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Bella Coola Courier Jul 31, 1915

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 s  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND  FISHING.  ������e?1  WEATHER REPORT FOR JUNE.  Compiled  by  Mr.  C.  H.  Urseth, of the  Bella (Joola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 70.    Minimum, 47.  Highest Max. (30th) 83. Lowest Min. (7th) 41.  Rainfall, 1.26 inches.  /OL. 3���������NO. 42  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, JULY 31,  1915.  $1.00 a Year  ermans  rive on Warsaw  ^ ���������  eneral Hindenburg's Soldiers  Fighting With Grim Determination  Russians Take the Offensive and Drive Germans Back  Petrograd, July 26. ���������Reports of Mackenzon's army being driven  .d>k with heavy losses confiimed. Russians have rallied, driven  i-mans back eight miles. Losses to enemy exceed 13",000. Com-  fh inder-in-chief of the Austrians calls vainly for re-inforccmc-nts,  .MS and ammunition. Austrians weakening and have evacuated  [li   trenches between Tolmino and Doberdo.  The Teuton Drive on Warsaw is Shattered  Petrograd, July 29. ���������A mighty battle on Narew river continues  uh force.    The Teuton drive on Warsaw is shattered.    General  [indenburg's soldiers are fighting with desperation in defensive  iii ions.    Our counter attacks are converted into offensive'action  >n  the entire Polish front.    The  Germans are  being gradually  fo'i.ed back at every point.    The flower of the Russian army was  i'uiled into action at the critical  moment, battering their way  nough the Teuton lines.    The German losses are over 5C0.CC0.  French Repulse  German Attack  Paris,  July 30. ���������Official communication.    Day calm from sea  _ _.  ^Berlin's Report on  \ ' ���������     Recent Fighting  __*-* i." Berlin, July 29.���������The situation  I'^^at Warsaw remains unchanged.  \.*_.> The French captured advanced  '������������&'? trenches in the Vosges. French  attacks north of Souchez unsuccessful.  French Are Successful  Rebellion in Hayti  fifv  Port-au-Prince, Hayti, July 28.  ���������The city is in flames and the  ("J?* _* population is panje-stricken. The  ______ pj.esjjjent is seized and members  |*of the French legation were taken  m^and publicly shot, their mutila-  2.$?* ted bodies tied  with ropes and  * *������S������*.dragged through the streets.  ���������"������>������.-3  i ^itiThe Eastland Disaster  i^p           ^% Chicago, July 28.-600 bodies  %_3j������recovered after the disaster to  '_&*J3.the steamship   Eastland  were  Paris, July 29. ���������Fightingin the  Arras region, north of Souchez,'  is resumed with violence. The  German attacks have been repulsed at all points. Notable  successes have been achieved in  Alsace. One and one-half miles  of trenches dominating the Fccht  valley have been taken.    '  Turks Retreat  Twenty-Five Miles  London, July 30. ���������Official communication.     General  Sir John  to-Vosges.    Activity of artillery (Nixon reports that as the result  of an action on the 24th of July  near Masriyek (Asiatic Turkey),  the disorganized Turkish forces  retreated northward more than  25 miles. The enemy's casual ties  in killed, wounded, and prisoners amounted to approximately  2500 men. Prisoners include 41  officers and 690 men, of whom  some 200 were wounded. Our  capture of arms and material include one 12-pounder gun, 12  field and two mountain guns,  also several machine guns, 1000  rounds of artillery and 100,000  rounds of small arms ammunition, explosives, bombs and other  miscellaneous ordinance stores.  Sacrifice Territory to Men  was more marked in sector of  Souchez, around Arras and.Sois-  sons and the Argon ne at Maria  Theresa, and before Fey-en-Haye  In the Vosges in the Ban deSapt  we succeeded in occupying a new  group of houses. In the section  south-west of Lounois, St. Die  and Thann were shelled. At  Barrenkopf the Germans tried to  retake the position of which we  had become masters, but the  violent attack which they delivered was easily repulsed," with  heavy losses to the enemy. All  of our gains have been maintained and consolidated. A German  battery which assisted in the attack was taken under our fire  and destroyed.  Gorizia Holds Out  .*. _  _���������.-__���������  Ft  "\&*:.buried today. The Eastland, with  * <f_* ������*���������* '  y$-*-2o00,   picnicers   aboard,   turned  .$8S*tui-tie on the Chicago river last  ."^-^Saturday and over 1000 persons  ^tf&perished.  %$.������������* W.  K.  Greenbaun, general  tfjtfcfoianager of the Indiana Trans-  .^���������awportation Co., was arrested after  "  __ _������  .Sfcjst he inquest.    Six  more indict-  _&  '"'���������"__*wnents are expected.  ���������____._  ^m - -���������  i  "^Turkish CampDestroyed  Athens. Greece, July 29.    The  fAllies make further gains in the  )ardanelles.     Turkish aviation  Scamps were burned and several  jj|renches captured.  Supplies for Russians  Seattle, Wash., July 29.--The  iWaterhouse Co. charters  seven  "[Steamers to  go   to Vladivostok  i',with war supplies.  Premier Asquith  Reviews Situation  London, July 29.���������Premier Asquith stated in the House of Commons that "Germany's submarine menace has not substantially  injured our trade. The fleet,is  unimpared and stronger than at  the beginning of the war. The  recruiting is highly satisfactory.  The Russians have borne the  brunt of the enemy's attacks with  indescribable gallantry. England's turn will come next, and  when it does she wiil be well  prepared. The government's  confidence in the success of the  campaign at the Dardanelles is  undiminished."  Rome, July 30.���������Gorizia is still  holding out against the attacks  of our forces. But that the city  is doomed is conceded, as the  evacuation is going on steadily.  _  Gen. Steele Promoted  Military Airship Explodes  $125,000 for Research  London, July 2!) Gen. Steele's  promotion is announced. Gen.  Turner of Quebec, succeeds the  chief of second Canadian forces.  A British military airship exploded in the hangar at Wormwood Scrubbs, two men were  killed outright and 15 injured.  A number of Canadian doctors  and nurses are going to the Dardanelles.  A gift of $125,000 is given the  Oxford University to be expended in chemical research to make  dv'es.  Charles Becker Electrocuted  Ossining.. N. Y., July 28.���������  Charles Becker was electrocuted  early this morning for the murder of Herman Rosenthal.  London, July 30.���������Petrograd  despatch to Times dated Thursday says: "Newspapers are preparing the public mind for a new  withdrawal necessitated by the  enemy's overwhelming superiority in guns and munitions. It is  pointed out that further efforts  to cling to the Vistula-Narew  lines are attended with grave  danger. The paramount consideration is to preserve the army  no matter at what sacrifice of  territory.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  Invitations are out for the wedding of Miss Mary Mitchell of  Hagensborg, to Edward Oien of  Takush Harbor,, to take place  this evening.  In response to the call to attend a meeting to consider the  possibility of Bella Coola raising  sufficient money to buy a machine  gun, the citizens of the town assembled at the Mackenzie school-  house on Saturday at 7*30 p. m.  