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Bella Coola Courier 1917-01-13

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 ft*  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR DECEMBER  Compiled by Mr. C. H. UrSeth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 30.   Minimum. 23.  Highest Max. (16th) 10. Lowest Min. (25th)-7  above zero.   Rainfall, 2.27. Snow21.25in.  Rainfall for the year (1916)' 40.89 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 5  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  ��������� t  Russians Gain Ground  on the Riga Front  London, Jan. 10.���������The Russian  thrust on the Riga,front has assumed importance, the offensive  is being continued today. The  Russians have already gained  considerable ground from the  Germans and according to late  reports the offensive is apparently proceeding1. Extraordinary  violent fighting along the, reaches of the A. A. river is in progress, most bitter fighting is being witnessed. Russians have  made distinct advances in this  sector, heavy artillery firing is  in progress along this line.        <  Germans Unsuccessful  Paris, Jan. 10���������An unsuccess-  filfattempt by the Germans to  , raid a French trench north,of  Ribecourt was the only incident  of note, elsewhere on the front  everything was calm.  Daylight Raid, But no  Enemy to Be Seen  London, Jan. 10.���������A daylight  raid by British troops on German positions south of Arras, the  troop3 went as far as the third  line, but no Germans were in  sight.  Sydney, Jan. 16. ���������The total  military cost to New Zealand of  the military occupation of Samoa  ���������to the end of November, 1916,  will be about $1,460,000."'  No arrangements have been  arrived at as yet between Premier Hughes and the Liberals  regarding election.  Madrid, Jan. 10.���������The Spanish  cabinet has resigned.  Ultimatum to Greece  Macedonia Question Crops Up  London, Jan. 10���������Greek situation approached another climax  today. Allied conference at  Rome formulated and despatched a note to Greece equivalent to  an ultimatum demanding compliance with the Allies previous  request for disarmament and  neutrality within, 48 hours.  u Macedonia question is again  uppermost in the public mind.  Fresh controversy involving the  disposition of Gen. SarraiPs men  and future integrity of Allies,  not only in the Balkans but along  other fronts, will have a direct'  and important bearing on the  early settlement of hostilities.  The old conflict between groups  of easterners and westerners  broke forth again. and a great  battle is being fought out.   ���������  Entente's reply to- Wilson's  peace note is expected to reach  Washington tomorrow.  "Austrians abandon hope of  of peace negotiations and discuss  calmly the continuance of war/  S. S. Camosun, in charge of  Capt. Brown, docked here Friday  afternoon and after taking the  mail and a number of passengers  on board proceeded on her way  south.    ' ���������    -  Mr. Chas. Cameron, teacher of  the Lower Bella School, arrived  to take up his duties after spending his vacation in Vancouver.  Winnipeg, Jan. 10.���������Forty-five  returned soldiers arrived here-to  day en route to the Pacific coast.  Victoria, Jan. 10.���������G. H. Dawson, surveyor-general for British  Columbia, has resigned.  Public Reception Given to  Hon. T. D. Pattullo  A public reception was tendered by the people of Prince  Rupert to the Hon. T. D. Pattullo, minister of lands, on the  occasion of his leaving for the  capital city. The gathering was  nonpolitical, but for the purpose  of saying au revoire to the new  minister and his family who are  leaving the northern city to take  up their residence in Victoria.  Militarism in France it a Neceitary Evil  Prof. Mack Eastman declares  that "today the influence of democracy is greater in France  than ever." France fhas been  External ly militarj|ti^.;: exempt-  ing only 16 per cenCof^ner population in peace times; while Germany with her large population,  could afford tb exempt 44 per  cent. France, however, was not  militaristic in soul, but had ac-  "cepted it as a necessary evil.  Cunard Liner Rammed  New York, Jan. 10.���������Cunard  liner Laconia, was rammed" by a  small mail boat prior to sailing  and was damaged to such an extent that the vessel ,was compelled to abandon the trip.  Serious charges have been made  against the Hearst news service  by the Associated Press. The  latter claim that the Hearst service has been stealing and selling its foreign news.  Chicago, Jan. 10.���������The chief,  a lieutenant and a sergeant, with  other officials in the police force,  have been arrested on charges  characterized as a filthy combination of crooks and police in conspiracy.      Denver, Jan. 10.���������Col. Cody,  famous the world over asv "Buffalo Bill," is in a critical condition and sinking fast.  '  Thorwald Jacobsen and Paul  Olsen left by the last boat to  start military training. Our best  wishes go.with them. V  " Fur buyer���������Le,Trace came down  from Prince Rupert last week,  and after cleaning up the town  of everything in the fur line left  on Monday for Ocean Falls and  the north: In the collection  made here by Mr. Le Trace were  a number of silver and cross  foxes, that are. so much in the  fashion at present.' This may  account for the ladies of the Republic to the south of us intending to spend so' many million  dollars in providing themselves  with furs. ,;    '  -- ��������� ���������������������������   i  Samuel Colborne took passage  on" the "sbuth'bound" steamer'"for  Vancouver last week'and will be  away for the besf'part of .the  winter' before returning ;'to his  ranch in the Saloomt valley.  A number of, neighbors and  and friends called, at the home  of Mr. and Mrs. B. Brynildsen  on Friday last to- say good-bye  to their son, Birger M., who has  enlisted in the 223rd Battalion,  He left for Vancouver that evening on the Camosun, where he  will be stationed for some time  before going on to Winnipeg.  Bella Coola General Hospital.  The annual meeting in connection with the above institution  was held in the Colony Hall on  Tuesday, January 9. In spite of  the inclemency of the weather  there was a good attendance.  ��������� The president, A. C. Christenson, in presenting his report for  the year gave a brief outline of  the work done, referring especially to the completion of the installation of the water system,  which, as now installed, he be  lieved  would prove a complete  success.  Considerable repairs to buildings had been found necessary  during the year, also some furniture had been purchased for the  use of the nurse in her quarters.  A new linen closet had been.built  for the hospital but, he regretted  to say, the linen supply had become sadly depleted. The president pointed out ,to the meeting  the urgent need of funds for this  and other necessary equipment  for the institution.  ���������( The services of a capable nurse  had been secured and,he felt that  the people had been very fortunate in securing Miss Bengtson  to fill this position.   ''  ���������He considered that the hospital had done well during the past  year, for which the medical-superintendent/ Dr. Eva Sutherland, should be specially thanked.  The president in closing his  address thanked the people of  the valley for their kindly, cooperation and support during his  term of .office and concluded by  wishing them a Happy and Prosperous New Year. '  ,-^'C. Carlson expressed the appreciation of the members of the  Hospital Association of the work  done during the year and suggested-that subscription lists be  circulated at once to raise funds  for the purchase of the necessary equipment for the hospital.  A vote of thanks was accorded  the outgoing board" who, individually, suitably responded.  r U I  Rev. H. Sageng also addressed  the meeting. He offered his services in canvassing the valley  for the hospital.  The election of officers for the'  year was then proceeded' with.  The following gentlemen being  elected by acclamation: President, A. C. Christenson; secretary, Chas. Tucker; Wm. Sutherland was elected third member  of the board and R. N. Livelton  the fourth member.  The secretary was' then instructed to circulate subscription  lists for funds for the hospital,  after which the meeting closed  in the usual manner. -  The financial statement for  1916 will be published in' our  next issue.  Annual Meeting of Farmers' Institute  The annual meeting of the local  Farmers' Institute was held at  the Colony Hall on Monday last'.  At two o'clock the-president,  T. P. Saugstad, called the meeting to order. After the minutes  of the last annual meeting had  been read and adopted the president stated that because of lack  of time he had no written report  to present and as their had been  practically no work done during  the last year there was very little  to .report. He stated that the  method of election had .been  changed by the new rules laid  down by the government. Hereafter the election of president,  vice-president and sec.-treasurer  will be done by the executive  board from their own members.  The .Farmers' Institute would  just elect eight directors.  The secretary reported that  the Live-Stock Association organized a couple of, years ago  had been dissolved, that in fact  it had met a natural death because the members failed to attend the*' meetings. He then  spoke about the necessity of  building silos and the purchase  of ensilage cutters, the need of  getting their produce to market  and that to accomplish these  things there was' heed of cooperation.  He also announced that the  government had decided that on  account of the financial stringency no Centra] Farmers' Conference would be held this year,  but that an advisory board had  been formed which would pre:  sent the needs of the farmers  to the government.  The election of eight directors  was then proceeded with. O. S.  