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Bella Coola Courier 1917-02-24

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 ���������J  <      '.   '*.    rT   /      - , / .  ;J  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR JANUARY  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella (Joola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 33.   Minimum, 24.  Highest Max. (fltli)4.r>. Lowest Min. v30ili) 12  below zero.   Kamfall, 3.5]. Snow 16in.  Rainfall for the year (1916} 40.S9 inches. '  VOL. 5���������NO. 11  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1917.  $1.00. a Year  "AllMustJerish"  Berlin, Feb. 2].���������Official statement says: "All who venture in  the barred zone must perish."  Prussianizing Poland  Amsterdam, Feb. 21.������������������Germany is thoroughly Prussianizing  Poland and despoiling her forests  of wealth. Jews are being maltreated and the jails in Warsaw  are filled with civilians.  Could Raise Second Loan  French Capture Prisoners  Paris, Feb. 21���������French troops  capture many prisoners in a surprise raid north of Fleury and  west of Waterville. 'In Oiseand  Aisne region considerable artil  1 rery activity, elsewhere calm.  Danger of U.S. Gashing  With Germany Not Over  o r   Washington, Feb. 21.-Real  danger of actual clash with Germany cannot be removed until  the Kaiser's government revokes  -the decree for submarine warfare. Detention of .Americans  in the Yarrowdale case and other  issues are in themselves admittedly serious.   ���������  Two unharmed American merchantmen in Germany's barred  zone and both bear cargoes held  ���������contraband by Germany. Their  safety from now on until definite  word of their arrival in port is  made will be subject of liveliest  interest in officialdom.  Espionage Bill passes Senate.  London, Feb. 21.���������The oversubscribed new British war loan  is described by the Times newspaper as a "colossal subscription," and goes on to say* that  Britain's prompt response to the  war. finance requirements is a  message which speaks to the  world in no uncertain tones. The  country could raise a second loan  if necessary.'  Norwegian steamer Dalbeattre  was sunk by the shell fire of a  German submarine. Two Americans were on board and the  crew were on the open sea for  thirteen hours.  Enemy lines on the Mesopota-  mian front are being steadily  pushed backward.  We carried out a successful  raid this morning East Souchez,  taking a few prisoners.  Usual artillery activity on remainder of fronts.- . ���������������   -  India will do munition work.  Central Empire now being mobilized by'Sir Thomas Holland.  Princes of India give liberally.  Russian government "will devote one hundred thousand roubles to establish merchant fleet.  ~ British-authorities propose enlisting women, will utilize them  as cooks, etc.  6076 Vessels Arrive British  Ports Since February 1  London, Feb. 22.���������Sir Edward  Carson in the House of Commons  today declared submarine menace  as grave and serious and is growing, but confident measures now  being devised will gradually'.miti-  gate its seriousness. , Four hundred thousand sailors wanted for  additional force for naval expansion. Lord Fisher, former first  sea lord, pjaced incharge as president of Board of Inventions. -  . During the period from February 1 to 18, 6076 vessels arrived  in British ports and 5873 left, despite German blockade. - The  hope Germany starvihgout England by submarine.ruthlessness  has gone glimmering.-  Order-in-Council announced today provides that vessels carrying goods to and from enemy  ports are liable to capture .and  condemnation unless they call at  Removing Art Treasures  The Hague, Feb. 22.��������� Man j  art treasures from Alsace and  Lorraine suddenly removed to the  German cities of Stuttgart and  Munich.  Berlin, Feb. 22���������Baron Krupr  presents iron tie-pins to faithful  employees instead of usual gold  purse.-  Paris, Feb,  is all quiet.  22.-Entire front  G  Ottawa, Feb. 22.���������Order-in-  .Council passed prohibitingCana-  adian'women and children from  visiting Britain and France.  gear of all kinds and will continue the business at the old  stand in the spirit of his predecessor. Mr. Ratcliff will have  to hustle some.  aUiedfports enroute for examination of- their cargoes. Blockade  of Germany apparently complete.'  ..British steamer Brigade, 425  tons/sunk, crew saved.  British capture entire garrison  on Sinai peninsula.  New York Times Says:  "Hour to Strike Overdue"  New York, Feb. 21.���������A. San-  del, of Hearst's Deutsches Journal and president of the Central  Powers war film exchange, and  C. W. Wunneburg, Sandel's assistant, have been arrested for  illegal espionage propaganda in  New York to aid Germany. San-  del was prominent in the attempt  to free Boy-Ed from guilt. British authorities gave the tip. Procedure was to send newspaper  men to England on pretext.  New York Times says: "thev  hour to strike is overdue." The  great Democratic journal shows  signs of parting with the^ president. Impatient of delay, the  paper declares that Americans  are humiliated by Germany's embargo, humbled and disgraced in  the eyes of the world, but passive Allies of the Huns. Pacifists are castigated by the journal  as responsible for American  rights being trampled upon and  annihilated.  Crying "we want bread" over  500 women, bareheaded and scantily clad stormed the City Hall  demanding relief from Mayor  Mitchell from high, cost of .living.  Some declared theft-'' fafttflies-������o  be starving. Most of the women  carried babies, their faces showing the pinch of hunger. Drastic  action to reduce cost of food in  New York to be demanded by a  committee headed by Dr. A. H.  Friedman.  Sweden Protest  Copenhagen-, Feb. 21���������Swedish  minister at Berlin has been instructed to make formal protest  to Germany with demand for  compensation for the loss by .torpedoing of the Swedish steamer  Varing. -    -  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  S. S. Camosun has resumed  her place on the Bella Coola run,  but on her initial'trip failed to  arrive on 'time. . She arrived  about two o'clock'Saturday pi m.,  nearly 24 hours late.  Her passenger list was composed of Mrs. J. R. Morrison,  Herbert Sutherland and W. E.  Gallienne.        .-���������   '  The only outgoing passenger  was-B. F. Jacobsen.  W.  U. S. to Enquire Into   ^  High Cost of Livingfegious clim  Washington, Feb. 22.���������Presi-  is determined that Congress shall  pass immediately four hundred  thousand dollars appropriation  which Federal trade commissiori-  requested for nation wide food  price probe. Senator Borah demanded that Congress remain in  session until adequate steps are  taken to bring prices back to  normal, he says people are victims of speculators and combinations which are milching millions  out of food. He declares that  less than one ship in one hundred  is sunk.  Herbert Sutherland has returned to his usual scene of activities  after spending several weeks enjoying the exciting life and salu-  p.f the coast cities.  E. Gallienne has forsaiten  his home in Bella Coola arid.ca^&d  ���������B. ���������F. Jacobsen's multifarious  interests made it necessary foi  him to leave his cosy home in the  middle-of the winter to take a  :trip to Vancouver, which very  likely will extend to the West  Coast where he has very promising mining property. The time  of his return is problematical;  but we shall look for big things  when he does arrive.  The long spell ofwet and mild  weather has given way to a  severe cold snap accompanied by  a cutting, cold wind. ,01d winter  delights in showing us that tote  strength is still unimpaired.  jj^The gang at work repairing  the wharf found the cold and the  A. M. Tyson, the inspector of  Indian agencies, is now working  his way north in a new sphere of  work. He has orders to raise a  large number recruits among the  Indians for a forestry battalion.  This will be an ideal chaiice for  the Indians to engage in extensive traveling and seeing foreign  lands without much risk to life  or limb. The opportunity offered  should be embraced by all the  younger Indians. It'would give  them new ideas, more knowledge  and experience, and would give  them on their return a standing  in their respective tribes superior to any of those who stayed at  home.  humming towrr^f\Ocean^$pi  He is paying our burg & flyiiVg;  visit to>settle his affairs  ������h lot with $e ^ftens^ofCtfifeif^ong wind too strong to face  -$f#l consequently abandoned the  'work until a more congenial time.  H       4, .  . F. A. "Johnson is busily engaged in hauling the lumber for  the extensive additions to be  made to the cannery.'^  The void created in our village  by the removal of the ever active  W. E. Gallienne will' be filled by  Milo Ratcliff, who has bought  Mr. Gallienne's horses, cows, and  Mrs. J. R. Morrison has also  decided to make her horne'^ at  Ocean Falls as Mr. Morrison has  accepted a position with the  Pacific Mills Ltd. Mrs. Morrison  intends to stay here two weeks  and take away her household  goods next week.  THE    MINISTER    OF    FINANCE  __  REQUESTS  THE  PEOPLE    OF    CANADA    TO  BEGIN NOW  TO  SAVE   MONEY   FOR   THE  NEXT WAR LO^N  JAN. ������. I������|7  DEPARTMENT Of FINANCE  OTTAWA  The Farmers' Institute has  been indulgingih meetings every  week for quite a spell. Accounts  of all of them cannot be given  as space is limited, but as they  are always held in the Colony  Hall, removed about ten miles  from our.sanctum, ,the editor  cares'"not to impose upon his  legs the task of .walking that  distance every time his reporfo-  rial duties would demand it.  We were present, however, at  a social evening given by the Institute on the evening of the 14th  instant, when the whole valley  and his best girl were out to enjoy themselves and also to listen  to an entertaining and instructive speech by A. R. Neale, our  provincial horticulturist, who at  that time had spent nearly two  weeks among our farmers.  