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Bella Coola Courier Aug 25, 1917

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Array ,"~"V  /*>  tol  '*���������*.  l^^piiaaaiu^^yi'Uttuut^f ^HMUtMiJi^ ^tuuuMu/^  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA COOLA. EXCEL-  LENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR JUNE  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.    "  Temperature: Maximum, 64.   Minimum, 43.  Highest Max. (14th)S2. Lowest Min. (11th) SO  Rainfall, 2.42.   '  Rainfall for the year (1916) 40.89 inches.  VOL. 5���������NO. 36  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 1917.  $1.00 a Year  War News for the Week  Tuesday. -Paris.--New and terrific battle reaching climax today  around bloody ground near Verdun. Fighting developed to our  advantage, conflict over a front of twelve miles, extending from  Avercourt wood to Beconvaux. On both banks of Meuse French  this morning attacked magnificently, numerous prisoners were  taken. Bravery exhibited by French troops incomparable. Con-:  initiation of artillery duels in Belgium. In upper Alsare, considerable artillery activity.  London.--By sheer weight of steel British'forced the continued  secessions of German lines on the Ypres-Poelkapelle sector today,  a number of huge tanks aided in the drive. , British losses extraordinary light considering the intensity of the fighting. South of  Lens British made successful raids. Big fire sweeps Saloniki,  more than half the city destroyed rendering eighty thousand persons homeless.  R)m3.-Italian offensive on Isonzo front begun yesterday by the  crossing of Isonzo river, already 7500 prisoners taken. Offensive  extends from Adriatic to the Alps. Pope so interested in world's  attitude to his peace plan that 'he rises an hour earlier to.read,  press comments from all the capitals.  Wednesday. , London.--France, Italy, Britain and Belgium joined today in most gigantic offensive yet directed against Germany.  West front from Belgian sea coast to Switzerland, over 435 miles,  one gigantic battle with-French, 'British', Belgian and Portugese  troops attacking. Southward, Italy's most formidable offensive  has thrown millions into death's grapple over a front of almost  one hundred miles. On Isonzo front Austrian lines beginning to  bend and give way at various points. Italians supported by floating and fixed batteries and monitors are marching towards sue-  cess in spite of undiminished enemy resistance and have captured  10,000 men. Gen. Haig's drive in Flanders is pressing forward,  while Canadians are getting tighter grip of Lens. Gen. Petain's  are driving fiercely out of "Verdun while steadily increasing their  pressure along Chemin Des Dames and in Champagne. ��������� Russia  alone of great allied powerstnot participating in concerted assault,  but little Roumania through her reorganized army is making stubborn resistance to great Teutonic attempt at further encroachment.  Berlin.-Battle of Verdun not yet ended. Our troops anticipate  forcible conclusion of battle.  Corfu.--One-quarter of Serbian city, Monastir, been destroyed  by fire"as result of Bulgarian's bombardment.  Petrograd.--Austro-German forces making vigorous attacks in  in southern Roumania. Russians and Roumanians offering stubborn resistance, but forced back at several points.  London  General Count Cadorna, commander-in-chief of the Italian  army, who is conquering the  Austrians.  Italians Make  Big Captures  Rome,,Aug. 23.���������Since the big  offensive commenced more than  thirteen thousand prisoners have  been taken by the Italians, also  capturing 13 guns.  Austrians Claim 5600  Thursday: London.-Another rapid succession of blows, British  and French striking at various points along Franco-Belgian front  fell this morning on Germans in the region of Ypres, where British advanced over fiercely contested field between Langemarck  and Frezenberg. No details received of new battle being fought  over section strongly organized by Germans with concrete redoubts and machine gun nests in shell holes. Sharp fighting continues around Lens, British making progress in spite of determined resistance of enemy. Germans last night concentrated efforts to recapture ground gained in new French offensive on Verdun front. Heavy counter attacks both sides of Meuse repulsed.  Total number of prisoners taken by French, 6116. Several strong  German attacks on the Aisne, during night, repulsed.- Ten German aeroplanes approached English coast yesterday, two enemy  machines brought down. Bombs dropped at Dover and Margate,  three killed, two injured., Raiders unable to penetrate far inland.  Austria's terrible toll of casualties continuing in Italian advance  which today reached thirty-five thousand dead and wounded/  Italians swept enemy from the villages of Descla, Britof, Canale,  Bomrez and Rosa.   "Germans begin offensive on Russian line./  Friday: Amsterdam^--Zeebrugge and environs bombed by entente airmen yesterday, great explosions occurred, property damage great. Bombardment lasted for an hour and a half. "'Policy  based on might alone, and not right, doomed to failure from beginning," was the interesting admission made by Dr. Von Kuelil-  mann, German imperial foreign ^secretary, in his maiden speech  to main committee in the Reichstag yesterday.  Paris.���������Le Matin deplores the sending of American troops, says  anywhere other than French front. Strong belief in political  circles here that the situation in Russia demands the presence on  eastern front of allied troops.   Urges Japanese troops be sent.  Vienna, Aug. 23.- New attack-  of Italians forced back Austrian  line at some points. Selo, on the  Carso plateau, has been lost.  Austrians have taken more than  5600 prisoners.  Despite Staggering  Losses the Big  Offensive Continues  London, Aug. 24.���������Gen. Haig  reports slight advance made  southeast of Lens. On Ypres  front, east of Langemarck, hostile' attacks repulsed. Allies  great offensive unceasingly boring ahead, already cost Germans  and Austrians close on one hun-  0  dred thousand dead and wounded  and at least twenty-one thousand prisoners on British, French  andltalian fronts. Despite staggering losses no "let up today,  deluge,both of shells and men  continue against their lines on  the west and Italian fronts. Offensive started against Russian  lines, enemy already have gained  ground on Riga front. Civilians  are evacuating Roulers, anticipate fighting for its possession.  Fifteen' vessels more than 1600  tons' and three less than 1600  tons sunk by submarines last  week.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  French Take 8426 Prisoners  Paris, Aug. 24.���������The number  of prisoners taken by French  since Monday total 8426, also 24  cannon and more than two hundred machine guns'. '" "German"  aviators dropped bombs last Sunday on two hospitals behind Verdun,killing two and wounding  forty-five nurses. Five French  vessels more than 1600 tons and  four of lesser tonnage desi /oyed  by submarines last week.  The weekly steamer between  Vancouver and Bella Coola was  very much belated this week,  while due Sunday morning she  did not put in an appearance before Tuesday afternoon. After  discharging freight and passengers at Ocean Falls, orders were  received to proceed to Namu and  load six thousand cases of empty  salmon tins for Kimsquit, which  had to be delivered immediately  as the heavy run of salmon there  had made a' serious shortage in  tins. After discharging cargo  at Kimsquil the steamer culled  here southbound.  shortly.  Miss Mildred Gibson left this-  week for Victoria where, she  will enlist as a nurse at the Royal.  Jubilee Hospital in that city.  * The marriage of John Davenport Clayton, eldest son of Mrs.  E. Clayton, to Hilda May Reed,  took place at St. Mary's Church,  o  Oak Bay, near Victoria, on Saturday morning, August ]������'th.  After spending some tin;e in  i'  the.cities the happy couple will  return and take up their residence hero, The Couiior joirs  with their many friends in wishing them every happiness.  Martin Christensen, who left  the valley last year for an extended, visit to the coast cities  in the States, returned this week.  Mr. Christensen informs us that  in the Republic the talk is all on  war and preparations are going  on all over the country on a huge  scale. The Alvo von Albensle-  ben as well as the 1. W. W. ckiFs  l I* s  that are helping the ��������� Gt rmans'  win the War from their different  bases in America are promptly  being taken care of, according  to Mr. Christensen. Things on"  the whole are very good in the  States, money and labor seems  to be plentiful.  