Mr. B. Brynildsen was elected  chairman and Mr. O. T. Landry,  secretary.  In the discussion that followed,  high hopes were expressed that  Bella Coola could raise $1000 for  such purpose. A committee was  elected to solicit subscriptions  and carry on the campaign to  raise money. The committee is  composed as follows: B. Brynildsen, chairman; O. T. Landry,  sacretary-treasurer; S. Le C.  Grant, A. Atkins, W. H. Mac-  kay, B. F. Jacobsen and C. Carlson. It was decided to proceed  with the work at once.  F. McCrea, timber-inspector,  is seen on our streets again.  John H. Lunos, fire-guard, was  seen at about the same time, so! Pressed   their   sentiments  in  a  manner that resulted in Mr. Atkins rushing out, while Miss  Nordschow took the consequences by reappearing before the  audience.     Louis Svisdahl gave  said, without a suspicion of flattery, that the musical programs  rendered by our local talent on  this and previous occasions have  been very good, and would be a  credit to a far more pretentious  community.  So as not to be obliged to repeat the same thing many times  over allow us to say at the beginning of our report that nearly  every item on the program received encore, and the ones which  were not accorded such recognition, were every whit as good as  the others.  Miss E. Carlisle led off with a  piano solo. Mr. C. Lord brought  down the house with a song. Mr.  Lindsell, in a style to beat the  negro professional of the south,  performed upon the banjo. Mr.  Atkins sang with his usual luck,  but would not come back. Mr.  Saugstad's manipulation of the  violin brought about a storm. He  was followed by Mr. Carlson who,  in a speech, tried to explain'that  even the people of Bella Coola  could take part in the war, while  at home, by assisting to furnish  the means to carry it on. Mr.  Lord availed himself of the lull  that followed in an elocutionary  effort to express his love for a  good cigar. Miss Ruth Nordschow and Mr. Atkins in a duet,  both instrumental and vocal, ex  it is to be presumed they have  had a confab of how to conserve  the forests.  They were unable fo take precautions against   the   work   of; two songs in which the audience  lightning, however.    At two dif-i Joined.    Misses Mildred  Gibson  ferent places fires were started  last Monday  by the lightning,  namely at Hagensborg and Noo-  S. S. Chelohsin came in early j the following acknowledgment;  Sunday morning, but did not j for contribution sent to the Bel- {  leave until afternoon. jgium Relief Fund.  I    Dear Sir,���������In the name of the  S. S. Coquitlam called at this victoria Branch Belgium Relief-  port last Monday with a cargo of , Fund j thank you and the citizens  supplies for the cannery. ! of Be])a  Coola fm. the /urther  .   r.  .       . ���������      j contribution   of   $21.95.     This  Mrs. A. Livingstone, organizer  and missionary of the W. C. T.  U. arrived last Sunday.    She is  stopping with Mrs. Fougner.  ; amount being realized  through  the sale of vegetables.  Yours faithfully,  j H. S. Terry, Sec.-Treas.  Mr. B. Brvnildsen has received ' Victoria, B. C, July 21, 1915.  PROVINCIAL ELECTION  . ������i  For Sale, or will Trade  for Baggy  One straight wagon and box  (pipe reach) in first-class  condition. Capacity 4000 lbs.  Apply���������  Henry G. Graingkr,  Bella Coola Hotel.  1 tixjtf^iixjj^^a^^i^ijB  Good Showing Recruits  Melbourne, July 28.- Twenty  thousand recruits joined the colors in three weeks. This good  allowing of men were all recruited in the State of Victoria.  Your influence and support is respectfully requested.  T..D, PATTlfLLO.  Liberal candidate for Prince Rupert Riding.  satsum.  Iver   Fougner,   Indian-agent,  and J. R. Morrison returned  on  Tuesday from their trip to visit:  the Indians of the interior. They \  had an uneventful trip. >  We congratulate Alger Brynildsen on his successful passing of  the High School entrance examination.  Mrs. B. Brynildsen with her  smaller children, and Mrs. Fleming with her little son, have spent  a few days visiting with the  Hammer's at Nootsatsum. They  returned home last Tuesday and  are now busy giving glowing descriptions of the very enjoyable  time they had.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. T. P.  Saugstad on the 28th inst. a girl.  Mother and child are doing well.  Concert at the Hotel.  On Saturday last, towards evening, the festively arrayed  populace of our burg wended  its way to the hotel in eager anticipation of the attractions provided by the W. C. T. U. in the  form of a concert for the benefit  of the Red Cross Fund.  Mrs. Clayton was the moving  spirit and everything went off in  a style to gratify the most exacting.    In all  seriousness be it  'and Marjorie Clayton gave a  pianoforte duet. Misses Addie  Gibson and Marjorie Claytcn  each gave solos, appreciated like  the rest. Mr. Saugstad then  came forward once more and gave  two violin solos. Mr. Atkins,  upon appearing in the doorway  at the supposed end of the program, was speedily summoned  to the platform and the delighted  audience had the privilege of enjoying another of his performances, after which everybody  stood up and sang the National  Anthem.  In order that the receipts should  be still further augmented, a  cushion was raffled for, with good  result. The total receipts of the  evening were $47.25.  The thanks of the community  are due Mr. J. W. Macdonald of  the Bella Coola Hotel, for his  generosity in granting the use  of his rooms, free of charge, for  the use of the entertainments  in aid of the Red Cross Fund.  Mrs. Livingstone will conduct  the services at the Mackenzie  schoolhouse Sunday evening.  Rev. T. C, Colwell will go to  Kimsquit for a short stay.  (J  ._  C  (Elutrrh Nntire  Sunday  School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  _  _  Mrs. Livingstone will take the  service:.  /_!���������.   T.  C.   Colwdl,  B. A..  Pastor  _  _  ���������4.-   <J_ <___-._������������._ ������U ^J������L-    ._>_.  o a  &j4__. i /9,r  ���������.. -?!'__'  W*  ���������i&  se  ns  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND  FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR JUNE.  Compiled  by  Mr.  C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 70.    Minimum, 47.  Highest Max. (30th) 83. Lowest Min. (7th) 4..  Rainfall, 1.26 inches.  '(>L. 3���������NO. 42  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, JULY 31,  1915.  $1.00 a Year  ermans  en in Drive on Warsaw  wnrwiitBiM.  M  eneral Hindenburg's Soldiers  Fighting With Grim Determination  Russians Take the Offensive and Drive Germans Back  Petrograd, July 26,��������� Reports of Mackenzcn's army being driven  jfe|ack with heavy losses con fumed. Russians have rallied, driven  Jermans back eight miles. Losses to enemy exceed IB",000. Com-  ftander-in-ch'ief of the Austrians calls vainly for re-inforccments,  funs and ammunition. Austrians weakening- and have evacuated  Hie trenches between Tolmino and Doberdo. ���������    ���������  The Teuton Drive on Warsaw is Shattered  fi Petrograd, July 29. ���������A mighty battle on Narew river continues  fith force.    The Teuton drive on Warsaw is shattered.    General  (indenburg's soldiers are 'fighting with desperation in defensive  Actions.    