Urseth and H. Schulstad were  appointed tellers and the election  resulted as follows: John Wid-  sten, J. Jorgenson, A. Hammer,  P. Lauretson, Ole Nygaa'rd, 0.  J. Lokken, A. K. Oveson and H.  O. Hanson.  son proved that the housing of a  large salmon pack was quite a  problem, this will be overcome  by remodelling some of the old  buildings.   The new residence of Reginald  Hill is now nearing it's completion and the owner with his  family expects to move into it  shortly.  "The quietness of the year is  being taken advantage'of to do  some needed repairs to the hospital buildings by the management. Mr. O. Schulstad is carrying out the work.  " Latest report from Ocean Falls  is to the effect that work on the  big paper plant is going on with  all speed possible to be put into  the construction and the finishing,  oil' ready for an early commence;-  ment to manufacture paper. \At  the commencement of iasl year  it was thought that the mills,  would be ready by this time, but  the scarcity of labor during the  oast twelve months has had a  great deal to do' with tha slowness in the construction woik  and it is likely that it will take  the better part of this year be-  fore the plant will be in actual  operation. '  ��������� The.Namu saw-mills are now  in operation and "a great deal of  lumber is being got ready for  two new canneries to be built in  ;he Rivers Inlet district. The  new canneries are ������to be ready  for the canning season which  opens the latter part of June.  w,.'V.^:.fa;v:  Chas. Hendricks, who has  spent the Christmas holidays in  town left for the logging camp  on Dean Channel this week.  James Larson has also returned to the camp after a visit to  his parents in Washington. The  work at the camp is now in full  swing. ^  The   Indian   village   is  now  practically   deserted   and   the  natives are either out trapping"  or else logging.   This is the old  habit of poor Loo that when the  New Year festivities have come  :   ���������  and gone he starts out in pursuit '"S^  of a living, and this he finds in  abundance along this coast either in meat or fish.  One of the British "Tanks" in action. The drawing is from an actual photograph of  the travelling armored land forts that have been .so effective for the British on the  Spmme front. The caterpillar wheels and the moveable guide wheels permit the tank  to cross trenches and shell craters, crush wire entanglements, etc. Large toothed  wheels, covered with armor (a section of the wheel is shown in the inset) operate the  continuous track,  The weatherduring the festive  season was not of the best and  has continued, to be on the wet  side for the most part of the  New Year so far. A certain  amount of snow fell during last  week, but the heavy rain of the  last few days has caused the  snow to disappear and the much  wished for good-sleighing has  passed with it. The local sawmills are largely dependent on  snow roads to haul their supply  of logs to the mills. They are  hoping for another fall of snow  and the consequent good sleigh-  ingf ______''.       '._���������  ���������''  The Johnson saw-mill is now  busy getting put some boat lumber for the local cannery.. Quite  a few boats will be built this  year at the local plant to replace  old ones. A certain number of  boats are discarded every year.  There is also some talk of, making alterations to the cannery  buildings and also additions to  be made to same.   The past sea-  The Provincial Legislature will  meet at Victoria on the 22nd of  Fe bruary.   Want Road Opened Up.���������When  Hon. Dr. King, minister of public works, was on his way from  home to the capital, following  his re-elettion, he was .interviewed at Revelstoke by the  board of trade in regard to opening up a road to the Big Bend  district. The minister pointed  out that in the building of roads  a definite plan must be laid out  and followed, so that the great:  est efficiency and most service  could be obtained for the amount  expended.  This will give anyone an idea  that road work will be undertaken and carried out differently  in the future than in the past.  There will be a slim chance in  finding a road boss with a fat  cheque book travelling about the  country giving out cheques prOrf  miscuously both for work done  and some that never was done.  Sunday' School  Church Service  -    10:45 a.m.  -   7:30 p.m.  I.  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W. H. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  J&V:":  Sh  ���������*>"* (p.  BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, January 13, J9i 7J  S  HPl        (~^ ' [seemingly must ere long use the  1 IlC   V^OUriCl compelling-power of law to be  l>uBusHKDWEEKLYATL5Ki,i.ACooLABvlable to fulfill its promise.   And  it is preparing for thennevilable  is indicated by last week's dispatches relating that Premier  Horde in an informal address at  Ottawa to returned soldiers intimated "that more drastic  measures will be taken in mobilizing the man power of the  country for the successful prosecution of the war."  " Therefore we may expect conscription in force before long.  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1  Year $1.00  6 Month.       0.75  3 Monthi   0.50  United Stale*  1  Year $1.50  United Kingdom  1  Year $1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please jiotify the management.  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,   Apply at  Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable anonymous communications will bu published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be given to the editor.  The Editor reserves the riirht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  "Saliia jutpnli luturfiua rat kx."  SATURDAY, JAN. 13, 1917.  More Stringent Measures.  As the war progresses in its  grim path of death and devastation, the seriousness of successfully grappling with'it becomes  more and more impressive. The  most stringent measures in the  control'of food and other necessaries, and the prohibition of  luxuries have for a long period  been enforced among the Teutonic Allies.   The, Entente powers  prohibition is gaining in strength  steadily and as the forceful premier is a strong believer in it,  it is safe to say the liquor dealers will hear something drop before long.  Let Us Hear From  You.  Wo have for a long time been  under the impression that the  people of this community, do not  realize the value of a local paper.  It brings to its subscribers the  happenings of the settlement  and they in our case are not of  much importance and may be  classed as'only so much gossip.  But strange to relate it is the  local news columns that the  average reader first turns to,  and in many instances the only  part which he finds of sufficient  interest to read at all.  Any articles dealing with matters relating to the development  of the valley or to its welfare-irv  in other respects receives scant  notice, very little comment and  never any action.  The Courier has, in the year  Let us at thebeginningof this c On the heels of Germany's  New Year resolve that in the proposal for a peace conference  future to cultivate a higher re- come stories from different quar-  gard for our neighors, display a ters.of the distress for lack of  greater willingness to discuss food' obtaining in the Teutonic  our ideas together and yield to States. It is also stated authori-  the opinions of the majority and tatively that the knowledge of  ever become necessary for them  to go to the same lengths in these  matters as their enemies.  ��������� Bat the third winter finds them  confronted with an enemy overrunning the country of Rouma-  nania, their latest ally, signifying a strength which is far from  being crushed as yet; and at the .probacy ab0ve the average, it  same time a scarcity of foodstuffs- in the markets of the  world, which has made it necessary for Britain even to regulate the quantity and quality of  the people's food.  Britain's dominions beyond the  i;eas have not found it encuiri-  bent upon them to adopt similar  measures, hoping that they be  ing so far removed from the seat-iack of faith in their ability, to  of war would not be forced to do ^^ together: they know from  so.    And let us trust that their  hopes in  this respect may  be  realized.  But in one respect Canada  must, before long, follow the  example of her Allies in Europe;  she will not be able to furnish  her quota of soldiers under the  present system and must therefore adopt conscription.  The Western provinces have  responded nobly to the call for  Volunteers and sent forth their  sons in excess of the number allotted ,to them, but the Eastern  provinces are so far behind that  the Dominion finds itself 130,000  men short of the 500,000 promised  Britain by Premier Borden.  Under the present direful circumstances this promise must be  kept and the men furnished.f  Different methods have been  suggested and adopted .-to'deal  with the situation, but they all  fall short 'of accomplishing the  object sought for.  Apolitical party in power intending to seek the" endorsement  of the electorate before long is  naturally reluctant, to advocate  and adopt stringent measures,  but honor goes before expediency;   the   Borden government  entertain less fear of evil results  from joint efforts.  There are.,-Ave must believe,  many ideas abro'^'among our  people, the discussion of which  may bring good results; why not  use the local paper as a medium  to.ventilate and discuss them?  The Courier will be glad to publish communications from our  people and give opportunity for  the discussion of different and  differing ideas in its columns.  Let the lethargy now so evident become a thing of the past,  lcl the life currents run strong  and above all let "brotherly love  continue" and then we know  that co-operation will be one of  results achieved, and Bella Coola  Coola as a home for a contented  and prosperous people'be a reality apparent to all beholders.  