombarded the wharves at  Hoboken, near Antwerp. Germans are said to be building destroyers at Hoboken. Squadron  was fired on by G3rman batteries  but, all returned to their base in  safety.  informs us that he found busi  but without causing any damage.' | "'ess very satisfactory all along  We occupied southern tip of the  crater thereby created.  Russians Capture Lutsk  and Over 50,000 Men  Petrograd, June 9���������Our troops  captured Lutsk, also series of  powerfully, organized Austrian  positions according to the official  communication. In addition to  to 40,000 Austrians previously  captured were 58 officers and 11,-  000 men captured in yesterday's  fighting also a large amount of  war materials taken.  Bulgarians Suffer Heavily  Saloniki, June 9.���������French and  Bulgarian forces engaged in a  violent encounter at Kupa Hili,  in Greek Macedonia. It is reported that the Bulgarians withdrew after suffering enormous  losses.  Jury Disagree  Victoria, June 9.- In the trial  of Gosden the jury disagreed and  were discharged. Nine were for  conviction and three for acquittal. It is believed the jury lined  up on political lines. Case traversed until next assizes.  the coast.  Mrs. Tarn is here,in the interests of The World, the popular  daily newspaper of Vancouver.  If energy and tact count in securing subscribers, we bespeak  for her a successful week here.  She expresses the opinion that  Bella Coola is not as well known  to the outside world as it should  be. As a summer resort she  speaks of our valley very highly  work.  After experiencing considerable difficulty  in  the   filling-in  job by the .dredge, by which process the harbor is being deepened  and  the  yard   space  being increased, they have  now got it  running successfully pumping a  continuous stream of mud and  gravel about one foot in diameter.    The side of the pulp mill  toward the waterfront has been  removed and  the machine shop j  has been  taken down to  make  room   for  the   new  paper  mill  which will butt up against the  present pulp  mill   and   extend  seven  hundred   and   fifty   feet  toward the water front.    When  the work of remodeling the store  is finished Ocean Falls will have  would be a scarcity of fishermen  this season, but he finds that this  was groundless as the applications for licenses are more than  can be granted.  The Good Hope cannery of  Rivers Inlet has been the victim  of a theft of considerable proportions. Last week seven of  its new nets were stolen, valued  about $1700. A reward of $500  is offered for information that  will lead to arresting the party.  We regret to relate that Albert  Brynildsen has been confined to  the house for nearly two weeks  suffering from an attack of inflammatory rheumatism. He is  in the way of recovery.  one of the largest inland stores  in the province, and it will be  up-to-date too with its elevator  ar.d refrigerating plant.  Privates H. G. Anderson and  Ingvald Urseth left to rejoin the  Comox-At.lin regiment after  spending the week with their  families and friends here. They  told of the eagerness of the boys  to depart for the front and that  everything seemed to be ready  Chief constable E. Gammon of  Prince Rupert, is at Bella Coola  on a tour of his district.  One of the passengers on the  Sunday steamer familiar to Bella  Coola people and nearly everybody else, on the coast of British  Columbia was J.  T.   Williams,  THE VIKINGS OF CANADA  SCANDINAVIANS ENLIST IN THE 197th.  Oyster Bay, June 9.- -It is believed that if Justice Hughes is  nominated as Republican candidate Colonel Roosevelt himself  will become a candidate.  JACKSON PASSAGE FISHERY   T -   ���������>��������� -  Thereby give notice as owner  of above Fishery that I will not  be responsible for any debts incurred in connection with the  working of same, unless given  on  my   own    personal   written  order.-  Dated, May 23rd, 1916.  CHARLES I. SMITH.  P. O. Box 730, Vancouver, B. C.  A battalion recruited and commanded by Scandinavians is now  being formed at Winnipeg. During the Civil War in the United  States there were regiments composed of Scandinavians only who, j Lake last year,  like the celebrated 15th Wisconsin's for instance, distinguished  themselves on many a hard fought field in the South; and the  Vikings of Canada, when given an opportunity, will also show the  bravery of their illustrious ancestors after whom they are named.  