Thp. new Land Setticrr.rrit  ���������iioaid .'it Victoria has con pletcd  all the organization vvoi k and is  now rondy to b",";in enlerlaining  applications for loans to the farmers of the province.  T forget to bring in your Subscription  to the Courier���������The more support you  give us, the better paper we will give you.  Berlin, Aug. 24���������German forces yesterday occupied without  fighting Russian positions west  of river Aa to Oding Bigaun on  Riga front.  Washington, Aug. 23.���������Bituminous coal prices fixed late last  night for every coal mine in the  United States by President Wilson. Next step in coal control  is to fix prices to be charged by  middlemen and retailers.  Munition Making in  Canada Stopped  Ottawa, Aug. 23���������War certificates which will sell at $8^60 and  return, purchaser. $10.00 at the  end of three years to be placed  oh sale immediately at banks and  money;order pOstoffices. Up-to-  date, ten millions have been made  available, for war purposes by  the sale of war certificates. Imperial munition board announced  the production of munitions in  Canada will.be. discontinued as  no longer necessary, exceptsome  line which will be produced in  lessened quantities. Plants affected in consequence will resume pre-war activities, others  will engage in production of  equipment for ships.  Russian Forces Retire  Petrograd, Aug. 24.���������'Russian  forces on northern end of front,  where Germans yesterday began  offensive, retired under pressure  from region of Raggedzem to  Kemmern Lake. Situation in  Finland serious as a result of  continued difficulty in forming a  cabinet and the persistance of  Socialists in their plan to renew  session of the dissolved Landtag.  Premier Kerensky has forbidden  meeting of the Landtag and will  use military force .if necessary.  Washington, Aug. 24.���������Germany bringing pressure to bear on  the Netherlands, threatening to  give her no more steel for shipbuilding unless ships are. used in  interest of Germany' and her  Allies.-. /  Embargo been placed on,;the  export of pulp in order to meet  war needs of United States. Canadian pulp mills are i furnish ing  about three-fourths of the newspaper used in the United States.  The run of salmon during the  week has been very satisfactory  and- the canneries have been kept  busy. Last week considerable  fish was sent to Rivers Inlet and  Namu as the local fish packing  plants could not handle the catch.  Under ordinary conditions the  best run of cohoe salmon usually  takes place between the twentieth of August and the twentieth  of September. In former years  fishing has continued up to October first and there is every likelihood that the canneries here  will not close before that time  this year.  W. Pybusof Ladner, and Paul  Swanson spent a week in town  and at the Numamis, cannery,  where they visited with manager  Alfred Jensen. . They left for  home by the Camosun on Tuesday.    .'.'    .''���������   '' '���������.' ';   ������������������'������������������'��������� '���������. ���������  A. K. Oveson, who has assisted, with the nets at the new cannery a short time, has returned  to his' farm at Hagensborg. ,  Our former townsman Walter  Gallienne, accompanied by Mrs.  Gallienne, called here this week  en route to Vancouver.  Mr. G. Saugstad, fishery overseer at Rivers Inlet, came in on  Tuesday and is spending a few  days with his family at Hagensborg. He will return to his post  again next week.  Pte. B. M. Brynildsen writes  under date July 23rd from Shorn-  cliffe, intimating that they are  now in strict training and that  they, the 11th reserve, will likely be sent to France in a couple  of months time or perhaps earlier  as far as is',kown at the time of  writing.       ,    ,  Considerable mining activity  is now taking place in this section of the province and many  claims have been recorded at the  local mining recorder's office  lately. This activity may help  Bella Coola some.  C-  J. C. Clausen of Victoria, visited in the community last week.  Mr. Clausen has been connected  with logging operations in this  province for a number of years'b  and it is likely that he will be' V  ������������������.���������"   ,'.''    ... Ah  running camps in this vicinity w  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a.m.  7:30 p.m.  Preacher for Sunday���������Rev.  W...H. Gibson.  All Are Welcome.  94^4������<������8^"4������&>&>^&^-<J4L><Sa BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday, August 25,  19)7  The Courier  the Bki.la Coola Publishinu Co. Ltd.  j under the pressure of   a pale  Le  V^OUrier j bluil" that the Quebec National-  Publishkd Wekkly atHki.i.aCoolaBVj.sts would never 'have dared to  to make good.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:.  Canada  1 Year $1.00  6 Months    ,    0.75  3 Month.    0.50  United State*  1 Year $1.50  United Kingdom  1 Year $1-00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.   -  Births, Marriages and Deaths.  per insertion.  50c  Fob Advertising Rates,  Office.  Apply at  To CoBHE=roNl)ENTS���������While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be itiven to the editor. '  The Editor reserves the riuht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  : rSSfiacHigiiiSiSj  tSMSR  MAKE PERFECT  Toronto/*"  fillAil  MADE IN CANADA  r.fllLLBTT COMPANY  V>  "S������alua papuli mipnttitn put in.  SATURDAY, AUG. 25, 1917.  Prohibition Carries.  The question of prohibition or  no for this province is at last  . settled and British Columbia will  be on the dry list October first.  The premier is to be congratulated in making good his promise  that if the vote on prohibition  turned out to be unsatisfactory  the Liberal party would enact  a bill for the suppression of the  sale of liquor for the duration of  this war and then' let the people  decide if they wished prohibition  to remain in force. No doubt  it is the best way to settle this  knotty problem as the province  will have experienced the benefits or otherwise of a dry state,  also the women will be able to  have their say.  Clearing the Decks.  According to press despatches  from Ottawa, Premier Borden  denies emphatically any collusion  with the Nationalists and says  their attitude is unpatriotic and  the first duty of his supporters  is to assist in defeating them.  What a change. How could  Sir Robert make such a statement against his friends'in view  of the fact that he owes his position to- the Nationalist backing  in the 1911 election. ' Will he follow up his statement by demanding that the Nationalist friends  in his cabinet resign. We shall  have to wait and see.  In the light of Sir Robert's  statement it is interesting to recall that after the 1911 election  and the Conservatives were put  into power, the process of cabinet makingwas in its final stage  when the Nationalists proceeded  to tell Canada's  new   premier  '"who's who and what's what."  They demanded that  at  least  three of their members should  hold portfolios.   The premier replied that he would complete the  making of his cabinet in a spirit  of j ustice to everybody.   Whereupon the   Nationalists replied:  "You will either, meet bur demands or meet parliament with  a majority of   eight or nine."  The reduction being due to the.  nineteen nationalists voting with  Laurier.   But the Nationalists  were sent for on behalf of Hon.  It. L. Borden, and they gloatingly declared that they got everything they asked for in the allotment of portfolios,  because  the premierof Canada weakened  Fun and Pay.  When   things   were   running  good in British Columbia, in the  bonusing of railways, the late  government thought that a little  may be made for their friends on  the side, and so a friend of the  administration was sent to London to buy a site for a palace,  to be built at an enormous cost,  in fact the price is so high that  the correct amount is not known.  However, the total outlay bn-this  account  must  be   considerably  over a million  dollars. ..  Then  there is the upkeep.   During the  year 1916-17,  salaries   are put  down  for the running of this  show at $35,000, and during the  same period there had to be some  finishing touches put about this  building, or what may be termed  as the last Bowserian touch, this  cost the taxpayers of British Columbia the modest sum of $175,"-  000.     