o     o   o    o    o  Prohibition in Britain.  It is not unreasonable to believe the gigantic convulsions of  the world will bring forth  changes of the greatest importance and benefit to mankind.  The aims of. the Allies in this  struggle have been stated so  often that it should not be necessary to repeat them, but it .is  enough *to say that if they''are  successful there-is every reason  to believe that militarism and  wars .of any magnitude will be  things of the- past. ��������� Another  great reform which this war will  bring about will be thedescruc  tion of the liquortraffic.  Not only most of the belliger  erit countries but also the neu^..  trals have in the last years enacted prohibition   or  stringent  measures, curtailing the traffic.  One of the most conservative in  this reform has been staid 'old  Britain; but the exigencies of the  experience   the   multitude  of'war is also bringing her  to a  ideas, the difficulty.of harmoniz-'realization of the danger of this  them into one concrete whole, .domesticevil and latest devolop-  the obstinacy displayed  by too ments show that before long she  many in even trivial, unimport-. will also line herself "with those  ant matters and the general lack who declare war upon the traffic,  of the spirit of co-operation.        I    Public sentiment in favor, of  on the other hand, in their free just dosed, discussed many mat-  access to the markets of the ters which it deems of great im-  world did not believe it would |p0rtance to the life of the settlement, but rack our brains as we  may we cannot,call to mind one  topic or subject that in our'hear-  ing has ever received a passing  comment. ���������       ���������,-."���������  When we look upon the intelligent faces of- our people and  know   that  their   education   is  is, hard to explain this utter  deadness to matters of a public  nature in the communal interests.  It cannot be that they do not  see the need of work along some  of the lines indicated at' least,  because that must be patent to  any person of brains. Let us  suggest it is probably due to a  this fact has strengthened the  determination of the Allies to  fight until the object for which  they so reluctantly took up arms  have been obtained.  It may not seem according to  the spirit of'Christianity to welcome the news of distress even  among our enemies; but when  we take into consideration the  fact that such a condition will  hasten will hasten the day when  peace upon just and righteous  principles be secured, then with'  that^great object in view every  christian should hail with gladness every indication that ensures the coming of that longed  for time.  - Last week the Courier published two dispatches,stating o'f the  suffering for lack of -food in  German States, and they are  corroborated by the news columns of the! papers received in  the last mail.  A dispatch to the London Daily  (Continued on next'page.)  S. M. NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is- a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding. ' i  The object of this space" is to  introduce to you the man who'always, fights for the rights and  prosperity of the masses, irrespective of politics.  itffniYi,f*f antfirmmrnrrMHOw^ittfcri-Eaffri ,������������fth~i������i'Mi,iMMBmir*^ii������TWTfa'r7iflinftfm"]ii' ���������w-riJ..-r/������n-jamM  ...^wcw-flTrrf^f. ^^������ ������^-*~-  $tor������  THOSE WHO,   FROM  TIME TO TIME,  HAVE  FUNDS  REQUIRING  INVESTMENT,   MAY  PURCHASE AT  PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  t  IN  SUMS OF $500  OR  ANY  MULTIPLE  THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919. i  Interest payable hall-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free  of exchange at any chartered Bank- in Canada) at the rate of five per cent  per annum from the date of purchase.  Holders- of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and  accrued interest, as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment  made under any future war loan issue in  Canada other than an issue of  Treasury Bills or other like short, date security,  f Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.  A commission of one-quarter of one per cent will be allowed to recognized bond and stock brokers on allotments made in respect of applications  for this stdck which bear their stamp:'-  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA. ���������  OCTOBER 7th,  1916.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF, "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE   IN    B. C.  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  THE BRITISH-COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN to renresent  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in different irta of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery, stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasantand remunerative. Honest, energetic men only are,needed. We particularly  want a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should write at once for our 80 page Catalogue.  OEST  ���������^J%\  ; ROYAL STANDARD  Start the New  Year Right  on the Flour Question!   .  Wild Rose Pastry Flour  0 and  Royal Standard Flour  Will give you entire satisfaction the year round.  i< Milled 'under conditions of 'absolute  purity, in one of the most modern, sanitary  mills in the world, they represent flour  perfection., "   ,  ���������  _ Tested daily under actual baking conditions in our own ovens. These flours  are never allowed to vary their purity  and quality. , .  ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR for bread,  buns arid biscuits���������WILD ROSE PASTRY  FLOUR for cakes, pies, pastries, etc.  Your dealer will recommend them.  GREAT   WE  TEA  The New Tea with the old-time flavor  PACKETS   ONLY  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  M  30C  3 ��������� C  3on  ]&  II  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  5. S.     LcUHOStin      Leaves  Vancouver every  Tuesday at 9 p. m. (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p.m.  S. S. "C6quitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head.Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., .Victoria.  HOE  30C  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  tnnwKmus.il JSiasnnswMMiMBVB r  Saturday, January 13,   1917  BELLA COOLA COURIER  Simply a little rub with a cloth keeps the highly burnished cooking top always glistening, dustless clean, without blacking; in four pieces it cannot warp or bulge.  It won't be hard to decide what range you want in your  kitchen after I show you the Kootenay's special features.  Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  837  Tv  Telegraph   from   Paris,   dated  December 28, says:  "J have private information  indirectly from Germany. A  friend o,f mine, the head of an  important Paris business firm,'  had a partner who is Swiss. The  latter has just visited Germany  and returned to Paris.    He is a  0  level-headed business' man and  says positively that Germany can  scarcely hold out more than six-  months longer. The shortage of  food is^much more serious than,  has ever been said.  "It is true that the entire population- has long since been un-  itble to Jbat" lis fill. He himself  sa\V many persons in various  German towns actually fall down  in the streets exhausted by hunger, ���������'"and in one case at least, a  man dropped dead from starvation in the road before his eyes.  Such sights apparently are now  not uncommon in Germany.  1 j '   o      O      O     o      o  Commerce Protectors.  vVhen we read of the havoc  upon shipping caused by the  German submarines, we are apt  to fee! an uneasiness that this is  a 'form of warfare the British  seapower is not competent to  .deal with." 'But this silent watch  dog on the deep is ever alert and  also resourceful.  The development of new tactics by the enemy only stimulates the activity of invention of  our protectors and in due course  a remedy is found "by which ,the  f  enemy's move is met and minimized if not utterly nullified.  'Just now the statement is  forthcoming by way of New York  from a reliable source, that there  is now in service an allied fleet  of heavily armed "commerce  protectors," of a new type, which  statement bears out stories thai  skippersof the Atlanticand coastwise steamers have been bringing to port of strange appearing  craft that are making their way  westward. These ships made no  reply to signals and could not be  approached. ��������� They steered a  vagrant course and w.ere described variously as of merchantmen, transports, light cruisers  Major-general Jan C. Smutz,  who has been promoted for  ���������>   his generalship in East   ' ,  Africa.  rines, and in anticipation of attempted raids similar to that  made by the U-63 off Nantucket  on Oct. 8. The British admiralty, it is said, determined to make  impossible another such raid and  the fleet of commerce protectors  was the result.      '      '*  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  fOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  v* Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Albekta.  the Yukon Territory, the Nokth-west Tehki-  tories and in a portion of the Province of  IJBITIRM Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of'tlan  acre. Not more than 2,500 acres will be leased  1 \o one applicant.  Application for a lease must be mode by the  applicant in .person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rijrlits applied for  are situated.  In surveyed teriitory the land must be described by sections, or IcRal subdivisions of sections, and in unaurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself. .  Each application must be accompanied by a ���������  fee of th which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. Tf the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such leturns should be  furnished ut least once a year,.  