The proceedings of the evening  were opened by Mr. Widsten, the  president, pounding the table  with his fist and calling on Miss  Clara Widsten to give an organ  recital. After that Mr. Neale  was called upon arid the interest  shown in his presentation of  practical pointers to the farmers  was such that his speech seemed  altogether too short when he  closed amid enthusiastic applause. After that it was hard  for the sedate president to keep  the bubbling spirit of the audience below the boilingover point.  Every musical piece rendered  was vociferously applauded and  encores insisted upon in every  instance.  Songs were given by Miss K.  Hallowes, Mrs. Holte, Mr. Louis  Svisdahl and Mr. Neale. These  songs were interspersed by  speeches of D. H. Hoage and C.  Carlson. 4  .The accompaniment to the  singing was performed by Mrs.  Urseth, Mrs. Holte and Mr. Louis  Svisdahl.  O.  J.  Nygaard,  the efficient  secretary of the Institute, secured ten new members for the organization.  ,  The evening's program ended  with the singing of the National  Anthem when everybody went  home vowing ,that if another  such a chance of enjoyment ever  presented itself he or she would  be, there.  i  Another well attended meeting  of the Institute was held Monday  the same week and another on  Wednesday the week following  and still another on Tuesday of  this week. We may have something to say in the future in regard to the business transacted  at these different meetings.  The chief topic of discussion  at the several meetings of the  Farmers'Institute held this year  has been co-operation, how to  make its benefits available to the  people of this valley and to make  it applicable to their circumstances. The time thus spent has  not been wasted. Ideas have(<  been formed and one ���������plan at  least has crystallized with the  result that now the members of  the Institute are fully committed  to give co-operation a trial.  At a meeting held at Colony  Hall, Hagensborg,' on Tuesday  last, a system of buying and sell;  ing co-operatively was decided  upon and an'agent elected as  manager.  Despite the inclemency of the  weather there was a large turnout, considerable "and long discussions ensued, but the utmost  harmony prevailed, which augurs  well for the enterprise.  C. Carlson was elected agent  for a term of three years.  His first official duty will be to  sell the surplus potatoes on hand  and with the present scarcity and'  soaring prices he will not find  this difficult. '   ���������  ������������������It is not believed that the new  departure of buying co-operatively will have any perceptible effect upon the business of the  local merchants, as it is not anticipated the volume of the trade  through the agent will exceed  that of the mail orders-sent cut  before. It is expected that in  pooling their purchases the farmers will obtain better prices  and make savings in transportation charges sufficient to make  the new system preferable to the  mail order kind.  BELLA COOLA AND DISTRICT RED  .  CROSS AND PATRIOTIC FUNDS  STATEMENT FOR JANUARY  Red Cross Fund���������collected by  Mr. Broughton, $19.00; by Miss  L. Schulstad, $19.50; and by Miss  A. Livelton, $4.75.  Total, $43.25  Patriotic Fund, $13.50.  (tthnnrb Nnitir    9  Sunday School  ' Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W. H. Gibson.  w All Are Welcome. \ 2  BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturdi  'ay, February 24,  19\7  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RAT ES :  Can&da  1  Ye*.r  $1-0������  6 .Month*       0-75  3 Month*   United States  1  Year $1.50  United Kingdom    ,  I Year $1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,  Apply at  ��������� Office.  To CoBitESPJNDCNTs���������Wliile unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, tlio  ,    name and addieas of every writer of such letters  must be (riven to the editor,  lhe Editor reserves the richt to refuse publication of any letter.    All manuscript al writer a  risk.  "'&aliw jiupnli miprrum r si lex/'  SATURDAY, FEB. 21, 1917.  Hon. Ralph Smith.  As a shock to the people of the  province came the' news of the  death of the Minister of Finance,  Hon. Ralph Smith.  He  was  of   the chosen few  ��������� whose powerful personality and  . intellect were such that neither  poverty nor lack' of education  could keep down: Born in New-  castle-'on-the-Tyne   in   1858  of  " parents in poor circumstances,  after receiving only a rudimen-  'tary education at eleven years  of age he had to work for his  living in the coal mines'of Northumberland. "But in later years  ���������when his genius began to assert  itself, he was able largely to over-  ��������� come the disadvantages of lack  of education.  Although he was able to overcome the many obstacles in the  way and attain to the foremost  positions in leadership he was  conscious of his limitations and  was therefore able to guard  himself from being embarrassed  by them.  Being born and brought up  among the laboring classes he,  throughout his whole distinguished career, earnestly and sincerely embraced their cause' and  labored.to improve their conditions. In the old land he became  a prominent labor leader and  when he, in 1892, emigrated to  Canada and came to Vancouver  Island his ability, and integrity  were not slow in being recognized and he rose in the course of  two years to a leading position  among his fellow-laborers.  He served his province a short  time in the provincial legislature,  from which he -resigned to be  elected by a majority of nine to  one in the Dominion'parliament,  where he served three terms.  In the last provincial election  he was elected to the lcgislatim  as a. member for Vancouver citj  and when, after, his appointment  to Minister..jxf Finance in Mr.  Brewster's cabinet, he sought the  endorsement of his constituency  he was elected by the largest  majority any candidate ever received in the province.  He was an earnest, consistent  member of the Methodist church,  vice-president of the Lord's Day  Alliance and. a lay preacher of  unusal ability. His loss .will be  keenly felt by the new government and his untimely death  mourned by all, irrespective of  party or creed. ,  Mobilizing the Farm.  Great Britain has found it  necessary in Uie task of self?  preservation to organize all the  industries of the landi that of  agriculture not excepted.  With the war far removed from  o.5o; our shores this form of defending the country has not received  serious attention from the lead-  ers of the nation; for the reason  that even if the war is prolonged  o  for a longer time than expected  it may not have to be resorted to  as a necessity.  But the idea of the state controlling and directing private industry, has received a strong  push forward during'the war,  and what before that event was  looked upon as an idea that could  only find a place in a disarranged  intellect has since then become  a thing favorably looked upon as  entirely practicable. As a consequence, if is probable that  when peace is restored the nationalizing of great industries will  become quite general.  In view of the ever soaring  prices 'of food stuffs; the fact  that we are all, without exception, dependant upon the land  for our living and also national  prosperity and, may it be said  with regret, theinetficiency.lack  of method and ignorance preva-  lentamong the producers it seems  that if there is any industry  which requires national .control  more than other it is agriculture.  We are all glad'that the different governments have established separate departments foi  the purpose of fostering agriculture and that these are doing excellent work and would accomplish far more than they are doing if the average farmer was  more susceptible to receiving advice and following it.  We are therefore of the opinion that even during times of  peace it may be found highly  profitable for all concerned to  heed the advice of the "News  and Leader," London, which in  an editorial says:  "The individual farmer, small  or large, must be brought under  the same direction and control  as the proprietor of an engineering works or any'other undertaking laid urider contribution as  a controlled establishment. He  must be told what crops are expected of him; he must be assured of an adequate supply of the  necessary factors of production  NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding. ���������',''.-���������'"'  . While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he si ands  for what will benefit these districts.  i&I������EMS  ^CLtANS^IDISINFECTS^  ���������in particular labor, capital or  credit, and seed; and his produce  must be taken over by the State  at a price which leaves justice  even as between producer and  taxpayer."  o    o     o    o    o  The New Submarine  Warfare.  When this phase of 'German  inhumanity arid- frightful ness  was first announced, with the  statement that several hundreds  new and powerful submarines  would be turned loose on the  ocean traffic, we will concede  that a strong uneasiness of feeling came over us. The'submarines have a way of concealing  themselves below the wide stretches of the ocean that make them  harder to find than a needle in a  haystack, so it is said.  Their campaign opened on the  first of the month and the first  few days the number of ships  destroyed were largely increased;  but after a week's combat with  them the British navy has shown  that it has studied the problem  thorougnly, and is able to deal  with it successfully..  We do not learn through the  despatches what the navy plans  to do or even what it is doing.  It does not believe in either boasting or advertising itself, but in  spite of all secrecy some facts do  leak out and we have learned  that the submarine warfare,  after les������ than two weeks, had  already began to subside, and it  is confidently expressed by leading men who ought to know that  it will prove tobe a failure, similar to.-_that of the dreaded but  futile Zeppelin raids.  New York papers, say that a  funnel shaped sea lane of patrol  ships, extending 300"miles from  the .British Isles westward has  been established by the British  Admiralty.    Passengers on the  Mackay Smith, Biair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST'   BRAND  SHIRTS,  PANTS,  OVERALLS,  MACKINAW  "MADE   IN   B. C  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES,CO. LTD., WANT men to represent  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B.C., them in different parts of  the Province in the sale .of their well-known hardy nursery'stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative'; Honest, energetic,men only are needed. 