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Bella Coola Courier 1917-02-17

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 <7  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR JANUARY  Compiled   by Mr. C.' H.  Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temprrature: Maximum, 33.    Minimum, 24.  Highest Max. (9th)45. Lowest Min. <30th) 12  below zero.   Rainfall, 3.51. Snowl6in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.C9 inches.  VOL 5���������NO. 10  k    BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17,  1917.  $1.00 a Year  e.  White Star Liner Sunk  London, Fob. 14���������Five persons  wore killed outright when submarine sunk the White Star liner  Afric, seventeen of tlie crew, are  missing. The Afric was in the  employ of the British government and was a steel vessel of  12,000 tons. British steamer  Foreland, 19G0 tons, also sunk.  ,  Survivors of the steamer Saxo-  nian landed todayi ������ Two boat  loads of survivors were ailoat on  the open sea for 68 hours. Three  Americans among the crew.  Greek steamer Aghois Sypridi-  on, 7G3 tons, sunk.  The Times newspaper received  from the Serbian legation a copy  of a photo found on the body of  a German officer, '.showing six  Serbians hanging to posts .near  the railway station of Krushe-  vatz, Serbian territory now in  possession of Austria. Between  fifty and sixty thousand women  and children have been deported  and interned in Austria for  crimes.  British officials think Austria  ��������� would like to quit, butWilhelm's  visit to Vienna may bolster up  their flagging spirit^1 '  Reuter despatches from Berne  says officials of trade unions and  Socialist organizations, numbering approximately ten thousand,  hitherto exempted from military  service have been called up.  So, news from any of fronts.  Buenos Ayres, Feb. 14.���������Report says that a British cruiser  gets the German raider after a  gruelling battle off the Brazilian  coast.  Berlin, Feb. 15.���������Germany's  order dated February 12th, made  public today, declaring the "days  of grace" in submarine warfare  is ours. All ships which ply in  barred zone do so with full,knowledge, of the dangers imminent  to them and their crews.     r - ;.'  Paris, Feb. 15.���������German submarine campaign so .far. is ineffective. Last Monday 112 ships  entered French ports. A*rewai#l  of five hundred francs to the crew  sinking a submarine is offered..  Copenhagen, Feb. 15���������Norway  and Sweden delivered identical  despatches to Germany in protest  against the barred zone.  New York, Feb. 15.���������White  Star liner Adriatic reaches Liverpool safely. Cunard liner Car-  mania passes safely through  barred zone. Steamers Innish-  bwen Head and Lambert .sunk,  crews saved.  Count Bernstorff, well guarded, and the German;, embassy  were escorted to the liner-under  strict surveillance of U. S. troops.  Havana, Cuba, is practically  under marshal law. ���������  Rome, Feb. 15.��������� Italian aviators drop bombs on Pola arsenal.  0. S. May Allow Allied  Warships in Her Ports  . Washington, Feb. 14���������Senator  Salsbury today offered- a resolution to .throw down neutrality  bars and,ithrow".opfen��������� ali LVS.  ports to alli'ecT :warshipsy , ��������� He  said: .'"This might enable the  government,- 'without declaration  of war; to assist preventing violations of rights to'the seas by-  giving assistance to- those, at  present engaged'*iri combating  these violations." It is understood that 'Senator Salsbury\\  resolution has the complete approval of President Wilson.  By quickly and- sharply replying to, Germany's suggestion oi  negotiating for peace,, tending to  avert ..war, President Wilson  handedoutan hint to organized  pacifists and propogandists. He  pointed out -that, those working  agapinst.'war. are, laboring at the  wrong end/"pf the trouble! ' Ii  there -is armed'cla'sh', the president emphatically said,, the blame  rests upon' the'^shoulders of the  German /government. .,The way  to peace, he declared, is for Germany' to'"withdraw 'her' U boat  decree.' ' "- ���������  ' Germany's tactics'.towards Ambassador Gerard" and' other Americans has aroused anger, and  the official notice of the Yarrow-  dale ��������� prisoners being-again detained by Germany served to increase the growing, animosity,  against her. Demands for the  release of American prisoners on  board the' Yarrowdale is to be  made on Germany, and with the  demand will go an explanation  that ftfe States is riot seizing any  German ships or their crew.  Count Bernstorff sails on Wednesday. Dr. Barthelme, a German newspaper man, is an unwelcome visitor and Washington  prefers his return to the Vater-  land with Bernstorff. .,  Official heads'of "all big U. S.  corporations display great readiness to act jn event of war. Pre-  paring'-for- quick mobilization of  troops.-, ��������� Special committee selec-  ted'~fbr handling niahy angles oi  the organization. President's  inaugural parade to be pompous  pageant.  Sub Blockade Ineffective  London, Feb. 14- Britain takes  Germany's denial of any invitation of the United States for  parleying in submarine warfare,  as confirming previous reports  that the Imperial government is  determined submarine warfare  must go on regardless of everything else. Amsterdam despatches giving this German denial  today are receiving divided interest in' the press*with the announcement in the House of Commons showing the ineffectiveness  )f the undersea blockade.  'f Admiral Beresford declared  that Britain lost four million  tons of shipping since the war  began, but her shipbuilding replaced three million tons.  Long list of medals conferred  on Canadian officers and' men for-  gallantry in' the field ' by ���������, King  George,, was issued today.  American Schooner Sunk  Washington, Feb. 15.���������American schooner Lyman ,M. Law,  1300tons; sunk by German submarine, vessel set on fire by the  bomb. Americans aboard safely  landed. Break with' Austria  seems inevitable.  1 President Wilson is formulating first step to protect Americans in their peaceful and legitimate errands on the high seas.  According to belief of those close  to the president, the recommendation of the government to actively a^sisjt American ship owners to arm their merchant ships.  'Washington suspicious of Hun  influence and fear malign workings of German agents in Mexican-and Cuban affairs, may stir  Carranza to hostile acts.  Uprising in Cuba and government and rebel troops have already dashed at  Santa Clara.  the directors be instructed to engage an agent if satisfactory  terms could be arranged, and report results at a meeting to be  held on the 14th instant.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  Ottawa, Feb. 15���������Government  considering advisability of calling  out'country's militia forces to  patrol boundary.' Approximately  fifty thousand men .will" be congregated if scheme materializes.  Victoria, Feb. 15,���������Owing to  "the death of Hon. Raljih,Smith  the opening of parliament is delayed to March 1st,*      ���������;���������;':  Steamers Cross Safely  New York, Feb. 14.���������Seven  steamers from British ports make  trip, across the ocean without  mishap. , 'Cordon of warships  convoyed .'them, trawlers swept  lane clear of mines and cruisers  gave protection. British admiralty demonstrates wonderful  supremacy in protecting shipping  in:the-barred zone. u  Admiral Bacon says don't w.q'rry  about subs, Gentian boasts not  warranted. U boat successes  comparatively slight and should  not cause alarm.  S. S. Venture was not able,to  make" up the whole of the .24  hours lost on account of thick  weather on the. previous trip;  but arrived.in port 2 o'clock Sat-'  urday morning., ' ,  - The arrivals.were:-Mrs. WvE.  Gallienrie and-Mrs. A. Woods,  who came tip from Ocean Falls.  The passengers-departing were!  Miss M. Clayton,- Mr. and Mrs.  A. J. Neale, 'B. Brynildsen and  Hjalmar Schulstad.  B. Brynildsen, our enterprising  local merchant, is off on his annual trip to the cities of the south  .to replenish his stock of merchanr  dise and renew old acquaintances.  He intends to be away 4 weeks.  Hjalmar Schulstad becoming  tired of hibernating at home decided to try his fortunes at Rivers  Inlet, where it is his intention to  remain through the spring and  summer.  A. J. Neale, assistant provincial horticulturist, .during his  stay in the valley was certainly  considerably handicapped by the  state of the weather and the  depth of the snow, but in spite  of difficulties encountered he was  able to accomplish a great deal  of work, and the farmers are all  agreed that in him they have a  friend and well-informed adviser.  He promised to return in about  two months, when the fruit trees  will receive,special attention.  The raffle for an antique silver  belt buckle took place at Hagensborg last Saturday and resulted  ���������in.-tjiiejNickl/ finding.its way to  the tpwnsite, Mr. C. Tucker being the fortunate winner. ���������  The Canadian Prisoners of War  Fund benefits to the extent of  $12.50_ from the sale of forty--  eight- tickets, and that amount  has been forwarded to the secretary of the fund.  The; Farmers-' ��������� Institute held  another well attended and successful meeting at the Colony  Hall, Hagensborg, on Mondays  February 5th.  - G. B. Olsen was elected member of the board of directors to  fill the vacancy created by the  resignation of Albert Hammer,  and A. Nesvold was elected auditor. Co-operation received the  most attention in the'discussion  which formed the main feature  of the meeting. A. J. Neale,  the government horticulturist,  gave valuable information and  advice. The farmers decided to  avail themselves of an opportunity offered to buy 100 cases of  stumping powder on special  terms. The question of engaging an agent to sell produce was  discussed and it was decided that  The board of directors of the  Farmers' Institute held a meeting on Monday last week,- and  elected O. J. Lokken secretary-  treasurer of the Agricultural  Fair Association.  Mark the Eggs!  We have been asked to call the  attention of the keepers of poultry, to the "Eggs',Marks Act,"  passed by the last legislature.  As every person bringing eggs  to market and does not comply  with the provisions of the Act  is liable to a fine all the way up  to a hundred dollars,-it is quite  important that it should be known  what the Act requires. We therefore quote the section relating to  first grade eggs, and it may be  noted that the same rule applies  to second grade, preserved and  Chinese eggs:  "Every person carrying on  within the Province of British  Columbia the business of selling  o.r offering first-grade eggs for  sale by retail shall cause each receptacle containing or holding  such eggs to bear a placard on  which shall be printed in letters  not less than four inches in  height the name of the Province  or country of origin, and (he additional words "Fresh," "Cold-  storage, "or "Preserved, "as the  caso may be; such sign or placard  to be so placed that same can be  readily seen by all persons desirous of purchasing eggs from  such persons carrying on such  business."  