Our counter attacks are converted into offensive action  fn the entire Polish front.    The  Germans are   being- gradually  fdrced back at every point.    The flower of the Russian army was  Juried into action at the critical moment, battering  their way  trough the Teuton lines.    The German losses are over 5C0,CC0.  French Repulse  German Attack  OKerlin's Report on  Recent Fighting  &JP3&' Berlin, July 29.  **_"__  The situation  &at Warsaw remains unchanged.  |The French captured advanced  ^trenches in the Vosges.    French  ^pattacks north of Souchez unsuc-  "*' ' cessful. -  French Are Successful  _.'���������������  'J������]  Rebellion in Hayti  Port-au-Prince, Hayti, July 28.  -The city is in flames and the  ^population is panic-stricken. The  ^president is seized and members  the French legation were taken  ||nd publicly shot, their mutilated bodies tied  with ropes and  Iragged through the streets.  rrhe Eastland Disaster  Chicago, July 28.���������600 bodies  Eecovered after the disaster to  le steamship   Eastland  were  uried today. The Eastland, with  2500. picnicers aboard, turned  turtle on the Chicago river last  L-turday and over 1000 persons  erished.  W.   K.  Greenbaun,  general  .anager of the Indiana Transportation Co., was arrested after  [.he inquest.     Six  more  ii.dict-  lents are expected.  urkish CampDestroyed  Athens. Greece, July 29.    The  ^mfAllies make further gains in the  Dardanelles.     Turkish aviation  ,������.0^camps were burned and several  Paris, July 29.���������Fighting in the  Arras region, north of Souchez,-  is resumed with violence. The  German attacks have been repulsed at all points. Notable  successes have been achieved in  Alsace. One and one-half miles  of trenches dominating the Fecht  valley have been taken.  Paris, July 80. -Official communication. Day calm from sea  to Vosges. Activity of artillery  was more marked in' sector of  Souchez, around Arras and Sois-  sons and the Argonne at Maria  Theresa, and before Fey-en-Haye  In the Vosges in the Ban deSapt  we succeeded in occupying anew  group of houses. In the section  south-west of Lounois, St. Die  and Thann were shelled. At  Barrenkopf the Germans tried to  retake the position of which we  had become masters, but the  violent attack which they delivered was easily repulsed,"' with  heavy losses to the enemy. All  of our gains have been maintained and consolidated. A German  battery which assisted in the attack was taken under our fire  and destroyed.  Gorizia Holds Out  Turks Retreat  Twenty-Five Miles  London, July 30.��������� Official communication. General Sir John  Nixon reports that as the result  of an action on the 24th of July  near Masriyek (Asiatic Turkey),  the disorganized Turkish forces  retreated northward more than  25 miles. The enemy's casualties  in killed, wounded, and prisoners amounted to approximately  2500 men. Prisoners include 41  officers and 690 men, of whom  some 200 were wounded. Our  capture of arms and material include one 12-pounder gun, 12  field and two mountain guns,  also several machine'guns, 1000  rounds of artillery and 100,000  rounds of small arms ammunition, explosives, bombs and other  miscellaneous ordinance stores.  Sacrifice Territory to Men  Premier Asquith  Reviews Situation  *>*  '^>Jl������renches captured.  \$$t      Supplies for Russians  -&$|   Seattle, Wash., July 29.-The  r'^.|Waterhouse Co.  charters seven  ;:$," !stearners  to  go  to Vladivostok  ���������'r'A\ith war supplies.  xdLv  **y_*Ki.  _ni������.|  For Sale, or will Trade  for Buggy  One straight wagon and box  (pipe reach) in first-class  condition. Capacity 4000 lbs.  Apply ���������  Henry G. Grainger,  Bella Coola Hotel.  2  London, July 29.���������Premier Asquith stated in the House of Commons that "Germany's submarine menace has not substantially  injured our trade. The fleet.is  unimpared and stronger than at  the beginning of the war. The  recruiting is highly satisfactory.  The Russians have borne the  brunt of the enemy's attacks with  indescribable gallantry. England's turn will come next, and  when it does she wiil be well  prepared. The government's  confidence in the success of the  campaign at the Dardanelles is  undiminished."  Gen. Steele Promoted  Military Airship Explodes  $125,000 for Research  London, July 29 Gen. Steele's  promotion is announced. Gen.  Turner of Quebec, succeeds the  chief of second Canadian forces.  A British military airship exploded in the hangar at Wormwood Scrubbs, two men were  killed outright and 15 injured.  A number of Canadian doctors  and nurses are going to the Dardanelles.  A gift of $125,000 is given the  Oxford University to be expended in chemical research to make  dye's.  Good Showing Recruits  Melbourne, July 2<S. Twenty  thousand recruits joined (lie colors in three weeks. This good  showing (if men were all recruited in the State of Victoria.  Rome, July 30.���������Gorizia is still  holding out against the attacks  of our forces. But that the city  is doomed is conceded, as the  evacuation is going on steadily.  Charles Becker Electrocuted  ...Ossining, N. Y., July 28.���������  Charles Becker was electrocuted  early this morning for the murder of Herman Rosenthal.  London, July 30.���������Petrograd  despatch to Times dated Thursday says: "Newspapers are preparing the public mind for a new  withdrawal necessitated by the  enemy's overwhelming superiority in guns and munitions. It is  pointed out that further efforts  to cling to the Vistula-Narew  lines are attended with grave  danger. The paramount consideration is to preserve the army  no matter at what sacrifice of  territory.  Invitations are out for the wedding of Miss Mary Mitchell of  Hagensborg, to Edward Oien of  Takush Harbor, to take place  this evening.  In response to the call to attend a meeting to consider the  possibility of Bella Coola raising  sufficient money to buy a machine  gun, the citizens of the town assembled at the Mackenzie school-  house on Saturday at 7?30 p. m.  Mr. B. Brynildsen was elected  chairman and Mr. 0. T. Landry,  secretary.  In the discussion that followed,  high hopes were expressed that  Bella Coola could raise $1000 for  such purpose. A committee was  elected to solicit subscriptions  and carry on the campaign to  raise money. The committee is  composed as follows: B. Brynildsen, chairman; O. T. Landry,  S3cretary-treasurer; S. Le C.  Grant, A. Atkins, W. H. Mac-  kay, B. F. Jacobsen and C. Carlson. It was decided to proceed  with the work at once.  F. McCrea, timber-inspector,  is seen on our streets again.  John H. Lunos, fire-guard, was  said, without a suspicion of flattery, that the musical programs  rendered by our local talent on  this and previous occasions have  been very good, and would be a  credit to a far more pretentious  community.  So as not to be obliged to repeat the same thing many times  over allow us to say at the beginning of our report that nearly  every item on the program received encore, and the ones which  were not accorded such recognition, were every whit as good as  the others.  Miss E. Carlisle led off with a  piano solo. Mr. C. Lord brought  down the house with a song. Mr.  Lindsell, in a style to beat the  negro professional of the south,  performed upon the banjo. Mr.  Atkins sang with his usual luck,  but would not come back. Mr.  