The Winnipeg Free Press has the following to say about the  Battalion:  Although comparatively little1 Particular attention has been  has been heard about the 197th given to the culinary department  Overseas Battalion, popularly and good food and plenty of it is  known as the Vikings of Canada, served at every meal, while the  it has been making rapid pro- motto "Cleanliness is next to  gress, with all ranks filling up'Godliness" is strictly observed,  rapidly.., The Battalion has chos- The sleeping quarters are com.  en for its crest "the many oared fortable and clean, and the sani-  boat of the Vikings. tary conditions   have   been  Lieut-Colonel A. G. Fonseca ; brought strictly up-to-date,  has surrounded himself with an For information in regard to  efficient staff of officers, and ; pay and pension to a Soldier, his  nothing is being left undone in i wife and children, or widowed  the training of the Battalion to mother, also in regard to free  make it one of the best of the transportation to Winnipeg, ap-  Canadian Army, while neither \ ply to Officer Commanding 197th  has anything been left undone-to! Battalion, Exhibition Barracks,  provide comforts for the men. ; Winnipeg.  Mrs. F. A. Johnson spent last  week visiting her home at Firvale. She and her family are  again to be found encamped under canvas near Mr. Johnson's  mill.   Although reluctantly we are  forced to admit that the season  for raising crops is rather backward this year. Cool weather  is the rule nearly every day.  Something unprecedented in the  history of the settlement of the  valley was the forming of a thin  sheet of ice on the morning of  May 23rd.  Dr. Sutherland in her capacity  as medical examiner of the  schools made her rounds last  week.   A. R. Neale, assistant horticulturist, arrived from Prince Rupert on Thursday and will spend  a couple of weeks in the valley.  In the votes and proceedings  of the Legislative Assembly of  British Columbia, Nos. 72 and  73 are found some questions relating to the public works done  in Bella Coola and at Anaham  We give them  below for the benefit of our readers who no doubt will read them  with interest:  Mr. Brewster asked the Hon.  the Minister of Public Works the  following questions:  1. What amount of money was  expended at Anaham Lake during the year 1915?  2. Who recommended this work  to be done?  3. Who were the persons and  for what length of time was each  person employed on this work?  fear was expressed that there "days;   A.   Schilling,   laborer,   8  days; F. Chandler, 3 days.  4. R. O. Jennings.  5. Nil.  6. Cleared 22 miles; grubbed  2 12 miles; graded 1 1-8 miles. '  Mr. Brewster asked the Hon.  the Minister of Public Works  Works the following questions:  1. What was the total amount  of money expended in the Bella  Coola Valley in 1915?  2. Who were the foremen em-  plyed on road-work in the Bella  Coola Valley in 1915?  3. What was the amount of  money expended under eaehfore-  man upon: (_) Repairs;' (b) new  work?  4. What was the milea:ge of  new road constructed under each  foreman? '        ���������'���������'.'���������"   .  5. What was the cost per mile  for road construction under-each  foreman? -  6. What was the cost of Mr. J.  Falls' locating work throughout  the Bella Coola Valley?  7. Did Mr. J. Falls make any  reports to the Government in  respect of location of roads as  above?  8. If so, what action did the  Government take on such reports ?  9. What was the amount expended on the wharf at Bella  Coola during each of the years  1914 and 1915?  10. What was the amount allowed to Road Superintendent  Jennings for travelling expenses  during each of the years 1914  and 1915 in connection with work  in the Bella Coola Valley? .  The Hon. Mr. Taylor replied a.s  follows: .   ' '.-  1. 1915-16, $12,906.05 on roads,  bridges, etc.  2. H. D. Brown, $1,482.75; F.  A. Johnson, $1,733.62; W. E.  Ratcliffe, $991.53; A. Svisdahl,  $1,320.17; all general repair work  on roads.  3. Answered by No. 2.  4. Answered by No. 2.  5. Answered by No. 2.  6. $206.35, including trip to  Chilcotin.  7. Yes.  8. No action taken.  9. 1914-15, $2,924.10; 1915-16,  $661.74.  10. 1914-15, $308.75; 1915-16,  $451.10; including other sections  of the Bella Coola Division.  Bella Coola Farmers' Institute  The Ayreshire bull will be found  at the ranch of T. R. Astleford  for three weeks, beginning June  9th.  A. Hammer, Secretary.  (flhurrh 5faiin>  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  Preacher for Sunday--Rev.  YV. H. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  _ W ii\U . . "I -j_  BEL LA COOLA  COURIER  in  L    t '       J __��������������� B  |'!'w_!5_  ki  __vH_.  ������Ht_M  Saturday, J,  une  The Courier  publishrd weekly at bella qoo^a by.  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  I   Year  .. .... .......'. ......   $1.00  6 Months   ...... ...::....    0.75  3 Months ..     ...... ..........   0.50  -    United States  1  Year. . .'��������� $1.50  United Kingdom  1  Year........     $1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  . Subscribers not receiving their,copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. .Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  ��������� .     .      "   For Advertising Rates,   Apply at  Office.  