Anyone will  agree that  $175,000 is not much money, as  far as money went with the late  government, but it is considerable and it is now up to the taxpayers of British Columbia to  pay for the good time that Bow:  ser and hisjriends had attheir  expense." That ,we are not finished with this London palace is  certain, for this year it cost us  $60,000 to operate ��������� this building.  Evidently the money ^provided  last year was not enough for its  finish, as-this year we are called  upon to the tune of $23,000 for a  little furniture, etc. There seems  to be no accounting for these  enormous outlays and it will be  up to the people of this province  to begin inquiring what are the  advantages we are receiving for  all this money paid out, or is it  only some game put over us by  unscrupulous politicians.  o     o    o     c    o  The War Still Goes On.  The number of men killed in  this war so far is estimated at  7,000,000: While the total casualties are estimated at over 45,-  000,000. ��������� When one considers  that the number of casualties in  this war so far is in excess of | is an illumination of how votes  he total population of Great; Were got in an attempt to defeat  Britain the figures are appalling, I prohibition.  ���������  and the war still goes on, with  no immediate prospect of peace.  The severe character of the war  and its prolongation makes one  think that all the world must be  infected with a mania for, blood  lust.  o    o    o    o    o  The Prohibition Vote.  The report of the royal commission which went to Europe to  inquire into the soldiers vote on  Prohibition is too lengthy to publish in our small paper, but we  give a few excerpts from the report just to show how sacred our  ballot box is. An example of  the fraudulent voting that .took  place is as follows:  The first card selected for examination by the commission was  that of William Brillat, No. 155-  063. Brillat is supposed to have  voted ,at, Crowborough on the  22nd December, 1916, whereas  the military records show,that  Brillat deserted on the 16th of  September, 1916, and had not  since been reported.  Another ease was Sergt.-Major Cruikshank, No. 54014, testified that he belonged to the 18th  Battalion of London, Ont, and  and that he had enlisted in Gait,  Ont, his place of residence at  time of enlistment; that he had  never lived in British Columbia.  Cruikshank stated that he had  argued the point with his senior  as to his voting and was informed "that it does not matter if  you have lived there or not, so  long as you have been there."  Cruikshank swore that he had  just signed an envelope and had  not marked any ballot paper.  t-  And so on, dozens of similar  cases as the above-are cited in  the report, the reading of .which  British Troops Show  Supremacy.  In an open letter addressed to  the London Chronicle, Sir Arthur  Conan Doyle points out that it  may be of interest to remind  readers how completely, judged  by every test. British soldiers  have mastered the Germans during the war.  After a foolish gibe by the  Emperor, he goes on,' and the  consistent sneers of the German  press, which made merryfor so  long over our attempts toraise  an army, it is instructive to get  down to the actual figures, which  would be infinitsly more favorable if it were not for the losses  in the first week of actual fighting. In prisoners we-have at  least double, the British prison-;  ers in Germany being about 34,-  000, while we have close upon  70,000 Germans. Only during  the Mons retreat have the Germans' taken any considerable  number of prisoners from us.  Our. losses during that week  came to nearly 15,000 men. On  the other hand, on the Marne,  at Loos, again and again at the  Som'm'e, on the Ancre and now  at Arras and . Vimy Ridge, we  have made captures which- run  into thousands. - -   '  The comparison of  captured  gunsjs even more remarkable  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B.C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST'   BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE   IN   B.  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  Our losses during the Mons retreat may be put down at about  i  60. Afterwards, the guns we  have lost could be counted upon  the fingers on one's hands. Two  at La Basse action'in October,,  1914, four heavy guns in the  poison gas action of April 23rd,  1915, and possibly one or two at  different times, but the total  certainly, could not exceed,70.  Against this we have taken 200  in the present fighting, and 140  in the fighting on the Somme.  Eight were taken in the battery  L action and four by the cavalry  m  NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  While others stand for'what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these districts.  D  Look for  the  i  "Circle V"  Trademark  on  Every Sack  <L5M  VANCOUVER  < MILLING &  GRAIN CO. LTD.  Vancouver  Victoria  \   Nanaimo1  New  ,   Westminster  <��������� '    Royal Standard is without exception  the most  popular Bread Flour in Western Canada. ���������  ' It is milled from No. 1 Canadian Hard Wheat  especially for Home Baking.  , Its absolute uniformity���������year in and year out-  great rising power���������full strength���������more loaves to  the sack���������its freedom from lint and dirt���������all these  appeal to the housewife.  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  ���������  Compare���������price for price���������  GREAT   WEST  TEA  with the tea you are now using.  It's Better.  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  30E  hoc  >l&.  UNION STEAMSHIP GO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  ,.;.;.,,   'v..,..:    .BETWEEN'   ',.-.��������� ���������"  BEL-LA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.      CamOSUIl     Leaves Vancouver every  Thursday at 11 p.m.     (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  -������������������:'.:S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella,Coola,by arrangement. >  For rates of Freights, Fares and other,information, apply to  Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government STTjf Victoria.  30E  nor:  W>>  Advertise your '.Wants in the Courier  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY.  1  l aJflfflaaHS ;. ���������  'Jm&HfiSL x  ^WjWMf    Kit,*  \SSb--1  I*  1:  m.  $'���������  ly hi  Saturday, August 25,  1917  BELLA] COOLA- COURIER  Makes Cooking a Pleasure  No bending over a hot top to reach  the dampers���������Kootenay controls are  all on the outside���������-in front. And the  oven thermometer shows the temperature without opening the oven door.  This range saves fuel, time, trouble  and���������your temper.   Write for booklet.  WQgQfe  KOOTENAY RANGE  LONDON1-    TORONTO      MONTREAL      WINNIPEG      VANCOUVER    ,  ST. JOHN. N.ll.      HAMILTON      CALGARY 15  SASKATOON      EDMONTON  next day. Six were taken by  the Lincolns on September 9th,  and about a dozen others during  the Marne retreat. Twenty-ono  were taken at Loos. Altogether  our total amounts to 400 guns, as  against 70 we liave lost..  Giving our enemies' credit'for  all the .military virtues'which  they undoubtedly possess, it has  none the less been clearly shown  that brave slaves led by clever  fiends can and will be beaten by'  freemen led by gentlemen'.  Reproach to Britain.  The overseas dominions regard  the destiny of the British Empire  with as much enthusiasm as we  in these islands do. They have,  indeed, an ardor natural to young  communities, which may ' well  serve to stimulate^our own ideas.  It is a repreach to Great Britain  that Sir Robert Borden should  be able to say without,challengc  that before the war Germany  had a more systematic and thorough knoiwiedgeof the resources  and developments of the domini-  Province of British Columbia.  DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.  PACIFIC MILK  Is the most economical milk you  can'use. It is rich, heavy consistency, and can be diluted to a  gr'eater extent for cooking and  table use than any other milk.  YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC"  FOOD PRODUCTS  CO., LTD., Manufacturers  Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C. '  NOTICE.  Re Overdue Payments on Applications to Purchase Crown Lands  in British Columbia.   ,  NOTICE is hereby given that, under  the provisions of the~~"S6Uliers'  Homestead -Act, Repeal Act," any  person who did not apply under the  "Soldiers', Homestead Act, 1916," to  complete his application to purchase,  either by payment in full ,or by the  selection of a proportionate allotment,  may, by proving his interest and paying up in full the balance of the purchase price and taxes before the 31st  December, 1917, obtain a Crown grant  if proof satisfactory to the Minister of  Lands is furnished that such person is  suffering injury through absence of  notice or otherwise.  And further that the interest in uncompleted applications to purchase held  by any person on Active Service may  be protected by notification to the  Lands Department ofv the fact that  such person is on Active Service and by  the /iling of proof of the interest of  such person.  Farther information will be furnished on request to the Deputy Minister  of Lands, Victoria, B.C.  Publication of this notice without  authority will not be paid for.       jel4  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  COAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta.  the Yukon Territory, the North-west Terri-  i TORIES and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of SI an  acre. Not more than 2,660 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurvcyed territory the tract applied'for shall be stoked out by the applicant  himself,  Each application must bo accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of live cents per ton.  i The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns acco"nting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  arc not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the leBsec may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  ' For full information application should be  made to the Secretury of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lunds. n  W. W.CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  ons than could be found in the  United Kingdom. "May we not  hope, "��������� he asked, "that after the  war a livelier, interest will be  taken in the young nations of  the great British Commonwealth?" No statesman or'par-  ty who do not feel "that in the  policy of the future the Imperial  interest must have a place which  it never yet' has had will find  themselves in touch with nation-  i f >,  al feeling. The Imperial war  cabinet is ,the, nursery of hopes  that will be fulfilled, because it  is the determination of all parts  of the British dominions that  the inspiration of the war shall  not cease when peace comes.���������  Edinburgh Scotsman.  Wear the "Dayfoot"  Solid Leather  Shoe  MADE FOR ������B. C. WEATHER  G. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y 303 Mercantile Building  Georgetown, Ont. and        Vancouver, B. C.  -*-  "Private Pat's" Resolution.  "I'm no' returned soldier,"  said Private Pat, after hopping  down the gangway from the  hospital sjiip. , "It's only a half-  returned' soldier I am, or half a  returned soldier, if you like,"  pointing down to his empty  trouser leg.  He must always have his little  joke, but he.was more than half  serious now.  "I meani I've only got back to  Canada." he said. "I'll be a  proper retimed soldier when  I've got back to work. And the  sooner the better; no loafing for  me! From the way my old father  writes,' and my wife too, they  seem to think there's nothing  for me to do but some kid's job,  like peddling pins, or bobbing  up and down with an elevator;  or else tramping ,around after  odd jobs, like the old soldierin  the fairy tale, with maybe a bit  of a pension to keep body and  soul together. I'll take whatever pension my old leg's worth,  but blamed if I want to live on  one and rust away the rest of my  life. I want to be a man again  as I was before, and make my  own living, not sponge on other  people."  But how is a man disabled to  make his own way in this world  is a natural question to ask. It  is.here where the Military Hospitals Commission step in and in  cases similar to Private Pat do  all that is possible to enable out  heroes to be independent. The  Commission'sobjectof existence  is to restore' the disabled man's  .power to- make his own way in  the world.- The Commission acts  for the whole people of Canada,  as trustee for every soldier disabled in their service.  Hon. W. J. Hanna, Canadian  food controller, calculates'that  food wasted in the garbage pails  of Canada each year through  carelessness and lack of kitchen  economy amounts to $56,000,000  per year, or about $7.00 per head  of population.  BUSINESS CARDS  ID H  HOE  m  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby IB or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  [g] If ioezz:        ">| [o  'THE two principal reasons  1   why   you   should  buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  .  FIRST���������   /  There is none better.  SECOND���������;]���������'������������������.. V/.  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C; under government inspection.  Ask for SHAMROCK"  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO;, Ltd.  Packers and Provitionera  Calgary     Vancouver    Edmonton  Watch Repairs  Send your watch to us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.  A price given before proceeding with work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.  O. B. ALLAN  .    Di&mond Merchant���������-Optician  Granville and Pender, Vancouver, B.C.  ~? -.i- ~-  1 he Mason & rlischriano  of to-day will make, plain our  privilege lo stale with authority:  "NO FINER  PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  0  ^JT Let us attend your Victor Record  jI mail ordersJW-our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  .ftfEfrlE  13d  "IS/HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  1XTHAT person so independent?  1XTHAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola farmers are independent]  they are strangers to hard times.  View of ,a ranch in Bella Coola Valley,  -HTHE REASONS for this enviable .condi-  ���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows'the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops/  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crop^ are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  *������^ country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  ���������-��������� ,: "������������������'-   '������������������   ���������     CAfcADA.    '  '-.One Year .;......... .'J.;...  'Six Months ���������'. ���������  Three Months . ���������   UNITED STATES  One Year...   .$1.00  . 0.75  . 0.50  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year. .........;.............. :$l.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find..'...... I....  for Bella Coola Courier for......-....  Name... ���������...,..  ..subscription  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed A  BELLA COOLA COURIER  Saturday, August 25,   19i 7  ������  hoe:  )S  watia������a������3zgraigsiBffla^^  (  i  s  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coast between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  liners  ggers  // will be to your interest to \\eep Well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������. tf  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or v/holesalehouse can  afford to let slip the op-  , portunity of increased  sales that public adver-  , tising brings.  Prospectors  I*  are in a class by themselves  They have been tried, and  tested for over Fifty Years  and have not been disappointing.  ASK YOUR MERCHANT FOR AMHERST  <(HOME-MADE" BRAND  nfil  ASV1HERST HALS FAX REGINA  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The Novth-W.est  Coast of British Columbia.offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  MUST CUT DOWN CONSUMPTION.  Canada and the United States  must cut down their normal consumption of wheat by 160,000,-  000 bushels to meet the needs of  Great Britain and the Allies.  Hon. VV. J. Hanna, food controller,' estimates that to feed Great  Britain, France, and the other  Allies, and the men at the front,  will require 1^105,000,000 bushels of wheat. This means that  at least 460,000,000 wilj have to  be imported' from Canada and  the United States. There will  under normal consumption in  these two coun tries only 300,000, -  000 bushels surplus for export,  and so by special efforts of food  conservation the people of United States and Canada will have  to make up a shortage of 160,-  000,000 bushels.  eagle lives for 100 years. Hens  and pigeons live for 10 to 15  years. An elephant lives for 100  years. A crocodile lives for 100  years.  Hon. Robert Rogers  Resigns  Dr. Clark of Red Deer Also Withdraws  A despatch from Ottawa says  that owing to the delay in carry-  ing into effect the conscription  bill the Hon.