The lease will include the coal milling rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  mode (o the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of LVimmioii Lands.  W. W. COKY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. II,��������� Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  ������ H  nor:  m  Fur Sales Agency  and even of submarines.-  it  Pieced together, these reports  fitted in with the suspicions, now  apparently confirmed of shipping  men that the-commerce protectors are described as large and  powerful, and capable of fair  speed. They ,were designed, it  is said, to meet German subma-  r  CLUB OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  sn that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  sub~sfcaiftially reduced rates.  ^  The Courier -.   '  .     -\       .       , $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg , 1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for  .   .   $1.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   . .   $1.50  The Courier   .   ���������   .  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  . i.oo  $2.00  Both papers,  for  .  .   $1.75  ^  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  J>  To Drain Zuder Zee.  It looks as if the world is to  have one sea less. The Dutch  government propose to drain the  Zuyder Zee and to shut it off by  a dyke running from the North  Holland coa'st to the Frisian  coast.      ���������   ���������  The sea which is very shallow,  and 70 miles long and from 10 to  45 miles broad, was in the time  of the Romans covered with  forestsand was a royal hunting  ground.  In 1170 came the great flood  known in Dutch history as' the  '.'All Saint's .Day Flood,',' The  sea swept over the land1 covered  the forests, engulfed towns and  cities, and drowned thousands of  people. More floods followed in  1237 and 1250, and by 1410 the  Zuder Zee had assumed practically its present proportions.  When the sea is drained one of  the show places 'of Holland will  disappear in the Island of Mark-  en. The fisher folk here all wear  the old national costume.     ,  Most of the houses are"constructed from the timber of old  boats, and many are built on  old piers; the floors of the houses  being 10 to 15 feet off. the ground.  The work of draining the Zuder  Zee will take 15 years, at an inclusive cost of about $45,000,000.  ,600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our,commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  Dealers and Trappers  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  &���������'..  Notes on Manure.  The more manure that can be  made this winter and the-better  it is handled the larger the crops  of 1917 be, for whether the season be favorable or unfavorable  a soil well supplied with plant  food and organic matter will be  more productive than one poor  in these important constituents.  We may go further and say;that  the crops on a soil so enriched  are better able to withstand periods of drought, for the soil's  absorptive capacity for moisture  is thereby increased and there is  present within reach of the ieed-  [ng r6bts-rrt6'{sture and an abundance of available nourishment  for the crop's use once the  weather conditions turn favor-  sble. To a certain extent, therefore, manure make the farmer  independent of the vagaries of  the season., :  Over the larger part, of Cana-1  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BANGE  III.  Take' Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20 chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the. point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less. a  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30, 1916. Jan. 6-March  da the cattle and live stock generally are housed in the. winter,  and thus it is that during this  season the large proportion of  manure requiring care and special handling is produced. In the  summer the larger part of the  manure is naturally distributed  over the pastures���������unless, as on  a few dairy farms, the cows are  stabled and "soiling'' crops used.  The winter's manure, therefore,  is a very important asset and its  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  32������^S  I heMason <jr rxischriano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege io stale with authority:  "NO  FINER  PIANO MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  ^JJ Let us attend your Victor Record  J������ mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  r^.  DElLWjIIlIi  \3i/HAT .person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \A/HAT person so independent?  vS/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  ������.*  ���������/'  A-        "' ~  *"V.  ���������>>  ""^v,^.  nTflE REASONS for this, enviable condi-  ���������*������������������   tion of affairs  are ��������� obvious to  anyone  ��������� who knows the Veil a Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make ���������for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  *������sp,  '���������^aEaw  -"S  OELLA COOLA and the. surrounding  s^ country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER;  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year ..... .........  Six Months .. ..........  Three Months ........ ���������..  f      UNITED STATES.  One Year......... :'.....  .$1.00  . 0.75  . 0.50  $1.50.  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year.  .$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, 13. C.  Enclosed.please find..........!.  for Bella Coola Courier for..........  '' '*'. s *  . subscription  Hame............................  f  ',���������'.������������������'������������������   .;':.'      P." O.V-.;.:.;.,....... ....;....  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed ���������' *  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,   January 13,  t9\7  mm  hoc  owner  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper publishecLon  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert. ,  A distance of six hundred miles.  // will be to your interest to keeP Well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings. r  REAL ESTA^IGo^s in the   .....^Srj&s^ffave come and gone.  / "' People are beginning to^fiock to  .the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  - should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  NOTES ON MANURE���������Continued.  care and handling matters worthy of our closest attention.  Three features connected with  the production, care and application may be commented on.  First. The waste of manure in  tlic liani through leaky and imperfect flooring and gutters. As  regards nitrogen and potash, the  fluid part of the excreta is far  more valuable than ��������� the solid,  both as regards quantity and  availability for crop use. Thousands of dollars worth of this  moist valuable plant food that  ought to be in the soils of our  fields, saturate the ground beneath cow barns, due to bad  flooring and the want of watertight gutters. Modern bams  provide against this loss by the  use of concrete.  Secondly.���������Use a sufficiency of  absorbent litter, not only to keep  the cattle dry and comfortable,  but also to take up and hold all  the liquid portion of the manure.  If the supply of straw is limited  it will repay to cut it, for by so  doing its absorptive capacity will  be increased three-fold.* Peat  moss from the surface of peat  bogs makes an excellent litter of  high absorptive capacity.' Air-  dried swamp muck is also" a valuable absorbent, besides adding  much organic matter and plant  food to the manure; a shovelful  placed in'the gutter behind each  cow, in the morning will serve.to  take up the liquid and greatly  facilitate the work'of cleaning  the stable. ���������  Thirdly.- As to the disposition  of the manure in the winter,"  don't leave it loose in the yard  to waste by leaching, drainage  'and excessive fermentation. ��������� It  | cannot be put  in the soil���������its  ���������safest'and best storage���������but if  the land is not rolling and subject to suface,wash it may be  drawn out and put on the land.  if'"'lhe land is  so (wet'that it  would be injured by the latter  method, or the snow is too deep  to permit of it, put out the manure in small heaps, say of 500 to  105o pounds, so placed that the  field may be uniformly dressed  in the spring.    Large heaps of  many tons are sure to heat excessively,  even  in the  coldest  weather, and much of their nitrogen and organic matter is thus  lost.   Small heaps in cold weather 'will freeze   through, losing  nothing;" in warm weather they  will lose but little by excessive  fermentation.-Seasonable Hints  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  The Coffee of Distinction  because   of   its   exquisite  flavor  Packed in our new hygienic  AIRTIGHT TIN   ;  The W. H. Malkin Company, Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C. k  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  Will You Help  " If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased-'to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor .Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist. r l ���������   '  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  ������ TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries,���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  If time is money, some men  must be counterfeit coinage.  ..ourier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. G.  lo]  noE  m-������.  'THE two principal reasons  *���������   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  ���������   Packers and Provisioned  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Ogilvie's  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From ���������  ALL GOOD GROCEfiS.  