'We particularly  want a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should write at once for our 80 page Catalogue.  Bella Coola Experimental Plot.   Report for 1916  S. Le C. Grant, Experimenter.  Section 1.   Plot 1.  Clover���������Common red: seed sown 8 lbs. per acre; sown April, 1914;  blossomed June 15, harvested June 19; blossomed July 10,  harvested July 13. Results, two excellent cuttings, fed  greeri. .Remarks, ploughed under third growth in September.   Good heavy sod for potatoes in 1917.   ���������  ,     Plots, 2 and 3."    ' <?"  White Dutch: seed sown 10 lbs. per acre; sown April, 1914;  blossomed June 10, harvested June'15; blossomed July 6,  harvested July 10. v Results, somewhat poor stand. Dandelion and sour grass got upper hand.'   ���������  Alsike: seed sown 6 lbs. per acre; sown April,.1914; blossomed Jtine 12, harvested. June 19; blossomed July 10, harvested'July 13. Results, fair stand, not equal to Common  Red.  Remarks, both these ploughed under and summer fallowed. Sown to winter wheat and winter rye in September.  Both came up well and show good promise. .  Cunard liner Tudania from Liverpool report this. Light cruisers, light patrol boats and armed  trawlers literally lined the course  taken by the Andania from Fast-  net until she was safely out of  the war zones, it was said.  In regard to the present unrestricted submarine campaign in  well-informed circles in London  reports highly satisfactory as to  "surprises" for the Germans are  current.  "Don't worry alJout the submarines; the navy will give them  all the worry they want.,"'ran a  message issued the other day by  Vice-Admiral Bacon, and all the  experts seem to be in agreement  that such successes as the Germans have obtained in the first  twelve days of February should  neither warrant their preliminary boasts nor, arouse alarm ill'>  this country.  Nicholas Murray Butler, presi-  Plots, 4 and 5.  Alfalfa���������Variegated; seed sown 15 lbs. per acre; sown April, 1914;  ' harvested June 25 and August 2.     Results, fair stand, but  did not stool as well as should.  Grimm's: seed sown 15 lbs. per acre; sown April, 1914;  harvested June 25 and August 2. Results, good healthy  stand and becoming established. '��������� '  Remarks, both varieties in drills 16 in. apart. Did'not  fill out as well as should. Grimm's superior to Variegated  here.- Ploughed under for green manure. Sorrel and chick-  weed too abundant. Five rows variegated not inoculated a  failure.  Plot 6.   "  Potatoes���������Table Talk: sown April 15; germinated May 10; harvested October 6.   Results, fair, rather small.  Ashcroft: sown April 15; germinated May 10; harvested  October 6.   Results, fair, somewhat'knobby.  Reliance: sown April 15; germinated May 10; harvested  October 6.   Results, good, clean and good quality.  ' Early Russet: sown April 15; germinated May 8; harvested  October 6. ' Results, poor yield, but early and good quality.  Uncle Sam: sown April 15; germinated May 9; harvested  October 6.   Results, best yield, clean and.good quality.  Remarks, dry, cold season curtailed yields to some extent  Uncle Sam seems to be the-best, variety in this district..  ' "Produce more 1917."���������Hon. Martin Burrell, Dominion Minister of Finance.  ROYAL STANDARD  FIELD SEEDS  WE are extending our already extensive field seed business for  1917.   It is the'desire of the Canadian Government that the  people produce as much as possible during the ensuing year,  and we are arranging with the leading de'alers" throughout British  Columbia   and   Alberta  to carrv  a  complete line  of   ROYAL  " ' STANDARD. FIELD SEEDS.    These seeds are the choicest it is  possible to secure in the World's Markets. ' They are Government  inspected and carefully1 selected for purity.  . rieeds should be purchased early as prices inevitably advance as  the Season progresses. In all probability the market will be short  and it will be difficult later in the year to make purchases.  Order ROYAL STANDARD Field Seeds NOW.    If your dealer  cannot supply you write us and we will ship to you direct.  WRITE TODAY FOR FULL INFORMATION AND PRICE LIST  Vancouver Milling & Grain Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Let the Tea Pot tell you  GREAT  WEST  \      ������������������������������������'TEA -  is Better  LEES0N,DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers ��������� Vancouver, B. C.  Section 2.   North end.  brasses���������Italian Rye: sown April, -1915; -height 2 3-4 ft.; harvested July 1 and August 20. Results, healthy stand, good sod.  Two good cuttings.   Well suited to moist land.    .        ,  ; .,  Tall meadow fescue:"'sown' April, 1915; height 3 feet;  harvested July, land August 20..   Results, taller griass,: but  not such'a heavy yield as above.        j ',;,    ;;       ���������  ^ Remarks, both these crops are well established, and are  well suited for pasture crops.  .     Canadian Blue: sown April, 1916; germinated April 30;  height 6 in.   Results, fair catch, shows promise.  Meadow Fesco: sown April, 1916; germinated April 28;  height 8 in.   Results, fair stand, healthy and good sod.  Orchard Grass: sown April 1916; germinated April 30;  height 9 in.   Results, good stand and excellent ,sod.  Creeping Bent: sown April 1916; germinated April 29;  height 8 in.   Results, Good catch, well established.  Dwarf Sc: Perennial Rye: sown April 1916; germinated  April 28; height 6 in.   Results, fine even catch and good sod.  Remarks, All plots cut in October and left on ground as a  mulch.   Above plots are in a moist location and should do  well.   Orchard and Perennial Rye show best results so far.  To be concluded in four issues.  P  o  0  30EZ  30E  Hi-  O  D  *3  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  '.;>,'���������.���������-BETWEEN ���������'. ^     ,��������� ;���������  BELLA GO9LA and VANCOUVER  S. S.     CaMOSUn      Leaves  Vancouver every  Tuesday at 9 p. m. (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p.m.  ��������� S. S. " Coquitlam " .sails from Vancouver fortnightly, ��������� carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of; Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, CarrallI St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.   .���������:".���������;���������  hoe  e  HOC  Advertise your Wants .in; the Courier  1 iiwwuwMimwAmMtonwMnMffffl It  Saturday, February 24,  1917  SELLA, COOLA COURIER  u  I HOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE    - _  . AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  IN SUMS OF $500 OR ANY  MULTIPLE THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from tho date of  purchase. , '  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as tho equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issue  in Canada othor than an issue of Treasury Bills or other liko short dato security.  Procoods of this stock aro for war purposos only.  A commission of one-quarter of ono per cont will bo allowod to recognizod bond and  stock brokers on allotments made in respect of applications for this stock-which bear their  stamp. J l '  For application forms apply to tho Deputy Minister of Financo, Ottawa.  DCPARTMCNT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA,  0CT0BEH 7th, 191G.  V8mmmm>\mmmi>mism  dent of Columbia University, declared in an interview in New  York a few days ago that the  British have captured no fewer  -than 200 German submarines.  Dr. Butler said the,German submarine plan' will not succeed.  ' The British patrol and the active  submarine arm of the British  navy will prove their sufficiency  adequately and effectively to deal  with the blockade, he declared.  ' There has been a great-outcry  among the ,Germans a'nd their  sympathizers against the so-called cruelty of the British in refusing to allow food stuffs to  enter Germany to relieve the  innocents.  These same parties, however,  have no fault to find with,the  Germans reducing a perfectly  peaceable nation to the verge of  starvation without any provocation whatever. The Germans  should not complain if the they  have to take some of their own  medicine."  Admiral Sir John Jellicoe,  commander of Britain's navy.  Third Annual Report  of  Bella Coola Experimental Plot  1916   ���������  S. Le C. Grant, Experimenter  For the third season consecutively the five acre plot, situated  on the farm of,Mr. S. Le C. Grant  about four miles from Bella Coola,  /���������  CLUB OFFER  "\  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading-weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates. '   The Courier   ���������������������������;.- $^   Both papers  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50   r^ $2.00  $2.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00l  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for  $2.00  The Courier $1.00   goth papers  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal . . 1.00  jQT $U5  $2.00  Vs  .  s The four papers may be had for $4.50.  ,/  was operated by the owner assisted by his son, under the direction of your representative.'  Crops under Test. -  " In continuation of the experiments of previous years, cultural  and variety tests were carried  on with various grains, grasses,  roots, potatoes and vegetables.  Some very good results were obtained, all through, in spite of  somewhat unfavorable weather  conditions. '      '  In addition to the regular plot  results of various crops as tomatoes, onions, corn, etc.; were  observed on land' immediately'  adjoining.  Arrangement of Plots.  The division of the five acres  into plots remainded the same as  in 1915. The crops were sown  with as much attention to rotation as possible. Plan of plots  remains the same as in 1915.  Season of 1916.  Though commencingearly, the  warm ���������spell was "evidently premature and a cold, dry period  followed, which checked several  of the earlier crops in their first  growth and considei'ably curtailed their yields and chances of  maturing. A dry spell also occurred during June and for a time  seemed serious. However, the  high water occurred just in time  and provided sufficient sub irrigation to save the'situation, and  in some cases permitted exceptionally good crops.  