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Bella Coola Courier Feb 10, 1917

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 ,-/  / ~ f'-^W!*-,  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  VOL. 5���������NO. 9  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  United States Awaits  Germany's Answer  Washington, Feb. 7.���������Germany's answer to President Wilson's notice severing diplomatic  relations is expected within 24  hours, and may be a declaration  of war. Belief rapidly crystal-  izing among officials that war  with Germany is inevitable. This  belief is,strengthened by receipt  of a Berlin press despatch quoting Foreign-minister Zimmerman  , assaying: "There is no step backwards" contemplated following  President Wilson's action.  Greatest effort is being centered on the navy, so completely  and quickly the work is proceeding that if the United States' be  called upon to strike tliey can do  so immediately andforcibly. The  ' policy is almost  complete and  secrecy in all departments is being closely observed. "The presi-  ' dent  discontinued   conferences  with newspapermen owing to the  delicate situation.  Neutrals action in response to  President Wilson's request is ex-  ��������� pected today in some' countries.  " Should' Neutrals followthe lead  ' of the States probably there will  be a conference by all of them  to discuss the part each is to bear  in bringing pressure to bear on  Germany to relax her'submarine  sea warfare.  Count Bernstorff will sail next  week, preparations now under  way,, the congregation of German  'consuls at New York is proceeding. Ambassador Gerard left  Berlin for home. Americans in  Germany advised to,leave/  All sailings from Norway to  the States is temporarily suspended. ,  Marconi wireless of America  in the event of emergency will  place the' entire organization at  the government's disposal. The  House representatives agrees to  the appropriation of millions for  guns, aircrafts and munitions.  17 Below Zero, in Berlin  Berlin, Feb. 7.���������Reports from  all fronts show no large engagements- have taken place. The  country is in the grip of severe  cold weather, 17 degrees below  zero in Berlin.          HoIlandFacesStarvation  Amsterdam, Feb. 7.���������Anxiety  concerning Holland's future is  more keen now than at any time  since the outbreak of war. Several factors contribute to gravity  of situation. Holland now faces  starvation; never produces more  than she would consume in four  and a half monthsrin a year, .existing stocks of grJHjj sii'nici^t  .; only for a few weeks. : German  concessions regarding protected  zone are mere mockery if States  enters the war. Massing of German troops on the, border adds  to the uneasiness.     y     ������������������������������������'��������� '   .  Five Steamers Sunk  in the War Zone  London, Feb. 7.���������Four British  and one Russian steamer were  sunk in the war zone yesterday  by submarines.  British aviators bomb Bruges  and damage torpedo boats in the  harbor, also buildings and docks  set on fire.  Two hostile raids on the Somme  front beaten off with great losses  to the enemy. oThree enemy  aeroplanes destroyed and six  others driven down in a damaged  condition..  British forces are1 established  on the Tigris, artillery now controls at short range the mouth of  Hai fiver near Kut;El-Amara.  Spain will probably be the first  neutral nation to,join with the  United States in severing relations with Germany. "Spanish  government despatch strong note  of protest to Berlin against Germany's unlimited submarining  2nd may take same course in the  matter as"the States.  i ' i  Ambassador Page gathering  details of killing of American  sailor." British freighter Eave-  stone shelled by German submarine, tension greatly increased as  result of the incident.;'  -Lloyd-George -says-Germany  faces certain defeat, this fact  lies behind the_studied savagery  of the Huns.  U. S. Hopes War May  Yet Be Averted  Washington, Fob. 8.��������� Hopes  are entertained that war may yet  be averted. It is feared, however, that some U boat commander may precipitate war. No decision has been reached regarding the Eavestone incident, few  ships are sailing.  Course of. action regarding  Austria still in doubt. House  representatives passed bills totalling'three-quarters of a billion  dollars for the army and navy.  Action taken to protect interned  ships. -Authorities prevent the  wrecking of the German ships  Manila and Colon. Some of the  interned vessels have been seized  by the government. General  espionage bill before the House  to curb the spy evil. Senate  stands behind the president in  the severance of relations with  Germany by a vote of 78 to 5.  Tons of Shipping Lost Since Feb. 1  London, Feb. 8.��������� Losses in  shipping since February 1st has  now reached one hundred thous-  and tons. Several ships "sunk  yesterday, but no details as yet.  ' British capture thousand yards  of hostile trenches on the Somme  front in.> the neighborhood of  Grandecourt. Considerable artillery activity throughout the  day and night on both sides of  the Somme and in Ypres sector.  Two of our aeroplanes were  brought down and ten German  planes were driven away.  King George in opening parliament declared the Allies are determined to secure just reparation for past and guarantees for  future, threats will not deter  them.-- Never before in the history of realm have Dominions  received such recognition in the  opening of parliament as today.  Hagensborg, who enlisted in the  Forestry Battalion last fall, ie  now in training with the regiment at Brockville, Ontario.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  Berne, Feb. 7.���������Semi-officially  stated that Switzerland's reply  to, President Wilson's note is to  decline from the line of strict  neutrality.  Paris, Feb: 7.���������Front relatively calm, sixteen prisoners and a  machine gun captured.    ,  Ottawa, Feb. 7.���������Premier Borden announces that ten thousand  soldiers are now back from the  front. . Much time is to be given  in the House to consider their  welfare. Legislation dealing  with land settlement to be introduced.  Ottawa, Feb. 8.���������Hald billion  war bill passed. Committees  appointed on returned soldiers  questions and confederation celebration.  ��������� Paris, Feb. 8.���������Spirited artillery actions in Belgium,' elsewhere all quiet.  New York, Feb. 8.���������Samuel  Gompers, president of American  Federation of Labor, declares  organized labor will support the  government.   -  Anchor line steamer California, 8669 tons, British registry,  sunk and 55 lives reported lost.  Havana, Feb. 8.���������Cuba supports President Wilson's action.  S. S. Venture arrived in port  last Saturday afternoon about 3  o'clock, one day behind time  As on this trip she encountered  the heaviest snowstorms ever  experienced on the coast it was  found impossible to make time.'  It was with great difficulty  that those whose business necessitated their presence at ��������� the  wharf could > make their way  through the deep snow.  ' No passengers had the courage  to disembark under the circumstances.      Mr. and Mrs. W. Gallienne, who  have been residents in the valley  for a number of years, departed  on the 3teamer for Ocean Falls.  Birger M. Brynildsen who had  been home on a visit before leaving with his regiment for the  east departed, his furlough having nearly expired.  Mrs. McDougal who has spent  several weeks staying with her  brother Hans Odegaard, Hagensborg; left on Saturday for Chicago with her two children.  Tollef Saugstad is off for a few  weeks to the American Can Co.'s  works at Vancouver to familiar  ize himself with the care of the  Sanitary-Can machinery of which  he will have charge at the local  caniiery next season.   '  The chief item of interest as  concerns our quiet settlement is  the heavy fall of snow, of last  week. It came down quite heavily  for more than two days and was  the winding up of four days of  exceptionally cold weather which  while it lasted was accompanied  by a strong wind. Last Saturday and Sunday was spent by  those who have heavy horses in  opening up the road,' the rest of  the community "kept the home  fires burning." Neither Sunday  School nor Divine Service was  held on Sunday last. Thawing  weather has been the order of  the day ever since up till the  time of the item.  The last week's issue erroneously stated that Wm. Sutherland had enlisted in the motor  service. We now make the correction that he has enlisted in  the navy;- that he is now serving  on the H. M. S. Rainbow of the  Canadian navy, and that after a  month's training he will join the  Atlantic patrol service.  We learn that Frank Hagan of  Our townsman, Sergt.-major  P. J. Kenyon, writes the Courier  from Shorncliffe, where he is now  stationed in the 1st Canadian  Mounted Police:  "I never thought when I left  .Bella Coola that the terrible Hun  was going to allow me to be intact for such a long time as he  has done. However, he has no  terror for us any more, and all  we are waiting for now is the  order to advance, and considering our positions and the pi-e-  paredness of our troops there  will be something doing when  we start on the1 western front,  presumably in March. Fritz  started the racket, and now it is  up to us to finish it for him.  "We expect to be back in Bella  Coola in good time for Christmas.  I saw Fred Grant a few days  ago, he is now back in France  with- his regiment. It was nice  to meet Hi L. Harris, who is now  at Bramshot, also Garnet Gibson  and Charles Lord."  Sergt.-major Kenyon winds up  with sayinp that Canada has lost  a lot of her best men, men that  any nation would be proud of,  and predicts a sure victory in the  near future.  After having been closed during the winter Johnson's mill  started operations last Monday  morning.   The prosperous and popular  firm of Mackay and Brink of  Hagensborg; is on the point of  being dissolved. Karl Brink will  continue (the business and it is  safe to say the favorable reputation earned by the former firm  will be maintained under Mr.  Brink's sole management.  This week is being spent in  taking 'an inventory and Mr.  Brink intends to assume charge  on Monday next.  ��������� Red Cross Auxiliary.  November collections* for Red  Cross Fund, by' Miss Schulstad,  $3.50; Miss Livelton, $2.50; Miss  Clayton, (for Mr. Broughton)  $12.50.   