rynildse  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  i  Dry Goods and Not ions  SfapiPand Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    &    ������  Tents-Packand Ridiiig Saddles  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mo& suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  ints - Oils - Varnishes - Stai  ms  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  i  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  O:  '/;_���������  .iii.uiii..m.u������i.iiLU..ip������iHJH,jMMBMll3airgWg! h  m  8J  m  I  H  a  ,3  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER  REPORT FOR DECEMBER  Compiled   by  Mr. C. H.  Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Ttrnfuralure: Maximum, 30.    Minimum, 23.  Highest Max. (10th) 10. Lowest Min. (25th) 7  above zero.   Rainfall, 2.27.  Snow21.25in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 5  BELLA COOLA, B. C, "SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1917.  $1.00  a Year  Russians Gain Ground  on the Riga Front  London, Janf 10.���������The Russian  thrust on the Riga front has assumed importance, the offensive  is being continued today. The  Russians have already gained  considerable ground from the  Germans and according to late  reports the offensive is apparently proceeding. Extraordinary  violent fighting along the reaches of-the A. A. river is in progress, most bitter fighting is being witnessed. Russians have  made distinct advances in this  sector, heavy artillery firing is  in progress along this line.  Germans Unsuccessful  Paris, Jan. 10���������An unsuccessful attempt by the Germans to  raid a French trench north of  Ribecourt was the only incident  of note, elsewhere on the front  everything was calm.  Daylight Raid, But no  Enemy to Be Seen  London, Jan. 10.���������-A daylight  raid by British troops on German positions south of Arras, the  troops went as far as the third  line, but no Germans were in  sight.  Sydney, Jan. 16.��������� The total  military cost to New Zealand of  the military occupation of Samoa  to the end of November, 1916,  will be about $1,460,000.  No arrangements have been  arrived at as yet between Premier Hughes and the Liberals  regarding election.  Madrid, Jan. 10.���������The Spanish  cabinet has resigned.  Winnipeg, Jan. 10.���������Forty-five  returned soldiers arrived here to  day en route to the Pacific coast.  Victoria, Jan. 10.���������G. H. Dawson, surveyor-general for British  Columbia, has resigned.  Public Reception Given to  Hon. T. D. Pattullo  A public reception was tendered by the people of Prince  Rupert to the Hon. T. D. Pattullo, minister of lands, on the  occasion of his leaving for the  capital city. The gathering was  nonpolitical, but for the purpose  of saying au re voire to the new  minister and his family who are  leaving the northern city to take  up their residence in Victoria.  Militarism in France is a Necessary Evil  Prof. Mack Eastman declares  that "today the influence, of democracy is greater in France  than ever." France has been  externally militafcjstid.f;exempting only 16 per cefttof Mr population in peace times, while Germany with her large population,  could afford to exempt 44 per  cent. France, however, was not  militaristic in soul, but had accepted it as a necessary evil.  Ultimatum to Greece  Macedonia Question Crops Up  London, Jan. 10���������Greek situation approached another climax  today. Allied conference at  Rome formulated and despatched a note to Greece equivalent to  an ultimatum demanding compliance with the Allies previous  request for disarmament and  neutrality within 48 hours.  Macedonia question is'again  uppermost in the public mind.  Fresh controversy involving the  disposition of Gen. Sarrail's men  and future integrity of Allies,  not only in the Balkans butalong  other fronts, will have a direct  and important bearing on the  early settlement of hostilities.  The old conflict between groups  of easterners and westerners  broke forth again and a great  battle is being fought out.  Entente's reply to Wilson's  peace note is expected to reach  Washington tomorrow.  Austrians abandon hope of  of peace negotiations and discuss  calmly the continuance of war.  S. S. Camosun, in charge of  Capt. Brown, docked here Friday  afternoon and after taking the  mail and a number of passengers  on board proceeded on her way  south. .  Mr. Chas. Cameron, teacher of  the Lower Bella School, arrived  to take up his duties after spending his vacation in Vancouver.  Cunard Liner Rammed  New York, Jan. 10.���������Cunard  liner Laconia, was rammed by a  small mail boat prior to sailing  and was damaged to such an extent that the vessel was compelled to abandon the trip.  Serious charges have been made  against the Hearst news service  by the Associated Press. The  latter claim that the Hearst service has been stealing and selling its foreign news.  Chicago, Jan. 10.���������The chief,  alieutenant and a sergeant, with  other officials in the police force,  have been arrested on charges  characterized as a filthy combination of crooks and police in conspiracy.       Denver, Jan.  10.��������� Col. Cody, j  famous the world over as "Buf-  . Thorwald Jacobsen and Paul  01 sen left by the last boat to  start military training. Our best  wishes go with them.  Fur buyer Le Trace came down  from Prince Rupert last week,  and after cleaning up the town  of everything in the fur line left  on Monday for Ocean Falls and  the north. In the collection  made here by Mr. Le Trace were  a number of silver and cross  foxes, that are so much in the  fashion at present. This,may  account for the ladies of the Republic to the south of us intending to spend so many million  dollars in providing themselves  with furs. '  Samuel Colborne took passage  on the southbound steamer for  Vancouver last week and will be.  away for the best part of the  winter before returning to hisi  ranch in'the Saloomt valley.  A number of neighbors and  and friends called at the home  of Mr. and Mrs. B. Brynildsen  en Friday last to- say good-bye  to their son, Birger M., who has  enlisted in the 223rd Battalion.  He left'for Vancouver that evening on the Camosun, where he  will be stationed for some time  before going on to Winnipeg.  Bella Coola General Hospital."  The annual meeting in connection With the above institution  was held in the Colony Hall on  Tuesday, January 9. In spite of  the inclemency of the weather  there was a good attendance.  The president, A. C. Christenson, in presenting his report for  the year gave a brief outline of  the work done, referring especially to the completion of the in  faloBill," is in a critical condi- jstallation of the water system,  tion and sinking fast. l which, as now installed, he be-  'lieved   would prove a complete  success.  Considerable repairs to buildings had been found necessary  during the year, also some furniture had been purchased for the  use of the nurse in her quarters.  A,new linen closet had been built  for the hospital but, he regretted  to say, the linen supply hadvbe-  cbme sadly depleted. The president pointed out to the meeting  the urgent need of funds for this  and other necessary equipment  for the institution.      .  ���������Theservices of a capable nurse  had been secured and he felt that  the people had been very fortunate in securing Miss Bengtson  to fill this position.  'He considered that the hospital had done well during the past  year, for which the medical superintendent, - Dr. Eva Sutherland, should be specially thanked.  The president in closing his  address thanked the people of  the valley for their kindly cooperation and support during his  term of office and concluded by  wishing them a Happy and Prosperous New Year.  C. Carlson expressed the appreciation of the members of the  Hospital Association of the work  done during the year and suggested that subscription lists be  circulated at once to raise funds  for the purchase of the necessary equipment for the hospital.  A vote of thanks was accorded  the outgoing board who, individually, suitably responded.  Rev. H. Sageng also addressed  the meeting. He offered his services in canvassing the valley  for the hospital.  The election of officers for the  year was then proceeded with.  The following gentlemen being  elected by acclamation: President, A. C. Christenson; secretary, Chas. Tucker; Wm. Sutherland was elected third member  of the board and R. N. Livelton  the fourth member.  The secretary was then instructed to circulate subscription  lists for funds for the hospital,  after which the meeting closed  in the usual manner.  The financial statement for  1916 will be published in our  next issue.  Annual Meeting of Farmers' Institute  The annual meeting of the local  Farmers' Institute was held at  the Colony Hall on Monday last.  At two o'clock the president,  T. P. Saugstad, called the meeting to order. After the minutes  of the last annual meeting had  been read and adopted the president stated that because of lack  of time he had no written report  to present and as their had been  practically no work done during  the last year there was very little  to report. Pie stated that the  method of election had been  changed by the new rules laid  down by the government. Hereafter the election of president,  vice-president and sec.-treasurer  will be done by the executive  board from their own members.  The Farmers' Institute would  just elect eight directors.  The secretary reported that  the Live-Stock Association organized a couple of years ago  had been dissolved, that in fact  it had met a natural death because the members failed to attend the meetings. He then  spoke about the necessity of  building silos and the purchase  of ensilage cutters, the need of  getting their produce to market  and that to accomplish thest j  things there was need of cooperation.  