Editor,  Bella Coola Courier.  Sir,���������In your paper of January  13th is an article entitled "Let  us hear from you." Itispossible  that the article will accomplish  the desired results and you will  receive all the communications  you can use, be that as it may,  it will do no harm to say that we  value the Courier and missed it  during its little rest.  Being a Canadian by choice as  well as by birth, E-nave. a strong-  interest in matters national that  to me are of great importance.  I also try to give matters eternal  the attention proportionate to  th.eir importance. It has occurred to me that since reading your  article that a letter from me oc  casionally might  be acceptable  to the Courier and its readers.  You,will, perhaps, agree with  me that the "Grace of God" and  the "Truths of the Bible" are of  great importance, and if it is not  outside of the objects of   the  Courier I would be willing to try  to place before your readers a  few verses of scripture and their  possible meaning and application,  to us.   I would try in "brotherly"  love" to study with you those  portions of the bible that may be  especially   important   for   our-  time. Our people are laying down  their lives   for   the  nation  as  others are for theirs, what may  we look for in' the future for the  nations in the light of the bible?  Our duties to .God, and the king,������  the danger of not always viewing  things in  war   time  from  the  Christian standpoint and of falling in this war  without a title  clear to a better life ought to be  of sufficient importance^ engage  our attention now.  Thos. R. Astloford.     -  Firvale, E. C, Jan. 15, 1917.  Hon. Ralph Smith  Dies Suddenly  Victoria,^Feb. 14���������Hon. Ralph  ShiitK, ritmister of Finance, succumbs"to uraemie poisoning after  brief illness. The announcement  caused profound shock. Deceased  statesman had a long and honorable record in public life.  THE     MINISTER     OF    FINANCE  REQUESTS  THE  PEOPLE    OF    CANADA   TO  BEGIN NOW  TO  SAVE   MONEY   FOR   THE  i  NEXT WAR LOAN  JAN. 9. IBI7  .  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE  ��������� ���������      '        '                                                                                 OTTAWA.  Ocean Falls News. ,  A new hospital buildirg is Le-,  ing erected and is now neaiirg  completion.    It will be up-to-date  in all respects arid a credit to the  'enterprising management.  A hall for all sorts of public  gatherings is already taken in  use and is much appreciated by  the people.  A Fire Hall is another public  building going up. It is being  erected close to ' Dr. Quinlan's  quarters, the post office, as it is  feared that the activity displayed  by the energetic postmaster may  cause heat through friction suf-  ficient to endanger property.  Quite an army of Japs are engaged in digging trenches for  sewers. The work was held up  for a while by the great fall of  snow, but is now 'again proceeding at full blast. One day one  of these' Japs was completely  buried by a cave in; after one-  half hour's .frantic digging he'  was pulled cut and everybody  expected him to be either dead  or at least considei'ably the worse,  for wear; but our Jap merely  shook himself, said "thank you"  and went immediately to work  again.   '     '     ; .     ^ -;  The work .'on the big dam is  going ahead rapidly as is also  the. building of the huge paper  mill' which is all.concrete..  Mr. and Mrs. Andy Woods are  in from their camp. Their launch  has had its cabin all torn off by  the action of heavy seas washing  over-it and piling it on the shore.  The Bentink (the company's tug)  towed the launch to Ocean Falls  where it is being repaired.  W.- E.  Gallienne from Bella  Coola, has moved down here and '  has gone to'work in the foundry.  Qli)urrlt ito?   1  Sunday School  Church Service  -    10:45 a.m.  ,-'.; 7:30 p.m.  V Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  t W. H. Gibson..  r ���������.��������� ���������������������������������������������/.:���������������������������  A All Are Welcome. /  BELLA  COOLA COURIER  Saturday, February 17,  I9i7  The Courier  bearers.   They know what the  military situation is and that is  !  Published Weekly at Bella Coola ry j why they are throwing prudence  tub Bella Coola Publishing Co. I/rn. I      ,',       ...        .    ,  land law to the winds.  ��������� In conclusion, let me say this  The barbarous and piratical warfare <which Prussia brings to our  coasts finds us ready all along  the line. We are organized; we  have a capable government; we  put our house in order just in  time. Berlin knows it���������knows  that we will be stronger and  stronger as time goes on."  SUBSCRIPTION RATF.S:  Canada  1  Year  $1.00  6 Month.       0.75  3 Months    0.50  United State*  1 Year $1.50  United Kingdom  1 Year....' $1.00  Subscription! payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,  Apply at  Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be ifiven to the editor.  The Editor reserves the riitht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk,  'Gallic jiopttlt iwprrma wit Iwe."  SATURDAY, FEB. 17, 1917.  Britain's Mighty Army.  Those people throughout the  world who had not a full knowledge of the indomitable spirit  of the British people have, until  quite recently, had a certain contempt for Britain's army.' While  they conceded her supremacy on  the sea they believed that her  organization of,the army was in-  efficient and her conduct of the  war blundering as compared with  the other great European powers. But this adverse opinion is  rapidly giving way to admiration  as the fact is becoming under-  stood that in the two and one-  half'years since the war started  Britain's'army. has developed into Europe's greatest war machine  The Fire Spreads.  The United States has, in her  dealings with German outrages,  shown a patience unparalled in  history.        ��������� ,  There may be several reasons  for this attitude, such as being  far removed from the scenes off  war her people failed to realize  its horrors; the large number of  German-Americans among her  citizens, the profits derived from  the manufacture of munitions  for the belligerents, unprepared-  ness, etc.  .German violations cf the international rules restricting war-  i  fare were, in instances where  lives of U. S. citizens had been  lost, met by protests which did  not avail to any great extent.  ' But at last the patience of this  the most patient of nations is  broken and United States has  severed her diplomatic relations  with Germany, and at this writing is on the verge of war.  ���������Germany's note to United  States of January 31st declaring  that beginning February 1st unrestricted submarine warfare  will be beguri^against her enemies or any neutrals venturing  NO ALUM  ( \V*aRJEDJc^  -PRINTED <  ^WHITEST  iliiS  will  iifll  Germany's not excepted.     ^  A statement to this effect has I within certain areas of the ocean  recently appeared in the press js the last straw which broke the  and it may be necessary to state  that it is not from some over-  enthusiastic admirer of everything British, but from a man  of the highest intelligence and  broadest knowledge, who for his  persistent criticism of Britain's  conduct of the war in its first  stages was openly and generally  branded as a traitor and his arrest as such was at one time  seriously considered.  Lord Northcliffe, the owner of  the London Times and generally  admitted the greatest living  journalist, on his return from a  visit to the western front in reply to the question: "Why has  Germany taken this action?"  namely, as regards unrestricted  submarine warfare, said:  "The Prussian reason is this:  They are desperate; we have  whipped them. They had the  greatest war machine ever constructed; We stopped them at  the Marne. -After wiping but between. Mons and. Meaux practically the entire British trained  strength, they have waited until  England has overtaken and passed them in men and material.  Our gallant Allies held them  while we made ready, splendidly  ready;   .  "I have been a critic of our  preparations. I am just back  from France, where I have seen  bur army, so I use words accurately in' describing it. It is beyond praise.  "We now stand on the land as  on- the sea. We havejgot Prussia  in a corner. She is doomed. Her  ruling house sacrificed eyerthing  for a trust in crowns. They  hoped to seat the despot on many  thrones  camel's back and United States  rebels. Germany graciously permits the United States to send  once a week one ship from New  York to Britain and one from  England to New York under  various restrictions, the ship to  be painted in rainbow colors and  flying certain flags.  Hitherto, the United States  government has shown absolute  indifference to German outrages  and violations of the laws of  humanity and international law  as long as these were confined to  the enemies of Germany or small  nations such as Norway, but at  this the latest outburst of fright-  fulness of which she cannot es  cape she can contain her- lofty  attitude no longer.  President Wilson after handing the German ambassador his1  passports made a report of his  action to Congress in a speech  and the response he met there  showed that the people of United  States are roused at last and will  not allow themselves to be  shamefully treated any longer.  , Mr. Wilson has directed notes  to the neutral nations asking  them to follow the example set  by his government and break relations with Germany. For this  act, which in the eyes of the Hun  is more unfriendly. than" wilful  murder, Germany feels highly  offended and threatens to declare  war on United States'.  And thus the conflagration is  ever spreading, and it seems to  us when in a pessimistic mood  that in time it will involve'the  whole world.  o    o    o    o     o  ' But we are not pessimistic.  Although deplorable it may be  this new phase of frightfulness  must so arouse the- neutral na-  tions that there will be a joint  effort of some kind on their part  which will bring the war to ah  earlier end.  Already numerous nations have  announced their approval of  President Wilson's actions and  the result of Germany's defiance  of the laws of nations will be  that she will lose even the nominal or seeming friendship of the  neutral world.  o     o    o    o     o  Even hospital ships will not be  spared by this wholesale murderer of Europe. In the rules of war  there is of course legitimate destruction of life, but it has long  been an established and observed  rule that the killingof non-combatants is murder pure and  simple. -Germany has under  various pretexts killed non-combatants, men, women and children j by th^'thousands since the  war began' and announces that  she will continue to do so. And  her rulers have the hardihood to  even appeal to God for His help  in their disregard of His laws.  i  O     0     Q . o     o  f        ,  The only' explanation to be  found for Germany's defiance of  all accepted rules of warfare is  that her internal conditionsare so  desperate that she adopts any  means' to bring the war to an  early conclusion.    