Total, $28.50.  For Patriotic Fund, $4.50.  December collections for Red  Cross Fund, by Mr. Broughton,  $18.00.  Patriotic Fund, $7.50.  Buenos\.Ayres, Feb. 8���������Bolivia  supports-Wilson's stand against  Germany'.''"  . Amsterdam, Feb. 8���������Holland's  food- scarcity grows. Distress  due to the war increased by intense cold.'"  Two'hundred persons, mostly  women,- .killed by an explosion  last'Saturday at the Nobel munition factor at Selhaus.  ". American ambassador Gerard  expects to leave Berlin on Sunday at the latest.;  THE    MINISTER    OF    FINANCE  REQUESTS  THE  PEOPLE    OF' CANADA    TO  BEGIN NOW  TO  SAVE   MONEY   FOR   THE  '  NEXT WAR LOAN  MN. |, 1917  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE  OTTAWA  Ocean Falls News.  Ladies Organize to Work for the  Red Cross Society  The ladies of Ocean Falls held  a meeting Monday evening Jan.  22nd, for the purpose of organizing a Red Cross Society,' to be  operated in connection with the  Vancouver Central. Dr. Christie  assisted by accepting the Chair  for tlie evening. In a very short  time twenty-eight ladies joined  as members^ Officers' were then  elected as follows:  Hon. chairman, Mrs. A. B.  Martin; Chairman, Mrs. J. Christie; Vice-chairman, Mrs. J. S.  Mackay; Secretary,' Mrs. ��������� Adelaide Metcalf; Treasurer, Mrs.-A.  D. Nevin; Work supervisor,. Mrs.  E. McL. Smith;  Official cutter^  Mrs. Misner.  Committees were formed for  entertainments, etc., and on Saturday evening, Jan. 27, a dance  was given by the Society in the  quarters erected for them by the  Pacific'Mills Limited. The pro-'  ceeds amounted to $37.10. This  money .will he-used for,the purpose of buying materials to.be  made up here and sent to the  Vancouver Central Red Cross  Society.  It is the intention to hold a  dance every Saturday evening.as  well.as a concert now and then..  We have pleasure in publishing a few extracts from a letter  received from Lieut. H..W-. M.  Rolston, of the 3rd Brigade of  the 2nd Indian Cavalry-Division,  who, at the time of writing, is  in hospital having met with an  accident.  He states that 90 per cent of  his Division are Westeners and  he is justly proud of them. Discipline is the chief factor of the  British army and' has been the  greatest life saver. It is impossible for a soldier to have tpo  much discipline.  He expects to see some fierce  fighting by the cavalry brigades  this spring, and they do not feel  like getting peace until the German machine is smashed. Peace  now would be a dastardly crime,  it would mean that the thousands  of men who have given their  lives would have done so in vain.  The 102nd and 54th are now in  the same brigade and are doing  very good work.  In conclusion, he ispleased'to  state that J. M. Rolston is now  a major in the Canadian head- '  quarters staff. Lieut. Rolston  wishes to be remembered to all  his friends.  W. J. M. Sanders, manager of  the Kelly, Douglas & Co., wholesale grocers, at Prince Rupert,  died at that place. The late Mr.  Sanders was an old employee of  that concern and for a number  of years a resident of the northern city.  (Shurrlr Kfattre    \  9  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a.m.  7:30 p. m.  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W, H. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  s  r^V  -'-'���������: ���������-���������������* 'in  IP  BELLA  COOLA COURIER  Saturday, February 10,   19)7  'sed and the oppressor, sang of  ithem:  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by |     "'Curse  ye  Meroz,   said   the  The Courier  the Bella Coola PijhllshIno Co. Ltd.  Angel of the Lord.     Curse ye  ; bitterly the inhabitants thereof,  j because  they came  not  to  the  $1.00 help of the Lord, to the help of  SUBSCRIPTION RATES  Canada  1  Year   6 Month.   '������-75i the Lord against the mighty.'  3 Months  0-50  United States  1 Year $1-50  ' United Kingdom  1  Year $1-00  away the glory of this world."  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the maiiMnetnciit  at oi>ce. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Ratls,   Api-ly at  Officio.  To Correspondents���������Wliili" unol>j������ftionaliie anonymous communications .vill be published, tho  name und address of every writer of such Icltcis  must be iriven to the editor.  The Editor reserves the riprht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer s  '    risk.  "J^aliw populi atijirrma rut Irx."  SATURDAY, FEB. 10, 1917.  "President Wilson has earned i       tl  for this nation the curse of Me-1 Be Consistent.  roz, for he has not dared to stand!    The Dominion Government is  on the side of the Lord against'very persistent in sending out  Peace  Without  Victory.  Colonel Roosevelt has uttered  ' some very strong words about  President Wilson's attitude in  this war. In the eyes of full-  blooded men, who never can be  disinterested and calm spectators  when injustice and cruelty are  rampant but whose souls cry out  in indignation against the tyrants  and in pity towards the victims,  Mr. Wilson's efforts, to so speak  and act that'he may be strictly  .neutral, seem to them rank hypocrisy or wilful blindness., In  questions of right and wrong-  there can be no neutral grounds.  It is either: "Those who are not  for me are against me."  In speaking about Mr. Wilson's  plea for peace without victory  Col. Roosevelt says:  "It is spurned by all men fit to  call themselves fellow citizens  of Washington and Lincoln orof  the war worn fighters who followed Grant and Lee.  "The Tories of 1776 demanded  peace without victory. The Copperheads of 1864 demanded peace  without victory. These men were  Mr. Wilson's spiritual forebears.  But neither Washington nor Lincoln was among the men who  drew the sword lightly, or who,  when once it had been drawn,  sheathed it without victory. If  a righteous war is ended by a  peace without victory such a  peace means the triumph of  wrong over right, and neutrality  between right and wrong means  the support of wrong against  right.  "Let Mr; Wilson think of the  men of Valley Forge, who in the  last extremity of want and misery yet spurned peace without  victory. Let him think of the  men of the Civil War and of  Lowell's trumpet lines:  '"Come Peace, not like a mourner  bowed  'For honor lost and dear ones  wanted,  'But proud to meet a people proud  'With eyes that tell of triumph  tasted.'  "When  fear of the German  submarine next moves Mr. Wilson to' declare for 'peace without  victory'  between   the   tortured  Belgians and their cruel oppressors and taskmasters; when such  fear next moves him to utter the  shameful untruth that each side  is fighting for the same things, j  let him think of the prophetess'  Deborah,   who,   when   Sisera  mightily oppressed the children  of Israel with his chariots of iron ;  and when the people of Meroz j  stood neutral between the oppres-'  the wrongdoing of the mighty."  ooooo  A Cruel Action.  Even-supporters of the provincial government must admit  of ilsunsympathcticif not, to say  cruel treatment of individuals  and bodies of men having dealings with it as compared to that  of the former government, which  always tried to accommodate and  yield to the wishes of their  friends and others and thereby  tried to help wherever It could.  We do not intend at this time to  mention the railway promoters  and land speculators who have  found the present government  so unwilling to render the assistance which they were wont to  receive before.  With much regret we learn that  the famous Indian Commission,  which has been in existence the  last three years, without finishing its work, has been dissolved  and its members lost their gocd  positions. They had secured appointment on a commission to  look up the rights of the Indians  of the province. For their services they were securing a pittance  of $20 per day each and in addition about $10 for expenses.  They naturally put in all the time  they could and therefore worked  365 days in the year. They did  not take time to stop for Sunday  they were so busy and anxious  to make themselves useful. As  the Indians arc weak and defenseless and likely will always  remain   so,   these   hardworked  appeals that we must produce  more and save as much as pos-  T r  sible. And every patriotic Canadian will try to do so. But it  does occurto us that the government would show more consistency if it would set the country  a better example. But it certainly does not seem to do so.  As a sample of the methods in  vogue with the government we  copy the following item from an  exchange:  "The two hundred unemployed  Canadian officers in England to  i  which attention has been given  in press dispatches of 'late, cost  the,country more than $1,000,000  a year. That money would be  much better spent on shells for  the firing line."  Let the government take some  of its own medicine and practice  a stricter economy.  o     o o     o r  Married women in the Provincial Government service at .Victoria have been invited to explain  why they have to work for a  living. The Executive have decreed, also, that all single men  of military age and physically fit,  and1 who have no ' dependents,  will have to go. Both inside and  outside service are to be curtailed  o     c     o     o ^   o  The Military Forces Voting  Act enabling soldiers to vote up  till New Year was the trap set  by the late government in the  interests- of its friends of the  liquor traffic to defeat the will of  the people on  the question  of  which will compel countries depending upon shipping for their  food supply to adopt measures to  restrict the consumption of������many  articles of food, which may lead  to actual suffering from lack of  proper nourishment.  Germany is said to have 800  new submarines ready for the  ravaging of commerce. It is  hoped some means may be devised to deal successfully'with  this increasing danger.  OOOOO  Germany's idea about carrying  out her treaty obligations in regard to the protection of Belgium  is rather of a kind almost unheard of.  On the, first invasion she ravaged the country as cruelly as  any savage horde. Since its occupation she has carried away  her ward's raw material, she  has closed her factories and carried away the machinery; she is  subjecting the country to a war  lax of $8,000,000 per month,  which is more than fen times the  ordinary taxes in times of peace,  and last hut not *least, she is  carrying away thousands of the  people into slavery in order to  help conquer the armies of the  Belgians and their Allies.  