Pests.  The ravages of the Cruciferne  Root Maggot caused considerable  damage in spite of all attempts  to control. Cutworms were also  present, but were easily kept  under control with poison bran  mash. Other insects noticed, on  the fruit trees adjoining the Plot  and in the district, were, Green  and Black Aphis, Cherry and  Pear Slug, Tent Caterpillar.  The  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  \    REGULATIONS  fOAL MINING IUGHTS of Uie Dominion, in  ~", Mamioba, Saskatchewan and Ai.ukkta,  the Yukon Tebiutoky, the Noktii-w est Territories mid in a jKirtion of the I'bovinck of  ItJtITISII Coi.UMHIA. may \w IhuuihI for ������ trrai of  twenty-une youiB at nn annual ri'ntnl of $1 an  acre. NuL more than 2.DG0 acres will be li;uaod  to one upj.licuiil.  Application fur a Ir.'iso mubt be mwie by the  applicant in pertton to the Audit or Sub-AKvnt  of the district in which the ritchts applied for  are situaltxi.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unaurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  foe of $5 which will be rcfund<xl if the rinhta  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton,  Tho person operating the mine shall furnish  the Audit with sworn returns accomitine for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the ros alty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such ipturns should be  furnished at least once a year.  'Die lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessniy for the working of tho mine  at the rale of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N.B.���������Unauthorised publication of this advertisement will not be paid for,���������30C90.  BUSINESS CARDS  nor  urn  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers, of B; C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Far Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  0-11  2SOE  )     O  0>-~~3H> _2~S>-(> <20_>_-_KC~H>'~9~S���������0���������a_MO  Comfort and luxury assured at a  minimum cost.   Many Prince Ru-,  pert testimonials prove its worth  HaveYouGot$20?  ���������     If not your credit is good  . . '������������������  Harry Hanson ,',  SpeciaS Water Heater  (Patented in Canada) j������  Installed in your kitchen range  will give you all the hot water  you can use within thirty minutes  after .fire is started. 121 nbwi/in  use in Erinee Rupert and every  user a booster. You don't know  hot water.comforts till you have  seen these results. $2.0,00 is the  Cost. Absolutely no charge unless satisfactory.  A bath supply within twenty minutes  after fire is started and then a new supply every twenty minutes thereafter.  Wall radiators can also be run from  your hot water boiler and other rooms  heated with1 no extra cost for fuel.  The Result.Will Surprise You  Investigate!  liable  r  Harry HansonThPe,a!  P. O. Box 395  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C  Dealers and Trappers  GET THE   HIGHEST  PRECE  FOR YOUR  P. O. Box  863  157 McDougall  Ave.,  EDMONTON, Alta.  <������> v/   We pay all express and  ^y / mail charges.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OP   COAST���������BANGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver. B. C. occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20 chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30. 1916.  Jan. 6-March  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OV   COAST���������BANOE   III.  Take Notice that I, Mark Smaby, of  Ocean Falls, B. C, occupation timber  cruiser, intend to apply for permission  to purchuse the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Pulp Lease 205;  thence North 20 chains; thence East 20  chains; thence North 20 chains; thence  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20  chains; thence East 20 chains; thence  South 7 chains more 'or less ,to high  water mark of Cousin's Inlet; thence  following along said high water mark  in a westerly direction to a point due  east of this post; thence West 12 chains1  more or less to .this post, containing  140 acres more or less.       '. '  ������������������'��������� ,.������������������....   (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 26, 1916.  . Jan. 27-Mar. 24.  TheMason <_T RischPiano  of to-day Witt make plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO FINER  PIANO MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  tfjl Let us attend your Victor Record  jJ mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  "Mason & Risch Ltd.  I   738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  yJyP_^~^:^-^_^C~^~-~----s-'_^[^"=-~ ���������_-  t-|--ir������r ��������� _���������_.-_- -~ir������ ��������� _   ���������"������i\���������   "-_,"    "1  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  .    ' CANADA.  One Year ..................���������������������������..$1.00  Six Months  .;:;........ .0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.      ,  One Year. .., -.<������������������-.���������' ��������� ���������-:. ...'$1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One ������������������.Year.'..-. ........ ��������� - ��������� .$1.00  1X7HAT person so happy and conten-  ,   ted as the prosperous farmer?  \X7HAT person so independent?  "^i/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  CZD  THE REASONS for this enviable condition of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The landis fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable; long- warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  ELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.'  Enclosed please find....  for Bella Coola Courier for  .". ..subscription  . Name. ....^ ...���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  ���������  P. 0......... .......... :.���������:...  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed 1  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, February 24,  19)7,  ���������H.mi     ii i ������������������WBP*C������W  0'ls  nor:  H 11  lobs  :or  owner  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver, and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  // will be to your interest to. keep well informed regarding, the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  Report of Bella Cooia Experimental Plot  (Coutinut-d from column 3, page 3.)  usual remedial   measures were  recommended.  1 , Diseases.  Common Scab of., Potatoes  (cospora scabies). Was very  prevalent on the Plot owing to  the growing of potatoes on the  same ground without a sufficient  number of years between crops.  Apple Scab (venturia pomi).  Is also becoming quite prevalent  and more systematic spraying  will have to be done in order to  get clean fruits.  ,Black Spot Canker (sphaerop-  sis malorum). Is found on some  of the older trees in the district.  There was also a slight infection of Smut of Grains (ustilago  avenae) also (ustilago zeae).  Results of Work.'  There is no doubt that the  work carried out in the past three  seasons has been of extreme  value to the development of farming in this district. A great many  crops such as Alfalfa, Alsike,  Clover, Buckwheat, Vetch, have  been tried here for the first time  and, being successful, have been  brought to the notice of the settlers, thereby increasing their  scope.   , ,-,  With the crops already grown  it has caused an improvement by  the introduction of better varieties and better cultural methods.  Mr. Grant has demonstrated  that, in spite of difficulties' oi  transportation, by growing vegetables of quality there is a good  opportunity of obtaining an extra income from this source. He  has sold to Ocean Palls during  the year, lettuce, cabbage, celery,  carrots, onions, cucumbers, tomatoes and apples, obtaining quite  satisfactory prices both there and  locally.  The trials on the plots have  proved that with reasonable attention almost all classes of general farm crops and vegetables  can be grown with success in this  district.  Future Work. ���������  That the experiments be continued along similar lines, with  special attention to grains, grasses, potatoes, corn and mixtures:  for silage, and cover crops.  Respectfully submitted,  A. R. Neale,  Assistant Horticulturist.  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  ���������*-*������>���������f-Mimi-iimftffW' ���������*���������' ��������� n**,"*'Tfnr-i iiitii  $1 a Year  :   Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  HOI  HpIIE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  HAMS  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioners  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  -~    at the: front.  BUY  rnmimm of cnwADfl  THREE-YEAR  MHOW������<MIMHMHMMUaHHUaMm  War Savins Certificates  $ 25.OO   for   $21.SO  BO.OO      " 43.00  100.00      " 86.OO  INDIVIDUAL PURCHASES LIMITED TO JI50J.  FOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY AT ANY BANK  OR ANY MONEY ORDER POST OFFICE,  JAN. 9,  1917  Finanoe   Department  Ottawa  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  ildse  9  LEADING   DEALERS 'IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    ($  HWTIMlrffl  Will You Help?  If so, Mr. Francis R., Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Ogilvie's  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  letter order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the most suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.   Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD if  ������  YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  HLSIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  jg^^^uuinm^^OiJiiiiiitiigYH"''"''!!^'"1""^  WEATHER REPORT FOR JANUARY  Compiled  by  Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 33.   Minimum, 24.  Highest Max. (9th) 45. Lowest Min. (30th) 12  below zero.   Rainfall, 3.51.  Snow 16 in.  Rainfall for the year  (1916) 40.S9 inches.  BL.5-NO. 11  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24,  1917.  $1.00. a Year  "All Must Perish"  Jerlin, Feb. 21.