He also announced that the  government had decided that on  account of the financial stringency no Central Farmers' Conference would be held this year,  but that an advisory board had  been formed which would present the needs of the farmers  to the government.  The election of eight directors  was then proceeded with. O. S.  Urseth and H. Schulstad were  appointed tellers and the election  resulted as follows: John Wid-  sten, J. Jorgenson, A. Hammer,  P. Lauretson, Ole Nygaard, O.  J. Lokken, A. K. Oveson and H.  O. Hanson.   Chas. Hendricks, who has  spent the Christmas holidays in  town left for the logging camp  on Dean Channel this week."  James Larson has also returned to the camp after a visit to  his parents in Washington. The  work at the camp is now in full  swing.   son proved that the housing of a  large salmon pack was quite a  problem, this will be overcome  by remodelling some of the old  buildings.   The new residence of Reginald  Hill is now nearing its completion and the owner ,wi,th his  family expects to move into it  shortly.  The quietness of the year is  being taken advantage of to do  some needed repairs to the hospital buildings by the management. Mr. O. Schulstad is carrying out the work.  Latest report from Ocean Falls  is to the effect that work on the  big paper plant is going on with  all speed possible to be put into  the construction and the finishing  off ready for an early commencement to manufacture paper. At  the commencement of last year  it was thought that the mills  would be ready by this'time, but  the scarcity of labor during the  past twelve months has had a  great deal to do with the slowness in the construction work  and it is likely that it will take  the better part of this year before the plant will be in actual  operation.  The Namu saw-millscare now  in operation and a great deal 6f  lumber is being got ready for  two new canneries to be built-in  ������he Rivers Inlet district. The  new canneries are to be ready  for the canning season which  opens the latter part of June.  The Indian village is now  practically deserted and the  natives are either out trapping  or else logging. This is the old  habit of poor Loo that when the  New Year festivities have come  and gone he starts out in pursuit  of a living, and this he finds in  abundance along this coast either in meat or fish.  J  c  S.Vfifv>v  6s  cv^  <-.���������.. *->  fl  The weather during the festive  season was not of the best and  has continued to be on the wet  side for the most part of the  New   Year  so  far.     A   certain  The Provincial Legislature will  meet at Victoria on the 22nd of  February.    Want Road Opened Up.���������When,  Hon. Dr. King, minister of public works, was on his way from  home to the capital, following  his re-election, he was interviewed at Revelstoke by the  board of trade in regard to opening up a road to the Big Bend  district. The minister pointed  out that in the building of roads -  a definite plan must be laid out  and followed, so that the great-  amount of snow fell during last lest efficiency and most service  week, but the heavy rain of the j could be obtained for theamount  last few   days   has  caused  the; expended.  This will give anyone an idea  that road work will be undertaken and carried out differently  in the future than in the past.  There will be a slim chance in  finding a road boss with a fat  cheque book travelling about the  country giving out cheques promiscuously both for work done  and some that never was done.  One of the British "Tanks" in action. The drawing is from an actual photograph of  the travelling armored land forts that" have been so effective lor the British on the  Somme front. The caterpillar wheels and the moveable guide wheels permit the tank  to cross trenches and shell craters, crush wire entanglements etc. Large toothed  wheels, covered with armor (a section of the wheel is shown in the inset) operate the  continuous track.  snow to disappear and the much  wished for goocl-sieighing has  passed with it. The local sawmills are largely dependent on  snow roads to haul their supply  of logs to the mills. They are  hoping for another fall of snow  and the consequent good sleighing.    The Johnson saw-mill is now  ousy getting out some boat lumber for the local cannery. Quite  a few boats will be built this  year at the local plant to replace  old ones. A certain number of  boats are discarded every year.  There is also some talk of making alterations to the cannery  buildings and also additions' to  be made to same.   The past sea-  I    (Elntrd? Notin?  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a.m.  7 : 30 p. m.  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W. II. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  <J1><^������  Ijf".  'ft! J'"  if  "S3-1  - x;'r j  :f}"!'!  If;'  ���������MA-:  ������������������.���������*a  .-������������������' in  *r BELLA COOLA  COURIER  Saturday,  January  13,  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year $1.00  G Month*    ; v ..   0.75  3 Mentha "...   0.50  .- United States  1 Year , $1.50  United Kingdom  1 Year....... $1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,  Office. .  To Correspondents��������� While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be given to the editor.  The Editor reserves the riffht to refuse publi-  " catiun of anyjletter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  'j&tlua jmualt 0itpramt-r5t Irx."  seemingly must ere long use the  compelling power of law to be  able to fulfill its promise. And  it is preparing for the inevitable  is indicated by last week's dispatches relating that Premier  Borde in an informal address at  Ottawa to returned soldiers intimated "that more drastic  measures will be taken in mobilizing the man power of the-  country for the successful prosecution of the war."  Therefore we may expect con  scription in force before long.  prohibition is gaining in strength  steadily and as the forceful premier is a strong believer in it,  it is safe to'say the liquor dealers will hear something drop be-  ' fore long.  SATURDAY, JAN. 13, 1917.  More Stringent Measures.  As the war progresses in its  grim path of death and devastation, the seriousness of successfully grappling with it-becomes  more arid.more impressive. The  mo3t stringent measures in'the  control of food and other necessaries, "and the1 prohibition "of  luxuries have.for a long period  been enforced among the Teutonic -Allies. - The Entente powers  < >  on the other hand, in their free  access to the markets of the  world did not believe it would  ever, become necessary for them  to go to.the same lengths in these  matters as their enemies.  . But the'third winter finds them  confronted; with, an enemy overrunning the-country of Rouma-  nania,- their-latest'ally, signifying a strength which is far from  being crushed as yet; and at the  same time a scarcity of foodstuffs in the markets of the  world, which has made it,necessary for Britain even to regulate the quantity and quality of  the people's food..  Britain's dominions beyond the  seas have not found it encumbent upon them to adopt similar  measures, hoping that they be-  apply at    Let Us Hear From  You.  W8 have for a long time been  under the impression that the  people of this community do not  realize the value of, a local paper.  It brings to its subscribers the  happenings of the settlement  and they in our case are not of  much importance and may be  classed as only'so much gossip.  But strange~'to relate it is the  local news columns that the  average reader first' turns to,  and in many instances the only  part which he finds of sufficient  interest to' read at all.  Any articlesdealingwith matters relating to the development  of the valley or to its welfare in  in other respects receives scant  notice, very little comment and  never any action. ���������  The Courier has, in the year*  just closed, discussed many mat-  ters which it deems of great importance to the life of the settlement, but rack pur brains as we  may, we cannot call-to' mind one  topic or subject-that in pur hearing has ever received a passing  comment..     \   -----        .       . ���������  When^.we look upon the intelligent faces of. our. people and  know, that their '��������� education is  probably above* the average, it  is hard to explain this utter  deadness to matters of a public  nature' in the communal interests.  It cannot be that they do not  see the" need of work along some  of the lines indicated at least,  because that must be patent to  j any person  of brains.    Let us  ! suggest it is probably due to a  ���������Let us at thebeginningof this On the heels .of Germany's  New Year resolve that in the proposal for a peace conference  future to cultivate a higher re- come stories from different.quar-  gard for our neighors, display a ters of the distress for lack of  greater willingness to discuss food obtaining in the Teutonic  our ideas together and yield to States. It is also stated authorise opinions of the majority and;tatively that .the knowledge of  ing so far removed from the seat "1^^ 0f fajth in their ability to  of war would not be forced to do  so. And-let .us trust that their  hopes in ��������� this respect may be  realized.  But in- one ^respect Canada  must, before long, follow the  example of her Allies in Europe;  she will not be able to furnish  her quota��������� of soldiers under the  present system and must therefore adopt conscription.  The Western provinces have  responded nobly to the call for  volunteers and sent forth their  sons in excess of the number allotted to them, but the Eastern  provinces are so far behind that  the Dominion finds itself 130,000  men short of the 500,000 promised  Britain by Premier Borden.  Under the present direful circumstances this promise must be  kept and the men furnished.  Different methods have been  suggested  and adopted to deal-  with the situation, but they all  fall short of accomplishing the  object sojight for.  