And in the face of such inhumanity we find good (?) people  who sympathize with the Germans!  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,  PANTS,  OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  ���������MADE   IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN t0 rer)recent  of 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them in different parts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest, energetic men only, are needed. We particularly  want a good man on the G. T. P. Railway.  Planters should write at once for our 80 page Catalogue.  members of the Commission ex- prohibition.  pected to hold their jobs as long-  as they were able to sit up, and  perhaps longer.    But not so.  Never giving the future of  these poor men and their families  a passing thought this new government of ours "fired" them  body and soul and now offers the  furniture they used for sale at  half pi ice.  Imagine their feelings. $30  per day is not to be sneezed at in  ihe.se war times,    "finis passes  Sir Richard McBride has, seemingly, been the agent to carry  out this sinister design and will  as a consequence very likely  have to hunt another job soon.  ooooo1  Very reluctantly but irresistibly  it is dawning upon our minds  that this the most-bitter, cruel  and bloody war ever known is  continually growing worse as  time drags on. The submarine  menace is assuming proportions ^':vc of Politics-  NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for, the  House of Commons for this Riding-  The object of this space is to  introduce to you ,thc man who always fights for the rights, and  prosperity of the masses, irrespec-  "Produee more 1917."���������Hon. Martin Burrell, Dominion Minister of Finance.  ROYAL STANDARD  FIELD SEEDS  WE are extending our already extensive field seed business for  1917. It is the desire of tne Canadian Government that the  people produce as much as possible during the ensuing year,  and we are arranging with the leading dealers throughout British  Columbia and Alberta to carry a complete line of ROYAL  STANDARD FIELD SEEDS. These seeds are the choicest it is  possible to secure in the World's Markets. They are Government'  inspected and carefully selected for purity.  Seeds should be purchased early as prices inevitably advance as  the Season progresses.    In all probability the market will be short ���������  and it will be difficult later in the year to make purchases.  ,      ,    Order ROYAL STANDARD Field Seeds NOW.   If your dealer .  cannot supply you write us and we will ship to yoa direct.  WRITE TODAY FOR FULL INFORMATION AND PRICE LIST   ���������  Vancouver Milling & Grain Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  "The contributions to the Red  Cross and Patriotic Funds as  published in this issue show a  decided falling off for the two  last months of the year just  closed.  While we admit that there may  be some people in the valley who  have not the money to give in  the winter time we will not admit that everybody outside the  townsite are "dead-broke." Our  people must realize that it is of  the utmost importance that the  wounded and'the poor be taken,  care of and that it is our duty to  do  so  even if our means are  scanty.  Even if our usual contributions  for.other purposes should of necessity, have to be curtailed or  dropped altogether it should be  done, because the taking care of  our defenders and their families  has the first and foremost claim  upon all of us. -  Compare���������rPrice for Price���������  Bmiium/    A  GREAT  WEST  Tl  with the teas you are now using.  It's Better!  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  Canadians on the march at the front.   The photograph shows theequipment carried  by our soldier lads as they enter the front trenches on the Somme.  ft  If  o  0  cz  HOE  :>���������  not:  ]&  *SI  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  ���������    BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      CamOSUll      Leaves Vancouver every  Tuesday at 9 p. m.        (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p. m.  S. S,. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement. \  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, Carrall, St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  HOE  HOE  m  Advertise your Wants 'in" the Courier  rwjmjtiufl^TMuA^Mtiwtiatgwafflge!^ \  s-  Saturday, February JO,  1917  BELLA; COOLA COURIER  [HOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  IN SUMS OF $500 OR ANY MULTIPLE THEREOF.  Principal ropayable' 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by cheque (froe of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per annum from the date of  purchase;' ,  Holders of this stock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as the.equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issue  In' Canada other than an issuo of Treasury Bills or other like short date security.  Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.  A commission of ono-quartcr of one per cent will be allowed to rocognizod bond and  stock brokors on allotments made in respect of applications for this "stock which boar their  stamp.  For application forms apply'to the.Doputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OF-FINANCE, OTTAWA,  OCTOBER 7lh, ]91C.  ,OM  MO  MO^OUHKM  A SOLDIER'S REVERIE. .  A descriptive series by our soldier correspondent, Jlrchie eD.  'Darlington, late of Shushartie Bay, B. C.    '  0MIB������O4BB������(O>'aRK������(>-������B������<a>������BS������O������H������<)4BtaB-O4QB������<M  0>������n  I am again "home for Christmas'-' after a further five weeks'  spell in a sea-board hospital.  This town in' the north where  I am convalescing is draped in  snow and somehow, perhaps by  reason of this mantle, it seems a  hundred years older.  The feature of this Christmas  is more than ephemeral. The  multitude of mud-stained, war-  hardened young men- bi-others,,  if you will, of the smiling ghosts,  but who have lived'through the  fire���������is a substantial and joyful  fact. Theirs is a strongly welded brotherhood which the slight  vagaries of uniform or badge do  not alter. Foregathered in old  "blighty" from the pestilent  Tigris, the sands of Egypt and  the mud of the Somme, the dif:  ferences of a button and a tunic  do not matter. A subtle change  is observable in all of them; the  obvious' tan, the transforming  effectof khaki, the freer carriage  and jaunty step aside, there is an  (9 alert and ' listening expression  which was never there before,  and one sometimes surprises a  sudden veiling of. the eyes���������a  new. characteristic.  Still they make a merry crowd;  despite the iron of discipline, the  sweat and blood of awful war,  their jollity survives. They beam  at .you and their laughter echoes  down' the street. Having ceased  to be over critical, with them the  philosophy of accepting things  as they are is apparently predominant: each a Napolean taking up the'gauge of destiny! 1  know the spirit underlying to be  unconquerable! '        ���������  Yet could we look beneath the  facings, the foibles' of the 'Knut'  species of former'days could be  described. By the rakish angle  of the service cap, the particularity in the parting of the hair,  the neatly-wrapped putties and  a dozen remarkable vanities)'we  could trace their origin to the  pre-Kitchener era.  Their modest stories bring^to  light a lot of hitherto unpublished history. A man's story, perhaps, is always better conveyed  when he is not conscious of telling it. .The sub-conscious mind  often reflects the truest impression. Thus we glean vignettes  of the larger battle pictures; exploits of companies and detachments; personal little chapters,of  humor and heroism, of Beaumont  Hamel and Courcelette. From  the mire and carnage, tiny shoots  of romance, which posterity will  nurture, are already beginning  to show.  The spirit of sadness is not  paramount; it is not even obvious.  Nature teaches that what we have  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  SYNOPSIS O?- COA&. "MINING  REGULATIONS       ,  fOAL MINING RIGHTS of u... Dominion, in  *" Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Aldehta,  the Yukon Territory, the North-v\ est Term-  tokies ar.il in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term cf  twenty-one years at an annual rental ol $1 an  acie. Not more than 2,360 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must he made by the  unplicant in person io the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the right* applied for  are mtuuted.  In Hui-veycd territory the hind must ho de-  Hcnbed by Heclious, or legal subdivisiuiis of section!), and inunsurveyed territory the truct applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  ' Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of 16 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, hut not otherwise.  A royulty hIiuII be paid on the merchant able output of the tniue at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shull fudiiflh  the Agent with sworn returns ucro">iling for the  full quantity of merchantable roul rnmed and pay  (he royalty thereun. If the coal mining rights  nre not being opcruted, such leturns should be  f urnished at least once u year. >  Iheleiihe will include the foul mining rights  only, but the lessee muy be permitted to purchase whatever uviiilublu surface rights may be  considered neressut y for the working of the mine  at the rute of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretory of the Depiirtment of the  Interiur, Ottawa, or to uny>Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lauds.  ,    W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the lnteiior.  N. li.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������306'JO.  BUSINESS CARDS  HOC  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and' trappers of 3. C,  Yukonand Alaska have taken advantage of our F,ur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or, 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.   '  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  [51 l< ioi >l fo]  Dealers and Trappers  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTBICT OF COAST���������BANOE III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation builder," intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (i-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West20 chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J. WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30, 1910. Jan. G~March  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  fli ffimnTn gHW-iT-Biwnut twraff-^-raiiiw-TTiTraiiup  HARRY HANSON "T^Jmt^LE  of Prince Rupert  inventor of the Harry Hanson  Special Wafer Heater  (Patented in Canada)  will make a trip to Bella Copla  to introduce his patented rapid  heating water coil, also to do  whatever plumbing or water pjpe  work there may be a call for.  If you have a pump and a good  well you do not need any city  water works to have all the conveniences of modern home comforts. Harry Hanson can improvise a system with ordinary  whisky barrells and one hour's  pumping each day. He has several of these systemsinstalled:as  far north as- Smithers and Terrace. Send him an ordinary floor  plan of your home and what you  want, also the location of pump.  State if you want hot and cold  water or cold water only. Will be  pleased to estimate on your work.  Harry iffanspn^"mL'S?10  P.O. Box 395  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������BANOE   III.  Take Notice that I, Mark Smaby, of  Ocean Falls, B. C, occupation timber  cruiser, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Pulp Lease 205;  thence North 20 chains; thence East 20  chains; thence North 20 chains;' thence  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20  chains; thence East 20 chains; thence  South 7 chains more or less to high  water mark of Cousin's Inlet; thence  following along said high water mark  (in a westerly direction to a point due  oast of this post; thence West 12 chains  more or less to this post, containing  140 acres more or less.  (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 2G, 1916.  Jan. 27--Mar. 24.  ThelViason & Risch Piano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO FINER. PIANO MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  i3B  J:  tfIT Let us attend your Victor Record  J-'  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  jj|   7.38;GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  ilf>  '1X7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  ' i  1 i  ^WL/HAT person so independent?  \X7HAT ambition "mor.^ noble than to  be a producer of tne necessaries  of life?  G  Bella Coola farmers are independent,  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley.  CZ3  "THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  f lion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.,  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to -the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over .twenty first prizes.  | ELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOZ;A COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  InNADA.  One Year $1.00  Sr< Months  0.75  Three Months   0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year.... <,....:.... $1.50  United Kingdom and The Continent.  One Year. ....;... ."..... .$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name. -...,..   .  ' p. 0.......;.,,..,.;...:...;.  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed ff  BELUA COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, February 10]  1917  m ������  noc  scribe  for the  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  It Will be to your in-  terest to keeP We^ m~  formed regarding the  happenings, throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  , GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public adver:  tising brings.  General Averescu, commander  of the Rumanian army.  A SOLDIER'S REVERIE���������Continued.  bred shall breed again and multiply; and by philosophy we learn  that what ,is honestly wrought  shall be blessed and endure. And  perhaps the joy of this third  Christmas-a memorable one for  reunions���������is sweeter for its admixture of pain; and maybe, too,  that is why the ghosts appear to  smiie  But in a day or so many of the  soldiers will go back to the Ypres  salient, the Ancre and the Som  me; to the flaming batteries and  the gaping craters of "no man's  land." Back to where once beautiful villages, stricken by the  lightning of war, lie iirshapeless  masses of debris which heaven  weeps'to behold: to where once  shady,* rustling-woods have,.become shrieking holocausts of  flame and hurtling shell; to where  the one time sweet; green pastures of Belgium are fouled by  seeping streams of red, human  blood and decaying, torn human  bodies. The great heart of Britain will be steel again. Even in  the eyes of the ghosts the battle  fires will gleam. Alas, that the  love and charity and principle of  REAL ESTATE booms in the Christmas could not be always  R cities have'come and gone, and everywhere!  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries ���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier", and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  Secure Seed Early.  It is already time that the farmers begin to plan what quantity and kind of seed they will  need in the spring. The agricultural papers predict a scarcity  of seed later on and it is therefore highly important that negotiations at least be started immediately to secure samples and  prices.  The difference in the yield between that of poor and good seed  is so great that the cost is not to  be considered.  at* the: front.  BUY  DOMINION OF CANADA  THREE-YERR  War Savings Certificates  $ 25.00   FOR   $21.50  50.00      " 43.90  IOO.OO      " 86.00  INDIVIDUAL PURCHASES LIMITED TO *I503,  FOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY AT ANY BANK  OR ANY MONEY ORDER POST OFFICE  JAN. 9,  1917  FINANCE    DKPARTMBNT  OTTAWA  Work of Red Cross Society jn France.  (By a returned Medical  Officer.)*   '  The work of the Red.* Cross  Society in France can hardly be  explained. One has to see it to  know what excellent work the  Society is doing.  With its huge supply depots,at  different bases, and accessory  depots attached to all fhospitals  of importance in France the work  extends as-far as the firing line.  While doing ambulance work behind the trenches, our field'hospitals and dressing stations were  greatly helped by. them. With  the/help of the Red Cross Society  we were able to make our patients  as comfortable as they would be  in any hospital in Canada. We  were supplied with endless quantities of socks, many suits of  pyjamas, bath' robes, bedroom  slippers, nightcaps, bedsocks,  and other comforts too numerous  to mention.  With the help of Red Cross and  other societies, the medical ser-  vice has been able to establish  up-to-date hospitals on lines .of  communication. These hospitals  have X-Ray and High Frequency  machines and laboratories -in  charge of renowned specialists.  It is comforting to those who  have relatives in France to know  that they are looked after as well  as if they were in Canada. The  Red Cross Society has also a fleet  of motor ambulances with their  volunteer drivers and .these are  doing exceptionally, good work.  Tommy is welljooked after in  France. When he is wounded  he is picked up by stretcher  bearers. First aid is given. Then  he his brought back to the regimental medical officer who makes  him comfortable and passes him  on to the field ambulance where  he receives a good hot drink.'  His wounds are attended to and  he receives a cigarette as there  is no better sedative to Tommy  than a cigarette. ' From the field  ambulance he is passed on to the  clearing station from which he  is sent down the lines of communication to one of the different hospitals. If an operation  is required, it can be performed  at the field ambulance or at any  unit behind it. The work is very  interestingespecially at the firing  line as it is often mixed up with  a few shells and bombs and then  the fights in the air are most  spectacular and always draws  attention.  Clean up the incubator and run  a trial hatch.  ibiiimi MiHMdirr*rt,nw-"-  $1 a Year  every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  H  o  HTllH two principal reasons  A   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Mams, lBacoh,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provi'sionere  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Ogilvie s  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  ALL GOOD GROCERS!  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    $    $  Settlers, Prospedtors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosT: suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints - Oils - Varnishes - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.    Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.   Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowes* Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  BRYNILDSEN & GO., BELLA COOLA, B.C  n    ��������� W-^-  ���������tjizl^l!.' < ),.ia,'���������.1-,vK-^i=m������3ra  nmnmt������ni������mi  iMUMJULlfJWUlUMI J    rj  > I.  -*':,' '   '. .,("'.   .  LIS  Br-  1^  K*SS  ���������  ii  YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  felt BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  ?NT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR JANUARY  Compiled  by  Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 33.   Minimum, 24.  Highest Max. (9th) 45. Lowest Min. (30th) 12  below zero.   Rainfall, 3.51. Snowl6in.  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.E9 inches.  5���������NO. 9  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  |ted States Awaits  Germany's Answer  lashmgton, -Feb.  7.--Germ-  answer to President Wil-  notice severing diplomatic  .ions is expectod within 24  ���������a, andmay be a declaration  ar.    Belief rapidly crystal-  among officials  that war  Germany is inevitable. This  f is strengthened by receipt  Berlin press despatch quot-  orefgn-ministerZimmerman  .yi ng: "There is no step backs'' contemplated following  ,ident Wilson's action.    .".  eatest effort is being cen-  1 on the navy, so completely  ���������quickly the work is proceed-  ,hat if the United States be  d upon to strike they can do  mediately and forcibly. The  >.y is almost   complete and  [ecy in all departments is be-  :losely observed.    