poisonous gases should, not be  used in modern warfare. We  know that Germany-has violated  j her pledge in this respect for a  long time. These poisonousgases  are produced from the seed of  the sabadilla plant which grows  in Venezuela. For thirty years  this has been exported to Hamburg in small quantities. In 1913,  the year-before the war, the exports to Germany jumped to  247,226 kilos, or about one half  a million pounds; and in 1914 the  record was 112,826 kilos. There  were virtually no exports to  other countries.  This   is   proof   positive   that  EATS DIRT  ������������  To Cqi-RESPONDENTS���������While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be. published, tho  name arid address of every writorof such letters  muat be given to the editor.  The Editor reserves tl.eri(.ht to refuse, publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  "f&nlva jpapuliaapmim rst lex."  SATURDAY, JUNE 10, 1916.  j Germany intended to violate this  pledge long before the war started, and it is not only a violation  of a pledge but also a violation  I of the broad dictates of humanity, even between enemies.   It  is a depth of infamy never reached in.the modern world, and yet  she professes to believe in God.  The Treachery of Germany.  It is rather interesting,to spec-  ulate of how Germany expected  to hold the respect of the family  of nations and have her promises  accepted ih the near future after  ��������� violating her treaties and.pledges  in the manner she has done since  the.war began.  ���������' Now she pleads that necessity  knows no law, that she was so  hard pressed by her enemies that  in o._der to preserve her very tion with the state of affairs in  existence she had to resort to the province and the great effort  illegal measures, while this sort made by.the government to re-  of pleading   may   be   sufficient instate itself in the favor of a  Mr. Bowser's Bid for Votes.  The  provincial  legislature at  Victoria'dissolved on May 31st,  and it was announced that elections would be held in.Septembe_.  The proceedings of this legislature have created   more than  ordinary interest, because of the  rebuke received by the government at the   by-elections;   the  well-nigh universal dissatisfac-  j unification in the eyes of pro-  Germans it  will not hoodwink)  . any who' consider honor of more  value than even life itself:   A  nation whose leaders at all times  majority of the electors  Bills,calculated to appeal to the  approval of the voters have been  passed, and it is hoped that all-hough they are the'fruits.of a  election, when he believed himself to be fairly popular with the  voters, he held  to  the evasive  utterances  of   ex-premier   McBride.    But after the crushing  defeat of his candidates, which he  attributed to the dissatisfied prohibitionists he, out of respect to  their strength,  promised  them  everything that they asked for.  But after awhile   the alarmed  liquor interests began to bring  strong pressure   to   bear upon  him that in the event of prohibition beingadopted thejr receive  compensation.     How  to please  both the Prohibitionists and the  liquor-interests at the same time  taxed the astuteness even of a  lawyer of Bowser's ability.   He  solved the problem  at last,  by  announcing that a royal commission   be appointed to ascertain  what amount the liquor interests  will.be entitled to as compensation for their loss of business.  In legislation it will therefore  be seen that he, in his humble  way, has tried to please as many  as possible.  The next thing he hastri&d'to  the negative side.    The public  cannot forget that the government majority in the legislature  deliberately   voted  a deficit Of  more than $5,000,000, making a  total of expenditure oyer reven  ue in six years of something like  $22,000,000.    At such a time as  tnis, when our income is declining,  when  thrift and economy  should be practised by the government to the   utmost,   when  money can be borrowed only at  a heavy discount, and when it is  vitally, necessary that we should  conserve all our resources for the  trying period that must follow  .the'������������������war,- the adoption of that  budget was an act of criminal  folly.    It was without a parallel  anywhere else in the world.   Its  purpose" of course is as clear as  daylight.    The  motive   which  prompted it was the same motive  as that which has been  behind  every move Mr. Bowser has made  since he succeeded to the Premiership.    He must have power  at/all costs, and he thinks that  if he cannot coax the electors to  I his   side ���������'" by ���������',��������� attract!ve:looking  legislation he can gain his end  by ruinously exploiting the public  treasury and credit.   What effect  his actions will have upon future  generations    concerns   him   no  more than the same consideration' concerned Sir Richard McBride when he brought down his,  disastrous policy.    