A political party in power intending to seek the endorsement  of the electorate before long is  naturally reluctant to advocate  and adopt stringent measures,  but honor goes before expediency;   the   Borden  government  entertain less fear of evil results  from joint efforts.   ���������  There are, we must believe,  many ideas abroad among our  people, the discussion of which  may bring good results; why not  use the local- paper as a medium  to' ventilate and discuss them?  The Courier will be glad to publish communications from our  people-and give opportunity for  the discussion of different and  differing ideas in its columns.  Let the lethargy now so evi-  dent become a thing of the past,  let the life currents run strong  and above all let "brotherly love  continue" and then we know  that co-operation will be one of  results achieved^ and Bella Coola  Coola as a home for a contented  and prosperous.people he a reality apparent to all beholders.  ,  " >" ���������  o      o    o     o     o  ,   Prohibition in Britain..  'It is not unreasonable to believe the gfgantic convulsions of  the world" will bring forth  changes of the greatest importance and benefit to mankind. ���������  The aims of the Allies in this  struggle have been stated so  often that it should not be necessary to repeat them,, but "it is  enough to say that if tney.are  successful there .is every reason  to believe that militarism and  wars of any magnitude will be  things of the past. Another  great reform which this war will  bring about will be the destruction of-the liquor traffic.  Not only most of the belligerent countries but also the neutrals have in the last years enacted prohibition or stringent  measures curtailing the, traffic.  One of the most conservative in  this reform has been staid old  Britain; but the exigencies of the  war is also bringing her to a  ideas, the difficulty of harmoniz-"realization of the danger of this  them into one concrete whole, ; domestic evil and latest devolop-  the obstinacy displayed by too ments show that before long she  many in even trivial, unimport-, will also line herself with those  ant matters and the general lack : who declare war upon the traffic,  of the spirit of co-operation.        I    Public sentiment in favor of  this fact has strengthened the  determination of the Allies to  fight until the object for which  they so reluctantly took up arms  have been obtained.  It may not seem according to  the spirit of; Christianity to welcome the news of distress even  among our "enemies; but when  we take into consideration the  fact that such a condition will  hasten will hasten the day when  peace uponL just and righteous  principles be secured, then with  that great object in view every  christian should hail with gladness every indication that .ensures the'coming of that longed  for time.  Last week the Courier published two dispatches stating of the  suffering- for lack of food in  German States, and they are  corroborated by the news columns of the papers received in  the last mail.  . A dispatch to the London Daily  (Continued on next page.) v  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF  "PRIDE OF THE WEST"  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  MADE   IN    B. C.VJ  Prompt Attention Given Letter Order*  IBHBBI  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN to rem.^(  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE.������������������%��������� VANCOUVER, B. C., them in different parts Jf  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917), delivery; The work is pleasant and remunerative.-,'.. Honesst, energetic men only are needed. We particularh  want a good man on the G.T. P. Railway.  /���������Planters should write at once forour80 page 'Catalogue.  work together: they know from  experience    the    mulititude   of  [  S. M. NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is "a candidate for the  House of Commons for this.fR.id-  ing.  The object of this space is to  introduce to you the man who always fights." for the rights and  prosperity of the masses, irrespective of politics.  Start the New Year Right  on the Flour Question!  Wild Rose Pastry Flour  and  Royal Standard Flour  .Will give you entire satisfaction the year round.  Milled under . conditions of absolute  purity, in one of the most modern, sanitary  mills in the world, they represent flour  perfection.  Tested-daily under actual baking conditions in our own ovens. These flours  are never allowed to vary their purity  and quality.  ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR for bread,  buns and biscuits���������WILD ROSE PASTRY  FLOUR for cakes, pies, pastries, etc.  Your dealer will recommend them.  'Hbegtor^  THOSE   WHO,   FROM   TIME TO  TIME,   HAVE  FUNDS   REQUIRING  INVESTMENT,   MAY   PURCHASE AT  PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  IN   SUMS  OF  $500  OR  ANY   MULTIPLE  THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free  of exchange at any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent  per annum from the date of purchase.  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and  accrued interest, as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment  made under any future war loan issue in Canada other than an issue of  Treasury Bills or other like short date security.  Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.  A commission of one-quarter of one per .cent will be allowed to recognized bond and stock brokers on allotments made in respect of applications  for this stock which bear their stamp.  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA,  OCTOBER  7th,   1916.  GREAT   WEST  TEA  The New Tea with the old-time flavor  PACKETS   ONLY  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  &  HOE  3 ������C  HOE  <5I  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.   "CamOSUIl      Leaves  Vancouver  every  Tuesday at 9 p. m. (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p. m.  0  o  D  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  o  Ft  [���������3  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent,  1003 Government St., Victoria.  -IOI  hoc  V)  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  $  K  ���������JH  ���������4 Saturday, January 13,   / 917  '39  ���������I  BELLA, COOLA  COURIER  -���������;; Simply a little rub with a cloth keeps the highly burnished cooking top always glistening, dustless clean, without blacking; in four pieces it cannot warp or bulge  M'aarys  ootenay  It won't be hard to decide what range you want in your  kitchen after I show you the Kootenay'a special features.  Sold by B. Brynildsen & Co.  December 28, says:  "I have private information  indirectly from Germany. A  friend, of mine, the head of an  important Paris business firm,  had a partner who is Swiss. The  latter has just visited Germany  and returned to Paris. He is a  level-headed business man and  says positively that Germany can  scarcely hold out more than six  'months longer. The shortage of  food is much more serious than  has ever been said.  ' 'It is true that the entire population has long since been unable to ������at its fill. He himself  saw many persons in various  German'towns actually fall down  in the streets exhausted by hunger, and in one case at least, a  man dropped dead from starvation in the road before his eyes.  Such sights apparently are now  not uncommon in Germany.  ���������:"'.-'   O       0_    C       O       O  Commerce Protectors.  When we read of the havoc  upon shipping caused by the  German submarines, we are apt  to feel an uneasiness that this is  a [form of warfare the British  seapower is not competent to  deal witli./' But this silent watch  Telegraph   from    Paris,   dated dog on the deep is ever alert and  also resourceful.  The development of new tactics by the enemy only stimulates the activity of invention of  our protectors and in due course  a remedy is found by which the  enemy's move is met and minimized if not utterly nullified.  Just now the statement is  forthcoming by way of New York  from a reliable source, that there  is now in service an allied fleet  of heavily armed "commerce  protectors," of a new type, which  statement bears out stories that  skippers of the Atlantic and coastwise steamers have been bringing to port of strange appearing  craft that are making their way  westward. These ships made no  reply to signals and could not be  approached. They steered a  vagrant course and were described variously as of merchantmen, transports, light cruisers  and even of submarines.  Pieced together, these reports  fitted in with the suspicions, now  apparently confirmed of shipping  men that the commerce protectors are described as large and  powerful, and capable of fair  speed. They were designed, it  is said, to meet German subma-  <T  CLUB  OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  *\  The Courier   .       .       .       .       . $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .  .   $1.50  The Courier   .       .        . '     .  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  $1.00  .  1.00  $2.00  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.75  V  The four papers may be had for $3.75.  J  "It Always Pleases"  Major-general Jan C. Srnutz,  who has been promoted''for  his generalship in East f  Africa.  rines, and in anticipation of attempted raids similar to that  made by the U-63 off Nantucket  on Oct. 8. The British admiralty, it is said, determined to make  impossible another such raid and  the fleet of commerce protectors  was the result.  To Drain Zuder Zee.  It looks as if the world is to  have one sea less. The Dutch  government propose to drain the  Zuyder Zee and to shut it Off by  a dyke running from the North  Holland coast to the Frisian  coast.  The sea which is very shallow  and 70 miles long and from 10 to  45 miles broad, was- in the time  of the Romans covered with  forests and was a royal hunting  ground.  