The presi-  discontinued   conferences  newspapermen owing to the  ate situation.  utrals action in response to  ident Wilson's request is ex-  !ed today in some countries.  Idr-N*eutralr-follow the lead  e States probably there will  conference by all of them  scuss the part each is to bear  inging pressure to bear on  any to relax her submarine  arfare.  unt Bemstorff will sail next  , preparations now under  the congregation of German  ulsat New York is proceed-  Ambassador Gerard left  in for home.    Americans in  any advised to leave.  11 sailings from  Norway to  States is  temporarily sus-  ed.  arconi wireless of America  he event of emergency will  :e the entire organization at  government's disposal. The  .se representatives agrees to  appropriation of millions for  , aircrafts and munitions.  Below Zero in Berlin  Serlin, Feb. 7.���������Reports from  ronts show no large engage-  ts have  taken  place.   The  [ntry is in the grip of severe  weather, 17 degrees below  in Berlin.   UandFacesStarvation  Amsterdam, Feb. 7.-Anxiety  (cerning Holland's future is  re keen how than at any time  IRce the outbreak of war. Sev-  ffiBnf factors contribute to gravity  flaBRituation. Holland now faces  gy^^ffvation; never produces more  Five Steamers Sunk  in the War Zone  London. Feb. 7.���������Four British  and one Russian steamer were  sunk in the war zone yesterday  by submarines.  British aviators bomb Bruges  and damage torpedo boats in the  harbor, also buildings and docks  set on fire.  Two hostile raids on the Somme  front beaten off with great losses  to the enemy. Three enemy  aeroplanes destroyed and six  others driven down in a damaged  condition..  British forces are established  on the Tigris, artillery now controls at short range the mouth of  Hai fiver near Kut-El-Amara.  Spain will probably be"the. first  neutral nation to join with the  United States in severing relations with Germany. "Spanish  government despatch strong note  of protest to Berlin against Germany's -unlimited submarining  andmay take same course in the  matter as the States.  Ambassador Page gathering  details of killing of American  sailor./. British freighter Eave-  stone shelled by German submarine, tension greatly increased as  result of the incident.  "HoydHjeorge*says Germany  faces certain defeat, this fact  lies behind the_studied savagery  of the Huns.  Berne, Feb. 7.���������Semi-officially  stated that Switzerland's reply  to President Wilson's note is to  decline from the line of strict  neutrality.  Paris, Feb. 7.���������Front relatively calm, sixteen prisoners and a  machine gun captured.  [ti she would consume in four  |;^||||| a half months, in a year, ex-  E'jffB&g stocks of ������$$$ sufficient  y^^BBsr for a few weeks. .German  W,;^Mcessions regarding protected  fe'^ftalne are mere mockery if States  K^Hffkrs the war.    Massing of Ger-  ''���������fiiHr1 tro������P3 on the- border adds  ^"^fftthe uneasiness.  Ottawa, Feb. 7.���������Premier Borden announces that ten thousand  soldiers are now back from the  front. Much time is to be given  in the House to consider their  welfare. Legislation dealing  with land settlement to be introduced.  Ottawa, Feb. 8.���������Hald billion  war bill passed. Committees  appointed on returned soldiers  questions and confederation celebration.  Paris, Feb. 8.���������Spirited artillery actions in Belgium, elsewhere all quiet.  New York, Feb. 8. ���������Samuel  Gompers, president of American  Federation of Labor, declares  organized labor will support the  government.  Anchor line steamer California, 8669 tons, British registry,  sunk and 55 lives reported lost.  Havana, Feb. 8.���������Cuba supports President Wilson's action.  Buenos. Ayres, Feb. 8-��������� Bolivia  supports Wilson's stand against  Germany.  Amsterdam, Feb. 8-���������Holland's  food scarcity grows. Distress  due to the war increased by intense cord.'  Two hundred persons, mostly  women,, killed by an explosion  last Saturday at the Nobel munition factor at Selhaus.  American ambassador Gerard  expects to leave Berlin on Sunday at the latest.  U. S. Hopes War May  Yet Be Averted  Washington, Fob. 8. ��������� Hopes  are entertained that war may yet  be averted. It is feared, however, that some U boat commander may precipitate war. No decision has been reached regarding the Eavestone incident, few  ships are sailing.  Course of action regarding  Austria still in doubt. House  representatives passed bills totalling three-quarters of a billion  dollars for the army and navy.  Action taken to protect interned  ships. Authorities prevent the  wrecking of the German ships  Manila and Colon. Some of the  interned vessels have been seized  by the government. General  espionage bill before the House  to curb the spy evil. Senate  stands behind the president in  the severance of relations with  Germany by a vote of 78 to 5.  100,000 Tons of Ship-  ping Lost Since Feb 1  London, Feb. 8. ��������� Losses in  shipping since February 1st has  now reached one hundred thousand tons. Several ships sunk  yesterday, but no details as yet.  British capture thousand yards  of hostile trenches on the Somme  front in the neighborhood of  Grandecourt. Considerable artillery activity throughout the  day and night on both sides of  the Somme and in Ypres sector.  Two of our aeroplanes were  brought down and ten German  planes were driven away.  King George in opening parliament declared the Allies are determined to secure just reparation for past and guarantees for  future, threats will not deter  them. Never before in the history of realm have Dominions  received such recognition in the  opening of parliament as today.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  S.S. Venture arrived in port  last Saturday afternoon about 3  o'clock, one day behind time.  As on this trip she en countered  the heaviest snowstorms ever  experienced on the coast it was  found impossible to make time.  It was with great difficulty  that those whose business necessitated their presence at the  wharf could . make their way  through the deep snow.  No passengers had the courage  to disembark under the circumstances.      Mr. and Mrs. W. Gallienne, who  have been residents in the valley  for a number of years, departed  on the steamer for Ocean Falls.  Birger M. Brynildsen who had  been home on a visit before leaving with his regiment for the  east departed, his furlough having nearly expired.  Mrs. McDougal who has spent  several weeks staying with her  brother Hans Odegaard, Hagensborg, left on Saturday for Chicago with her two children.  Tollef Saugstad is off for a few  weeks to the American Can Co.'s  works at Vancouver to familiar-  jize himself with the care of the  I Sanitary-Can machinery of which  i he will have charge at the local  canrfery next season. .  The chief item of interest as  concerns our quiet settlement is  the heavy fall of snow of last  week. It came down quite heavily  for more than two days and was  the winding up of four days of  exceptionally cold weather which  while it lasted was accompanied  by a strong wind. Last Saturday and Sunday was spent by  those who have heavy horses in  opening up the road, the rest of  the community "kept the home  fires burning." Neither Sunday  School nor Divine Service was  held on Sunday last. Thawing  weather has been the order of  the day ever since up till the  time of the item.   The last week's issue erroneously stated that Wm. Sutherland had enlisted in the motor  service. We now make the correction that he has enlisted in  the navy; that he is now serving  on the H. M. S. Rainbow of the  Canadian navy, and that after a  month's training he will join the j  Atlantic patrol service. I  We learn that Frank Hagan of;  Hagensborg, who enlisted in the  Forestry Battalion last fall, is  now in training with the regiment at Brockville, Ontario.  Our townsman, Sergt.-major  P. J. Kenyon, writes the Courier  from Shorn cliff e, where he is now  stationed in the 1st Canadian  Mounted Police:  "I never thought when I left  Bella Coola that the terrible Hun  was going to allow me to be intact for such a long time as he  has done. However, he has no  terror for us any more, and all  we are waiting for now is the  order to advance, and considering our positions and the preparedness of our troops there  will be something doing when  we start on the western front,  presumably in March. Fritz  started the racket and now it is  up to us to finish it for him.  ' 'We expect to be back in Bella  Coola in good time for Christmas.  I saw Fred Grant a few days  ago, he is now back in France  with his regiment. It was nice  to meet H. L. Harris, who is now  at Bramshot, also Garnet Gibson  and Charles Lord."  Sergt.-major Kenyon winds up  with saying that Canada has lost  a lot of her best men, men that  any nation would be proud, of,  and predicts a sure victory in the  near future.  After having been closed during the winter Johnson's mill  started operations last Monday  morning.    The prosperous and popular  firm of Mackay and Brink of  Hagensborg, is on the point of  being dissolved. Karl Brink will  continue the business and it is  safe to say the favorable reputation earned by the former firm  will be maintained under Mr.  Brink's sole management.  This week is being spent in  taking an inventory and Mr.  Brink intends to assume charge  on Monday next.  ��������� Red Cross Auxiliary.  November collections' for Red  Cross Fund, by Miss Schulstad,  $3.50; Miss Livelton, $2.50; Miss  Clayton, (for Mr. Broughton)  $12.50.    Total, $28.50.  For Patriotic Fund, $4.50.  December collections for Red  Cross Fund, by Mr. Broughton,  $18.00.  Patriotic Fund, $7.50.  THE     MINISTER     OF     FINANCE  REQUESTS  THE  PEOPLE    OF    CANADA    TO  BEGIN NOW  TO  SAVE   MONEY   FOR   THE  NEXT WAR LOAN  JAN. t���������  J������17  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE  OTTAWA  Ocean Falls News.  Ladies Organize to Work for the  Red Cross Society  The ladies of Ocean Fallsheld  a meeting Monday evening Jan.  22nd, for the purpose of organizing a Red Cross Society, to be  operated in connection with the  Vancouver Central. Dr. Christie  assisted by accepting the Chair  for the evening. In a very short  time twenty-eight ladies joined  as members. Officers were then  elected as follows:  Hon. chairman, Mrs. A. B.  Martin; Chairman, Mrs. J. Christie; Vice-chairman, Mrs. J. S.  