���������Official state-  lnt says: "All who venture in  barred zone must perish."  Prussianizing Poland  Lmsterdam,  Feb. 21.���������-Germ-  is thoroughly Prussianizing  jund and despoiling1 her forests  'ealth.    Jews are being ma!-  ited and the jails in Warsaw  filled with civilians.  y ...  rench Capture Prisoners  {:...;���������.. ������������������������������������������������������ '.  tens, Feb. 21���������French troops  Sturemany prisoners in a sur-  ?e raid north.of Fleury and  it-of Waterville. In Oiseand  fne region considerable artil-  activity, elsewhere calm.  mger of U. S. Clashing  rith Germany Not Over  'ashington,   Feb.  21.-Real  if' "' ���������   ���������     ���������  jger of actual clash with Ger-  |fiy cannot be removed until  ; Kaiser's government revokes  1 decree for submarine war-  Detention of Americans  le Yarrowdale case and other  ies are in themselves admit-  *  \y serious. ��������� - --:,���������  |wo unharmed American mer-  intmen in Germany's barred  le and both bear cargoes held  jftraband by Germany.    Their  ���������ty from now on until definite  *<l of their arrival in port is  le will be subject of liveliest  jrest in officialdom.  I-pionage Bill passes Senate.  Could Raise Second Loan   j     London,  Feb.  21. ��������� The Overall  subscribed new British war loan  is described by the Times newspaper as a "colossal subscription," and goes on to say that  Britain's prompt response to the  war finance requirements is a  message which speaks to the  world in no uncertain tones. The  country could raise a second loan  if necessary.  Norwegian steamer Dalbeattre  was sunk by the shell fire of a  German submarine. Two Americans were on board and the  crew were on the open sea for  thirteen hours.  Enemy lines on the Mesopota-  mian front are being steadily  pushed backward.  We carried out a successful  raid this morning East Souchez,  taking a few prisoners.  Usual artillery activity on remainder of fronts.-  India will do munition work.  Central Empire now being mobilized by Sir Thomas Holland.  Princes of, India give liberally.  Russian government "will devote one hundred thousand roubles to establish merchant fleet.  ~ British authorities propose enlisting women, will utilize them  as cooks, etc.  Sweden Protest  i>'������$frr!r'-~>V-yi'i  mi  EH!  PL  KK5  I  I  m  \w York Times Says:  \Hour to Strike Overdue"  .w York, Feb. 21.-A. San-  <>f Hearst's Deutsches Journ-  i d president of the Central  ��������� ts war film exchange, and  ���������V. Wunneburg, Sandel's as-  aiit, have been arrested for  7.il espionage propaganda in  * York to aid Germany. San-  \. as prominent in the attempt  i oe Boy-Ed from guilt. Brit-  authorities gave the tip. Pro-  ure was to  send newspaper  to England on pretext,  ew York  Times says:  "the  r to strike is overdue."   The  at Democratic journal shows  i of parting with the presi-  t Impatient of delay, the  cv declares that Americans  humiliated by Germany's em-  po, humbled and disgraced in  ������������������yes of the world, but pas-  AJlies of the Huns. Pacif-  are castigated by the journal  responsible for American  its being trampled upon and  lhilated.  j^Crying "we want bread" over  {������vO0g women, bareheaded and scan-  .,-itgy clad stormed the City Hall  '/$ejm mding relief,  from   Mayor  ^jll|tchell from high, cost of living.  , -^9(l11^ d eel ared tnefr;':Idrtiilies to  ' ^-'starving.    Most of the women  -���������'eairied babies, their faces show-  *fi_? the pinch of hunger. Drastic  on to reduce cost of food in  York to be demanded by a  mittee headed by Dr. A. H.  $edmun.  Kir-fiw.  Copenhagen, Feb. 21���������Swedish  minister at Berlin has been instructed to make formal protest  to Germany with demand for  compensation for the loss by,tor-  pedoing of the Swedish steamer  Varing.  6076 Vessels Arrive British  Ports Since February 1  London, Feb. 22.���������Sir Edward  Carson in the House of Commons  today declared submarine menace  as grave and serious and is growing, but confident measures now  being devised will gradually���������miti-  gate its seriousness. Four hundred thousand sailors wanted for  additional force for naval expansion. Lord Fisher, former first  sea lord, placed in charge as president of Board of Inventions.  . During the period from February 1 to 18, 6076 vessels arrived  in British ports and 5873 left, despite German blockade. - The  hope Germany starvingout England by submarine, ruthlessness  has gone glimmering.  Order-in-Council announced today provides that vessels carrying goods to and from enemy  ports are liable to capture and  condemnation unless they call at  Removing Art Treasures  The; Hague, Feb. 22.���������Manj  art treasures from Alsace and  Lorraine suddenly removed to the  German cities of Stuttgart and  Munich.  Berlin, Feb. 22���������Baron Krupp  presents iron tie-pins to faithful  employees instead of usual gold  purse.  Paris, Feb. 22.���������Entire front  is all quiet.  Ottawa, Feb. 22. ��������� Order-in-  .Council passed prohibiting Cana-  adian women and children from  visiting Britain and France.  allied^ports en route for examination of their cargoes. Blockade  of Germany apparently complete.  .British steamer Brigade, 425  tons, sunk, crew saved.  British capture entire garrison  on Sinai peninsula.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  UiS,  to Enquire Into    **  High Cost of Livingstons dim  Washington, Feb. 22.���������Presi-  is determined that Congress shall  pass immediately four hundred  thousand dollars appropriation  which Federal trade commission  requested for nation wide food  price probe. Senator Borah demanded that Congress remain in  session until adequate steps are  taken to bring prices back to  normal, he says people are victims of speculators and combina-  B. F. Jacobsen's multifarious  interests made it necessary for  him to leave his cosy home in the  middle'of the winter-to take a  "trip to Vancouver, which very  likely will extend to the West  CoastK.,where he has very promising mining property. The time  of his return is problematical;  but we shall look for big things  when he does arrive.  The long spell of wet and mild  Herbert Sutherland has return-! weather has   given   way   to   a  ed to his usual "scejie of activitiesj severe cold snap accompanied by  after spending several weeks en- a cutting, cold wind.    Old winter  joying the exciting life and salu- delights in showing us that h^  joi the coast cities,   strength is still unimpaired  S. S. Camosun has resumed  her place on the Bella Coola run,  but on her initial" trip failed to  arrive on^ time. She arrived  about two o'clock'Saturday p'. m.,  nearly 24 hours late.  Her passenger list was composed of Mrs. J. R. Morrison,  Herbert Sutherland and W. E.  Gallienne. -  The only outgoing passenger  was-B. F. Jacobsen.  gear of all kinds and will continue the business at the old  stand in the spirit of his predecessor. Mr. Ratcliff will have  to hustle some.  visit tOv.settle his affairs.  Mrs. J. R. Morrison has also  decided to make her home^ at  Ocean Falls as Mr. Morrison has  accepted a position with the  Pacific Mills Ltd.   Mrs. Morrison  ^ W. E. Galiienne has fors^lfenb^he  gang at work  repairing  his hx>me in Sella Coola^d.ci^pne wharf found the cold and the  l/fifs lot with ^Je ^Tlens'"*(SpCt^%ong wind too strong to face  'humming town^bf'Ocean^1_V^& consequently abandoned the  He'1 is paying our burg a flytfi_Sfc������*ork umtilajnore congenial tirne.  F.  A.  Johnson  is  busily  en  gaged in hauling the lumber for  the extensive additions to be  made to the cannery.'"  The void created in our village  by the removal of the ever active  tions whichare milching millions      ends ^ ^ ^ ^ wceks w_ E  Gallienne wi��������� be fllled by  "etln^L^pinrnehundredUd take away   her   household MiloRatcHff, who has bought  is sunk.  |goods next week.  Mr. Gallienne's horses, cows, and  THE     MINISTER     OF     FINANCE  REQUESTS  THE    PEOPLE    OF    CANADA    TO  BEGIN NOW  TO   SAVE   MONEY   FOR   THE  NEXT WAR LOAN  JAN. ������.  JBI7  DEPARTMENT O* FINANCE  OTTAWA  A. M.. Tyson, the inspector of  Indian agencies, is now working  his way north in a new sphere of  work. He has orders to raise a  large number recruits among the  Indians for a forestry battalion.  This will be an ideal chance for  the Indians to engage in extensive traveling and seeing foreign  lands without much risk to life  or limb. The opportunity offered  should be embraced by all the  younger Indians. It would give  them new ideas, more knowledge  and experience, and would give  them on their return a standing  in their respective tribes superior to any of those who stayed at  home.       ~   The Farmers' Institute ha?  been indulging in meetings every  week for quite a spell. Accounts  of all of them cannot be given  as space is limited, but as they  are always held in the Colony  Hall, removed about ten miles  from our, sanctum, .the editor  cares not to impose upon his  legs the. task of walking that  distance every time his reporf.o-  rial duties would demand it.  We were present, however, at  a social evening given by the Institute on the evening of the 14th  instant, when the whole valley  and his best girl were out to enjoy themselves and also to listen  to an entertaining and instructive speech by A. R. Neale, our  provincial horticulturist, who at  that time had spent nearly two  weeks among our farmers.  The proceedings of the evening  were opened by Mr. Widsten, the  president, pounding the table  with his fist and calling on Miss  Clara Widsten to give an organ  recital. After that Mr. Neale  was called upon and the interest  shown in his presentation of  practical pointers to the farmers  was such that his speech seemed  altogether too short when he  closed amid enthusiastic applause. After that it was hard  for the sedate president to keep  the bubbling spirit of the audience below the boilingover point.  Every musical piece rendered  was vociferously applauded and  encores insisted upon in every  instance.  Songs were given by Miss K.  Hallowes, Mrs. Holte, Mr. Louis  Svisdahl and Mr. Neale. These  songs were interspersed by  speeches of D. H. Hoage and C.  