- Robert Rogers,  minister of public works, has resigned.  Seems like a graceful exit from  public office for the Hon. Bob.  And this after the Royal Commission had coated him with  a liberal application of the much  needed whitewash.  Or. Michael Clark, the Liberal  member for Red Deer, Alberta,  announces his withdrawal from  politics. Ill health and aversion  to leadership of Quebec are some  of the reasons for his retirement,  also objects to the other party  being dominated by strong eastern corporation and protectionists interests.  According to a statement just  issued, Canada's war expenditures to July -20th,' 1917, total  $623,000,000, includingestimated  amount of upkeep of troops in  France. The net debt of Canada on July 20th was $851,000,000.  Canada's present rate of war expenditure per day at home and  abroad is $850,000.  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  D TOWN. , Do not talk-support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your, community.     .,  et ������iirier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Let us all try our best to save  ���������both in money and food.  Growth and Life of Animals.  A man grows for twenty years  and lives from 70 to 100 years.  A horse grows for five years and  lives for 30 years. A cow grows  for four years and lives for 20  years. A lion grows for four  yours and lives for 40 years.' A  dog grows i or two years and lives  from 12 to 1-1 years. A bear  grows for one year and lives for  8 years. An ass grows for five  years and lives for 30 years. A  sheep live������ for 10 years. A fox  lives from 14 to 16 years.   An  Ames Holden McCready Ltd.  Vancouver; B.C.  LEADING WHOLESALERS IN BOOTS,  SHOES AND   RUBBERS  FOR   MEN,  -     WOMEN AND CHILDREN.  i  Largest Manufacturers of Boots and  Shoes in Canada  Just a Few of Our Exclusive Specialties  hi iii in        - ��������� ��������� '   '���������       "���������-   THE GOAL EVERBEARING APPLE. The only everbearing  apple in existence. A delicious all-the-season fruit. Fine  tree, each, $1.00.  THE VANDERPOOL RED APPLE.   The great export apple  and keeper.   Each,"50c.  THE ORENCO APPLE. , The best dessert'apple.   Each, 50c.  THE YAKIMENE PEACH-APRICOT. A remarkable combination of the apricot and peach.    Hardy.    Each, $1.00.  THE VROOMANFRANQUETTE WALNUT. Produces food  of great nutritious value on a -highly ornamental tree.'  Each $1.  THESOUVENIREVERBEARING RASPBERRY. Thegreat-  est everbearer.   Hundred, $14.00.  SPECIAL   SAMPLE   OFFER  We will send prepaid to your nearest station next Spring one of each of  these splendid trees and a dozen Souvenir Raspberries on receipt of a $5.00  bill, or C. O. D. $5.50.   Orders should be plated NOW for these or any  other of our well-known stock.    We do not ship into the interior in the Fall.  N.B.-lt is MOST IMPORTANT that orders be sent in AT ONCE-the  stock must be reserved NOW.  The British Columbia Nurseries Co., Ltd.  1493 SEVENTH AVENUE WEST       ���������   ���������  Nurseries at Sardls.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  mmmmismmm  ^<m  ready  wi  ��������� Sportsmen who use Remington UMC know  that every promise made for theih is more than lived  up to.   It's a comfort to know that���������in the field.  THE "REMINGTON" a  smokeless shell is a winner at any trap or in any  field.  "NITRO CLUB" SMOKELESS Anothei steel lined  shell of superb quality-  called tlio "speed" shell.  For a straight, swift punch, with no guess work, you 11 certainly find  these sheila make good. Use them with your trusty Remington UMC J ump  Gun, and it"will be a ghost, not a bird, that gets away from you.  KorgiUT.e shooting���������a Remington UMC Rifle (all calibres) j<  arl metal'ics are indispensable���������if  you  want  RESULTS.  We make cartridges for every known make of rifle;        ���������   ;   ^ .���������*,    ~        Go to the 'dealer who shows this Remington UMC sien���������satisfaction  *SPORTSMENS)J and every arm and ammunition need filled���������RIGlli.  HEADQU  J FIREARMS fr,]  I ammunition!  Remington U.EVI.C. of Canada  Limit ed  WINDSOR, ONT. 715  st"'  rWj  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  r  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING  AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    &  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosl: suitable articles are kept at -prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour. . Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand!   Prompt service  Best Gcods   Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  ma  mmmMXjwjmi ��������� u���������MuiiM-mgam  m  h^j'^'A ^  t 3  > i  IF YOU WANT GOOD SPORT  VISIT BELLA GOOLA. EXCELLENT HUNTING AND FISHING.  WEATHER REPORT FOR JUNE  Compiled  by Mr.  C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.   ,  Temperature: Maximum, 64.   Minimum, 43.  Highest Max. (14th)82. Lowest Min. (,11th) SO  Rainfall, 2.42.  Rainfall for .the year  (1916) 40.89 inches.  iVOL. 5���������NO. 36  BELLA COOLA, B.C., SATURDAY, AUGUST 25,  1917.  $1.00 a Year  antic Of fensive Launche  War News for the Week  ft  LW  .^l1  4-j  Tuesday.    Paris.--New and terrific battle reaching climax today  round bloody ground near Verdun.    EMghting developed to our  Ivantage, conflict over a front of twelve miles, extending from  ft vercourt wood to Beconvaux. On both banks of Meuse French  his morning attacked magnificently, numerous prisoners were  <iken. Bravery exhibited by French troops incomparable. Con-  l mation of artillery duels in Belgium. In upper Alsace, consid-  rable artillery activity.  London.���������By sheer weight of steel British*forced the continued  sessions of German lines on the Ypres-Poelkapelle sector today,  number of huge tanks aided in the drive.     British losses extra-  "linary light considering the intensity of the fighting.   Southof  >ns British made successful raids.    Big fire  sweeps Saloniki,  ire'than half the city destroyed rendering eighty thousand perms homeless.  Horns.--Italian offensive on Isonzo front begun yesterday by the  r Gsing of Isonzo river, already 7500 prisoners taken. Offensive  ���������wtends from Adriatic to the Alps. Pope so interested in world's  'titude to his peace plan that 'he rises an hour earlier to read  ������ ;ss comments from all the capitals.  Wednesday.    London.-France, Italy, Britain and Belgium join-  ;d today in most gigantic offensive yet directed against Germany.  Wjst front from Belgian sea coast to Switzerland, over 435 miles,  i������i gigantic battle with' French, British, Belgian and Portugese  ti >ops attacking.    Southward, Italy's most formidable offensive  us thrown millions into death's grapple over a front of almost  )i <} hundred miles.    On Isonzo front Austrian lines beginning to  u nd and give way at various points.    Italians supported by floating and fixed batteries- and monitors are marching towards suc-  -s in spite of undiminished enemy resistance and have captured  L'i 000 men.    Gen. Haig's drive in Flanders is pressing forward,  uile Canadians are getting tighter grip of Lens.    Gen. Petain's  3a'������ driving fiercely out of Verdun while steadily increasing their  )> ssure along Chemin Des Dames and in Champagne.    Russia  i1 me of great allied powers not participating in concerted assault,  [l .1 little Roumania through her reorganized army is making stub-  lb >' n resistance to great Teutonic attempt at further encroachment.  Berlin.-Battle of Verdun not yet ended.    Our troops anticipate  "cible conclusion of battle.  ���������'orfu.--One-quarter of Serbian city, Monastir, been destroyed  fire^as result of Bulgarian's bombardment.  Petrograd.-Austro-German forces making vigorous attacks in  [in southern Roumania.    Russians and Roumanians offering stubborn resistance, but forced back at several points.  Thursday: London.-Another rapid succession of blows, British  Lind French striking at various points along Franco-Belgian front  I**ell this morning on Germans in the region of Ypres, where British advanced over fiercely contested field between Langemarck  'and Frezenberg.    No details received of new battle being fought  jSovar section strongly organized by Germans  with concrete re-  ains'  General Count Cadorna, commander-in-chief ojc the Italian  army, who is conquering the  Austrians. \  Italians Make  Big Captures  Rome, Aug. 23.���������Since the big  offensive commenced more than  thirteen thousand prisoners have  been taken by the Italians, also  capturing 13 guns.  