Sir Richard  is now snugly sheltered in a London palace built with our taxpayers' money virtually behind  their backs and drawing a higher salary than the Prime Minister   of   Canada   receives.    Mr.  Bowser,  we presume,   will  expect to find a similar haven'when  10> I9.t  ilai  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER,  B. C.  WhoBesale  DRY GOODS AND  MEN'S  FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF"PRIDE OF THE  WEST"  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  a  MADE    IN    B. C  Send for Catalogue Prompt Attention Given Letter Order,  Spend Your Vacation in Bella Coola  where is found scenery unsurpassed  Mountaineering Amidst Eternal Snows  GRIZZLY BEARS, BLACK BEARS,  Goats and Deer in abundance  The reward of a three days'hunt In nature', ������.������_ al Bella Coola.  Trout in all the Stream* r        ��������� -  e ou-eams Camping in a Fine Climate  -  ��������� I    ������_-������.--  ���������j   ".c me iruiis.oi a       --,-������. ���������*,_, __v. uao __ icu to i v^* w.ijuu asimilar naven when  appeal to God as their chief help-j deathbed  repentance they will do that he may be returned to J he considers it expedient to get  . _ *_ _���������       I power is to blacken the character out.���������Victoria Times.  Mr. Fred Hendricks, who has  had a wide and varied experience  throughout the continent in search  of large and small game, offers  his services as guide and guarantees "game, or no.pay."  Bella Coola can ��������� be reached ly  Union Steamship Co. 's steamers  from Vancouver every Thursday.  Two days' sail through scenery  rivalling the coast of Norway. A  bus meets the steamer.  Modern Hotel accommodation   with ______ ,.���������!_       '_"-   ',���������������������������,  Write to F. Hendricks. P. O. Box 63, Helta Coola, B. C.,as to ihe test time to hunt Ihe varhu.  Came.  er cannot deceive honest _ind intelligent people into' the belief  that they rely on God, when their  illegal actions show that they  have no confidence in Him at all.  Those  who  rely on  God  know  prove of benefit to the province  Some of them were subjected to  strong criticism and some were  acquiesced in, by the opposition,  but it is our belief that if an  honest government tries to en  of the opposition. Without dealing with that part of his endeavors in this article we will con-  that He can and will protect force them they will be found,  them in any righteous cause in spite of defects, to be for the  without they having to resort to common good; the defects can be  sinful means. eliminated ���������: by a   legislature in  Germany's loud protestations sympathy with their objects,  that she, is  particularly strong     That Mr. Bowserinhisanxiety  in her faith in the Ruler of the  Universe can in the light of her  violations of the laws of nations  and humanity be put down as  sheer hypocrisy.    ���������  Furthermore, while she in her  folly believed that she could secure    success   through   illegal  methods, she would not have resorted to them if she had not  ielt so supremely confident of  victory that when the war was  oyer her position among nations  Would be of such overwhelming  Strength that no combination of  nations would dare to oppose her  decrees, and in the security and  pride of this strength she would  dictate   her   will  to   the other  nations and they would have to  submit whether they believed in  her promises or not.   In short,  she could defy the opinion of the  world.  But that it was not the unexpected and the unprovided for  exigencies of the war that caused  har to violate   her   obligations  may be proven by trade reports  lately   published.    They   prove  that she had decided to violate  Tier pledges a whole year or more j  before the war started.  The nations represented at  The Hague conference, of which  Germany was one, agreed thatj  to get vote's has tried to become  all things to all men can be shown  by his attitude towards prohibition.    Before the Vancouver by-  clude by saying, that it is not  very hard for a person even if  he is no prophet or the son of  one, to predict that in trying to  serve two-masters'he will signally fail. He will not be able to  fool the people all the time.  The Piling tip of Debts.  ���������But whatever the record of the  session may disclose in a positive  Aid to Clients.  The government majority obediently voted a $10,000,000 loan  mainly in order that Mr. Bowser's clients,  the Pacific Great  Eastern Railway Co., might receive $6,000,000.    This will make  more than $25,000,000 contributed to that road by the people of  the province, who now are paying the interest on  the  bonds  guaranteed   by   them.     