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Bella Coola Courier 1917-01-06

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 [  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  VOL. 5���������NO. 4  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  Recover Lost Positions  Petrograd, Jan. 3.-- Russian  and Rumanian forces retired at  some points in Moldavia. On  the west frontier in Casimo,  close to the Hungarian frontier,  Rumanians regained lost ground.  Switzerland Fears  Huns Preparations  oh Their Frontier  Paris, .Jan. 3.- Skirmishing  around "small posts in the woods  of Le Pel re and .larey, northwest of Hirey, was the only fighting that occurred on the western  front yesterday. The night was  generally calm.  " -gwiUeriand, fearful of Hun  designs, ��������� thinks the feverish  trench digging on their frontier  * predicts a thrust at Lyons ��������� by  way of that, country. Such an  attack would turr.~Franceis=de-_  fenses. ��������� Swiss agree that they  must watch carefully all their  frontiers. '..Germany could strike  at Verdun from the rear and  flank if she succeeded in forcing  hsr way through Switzerland.  Our patrols entered enemy's  trenches east of-Armentures in  several places. During the night  enemy artillery'was active north  of Ancre. Artillery activity continues on both sides in various  pla'ces on the front, most marked  on Loos salient and neighborhood.  Central Powers Believed to be in Desperate Straits  London, Jan. 4, ���������Authentic official information (substantiating  press reports) of the seriousness of internal conditions-of; the  Central Powers, is believed to have been partly instrumental in  Allies decision to turn a deaf ear to peace pleas. Evidently the  Teutonic motion is within measurable distance of a halt, the limit  of endurunce of their much suffering people is rapidly s uproach-  ing a climax.   The feeding of the population is a huge problem.  The reply to President Wilson's peace note-was fully drafted today and expected to be positive, candid and sincere.  Total Britisli casualties from December I to 31, inclusive, is 815  ofiicers and 30,350 men. Over a thousand wounded Canadians  have been moved to Buxton to recuperate. "  New German Submarine  New York, Jan.-4���������Reports of  new German submarines capable  of laying mines while submerged  and new reports of a mysterious  German raider now roaming the  Atlantic, have been brought here  by Holland-American liner Nieu  Amsterdam.  England on War Bread  London, Jan. 3.���������British press  hopes that the Allies reply to  President Wilson's note will be  a case of plain speaking, with  clear statements which they  would consider peace negotiations.  i       - Government will shortly buy  out and control drink trade.  England began eating war  bread yesterday, except in color  the bread shows slight difference  from the ordinary wheat bread.  Scotland has another week's  supply of white bread and then  goes on the war bread.  Marine casualties during last  month total 115 steamers, valued  at $152,939. The majority were  British steamers.  The final draft of reply of Entente Allies to President Wilson's peace note has already  been approved by France and  Great Britain arid will be forwarded to Italy and Russia, the  reply to be published at the end  of this week.  No Milk for Four Weeks  London, Jan. 3.���������A despatch  from Amsterdam says: "We are  i starving, tell everybody outside  of Germany, if soldiers can stand  ' it, we cannot. Women of Germany cannot go on seeing our  children suffer privation and  hunger. Death bette^thjan su^h  :<y'vL. life."    The misirry-i^'little  ; towns in northwestern'Germany  is terrible despite continual  smuggling of food, stuffs from  Holland. People - in Cologne  have had no milk for four weeks.  Every day rioting takes place  between buyers, ..an A often between buyersand police.  Bordon Predicts  Drastic Measures  Ottawa, Jan. 3.��������� Controller  Harold Fisher was elected mayor  of Ottawa.  Premier Borden in an informal address at the Chateau Laurier to returned soldiers, intimated  that more drastic measures will  be taken in mobilizing the man  power of the country for the  successful prosecution of the  war.           Montreal, Jan. 4���������Distribution  of the National Service Cards  commenced here this week.  Judges Fortin and Lamonthe and  Ai-ch-Bishop Bruchesi were,the  first to sign.   Winnipeg, Jan. 4.���������Trades and  Labor Council advise labor men  to oppose registration by not  signing.    j   Quebec, Jan. 4.���������150 invalided  soldiers expected here today.  Ottawa, Jan. 4.���������Scarcity of  tonnage may interfere with sending overseas fifteen hundred  miles of steel rails for France.  During 1916, Canada recruited  178,537 men for overseas service.  Joseph Armstrong, M. P., for  East Ambton, will probably be  thV successor to the late Hon.  Casgrainj as postmaster-general  for the Dominion.  Kitchener,-Ont, Jan. 4���������Military pickets are still on duty at  the News Record office, Dominion Button Works and the residence of the mayor-elect.  Discuss Peace Answer  Berlin, Jan. 4.���������Ambassador  Gerard and Bethmann-Hollweg  discussed the entente's answer  to Germany's peace proposals.  It is believed that the American  ambassador learned what was  the possibility of Germany acting favorably on renewed request  on conditions of peace should the  United States make such move.  Parker-Williams Resigns  Victoria. Jan. 4.���������J. H. Haw-  thornthwaite, Socialist, accepted  the offer of nomination in the  coming by-ele^ion at Newcastle  caused by the resignation of  Parker-Williams.  Berlin Receives Reply  "Amsterdam, Jan, 4. ��������� Allied  reply to the peace proposals ol  the Central Powers has been  presented to the foreign office  by the Swiss minister.  ���������(.   M  H   M  K   M  K   >  K   >���������  < "M  (Smttttgs!  T  We take this'opportunity of expressing our  hearty appreciation of  the loyal support extended to us by our readers and advertising patrons  during the past year. *  The Courier looks forward with optimism to the  future of Bella Coola, and trusts that' each of you  may he generously-benefitted by greater developments  and further business activities during the present year.  We thank you for the many evidences of your  friendship and extend to you all our cordial wishes for  apPB5  London, Jan. 4.���������Many Canadians with tlie Imperial forces'  have been awarded a military  cross. -   The substitution system will  make nearly four million men  available. ^. -  The London Daily Mail has an  editorial condemning the Saloni  ki expedition in defiance of mili  tary traditions.  ������  .Bell  Coola Publishing Co.  <   M  ������   M  K   >������  KM  Ltd.  Paris, Jan. 4.���������Artillery active  north and south of the Somme,  our troops took many prisoners.  , Over half a million men have  been captured by allied armies  during 1916.'  During the two months having) ings or experiences are concern-  elapsed since our, last issue the  settlement of Bella Coola has  pursued its even and peaceful  ways. .No noteworthy event has  taken place. Even though the  most stupendous ti'agedies .are  taking place in the outside world  Bella Coola, hid away in the fastnesses of the mountainous regions of the uttermost portions  of the {western world, is as far  asmaterial things are concerned  yery little affected by the war.  In fact, we believe that people  here who fail to read the news  if such there be, would not as  far as there immediate surround  ed be aware that anything unusual was transpiring.  S. S. Camosun arrived on lime  last Friday afternoon about five  o'clock, with a light load.  In the winter schedule which  went into operation Nov. 15, the  S. S. Camosun also includes Bella  Bella, Surf Inlet and Swanson  Bay, in her calls in addition to  tne ports on the summer route.  Capt. Dickson, who for so  many years has been a familiar  figure on the Union S. S. Co.'s  steamers on the northern coast,  has resigned his position as cap  tain of the Camosun and enlisted  for the war.  During his long service he has  come in contact with a large  number of people residing on the  coast and has by,his courteous  manners, helpful ways and geniality, made himself eminently  popular, and it' is no exaggeration to state that he will be  missed very much. Our best  wishes follow him in his new  career.  Mr. and Mrs.. J. R. Morrison  went away on Sunday to take up  their residence for a time, which  we hope will not be long,1 at  Ocean Falls.  Mr. Morrison has accepted^  position with the Pacific Mills  Ltd. in its survey service.-  Mrs. Morrison, who for so long  a time has taken an active and  leading part in Sunday school,  church and benevolent work in  our midst, will be sadly missed.  National Service Week  Don'l Delay in Filling Out Your Card  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Percy  Gadsden on December 24th, at  the hospital, a girl.  The mother and child are doing  well.           