Saugstad's manipulation of the  violin brought about a storm. He  was followed by Mr. Carlson who,  in a speech, tried to explain'that  even the people of Bella Coola  could take part in the war, while  at home, by assisting to furnish  the means to carry it on. Mr.  Lord availed himself of the lull  that followed in an elocutionary  effort to express his love for a  good cigar. Miss Ruth Nord-  schow and Mr. Atkins in a duet,  both instrumental and vocal, ex-  seen at about the same time, so j pressed their sentiments in a  it is to be presumed they have  had a confab of how to conserve  the forests.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  manner that resulted in Mr. Atkins rushing out, while Miss  Nordschow took the consequences by reappearing before the  They were unable to take pre- j audience. Louis Svisdahl gave  cautions against the work of \ two songs in which the audience  lightning, however. At two dif-j joined. Misses Mildred Gibson  ferent places fires were started Iand Marjorie Clayton gave a  last Monday  by the  lightning '  namely at Hagensborg and Noo-  satsum.  S. S. Chelohsin came in early j the  following   acknowledgment^  Iver   Fougner,   Indian-agent,  and J. R. Morrison returned on  Sunday  morning,   but   did   not j for contribution sent to the Bel-  leave until afternoon. jgium Relief Fund.  ;    Dear Sir,���������In the name of the  S. S. Coquitlam called at this; victoria Branch Belgium Relief-  port last Monday with a cargo of iFund j thank VOuand thecitizens  supplies for the cannery- !of Bella  Coola for the further  ���������       A   f.  .      4 ���������      'contribution   of   $21.95.     This  Mrs. A. Livingstone, organizer,amount fae        ^.^  t h  and missionary of the W. C. T. i (he _.,. ()f tableg>  U. arrived last Sunday.    She is j ymirs faithful,  stopping with Mrs. bougner.       j H   ^ ^.^ Sec _Tl.eas  Mr. B. Brvnildsen has received! Victoria, B. C, July 21, 1915.  Tuesday from their trip to visit  the Indians of the interior. They  had an uneventful trip.  We congratulate Alger Brynildsen on his successful passing of  the High School entrance examination.  Mrs. B. Brynildsen with her  smaller children, and Mrs. Flem-  pianoforte duet. Misses Addie  Gibson and Marjorie Claytcn  each gave solos, appreciated like  the rest. Mr. Saugstad then  came forward once more and gave  two violin solos. Mr. Atkins,  upon appearing in the doorway  i at the supposed end of the pro-  igram, was speedily summoned  to the platform and the delighted  audience had the privilege of enjoying another of his performances, after which everybody  stood up and sang the National  Anthem.  In order that thereceipts should  be  still   further   augmented,   a  PROVINCIAL ELECTION  Lit  Your influence and support is respectfully requested.  T..-D. PATTLJLLO.  .eral candidate tor Pnnco Rupert Riding.  ing with her little son, have spent  cushion was raffled for, with good  a few clays visiting with the  Hammer's at Nootsatsum. They  returned home last Tuesday and  are now busy giving glowing descriptions of the very enjoyable  time they had.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. T. P.  Saugstad on the 28th inst. a girl.  Mother and child are doing well.  Concert at the Hotel.  On Saturday last, towards eve-  ning, the festive 1 y a r r a y e d  populace of our burg wended  its way to the hotel in eager anticipation of the attractions provided by the W. C. T. U. in the  form of a concert for the benefit  of the Red Cross Fund.  Mrs. Clayton was the moving  spirit and everything went off in  a style to gratify  the  most ex-  result.   The total receipts of the  evening weie $47.25.  The thanks of the community  are due Mr. J. W. Macdonald of  the Bella Coola Hotel, for his  generosity in granting the use  of his rooms, free of charge, for  the use of the entertainments  in aid of the Red Cross Fund.  Mrs. Livingstone will conduct  the services at the Mackenzie  school house Sunday evening.  Rev. T. C. Colwell will go to  Kimsquit for a short stay.  I    (ftlutrrh Sfatin*  _  Sundr.y School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p. m.  acting.  Mrs. Livingstone will take the  service.  j  Rev.   T.  C.   Cotu-cll,  B. ....   Pastor  In all  seriousness be it! #c_vv^*  .  * . _  _ ������ii*  * __._  w (?.m������vv., _m  _ _>   .1  m  ''i _   _s������_  i ii ^ l_Jf__s_  !.-  1 _ "i  . ��������� _ -  I. J5  _____!i-  ___  ' . ii i'   _     1  Hr_\ *  _ ' }J .9  . -'"'  "<!  u  >e  "li  4V ,  i j ___.  "���������cr  BELLA  COOLA COURIER  Saturda  hily 31  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1  Year $1.00  6 Months    0.75  3 Months    0.50  United States  1  Year $1.50  United Kingdom  1  Year $1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving* their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising  Rates,  Apply at  -   . Office. -- '    ,  To Correspondents��������� While unobjectionable ani  onymous comm__ni<__.l_ons will be published, th*-  name and addre_m_.f every writer of such letters  must be given to'the editor.  Ihe Editor re3e_.es the rifjht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript az writer's  risk.  Yancou.er Office - - 317-323 Cambie St.  "&alus papnli lmprrma i-st Iwe."  a novel vyay of meeting the conditions brought on by a disastrous war-and other causes,  which it is not necessary to touch  upon in this connection.  Another item in the estimates  which it is hard to see any reason for increasing nearly one half  million of dollars, is the appropriation for education.    We have  heard it stated by persons claiming to know that a great many  people have left   the  province  these last years, and if such is  the  case'there   should  be less  need of an increased expenditure  for the education of the young,-  if their number is less than two  years ago; but the government  believes it will cost $458,029.57  more for education this year than  two years ago.  - In the face of these astounding facts the only conclusion we  come to is that our salaried servants do not feel the hard times,  neither are they aware of them.  It will be an act of charity almost to let some of them out of  office' next election so that they  may learn to sympathize with  fellow men. We do not like to  use any harsh ��������� terms in dealing  with this subject for fear we may  hurt, the feelings of our more  charitably disposed Conservative  friends who sympathize with the  men in office; but truly we are  _PftL  MAKES PERFECT BREAD  SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1915.  t  Business as Usual.  In conversation with a fiiend  the other day we deplored the  ��������� fact that in view of the distress  found on every hand the provincial- government do not reduce  the running expenses of the administration. When we had this  talk we had not examined the  estimates for the current year.  Our friend said he felt sure the  government was retrenching by  c  not only appropriating less sums  for public works but also reducing the number of public servants wherever possible. We  where glad to learn that the government showed by its action  that it appreciated the gravity of  the situation.    