Carlson. ^  The accompaniment to the  singing was performed by Mrs.  Urseth, Mrs. Holte and Mr. Louis  Svisdahl.  0. J. Nygaard, the efficient  secretary of the Institute, secured ten new members for the organization.  The evening's program ended i  with the singing of the National  Anthem when everybody went  home vowing that if another  such a chance of enjoyment ever  presented itself he or she would  be there.  Another well attended meeting  of the Institute was held Monday  the same week and another oh  Wednesday the week following  and still another on Tuesday of  this week. We may have something to say in the future in regard to the business transacted  at these different meetings.,  The chief topic of discussion  at the several meetings of the  Farmers'Institute held this year  has been co-operation, how to  make its benefits available to the  people of this valley and to make  it applicable to their circumstances. The time thus spent has  not been wasted. Ideas have  been formed and one plan at  least has crystallized with the  result that now the members of  the Institute are fully committed  to give co-operation a trial.  At a meeting held at Colony  Hall, Hagensborg, on Tuesday  last, a system of buying and selling co-operatively was decided  upon and an' agent elected as  manager.  Despite the inclemency of the  weather there was a large turnout, considerable and long discussions ensued, but the utmost  harmony prevailed, which augurs  well for the enterprise.  C. Carlson was elected agent  for a term of three years.  His first official duty will be to  sell the surplus potatoes on hand  and with the present scarcity and  soaring prices he will not find  this difficult.  It is not believed that the new  departure of buying co-operatively will have any perceptible effect upon the business of the  local merchants, as it is not anticipated the volume of the trade  through the agent will exceed  that of the mail orders sent out  before. It is expected that in  pooling their purchases the farmers will obtain better prices  and make savings in transportation charges sufficient to make  the new system preferable to the  mail order kind.  BELLA COOLA AND DISTRICT RED  CROSS AND PATRIOTIC FUNDS  STATEMENT FOR JANUARY  Red Cross Fund���������collected by  Mr. Broughton, $19.00; by Miss  L. Schulstad, $19.50; and by Miss  A. Livelton, $4.75.   Total, $43.25  Patriotic Fund, $13.50.  I    (Elntrrh Gutter    \  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a.m.  7 : 30 p. m.  V       Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  t W. H. Gibson.  \ All Are Welcome.  <fS  H l~ ��������� i . ������������������������* r  I'M?  f 3" R  #  in*,.i rift* ;#f  mi-w  km  fell SI  *   j  hm   ������  !#;!  WW  J{'���������":)Slfci*'_i  Silk .vMriMa *  iff;- >%>/4l������  " 1 ������> *    ! "31'**���������������*���������*������: ������  |ji,5l-V"''-.''^  i f b i -"t- ���������? 4.:  Slaiiiii  f 7  '  !i'[i,l  * H  Sit.'; |"i*'l*f*'*!  \ lifro'lSfc  ' I  i  1  ,.fo  is v  I  <  4'A ;  !lf-  ������������������������  /,  i ' 1  its-  'I''  r ������������������������  f r  2  BELLA 006LA eotJRlER  The Courier  PublishedWeekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  $1.00  0.75  SUBSCRIPTION RATES  Canada  1  Year '.   6 Months      3 Months    0.50  United States  1  Year  .$1.50  .  United Kingdom  1 Year $1.00  -Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at, once. Changes in" address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,  Apply at  Office.  To CoiUlESPONDENTS��������� While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and adtiress of every writer of such letters  must be giyen to the editor.  The Editor..reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  'j^aUtu jmpuli Hitprpma rat if x."  SATURDAY, FEB. 24, 1917  Hon. Ralph Smith. --  As a shock to the people of the  province came the news of the  death of the Minister of Finance,  Hon. Ralph Smith.  He  was   of 'the  chosen few  whose, powerful personality and  intellect were such that, neither  poverty' nor lack of education  could keep down.    Boi>n inNew-  castle-on-the-Tyne   in ��������� 1858   of  parents in poor circumstances,  v   after receiving only a rudimentary-education at eleven ��������� years  of'age. he had to work for his  livirig^in the coal mines of Northumberland. "But in later years  whea his.genius'began to assert  its elf,he -w'asTable.lar geVy, to o v er-  come-'the'disadvantages of lack  of education. ...r- '".-V ".  ,   Although' he was able to overcome the many obstacles.in the  way and attain to the foremost  -   positions in  leadership he was  '    conscious of his limitations and  was   therefore   able  to   guard  himself from being embarrassed  by them.  Being  born  and   brought up  among the laboring classes he,  throughout his whole distinguished carejer, earnestly and sincerely   embraced   their   cause  and  labored to improve their condi-  . tions.    In the old land he became  a prominent labor   leader   and  when he, in 1892, emigrated to  Canada and came to Vancouver  Island his ability and integrity  were not slow in being recognized and he, rose in the course of  .  two years to -a" leading position  among his fellow-laborers.  He served, his province a short  time in the provincial legislature,  from which: he .resigned to be  elected by a majority of nine to  one in the Dominion parliament,  where he served three terms.  In the Jast provincial election  he was elected to the 'legislature  as a member for Vancouver cit\  and when, after his appointment  to Minister of Finance in Mr.  Brewster's cabinet, he sought the  endorsement of his constituency  he was elected by the largest  majority any candidate ever received in the province.  He was an earnest, consistent  member of the Methodist church,  vice-president of the Lord's Day  Alliance and a lay preacher of  unusal ability. His loss will be  keenly felt by the new govern  Mobilizing the Farm.  Great Britain has found it  necessary in the task of selfr  preservation to organize all the  industries of the land, that of  agriculture not excepted.  With the war far removed from  our shores this form of defending the country has not received  serious attention from the leaders of the nation; for the reason  that even if the war is prolonged  for a longer time than expected  it may not have to be resorted to  as a necessity.  But the idea of the state controlling and directing private industry has   received   a   strong  push forward  during the war,  and what before that event was  looked upon as an idea that could  only find a placein a disarranged  intellect has since then become  a thing favorably looked upon as  entirely practicable.    As a consequence,   it  is   probable   that'  when peace is restored the nationalizing of great industries will  become quite general.  In  view of the ever soaring  prices of .food  stuffs; the fact  that we are all, without exception,- dependant.upon  the land  for our living- and also national  prosperity and,  may it be.said  with regret, the inefficiency, lack  of method and ignorance prevalent among theproducers it seems  that "if  there is   any industry  which requires national control  more than other it is agriculture.  We are all glad that the different governments have established separate departments foi  the purpose of-fostering agricul-  ture_~and thajt these.'are doing excellent work and '-"-would accom-  plish far more than .they are doing if the average-farmer was  more susceptible to receiving advice and following it.  We are therefore of the opinion that even during times of  peace it may .be found highly  profitable for all concerned to  heed the advice of the "News  and Leader," London, which in  an editorial says:  "The individual farmer, small  or large, must be brought under  the same direction and control  as the proprietor of an engineering works or any other under-  taking-laidurfder contribution as  a controlled establishment. He  must be told-what crops are expected of him; he must be assured of an adequate supply of the  necessary factors of production  ���������in particular labor, capital or  credit, and seed; and his produce  must betaken over by "the State  at a price which leaves' justice  even as between' producer and  taxpayer."  o    o    o    o    o  The New Submarine  ->. Warfare.  When this phase of German  inhumanity   and - frightfulness  was first announced,   with  the  statement thatsevera'l hundreds  new and  powerful   submarines  would- be  turned  loose on  the  ocean  traffic,   we will'' concede  that a strong uneasiness of feeling came over us.   ThVsubmarines have a way of concealing  themselves below the wide stretches of the ocean that make them  harder to find than a needle in a  haystack, so it is said.  Their campaign opened on the  first of the month and the first  few days the number of ships  destroyed were largely increased;  but after a week's combat with  them the British navy has shown  that it has studied the problem  thorougnly and is able to deal  with it successfully.  'We do not learn through the  despatches what the navy plans  to do or even what it is doing.  It does not believe in either boasting or advertising itself, but in  spite of all secrecy some facts do  leak out and we have learned  that the submarine warfare,  after les? than two weeks, had  already began to subside, and it  is confidently expressed by leading men who ought to know that  it will prove to be a failure, similar to that of the dreaded but  futile Zeppelin raids.  New York papers say that a  funnel shaped sea lane of patrol  ships extending 300 miles from  the .British Isles westward has  been established by the British  Admiralty.    Passengers on the  Mackay Smith, Blair-& Co ]\i  VANCOUVER,  B. C.       '  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST'   BRANn  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  .������*  I"  I.  Send for Catalogue  'MADE    IN    B. C.  Prompt Attention Given L  clt" Orde���������  r'rt  >  H.i  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO, LTD., WAWT  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE.W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in   - lo tm  the Province in the sale.of their well-known ha  for spring (1917) delivery.    