Mackay; Secretary, Mrs. Adelaide Metcalf; Treasurer, Mrs. A.  D. Nevin; Work supervisor* Mrs.  E. McL. Smith;  Official cutter,  Mrs. Misner.  Committees were formed for  entertainments, etc., and on Saturday evening, Jan. 27, a dance  was given* by the Society in the  quarters erected for them by the  Pacific Mills Limited. The proceeds amounted to $37.10. This  money will be used for the purpose of buying materials to be  made up here and sent to the  Vancouver Central Red Cross  Society.  It is the intention to hold a  dance every Saturday evenings as  well as a concert now and then.  We have pleasure in publishing a few extracts from a letter  received from Lieut. H. .W\ M.  Rolston, of the 3rd Brigade of  the 2nd Indian Cavalry-Division,  who, at the time of writing, is  in hospital having met with an  accident.  He states that 90 per cent of  his Division are Westeners and  he is justly proud of them. Discipline is the chief factor of the  British army and has been the  greatest life saver. It is impossible for a soldier to have tpo  much discipline.  He expects to see some fierce  fighting by the cavalry brigades  this spring, and they do not feel  like getting peace until the German machine is smashed. Peace  now would be a dastardly crime,  it would mean that the thousands  of men who have given their  lives would have done so in vain.  The 102nd and 54th are now in  the same brigade and are doing  very good work.  In conclusion, he is pleased'to  state that J. M. Rolston is now  a major in the Canadian headquarters start". Lieut. Rolston  wishes to be remembered to all  his friends.  W. J. M. Sanders, manager of  the Kelly, Douglas & Co., wholesale grocers, at Prince Rupert,  died at that place. The late Mr.  Sanders was an old employee of  that concern and for a number  of years a resident of the northern city.  (tttmrrli Nntto    ?  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a. m.  7:30 p.m.  W        Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  ������ W. H. Gibson.  f All Are Welcome.  ->������    <  'lii!''  ���������lift-  !<n  ** ill ul  ���������-���������&  iliPil  ' ������ is>"! ' \* '��������� ' ! AS  jl f$ ���������;*; < si  'ii ml  fli&i ill  II If-II"  lll^  flj  :fi  P?r?Ki ������  i ��������� n * ������i  it '���������'���������''? FaUs^r  ilfr������|ii^.#r  sus������ lAJ-'tSTfr  ;������,< ,WssgIvji  5    I  i  \  \  i  aw j  mm  1 1  a  ^'11 It  isk Afi  ' Si) >511  I  '.  >>  BELLA COOLS  COURIER  Saturday,  FCJ}  ruary JQ  Thet  ourier      them  sed and the oppressor,,sang of  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  1 Canada  "'Curse  ye Meroz,   said   the!  Angel  of "the-Lord.     Curse ye;  i bitterly the inhabitants thereof, i  i because they came not to  the;  1V ..$i.oo he poi the Lord, to tne help of  ������ Year; ������      ;      ^ . ,      away the glory of this world.  6 Months  .������-75 i the Lord against the mighty.        dwaj ������     J  0 50 -I ��������� o      o     c     o  . o  3 Months  "President Wilson has earned j   ��������� .,  Be Consistent.  United States  1 Year.  .$1.50  United Kingdom  1 Year *100  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  Subscriptions payable in advance. ^Q ^rfQjjg^oijjg 0f the mighty.  for this nation the curse of Meroz, for he has not dared tostand j    The Dominion Government is  on the side of the Lord against i very persistent in sending out  Fob Advertising  Rates,- Apply at  Office.  TO CORRESPONDBNTS-Whjle ������n?bJec������?.n?^f ":  onymous communications will be published. th������  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be triven to the editor.  The Editor reserves tbe rurht to refuse putoii-  catiun of any letter. All manuscript at writer s  risk.  '^alua po^iuli sitprrma fist icx/  SATURDAY, FES. 10, 1917.  Peace Without Victory.  Colonel Roosevelt has uttered  some very strong words about  President Wilson's   attitude in  this war.   In the eye's of full-  blooded men, who never can be  disinterested and calm spectators  when injustice and cruelty are  rampant but whose souls cry out  in indignation against the'tyrants  and in pity towards the victims,  Mr. Wilson's efforts, to so speak  and act that he may be strictly  neutral, seem to them rank hypocrisy or wilful  blindness.'   In  questions of   right and  wrong  therecan be no neutral grounds.  It is either: "Those who" are not  for'me are against me."  "lh,speakingabout'Mr. Wilson's.:  A Cruel Action:  Even supporters' of the provincial government must admit  of its unsympathetic if-not to say  cruel treatment of individuals  and bodies of men having dealings with it as compared to that  of the former-government, which  always tried to accommodate and  yield to the wishes of their  friends and others and thereby  tried to help wherever ft could.  We do not intend at this time to  mention the railway promoters  and land speculators who have  found  the present government  so unwilling to render the assist-  plea.."fpr,.,peace .wjthout .victory  0p[;_Rpo'sevelt says  'It is spurned by-all men fit'to^  >-��������� ���������-   .   .       -     ���������.- \  ance which they were wont to  receive before.  With much regret we learn that  the famous Indian Commission/  which has been in existence the  last three years.-without finishing its work, has been dissolved  and its members lost their good  positions. They had secured appointment on a commission to  look up the rights of the Indians  of the province. For their services they were securing a pittance  of $20 per day each and in addition about $10 for expenses..  They naturally put.in all the time  they could a'tid therefore .worked  365 days fn the year. -They did  not take time-to'stop for Sunday  fenseless and likely will always  remain so, these hardworked  members of the Commission ex  perhaps longer.    But not so.  Never giving   the   future  of  these poor men and their families  a passing thought this new gov-  lernment of  ours "fired" them  >--���������-   -   ,       "_������.,-,'   -i-    -M they were so busy and anxious  call themselves fellow citizens;      J J  , ���������-   . .    L ,-r.     , ,.* to make themselves useful.    As  of Washington and Lincoln or.of; ^ j# ^  the war worn fighters who followed Grant and Lee.  "The Tories of 1776 demanded  peace without victory.   The Copperheads of 1864 demandedpeace  without victory. These men were  Mr. Wilson's spiritual forebears.  But neither Washington nor Lincoln  was among the men who  drew the sword lightly, or who,  when once it had been drawn, j  sheathed it without victory.    If  a righteous war is ended by a  peace   without   victory such a  peace   means   the   triumph of  wrong over right, and neutrality  between right and wrong means  the support of   wrong against  right. %  "Let Mr. Wilson think of the  men of Valley Forge, who in the  la3t extremity of want and misery yet spurned peace without  victory. Let him think of the  men  of the  Civil War and  of  Lowell's trumpet lines:  "'Come Peace, not like a mourner  bowed  'For honor lost and dear ones  wanted,  'But proud to meet a people proud  'With eyes that tell of triumph  tasted.' ���������  "When fear of the German  submarine next moves Mr. Wil-  son to declare for 'peace without:  victory'  between   the   tortured  Belgians and their cruel oppressors and taskmasters; when such  fear next moves him to utter the  shameful untruth that each side  is fighting for the same things,  let him think of the prophetess  Deborah,   who,   when   Sisera  mightily oppressed the children  of Israel with his chariots of iron j  and when the people of  Meroz;  stood neutral between the oppres-  appeals that we must produce  more and save as much as possible. And every patriotic Canadian will try to do so. But it  does occur to us that the government would show more consistency if it would set the country  a better example. But it certainly does not seem to do so.  As a sample of the methods in  vogue with the government we  copy the following item from an  exchange:  "The two hundred unemployed  Canadian officers in England to  which attention has been given  in press dispatches of late, cost  the country more, than $1,000,000  a year. That money would be  much better spent on shells for  the firing line.''' t.  Let the government take some  of its own medicine and practice  a stricter economy.  .     O      C-, o       o  . Married women in the Provincial Government service at Victoria have been invited to explain  why they have" to ' work for a  living. The Executive have decreed, also, thatall. single men  of.military-age and physically fit,  and who have no dependents,  will have to go. Both inside and  outside service are to be curtailed  o     o  *\  The   Military -Forces' Voting  Act enabling soldiers to vote up  till New Year was the trap set  by the late government in the  the Indians  are weak  and  de-;interests- of its friends of the  liquor traffic to defeat the. will of  the people on the question of  prohibition  pected to hold their jobs as long!    Sir Richard McBride has, seem-  as they were able to sit up, and ingly, been the agent to; carry  out this sinister design and will  as a consequence very likely  have to hunt another job soon.  O      O      o      o      o  Very reluctantly but irresistibly  bo"dyand soul and now offers the; it is  dawning upon  our minds  s������.le at that this the most bitter, cruel  and bloody war ever known is  furniture they used for  half price.  Imagine  their feelings  per day is not to be sneezed at in j time drags on.    The submarine  these war times,    "fhus passes' menace is  S30; continually growing worse as  s on. The submarine  assuming proportions  which will compel countries de-  pending;Upon shipping for their  food .supply:to adopt measures to  restrict the consumption oLmany  articles of'food, which may lead  to actual suffering from lack of  proper nourishment.  Germany is said to have 800  new submarines, ready for the  ravaging of commerce. It is  hoped some means may be devised to deal successfully with  this increasing danger.  OOOOO  Germany's idea about carrying  out her treaty obligations in regard to the protection of Belgium  is rather of a kind almost unheard of.  