But in order to  become perfectly convinced, we |sion of our difficulties, study them  hunted up the estimates for the  year 1915-16 and started to compare the different items with  those of the Public Accounts of  1913-14.    We found  that some  reductions really had been made,  but they were in  items  which  did not affect the office holders.  We found the government were  not wholly unwilling to retrench  if it could be done at" the expense  of someone else. ;  Twoitemsin particular brought  this fact home to us.    Any or-  thinking a whole lot. .  ' o     o     o     o     o  Take Action!'  By" reason of the remoteness  from markets' and inadequate  means of communication the development of agriculture in its  different branches in^our midst  has been much retarded. It is to  be hoped that the Farmers'Institute will "take up the discus-  hard and intelligently, because on  their solution rests the prosperity  of the settlement.  One of the questions to be dealt  with should be how to get into  direct communication with markets of the north. ' .If this can  be solved satisfactorily, -the farmers will feel more encouraged  developing their respective holdings, take more interest in im  proving the breeds of their dom  farmers in the true sense of the  term. We all agree it is not  profitable to send the produce of  Bella Coola to Vancouver, where  it comes in competition with that  raised by the more advanced  farmers of. the. Fraser River  valley, Vancouver Island and  other places.    ���������  ^ We believe it would pay  the  farmers to co-operate in the running of a launch between Bella  Coola and the mouth of the inlet,  either Namu or Bella Bella.   We  also believe it   would  pay the  farmers to have a central place  where the butter produced in the  valley could be put up in a manner to secure-for it a ready market   in   competition   with   the  creamery    butter    from    other  places.  'There may not as yet be a sufficient amount of cream produced  here to warrant the establishment of a creamery, but we have  heard of a practical and successful way of working over the butter from the different farmers in  a manner so as to make it equal  to the best on the market, and if  that has been found practicable  in other places it should be tried  here,, and "as we believe   with  similar results.  The executive of the Farmers'  Institute should take these matters up, as well as others discussed in these columns,- and prepare them for presentation to a  meeting of all the members. We  feel there is an apathy prevalent  in the organization which it is  necessary to overcome, and we  urge upon the officers of the institute to take immediate steps  for the promotion of the welfare  of the community.   In the month  of August  preliminary  steps  must be  taken to prepare the  way to send of the products to  the   exhibition.      At  meetings  held for this purpose and which  cannot be put off for a more convenient time,   the subjects referred to 'could be taken up and  prepared for discussion at the'  winter. The day of the farmer  is here and they must be up and  doing. The land is theirs and  they must make the most of it,  that a hungry world may be fed.  a  ���������  E0  Big Games Played by  Big Men and Hot Air.  m  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER,  B..C.  dinary person would suppose that  the appropriation, in aid of the  .sick and destitute would be larger during these hard times than  when the times were better. But  such is not the case in our province,  managed  by the  highly  efficient statesmen of the McBride government.   We will not  s#y   Conservative  government,  because we do not believe the  Conservative party will approve  of this sort of administration.  The appropriation for Hospital?  and charities has been reduced  $39,684.07 from the sum used for  such purposes two years ago,  which seems to show the government expects less sickness and  distress now or else that the call  of the needy appeals less strong  ly to them.  But if they sympathize less  with the poor, their feelings towards  themselves   and   fellow-  servants   are   still   tender,   and  actually growing more so.    They  have raised the salaries and hired  additional  help  to the tune of  $390,810.62 over above the generous allowance   they   received  two years ago.    Truly the government of British Columbia has  estic animals, be more energetic  in. increasing the area of their general meetings held later in  season and throughout the  A great deal has of late been  said about our lumbering industry, it is all tklk of course and  no action and of necessity it  should be so. '  The Ameriqans are running  lumber mills along business lines,  in fact founded, built and operated on business lines by men of  Business. In ?British Columbia  our industries, as well as our government is run principally on  hot air.   "������������������'..  Hot air is an excellent thing  for its purpose, but it does not  go far in operating of British  Columbia's industries. We must  have sound and honest business  men who know their business  and who will take hold of our  resources and develop them along  honest business lines.  British Columbia must also have  a stable government, made up of  honest men  who will  do their,  labors faithfully   and   honestly  for the state.    If the saying that  "honesty is the best policy" is  true, then it is up to the people  of British Columbia to change,  and adopt that policy.    This applies particularly to the people,  as the government is but a reflector of what the people are.  The electors of British Columbia  must be the first party to move  for a change.  Everything  is blamed to the  war, the politicians tell us that  no ships can be had to take away  our lumber.    This may be true  now,  but what encouragement  have the ships from other lands  had to come to British Columbia  for cargoes?   Where are our free  ports?   Oregon and Washington  offer no free ports, but the fact  remains that foreign vessels load  in theirportsall the same; therefore, it may be well worth our  while to inquire what is wrong  with British Columbia, its industries and its people.  (Continued on next page.)  Wholesale  DRY GOODS  AND  MEN'S  FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE  OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE    IN    B.  Send for Catalogue Prompt Attention Given Lett,.  n  .  J.  *_  /  _.  a.  L-    "'%.  fe"_-  Gault Brothers Limited  WHOLESALE "DRY GOODS  361 Water Street       Vancouver, B. C.  CjJ Gault Brothers for over 60 years have succe. ./;///v  maintained wholesale Warehouses throughout Canada  C|j The Vancouver stock ������ '/������e largest and best assorted  slock on lne Coast, in some cases the best west of'/ or...,/���������������������������  W  STAPLES  SMALLWARES  RIBBONS  Ready-to-Wear  MEN'S FURNISHINGS  House Furnishings  CARPKTS  LINENS  DRESS GOODS  MAIL ORDERS EXECUTED THE DAY RECUl'U)  Spend Your Vacation in Bella Coola  where is found scenery unsurpassed  Mountaineering Amidst Eternal Snow*  GRIZZLY BEARS, BLACK BEARS,  Goats and Deer in abundance  The reuwrdefa thru </oyi" hunt in nature', u>iUi at Bjlla Coo/j  Trout  in all  the Streams Camping in  a Fine- Climate  Mr. Fre<l Hendricks, who ha������  had a wide and varied experience  throughout the continent in search  of large and small game, offers  his services as guide and guarantees "game, or no pay." "  Bella Coola can i . i. :., (. . Sv  Union Steamship Co.'