Nearly  $7,000,000 has been released to  it was entitled to under the act, iadminister it to   suit   him.s.lf.  a gross betrayal of trust on the What prospects are there of a  t _������    ������ ������  sense is much over-balanced by | the company beyond the amount -  part of the government and one  -which violates a well-known section of the criminal code.    This  outrageous transaction is a glaring exhibition of Mr. Bowser's .....  contempt  for the law when it]government?  pleases him to show it. ' It is a  costly specimen of the illegality  which has cursed this province  for years and indicates that no  matter what a statute may expressly provide the Premier will  proper administration of th.  workmen's compensation act or  any other legislation, .soumI in  itself, with a politician of the  Bowser stripe in charge of the  Victoria 'J'iir,..:  Manitoba went dry on Jur,. 1:  and by that event one of the  chief sources of corruption in  politics will be dried up in that  province.  ^t^'  ./..  A-  &&������&  i?  rc-9  - Vl ___,��������� Your Grocer Knows.   Y7?  AYL.MER   CONDENSED   MILK CO..  Ltd.   Zt  \::r/  iJ������jrrQlr;\  A Supper Treat-Baked Custard  Beat two ���������ggs umil )igKt> oJd 3  tab|cjpoonj {  -P Canad. fi^.. (Evaporated) Milk, ono cup ���������__,.  M,x*e|| Pour into buttled di_Kr grate ^ ���������,.,  top, _._ tlu. ,��������� pan of Kot WBtBr, pIaco j- mod_rat(j ^  oven and bake.  Say "Canada First.  20NDE  AYLMER.    ONTARIO  OE  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIeTc & HUDSON BAY^_LwIy_  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  ���������J. O.      LamOSUn      Leaves   Vancouver  every  Thursday at 11  p. m.     (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays 9 a. m.  t S S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  H^)rnrptBp������.f..iKht..Pa? aml othor information, apply I.  agent,  MX), uovkknment St., Victoiua.  ^E  fflhe  |Wi  Igisl  ___P^_Q__S  lsli_  Secti  Id h  hs.  litis  1*1  |maj<  fonse  lefii  _____!  |>y  __^__l  [was  Ir.th'  e or  H____l  e re  ^���������isla  ������_____  ent.  The  Ibera  _______  mpli  -by i  .������������������,li.    :.,���������  is Jo  1 the  khe;  In of  Vani  WBi  10 h;  H  "eren  ________sT^  : are  __>_n____n^  ; fac  _������������������  Ll  Whoh  t  The  ���������������><jR5  ���������f:i.  HOE  ��������� C  30E  fc,4  >j^twMi_w_ya3F^_^B������e^ /9)* mtLday;ruhf-id. 1916  ie Committee Dissolved.  Iwith��������� the   dissolution  of   the  ������islat, re, ��������� the committee in-  [sticrating the Vancouver by-  tion frauds is also dissolved  id has made report of its find-  It is needless to mention that  Imajorityof the members being  nservatives they found against  e Liberals.    The report is sign-  by only the Chairman,    As  was altogether a hopeless task  r the minority in the commit-  e or in the legislature to alter  e report^ it went through the  islature   without   any   com-  ent.  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  the employ of the Liberal organization.  The committee has since its  appointment, April 27, held 26  meetings and examined fifty-five  witnesses. It was only during  the last week of its existence the  committee gave the Liberals an  opportunity to bring forward  witnesses favorable to them.  Without going into details we  may confidently assume from the  evidence adduced that the Conservative leaders knew more  about the pluggers coming to  violate our election laws than  did the Liberals.    Thatalthough  la  id  the evidence, the Conservatives  [The report does not charge the !claimed that they held, was of a  Iberal party or its leaders with j nature to discredit the Liberal  Implicityih the crime, but does; I)arl>' and very like'y defeat it  by inference, in that it accu-!in the Victoria by-election, held  ^s John T. Scott, an employee ione week 'ater.it was not used.  ' the organization   committee!1"  fact the  Conservatives said  the Provincial Liberal Associa-j nothing about it until the Liber-  \n of hiring men in Seattle and |a,s bc'*an Lhe Prosecution of one  Vancouver to personate voters lAnnnance,   for   hiring   men   fo  fhb had  left Vancouver.   The! Personate;   then    they   became  iference that the Liberal lead-1 very active.    Certainly, a very  [���������3 are implicated is drawn from j suspicious circumstance.  <e fact that Mr. Scott was in1    The character of the Const r-  SOLD BY ALL DEALERS  J  ���������i If.  fa  he  ci-  in  he  he  A few lines We specially  recommend  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  Huntley & Palmers  ���������Biscuits  Griff en & Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������  Canned and dried  fruits  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  vative witnesses were such that  they could not be believed under  oath. They were self-confessed  criminals and toughs of the lowest kind, so brutalized by vice  and excesses that it is doubtful  if they could tell the truth even  when they tried to. Trie general  reputation of the chief witness,  John L. Sullivan, a notorious  saloonkeeper and proprietor of  the Irving hotel in Vancouver,  was also so bad that deputy-chief  McRae, a police officer on the  Vancouver force, said at the examination that he did not put  much faith in anything that  came from such a source, and  gave that as a reason why he  did not exert himself very much  when appealed to by Sullivan.  