On the first invasion she ravaged the country as cruelly as  any savage horde. Since its occupation she has carried away  her ward's raw material, she  has closed her factories and carried away the machinery; she is  subjecting the country to a war  tax of $8,000,000 per month,  which is more than ten times the  ordinary taxes in times of peace,  and last hut not Heast, -she is  carrying away thousands of the  people into slavery in order to  help conquer the armies of the  Belgians and their Allies.  And in the face of such in:  humanity we find good (V).people  who sympathize with the Germans!  " c  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^  irninTWiMMUidi^^'fe-^/j'ar.. ^.'JHbkB  OKtBKBSBSBBaS'- -T*-*,,li< ^���������^v"1 * vnesSsC  B^BSSf:' Bffi^BHffi^^nffl&B  IBHB^L^^^EBSNQ^^BsH^in  ;    SvM. NEWTON   ,  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate; for the  House of Commons for this Riding. .  The object of this space is to  introduce to. you the man who always fights for the rights and  prosperity of the.-masses, irrespective of politics.    ���������  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER, B.C. '  Wholesale  DRY GOODS  AND  MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE  WEST" B^AND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  ."MADE   IN    B. C."  Send for Catalogue Prompt Attention CiV( n [ enPf n j  Canadians on the march at the front.    The photograph shows the equipment  by our soldier lads as they enter the front trenches on the Somme.  carried  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT ,  of 1493 SEVENTH AY.L W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them i��������� m(;,!e������n[?*|  the Province in the sale of, their well-known Imnlv nurcf!a't5lI  for spring (1917) delivery.    The work is pleasant'and r2H  tive.   Honest, energetic men only are needed    We nnri <  want a good man on,the G. T. P. Railway. ' rlK*I  Planters should write at once for our 80 pag<< Catalou  "Produce more 1917."���������Hon. Martin Burrell, Dominion .Mui^tenfK     I  ROYAL STANDARD  FIELD SEEDS  w  E.are extending our already .extensive !:> !i -e&j i>u^������U  1917.    It is the desire of the Canadian Gwfcrrmientlb |  people produce as much as possible during i!it.'t'n^;r?r  ��������� and we are arranging with the leading dtfii,-r.s throiigrJiifc  Columbia   and   Alberta   to carry h  comul..-'.-"ijr,. < f r>ovT)  - STANDARD FIELD SEEDS.    These soids an-'the eboS,v|  possible to secure in the World's Market?.   Tht-y are GoW'-J|  inspected and carefully selected for purity. "^  Seeds should be purchased early.as pru-M ;::������.-viiaLh ix[\va,\  the Season progresses.    In all probability tli������- market wiIi*U������-|  audit will be difficult later in tbe year "to nuski- ijiirch^    3  t Order ROYAL STANDARD Field Seeds NOW.   if'v^J  cannot supply you write us and we will ship ;������������������> yoj direct.  WRITE TODAY FOR FULL INFORMATION AND PRICE U5T  Vancouver Milling & Grain Co. Ltd,  VANCOUVER, B. C.  K?B  The contributions to the Red  Cross and Patriotic Funds as  published in.this issue show a  decided falling off for the two  last months of the year just  closed.   . -  While we admit that there may  be some people in the valley who  have not the money to give in  the winter time we will not admit that everybody outside the  townsite are "dead-broke." Our  people must realize that it is of  the utmost importance that'^  wounded and the poor beta-  care of and that it is our (km,  do so even if our rnea^r  scanty.  Even if our usual contrite  for.other purpo:'.-s shcuidel?  cessity have to be curtaiiw:  dropped allo^-ther it rhc^J  done, because the taking au  our defenders and tiH-irta^  has the first and foremoiiCi;  upon all of us.  Compare���������--Price for Price���������  GREAT   WEST  with the teas you are now using.  It's Better!  LEES0N, DICKIE/GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B.C  ^E  non  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C, LTD.!  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGKK SKIiVK ���������������������������  ,     BETWEEN ..j  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER   Ij  S. S.   "CamOSUn"   Leaves   Vancouver every gj  Tuesday at 9 p. m. (Victoria day previous.  Leaves Bella Coola Fridays p. m.  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Van<'"^'!  nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosiv. -. vl  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  ��������� fori-  ii fall  _ .    , .     .,    ,iph|V t0  For rates of Freights, Fares and other inforrnsit .������������������' ���������   |:'K|.l(Ki  Head Okkjce, Carrall St.,  Vancouver; or <.k<>. ���������"  agent, I003 Government St., Victoria.  Advertise your Wants in the Cou^| Saturday, February 10,   1917  BELLA; COOLA  COUftlErt  ii  GS  AW  Ird,  ert  11 !'art5(|  ���������serysitj  artier  ogue.  "f KiU  !t!!t III J  CtiuJCf;  *"ili Uf  'hassrs.  '��������� yosr ,-jp  U5T  i. LlA  :e tha  jr be!  surdi  moarj!  ntrifcii  ;cu:d<  ���������ur'.ai!  t 5 ho;  ma  t-ir in  T  ang.  rrntainrtr'ifrr'riiawBttai  TO  INVESTORS  WI'IIILin.JILMi  HOSE WHO, FROM TIME TO TIME, HAVE FUNDS REQUIRING  INVESTMENT MAY PURCHASE  AT PAR  DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENTURE STOCK  1 IN "SUMS  OF  *SOO  OR  ANY  MULTIPLE  THEREOF.  Principal repayable 1st October, 1919.  Interest payable half-yearlyi 1st April and 1st October by cheque (free of exchange at  any chartered Bank in Canada) at the rate of five per cent per-annum from the date of  purchase. ���������       '    ��������� .-  Holders of this slock will have the privilege of surrendering at par and accrued interest,  as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issue  in'Canada other than an issue of Treasury Bills or other like short date security.  "..',    Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only. '  A commission of one-quarter of one per cent will be allowed to recognized bond and  stock brokers on allotments made in respect of applications for this stock which bear their  stamp.  For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of Finance, Ottawa.  DEPARTMENT OFFINANCE, OTTAWA, ���������  OCTOBER 7th, ]916.  ..A SOLDIER'S REVERIE.  A descriptive series by our soldier correspondent, Jlrchie *D.  Darlington,  late of Shushartie Bay, B. C.  I am again "home for Christ- j fire���������is a substantial and joyful  imas" after a further five weeks' j fact.    Theirs is a strongly wel-  Ispell in a sea-board hospital.  This town in the north where  II am convalescing is draped in  snow andk Somehow, perhaps by  reason of this mantle, it seems a  hundred years older.  The feature of this Christmas  is  more than   ephemeral.    The  Imultitude of mud-stained, war-  [ded brotherhood which the slight  vagaries of uniform or badge do  not alter. Foregathered in old  "blighty" from the pestilent  Tigris, the sands of Egypt and  the mud of the Somme, the differences of a button and a tunic  do not matter. A subtle change  is observable in all of them; the  ^hardened young men- brothers, [obvious tan,   the transforming  if you will, of the smiling ghosts,  but who have lived through the  effectof khaki, the freer carriage  and jaunty step aside, there is an  l5< alert and   listening   expression  , which was never there before,  l  and one sometimes surprises a  sudden   veiling of  the eyes���������a  new characteristic.  Still they make a merry crowd;  despite the iron of discipline, the  sweat and blood of awful war,  their jollity survives. They beam  at you and their laughter echoes  down the street. Having ceased  to be over critical, with them the  philosophy of accepting things  as they are is apparently predominant: each a Napolean taking up the gauge of destiny! I  know the spirit underlying to be  unconquerable!  Yet could we look beneath the  facings, the foibles of the 'Knut'  species of former days could be  described. By the rakish angle  of the service cap, the particularity in the parting of the hair,  the neatly-wrapped putties and  a dozen remarkable vanities, we  could trace their origin to the  pre-Kitchener era.  Their modest stories bring to  light a lot of hitherto unpublished history. A man's story, perhaps, is always better conveyed  when he is not conscious of telling it. The sub-conscious mind  often reflects the truest impression. Thus we glean vignettes  of the larger battle pictures; ex-  oloits of companies and detachments; personal little chapters of  humor and heroism, of Beaumont  Hamel and Courcelette. From  the mire and carnage, tiny shoots  of romance, which posterity will  nurture, are already beginning  to show.  The spirit of sadness is not  paramount; it is not even obvious.  Nature teaches that what we have  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  SYNOPSIS Of COM.: "rvilNIWO  regOl/vt-jons  pOAL MINING RIGHTS of ih.: Dominion, in  *-' Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Albeivta,  tbe Yukon Territory, the North-west Territories and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  .twenty-one years at an annual rental ol $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at tbe rate of five cents per ton.  The person operatini? the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco"nting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of-Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  ^.MlWmir���������'- ��������� ..>~.-~���������~~-~-tj*-i.:.��������� ������������������  3  I heMason & IxischPiano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  BUSINESS CARDS  [OE  Fur Sales.Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Ftur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  . We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission i3 only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  [OE  Dealers and Trappers  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  OH  ���������<M  KM  MO  O)  HARRY HANSON "t������leur������eb^r������le  of Prrnice Rupert  inventor of the Harry Hanson  Special Water Heater  (Patented In Canada)  will make a trip to Bella Coola  to introduce his patented rapid  heating water coil, also to do  whatever plumbing or water pipe  work there may be a call for.  If you have a pump and a good  well you do not need any city  water works to have all the conveniences of modern home comforts. Harry Hnnson can improvise a system with ordinary  whisky barrells and one hour's  pumping each day. He has several of these systems installed as  far north as Smithers and Terrace. Send him an ordinary floor  plan of your home and what you  want, also the location of pump.  