Despite Staggering  Losses the Big  Offensive Continues  London, Aug. 24.���������Gen. Haig  reports   slight advance   made  southeast of Lens.     On Ypres  front, east of Langemarck, hostile   attacks   repulsed.       Allies  great offensive unceasingly boring ahead, already cost Germans  and Austrians close on one hundred thousand dead and wounded  and at least, twenty-one thousand prisoners on British, French  and Italian fronts.  Despite staggering losses no let up  today,  deluge both of shells and men  continue against their lines on  the west and Italian fronts.    Offensive started against Russian  ines. enemy already have gained  ground on Riga front.    Civilians  are evacuating Roulers, anticipate fighting for its possession.  Eifteen vessels more than 1600  tons and  three less than 1600  tons sunk   by  submarines last  week.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  shortly.  . Miss Mildred Gibson left this  week for Victoria where she  will enlist as a nurse at the Royal.  French Take 8426 Prisoners  stdoubts and machine gun nests in shell holes.    Sharp fighting continues around Lens. British making progress in spite of deter-  'j^jfMrnined resistance of enemy.    Germans last night concentrated ef-  *-iSFforts to recapture ground gained in new French offensive on Ver-  "^(lun front.    Heavy counter attacks both sides of Meuse repulsed.  JjjgTotal number of prisoners taken by French, 6116.    Several strong  /**��������� German attacks on the Aisne, during night, repulsed.   Ten Ger-  ->& man aeroplanes approached English coast yesterday, two enemy  ?,[& machines brought down.    Bombs dropped at Dover and Margate,  -^ three killed, two injured.    Raiders unable to penetrate far inland.  ���������   'j Vustria's terrible toll of casualties continuing in Italian advance  -VJ   /hich today reached  thirty-five thousand  dead  and wounded.  ->"-'J Italians swept enemy from the villages of Descla, Britof, Canale,  %      Ilomrez and Rosa.    Germans begin offensive on Russian line.  Friday:    Amsterdam.-Zeebrugge and environs bombed by en-  "l"   tjnte airmen yesterday, great explosions occurred, property damage great.    Bombardment lasted for an hour and a half.    "Policy  ' *   based on might alone, and not right, doomed to failure from be-  ���������> ginning," was the interesting admission made by Dr. Von Kuehl-  niann, German imperial foreign secretary, in his maiden speech  ��������� j������,.��������� ta main committee in the Reichstag yesterday.  ^tf{^     Paris.���������Le Matin deplores the sending of American troops, says  /������������������" anywhere other than French  front.    Strong   belief in political  T#jVr circles here that the situation in Russia demands the presence on  2j?V eastern front of allied troops.    Urges Japanese troops be sent.  Austrians Claim 5600  Vienna, Aug. 23.- New attack-  of Italians forced back Austrian  line at some points. Selo, on the  Carso plateau, has been lost.  Austrians have taken more than  5600 prisoners.  Washington, Aug. 23. ���������Bituminous coal prices fixed late last  night for every coal mine in the  United States by President Wilson. Next step in coal control  is to fix prices to be charged by  middlemen and retailers.  Paris, Aug. 24.���������The number  of prisoners taken by French  since Monday total 8426, also 24  cannon and more than two hundred machine guns. German  aviators dropped bombs last Sunday on two hospitals behind Verdun, killing two and wounding  forty-five nurses. Five French  vessels more than 1600 tons and  four of lesser tonnage destroyed  by submarines last week.  Berlin, Aug. 24���������German forces yesterday occupied without  fighting Russian positions west  of river Aa to Oding Bigaun on  Riga front.  The weekly steamer between  Vancouver and Bella Coola was  very much belated this week,  while due Sunday morning she  did not put in an appearance be- Jubilee Ho1;pitai in that city  fore Tuesday afternoon. After  discharging freight and passengers at Ocean Falls, orders were  received to proceed to Namuand  load six thousand cases of empty  salmon tins for Kimsquit, which  had to be delivered immediately  as the heavy run of salmon there  had made a serious shortage in  tins.  Martin Christensen, who left  the valley last year for an extended visit to the coast cities  in the States, returned this week.  Mr. Christensen informs us that  in the.Republic the talk is all on  war and preparations are going  on all over the country on a huge  After discharging cargo! scale.    The Alvo von Albensle-  at Kimsquit the steamer called i ben as well as the I. W. W. class  here southbound. ! that are  helping the  Germans  ~ win the war from their different  The marriage of John Daven-|baseg in America are promptly  port Clayton, eldest son of Mrs..jbeinj, taken  care of?  accordirig  E. Clayton, to Hilda May Reed, j to Mr_ chastens���������.    Things on  took place at St. Mary's Church, ! the whole are very good in the  Oak Bay, near Victoria, on Sat-1 States, money and labor seems  urday morning, August Ifcth.      j to be pientiful  After spending some time in !  Th������   new    Land    Settlement  the..cities the happy couple will;  return and take up their resi-j  dence here.    The Courier joins1  Heard at Victoria has con pleted  ail the organization work and is  !:ov." ready to b ���������-!/?! n enter lain ing  with their many friends in wish-; applications for loans to the faring them every happiness. j mers of the province.  HT forget to bring in your Subscription  to the Courier���������The more support you  give us, the better paper we will give you.  Munition Making in  Canada Stopped  Ottawa, Aug. 23���������War certificates which will sell at $8.60 and  return purchaser $10.00 at the  end of three years to be placed  on sale immediately at banks and  money order postoflices. Up-to-  date, ten millions have been made  available for war purposes by  the sale of war certificates. Imperial munition board announced  the production of munitions in  Canada will be discontinued as  no longer necessary, except some  line which will be produced in  lessened quantities. Plants affected in consequence will resume pre-war activities, others  will engage in production of  equipment for ships.  Russian Forces Retire  Petrograd, Aug. 24.���������Russian  forces on northern end of front,  where Germans yesterday began  offensive, retired under pressure  from region of Raggedzem to  Kemmern Lake. Situation in  Finland serious as a result of  continued difficulty in forming a  cabinet and the persistance of  Socialists in their plan to renew  session of the dissolved Landtag.  Premier Kerensky has forbidden  meeting of the Landtag and will  use militarv force if necessarv.  The run of salmon during the  week has been very satisfactory  and the canneries have been kept  busy. Last week considerable  fish was sent to Rivers Inlet and  Namu as the local fish packing  plants could not handle the catch.  Under ordinary conditions the  best run of cohoe salmon usually  takes place between the twentieth of August and the twentieth  of September. In former years  fishing has continued up to October first and there is every likelihood that the canneries here  will not close before that time  this year.  W. Pybus of Ladner, and Paul  Swanson spent a week in town  and at the Numamis cannery,  where they visited with manager  Alfred Jensen. They left for  home by the Camosun on Tuesday.  A. K. Oveson, who has assist  Our former townsman Walter  Gallienne, accompanied by Mrs.  Gallienne, called here this week  en route to Vancouver.  Washington, Aug. 24. ���������Germany bringing pressure to bear on  the Netherlands, threatening to ed with the nets at the new can.  give her no more steel for ship-j nfcry a short time> has returned  building unless ships are used in ; tQ hig. f.u.m at Hagensborg..  interest of   Germany  and   her1  Allies.  Embargo  been placed on the  J. C. Clausen of Victoria, visited in the community last week.  Mr. G. Saugstad, fishery overseer at Rivers Inlet, came in on  Tuesday and is spending a few  days with his family at Hagensborg. He will return to his post  again next week.  Pte. B. M. Brynildsen writes  under date July 23rd from Shorn-  cliffe, intimating that they are  now in strict training and that  they, the 11th reserve, will likely be sent to France in a couple  of months time or perhaps earlier  as far as is kown at the time of  writing.   