The Liberal members of the  committee were anxious to get  John T. Scott to testify in order  to find out who furnished the  money to pay ten dollars each  and expenses to these law violators.  But just before he was to be  called and after he by telephone  from Seattle had signified his  willingness to come;- a warrant  was issued by the government  for his arrest on sight. Anyone  at all acquainted with the practice in cases of this kind knows  that officers of the law do not  scare their quarry off by advertising broad cast that a person is  to be arrested. . They always refuse information on such points  even if asked for it; but in this  instance the Conservative papers  heralded the fact that John T.  Scott would be arrested as soon  as he appeared. With the result  that Scott refused to come to  Victoria.  The self-confessed criminals  of Seattle were promised, by the  government, safety from arrest  if they would come and testify  against the Liberals. While the  same immunity was not granted  to a man whose criminality was  not proven; but who was likely  to give evidence unsatisfactory  to the Conservative cause.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ^ Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  th. Yukon Territory, the North-v/est Territories and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,000 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must he made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated. .  in surveyed territory the land muBt be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  , fee of $u which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  j'the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  r-are not being operated, such returns should be  J"urnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase; whatever available surface rights may be  considered n>��������� cessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of .10.0. an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N.B.��������� Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������-30090.  1 heMasoncr riischJriano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  ill!!  ft  ^]T  Let us attend  your Victor  Record  JJ  mail orders���������our service is intelligent ,  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C  i 1  Cl  ," BUSINESS CARDS  o  <                    .'.KM                        )  O  Fur Sales Agency  G00 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 8 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  O  HOI  Dealers and Trappers  Wholesale Grocers  Vancouver, B. C.  [ cr>  * <"WT>  9  __  ?  .____ a  The  Best  Known  and   Popular  Lubricant for  Motor Boats  Its use assures freedom from Carbon deposit  on valves, spark plugs, or In cylinders  t  IMPERIAL OIL CO. LTD., VANCOUVER, B.C.  Is John 7. Scott Guilty?  In   reading the  evidence adduced  in the alleged frauds in  the   Vancouver   by-election   it  seems reasonable to believe that  John T. Scott, an employee of the  organization  committee of   the  Liberal Association, was criminally   connected   with   the   vote  plugging.    For this reason it is  highly regrettable that the government should commit the astounding blunder of allowing its  decision   to   have  him  arrested  published at a time when he was  safe from arrest by being in Seattle.    Under the circumstances  it is easy to assume that he was  also in the employ of parties in  whose  interests it would  be to  injure the Liberal party.  VXTHAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \5UHHAT person so independent?  ^IX/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  '"THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  -*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at' the Pi-ii.ee  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried av. ay-  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  >_*  Sli -  1 "I  It Always Pleases"  .3  Credit Commission   Will Finance  B. C. Farmers.  The government of British Columbia during the last session  passed a bill providing for the  establishment of an Agricultural  Credit. Commission. The Commission is authorized to borrow  up to'$15V0'00,00_ and to loan to  those engaged in agriculture in  the province.  The Commission may accept as  security for loans, first mortgages upon agricultural land in the  province of British Columbia,  free from all encumberances  other  than   interests vested  in  Continued on page 4, column _.  