.- .��������� ..���������..im.-  from Vancouver every T.nir.<lay.  Two days' sail thn. ..i. ii ._���������>'.itry  rivalling the coast of N . ...v. A  bus meets the . .earner.  Modern Hotel accommodation, wilh hot and cold water, bnth������. etc., and  last but not leatt Guide* that will "guarantee" game.  Write to F. HcnJricb, P. O. Box 63 .frlla Coola. B. C. ������4 to ihe Uri lime h hunt tU  .:..."<������  ,S_>  m  .-:B:__7ST^f#  Ceylon  :vp<. Keb-.Bv.-.--:  WM. BRAID   ft CO.  ....   TKA     IMPOnTCRs  ; VANCOUVER,;  8. _-..-.  Order  that  pound  of BRAID'S BEST  Tea now. Packed  in handsome 1, 3,  and 5 lb. tins.  _on  z>  ...  ���������_8  Ll  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SKRVK-K  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  if  k S.       Chelohsin      Leaves   Vancouver  every  Thursday at  11   p. m.     (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays 9 a.m.  2___  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY  S.S. "Coquitlam" and S.S. "Capilano" uiil -^i'  from Vancouver every two weeks, carrying <'^"li,|i:  and Explosives.  rates of KreigliiH,   I .ires  ������ h.".a,   _/ '"   ''"''K'".   fares ..nd ol.lu.r  yj       agenL,  iooj   .ovki.nmknT St.,  Vir/routA.  Hid other informal."!!. ;'!'l,lv ���������  or (ll.).   Mi'������:':";"K  le  (*;  hoi  - .^iffiW. <  11     U     I  -U^_W^i)^^?f.  ._^'^ii^"**I'^-^^  .t_wji_.~S-_^__'.-.;.^:ii������i_  _^*f    ._*'- Waiardai, July 31,1915  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  W  er������  |]>  \\  c  Si.  *������������������_  'DS  ���������i  de paper that the Ocean Falls  a large lumbering and pulp  ijicern at the head of Cousins  lot, some sixty miles from  I |'a Coola, had been formed in-  a new company, The Pacific  I Is Limited, to operate the big  mt with a capital of $9,500,000.  long the incorporators are:  i. A. Letter, lawyer. -  rJ , S. Robinson, lawyer.  1 eslie'Craven,'lawyer;  V. S. Lane, lawyer.  G: Parker, student-at-law.  V.hy all Lawyers?   The capaci-  of these mills are stated to be  ,000   feet   of   lumber  every  onty-four hours.      Therefore  is reasonable to suppose that  i quires business men at the  id with a'knowledge of logs,  ibering and sawmills to oper-  this huge plant, to say noth-  ��������� about  the large pulp mills  i������> idlealongside the saw mills,  'ill a plant that cost ten mil-  [n dollars pay interest on the  gry������ stment.?     Yes,   somebody  ,'s( and it will pay big.    Others  urse are doubting Thornas-  rO.  IW  >la  t  r-  Pi  IIP  &  'Some time ago we read in a (money need be used by this law-  corporation for the  purpose of  buying'timber limits.  The people of British Columbia  have as their agents to look after  their business���������  Sir Richard McBride, lawyer,  W. J. Bowser, lawyer,  W. R. Ross, lawyer,  and they will see to it that out of  this  nearly ten  million dollars,  nothing is paid to the people of  British Columbia for their timber property,  but that all   this  money is kept well within and  for the purposes of this Pacific  Mills Corporation.  Of course we in British Columbia" are used to talk in millions  and' handle millions, in fact it is  a great deal easier for us to gather together ten million'dollars  than it would be for people in  other provinces to assemble ten  thousand.  The Vancouver Province of  July 17 has in large types the  following:  . "Big pulp plant to be opened.  Deal in millions of dollars now-  being completed here (Vancouver). The company will open  up on a larger scale than ever,"  and goes on to tell the public  that the original Ocean Falls  Company had acquired extensive  pulp leases from the Provincial  Government. Vancouver wholesalers who were done in by supplying merchandise to the old  company will now become shareholders in the Pacific Mills Limited.    The plant is to run night  md say that it will not pay,  anyrate we are not concerned  ut this, we leave it to the  pie who put their money into  .ce huge concerns,  s it reasonable or can it be  Jsible that it requires nearly  'million dollars to run this saw  The timber holdings of  enormous corporation is the  erty of the people of British  jumbia,    and    therefore    no  A feu) lines we specially  recommend v  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  Huntley & Palmers  ���������Biscuits  Griff en & Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������  Canned and dried  fruits  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  _!^nrW_holesaIe Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  .ft  I J. W. Peck & Co. Ltd.  Manufacturers of  CLOTHING, SHIRTS,  CAPS and OVERALLS  We carry a complete stock of Men's Furnishings  and all the best English  and American   Hats  JOHN W. PECK & CO., LTD.  MONTREAL        WINNIPEG       VANCOUVER  ^  J>  Always have  Nabob  Jm y������* B a jf  Powder  and day.    The whole thing reads  like a fairy tale.  The Province overlooks one  thing and it is well that the public should not be left in the dark  as to this. Back in the mountains  is a tank, constructed partly by  Providence and partly by British  capital, for the supply of water  to this huge plant. The size of  this reservoir is fourteen miles  long, two miles wide an$ one  mile deep. We only mention  this to show the people in close  proximity of the mills that even  with hot air in such large quantities there will be no immediate  danger, as the flood gates of this  cold water is so constructed that  all the water can be put to use  in an instant.  Over capitalization of any business is a dangerous, thing, and  has had a great deal to do with  the many failures of concerns  that would otherwise have now  been in good financial standing.  Money easily obtained, is equally  easily gotten rid of, and our substantial business concerns in  British Columbia today are those  that started out on practically  nothing. It was a case.of "get  there or bust," and as there was  nothing to bust on it was all go,  and they are still going.  Before British Columbia can  came into her own we must have  honesty in government and honesty in business. We fully agree  with Mr. George Kidd,'general  manager of the B. C. Electric  Railway Company, when he advises that the people here should  see to it that foreign capital invested in this province was wisely spent and fairly protected.  If that is done there will be no  lying idle of our lumber mills or  our mines.      British  Columbia  will then see a new era of -prosperity; not che buyingand selling  of town lots prosperity, but what  would come from the general development of our province along  industrial lines.     Men  who are  now fed by municipalities out of  the taxpayer's money would then  be producers.     There will be no  starving families aboutour towns  and villages.     British Columbia  will then be a desirable place to  make a home in, whereas now,  people are leaving as fast as they  can.  Even the Chinamen are now  leaving  British   Columbia,   like  rats a doomed vessel, four hundred and twenty-six,  with four  hundred tons of baggage, left on  one steamer  from Victoria  for  China.    