It is to be  i  hoped she may succeed in this  praiseworthy effort.  O '    O       O       O       0  The' New .York Globe describes  the unrestricted submarine, warfare as an act of criminal insani-  ty in the following statement:  "Having begun the European  war by an act ot perfidy, the  German government now seeks  to end it by an act of criminal  insanity. . . . Upon neutral  rights Germany would wipe her  feetas upon a door-mat."  In the face of such crimes  against her fellow-nations where  will Germany stand in-her relations to them when' the war is  over?-  o'    o    o    o    o  An Election Impracticable.  The statesmen of Canada, who  in their anxiety to ��������� show their  loyalty, patriotism and appreciation of the soldiers at a time  when they were charged with  looting the treasury in favor of  their henchmen by allowing them  o ll  excessive prices for war supplies,  passed a bill to give the soldiers  overseas an opportunity to vote  in the coming election. They  now find it is impracticable, to  carry out the provisions of the  Act and urges this as a reason  against a war-time election.  Any one,  not a demagogue,  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  :���������: Who]  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST'  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS, OVERALLS,  MACKINAW  'MADE   IN   B. C  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN toWesent  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C��������� them in different parts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest, energetic men only are needed. We particularly  want a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should write at once for our 80 page Catalogue.  "Produce more 1917."���������Hon. Martin Burrell, Dominion Minister of Finance.  ROYAL STANDARD  FIELD SEEDS  WE are extending our already extensive field seed business for  1917. It is the desire of the Canadian Government that the  people produce as much, as possible during the ensuing year,  and we are arranging with the leading dealers throughout British  Columbia and Alberta to carry a complete line of, ROYAL  STANDARD'FIELD SEEDS. These seeds are the choicest it is  possible to secure in the World's Markets. They are Government  inspected and carefully selected for purity.  Seeds should be purchased early as prices inevitably advance as'  , the Season progresses.'  In all probability the market will be short'  and it will be difficult later in the year to make purchases.  Order ROYAL STANDARD Field Seeds NOW.   If your dealer  cannot supply you write us.and we will ship to you direct.  WRITE TODAY FOR FULL INFORMATION AND PRICE LIST,  Vancouver Milling & Grain Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  knew all along that this Act.was  mere play to the galleries"'and  that it was of no practical value  either to the soldiers or to the  country. But in' a matter con-  cerning,the rights and privileges  of those who are risking ;their  lives in the defence of our country it is not expedient to be critical and therefore the Act'was  not seriously opposed.  0' course, no one denies the  right for the soldiers to have a  voice in the'affairs of the nation;  but in.their case there are many  elements that make the exercise  of that right impracticable.  And now when the opposition  is demanding, an appeal to the  country the prime minister urges  the action of his government in  giving the soldiers on service in  Europe a chance to vote as an  excuse for not being willing to  comply with the laws of the  land in this respect.  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a' candidate'.for the  House'of ���������Commons' for this Rid-  Compare���������-Price for Price������������������  GREAT"  WEST  TEA  with the teas you are now using.  It's Better!  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  HOE  D?[!  HOE  ]&  Will You Help;  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands'  for what will benefit these di3-'  We are acting as trust'tricts.  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply..  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist.  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.e.;LT0.  REGULAR FREIGHT .AND PASSENGER SERVICE  ///���������' *���������'������������������:     BETWEEN    ; ;^ ���������;;���������,, ".-.-.���������.:  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  5. S. TOtfnOStlH     Leaves Vancouver every  Tuesday at 9 p. m.'       (Victoria'..day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p.m.     '  S. S. " COQUITLAM" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information,, apply to  Head Office, Cabrall St., Vancouver ; \o'r Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  ^d  HOE  5]������[C  30C  W  uurv������iiuiiim������������mmijun jmumimbi 'MumaaMum Saturday, February 17,  1917  ' BELLA; COOLA COURIER  jHOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE  IN SUMS OF $500 OR ANY MULTIPLE THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from the' date of  purchase. ��������� << ,  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issue  in Canada other than an issue of Treasury Bills or other like short date security. '  Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.  , ,      A commission of one-quarter of one per cent will bo allowed to recognized  bond and  stock brokers on allotments made In respect of applications for this stock which bear their  stamp.  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  f  DEPARTMENT OF HNAWCC, OTTAWA. ' '  OCTOBEH 7th. 1916.  mrr-  Steps in Butter-Making.  , One great difficulty which  meets the farmers in our district  in dealing with dairying is how  to obtain a market for the butter.  ^There i3 not a,sufficient number  of cows in the settlement yet to  make it possible to operate a  creamery profitably, and the butter made by the different housewives varies so much that it is  found impossible to findsteady  customers for it.   .      -  The Farmers' Institute has decided to employ a sales agent to  dispose of the produce of the  valley. Among his duties will  be the sale of this variegated  butter. It is our belief he will  find this task beyond his ingenuity or resourcefulness. Some  plan must be found to" make the  butter uniform. We believe such  a'plan could be, devised without  having 'a creamery, and Mr.  Neale, our efficient government  agricultural adviser, has promised that when he next calls on our  farmers he will present a practical way of "oveTcoming' this difficulty. , 0  In the meantime let our farm-  ers study and practice ways by  which the cream be made as good  as possible as it must be clear to  everybody that without' good  cream there can be no good butter. V. R. Jones of the Dairy  Husbandry Department at the  South Dacota State College, tells  in the-Farm Journal-  How to Produce Good Milk.  Cows must be healthy and kept  clean.  The barn should be kept clean,  well lighted and ventilated. The  barn-yard should be kept clean  and properly drained. Utensils  should be thoroughly washed and  scalded or steamed and kept in a  clean room. ���������  Cows should be fed good wholesome food and pure water.  Milkers and attendants who  come in contact with the milk  should be healthy and clean.  Cows should not be fed at milking time or immediately before.  Dust from feed falls into the  milk' and contaminates it with  germs.  Wipe the udder and side of  cow with a damp cloth and milk  with clean, dry hands. Use a  small top milking pail. This  helps to keep foreign matter  from the milk.  Immediately after, milking remove the mi)k to a separate room  from the barn, to be strained and  cooled. Cool the milk to as low a  temperature as possible without  freezing. Forty or 50������ F. retards growth of most germs,  and particularly those that cause  milk to sour quickly.  ' In summer keep flies out of the  barn and milk room. One fly  may carry, as many as 150,000  germs to the milk. These may  be disease germs. Manure should  not' be allowed to accumulate  around the barn���������it is a breeding  place.for flies.  The number of bacteria in milk  depends largely upon cleanliness  of milking and handling,-temperature at which milk is kept  and age of milk. Therefore,  clean milk and quick cooling are  very important factors in producing pure dairy products.  Cows fed a ration composed  largely of ensilage produced  seventeen per. cent more milk  and twenty-eight per cent more  butterfat than those given a  ration consisting mainly of grain  in a feeding test conducted for  121 days at the Ohio Experiment  Station. The silage ration was  also cheaper for milk production.-  The cows gained nearly eight  per cent in milk yield when put  on the silage ration. They produced butterfat at a cost of 13c.  a pound, while the cost of a pound  from the cows fed mainly grain  was 22c.   ���������   '   ���������  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  QpAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  V Manitoba, Saskatchewan and alberta,  the Yukon Territory, tbe-NoETH-WESTTcRRi-  TCK1B3 and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one yearn at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. ��������� Not more than 2,500 acres will be leased  to one applicant. ,   -  ' Application for a lease must be made bj- the  applicant in person to tfee Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed teiritory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract ap.  plied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Kach application must be accompanied by a  fee of J5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output oi the mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.  " The person operating the mine shall fiiriiihh  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the'royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  - The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever availuble surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of ���������themine  at the rale of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  (HI  30C  ������  Fur Sales Agency  Pensions for Soldiers.  r , ^  The Dominion Government has  appointed a Board of Pension  Commissioners for Canada with  offices ,in "Ottawa. As this Board  wish to cause as little delay'as  possible in dealing with commu-  Tiications with regard to pensions,  they wish the public to correspond directly with the Board of  Pension Commissioners, Ottawa.  A good deal of delay may be  caused by communications being  sent through other Departments  of the Government.  The Patriotic Fund Association  and the Military Hospitals Commission have kindly consented to  give information and assistance  to those wishing to write direct  to the Board of Pension Commissioners. These societies.haye  offices in certain localities in  Canada.'  