In 1170 came the great; flood  known in Dutch history as the  "All Saint's Day Flood.", The  sea swept over the land, covered  the forests, engulfed towns and  cities, and drowned thousands of  people. More floods followed in  1237 and 1250, and by 1410 the  Zuder Zee had assumed practically its present proportions.  When the sea is drained one of  the show places 'of Holland will  disappear in the Island of Mark-  en. The fisher folk here all wear  the old national costume.  Most of the houses are constructed from the timber of old  boats, and many are built on  old piers, the floors of the houses  being 10 to 15 feet off the ground.  The work of draining the Zuder  Zee will take 15 years, at an inclusive cost of about $45,000,000.  Notes on Manure.  The more manure .that can be  made this winter and the better  it is handled the larger the crops  of 1917 be, for whether the season be favorable or unfavorable  a soil.well supplied with plant  food and organic matter will be  more productive than one poor  in these important constituents.  We may go further and say that  the crops on a soil so enriched  are better able to withstand peri-  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  COAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  v-' Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Tekrjtory, the Nukth-west Territories and in a portion of the PROVINCE of  British Columbia, may he leased for a term of  twenty-one year3 at on annual rental ot $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be de-  sci-ibed. by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded it the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accenting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  30E  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  hoc  Dealers and Trappers  GET  THE  HIGHEST       /V $*,  PRICE  FOR  YOUR   /   _VJ.  FURS/������  at the  O. Box  863  157 McDougall  Ave.,  EDMONTON, Alta.  We pay all express and  mail charges.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BANGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C. occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30, 1916. Jan. 6-March  ods of drought, for the soil's  absorptive capacity for moisture  is thereby increased and there is  present within reach of the feeding roots moisture and an abundance ' of;' available nourishment  for the crop's use once the  weather conditions turn favor-  sble. To a certain extent, therefore, manure make the farmer  independent of the vagaries of  the-season.  Over the larger part of Cana  da the cattle and live stock generally are housed in the winter,  and thus it is that during this  season the large proportion of  manure requiring care and special handling is produced. In the  summer the larger part of the  manure is naturally distributed  over the pastures���������unless, as on  a few dairy farms, the cows are  stabled and "soiling" crops used.  The winter's manure, therefore,  is a very important asset and its  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  ^mm  TheMason & Risch Piano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE I "  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  I  JTT  Let us attend  your Victor Record  ���������      ^1   mail orders-���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  t I   HIM <IIH1I'���������!!   ���������  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00   iiWl  I    ���������������������������������������������n  i   i   mttm     il ~    i ' "  \)L7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  Vjfc/HAT person so independent?  \X/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  -:������&%&:.',  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  (     )  HTHE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers With sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find   for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   .subscription  P. O   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  I:  #1  Si  TiiwniniW jwmw������������awi3������w"W������������������!������������^^  lit;  ., ������������������   nil' r  111*! (I   1 I  SB<i  -i  i 1  #r  n  .'I?  iff;  v   A||,  ml!' -������&  '��������� :.n  "���������'''if ill,,  t ��������� < lih $&? J i  *        ' !.      ,'  IS,"   |  *   i!'H  #>������*'  ������������������s r'' ��������� ^ I  ." f-j >{.  i !  ;���������>  Subscribe  r  i f  for the  Courier'  OJIE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coaft between Vancouver and  Prince, Rupert.      ���������  A distance of six hundred miles.  It will he to your interest to keep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  - the. Northern section of  this. Province-^-   .  v THE "COURIER"  ;    GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS  flow! isthetime to' keep:;  your name before the  public. No manufacture  er driwholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings. .^  DEAL;ESTA3^ooms.-in the  "        SiS^feave come and gone.  pSople^rtf beginning -to,flock to  . Kuntry.    The -North-Wes  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities  for" all.    Did not  know, is no excuse.    Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier.  J  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right.  NOTES ON MANURE-Continued.  care and handling matters worthy "of our closest- attention.  Three features-connected with  the production, care and application may be commented on. ^  First. The waste of-manure in  the barn through leaky and imperfect flooring and gutters.   As  regards nitrogen and potash, the  fluid part of the excreta is" far  more valuable   than the solid,  both as  regards   quantity and  availability for crop use. ��������� Thousands of dollars  worth  of this  moist valuable plant food that  ought to be in the'soils of our  fields' saturate the ground beneath "cow  barns,   due to   bad  flooring and the want of watertight guttersr   Modern  barns  provide against this loss by the  use of concrete. - . ^    \  Secondly-Use a sufficiency of  absorbent litter, hot only to keep  the.cattle ,dry and comfortable,  but also to take up and hold all |  the liquid portion of the manure.  If the supply of straw is limited  it will repay- to" cut_.it,' for by so  doing its absorptive capacity will  be increased 'three-fold.!-  Peat  moss from the .-surface of peat  bogs makesan excellent litter of  high absorptive capacity.-, .Air-  dried swamp muck'is also a valuable absorbent, Resides adding  much organic matter and plant  food to the manure; ,_a shovelful  placed in the gutter behind'each  cow'in the morning will'serve to  take up "the-liquid and greatly  facilitate the work of;cleaning  the stable.;.-      _f -  ;f ; ���������  '   Thirdly.- -As to the disposition  "of the" manure 4n "the winter,  ,don't leave-it ^oosefiri "the yard  'to.waste,-by leaching, drainage  and excessive-'fermentation.^  It  cannot :be' put "in -the soil-its  | safest-and best storage-but if  ' the land is not rolling "and subject .to suface wash it may be  drawn out and put on the land,  ���������if-the land  is so  wet'that it  would be injured by the latter  method, or the snow is too deep  to permit of it,.put out the manure in small heaps, say of 500 to  'lbtto pounds, so placed that the  field may be uniformly dressed  in the spring.    Large heaps of  many tons are sure to heat excessively,   even in  the   coldest  weather, and much of their-mt-  rogen and organic matter is thus  lost.   Small heaps in cold weather will freeze   through,   losing  nothing;'in warm weather they  will lose but little"by excessive  fermentation.--Seasonable Hints  . BELLA" COOLA COURIER  'Saturday, /latumnj /j  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN  \m.  MALKIN  COFFEE  the Coffee of Distinction  *      because   of   its   exquisite  flavor :    " -     ;  "s������>������-  ^Packed in our new hygienic  !      AIR-TIGHT TIN   '  The W. H. Malkin Company, Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C ;  BBrynildsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  .JM  fo-V.  Canada's Boys Want Smokes J  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING  AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  Will You Help?  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     $  ������  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer-any en-  quiries  CoSg'Bo^;; Caution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  ii  ^^^^^^^^.^?^^^  28 Windsor Hotel. Montreal, and will be glad to supply   .ting Books, Contribution  to any who are willing to, assist.  If time is money, some men  must be counterfeit coinage.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  DUILD UP  YOUR HOME  D town. " Do not talk���������support home industries-talk is  cheap, the best way to show  that you are in   earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  HTHE two principal reasons  *   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST��������� '  There is none better.  SECOND-^ ���������   ���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and ProvUioners  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Burns;  Ogilvie s  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekei s will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the most suitable articles are kept at prices thai  invite competition.  ���������'i  5?:  I,  t  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  Stains  I  5. ���������  ALL GOOD GROCERS.,  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descrip*^  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of a  ������������  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods-Lowest Prices JLargest  lys,  w  VI ti  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO, BELLA  C00LA,&1

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