We regret very much to learn  that Miss Rutm Nordschow is at  the hospital suffering from a  serious illness. We are glad to  know, however, that the crisis  seems to be past and that she is  slowly improving.  THIS CARD MUST BE FILLED IN'AND PROMPTLY RETURNED BY ALL MALES BETWEENTHE AGES OF It AND ������3 INCLUSIVE.  NATIONAL.  1. What is your full'namo?:  CANADA.    ,   2. Kow eld aro you ?  yoars  4. Nanio of city, town, \  villago or Post Offico /              i   Stroot                                                     . NumUr  5. In what country   1  were you Corn ?  /   .  .                   6. In what country was )  your fatnor born ?   (     7. In what country was \  your mothor born ? ]_,..   .                10. How much lime havo you lost \  in last 12 months from sicknoss? /    -   '11. Hava you (ull use of your arms ?    .   .,    "  12. Of your legs?    13. Of your sight?.            -   .  14. Of your hoarlng?                                                           ,l  8. Wero you born a. British subject ?.   ... _ -   15. Which aro you���������marnod, \  single or a widower ?    . /       16. How many parsons besides 1  yourself do you (Upport? j  17. Whal aro you working at for a  18. Whom do you work for?  19. Have you a trade or profosslon ?.  21. Are you working now?  iving?  22  20. If so, what ?  If not. why?  23. Would you bo willino to change your prosont work for other necessary work at the same pay during the war?...   24. Aro you willing, if your railway faro is paid,io IcJvd whoro'you nowlivo.and go to sbmoythdr place in Canada to do such work ?..,  INSTRUCTIONS FOR CIL^-INO IN THIS.CARO.AHKON THE OTHER SIDE...  . IT ASKS 2������ QUESTIONS.       COUNT VOUB ANSWERS .  Our fellow-townsman Thor-  wald Jacobsen, who enlisted a  short time before Christmas, is  back again in Bella Coola in the  capacity of recruiting sergeant.  He is abroad at all times impressing upon young and old  their duty of enlisting.  ������Birger Brynildsen and Paul  Olsen have enlisted and will leave  for Vancouver on this week's  steamer.  The corporation of the Bella  Coola General Hospital holds its  annual meeting at the Colony  Hail, Hagensborg, next Tuesday.  The election of officers and  other business will be transacted.  The Farmers' Institute holds  its annual meeting at the same  place next Monday.     '  Planning'for next year's work  should be one of the chief features of the meeting.  Many questions of great importance and vital to the welfare  of.the settlers are awaiting discussion and intelligent handling  and should enlist the interest of  everyone who intends to stay in  Bella Coola. Everybody, men  and women, is.earnestly urged  to attend.  The first week of the year  which is the "National Service  Week" is now drawing to a close  and is a week in which everyone  in Canada has an interest.' The  men arc interested because it is  obligatory upon each of them,  between the ages of 10 and G5  years, to fill out one of the cards  for this purpose. The, women  are interested because their cooperation is being invited, 'in>  seeing that their men-folk attend to this importantduty. The  children are interested because  their school teachers have explained to them the meaning of  National Service and the way in ,  which 'father arid ,the big brothers, at home have to reply to  the various questions.  ��������� To write in the answers and  return the card promptly is a  good New Year's resolution for  every man throughout the Dominion and it has the advantage of  being easy of fulfilment. Prompt  mailing of the answers is particularly desirable.  National Service means that  we are to get into that frame of  mind which will cause us to  think of the needs'of the country,  to realize that the interests of  the State have a greater claim  on us than our self-interest.  This applies to everyone, from  the highest in the land down  to the lowest. The Prince  of Wales' motto "I serve" may  well be the motto of every citizen of the British Empire at this  time.      . _;!  There are many ways of .sending the nation besides going to  the front. The man on the farm  and the mechanic in the workshop may be serving the nation  as usefully as the man in the  trenches. Every man should be  doing the work which represents  his most efficient service to his  country.  The' war is teaching us, or  should be teaching us, great  lessons. Terrible as are its effects, those who have faith in  Canadian manhood hope and believe that the nation will emerge ..  from this experience a stronger  and a better people. If the meaning of National Service is thoroughly grasped and properly  understood, if the Government's  call for information is responded  to in the right spirit, this year  will be the banner year in Canada's history.  c/ BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, January 6,   19\7  The Courier  I'uiiMKHKi) Wkmklv at Hicu.aCooi.a by  thk Hkixa Cooi.a rum.isJiiNV, Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada,  1   Year $1.00  6 Months   .. .#    0.75  3 Months ....'    0.50  United States  1  Year..' $1-50  United  Kingdom  1  Year $100  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly pleiisu notify the management  ut oiKie. Changes in address should be  sent in its w>on as possible.  Foil  Advertising  Hati:s,   Afri.y  at  Ok kick.  TO CoRKKSI'ilNlir.NTS���������Wlliltf  llll������il������j''<*l">"libl<a .���������111-  onymoua cunwiunii':ili<>iiN will 1m> |iulilMi<-ii. uii'  nnirn* mid nildiviiiiiif i-vi-ry wniornf mii'li li'lti-rs  ���������Hunt lit" nh*n 1" tin' 1'iliiiir,  Tim Editor ri'wi'vi's tho ii������ltt l" n fii-*' pulill-  rution of nny Ii'IUt.    All iimnuxrripl lit wnli-r ������  rink.  ���������&al������a {.rnpnli iutprrntu rot Irx.  SATURDAY, JAN. G,' 1917.  A Happy New Year.  After'a vest of two months  the Conner again resumes its  visits to the subscribers. Rejuvenated and invigorated by  the vacation which by the staff  has been spent in out-door work  . the publisher hopes to be able to  present a paper which will prove  interesting and helpful to the  readers.  ��������� And in meeting with you at  this'particular season of the year  we extend to you the compliments of the season in a hearty  greeting of a Happy New Year.  This may not, under the prevalent distressing conditions, be  exactly the most appropriate  kind of a greeting neither does  it seem proper that any one  should "be quite happy at this  time when there is so much distress in the world; hut the greeting is accompanied with the hope  i.  that the year which is now. dawning may bring about a happy  change, that peace may be declared, our boys return from  the battlefields and the vocations  of peaceful times be resumed.  And let us all in this year try  to so conduct ourselves that we  do ouriittle share towards bringing happiness to others and thus  in the most effective way bring  happiness to ourselves. And may  we now and hereafter, more  than in the times past, take more  thought of the things unseen  and eternal.  It is our belief that despite unfavorable circumstances if this  be our earnest endeavor w,e shall  experience a Happy New Year.  o    o     o    o    o  The Proffer of Peace.  The chief interest the last few  days has centred in Germany's  proffer of peace.  It seems that after more than  two years of warfare of, the most  intense kind, for which she had  most carefully prepared herself  beforehand, and after ruthlessly  and wantonly having attacked  her smaller neighbors, ; Serbia  and Belgium, Germany, has all. of  a sudden been seized with a high  regard for humanity and a great  concern for the protection of the  weaker nations.. With these  laudable objects ostentatiously  in view she calls upon her enemies to enter into peace negotiations. -,.'���������;'..  Her recent seemingly change  of heart does not impress tier  .adversaries to any serious extent.    Each and'everyone of. her  several enemies have turned her  offers down with scorn.  It has been stated in pro-German papers circulating in Bella  Coola that Britain is conducting  this war with a view of exhausting her allies as well as Germany  in order that when the war is  over she will be the mistress of  both land and seas in the whole  world; and that her allies are  growing restive and are complaining that it is Britain's fault  that the war is not brought to a  close.  That our pro-German friends  are laboring under a false impression may be gathered from  the fact that Russia and France  preceded Britain in refusing to  agree to entering into any negotiations with the great criminal  of civilization. And Italy through  her Jresponsible ministers, amid  the cheers of the representatives  of the nation, declared likewise  her refusal to be drawn into a  conference with her enemy.  It goes without saying that  the desire for peace is strong in  all'the belligerent countries, but  having taken up the sword in a  righteous cause, 'namely, the  protection of the weaker nations  and in defense of the sanctity  of treaties, Britain and her allies  will not laydown their arms.until this great crime against  humanity and civilization be  punished to such an extent that  it will never occur again.  