In addition, in order to facilitate the granting of pensions,  the Board is.opening branch pension offices in Vancouver, Cal-  gary, Edmonton, Regiha, Winnipeg, London, Hamilton, Toronto,  Barrie, Kingston,, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec, St. John's and  Halifax. All information with'  regard to pensions may be ob  tained from these offices.  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  .Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur. buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the ��������� highest market  price always.  - We hold sales monthly, but will ad-  Vance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  Sending balance immediately after Bale.  Our commission is only 3'to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  [311'" IP' ������l 0  ^-r^iis.^-i^t  .-���������^-r^i-^S iir-ir^r*1  L������2t3^as3a  TheMason <������r RischPiano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to stale with authority:  "NO FINER PIANO MADE I"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  l>f  tfjl Let us attend your Victor Record  JJ mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue '  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  iS^s���������^r-=JlKS������S^^~������3������s^igEgSjKj~g: =._i:^_J!!5S3^ii--;  Dealers and trappers  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BAHGE  III.  Take Notice " that I, Thoma9 J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following-  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20 chains, thence  South 20 chain3, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30, 1916.  Jan. 6-March  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BANGS  IIX.  Take Notice that I, Mark Smaby, of  Ocean Falls, B. C, occupation timber  HARRY HANSON "1S5J^SLE  ....   of prince Rupert  inyentor of the Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  <  (Patented \n Canada)  will make a-trip to Bella Coola  to introduce his patented rapid  heating water coil, -also to do  whateverfplumbing or water pipe  work thereimay be a call for.   '-.: w  If you have a pump and a good  g  well you do not need: any city, |  water works to have all the con-  X  veniences. of-modern, home com- ���������  forts.    Harry Hanson   can im-i  provise a system with, ordinary  whisky barrells'���������;' and.' one hour's  pujfftpjrigieacli.day.   -He has, sev-  : 0rai:bf these systems-installed as  far north -as Srhithers  and Terrace.   Send him an ordinary floor  plan of your home and what you  want, also the location of pump.  State if you want hot and - cold  water or cold water only. Will be  pleased"to.estimate on your work.  HarryHanson t^"^10  :"': P. 0. Box 395  139 Zricl Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  cruiser, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:      ,    ,  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Pulp Lease 205;'  thence North 20 chains; thence East 20,  chains; thence North 20 chains; thence  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20 (  chains; thence East 20 chains; thence;  South 7 .chains more or less to high:  water mark of Cousin's Inlet;  thence  following along said high water mark,  in a westerly direction to a point due'  east of this post; thence West 12 chains ,  more  or less to this post, containing  140 acres more or less.  (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 26, 1916.  Jan. 27--Mnr. 24,  J&,  ^L/HAT person so happy and conten-  ''        ted as the prosperous farmer?  \j|/HAT person so independent?   .  \A/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they ate'strangers to hard times.  ��������� f-.-������_-.;-���������  :*i~���������������'-.>������ ���������*"_;    .Jl..���������:.������������������ ".:''2iii?.--.'5"):.'<  View ofa ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  =1  for  THE REASONS  ���������*���������   tion of affairs  are  obvious to  this enviable condi-  anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  .The. land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and .mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the' best advantage.  This fact was established at- the Prince  Rupert exhibition last-year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  c=D\  ELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  CZD  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year :.....:.:.....  Six Months ....'-,-���������  Three Months .........  .$1.00  . 0.75  . 0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year.  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year. .....-. .$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find   for Bella Coola Courier for...  LTD.  . subscription  Name  ��������� . ......  .  ���������: ;��������� P.6..J...........;..........  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed u  BELLA COOLA COURIER  '   '���������   ^Saturday, Felruary 17,  1917  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl; between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  It will be to your interest to keeP wett, in~  formed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  General Botha, premier of  South Africa.  ADVERTISERS  Now is the time to keep'  your, name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms .in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should .keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  You are judged by the  stationery that^you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk-support home industries���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  A Letter Trom Ingvald Ursetli.  ' ' December 24, 1916.  Christmas Eve,���������just think of  it! And here am 1, some thousands of miles separated from  everything dear to almost every  man's heart. 'What memories  throng one's mind at such a"time  and under such circumstances.  But in spite of the many leagues  I am determined to have my way  and be with you tonight in  thought and mind���������a poor makeshift perhaps, but still it hulps.  C^    O      0      o      o  It's been very quiet tonight,  only the occasional solemn boom  of a gun breaks in upon one's  'dreamy air-castles, and you are  rudely brought to earth again,  back to realities.  Peace on earth, indeed, is it  not a hollow mockery? Still, it  has withstood the Ages. There  must bcgenuinesa-soniewhere if  we can only find it. ' But these  are sombre reflexions, are they  not? We should be happy tonight, and right here is where 1  for one commence.  ^ Don't imagine for a minute  I that we are entirely without our  . doings." We are not to be out-  i done in the line of "eats" either,  for there is a good, big chunk of  that impervious substance known  as "puddin" for each and every  mother's son of us. And also  various other triumphs known  only to the initiated.  Some of the fellows are practising Christmas Carols tonight,  just fancy! Even now their raucous efforts'beat upon my ears,  and I am not close to the quartette by any means.  I'll finish this tomorrow night.  Perhaps something will transpire  in the course of the day which  will merit chronicling.  O    ��������� i      O      c"      O  Tuesday, 2Gth. Did not finish  this yesterday, was kept quite  busy.    Military duties .took up  i all the f.n-enoon and in the p. m.  i we bjstow ed our presence upon  one or two little functions gotten  $ 25.OO   FOR   $21.60  50:00     "        43.00  100.00      " 86.00  INDIVIDUAL PURCHASES LIMITED TO *J503.  FOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY AT ANY BANK  OR ANY MONEY ORDER POST OFFICE  FlNANOE^DBPARTMBN'  <J|ttawa  JAN.  9,  1917  up in celebration of the day.  Through the generosity of the  0. C. a number of us were provided with an excellent dinner.  And then at night a concert'and  entertainment at the local Y. M.  C. A. This was carried out. in a  big barn all prettily decorated  an8 lit up with candles. Singing  by the audience formed the principal part of the program. Everything was sung and played, rag-,  time and all.  ' o     o     o     o     o ,  What you saw about the 102nd  in the papers is all, true, and  more too.    Our boys were indeed  very lucky, if one can call it that.  They have all been in some queer  old corners, but-when-the smoke  lifted, the delegates from little,  old B. C, were,still intact and  very much on the job.  o    o o    o  Thanks so much for last parcel  of socks, etc., just received. Always so nice to get things from  home. Am keeping a sharp lookout for that fruit cake'. Wont  it taste good. Wish I was within raiding distance of your pantry right now.���������Love to you all.  Ingvald.  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  t  CLUB OFFER  55%  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made ar-  rangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier   ,       .      ..     -.       . $1.00    g   ,     ���������  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50   , ������    paplrf, nr.   tor   .   .   $������.UU  $2.50  The Courier   . '    .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .  .   $2.00  The Courier   .       .      ���������.       .       ��������� $1-00    Both papers  Family Herald & Weekly Star, Montreal . . LOO,  for $j 75  $2.00    ���������   ���������  in  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  in  The celebration of Christmas  by soldiers lighting to secure  permanent peace is in accordance  with the spirit of Christianity.  j-*r*-iTf ���������"-***��������� ���������*waj������-������'-jjf���������iiwi  '"Pi IE I wo principal reasons  1   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., arc:  TIDCT  I- JLW.J I."  $1 a Year  s  every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  *  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioned     '  Calgary   . Vancouver     Edmonton  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEAf ING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well, assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's ancl Children's Shoes  in all styles &t the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    S  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospe&ors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the moft suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Varnishes - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour; .  Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.. Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  mmam������m������������iimra &  ess  \  t  you want good sport  1sit bella coola. excel-  Lent hunting and fishing.  WEATHER REPORT FOR JANUARY  Compiled  by  Mr. C H.  Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 33.   Minimum, 24.  Highest Max. (9th)45. Lowest Min. (30th) 12  below zero.   Rainfall, 3.51. Snow 16in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  >L/5���������NO. .10  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17,   1917.  $1.00 a Year  rhite Star Liner Sunk  ondon, Feb. 14������������������ Five persons  re killed' outright when sub-  rine sunk the White Star liner  ric, seventeen of the crew are  ssing. The Afric was in the  ploy of the" British govern-  nt and was a steel vessel of  000 tons. British steamer  i-eland, 1960 tons, also sunk.  urvivors of the steamer Saxo-  n .- landed today. Two boat  ds of survivors were afloat on  > open sea for 68 hours. Three  ericans among the crew.  reek steamer Aghois Sypridi-  768,tons, sunk,  he Times newspaper received  m the Serbian legation a copy  a photo found on the. body of  German officer, showing six  bians hanging to posts near  railway station of Krushe-  z, Serbian territory now in  session of Austria. Between  y and sixty thousand women  children have been deported  interned in Austria for  mes.  ritish officials think Austria  uld like to quit, butWilhelm's  it to Vienna1 may bolster up  r flagging spirit,  euterdespatches from Berne  s officials ofztrade unions and  bialistiorganization&r num ber-  approximately ten thousand,  herto exempted from military  Irvice have been called up.   /  o news from any of fronts.  U.S. May Allow Allied  Warships in Her Ports  uenos Ayres,  Feb.   14.���������Re-  irt says that a British cruiser  ts the German raider after a  iielling battle off the Brazilian  ast.  |Berlin,   Feb.   15.���������Germany's  rder dated February 12th, made  iblic today, declaring the "days  grace" in submarine warfare  ours.    All ships which ply in  irred zone do so with full knowledge of the dangers imminent  them and their crews.  [Paris, Feb. 15.���������German submarine campaign so farjs inef-  Jctive. Last Monday 112 ships  itered French ports. A"reward  1 five hundred francs to the crew  |nking a submarine is offered.  ^Copenhagen, Feb. 15���������Norway  id Sweden delivered identical  l&spatches to Germany in protest  fainst the barred zone.  ?New  York,   Feb.   15.���������White  itar liner Adriatic reaches Liv-  ^pool safely.    Cunard liner Car-  lania   passes    safely   through  Barred zone.    Steamers Innish-  ren Head and Lambert .sunk,  Stews saved.  Count Bernstorff, well guard-  "3,   and  the   German   embassy  h> oSgiWere escorted to the liner-under  ^tjpfcrict surveillance of U. S. troops.  \������*jL Havana,   Cuba,   is practically  * Sounder marshal law.  "\%'   ��������� Washington, Feb. 14���������Senator  Salsbury today Offered-a resolution'.'to '-throw ;down neutrality  bars andJihrpvv 0p6n all' U-' S.  ports to .ailiecT iwarsMpSv- ��������� He  said: -'.This' might enable the  government,--without declaration  of war, to assist preventing violations of rights to;the seas by  giving - assistance'-:-to* ��������������������������� those at  present engaged-irt combating  these violations." It is understood that --Senator Salsbury'*  resolution has the .complete approval of'President Wjlson.  By quickly and-sharply replying to Germany's suggestion oi  negotiating for peace tending to  avert war, President Wilson  handed'out an hint to organized  pacifists arid propogandists. He  pointed out that, those working  against/w.af. are laboring at the  wrong end "of the trouble. If  there -is armed5 cla'shj the presi-  dentemphatically said,.the blame  rests upon -the shoulders of the  German '"government. .The way  to" peace, he declared, is for Germany" to" withdraw 'her' U bdat  decree.    ... ; ' -  .Germany's tactics .towards Ambassador Gerard and other Americans has - aroused anger, an d  the official notice of the Yarrow-  date- prisoners being- again de-  tained.by Germany served to increase the growing, animosity,  against her. Demands for tht  release of American prisoners on  board the Yarrowdale is to be  made on Germany, and with the  demand will go an explanation  that the States is not seizing any  German ships or their crew.  Count Bernstorff sails on Wednesday. Dr. Barthelme, a German newspaper man, is an unwelcome visitor and Washington  prefers his return to the Vater-  land with Bernstorff.      ���������  Official heads'of all big U. S.  corporations display great readiness to act in event of war. Pre-  paringfor-quick mobilization of  troops.- ��������� Special committee selec-  tedfor handling many angles oi  the organization. President's  inaugural parade to be pompous  pageant.  Sub Blockade  Ineffective  Rome, Feb.  15.���������Italian avia-  * ���������'jt.tors drop bombs on Pola arsenal.  *������*  -/J** Ottawa, Feb. 15���������Government  ^Considering advisability of calling  x. Out "country's  militia forces to  t patrol boundary.  Approximately  \nfty thousand men .will be con-  , * frregated if scheme materializes.  (     Victoria,  Feb. 15,���������Owing to  'the death of Hon. Ralph Smith  the opening of parliament is delayed to March 1st,  Steamers Cross Safely  New York, Feb. 14.���������Seven  steamers from British ports make  trip across the ocean without  mishap. Cordon of warships  convoyed .'them, trawlers swept  lane clear of mines and cruisers  gave protection. British admiralty demonstrates wonderful  supremacy in protecting shipping  in.the-barred zone.  Admiral Bacon says don't worry  about subs, German boasts not  warranted. U boat successes  comparatively slight and should  not cause alarm.  Hon. Ralph Smith  Dies Suddenly  Victoria, Feb. 14���������Hon. Ralph  Smith, rmhister of Finance, succumbs to uraemic poisoning after  brief illness. The announcement  caused profound shock. Deceased  statesman had a long and honorable record in public life.  London, Feb. 14- Britain takes  Germany's denial of any invitation of the United States for  parleying in submarine warfare,  as confirming previous reports  fhat the Imperial government is  determined submarine warfare  must go on regardless of everything else. Amsterdam despatches giving this German denial  today are receiving divided interest in the pfess-with the announcement in the House of Commons showing the ineffectiveness  )f the undersea blockade.  \Admiral Beresford declared  that Britain lost four million  tons of shipping since the war  began, but her shipbuilding replaced three million tons.  Long list of medals conferred  on Canadian officers and men for  gallantry in the field by King  George,, was issued today.  American Schooner Sunk  Washington, Feb. 15.���������American schooner Lyman M. Law,  1300tons, sunk by German submarine, vessel set on fire by the  bomb. Americans aboard safely  landed. Break with Austria  seems inevitable.  President Wilson is formulating first step to protect Americans in their peaceful and legitimate errands on the high seas.  According to belief of those close  to the president, the recommendation of the government to actively assist American ship owners to arm their merchant ships.  Washington suspicious of Hun  influence and fear malign workings of German agents in Mexican: and Cuban affairs, may stir  Carranza to hostile acts.  Uprising in Cuba and government and rebel troops have already  clashed at  Santa Clara.  ! the directors be instructed to en-  igage   an  agent  if satisfactory  . terms could be arranged, and report results at a meeting tobe  held on the 14th instant.  jottings of Bella Coola and District  S. S. Venture was not able to  make" up the whole of the .24  hours lost on account of thick  weather on the. previous trip;  but arrivedin port 2 o'clock Saturday morning.  ; The arrivalsvwere:^Mrs. W>' E:-  Gallienne and - Mrs. A. Woods,  who came up from Ocean Falls.  The passengers departing were!  Miss M. Clayton,- Mr. and Mrs.  A. J. Neale, JB. Brynildsen and  Hjalmar Schulstad.  B. Brynildsen, our enterprising  local merchant, is off on his annual trip to the cities of the south  to replenish his stock of merchandise and renew old acquaintances.  He intends to be away 4 weeks.  Hjalmar Schulstad becoming  tired of hibernating at home decided to try his fortunes at Rivers  Inlet, where it is his intention to  remain through the spring and  summer.  A. J. Neale, assistant provincial horticulturist, during his  stay in the valley was certainly  considerably handicapped by the  state of the weather and the  depth of the snow, but in spite  of difficulties encountered he was  able to accomplish a great deal  of work, and the farmers are all  agreed that in him they have a  friend and well-informed adviser.  He promised to return in about  two months, when the fruit trees  will receive special attention.  The raffle for an antique silver  belt buckle took place at Hagensborg last Saturday and resulted  ���������in^e.huckle^ findingJis way to  the town site, Mr. C. Tucker being trie fortunate winner.  The Canadian Prisoners of War  Fund benefits to the extent of  $12.50 from the sale of forty--  eight- tickets, and that amount  has been forwarded to the secretary of the fund.  The Farmers-' Institute held  another well attended and successful meeting at the Colony  Hall, . Hagensborg, on Monday,  February 5th.  , G. B. Olsen was elected member of the board of directors to  fill the vacancy created by the  resignation of Albert Hammer,  and A. Nesvold was elected auditor. Co-operation received the  most attention in the^discussion  which formed the main feature  of the meeting. A. J. Neale,  the government horticulturist,  gave valuable information and  advice. The farmers decided to  avail themselves of an opportunity offered to buy 100 cases of  stumping powder on special  terms. The question of engaging an agent to sell produce was  discussed and it was decided that  The board of directors of the  Farmers' Institute held a meeting on Monday last week, and  elected O. J. Lokken secretary-  treasurer of the Agricultural  Fair Association.  Mark the Eggs!  We have been asked to call the  attention of the keepers of poultry to the "Eggs Marks Act,"  passed by the last legislature.  As every person bringing eggs,  to market and does not comply  with the provisions of the Act  is liable to a fine all the way up  to a hundred dollars, it is quite  important that it should be known  what the Act requires. We therefore quote the section relating to  first grade eggs, and it may be  noted that the same rule applies  to second grade, preserved and  Chinese eggs:  "Every person carrying on  within the Province of British  Columbia the business of selling  o_r offering first-grade eggs for  sale by retail shall cause each receptacle containing or holding  such eggs to bear a placard on  which shall be printed in letters  not less than four inches in  height the name of the Province  or country of origin, and the additional words "Fresh," "Cold-  casionally might  be acceptable  to the Courier and its readers.  You will, perhaps, agree with  me that the "Grace of God" and  the "Truths of the Bible" are of  great importance, and if it is not  outside of the objects of the  Courier I would be willing to try  to place before your readers a.  few verses of scripture and their  possible meaning and application  to us. I would try in."brotherly"  love" to study with you those  portions of the bible that may be  especially important for our  time. Our people are laying down  their lives for the nation as  others are for theirs, what may  we look for in the future for the  nations in the-light of the bible?  