The reason given for the  exodus of the Chink is that there  is no work,   and that they can  live cheaper in China.    It is also  stated that the Celestials are affect ed worse than anyone by the  depression, the hard times have  cleaned Johnny out of the family  kitchen,   both   in   Victoria  and  Vancouver to an appreciable degree, and when there is no cooking  to  be done,   the  eating is  somewhat  slim,   and   in  consequence Johnny hikes for Canton.  British Columbia needs a house-  cleaning, like Manitoba.    It behooves  the  people,   every  man  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING KJGHTS of the Dominion, in  '*' Manitoba, Saskatchewan ami Ai.iiki.ta,  the Yukon Teku.toi.y, the North-west Teuki-  ��������� toijie:. and in a portion of the Puovinck of  Bkjtish Columbia, muy be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than a.DCO acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the A������_nt or Su-.-Af.ent  of the district in which the ritfhts applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must he described by .sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in u_.surv.yed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $6 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of J10.0O an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior. Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. COItY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. U. ��������� Unauthorized publication of this ad-   I  vertisement will not be paid for.���������30_!KJ.  / heLViason (jr fxischPiano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege lo stale with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE/"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  tfjf  Let us attend  your Victor Record  JJ  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  :|| and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  I Mason & Risch Ltd.  |    738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C  _j-.._:.__!^^������S_5-^r.va?;p_.  or?  WATER NOTICE  HTake Notice that B. Brynildsen  1 of Bella Coola, B. C, will apply for a license to take and use  1000 gallons per day of water out  of a spring situated about 60 feet  north of the north boundary of  that portion of Lot 124, known  as Hotel Lot and registered at  the Land Registry Office at Victoria under No. 18473 C. The  water will be carried from the  spring at a point about 60 feet  north of the north boundary of  said Hotel Lot and to be used for  domestic purposes upon the property described as Bella Coola  Hotel Lot and registered as number 18473 C, This notice was  posted on Ihe ground on the 10th  day of July, 1915.  A copy of this notice and an  application pursuant thereto and  to the "Water Act, 1914," will  be filed in the office of the Water  Recorder at Vancouver. Objections to the application may be  filed with the said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller  of Water Rights, Parliament  Buildings, Victoria, within 30  days after the first appearance  of this notice in a local newspaper. The date of the first  publication of this notice is July  10th, 1915.  B. BRYNILDSEN, Applicant.  July 10--31  BUSINESS CARDS  \A/HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  VjU'HAT person so independent?  \]^HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  "THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  * tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  Geoffrey K. Burnett   D. J. McGugan  C.E., B.C.L.S., B.A.S.C., B.C.L.S.,  ASS. 11. CAN. SOC. C.E.  Burnett & McGugan  (Successors to GeotFrey K. Burnett)  (Late Hill & Burnett)  CIVIL ENGINEERS and  B.C. LAND  SURVEYORS  Grand View Hotel, Bella Coola, B.C.  City address���������New Westminster. B.C.  P. O. Box 8S<>. Telephone 232.  DELLA COOLA and the surrounding  ���������*"^ country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Goast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  JOE  Fur Sales Agency  fiOO dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the bitfjrest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  prire always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to <1 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  no.  oooo-<  ii  POLA  The  Best Known  and   Popular  Lubricant for  Motor Boats  Its use assures freedom from Carbon deposit  on valves, spark plugs, or in cylinders  IMPERIAL OIL CO. LTD., VANCOUVER, B.C.  ���������o-  <_������C^<J> o-  and woman of British Columbia  in the house and un-J who wishes to see our fair pro-  expected    company I vjnce     t its fu]| share of return-  '"    be   ever   wel- ! .  ing prosperity, to study the present condition and how it has  been brought about, and when  the time comes for actic-n to  politically clean up this province  as she never has been done before.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  will    oe   ever   wt  come    it only takes  a minute to prepare.  At all good grocers.  A packet makes  a pint.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  Onk Ykak $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Tmu.1. Months  0.50  UNITKD STATUS:  Onk Ykak  $1.50  TJ nitkh Kinopom and tiif. Continent.  Onk Ykak $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO.. LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. O   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  J tf  BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, ju\g 3j  ONE DOLLAR  FOR'ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only ,,  newspaper published on  the mainland coa_t between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  Ii will be to your interest to \\eep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������r-  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  One way to assist in the relief  of the wounded is to reduce the  number of casualties. And an  ounce of prevention is worth a  pound of cure. Let us reduce  the number of wounded by giving the soldiers the means of  overcoming those who inflict the  wounds. At the same time we  will also look after the wounded  and if we conduct the war on  such principles our task will become lighter.  On Ihe Way to War.  We are glad to be able, by the  courtesy of Mr, S. Le C. Grant,  to publish below a letter from  his son Fred, who is now in England on the way to the war.  Fred Grant is truly one of us.  The settlers of the valley have  known him since he was a small  boy, when he came here from  Rivers Inlet to go' to school, and  our best wishes follow him in his  perilous but glorious undertaking. We feel assured he will  give a good account of himself  and be an honor to himself and  his people. And that he may return in health and good spirits  to home and folks he loves so  much, is the earnest hope of us  all.  2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles.  S. S. Megan tic,  June 13th, 1915.  .... This is the second day  on the boat and I much prefer it  to the train." We can keep cleaner and besides there is lots of  room to walk about and work up  an appetite. Although we are  only in the Gulf it was a little  rough this afternoon, but is calming right down this evening as  we are nearing the southern  coast of Newfoundland. After  leaving Quebec we were told that  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did mot  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by readingthe "Courier."  