All   the   Entente  Allies  are  agreed that lasting peace cannot  be assured until Germany has  been,brought1to her knees.   At  the beginning of the war she  boldly and brazenly defended her  violation   of   her   treaties,   her  solemnly pledged word by stating'that they stood in'the way  of her ambitious   desire for a  place in the sun, that her word  was of no consequence  where  she deemed it necessary to violate  it to attain valuable objects; in  fact,  that necessity  knows no  law.     That being the case she  must be brought to a condition  where her neighbors will be in a  position to compel her to abide  by her treaties, and we are sorry  to'say she is not in such a state  as yet, although the' indications  are that before long she will be  glad to accept peace on righteous  terms.  It is not unreasonable to infer  NO ALUM  that her recent peace offers have  been prompted by a feeling that  she is getting into desperate  straits and that she will be able  to obtain better terms now than  at a.later time.  O      O      O      O      O  Hon. M. A. Macdonald, the  Attorney-General, has again  been vindicated.' He had an  even harder contest to encounter  in, the last by-election than in  the two previous elections where  he in each .instance received  over-whelming majorities. ���������������������������  Iiv this last election where he  sought confirmation of his appointment as Attorney-General  in Hon. Mr. Brewster's cabinet,  he was opposed not only by the  Bowser machine supporting an  opposition candidate from the  Liberal party, but also by such  friends and supporters, of .this  candidate from within his own  party.  This vindication was of such a  substantial size that we can feel  reasonably confident that the  pre-election accusation of Mac-  donald's connection with the  alleged plugging affair in -Vancouver be foreve'rset at rest.    ,  o     b    o     o     o '  All indications goto prove that  the people of British Columbia  of all parties now that the election is over and.its issues settled  for a long period, are well satisfied with the trend of affairs in administrative circles. There seems  to be no exception to the confidence felt in the ability and  honesty of the government now  in power. And deserving of  and backed by this confidence  we predict that the government  will inaugurate a new era in.the  development of the resources of  our province and the administration of its affairs.  The Farmers' Institute.  Next Monday the local Farmers' Institute will hold its annual  meeting.  We have of late been somewhat dissatisfied with the conduct of the affairs of the Institute, and indications are to the  effect that others share our  feelings.  , And that being the case it is  feared that the interest of former years felt for it will not be  forthcoming at this time and as  a consequence but few will attend.  if cannot be too strongly urged  upon the farmers of' the valley  the importance of giving the  Institute their best and most  careful consideration.  ltistheoneorganization which  should be a bond between the  farmers;' uniting them in efforts  for the common good.  Situated as are the settlers in  this particular place far removed  from markets it is even more  necessary for them to co-operate  than for farmers living in closer  proximity to markets, and it is  now conceded on every hand that  in order to get the best results  from farming there must be cooperation.  Therefore, turn out in large  numbers to the meeting and let  there be a revival of interest and  harmonious wrork.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  MADE   IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN t0 reweacni  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B.C., them in different parts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest, energetic men only are needed, Weparucularly  want a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should.write at once for our 80 page Catalogue.  ���������   S. M. NEWTON  The Prince "Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Rid-  The object of this space is to  introduce to you the man who always fights for the rights and  prosperity of the masses, irrespective of politics.  Remember!  in time  just to remind.you to take a look at your (lour  sacks or flour bins and see if you are in need of  Wild Rose Pastry Flour  OR  Royal Standard Flour  WILD ROSE,for  those Cakes, Pies  and  Pastries.  ROYAL STANDARD for making those  fine Loaves. , . *        '   ���������  Note the trademark on' the sack���������'^e circle "V"  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  o  CANADA  |~ps&3  VICE  PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby eiven under the authority of the "War Measures  Act, 1914," that during the fr'st wee!: in January, 1917, an inventory will be made  by the Post Office Authorities, of every male between the ages of sixteen and 'sixty-'  "���������   five'residing in. Canada. ". .',  7  National Service Cards and addressed envelopes for their return to Ottawa  have'been placed in the. handq of all Postmasters for distribution amongst the  persons required lb fill in such cards. Every male person of the prescribed ages  is required to fill'in'and return a card enclosed in an envelope within ten days  of its receipt. . ;' ' '     v.  Any person who fails to receive a card and envelope may obtain the same  upon application to the nearest Postniaiiter.   .   " ��������� ���������'  Let the Tea Pot tell you���������  GREAT  WEST  TEA  IS   BETTER  o  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  m  zion  D������C  ion  m  Ottawa, 15th December, ID 16.  R. B. BENNETT,  Director General.  ::-,,/:;;��������� GOD SAVE THE,KING.   . -,^  NATIONAL SERVICE WEEK    :    1st to 7th JANUARY.  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.   <&  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      CamOSlin      Leaves  Vancouver every  Tuesday at 9 p.m. (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p. m.  S. S, " Coquitlam "; sails from '"Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, 'will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  JUG  For rates of Freights, Fares arid other information, apply to  Head Office, Garrai,i, St.,* Vancouver; or Geo. McGkecor, .  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.,      .  nor:  31������ C  30E  & 1  Advertise your Wants in the Courier ���������������  V  Saturday, January 6,  1917  BELLA COOLA  COURIER  Simply a little rub with a cloth keeps the highly burnished cooking top always glistening; dustless clean, without blacking; in four pieces it cannot warp or bulge.  (  It won't be hard to decide what range you want In your  kitchen after I show you the Kootenay's special features.  BOX  Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  Peace Talk.  President Wilson has issued a  note to the belligerent countries  asking them to state their terms  for peace or in' other words asking them what they are lighting  for.  His note has caused consider  able surprise and indignation  among intelligent people especially those ' of the Entente  powers.  His critics, which are a host,  find it hard to understand that  the head of one of the greatest  and most enlightened people of  r  CLUB OFFER  "\  We have pleasure in announcing' that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier ��������� . ���������     .       .       .       . $1:00  ���������Fanse^ A'avoc&ie & Home Journal, Winnipeg l. 50  $2.50  Both papers  for .   .   $1.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for . .  $1.50  The Courier   .      .       .    ��������� .  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  . 1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for  .   .   $1.75  ^  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  ���������ii  J  the world, should officially publish his ignorance of what these  nations are fighting for.  The president's profession that  "each side desires to make the  rights and privileges of weak  nations and small states as secure against aggression or denial  in the future as the rights and  privileges of the great and  powerful states now at war,"  is especially irritating. He seems  to forget it was Germany and  Austria's assault upon the weaker nations that brought on the  greatest war in history. That  Britain and Russia at least went  into the war for the purpose of  defending the weak whom they  had promised to protect.  