Our duties to God, and the king,  the danger of not always viewing  things in war time from the  Christian standpoint and of falling in this war without a title  clear to a better life ought to be  of sufficient importance to engage  our attention now.  Thos. R. Astleford.  Firvale, E. C, Jan. 15, 1917.  storage," or "Preserved," as the  case may be; such sign or placard  to be so placed that same can be  readily seen by all persons desirous of purchasing eggs from  such persons carrying on such  business."  Editor,  Bella Coola Courier.  Sir,���������In your paper of January  13th is an article entitled "Let  us hear from you." Itispossible  that the article will accomplish  the desired results and you will  receive all the communications  you can use, be that as it may,  it will do no harm to say that we  value the Courier and missed it  during its little rest.  Being a Canadian by choice as  well as by birth, I have, a strong  interest in matters national that  to me are of great importance.  I also try to give matters eternal  the attention proportionate to  their importance. It has occurred to me that since reading your  article that a letter from me oc-  THE     MINISTER     OF     FINANCE  REQUESTS  THE  PEOPLE    OF    CANADA    TO  BEGIN NOW  TO  SAVE    MONEY   FOR   THE  H  NEXT WAR LOAN  JAN.  f.  ���������j  1917  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE  OTTAWA  Ocean Falls News.  A new hospital buildirg is being erected and is now neaiirg  completion.    It will be up-to-date  in all respects and acredit to the;,  enterprising management. ...  A hall for all sorts of public  gatherings is already taken in.  use and is much appreciated by  the people.  A Fire Hall is another public  building going up. It is being  erected close to Dr. Quinlan's  quarters, the post office, as it is  feared that the activity displayed  by the energetic postmaster may  cause heat through friction sufficient to endanger property.  Quite an army of Japs are engaged in digging trenches for  sewers. The work was hejd up  for a while by the great fall of  snow, but is now again proceeding at full blast. One day one  of these Japs was completely  buried by a cave in; after one-  half hour's frantic digging he  was pulled cut and everybody  expected him to be either dead  or at least considerably the worse  for wear; but our Jap merely  shook himself, said "thank you"  and went immediately to work  again.  The work on the big dam is  going ahead rapidly as is also  the building of the huge paper  mill which is all concrete.  Mr. and Mrs. Andy Woods are  in from their camp. Their launch  has had its cabin all torn off by  the action of heavy seas washing  over-it and piling it on the shore.  The Bentink (thecompany's tug)  towed the launch to Ocean Falls  where it is being repaired.  W. E. Gallienne from Bella  Coola, has moved clown here and  has gone to work in the foundry.  ��������� ff> -<\r> ~-r������<r> .<t o <% o <\ r^-<% ������  (Blutrrh Sfottxr  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a.m.  7:30 p.m.  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W. H. Gibson.  AH Are Welcome.  Z.W  ,#.  i-v  i '?  i is'.  BELLA  COOLA COURIER  Saturday, Fch  The Courier  i  4   *  u  iiiii  S I -fe>l 'J 1 ,#i  **.  ^  11  l.WLUj  M/glP  > id  tl   (T   *   ������������������    I       *'+'   .St."it  1 I  ?  I  ft!     s?R  !(J  b.J  i*  ."���������i       V     '-Bi-  i  1   Jl I V" *4   'Md  I   !������.  ...I  I <  I j,.  vir  h  i  1 !i!!; mi  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  THE BELLA.COOLA PUBLISHING Co. LTD.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1 Year *100  6 Months       ������-75  3 Month.   ������-50  United States ,  1 Year  *1*0  -United Kingdom  1. Year. ..." *L0������  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. -Changes in address should be  sent' in as soon as possible.    For Advertising Rates,  Apply at  Office.    i  TO CORRESPONDENW-While unoWeetfroaMe anonymous communications will be Published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be (riven to the editor. _,.,j  The Editor reserves the rijrht to.refuse publ -  cation ofany letter. All manuscript at wnter's  risk.   SATURDAY, FEB. 17, 1917.  Britain's Mighty Army.  Those 'people throughout the  world who had not a full knowledge of: the indomitable spirit  of the British people have, until  quite recently, had a certain contempt for Britain's army. While  they conceded her supremacy on  the sea they believed that her  organization of the army was inefficient and her conduct of the  war blundering as compared with  the other great European powers. But this adverse opinion is  rapidly giving way to admiration  as the'fact is becoming understood that in the two and; one-  half years since the war starte'd  Britain's:ai:,ipy,has developed in-,  to Europe-s greatestwar machine  Germahylsnot'exceptedr.' ^*,%  A statement to this-effect has  recently kppeared in the press  and it may be necessary to state  that it is not from some over-  enthusiastic admirer of everything British, but from a man  of the highest intelligence and  broadest knowledge, who for his  persistent criticism of Britain's  eon.du.ct' of the war in its first  stages was-<opehly and generally  branded as a traitor and his arrest as such was at one time  seriously considered.  Lord Northcliff e, the owner of  the London Times and generally  admitted \the greatest living  journalist, on his return from a  visit to the western front in reply to the question: "Why has  Germany taken this action?"  namely, as regards unrestricted  submarine warfare, said:  "The Prussian reason is this:  They are desperate; we have  whipped them. They had the  greatest war machine ever constructed. We stopped them at  the Marne. After wiping oat between Mons and, Meaux practically the entire British trained  strength, they have waited until  England has overtaken and passed them in men and material.  Our gallant Allies held them  while we made ready, splendidly  ready.  "I have been a critic of our  preparations. I am just back  from France, where I have seen  our army1, so I use words accurately ifl describing it. It is beyond praise.  "We now stand on the land as  on the sea. We have got Prussia  in a corner. She is doomed. Her  ruling house sacrificed everthing  for a trust in crowns. They  hoped to seat the despot on many  thrones.   We are acting as trust  bearers. They know what the  military situation is and that is  why they are throwing prudence  and law to the winds.  In conclusion, let me say this:  The barbarous and piratical warfare which Prussia brings to our  coasts finds us ready all along  the line. * We are organized; we  have a capable government; we  put our house in order just in  time. Berlin knows it���������knows  that we will be stronger and  stronger as time goes on."  0000,0  The Fire Spreads.  The United States has, in her  dealings with German outrages,  shown a patience unparalled in  history.  There may be several reasons  for this attitude, such as being  far removed from the scenes of  war her people failed to realize  its horrors; the large number of  German-Americans among her  citizens, the profits derived from  the manufacture of munitions'  for the belligerents, unprepared-  ness, etc.  ^German violations of t the international rules restricting. warfare were, in instances where  lives of U. S. citizens had been  lost, met by protests which did  not avail to any-great extent. ���������  But at last the patience of this  the most patient of nations is  broken.,and United States has  severed her diplomatic relations  with Germany, and at this writing is on'th'e verge of war.  Germany's note-to United  States of January 31st declaring  that beginning" February 1st unrestricted submarine warfare  will' be begun.-against her en^-  NO ALUM  ^L������J^������i^  PRINTED '  wmM  cape she can contain her- lofty  attitude no longer.  President Wilson after.handing the German ambassador his  passports made a report of his  action to Congress in a speech  and the response he met there  showed that thejpeople of United  States are roused at last .and will  not allow themselves .to be  shamefully treated any longer.  ' Mr. Wilson has directed notes  to the neutral nations ^asking  them to"foliow the,example set  by his government and break relations with Germany. For this  act, which in the eyes of the Hun  is more unfriendly,than" wilful  murder, Germany feels highly  offended and threatens to declare  war on United States.  And thus the conflagration is  ever spreading, and it seems to  us when in a pessimistic "mood  that in time it will involve the  whole world.  o     o    o  ��������� o    o  . But we are not pessimistic.  Although deplorable it.may be  this new phase of frigh'tfulness  ....^-...   ,  M . .. -... must,so arouse^the^n^eutraj'na-  mies>or; any-neutral's" venturing |tions^hat thefe%iil'be'"a joint  within certain area's of the ocean  is the last straw which broke the  camel's back and United States  rebels. Germany graciously permits the United States to send  once a week one ship from New  York to Britain and one from  England to New York under  various restrictions, the ship to  be painted in rainbow colors and  flying certain flags.  Hitherto,' the  United   States  government has shown absolute  indifference to German outrages  and violations  of   the laws of  humanity and international law  as long as these were confined to  the enemies of Germany or small  nations such as Norway, but at  this the latest outburst of fright-  fulness of which she cannot es-  effort'of some kind on theirrpart  which will bring the war to ah  earlier end.  Already numerous nations have  announced their - approval of  President Wilson's actions and  the result of Germany's defiance  of the laws of nations will be  that she will lose even the nominal or seeming friendship of the  neutral world.  o     o     o     o     o  Even hospital ships will not be  spared by this wholesale murderer of Eu,rope.IntheruleSOf Tar  there is bf course legitimate destruction 'of life, but it has long  been an established and observed  rule that'the killing of non-combatants is murder pure and  simple. \Germany has under  various pretexts killed non-combatants, m'en, women and children, by th<if thousands since the  war began1 and announces that  she will continue to do so. And  her rulers have the hardihood to  even appeal to God for His help  in their disregard of His laws.  \    ���������  o    o    o    o    o  The only', explanation to be  found for Germany's defiance of  all accepted rules of warfare is  thather internal conditionsare so  desperate that she adopts any  means to bring the war to an  early conclusion. It is to be  hoped she may succeed in this  praiseworthy effort.  "o    o'   o     o . o  The New York Globe describes  the unrestricted, submarine, warfare as,an act of criminal insanity in the following statement:  ,"Having begun the European  war by an act of, perfidy, the  German government now seeks  to end it by an act of criminal  insanity. . .- ,.' Upon neutral  rights, Germany would wipe her  feet as upon a door-mat.". -  In the face of such crimes  against her fellow-nations where  will Germany stand in her relations to them when the war.is  over?  { o    o    o    o    o  An Election Impracticable.  The statesmen of Canada, who  in their, anxiety to show their  loyalty, patriotism and appreciation of-the soldiers- at a time  when they were charged with  looting the treasury in favor of  their henchmen by allowing them  excessive prices for war supplies,  passed a bill to give the soldiers  overseas an opportunity to vote  in the coming election. They  now find it is impracticable, to  carry out the provisions of the  Act and urges this as a reason  against a war-time election.  Any  one,  not a demagogue,  Smith; Blair & Co. Ltd  <���������:.<      VANCOUVER, B.C.  ������ t ���������        "i *  rf "  " '  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST'   BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE   m    B. C."  Send for Catalogue , Prompt Attention Given Utter Order,  13*9  lift  IV  part  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WAm  of 1493 SEVENTH AYE.W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in .  the Province in the sale of their well-known hfin.lv nursery s:  >���������'  for spring (1917) delivery.   The work is pleasant and reniun -i:  tive.   Honest, energetic men only are needed.   We particul ' *%  want a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should write at once for our 80.page Catalogue  "Produce more 19171"���������Hon. itfartln Barrel!, Dominion Minister of Firs  ROYAL STANDARD  FIELD SEEDS  WE are extending our already extensive fit-KI seed bmm  1917.    It ia the desire of the Canadian Government thj  '  people produce as much as possible during the ensuing  and we'are arranging with the leading dealers throughout B ",  Columbia   and   AlberU to carry  a complete  ii!lt. ���������f RO]  STANDARD FIELD SEEDS.    These seeds *r>:- the choice?, .  possible to secure in* the World's Markets.   They are Govert  Inspected and carefully"selected for purity.  steeds should be purchased early as prices inevitably advy  the Seasqn progresses.    In all probability the market will u  ���������  and.it will oe difficult later in the year to make purchases.  .-    Order ROYAL STANDARD Field Seeds NOW.   If yourm,  cannot supply you.write us and we will ship to you direct.  WRITE TODAY FOR FULL INFORMATION AND PRICE LIST  Vancouver Milling & Grain Co. Ltd  ;       VANCOUVER, B. C.  knew all along:that this Ac^.wag  mere play to the galleriearand  that it was of no practical value-  either to the soldiers-or to the  country/ 'Biit itf-a tbaCter con-  cefning^the rights and^privneges  of those who are risking /their  lives in the defence of our coun-  try it is not expedient to be critical and therefore the Act*was  not seriously opposed.  Of course, no one denies the  right for the soldiers -to have a  voice in the affairs of the na'.  but in their case there arep  i  elements that make theexr������  of that right impracticable.  And now when the oppa j  is demanding an appeal t _k  country the prime minister  -������  the action of hisKOYemm������   h���������  giving the soldiers on sen- f fa  Europe a chance to vote. -F r  r *v  excuse for not being willi; '\~j%  comply  with   the   laws ol   y t "  land in this respect. t -#  Canada's Boys Want Smokes!  NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these districts.  Will You Help?  If so, Mr. Francis R. Jones will be pleased to answer any enquiries addressed to the Canadian Office of the Over-Seas Club,  Room 28, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, and will be glad to supply  Collecting Books, Contribution Cards, Boxes and Circulars  to any who are willing to assist.  Compare���������Price for Price��������� g  GREAT   WEST j!  TEA  with the teas you are now using.  It's Better!  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO, Ltd. [ {  Wholesale Grocers  Vancouver,  m.  HOE  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF BA LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGKK SKRMt  *        BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.  "(amOSUIt"   Leaves   Vancouver every  Tuesday at 9 p. m. (Victoria day previous  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p m.  fa    '  S. S.   ''COQUITLAM"  sails   from  Vancouver loi^j  nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosive.  *  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  o  D  Ifilc  :uR.  For rates of Freiirhta, Fares and other mforn' l" .;.(,1!K���������,r.  Head Office, Cabrall St., Vancouver or Oh.".  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  3*  HOC  ���������-���������  livjrvrttif'������������������'.TT i     ���������===== i  Advertise your >Wants in the wj  f������  =EK2=G= IJBHlsw������������������  mm  HIINGS  AND  KINAW  "er Orden  r v*  m  N to reprej(  went parts  -' nurserysUciSa  ar>u remunef t  v������' parties  <M  1 seed bmictjj ',.  vernmentihitu  the ensuing tet  throughout Bria  iiif of R0YJ  Use choictniiJ^  ure GoYertae,  k;i  vitally adviicei  arkc-t will be sic  ;��������� purchases.  W.   Ifyoufin  i;j direct.  ������RICE UST     p  Co. Ltd. 1  2$f&&  rs of the natk^^  there are eh;  ike the exert?  iracticable.  \ the opposes  i appeal tote!  ie-ministeriirfi|  i Kovemment-  ���������rs on service-  e to vote uLEW  being willing:  I  t?a  laws of Ljf  ice���������  ST  m  &5  0., Ltd.  5  lCouver,D>KsS*  C, LTD.  UVER  Ver every  nrevious-)  u.vor fort-  ;   will call  iSaturday, February 17,  1917  BELLAj COOLA  COURIER  TO INVESTORS  |HOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  IN   SUMS OF  $500'OR ANY  MULTIPLE THEREOF.  ������������������if  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from the date of  purchase.  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issue  ' in Canada other than an issue of Treasury Bills or other like short date security.  Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.  A commission of one-quarter of one per cent will be allowed to recognized bond and  stock brokers on allotments made in respect of applications for this stock which bear their  stamp.  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA.  OCTOBER 7th. 1916.  teps in Butter-Making.  One   great   difficulty which  <-'ets the farmers in our district  dealing with dairying is how  to obtain a market for the butter,  here is not a sufficient number  f cows in the settlement yet to  ake it possible to operate a  r^amery profitably, and the but-  ov made by the different house-  lves varies so much that it is  ound impossible to find steady  iibtomers for it.  The Farmers' Institute has de-  iJnd to employ a sales agent to  impose of the produce of the  alley. Among his duties will  o the sale of this variegated  utter. It is our belief he will  nd this task beyond his ingenui-  or resourcefulness. Some  Ian must be found to" make the  utter uniform. We believe such  plan could be devised without  awng; va creamery, and Mr.  e.ile, our efficient government  gncultural adviser, has promis-  d that when he next calls on pur  armers he will present a practi-  al way of overcoming this diffi-  ulty.  In the meantime let our farm-  rs study <and practice ways by  hi eh the cream be made as good  ������? i������ )ssible as jt must be clear to  Vfrybody that without good  ream there can be no good but-  er. V. R. Jones of the Dairy  u:>bandry Department at the  outh Dacota State College, tells  In ihe-Farm Journal���������  ow to Produce Good Milk.  i A'ws must be healthy and kept  Itan.  The barn should be kept clean,  ell lighted and ventilated. The  arn-yard should be kept clean  and properly drained. Utensils  should be thoroughly washed and  scalded or steamed and kept in a  clean room.  Cows should be fed good wholesome food and pure water.  Milkers and attendants who  come in contact with the milk  should be healthy and clean.  Cow's should not be fed at milking time or immediately before.  Dust from feed falls into the  milk'and contaminates it with  germs.  Wipe the: udder and side of  cow with a damp cloth and milk  with clean, -dry hands. Use a  small top milking pail. This  helps to keep foreign matter  from the milk.  Immediately after milking remove the milk to a separate room  from the barn, to be strained and  cooled. Cool the milk to as low a  temperature as possible without  freezing. Forty or 50������ F. retards growth of most germs,  and particularly those that cause  milk to sour quickly.  In summer keep flies out of the  barn and .milk room. One fly  may carry as many as 150,000  germs to the milk. These may  be disease germs. Manure should  not be allWed to accumulate  around the barn���������it is a breeding  place for flies.  The number of bacteria in milk  depends largely upon cleanliness  of milking and handling, temperature at which milk is kept  and age of milk. Therefore,  clean milk and quick cooling are  very important factors in producing pure dairy products.  Cows fed a ration composed  largely of ensilage produced  seventeen  per cent more milk  ItMways  ���������*  and twenty-eight per cent more  butterfat than those given a  ration consisting mainly of grain  in a feeding tent conducted for  121 days at the Ohio Experiment  Station. The silage ration was  also cheaper for milk production.-  The cows gained nearly eight  per cent in milk yield when put  on the silage ration. They produced'butterfat at a cost of 13c.  a pound, while the cost of a pound  from the cows fed mainly grain  was 22c.   ���������  Pensions for Soldiers.  The Dominion Government has  appointed a Board of Pension  Commissioners for Canada with  offices in "Ottawa. As this Board  wish to cause as little delay as  possible in dealing with communications with regard to pensions,  they wish the public to correspond directly with the Board of  Pension Commissioners, Ottawa.  A good deal of delay may be  caused by communications being  sent through other Departments  of the Government.  The Patriotic Fund Association  and the Military Hospitals Commission have kindly consented to  give information and assistance  to those wishing to write direct  to the Board of Pension Commissioners. These societies have  offices in certain localities in  Canada.  In addition, in order to facilitate the granting of pensions,  the Board is.opening branch pension offices in Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Regiha, Winnipeg, London, Hamilton, Toronto,  Barrie, Kingston, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec, St. John's and  Halifax. All information with  regard to pensions may be obtained from these offices.