Considerable mining activity  is novv taking place m this section of the province and many  claims have been recorded at the  local mining recorder's office  lately. This activity may help  Bella Coola some.  ���������o-<n^-cio-<ir>  QJlmrdt Nflitr?  export of pulp in order to meet: Mr. Clausen has been connected  J\  war needs of United States. Can-; with logging operations in this ������  adian pulp mills are furnishing | province for a number of years.C  about three-fourths of the news-! and it.is'likely that he will be!:?  i i h  paper used in the United States, i running camps in this vicinity -  Sunday  School  Church Service  10:45 a.m.  7:30 p.m.  Preacher for Suiulav- Rev.  W. 11. Gibson.  AH Are  Welcome.  3  ���������iXU-'JiS' <*OO^.ML>^JML> <"���������������  L BELLA COOLA COURIER  SalurJi  ay, A  " "*������/#, /(  The Courier  under the  pressure of   a  pale  bluff that the Quebec National-  Pubushed Weekly at Bella Coola by, jsts would never'have dared to  THE BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING Co. LTD,! ^ ^^    ^  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada    t  1  Year .'.- $100  6 Month*   ������-75  3 Month.    0.50  United States  1 Year $*-50  United Kingdom  1 Year. :...:.. $100  Subscription* payable in advance.  ���������Subscribers not receiving their copy-  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  9ent in as soon as possible.  Births, Marriages and Deaths.  50c  per insertion.  For Advertising Rates,  Apply at  Office.  To Correspondents��������� While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be given to the editor.  The Editor reserves the rijrht to refuse publication of any letter. All manuscript at writer s  ri������k.  'Pallia popult flitprpma rHt Irx/  SATURDAY,  AUG. 25, 1917.  Prohibition Carries.  The question of prohibition or  no for this province is'at last  settled and British Columbia will  be on the dry list October first.  The premier is to be congratulated in.making good his promise  that if the vote on prohibition  - turned out to be unsatisfactory  the Liberal party would enact  a bill for the suppression of the  sale of liquor for the duration of  this war-and. then let the pebble  decide if they wished prohibition  to remain in force. -No doubt  it is the best way to settle this  knotty problem as the province  will have "experienced the benefits or otherwise of a dry state,  also .the women will be able to  have, their say.  o    o,   o    o    o  Clearing the Decks.  According to press despatches  . from Ottawa, Premier Borden  denies emphatically any collusion  with the Nationalists and says  their attitude is unpatriotic and  the first duty of his supporters  is to assist in defeating them.  What a change. How could  Sir Robert make such a statement against his-friendsln view  of the fact that he owes his position to the Nationalist backing  in the 1911 election. Willhefol-  low up his statement by demanding that the Nationalist friends  in his cabinet resign. We shall  have;to wait and see.  In  the light of Sir Robert's  statement it is interesting to recall that after the 1911 election  and the Conservatives were put  into power, the process of cabinet making was in its final stage  when the Nationalists proceeded  to tell  Canada's   new   premier  ''who's who and what's what."  They demanded  that  at  least  three of their members should  hold portfolios.   The premier replied that he would complete the  making of his cabinet in a spirit  of justice to everybody.   Whereupon the   Nationalists replied:  < "You will either meet our demands or meet parliament with  a majority xjf   eight or nine."  The reduction being due to the  nineteen nationalists voting with  Laurier.    But the Nationalists  were sent for on behalf of Hon.  R. L. Borden, and they gloatingly declared that they got everything they asked for in the allotment of  portfolios,   because  the premier of Canada weakened  Fun and Pay.  When   things   were   running  good in British Columbia, in the  bonusing of railways, the late  government thought that a little  may bemade for their friends on  the side, and so a friend of the  administration was sent to London to buy,a site for a palace,  to be built at an enormous cost,  in fact the price is so high that  the correct amount is not known.  However, the total outlay on-,this  account   must   be   considerably  over a  million dollars.      Then  there is the upkeep.   During the  year 1916-17,   salaries   are put  down  for the running of this  show at $35,000, and during the  same period there had to be some  finishing touches put about this  building, or what may be termed  as the last Bowserian touch, this  cost the taxpayers of British Columbia the modest sum of $175,"-  000.     Anyone  will   agree that  $175,000 is not much money, as  far as money went with the late  government, but it is considerable and it.is now up to the taxpayers of British  Columbia to  pay for the good time that Bowser and hisjfriends had at their  expense.   That we are not finished with this London palace is  certain, for this year it cost us  $60,000 to operate this building.  Evidently the money^provided  last year was not enough for its  finish, as-this" year we are called  upon to the tune of.$23,000 for a  little furniture, etc;. There seems  to be no accounting for these  enormous .outlays and it will be  up,to the people of this province  to begin inquiring what are the  advantages we are receiving for  all this money paid out, or is it  only some game put over us by  unscrupulous politicians.  and the war still goes on., with  no immediate prospect of peace.  The severe character of the war  and its prolongation makes one  think that all the'world must be  infected with a mania for blood  lust.  The  War Still Goes On.  The number of men killed in  this war -so far is estimated at  7,000,000. While the total casu:  alties are estimated at over 45,-  000,000. When one considers  that the number of casualties in  The Prohibition  Vote.  The report of the royal commission which went to Europe to  inquire into the soldiers vote on  Prohibition is too lengthy to publish in our small paper, but we  give a few excerpts from the report just to show how sacred our  ballot box is. An example of  the fraudulent voting that took  place is as follows:  The first card selected for examination by the commission was  that of William Brillat, No. 155-  063. Brillat is supposed to have  voted at Crowborough on the  22nd December, 1916, whereas  the military records show that  Brillat deserted on the 16th of  September, 1916, and had. not  since been reported.  Another case was Sergt.-Major Cruikshank, No. 54014,, testified that he belonged to the.l8th  Battalion of London, Ont., and  and that he had enlisted in Gait,  Ont., his place, of residence at  time of enlistment; that he had  never lived in British Columbia.  Cruikshank stated that he had  argued the point with his senior  as to his voting and was informed "that it does not .matter if  you have lived there or not, so  long as you have been there."  Cruikshank swore that he had  just signed an envelope and had  not marked any ballot paper.  And so on, dozens of similar  cases as the above are cited in  the report, the reading of^which  British  Troops Show  Supremacy.  In an open letter addressed to  the London Chronicle, Sir Arthur  Conan Doyle points out that it  may be of interest to remind  readers how completely, judged  by every test, British soldiers  have mastered the Germans during the war.  After a foolish gibe by the  Emperor, he goes on, and the  consistent sneers of the German  press, which made merry for so  long over our attempts to raise  an army, it is instructive to get  down to the actual figures, which  would be infinitely more favorable if it were not for the losses  in the first week of actual fighting. In prisoners we .have at  least doubley the British prisoners in Germany being about 34,-.  000, while we have close upon  70,000 Germans. Only during  the Mons retreat have the Germans taken any considerable  number of prisoners from us.  Our losses during that week  came to nearly 15,000 men. On  the other hand, on the Marne,  at Loos, again and again at the  Somme, on the Ancre and now  at Arras and Vimy Ridge, we  have made captures which run  into thousands.  The comparison  of  captured  gunsjs even more remarkable  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. I tj  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS  AND  MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST'   BRAND  SHIRTS,. PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  ���������BBBBBHHHHH  MADE    IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given lei(e  rOrdt  7-1  v.