FEED ROOTS.  It is still time to plant roots.  Arrange to have plenty on hand  when winter begins and feed  them generously to the cows,  only be careful not to feed frozen roofs.  They are a succulent food and  produces a rich Mow of milk  while it helps to preserve the  health of the animals.  __=__ [D] cud [  __*_  Get "More Money" for your JToxcs  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected in your sou tion  SHIP YOtlll FU__S DIRECT to "SIIUDERT" the largest  bouse in the World dealing exclusively In NOR lit AMERICAN RAW FUkS  a reliable���������responsible���������sale Fur House with nn unblemished reputation existing; for "more than n third of a century." a Ions: successful record of sending Fin Shippers prompt.SATIS FACTORY  AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for"TTIk fc.ubtct fetlipptr."  the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.  Write for it-NO W-it's FREE  AT.   <.T4F TT_F__T   Ft..*   25-27 WEST AUSTIN A VE.  . _5. _.rlUtSt_K 1 , UIC. Dept.C67 CHICAGO. U.S.A.   I  inriiiii i  i_t_.iii-_ih "-" ���������   '    ~~" ~  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA  COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months  ��������� 0.7.  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find   for Bella Coola Courier for   .subscription  Name.  P. O.  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  ... .U'..-. ������������������ :--rr  _ - a 4  BELLA  COOLS COURIER  is a wet one and the clo.yer heavy  ooner  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coa_r between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles, j in full bloom.  CUTTING AND CURING CLOVER HAY.  The tendency among 'fanners  is to dry the hay top much.  The  wind and the sun extract some  of its nutritive qualities and when  in addition ' to this  loss "it has  been made as dry and brittle as  sticks the stock will not be able  to digest it as completely as they  would if it was in a more tender  and pliable condition.    The long  drying out process causes a twofold loss, loss in food and-loss in  dfgestive values.    As it is to the I  interest of the farmers to realize  as much as possible from their  produce  we  believe  it  will   be  found to their interest to follow  the advice given in. an article  taken from The Farm Journal on      While the quantity in the yield I  the cutting and curing of clover: of milk is not diminished by milk-  "When farmers learn to handle ing the. cows at unequal times,  Saturday, June ^  it will take twice as long as when  the season is.dryer and the clover  lighter and  less sappy.     Each  man must use his own judgment  in regard to this  point.    As a  ruler-it is not the natural sap in  the straw that one needs to look  after, but the external moisture.  Hay can go* into the barn with  considerable sap in it and come  out nice hay, while a very little  dew or rain will ruin it.    If the  'season  is a  wet   one   and  the  ground; full of water at haying  time, the moisture will continually rise' from  the ground and  keep the hay damp  Commission shall ascertain that  > >  clover so as to: make the best  quality of hay, they will appreciate its value more;*less frequent  1  the quality is seriously affected  There will be less butter.   -  v remark that they prefer timo- -  thy.   Clover should be cut when I Cred,t Commission���������Will Finance  // will be to your interest to'k^P well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  ���������  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesaleho use can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  Themowershould  be  followed   by  the  tedder to  loosen up the swath, letting in  the air so"_t can  cure evenly.  The clover should not be left to  burn up in the sun, but should  be raked up as soon as n-icely  wilted.    The aim should be to  cure the hay in the windrow or  pile, rather than let it lie too  long, exposed to the sun.    If it  lies over night in ihe windrow,  it is advisable to go along with  forks and  turn   the   windrows!  over the.next morning as soon as  the dew is off.  "Two or three men can, in a  short time, turn over a good-sized  field, and in a little while the hay  is ��������� ready to haul in, although  something always depends on J  the season as to the-time it takes  J^EAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  to "cure the clover.    If the season  J&������pgg|!__  B. C. Farmers  (Continued from column G, page 1.)  the Crown.-   No loan will be accepted for a less amount than  $250 or for a greater amount  than $10,000, and no loan will be  accepted for an amount exceeding 60 percent, of the appraised  value of the land offered as security,  calculated on-the basis  of   value    and   productiveness  when the improvements in respect of which the loan is  required shall have been effected.  