While the.president was die-  tnJLing this extraordinary statement as to the common aims of  the warring nations, Germany  was still practising her inhuman  methods in the treatment of the  weak by deporting the Belgians  by the thousands from there  devastated country to work for  their conquerors in a state of  slavery. ���������  At this writing we have not  learned what Britain and her  Allies will say in reply to this, in  their estimate, insulting note,  but it has been suggested-that it  should be on the same lines as  President Lincoln's reply to a  similar request from France during the Civil War, namely, that  the.war will end with the overthrow of those who began it and  the principles for which the  Union was making.its heavy  sacrifices had been vindicated.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS   ,  r>OAL MINING KIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ^ Manitoua, Saskatchewan and Albkuta,  the Yukon Vekkitoky, the North-west Tekri-  I TOMES-und in u portion of the 1'icovinck of  UniTiSti Columbia, may be IoiiskkI for a term of  twenty-one yearn lit un amiuiil rental of $1 an  acre.' Not more tliun 2.660 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease mutjl he made by the  applicant in pi-i-Hun to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or lejffal subdivisions of sections, und in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of }5 which will be refunded if the riidits  applied for are not available, but hot otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mino at the rat������ of fivo cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Airont with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable, coal mined und pay  the royalty thereon'!1. If the coal minintr rights  are not beinir operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The leuau will include the eoal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available nurface rights may be  considered nereHsaiy for the working of the mine  at the rate of SIO.(X) an acre.  I'Vir full information application should Im>  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  w. w.'.corv;  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. 11.--llnantliorlr.od publication of this advertisement will not he paid for.���������SutSUU.  BUSINESS CARDS  0H  30E  H������  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of 13. C,  Yukon und Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Anency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission' is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  fol It ioi >l fol  VANCOUVER LANf) DISTRICT  w.^artOf ;:.,-*mrtir  ;iv>.  DISTRICT   OF   COAST���������RANGE   XII.  Take  Notice  that I,   Thomas J  Whiteside, of Vancouver. B. C, oecu  pation   builder,   intend  to   apply  for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement,. containing ������40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30, 1916. 7 Jan.O-Mnrch   i  Dealers and Trappers  We pay all .express and  mail charges.  O)  <0><m*<>'  )-amui������.o-iB������m^O><gBP-o ������m* (0><  ���������O-ffiBHHH  "Q  0>  A SOLDIER'S FUNERAL.  A descriptive series by our soldier correspondent, Jlrchie T):  'Darlington, late of Shushartie Bay, B. C.     '  Standing alone and still in the  darkness outside the sleeping  camp I was rather a dreamy  sentinel and not so'keenly alert  as the regulations demand.  .  It is surprising how fanciful  one can become between the hour  of 1 a. m. and daylight. When  everything is so quiet and one  can see just ten yards���������no more  ���������into the blackness; and no  human voice, only the sound of  the wind in the bushes breaks  the stillness of the night, then  one remembers- old���������sometimes  sad���������songs, and the old friends  of years; and one's thoughts  travel backwards, likely to linger on the places which association endears. Either that, or  we build lofty castles of fantastic architecture and unstable  construction, which, with foundations as flimsy as the gaseous  ether, come crashirig to the  ground in the soft light of dawn;  and the-notes of "reveille!"  echoing from camp to camp  along the line of coast, bring  the mind with an uncomfortable  jerk to the more concrete present; even as, resounding through  horse lines and barrack square  and in, the straight lanes between the canvas tents, they  call the sleeping soldiers to duty.  My thoughts were of an unknown comrade who, the day  before, "had been laid in the little  cemetry below Garrison Church.  If you could see Garrison  Church you would appreciate its  lovely situation. It is an outpost  of Shorncliffe garrison, stands  prominent among many outstanding landmarks, and looks  over dark-green, heatherclad  slopes, at the sea. The "Rest  Camp" or cemetry, nearly surrounds it, and it is full of soldiers graves ��������� soldiers of all  ranks who have "crossed over"  in the past fifty years. To this,  at the present day, there is a sort  of annex, a square at the bottom  of a little valley. The turf here  is greener than on the older  ground, and also there are two  or three rows of white crosses  marking where Canadian soldiers  lie. The men who lie here have  answered the call of the guns,  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  2U  / hejylason cr Risch Piano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO FINER  PIANO MADE I"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  tfjf Let us attend your Victor Record  jJ mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  :: 3  =l  ������  C=J||C  \JL7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  i r  VI/HAT person so independent?  ^%/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  .'.���������.���������'I"(n"; ���������'I-���������>')'; ���������>JV\Vt'f-{i'>f>;,|  View of a ranclrin Bella Coola Valley.  THE REASONS for this enviable condition of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  *"* country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  r^,  CZZ]  ������  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  ��������� CANADA.  One Year ........ ���������..  Six Months .... ...  Three Months   UNITED STATES.  One Year.  ...$1.00  ... 0.75  ... 0.50  $1.50  United Kingdom and the,Continent.  One Year. .............':'........ .$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find ..���������   for Bella-Cobla Courier for.........  .subscription  .���������':     ���������:'..; Name.'.,..'..���������'���������,���������:��������� - ��������� ��������� ������������������ ��������� ���������,���������  ���������  ..��������������������������� .; ���������'."p:'q., ......;.....-.. a.. ..���������'.���������...;  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  1/ A  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, January 6,   19)?  o  "JOC  D  ������fl  subscribe  :or me  ONE DOLLAR  FOR. u^E YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coa������l between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  It will be to your interest to keep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before, the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let-slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.    -  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities,have come and gone.  People are beginning to'flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia otters  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������sup-  port home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are' in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and yon  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  A SOLDIER'S FUNERAL���������Continued  land are worthy of all Ihodeep  respect posterity can give them.  [And here, with the solemn pomp  attendingiirioldicr'slast journey,  a comrade of the th liattalion  was laid to rest.  Tli'j afternoon was hot and the  sun glared from a sky of clear  azure. Further down the hill  the engineers were throwing  grenades. ]n a distant rise the  helios (lashed, and from the clear  arc above came the hum of an  aeroplane in swift flight towards  the sea.  The music was, at first, faint  upon the air, soft and beautiful  from afar, but grim enough in  its meaning to those of us who  stood there waiting and guessed  perhaps a ��������� mother's agony or a  wife's despair. The sound gradually grew in volume, the slow,  majestic cadence of tho "Dead  March" in Saul, speaking of  eternity; an army child,believer  that it arouses sleeping ranks of  soldiers bivouacked on the oilier  side of Jordan, who riso to coiv  duct a new comrade to liis quarters. % The air engenders pagan  beliefs! ''it, grows yet louder,  and the voices of (he sappers and  the helio-signallers become  hushed. At last all sounds arc  lost in the music as the slow-  moving procession draws neai  the church. There was, a -tense  and thrilling moment when the  firing squndGand small cortege  passed; and stiff salutes as the  gun-carriage bearing the flag-  draped coffin came abreast: that  is the order, you must pay the  same compliment to a dead private soldier as you would to the  king!  A khaki-clad padre read the  service! then at its conclusion  came three " sharp, punctuated  order,-."ready!" "present!" and  '���������'fire!" again, after a pause. Yet  again for the third time. And  the crack of the volleys echoed  down the valley. Then a momentary stillness, broken by a simultaneous click of spurs and iron-  shod heels as the sweet notes  of the "Last Post", the soldiers  requiem, sounded.  ��������� Another lad had commenced  his journey through limitless  eternity and we left the cold clay  for Mother Nature to do with as  she would.  The Coffee of Distinction  because  of   its   exquisite  flavor  Packed in our new hygienic  AIR-TIGHT TIN  The W. H. Malkin Company, Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  mpjffmamMMM.  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  cheers and refreshes  , atanyhouroftheday.  [You get the most delicious tea when, you  You Help  ?  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  ^Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting,Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist.  use  NovarSold  In Bulk.  3fe������Sss^3������g$S3Kj^r:<  TEA  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  o  rJOE  HTHE two principal reasons  A   why   you   should  buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������"  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisional's  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  Ogilvie's  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING  AND COOK STOVES  mm  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    S    ������  Riding iSaddles  Settlers, Prospedtors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the moft suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints - Oils - Varnishes -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions ���������V:t  i  M  V*  IF YOU WA^T GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  feniMimff^f^itiuMigYH"1"1*"^! IV"*"^  VOL. 5���������NO. 4  BELLA COOLA, B. C,\SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1917.  $1.00  a Year  Recover Lost Positions  Petrograd, Jan. 3.���������Russian  and Rumanian forces retired at  some points in Moldavia. On  the west frontier in Casimo,  close to the Hungarian frontier,  Rumanians i*egained lost ground.  Switzerland Fears  Huns Preparations  on Their Frontier  Paris, Jan. 3.-Skirmishing  around small posts in the woods  of Le Petre and Jarey, northwest of Hirey, was the only fighting that occurred on the western  front yesterday. The night was  generally calm.  Switzerland, fearful of Hun  designs, thinks the feverish  trench,digging on their frontier  predicts a thrust at Lyons by  way of that country. Such an  attack would turn France's defenses. Swiss agree that they  must watah carefully all their  frontiers^ 'Germany could strike  at Verdun from the rear and  flanlf if she succeeded in forcing  har way through Switzerland.  Our patrols entered enemy's  trenches east of Armentures in  several places. During the night  enemy artillery was active north  of Ancre: Artillery activity continues on both sides in various  places on the front, most marked  on Loos salient and neighborhood.  Central Powers Believed to be in Desperate Straits  London, Jan. 4.���������Authentic official information (substantiating  press reports) of the seriousness of internal conditions 6i the  Central Powers, is believed to have been partly instrumental in  Allies decision to turn a deaf ear to peace pleas. Evidently the  Teutonic motion is within measurable distance of a halt, th������ limit  of endurance of their much --suffering people is rapidly approaching a climax.    The feeding of the population is a huge problem.  The reply to President Wilson's peace note was fully drafted today and expected to be positive, candid and sincere.  Total British casualties from December 1 to 31, inclusive,:is.815  officers and 36,350 men. Ov'er a thousand wounded Canadians  have been moved to Buxton to recuperate. \      .  New German Submarine  "New York, Jan. 4���������Reports of  new German submarines capable  of laying mines whilesubmerged  and new reports of a mysterious  German raider now roaming the  Atlantic, have been broughthere  by Holland-American liner Nieu  Amsterdam.  England on War^ Bread  London, Jan. 3.���������British press  hopes that the Allies reply to  President Wilson's note will be  a.case of plain speaking, with  clear statements which they  would consider peace negotiations.   Government will shortly buy  out and control drink trade.  England began eating war  bread yesterday, except in color  the bread shows slight difference  from the ordinary wheat bread.  Scotland has another week's  supply of white bread and then  goes on the war bread.  Marine casualties during last  month total 115 steamers, valued  at $152,939. The majority were  British steamers.  The final draft of reply of Entente Allies to President Wilson's peace note has already  been approved by France and  Great Britain and will be forwarded to Italy and Russia, the  reply to be published at the end  of this week.  No Milk for FourJWeeks  London, Jan. 3.���������A despatch  from Amsterdam says: "We are  starving, tell everybody outside  of Germany, if soldiers can stand  it, we cannot. Women of Germany cannot go on seeing our  children suffer privation and  hunger. Death better than such  a life." The misery in little  towns in northwestern; Germany  is terrible despite"*.'continual  smuggling of food stuffs from  Holland. People in Cologne  have had :"' r,,������' four weeks.  Every da: i������..'tini'', takes place  between b'.fyers, and often between buy. '-a ft mi police,  Bordon Predicts  Drastic Measures  Discuss Peace Answer  Ottawa, Jan. 3. ��������� Controller  Harold Fisher was elected mayor  of Ottawa. <  Premier Borden in an informal address at the Chateau Laurier to returned soldiers, intimated  that more drastic measures will  be taken in mobilizing the man  power of the country for the  successful prosecution of the  war. _'  Montreal, Jan. 4���������Distribution  of the National Service Cards  commenced here this week.  Judges Fortin and La'monthe and  Arch-Bishop Bruchesi. were the  first to sign.  Winnipeg, Jan. 4.���������Trades and  Labor Council advise labor men  to oppose registration by not  signing.   Quebec, Jan. 4.��������� 150 invalided  soldiers expected here today.  Ottawa, Jan. 4.���������Scarcity of  tonnage may interfere with sending .overseas fifteen hundred  miles of steel rails for France.  During 1916, Canada recruited  178,537 men for overseas service.  Joseph Armstrong, M. P., for  East Ambton, will probably be  the successor to the late Hon.  Casgrain as postmaster-general  for the Dominion.  Kitchener, Ont., Jan. 4���������Mili-.  tary pickets are still on duty at  the News Record office, Dominion Button Works and the residence of the mayor-elect.  Berlin,  Jan.  4.���������Ambassador  Gerard and   Bethmann-Hollweg  discussed the entente's answer  to Germany's peace  proposals.  It is believed that the American  ambassador   learned  what, was  the possibility of Germany act-  ing favorably on renewed request  on conditions of peace should the  United States make such move.  Parker-Williams Resigns  Victoria, Jan. 4.��������� J. H. Haw-  thornthwaite, Socialist, accepted  the offer of nomination in the  coming by-election at Newcastle  caused by the resignation of  Parker-Williams.  Berlin Receives Reply  Amsterdam, Jan. 4. ��������� Allied  reply to the peace proposals of  the Central Powers has been  presented to the foreign office  by the Swiss minister.  < ���������>���������*  <    M  y<>4  xntm^Bi  i  We take this'opportunity of expressing our  hearty appreciation of  the loyal support ex- ~  tended to us by our readers and advertising patrons  during the past year.  The Courier looks' forward with optimism to the  future of Bella Coola, and trusts that each of you  may be generously benefitted by greater developments  and further business activities during the present year.  We thank you for the many evidences of your  friendship and extend to you all our cordial wishes for  London, Jan. 4.���������Many Canadians with the Imperial forces  have been awarded a military  cross.       ���������__   ���������The substitution system will  make nearly four million men  available. _________  The London Daily Mail has an  editorial condemning the Salonika expedition in defiance of military traditions.  Paris, Jan. 4.���������Artillery active  north and south of the Somme,  our troops took many prisoners.  Over half a million men have  been captured-by allied armies  during 1916.  During the two months having  elapsed since our last issue the  settlement of Bella Coola has  pursued its even and peaceful  ways. No noteworthy event has  taken place. Even though the  most stupendous tragedies are  taking place in the outside world  Bella Coola, hid away in the fastnesses of the mountainous regions of the uttermost portions  of the fwestern world, is as far  as material things are concerned  very little affected by the war.  In fact, we believe that people  here who fail to read the news  if such there be,  would not as  ings or experiences are concerned be aware that anything unusual was transpiring.  