Plumbing  We buy from the Factory and  sell to YOU direct. Largest  Plumbing Showroom West of  Toronto. Let us quote $ou.  KYDD BROS., LIMITED  Vancouver, B. C.  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are dfmg something for yourself  and your community.  there would be another mail going ashore about 9 o'clock in the  evening at  Father Point,  so  I  got busy and wrote a*bunch of  post cards.    This morning there  was a notice posted up outside  the  purser's  office  saying   the  company were very sorry but oh  account of a misunderstanding  the mail  had  not gone ashore  with the pilot.    An officer told  us that the captain had sent a  a sailor as usual to the post office  for the mail just as the pilot was  ready to leave the ship.    When  the sailor got to the entrance of  the main saloon the guard would  not let him through without a  pass  and   by the  time  he had  hunted up the orderly officer and  received the mail, the pilot had  gone ashore.    We had a muster  parade at 9 o'clock this morning  to see if everyone was properly  dressed for church, then broke  away and fell in at 10 o'clock and  marched into the first-class saloon  where'service was. held.    The  preacher was a nice old fellow  and I enjoyed it very much. The  baths are simply lovely, they are  large and are filled  with   salt  water, hot or cold.    I think this  is about all I can find to tell you  about tonight, I am going to try  and write a little every evening.  June 14.    Nothing exciting  has occurred today.    This morn-  .ing and afternoon we had physical drill for an hour at a time,  we were supposed to have boat  drill also, but it never'came off.  It has been very windy all day  and the waves seem to be quite  big, a few men are not feeling  good, they are men  who have  lived on the prairies all their lives  There is a very good orchestra  on board, and between  it and  some of our boys we are kept  well supplied with music.    I am  surprised  to   see   how   many  large   sailing   ships   there   are  crossing the ocean, so  far we  have passed more of them than  steamers.    Last night I found a  good place to get a light lunch  before going to bed.    I was wandering along some passages on  the, second-class   deck   when  I  passed the pantry and saw two  of our boys in  there having a  regular tuck in, so I thought I  would see what was doing.   The  steward made me feel right at  home and gave me chicken sandwiches, some good cheese and  bread, coffee, and cranberry pie  with nice thick cream.     Don't  you think I fared very well?    It  is awfully cold on deck, hope we  pass a great, big iceberg   June 19. Well, I have not written every evening as I intended.  Two nights there has been a concert and another night I was on  guard, so it -was impossible^ to  write those, evenings, and the  other .nights: I was running  around having a good time. We  passed a few small icebergs and  a lot of floating ice, but unfortunately I was hot on deck to see  them. In the evening about 11  o'clock, when the fog was very  thick, the boat bumped into one  denting four plates, luckily she  was running very slow at the  time; We have had boat drill  the last, few evenings. As soon  as the trumpet is sounded everyone has.to get up to their Own  life boats, with their life belts  on, as quick jas possible.' Two  hundred men are on guard all  the time now. Forty of them  are stationed about the ship with  12 quick-firing guns, and the  others just have their rifles. I  have to take an eight-hour shift  myself this afternoon.  June 20.   We are getting very  near the end of our voyage now.  It is only a matter of a few hours j  before we arrive at some place j  in the south of  England.   .The}  boat went rather a round about |  way coming across.    Last night|  we were off the coast of Spain,  so you see we are keeping clear  of the danger zone.     Through  the night and   today,:,we  have  been running north and are now  in  the "English   Channel.       At  noon an  escort met us, which  consisted of two torpedo destroyers.    The fellows nearly went  crazy when they came along side,  and one could hardly blame them  for it was such a grand sight.  . ...   The destroyers keep going all   around   us,   sometimes  taking a shoot ahead, then one  side, then behind and then again  coming.up alongside.    We have  been making twenty-one knots  an hour all day and it seems as  -if our boat is standing still when  the destroyers pass us.   There  is,quite a choppy sea and every  once in a while they go nearly  out of sight, only the masts, funnels and  pilot  house  showing  above the wash. -.-;.' ...  June 20. . As soon as I got up  on deck I could see a long strip  of land and about an hour afterwards we arrived at Plymouth.  A tender came alongside and took  the mail and a few officers ashore.  We are going to stay on board all  night. The last two days the  life boats were swung out over  the side in case of a submarine attack. Last night was foggy,  but still we didn't slow down,  kept running at full speed and  even didn't whistle. We don't  know where we are to be stationed. It is hard to realize that I'm  so far away from home, but if  it is 5000 miles or more off, it is  just as dear to me.    ....  Fred Grant.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  HpHE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for" "SHAMROCK'  BACON  HAMS  o  <���������       mi                ��������� _  O  Ogilvie's  R-oyal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  ESTABLISHED AT BJ.LLA COOLA IN  IK!)..  EGGS  and  keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and  Provisioned  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  .Brynildsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Pry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  )L.  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND  COOK STO\_s  Heut  R  jpetr  match  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������  _v__  Bf_____e cr  f __H-  ^������_S  ^efforts  __ffi_  ���������Kf-W  affifarew  _____  KKd Lc  iljfcutOT  _T*_&  Kith  s  ������������������ 'd_G_  >G|5.ces  jjrayoru  _____ ^ s0  _b   1_H___  4 fflH  .   _______  SB*3 pw  ^fl  Bare sti  ______  M  _t___?emir  |K>" trc  -_s_E_&3_i  nmder.  -_*_?*t__-  Hfrerrna  I^GulHvi  ___������ar<^  F^_CT___  Igwarsa  p ���������������'_l*C_H_  f^_f_i  iw-th a  iB-f^  s  Lone  merits  jdi-cus.  ^__������i^ inj?'s t  aijreen  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mo_l suitable articles are kept at prices thai  invite competition.  -S  Paints -   Oils   - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of al! kinds  Patent Medicines of all description'  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  WE  fRoui  kJ    Lon  g;& _dc.fi nil  ������, Germs  tation  s temtc  '__> entrai  consic  Best Goods   Lowest Prices   Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, BX  auMasBAtmi'  S-jf_S������-wWS5p^������S^'������Siimcsao^  i"^.^*^.^!'.K^^^  ~'.^������^ix_(rtU������������^;,,j.������(j,4\fcii__i^iaj(,i_ft^wuv._.,i^.^^i_ ������t^������v>  Gal  1000  50,00(  ped ti

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