State if you want hot and cold  water or cold wateronly. Will be  pleased to estimate on your work.  Harry Hanson^Sr'8  P. O. Box 395 |  139 2nd Ave., Prince Rupert, B.C.   |  fB������IK������BMI^^ll<1M)������������0'MHO  DISTBICT   OF   COAST���������KANGE   III.  Take Notice that I, Thomas J.  Whiteside, of Vancouver, B. C., occupation builder," intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described land:  Commencing at a post situated on the  north shore of Jackson Passage, about  one-half (1-2) mile within the entrance  and near a small stream, thence North  20 chains, thence West 20 chains, thence  South 20 chains, to the shore, thence  following the shore line to the point of  commencement, containing 40 acres,  more or less.  THOMAS J.  WHITESIDE.  Dated, November 30. 191(i. Jan. G���������March  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTSICT   Or   COAST���������BANOE   III.  Take Notice that I, Mark Smaby, of  Ocean Falls, B. C, occupation timber  cruiser, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Pulp Lease 205;  thence North 20 chains; thence East 20  chains; thence North 20 chains; thence  East 20 chains; thence South 20 chains;  thence East 40 chains; thence South 20  chains; thence East 20 chains; thence  South 7 chains more or less to high  water mark of Cousin's Inlet; thence  following along said high water mark  in a westerly direction to a point due  oast of this post; thence West 12 chains  more or less to this post, containing  140 acres more or less.  (Signed) MARK SMABY.  Date, December 2G, 191G.  Jan. 27-Mar. 2i.  %  ������ Let us attend your Victor Record  ^li mail orders~ifour service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  Z3$I������RANV1LLE ST., VANCOUVER, B, C.  V-.*-, ,--.������������������ I!;  w  HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \X7HAT person so independent?  \A/HAT ambition mor > noble than to  be a producer oi:  t\e necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  View of a ranch in Bella Coola Valley,  HTHE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to -the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over .twenty first prizes.  DELLA COOLA and the surrounding  "~^ country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscription* Payable in Advance.  I* Is AD A.  Onk Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Ykar  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  ������������������. i-^���������..-..,���������,-..._ T-IM -,,- iriir r ������������������������������������ *���������   ��������� ���������" ���������i 'imir"*-**"  SUBSCRIPTION  BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier Cor   Name   l\ 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  .;������.'";''  ���������v '���������$%>;  ������������������/t  r  hmh ~\.  ;   .1'1 ���������  ; 'i iStf  ���������Ml  I  Sit* t *:������A;< 813  :! i'i     ^ .  5  IH ,4 ill  F ) C   V  1 '  /������?'   |  (iii,:,.:...������?*  ..... .,&$!  .1  ! '���������*.  *������������������?)������������������  ikfrmv  /  . /BELUA  COOLA COURIER  Saturday, Fel  ruaryfO; /9j;  Subscribe  for the  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland" coasT between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles  General Averescu, commander  of the Rumanian army.  , It Will be to your interest to keep well informed, regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northerrf section of  this.Province���������  THE>COURIER"1  .  i GfVES THEM.  *" ������  Ntfinis .Ae time ..to keep  : your;~^amef before the  public. No manufactur-  er-or:>yhdl^alehouse can";  afford.;toV|et*Iip the.opv  portunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  - cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier.'-'  A SOLDIER'S REVERIE���������Continued.  bred shall breed again and multiply; and-by philosophy we learn  that what is honestly wrought  shall be blessed and endure. And  perhaps the joy of this third  Christmas���������a memorable one for  reunion's���������is-sweeter for its admixture of pain;'and maybe, too,  that is .why the ghosts appear to  smile. '  '  But in a day or so-many of the  soldiers will.go back to the Ypres  salient, the Ancre.and the Somme; to the flaming batteries and  the gaping craters of "no man's  land." Back to where once beautiful villages, stricken-'by the  lightning of war,di.eiH shapeless  masses'-.of debris which heaven  weeps" to - behold :;to where once  ; shady .".Tustling^woods- H ave Jse-'  .cqme'^shrieking ' holocausts of  flame and nursing sn'ell; to where  ihe'one time;"sweet,{green pastures of Belgium are fouled by  seeping ^streams of- red, human  'bloodWd decaying, torn human  bodies. The great heart of Britain will be steel again. Even in  the eyes of the ghosts the battle  fires will gleam. Alas, that the  love and charity and principle of  Christmas could not be always  and everywhere!  Secure Seed Early.  MAKE YOUR DOLLARS  FIGHT  AT THE   FRONT.  BUY  DOMINION OF CANADA  THREE-YEW  War Savings Certificates  $ 25.00   FOR   $2i.ao  50.00      " 43.00  100.00    "    ;  se.oo  INDIVIDUAL PURCHASES LIMITED TO S15W.  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 18%.  B.Brynildsen  FOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY AT ANY BANK  OR ANY MONEY ORDER POST OFFICE  JAN. 9,  1917  FlNANOE    DBPARTM  OTTAWA  tNT  Work of Red Cross Society in France.  (By a returned Medical ,  Officer.)"  . - The work of the. Red Cross  Society in France can-hardly be  explained. One hasto' see it to  know .what excellent-work the  Society is doing. ",  ���������  With its hugesupply'depots-.at  different bases, arid accessory  depots attached "to- ajkhospitals  of importance in France'the work  extends as-far as the .firing line.  While doing ambulance.work behind the trenches, our ifield hosr  pitals and dressfrig.st������ti<frsVere  greatly- helped^y^ them." With  .th������ help of the RecFCrossi Society  'we were able to make our patients  as comfortable" as theyi would,be  in any hospital in Canada. .We  were supplied with endless quantities of socks, many suits;o"f  pyjamas, bath robes, bedroom  slippers, nightcaps, bedsocks,  and other comforts too numerous  to mention. i  With the help of Red Cross and  other societies, the medical ser-  rice-has been able to establish  up-to-date hospitals on linesjof  communication.  These hospitals  Job Printing  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.  We will do it right.  It is already time that the far- i    ���������    _, _. ,n. ,��������� J-  J have X-Ray and High Frequency  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  D TOWN; Do not talk���������support home industries��������� talk is  cheap. The best way Xo show  that" you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the"Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  mers begin to plan what quantity and kind of seed they will  need in the spring. The agricultural papers predict ^scarcity  of seed later on and it is therefore highly important that negotiations at least be started immediately to secure samples and  prices.  The difference in the yield between that of poor and good seed  is so great that the cost is not to  be considered,  machines   and   laboratories 4n  charge of renowned specialists.  It is comforting to those who   L-  have/e.lativesin France to know,  that thky are looked after as well  as if they were in Canada. The  Red Cross Society has also a fleet  of motor ambulances with their  volunteer' drivers and these are  doing exceptionally good work.  Tommy js welljooked after in  France.   When he is wounded  he  is  picked   up. by stretcheT  bearers. First aid is given. Th<n  he his brought back to .the regimental medical officer who makes  him comfortable and passes him  on to the field ambulance where  he .receives, a good hot, drink,'  His wounds are attended to and  he receives a -cigarette aa there  is no better;sedatiVe to Tommy  than a cigarette. "From the field  ambulance he is" passed on to the  clearing station from-which he  is sent down the lines of com-  munication to one of the different hospitals.     If an operation  is required, it can be performed  at the field ambulance or at any  unit behind it.   The work is very  interestingespeciallyatthefiring  line as it is often mixed up with  a few shells and bombs and then  the fights in the air are most  spectacular  and   always draws  attention.  LEADING   DEALERS   SN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  ^.v***  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  *  .  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  * i..-.  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  r   ���������������������������in* *m*     * ���������������������������     '      ���������"' '   '*    '       '������������������������"!'������������������������ I'     ���������     i" ���������������������������m,������-,-,.iM x  ... -, ,  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's I and Children's Shoes  in all styled at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ^    '*  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Clean up the incubator and run  a trial Hatch.  ADVERTISE INITHE "COURIER"  I:  $1  Courier  a Year  Pablished every  Saturday at  BELU COOU, B. C.  ���������"THE two principal reasons  A   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND-  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  BttRNs:  ���������  3  Royal Household Flour  always giv^s satisfaction  Better order a bag now  V- - ....  From |  Settlers, Prospe&ors, Hunters, Trap  pers, Campers, and Land-Seekers wil  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock.    Nothing but the mosl suitable articles are kept at prices thai  invite competition.  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money'at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provi������ioner������  Calgary     Vanconver     Edmonton  Paints -  Oil* - Varnishes - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all description*  Beat brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of a������ *orts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices-Largest  Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA  COOLA, B.C  A. rw r**-ft*Vir** :!tiM*t<**.aU^,w^f

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