The work is ploas;u  tive.   Honest, energetic men only are needed  want a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should write at once for our 80 \>uy  "jiK'foritrar  ���������"':>' !inm>rys  ������'/"'! rt-m'ur  'artieu;  UV  i  i'*l('piie.  Bella Coola Experimental Plot.   Report for 1916  S. Le C. .Grant, Experimenter.  Section 1.   Plot 1.  Clover���������Common red: seed sown 8 lbs. per acre; sown April, 1914;  -   blossomed June 15, harvested June 19; blossomed July 10,'  ���������    harvested Julyl13.     Results, two excellent cuttings, fed  green.   Remarks, .ploughed under third growth in September.    Good heavy sod for potatoes in 1917.  ���������". > r Plots, 2 and 3. -  :  White Dutch: seed sown 10 lbs. per acre; sown April, 1914;  blossomed June 10, harvested June'l5; blossomed July 6,'  harvested July 10. .   Results, sornewhat poor stand.   Dandelion and sour gras"s..go| upper hand.'   ���������  '*'*���������;,   Alsik.erjseed sown 6 lbs. per acre; sown April,.1914; blos-  ;-    somed JBne 12, haryested. June 19; blossomed July 10, har-  .   vested-July 13. .Results, fair stand, not equal to Common  Red: .  .  Remarks, both these ploughed under and summer fallow  ed. Sown to winter wheat and winter rye in September  Both came up well and show good promise.    '  Cunard liner Tudania from Liverpool report .this. Light cruisers, light patrol boats and armed  trawlers literally lined the course  taken by the Andania from Fast-  net until she was safely but of  the war zones, it was said.  In regard to the present unrestricted submarine campaign in  well-informed circles in London  reports highly satisfactory as to  "surprises" for the Germans are  current.  il'Wt ifct  uiii KiVfet  ������������������ v.aot/'f  <���������' other da  "Don't worry  marines; the nav  all the worry ti:  message issue, d t  Vice-AdmiraU^u'on, and a!!  experts seem to ������������������������<��������� ir. agrctr  that such success.-: as the i  mans have obtain.,[ jn tjje  tw-elvedays of February sb  neither warrant their preiii  ary boasts nor arouse aiarr  this country.  Nicholas Murray Butler,pj  ���������t  ���������UAS"  ;Spfe:;V::iV;  "Produce more 1917."��������� Hon. Martin Burrell, Dominion Mi  ROYAL STANDARD  FIELD SEEDS  WE are extending our already exten^iv.' ij.-J,j ���������-  1917.   It is the-'deaire of the Canadiiin <;t.v,-n  people produce as muqb a������ possible (iuri.-n. ih,  and. we are arranging: with the leading deal, r- Mr,  Columbia   and   Alberta   to earn'  a complete  iirv  STANDARD FIELD SEEDS.    >The������e seed* art: i;.  ������������������'���������'������������������ r <>: Fim:  r-u-oross  ���������r.t that  ..-uir,gy.  ���������v.-ut En  I'htv arc Governs  Plots, 4 and 5.  Alfalfa���������Variegated; seed sown-15 lbs. per acre; sown April, 1914;  harvested June 25 and August 2.     Results, fair stand, but  did not stool as well as should.  , Grimm's: seed sown 15 lbs. per acre; sown April, 1914-  harvested June 25 and August 2. Results, good healthy  stand and becoming established.  Remarks, both varieties in drills 16 in. apart. Did not  fill out as well as should. Grimm's superior to Variegated  here. Ploughed under for green manure. Sorrel and chick-  weed too abundant. Five rows variegated not inoculated a  failure.  possible to secure in the World's Markets,  inspected and carefully selected for paritv.  deeds should be purchased early as pricx* inc. :'/.!!���������. advaa  the Season progresses.    In all probability the rr.arkrt "willies!  -    and it will be difficult later in the year to uu-.kr ; urhares.  Order ROYAL STANDARD Field Seeds NOW    if v.,iJrde  ��������� cannot supply you write us and we will ship to >- i direct.  WRITE TODAY FOR FULL INFORMATION AND PRICE LIST  Vancouver Milling & Grain Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C  r__.--e-u'_et--___M  Plot 6.   "  Potatoes-Table Talk: sown April 15; germinated May 10; harvested October 6.   Results, fair, rather small.  Ashcroft: sown April 15; germinated Mav 10; harvested  Octobers    Results, fair, somewhat knpbby.  Reliance: sown April 15; germinated May 10; harvested  Qctober 6.   Results, j_-ood, clean and good quality.  Early Russet: sown April 15; germinated May 8; harvested  October 6.    Results,'poor yield, but early and good quality.  Uncle Sam: sown April 15; germinated May 9; harvested  October 6.   Results, best yield, clean and good quality  Remarks, dry, cold season curtailed yields to some extent  Uncle Sam seems to be the-best variety in this district  4  Let the Tea Pot tell you  great west  Tea  is Better  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers       : Vancouver, B.C  : ������  M. NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Rid-  ment and   his   untimely   death'1  mourned by all, irrespective of  party or creed.  _  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these dis-  Itricts.  Section 2.    North end.  Brasses-Italian Rye: sown April,-1915; -height 2 3-4 ft.; harvested July 1 and August 20.    Results, healthy stand, good sod  Two good cuttings.    Well suited to moist land.  Tall meadow fescuefsown- April, 1915; height 3 feet-  harvested July! and August 20.    Results, taller grass  but  not such a heavy yield as above.        (   ..    -  .^Remarks, both these crops are well established, and are  well suited for pasture crops.  Canadian Blue: sown April, 1916; germinated April 30-  height 6 in.    Results, fair catch, shows promise.  Meadow Fesco: sown April, 1916; germinated April 28-  height 8 in.   Results, fair stand, healthy and good sod       '  Orchard Grass: sown April 1916'; germinated April 30-  height 9 in.    Results, good stand and excellent sod.  Creeping Bent: sown April 1916; germinated April 29-  height 8 in.   Results, Good catch, well established.  Anv?������frf SClff.enni?! Ryf: S0Wn APriI1916l germinated  April 28; height 6 in.    Results, fine even catch and good sod  Remarks, All plots cut in October and left on ground as a  mulch.    Above .plots are in a moist location and should do   ^e11-    Orchard and Perennial Rye show best results so far  I  o  D  Z30E  I >|������|  301  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SK1:VI<  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  !>��������� S.      CamOSUIl"   Leaves   Vancouver  every  Tuesday at 9 p. m. (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p.m.  % S. S.   "COQUITLAM"   sails   from   Vancom  nightly, carrying Gasoline  and  Explosives,   w i  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  -r~ For,,r-tes of Freights, Fares and other informntir  nJ    , tec������ Carrall St.,  Vancouver; or Gko.  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  To be concluded in four issues.  no  Advertise your Wants in the Courier  ���������:h  4:.  1 i  ���������?> 7"!?.??~r "-3?f"3(!~t 2P������ >v"j;r-,V. >-1������k  lM3^&������������sfc?  v:  ������L.sSr4?>^fefe Wf^^  Kjrf.'if^._������3~^*.;! .'.vZf^z './9;.  $$Smfciay, February 24,   1917  i  ~$W.  !ws  BELLA COOLA COURIER  $  ���������**?��������� -mrsrwMiM  AV  leri  t  t     ' J*.  }  F  *  _-��������� ���������*  5 ��������� * __  + -  i * ij  r- 1  if   * I  %i  W'fesfi   ft  ������������������y act -'  "'liner, *���������  t'cti'sr! #  ���������  rati  lallfe  retmett  hefe  he firs!  >' shocsd  reiiir:-  ilam:'1'  r, pr_  ir*i__  j .-_������  ���������pa  ft  f-I  m  ,c  >     J_ '  I  .  i  3a  B Hi  f'-  TO INVESTORS  |HOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  IN  SUMS OF  $500  OR  ANY  MULTIPLE THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from the date of  purchase.  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issue  in Canada other than an issue of Treasury Bills or other like short date security.  Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.  A commission of one-quarter of one per cent will be allowed to recognized bond and  stock brokers on allotments made in respect of applications for this stock which bear their  stamp.  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA,  OCTOBER 7th, 191C.  ______________{  iht of Columbia University, de-  ared in an interview in New  rk a few days ago that the  itish have captured no fewer  an  200 ; German  submarines.  |r. Butler said the German submarine plan   will   not  succeed,  e British patrol and the active  bmarine arm of   the British  lavywill prove their sufficiency  lequately and effectively to deal  ith the blockade, he deelared.  Th ere h as been a great- ou tcr y  imong the Germans and  their  rmpathizers against the so-cal 1-  cruelty of the British in re-  lusing to allow food stuffs to  Inter Germany to relieve the  Innocents;       -^      ^  These same parties; however,  iave no fault-to find with the  r2rmans; reducing a perfectly  Peaceable nation to the verge of  jtarvatipn without any provocation whatever. The Germans  should not complain if the they  ive to take some of their own  ledicine. ~  Admiral Sir John Jellicoe,  commander of Britain's navy.  Third Annual Report  of  Bella Coola Experimental Plot  1916  S. Le C. Grant, Experimenter  For the third season consecutively the five acre plot, situated  on the farm of Mr. S. Le G. Grant  about four miles from Bella Coola,  e  CLUB OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading-weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  *\  The Courier   .       .       .       .       ��������� $1-00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for  .   .   $2.00  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00 D"  n Both papers  1.50 .        v *    tor   .  $2.00  $2.50  The Courier   .  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal  ��������� ������lM    Both papers  ���������______   lor   .   .   $1.75  $2.00  V_  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  J  was operated by the owner assisted by his son, under the direction of your representative.  Crops under Test. -  In continuation of the experiments of previous years, cultural  and variety tests were carried  on with various grains, grasses,  roots, potatoes and vegetables.  Some very good results were obtained, all through, in spite of  somewhat unfavorable weather  conditions.  