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  I- REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  V Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  tli.e Yukon Territory; tbe'No'nT^-WEST Territories and in a portion of the PROVINCE of  British Columbia; may be leased for a term of  ��������� twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre.- Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased  ; to one applicant.  .-' Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Assent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  .'-. in surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the^rate of five cents per ton.  ..*��������� 'the person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the:royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  - The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of'the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  - For full information application Bhould be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W..W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������306SO.  BUSINESS CARDS  Ed  nor.  ?! lo  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  .Our sealed bid plan whereby, 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the- highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will ad-  Vance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Gur commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.  H  30E  ]   0.  :Sii fcaaf -r^������aK=S  if!  0M  HARRY HANSON  'THE RELIABLE  PLUMBER"  of Prince Rupert  inventor of the Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented in Canada)  will make a trip to Bella Coola  to introduce his patented rapid  heating water coil, also to do  whatever "plumbing or water pipe  work there may be a call for.  If you have a pump and a good  well you do not need any city  water works to have all the conveniences of modern home comforts. Harry Hanson can improvise a system with ordinary  whisky barrells. and. one hour's  pujiipirig. each day. He has several of these systems installed as  far north as Smithers and Terrace. Send him an ordinary floor  plan of your home and what you  want, also the location of pump.  State if you want hot and cold  water orcold water only. Will be  pleased to estimate on your work.  Harry Hanson ThPeluRnlL,e?'e  P. O. Box 395  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTRICT   OF   COAST���������BANGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C. occupation builder, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West 20 chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30, 1916.  Jan. 6���������March  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BANGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Mark Smaby, of  Ocean Falls, B. C, occupation timber  cruiser, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the \  southwest corner  of  Pulp Lease 205;!  thence North 20 chains; thence East 20 ,  chains; thence North 20 chains; thence:  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20  chains; thence East 20 chains; thence .  South  7  chains   more  or less to high  water mark of Cousin's Inlet;   thence  following along said high water mark  in a westerly direction  to a point due  east of this post; thence West 12 chains .  more  or less  to   this post, containing  140 acres more or less.  (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 26, 1916.  Jan. 27-Mar. 24.  TheMason <������r Risch Piano  of to-day will make plain our  prioilege to state with authority:  "NO FINER   PIANO MADEl"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  Let us attend  your Victor Record  -U  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in'Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0. J 5  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  i-l.i , J i;  \A/HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \\7HAT person so independent?  \X/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are independent;  they ate strangers to hard times.  ���������;-T^:smm  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  ���������"THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The. land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and .mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the. surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  ,/J.   :'  1}-  ���������'  >A\  H  fe T  'BELLS  COOLA COURIER  Saturday, February />( jjw  f  i  HOE  m 0  ii  U  llfePif  |   IV'- -J i I'll  .5 tii,!!  iiiiii  iw  'III  <������!1 rli*S  IE 3'!  W������ill*  IK  HSI  lit  WIST.      ||1-J'I   i  MS  n  m-Z'Jj Ac;  if "t' -r;i... i- *  Jii'lf*   '*- i< '  J1.-'.;. 3$$  , \m m> &  V kr> N  t     1  i  4  I Hi  i; *  ���������v!   ������������������iv  - '13  :U I;  !<'  I i  '     I  *  ::;rf  Illlll  Subscribe  oiiner  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coaft between Vancouver and  Prince.Rupert. .  A distance of six hundred miles.  ' It Will be to your interest to k^Pt-well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  General Botha, premier of  South Africa.   A Letter Trom Ingvald Urseth.  December 24, 1916.  Christmas Eve.-just think of  it' And here am I, some thousands of miles separated from  everything dear to almost every  man's', heart. What memories  throng one's mind atsuch a time  and under such circumstances.  But in spite of the many leagues  I am determined to have my way  and be with you tonight in  thought and mind-a poor makeshift perhaps, but still it hdps.  i   o,    o     o     o     o  It's been very quiet tonight,  only the occasional solemn boom  ADVERTISERS-  Now is ^e^time; to keep  * vour 'name -before * the  er or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  must be* genuineas^dhiewhere if  -_i��������� g~a ;f - "Rnh these  r  MAKE YOUR| DOLLARS  AT   THE   FRONT,  BUY  DOMiWIOW OF CANADA  THREE-YEAR  War Savings Certificates  ESTABLISHE#AT BELLA' COOLA IN  1895  $ 25.00   FOR   $21.60  50:00     '���������'        43,00  100.00      " 86.00  INDIVIDUAL PURCHASES LIMITED TO *t������0.  FOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY AT ANY BANK  OR ANY MONEY ORDER POST OFFICE  JAN.  9,  1917  RNANOB.DBPARTMBNT  cTttawa  B.Brynitdsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  up in celebration of the day.  Through the generosity of the  0. G. a number of us were provided with an excellent dinner.  And then' at night a concert'and  entertainment at thelpcal Y. M.  C. A. This was carrie'd.outin a  big barn all prettily decorated  of a eun breaks in upon one's an8 litup with'candles. Singing  dreamy air-castles, and you are by the audience formed the prm-  mdelv brought -to earth again, cipal part of the program. Eyery-  back to realities. ���������  thing was sung and played, rag.  Peace, on  earth, indeed, is it time and all.  not'a"hollow-mockery?   Still, it  has withstood' the Ages.   There  . What you. saw about the 102nd  uHvnereu in the Papers is'all  true,,and  ",   ������   i >-i^nt these more t0������-    Our boys were indeed  we can only find it.    .but these ������������������_���������__ _  ar.e soriibre reflexions, are they  not?  .We should', be., happy tonight, "apd right liere,is. where I  for one foramen ij.eij-.'''    r  ' Don't imagine'-for ;a minute  that:werareentirely.;withoutour  * 'doings?' We ar/not to be outdone in theiirieof "eats" either,  for there is a good, big chunk of  thatimpervious substance known  as "puddin" for each and every  mother's son of us. And also  various other triumphs known  only to the initiated.  Some of the fellows are practising Christmas Carols tonight,  just fancy! Even now,their raucous efforts beat upon my.ears,-  and I am not close to the quartette by any means.  I'll finish this tomorrow night.  Perhaps something will transpire  in the course of the day which  will merit chronicling.  very lucky, if one.can call it that.  ���������They have all bee'irin some queer  old corners"; biit; when-the smoke  lifted, the delegates from, little,  old-.B. C.;. were, still intact and  very much'on the job.  ��������� ������ ������ ������ ������  Thanlcs so much for last parcel  of socks, etc., just received.* Always so nice to get things from  home. Arii keeping a sharp lookout for that "fruit cake. Wont  it taste good. 'Wish I was within raiding distance of your pantry right now.^-Loye to you all.  Ingvald.  1  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMR,1 HEATING AND COOK STOVES  You are judged by the  stationery that^you use.  Let us do your job printing   We will do it right.  Tuesday, 26th,   Did not finish_  this yesterday,  was kept quite  busy.    Military  duties took up  i all the forenoon and in the p. m.  I we bestowed our presence upon  :! one or two little functions.gotter.  CfcUB OFFER  We have pleasure -in announcing that we have made arrangements with two 6f4the leading.weekly publications  so that our subscribers pay" have "the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.      ' ___  The Courier   .       .      .r  Farmers Advocate & Home Joarnal, Winnipeg  $1.00 D  ,    ���������  ��������� ^_ Both papers  1.50 ,       v r    tor   .  $2.00  $2.50  The Courier   .'      .       .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for  .  .   $2.00  The Courier   .       .     ���������'-.-   .   .  Family Herald & Weekly Stary Montreal  $1.00  ��������� L00,  $2.00  Both pa'pers  for  .   .   $1.75  Large and well assorted stock  of Meii's/'Boys9- and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We cany the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in j^^|e������ % the lowest possible pnca^-'^iMi's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������   8  The four papers may be had for $4.50.  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  The celebration of Christmas  by soldiers fighting to secure  permanentpaace is in accordance  with the spirit of Christianity.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  mamrs*a������i Jm\m\C.nm  The Courier  $1 a Year  r  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  THE two principal reasons '  ���������*���������   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisij.icra  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  '9  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  Burns;  Settlers, Prospe&ors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the most suitable articles are kept at prices thai  invite competition.  Paints ^ "Oik  -Varnishes  - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descript^  Best brand, of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorU  kept on hand.    Prompt service  %  fe  sis  Wk  t'������  ������..iJ  f!  m  Best Goods-Lowest Prlcasj^ff?* St������C  .... RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B.BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA CO0LA,B^  lane  ffillt  in������  3iv  iur<  m  le������>  k;'j?Pfevon  ���������.' <i**aepiand  '     ^'Mtchel  .���������*59tee d  - ^-\v|star\  ^Wthe  !l f-i  ks:;m$on t  "Commit  amsa  ii mm in i''���������:^cga^'*  r.^tpedm;

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