S. S. Camosun arrived on time  last Friday afternoon about five  o'clock, with a light load.  In the winter schedule which  went into operation Nov. 15, the  !S..S. Camosun also includes Bella  Bella, Surf Inlet and Swanson  Bay, in her calls in addition to  tne ports on the summer route.  CapT. Dickson, who for so  many years has been a familiar  figure on the Union S. S. Co.'s  appgNmfear  Bella- Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  ���������< >���������<  H    H  ���������O  steamers on the northern coast,  far as there.immediate surround-j has resigned his position as cap  tain of the Camosun and enlisted  for the war.  During his long service he has  come in contact with a large  number of people residing on the  coast and has by his courteous  manners, helpful ways and geniality made himself eminently  popular, and it is no exaggeration to state that he will be  missed " very much. Our best  wishes follow him in his new  career. .      Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Morrison  went away on Sunday to take up  their residence for a time, which  we hope will not be long, at  Ocean Falls.    v  Mr. Morrison has accepted a  position with the Pacific Mills  Ltd. in its survey service.  Mrs. Morrison, who for so long  a time has taken an active and  leading part in Sunday school,  church and benevolent work in  our midst, will be sadly missed.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Percy  Gadsden on December 24th, at  the hospital, a girl.  The mother and child are doing  Well.   We regret very much to learn  that Miss Ruth Nordschow is at  the hospital suffering from a  serious illness. We are glad to  know, however, that the crisis  seems to be past and that she is  slowly improving.  Our fellow-townsman Thor-  wald Jacobsen, who enlisted a  short time before Christmas, is  back again in Bella Coola in the  capacity of recruiting sergeant.  He is abroad at all times impressing upon young and old  their duty of enlisting.  Birger Brynildsen and Paul  Olsen have enlisted and will leave  for Vancouver on this week's  steamer.  The corporation of the Bella  Coola General Hospital holds its  annual meeting at the Colony  Hall, Hagensborg, next Tuesday.  The election of officers and  other business will be transacted.  The Farmers' Institute holds  its annual meeting at the'same  place next Monday.  Planning for next year's work-  should be one of the chief features of the meeting.  Many questions of great importance and vital to the welfare  of the settlers are awaiting discussion and intelligent handling  and should enlist the interest of  everyone who intends to stay in  Bella Coola. Everybody, men  and women, is earnestly urged  to attend.  National Service Week  Don't Delay in Filling Out Your Card  The first week of the year  which is the "National Service  Week" is now drawing to a close  and is a week in which everyone  in Canada has an interest. The  men are interested because it is  obligatory upon each of them,  between the ages of 16 andN 65  years, to fill out one of the cards  'for this purpose. The women  are interested because their cor  operation is being invited, in  seeing that their men-folk attend to this important duty. The  children are interested because  ���������their school teachers have explained to th'em the meaning of  National Service and the way in  which father and the big brothers at home have to reply to  the various questions.  To write in the answers and  return the card promptly is a  good New Year's resolution for  every man throughout the Dominion and it has the advantage of  beingeasy of fulfilment. Prompt  mailing of the answers is particularly desirable.  National Service means that  we are to get into that frame of  mind which will cause us to  think of the needs of the country,  to realize that the interests of  the State have a greater claim  on us than our self-interest.  This applies to everyone, from  the highest in the land down  to the lowest. The Prince  of Wales' motto "1 serve" may  well be the motto of every citizen of the British Empire at this  time.'  There are many ways of serv^  ing the nation besides going to  the front. The man on the farm  and the mechanic in the workshop may be serving the nation  as usefully as the man in the  trenches. Every man should be  doing the work which represents  his most efficient service to his  country.  The war is teaching us, or  should be teaching us, great  lessons. Terrible as are its effects, those who have faith in  Canadian manhood hope and believe that the nation will emerge  from this experience a stronger  and a better people.' If the meaning of National Service is thoroughly grasped and properly  understood, if the Government's  call for information is responded  to in the right spirit, this year  will lie the banner year in Canada's history.  i  Him  ;7:|iiiill  ���������.-'.���������>,>lfe'Jit.'ii'  :������������������'������������������-.��������� ^mM-1  ���������    ���������    ' , ������������������'.��������� - .>-l >;<y.k'U  :'/'.-y:^#i;  : #i;;  ~m  m  7������;$;.v  7.;*Ms  ���������%m  M  7'/;?/.  "���������i ���������*;:,.  mm  7r $'..  m  Mi  7fs:  ���������t*77  1:  t  ffl������ O'T'O '  ^A-^>    ���������...   '���������  ,. :..3^YV-.0''fc.A-'  ���������vsvn  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,  January 6,   19)7  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year  $1.00  6 Months    0.75  3 Months    0.50  United States  -1  Year....' $1.50  t  United Kingdom  1  Year $1.00  t \    ' ' Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,  Apply at  Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable an-  ' onymous communications will be published, the  ' name and address of rvery writer of such letters  ������������������ must be given to the editor.  ,' The Editor, reserves the riffht to refuse publication of any letter.    AH manuscript at writer's  risk. /  * j&almi iwpitlt jniprema est lex"  SATURDAY, JAN. 6, 1917.  " ' -A Happy New Year.  -\ After 'a rest of two months  the Courier again " resumes its  ���������visits /to the  subscribers.  .Re-  juvenated  and   invigorated, by  the Vacation*" which by-.the- staff  ..'hasbeen'spent in out:door work  the publisher hopes to be able to'  , -present a.paper which will prove  ' interesting and  helpful to the  readers. * .' -     ''  "'And'^in, meeting with you at  '-this particular season of the year  weUextehd to you-the compli-  "  merits of-the season in. a hearty  - greeting ;bf, a Happy-New Year.  ,L This may-not, under the prevalent .."distressing, conditions,   be  ���������  exactly"'-the, most. appropriate  ���������'- kind.of a greeting neither.does  ,������������������ it"  seem ^proper,.-that  any one  'shouldlbe quite"happy at this  - timevwheri there ;is somuchdis-  tress in the .world; but 'the greet-  ��������� ing'is accompanied with the hope  , that' the year which is now dawning may. bring about a happy  change, ,that peace may be de-  ��������� dared,, our boys, return- from  the battlefields and the vocations  of peaceful times be resumed.  And let us all in this year try  to so conduct ourselves that we  do our little share towards brings  ing happiness to others and thus  in the most effective way bring  happiness to ourselves. And may  we now and hereafter, more  than in the times past, take more  thought of the things^ unseen  and eternal.  It is our belief that despite unfavorable circumstances if this  be our earnest endeavor we shall  experience, a Happy New Year.  ooooo"  The Proffer of Peace.  The chief interest the last few  days has centred in Germany's  proffer of peace.  It seems that after more than  two years of warfare of the most  intense kind, for which she had  most carefully prepared herself  beforehand, and after ruthlessly  and wantonly having attacked  her smaller neighbors, Serbia  and Belgium, Germany has al! of  a sudden been seized with a high  regard for humanity and a great  concern for the protection of the  weaker nations. With these  laudable objects ostentatiously  in view she calls upon her enemies to enter into peace negotiations.  Her recent seemingly change  of heart' dbes not impress her  adversaries to any serious extent.   Eachand every one of her  several enemies have turned her  offers down with scorn. ������  It has been stated in pro-German papers circulating in Bella  Coola that Britain is conducting  this war with a view of exhausting her allies as well as Germany  in order that when the war is  over she will be the mistress of  both land and seas in the whole  world: and that her allies are  growing restive and are complaining that it is Britain's fault  that the war is not,brought to a  close. -.  ' That our pro-German friends  are,laboring under a false impression may be gathered from  the fact that Russia and France  preceded Britain in refusing to  agree to enteringinto any negotiations with the great criminal  of civilization. And Italy through  her jresponsible ministers, amid  the cheers of the representatives  of the nation, declared likewise  her refusal to be drawn into a  conference with her enemy.  . It' goes without" saying that  the desire for peace is strong in  all the.belligerent countries, but  having taken up the sword in a  righteous cause, namely, the  protection of the weaker nations  and in defense of ������he sanctity  of treaties, Britain and.her allies  will not lay down their arms ^until ' this great crime - against  humanity and civilization be  punished to such van extent that  it will never occur again.  , All the ^Entente Allies .are  agreed that lasting peace cannot  be" assured .'until Germany "has  been' brought to her knees. At  the beginning "of the war she  boldly and brazenly defended her  violation "of her . treaties, her  solemnly pledged word by stating .that they stood -'in the way  of her" ambitious desire for a  place in the sun, that her word  was of no consequence where  she deemed it necessary to violate  it to attain valuable objects; in  fact, that necessity knows no  law. That being the case she  must be brought to a condition  where her neighbors will be in a  position to compel her to abide  by her treaties, and we are sorry  to say she is not in such' a state  as yet, although the indications  that her recent.peace offers have  been prompted by a feeling that  she is getting into desperate  straits and that she will be able  to obtain better terms now than  at a later time.  iO  Hon, M. A. Macdonald, the  Attorney-General, has again  been vindicated. He had an  even harder contest to encounter  in the last by-election -than in  the two previous elections where  he in each instance received  over-whelming majorities. ,  In .this last-election where he  sought confirmation of his appointment as Attorney-General  in Hon. Mr. Brewster's cabinet,  he was opposed not'only by the  Bowser machine supporting an  opposition . candidate from the  Liberal party, but also by'such  friends and supporters of this  candidate from within his own  party. ' - %     _  .This vindication .was of "such a  substantial sizethatwe can feel  .reasonably confident that the  pre-election accusation of* Mac-  donald's connection with the  alleged plugging affair in������Vah-  couver-be forever set at rest. *  All 'indications go to prove that  the people of British Columbia  of all parties now that the election is over and its issues settled  for a long period, are well satisfied with the trend of affairs in administrative circles. There seems  to be no exception to the confidence felt in the ability and  honesty of the government now  in power. And. deserving of  and backed by this confidence  we predict,that the government  are that before -long'she will; bej wjh inaugurate a new; era in the  The Farmers' Institute.  Next Monday the locaj* Farmers' Institute will hold its annual  meeting.  We have of late been somewhat dissatisfied with the conduct of the affairs of the Institute, and indications are to the  effect that others share our  feelings.  And that being the case it is  feared that the interest of former years felt for it will not be  forthcoming; at this time and as  a consequence but few will attend. ���������  ;  It cannot be too strongly urged  upon the farmers of the valley  the importance of giving the  Institute their best and "most  careful consideration.  Itis the one organization which  should be a bond between the  farmers, uniting them in efforts  for the common good.  ��������� Situated as are the settlers in  this particular place far removed  from markets it is even more  necessary for them to co-operate  than for farmers living in closer  proximity to markets, and itis  now conceded on every hand that  in order to get the best results  from farming there must be cooperation.  - Therefore, turn out in large  numbers to"the meeting and let  there be-a revival of interest and  harmonious work.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER,  B. C.  .  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S  FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST"  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE    IN    B. C.1"  Send for Catalogue \ ( Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD, WANT MEN to ren.^r^  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in different parts "f  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest,-energetic men only are needed. We particular!v  \v.ant a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should write at once for our 80 page Catalogue.  Remember!  in time  just to remind you to take a look at your flour  sacks or flour bins and see if you are in need of  Wild Rose Pastry Flour  OR  Royal Standard Flour  WILD ROSE for   those Cakes, Pies   and  Pastries.  ROYAL STANDARD for making those  fine Loaves.  Note the. trademark on the sack���������the circle "V"  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  glad to accept peace on righteous  terms. ,        ,.  It is not unreasonable to infer  development of 4he resources of  our province and the administration of its affairs.  NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  The object of this space is to  introduce to you the man who always fights for the rights and  prosperity of the masses, irrespective of politics.  CANADA  Let the Tea Pot tell vou���������  GREAT   WEST  TEA  IS   BETTER  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers  Vancouver, B. C.  NATIONAL SERVICE  PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given under the authority of the "War Measures  Act, 1914," that during the. first week in January, 1917, an inventory will be made  by the Post Office Authorities, of every male between the ages of sixteen and sixty-  five, residing in Canada.  National Service Cards and addressed envelopes for their return to Ottawa  have been placed in the-hands of all Postmasters for distribution amongst the  persons required to fill in such cards. Every male person of the prescribed ages  is required to fill in and return a card enclosed in an envelope within ten days  of its receipt.  Any person \vho fails, to receive a card and envelope may obtain the same  upon application to the nearest Postmaster.  m  10Z  ) ��������� c  HOE  ]&  Ottawa, 15th December, 1916.  R. B. BENNETT,  Director General.  GOD SAVE THE KING.  NATIONAL SERVICE WEEK  1st to 7th JANUARY.  o  n  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      CamOSUll      Leaves   Vancouver  every  Tuesday at 9 p. m. (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p.m.  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, CaHrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  O  (  V.  30E  ) ��������� C  HOE  )   VJ  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  1  WW  I  m  m  I  Mil  ���������v, t 1 HRB   :  91     Saturday, January 6,   1917  BELLAj COOLA  COURIER  Simply a little rub with a cloth keeps the highly burnished cooking top always glistening, dustless clean, without blacking; in four pieces it cannot warp or bulge  fFCIar/s  otenay  tit  It won't be hard to decide what range you want in your  kitchen after I show you the Kootenay's special features.  Sold by B. Brynildsen & C  807  Peace Talk. '.able   surprise   and   indignation  President Wilson has issued a among intelligent people especi-  note to the belligerent countries j ally those of the Entente  asking them to state their terms j powers.  for peace or in other words ask-     His critics, which are a host,  ing them what they are fighting find it hard to understand that  for. | the head of one of the greatest  His note has caused.consider*land most enlightened people of  it  CLUB OFFER  ^  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier   .       ."���������      .       .    ' . $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50  $2.50  The Courier   ...  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .       $1.50  Both papers  for   .  .   $1.50  The Courier  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  .  1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.75  V  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  J>  X-sSavjC.  V  the world, should officially publish his ignorance of what these  nations are fighting for.  The president's profession that  "each side desires to make the  rights and privileges of weak  nations and small states as secure against aggression or denial  in the future as the rights and  privileges of, the great,and  powerful states now at war,"  is especially irritating. He seems  to forget it was Germany ^and  Austria's assault upon the weaker nations that brought on the  greatest war in history. That  Britain and Russia at least went  into the war for the purpose of  defending the weak whom they  had promised to protect.  While the president was dictating this extraordinary statement as to the common aims of  the warring nations, Germany  was still practising her inhuman  methods in the treatment of the  weak by deporting the Belgians  by the thousands from there  devastated country to work for  their conquerors .in a state of  slavery.   ,  At this writing we-have not  learned what Britain and her  Allies will say in reply to this, in  their estimate, insulting note,  but it has been suggested that it  should be on the same lines as  President Lincoln's reply to a  similar request from France during-the Civil War, namely, that  the war will end with the overthrow of those who began it and  the- principles for' which the  Union was making its heavy  sacrifices had been vindicated.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  /~'OAL MINING EIGHTS of the Dominion, in  *" Manitoba, Sasjcatciikwan and Alberta,  the Yukon Tekiutokv. the North-west Terki-  I tories and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one yearn at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,5fX) acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the A^ent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.   ~  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if-the rinhta  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of, five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco"ntinjf for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only., but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N1. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  JOE  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the'highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  0 K 'QJ >\  DISTBICT   OP   COAST���������BANGE   IU.  Take .Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver. B.'C, occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land: ,  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  (3ne-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated. November 30, 1916. Jan. 6-March  Dealers and Trappers  GET  THE  HIGHEST  PRICE   FOR  YOUR  FURS/������>  <s>\  at the  P. O. Box  Qpy    157 McDougall  <vX Ave'  ^y/ EDMONTON, Alta.  We pay all express and  mail charges.  <Q) 111111111 <M  M0>  MM  MM  <0  A SOLDIER'S FUNERAL.  A descriptive series by our soldier correspondent, Jlrchie *D.  ^Darlington, late of Shushartie Bay, B. C.  0>.  Standing alone and still in the  darkness outside the sleeping  camp I was rather a dreamy  sentinel and not so keenly alert  as the regulations demand.  It is surprising how fanciful  one can become between the hour  of 1 a. m. and daylight. When  everything is so quiet and one  can see just ten yards���������no more  ���������into the blackness, and no  human voice, only the sound of  the wind in the bushes breaks  the stillness of the night, then  one remembers old���������sometimes  sad���������songs, and the old friends  of years; and one's thoughts  travel backwards, likely to linger on the places which association endears. Either that, or  we build lofty castles of fantastic architecture and unstable  construction, which, with foundations as flimsy as the gaseous  ether, come crashing to the  ground in the soft light of dawn;  and the notes of "reveille!"  echoing from camp to camp  along the line of coast, bring  the mind with an uncomfortable  jerk to the more concrete present; even as, resounding through  horse lines and barrack square  and in the straight lanes between the canvas tents, they  call the sleeping soldiers to duty.  My thoughts were of an unknown comrade who, the day  before, had been laid in the little  cemetry below Garrison Church.  If you could see Garrison  Church you would appreciate its  lovely situation. It is an outpost  of Shorncliffe garrison, stands  prominent among many outstanding landmarks, and looks  over dark-green, heatherclad  slopes, at the sea. The "Rest  Camp" or cemetry, nearly surrounds it, and it is full of soldiers graves ��������� soldiers of all  ranks who have "crossed over"  in the past fifty years. To this,  atthepresent day, there is asort  of annex, a square at the bottom  of a little valley. The turf here  is greener than on the older  ground, and also there are two  or three rows of white crosses  marking where "Canadian soldiers  lie. The men who lie here have  answered the call of the guns,  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  1 helvlason cr FiischPiano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to stale with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  ^jT  Let us attend   your Victor Record  jJ   mail orders���������our service is intelligent     v  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  \7L/HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \)L/HAT person so independent?  ^li/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are independent',  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  ���������"THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1-50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  ���������If.  :'fc  7ft m  I     1  i  BELLA COOLA  COURIER  an  30E  D      D  scribe  for the  a  ���������      99  ier  ONE DOLLAR  FOH ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert."  A distance of six hundred miles,  It will be to your interest thf-:\eep "well informed7 regarding the  happenings throughout  tht Northern section of  this Province���������   -  THE "COURIER"  ���������   GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS  Now is the time to keep,  your...name before the  public.: -No manufacturer or wholesalehbuse can  afford ;to let.slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The. North-West  Coast of British' Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by-reading the "Courier."  A SOLDIER'S FUNERAL���������Continued  and are worthy of all the deep  respect posterity can'give them.  And here, with the solemn pomp  attending a soldier's last-journey,  a comrade of the ���������th Battalion  was laid to rest.  The afternoon was hot and the  sun glared from a sky of clear  azure. Further down the hill  the engineers were throwing  grenades. In a distant rise the  helios flashed, and from the clear  arc above came the hum of an  aeroplane in swift flight towards  the sea.'  The music was, at first, faint  upon -the air, soft and beautiful  from afar, but grim enough in'  its .meaning to those of us who  stood there waiting and guessed  .perhaps a mother's agony or a  wife's despair. The sound gradually-grew in volume, the slow,  majestic cadence of the "Dead  March" in Saul, speaking of  eternity; an army child believes  that it arouses sleeping ranks oi  soldiers bivouacked on the other  side of Jordan, who rise to conduct a new comrade to his quar-  ters. The air engenders pagan  beliefs ! It grows yet louder,  and the voices of the sappers and  the hslio-signallers becom.e  .hushed.- At last-all sounds are  lost in the music as the' slow-  moving procession draws',near  the church. There-was a tense  and thrilling moment when the  firing squad-and .small cortege  passed; and stiff salutes as the  gun-carriage bearing the flag-  draped coffin came abreast: that  is the order, you must pay the  same'compliment to a dead private soldier as "you would to the  king!     . '      ���������:  A khaki-clad padre; read' the  service! then at "its- conclusion  came three sharp,, punctuated  order, "ready!" "present!" and  "fire!" again, after a paused Yet  again for the .third-.time. . And  tlie crack of the volleys echoed  clownthe valley. Then a momen-  tary.stillness, broken by a simultaneous- click of spurs and iron-  shod heels as the sweet notes  of the "Last Post", the soldiers  requiem, sounded.  Another lad had commenced  his journey through limitless  eternity and we left the cold clay  for Mother Nature to do with as  she would.  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right.  i-^ ���������, |  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  ���������The Coffee of Distinction  because   of   i t s   exquisite  flavor  Packed in our new hygienic  AIR-TIGHT TIN  '-���������-������������������'��������� ~- ���������������������������  The W. H. Malkin Company, Ltd,  VANCOUVER^ B.C. ;  ������  usHB  *'.  ' 1 . *  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  B.Brynildsen&G  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  Will You Help?  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  x*. TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your Community.  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  O     C  HOE  )     O  r"THE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Burns;  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  QgilvieY  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������     ������  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospedtors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the moft suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  p. burns & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioncr* -  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  ���������t  -*      IPS  t'i  '���������4  V-  i  &  A

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