The  Commission   may advance  by proportionate instalments as  the work progresses.  Loans may be made for the  following purposes:.  a The acquiring of land for  agricultural purposes and the  satisfaction of encumbrances on  rV.^  **DW**_W**_,__.   cheers and refreshes  at any hour of the day.  [You get the most delicious tea when you  use  M������vwr Sold  In Bulk.  SALMI  ���������      TEA |  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job-printing.   We will do it right.  Plumbing  We buy from the Factory and  sell to YOU direct. Largest  Plumbing Showroom West of  Toronto. Let us quote you.  KYDD BROS., LIMITED  Vancouver, B. C.  land used for such purpose.  b   The clearing, draining, dyking, or irrigation works.  c   The erection of farm buildings.  d  The purchase of live stock,  machinery, fertilizers, etc.  e   Discharging   liabilities   incurred for the improvement and  development of   land  used  for  agricultural  purposes   and any  purpose that,  in the judgment  of the Commission, is calculated  to improve land' productiveness,  and   to   associations   organized  under the "Agricultural Associations Act," with the approval of  the Lieut.-Governor in Council  Before granting.any loan the|other industry in the province  the loan is justified on the following grounds:  a The value of the security  offered, estimated on the basis  of agricultural productiveness.  b The desirability of the proposed loan for any of the purposes described above.  c The ability of the borrower,  to make a fair living for himself j  and his family from the farming  of his land when improved as  proposed by means of the loan  applied, andj! after having paid  interest and a m o r't i z a t.i o n  charges.  d That the granting of the  proposed loan for the specified  purpose will, in the opinion of  the Commission, be of economic  benefit to tKe borrower.  All applications for loans must  ���������'���������..���������   ���������' ���������������������������     '��������� ���������   ' ���������  be made on   blank application  forms, supplied by the Commission. The ���������;Commission shall  make long-date loans, short-date  loans, and single-season loans.  The principle underlying the  Act is wholly constructive, the  loans being calculated to supplement the industry and ability of  the farmer, and while the provisions of the Act apply directly  to those already on the land and  occupying farms, it also provides  facilities  for the  beginner.   A  man without capital who is able  and willing to work may start  on a raw farm and receive advances as his work of making a  farm progresses.  In short, the Agricultural Credit Commission of British Columbia is a friendly loaning company  with   $15,000,000   available  as  needed, and with the credit of  the Province of British Columbia  behind,it in order:~to obtain further credit when" necessary.    It  was devised'for the sole purpose  of financing those engaged in  the agricultural- industry,  just  as our present banking system  was devised to finance those engaged   in   the . mercantile   and  manufacturing industries.    It is I  able and anxious to finance every  agricultural producer in British  Columbia~who is willing to help  himself, and not only help him  to make a living for himself and  his family, but enable him to so  increase the revenue of his farm  that he will be able to adopt a  standard of living equal to that  enjoyed by those engaged in any  H  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA lK^J"  B.BryniIdsei  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING  AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������    &  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  DUILD  UP  YOUR  HOME  TOWN.     Do not talk���������sup-  - port home industries ��������� talk is  cheap.    The best way to show  that you  are in  earnest is  to  ,. practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  A5YERT]SEJNJ:HE "COURIER"  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  HpHE two principal reasons  1   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,'  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money, at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioned  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Ogil vieV  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  Burns;  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  tad it to their advantage to look over  our stock; Nothing but the mo������ suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brand, of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods-Lowest Prices-Largest Stock]  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  l!JtW_nSB___!^^  _,wc

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