In addition to the regular plot  results of various crops as tomatoes, onions, corn, etc., were  observed on land immediately  adjoining.  Arrangement of Plots.  The division of the five acres  into plots remainded the same as  in 1915. The crops were sown  with as much attention to rotation a.s possible. Plan of plots  remains the same as in 1915.  Season of 1916.  Though commencing early, the  warm spell was "evidently premature and a cold, dry period  followed, which checked several  of the earlier crops in their first  growth and considerably curtailed their yields and chances of  maturing. A dry spell also occurred during June and for a time  seemed serious. However, the  high water occurred just in time  and provided sufficient sub irrigation to save the situation, and  in "some cases permitted exceptionally good crops.  Pests.  The ravages of the Cruciferae  Root Maggot caused considerable  damage in spite of all attempts  to control. Cutworms were also  present, but were easily kept  under control with poison bran  mash. Other insects noticed, on  the fruit trees adjoining the Plot  and in the district, were, Green  and Black Aphis, Cherry and  PearSlug, Tent Caterpillar.   The  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  SYNO JSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  ("*OAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  v^ Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta.  the Yukon Territory, the North-west Territories und in a portion of the PROVINCE of  IijUTSSH Oui.umhia. may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,1560 acres will be leased  to one applicant:  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the ritfhtB applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections; and in unsurveyed territory tKe tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rijrhts'  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco"ntinK for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information- application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. H.--Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  g\ [c  HOI  D      O  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B.C.,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.   M fo  30E  Dealers and Trappers  O)  o  ���������<C  Comfort and luxury assured at a I  minimum cost. Many Prince Ru- ?  pert testimonials prove its worth   ?  f Have You Got $20 ?  If not your credit is good I  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BANGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver. B. C. occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West 20 chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30. 1916.  Jan. 6���������March  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  ItAlways  Pleases%s  I  Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented in Canada)  Installed in your kitchen range  will give you all the hot water  you can use within thirty minutes  after fire is started. 121 now in  use in Prince Rupert and every  user a booster. You don't know  hot water comforts till you have  seen these results. $20.00 is the  Cost. Absolutely no charge unless satisfactory.  A bath supply within twenty minutes  after fire is started and then a ncu) supply every twenty minutes thereafter.  Wall radiators can also be run from  your hot water boiler and other rooms  heated with no extra cost for fuel.  The Result Will Surprise You  Investigate!  Harry HansonThP9luR^,������ |  2 P. O. Box 395 A  I   139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.   |  DISTBICT   OP   COAST���������BANOE   III.  Take Notice that I, Mark Smaby, of  Ocean Falls, B. C, occupation timber  cruiser, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Pulp Lease 205;  thence North 20 chains; thence East 20  chains; thence North 20 chains; thence  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20  chains; thence East 20 chains; thence  South 7 chains more 'or less to high  water mark of Cousin's Inlet: thence  following along said high water mark  in a westerly direction to a point due  east of this post; thence West 12 chains  more or less to this post, containing  140 acres more or less.  (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 26, 1916.  Jan. U7--Mar. 24.  mm^^mmm  TheMason & FxischPiano  of to-day Will make plain our  privilege to stale with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  U  ������1 Let us attend your Victor Record  ^il mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  ������51^  *V^!  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year .'$1.00  Vjli/HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \)UrHAT person so independent?  \^/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent',  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  THE REASONS  for this  enviable condition of affairs   are   obvious  to  anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers- with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm pro-,  duce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  *-^ country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  .ti   :J  W '������  !#"l  '<!(.  f/.lj. ii1  ii  4  !  f!  1*1  |i:il:t-,":-J83  111  ���������(tf   ���������*   ^'"il  ;4.iiLiu isj-_.:,___s  .TH?:v:r'ni,:['.^������  1 18,1 jjM' i\i$  iff!    E      'I'-Hi Hrfli'8  f.sg.  1 n?3>.'!i4-fi  f f SV ."ifllP  . W  i )*-_    ri far-  Mil J.1 !;d !; f$s  "88  U  t i  i&jtftft.  V;  I .W  u'w '���������  >*���������  i.  T.at     * -a  ������������rr i������  ^h3??%  ii1 '*aa  Hi  i  5K������  / Y Ir  S     IT1  ><>��������� *   IK  .III    I      A ������S  5^  ! f   iiJt_J  I  '��������� i!  >f  fls  t  1  _  I"      '  V  BELLA  COOLA  GOURlER  Saturday,  February 24  /9T  (2l,[c  30E  u  Subscribe  for the  u  J9  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  7 ���������������������������  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles  // will he to your interest to keeP WeM tn-K  formed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section oj  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time. to keep  your name - before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the" country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  ��������� opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right.  Report of Bella Coola Experimental Plot  (Continued from column 3, page 3.)  usual remedial   measures" were  recommended.  Diseases.  Common Scab of Potatoes  (cospora scabies). Was very  prevalent on the Plot owing to  the growin-g of potatoes on the  same ground without a sufficient  number of years- between crops.  Apple Scab  (venturia pomi).  Is also becoming quite prevalent  and more systematic  spraying!  will have to be done in order to  get clean fruits.  Black Spot Canker (sphaerop-  sis malorum). Is found on some  of the older trees in the district.  There was also a slight infec-  tion of Smut of Grains (ustilago  avenae) also (ustilago zeae).  Results of Work.  There is no doubt that the  work carried out in the past three  seasons has been' of extreme  value to the development of farming in this district. A great many  crops such as Alfalfa, Alsike,  Clover, Buckwheat, Vetch, have  been, tried here for the first time  and, being successful, have been  brought to the notice of the settlers, thereby increasing their  scope.  With the crops already grown  it has caused'an improvement by  the introduction of better varieties and better cultural methods.  Mr. Grant has demonstrated  that, in spite of difficulties" oi  transportation, by growing veg:j  stables of quality there is a good  opportunity of obtaining an extra income from this source. He  has sold to Ocean Falls "during  the year, lettuce, cabbage, celery,  carrots, onions; cucumbers, tomatoes and apples, obtaining quite  satisfactory prices both there and  locally.  ' The trials on the,plots have  proved that with reasonable attention almost all classes of general farm crops and vegetables  can be grown with success in this  district.  Future Work.  ��������� That the experiments be continued along similar lines, with  special attention to grains, grasses, potatoes, corn and mixtures  for silage, and cover crops.  Respectfully submitted,  A. R. Neale,  Assistant Horticulturist.  MAKE YOUR DOLLARS  FIGHT  AT   THE   FRONT.  BUY  DOMINION OF CANADA   ��������� ______u____i maaKmmmMm^ti^^m^^Kmtnttm���������������������������������   \  THREE-YEAR  ____^__������t____Hi____������a_a__aa_aM~i~a-~ua_M������aMi  War Savings Certificates  $ 25.00   FOR    $21.SO  50.00      " -4-3. OO  100.00      " 86.00  INDIVIDUAL PURCHASES LIMITED TO $1500.  FOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY AT ANY BANK  OR ANY MONEY ORDER POST OFFICE  JAN. 9,  1917  Finanoe   Department  Ottawa  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  DU1LD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show!  that yoa are in earnest i3 to I  practise it. i (  Support the "Qmrier* &nd yoa |  Will You Help  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books,  Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist. :'-��������� -  ���������������1*2  i4.fi  The Courier  $1 a Year  t  i   Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  i'i  i  THE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packer* and Provitionert  Cdigary     y_oco���������ver     EdmontoB  Ogilvie's  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS  \     V  1     I ���������'  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN ikw  rynildsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchanciise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Mens,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    ������  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospedtors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the moft suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition,  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  j Best Goods���������Lowest Prices- Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  a������KH-B_o____BB_a_  E"^  '4-1  '* yi  m  &4  ������  ������  .   ������  .-tf  ^ttij^Sivj^^^i^^l^^alii

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