&  S'-.iB  V"  M  $%  Our losses during the Mons retreat may be put down at about  60. Afterwards, the guns we  have lost could be counted upon  the fingers on one's hands. Two  at La Basse action in October,  1914, four heavy guns in the  poison gas action of April 23rd,  1915, and possibly one or indifferent times, lJlU the t  certainly could nut exceed'  Against this we have h'-���������  in the'present !ijrhtir.K, arid"  irv the fighting <>,, lhe'sora-  Eight were t.ak'<-i, in the bat1-  L action and tour i,ythec  aYi -i  m  this war so far is in excess of,jsan illumination of how votes1  the total population of Great were got \n an attempt to defeat  Britain the figures are appalling, prohibition. -  S. M. NEWTON  The Prince Rupert Empire  man, who is a candidate for the  House of Commons for this Riding.  While others stand for what  will benefit their party, he stands  for what will benefit these districts.  _J ROYAL  STANDARD  FLOUR  ���������Still**  Look for  the  "Circle V  tt  Trademark  oh  Every Sack  VANCOUVER  MILLING &  GRAIN CO. LTD.  Vancouver  Victoria  Natiiimo  New  Weitmjrutef  t);  rcort  RoyaPStandard is without exception  popular Bread Flour in Western Canada.  It is milled from No.' 1 Canadian Hard Wheat  especially for Home Baking.  Its absolute uniformity���������year in and y< :ir out���������  great rising power���������full strength mon> loaves to  the sack���������its freedom from lint and dirt -a!! th'-e  appeal to the housewife.  SOLD BY ALL STOREKEEPERS  *S*S  m  Compare���������price for price���������  GREAT   WEST  TEA  with the tea you are now using.  It's Better.  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B.C.  38SK  -'$������  ���������7*   Jfc J*/  30E  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD,  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSKNCKK SKKVH'K  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.   "CamOSUll"   Leaves   Vancouver every  Thursday at  11  p.m.     (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S. "COQUITLAM" sails from Vain'"  nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives.  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  cr  tort-  t-all  For rates of Freights, Fares find other informal  Head .Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; <>��������������� <I'���������'���������"���������  agent,  1003 Government St., Victoria.  ,,, ;.|.|.ly '"  ,\|, ���������i;i:k<;������i|!'  PROJECTED ROUTE OF THE PACIFIC & HUDSON BAY RAILWAY  Advertise your Wants in the Coun*  ������a$  At ���������  * --"si  ���������v  .jU^'" W8S!  I _ -    *g- -.  1 f \%WatitrJay~ August 25,   1917  BELLAi COOLA  COURIER  >"*a  Makes Cooking a Pleasure  No bending over a hot top to reach  the dampers���������Kootenay controls are  all on the outside���������-in front. And the  oven thermometer shows the temperature without opening the oven door.  This range saves fuel, time, trouble  and���������your temper.    Write for booklet.  KOOTENAY RANGE  LONDON      TORONTO   w MONTREAL      WINNIPEG      VANCOUVER  ST. JOHN, N.Ii.     HA.Mri.TON     CALGARY is  SASKATOON       EDMONTON  i,   fi  ai)  l  *%Ai*M  t day.    Six were taken  by  Lincolns on September 9th,  ���������} about a dozen others during  Marn.e retreat. Twenty-one  nj taken at Loos.    Altogether  total amounts to 400 guns, as  mst 70 we have lost.  iving our enemies credit for  the military virtues which  ������?\ undoubtedly possess, it has  ni the less been clearlyshown  t brave slaves led by clever  fmls.can and will be beaten by  ( men led by gentlemen.  Reproach to Britain.  Theoverseas dominions regard  thedestinyof the British Empire  with as much enthusiasm as we  in these islands do. They have,  indeed, an ardor natural to young  communities, which may well  serve to stimulate our own ideas.  It is a repreach to Great Britain  that Sir Robert Borden should  be able to say without challenge  that before the war Germany  had a more systematic and thorough knowledge of the resources  and developments of thedomini-  PACIFIC MILK  Is the most economical milk you  can use. It is rich, heavy consistency, and can be diluted to a  greater extent for cooking and  table use than any other milk.  YOU'LL LIKE PACIFIC"  &tt  FOOD   PRODUCTS   CO., LTD., Manufacturers  Office: 322 DRAKE STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C. '  Province of British Columbia.  DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.  NOTICE.  Re Overdue Payments on Applications to Purchase Crown Lands  in British Columbia.  \TOTICE is hereby given that, under  *���������* the provisions of the "Soldiers'  Homestead -Act, Repeal Act," any  person who did not apply under the  "Soldiers' Homestead Act, 1916," to  complete his application to purchase,  either by payment in full or by the  selection of a proportionate allotment,  may, by proving his interest and paying up in full the balance of the purchase price and taxes before the 31st  December, 1917, obtain a Crown grant  if proof satisfactory to the Minister of  Lands is furnished that such person is  suffering injury through absence of  notice or otherwise. -  And further that the interest in uncompleted applications to purchase held  by any person on Active Service may  be protected by notification to the  Lands Department of the fact that  such person is on Active Service and by  the filing of proof of the interest of  such person.  Further information will be furnished on request to the Deputy Minister  of Lands, Victoria,  B. C.  Publication of this notice without  authority will not be paid for.        jel4  ons than could be found in the  United Kingdom. "May we not  hope," he asked, "that afterthe  war a livelier interest will be  taken in the young nations of  the great .British Commonwealth?" No statesman or parr  ty who do not feel that in the  policy of the future the Imperial  interest must have a place which  it never yet has had will find  themselves in touch with national feeling. The Imperial war  cabinet is the nursery of hopes  that will be fulfilled, because it  is the determination of all parts  of the British dominions that  the inspiration of the war shall  not cease when peace comes.���������  Edinburgh Scotsman.  m  <&  >&1  I    i  'WW!  -ffl  Wear the "Dayfoot"  Solid Leather  Shoe  MADE FOR B. C. WEATHER  G. B. DAYFOOT and Co'y 303 Mercantile Building  Georgetown, Ont. and        Vancouver, B. C.  "Private Pat's" Resolution.  "I'm no returned soldier,"  said Private Pat, after hopping  down the gangway from the  hospital shiip. "It's only a half-  returned soldier I am, or half a  returned soldier, if you like,"  pointing down to his empty  trouser leg.  He must always have his little  joke, but he.was more than half  serious now.  "I mean, I've only got back to  Canada." he said. "I'll be a  proper retimed soldier when  I've got back to work. And the  sooner the better; no loafing for  From the way my old father  writes, and my wife too, they  seem to think there's nothing  for me to do but some kid's job,  ike peddling pins, or bobbing  up and down with an elevator;  or else tramping around after  odd jobs, like the old soldier in  the fairy tale, with maybe a bit  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  *���������'.'. Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the Yukon Territory, the North-west Terri-  ��������� Tories, and in a portion of the Province of  British Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-Affent  of the district in which the riftnta applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied "for shall be staked- out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty ahall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  i The person operating the mine ahall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the leasee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  ; For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior. Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  of a pension to keep body and  soul together. I'll take whatever pension my old leg's worth,  but blamed if I want to live on  one and rust away the rest of my  life. I want to be a man again  as I was before, and make my  own living, not sponge on other  people."  But how is a man disabled to  make his own way in this world  is a natural question to ask. It  is here where the Military Hospitals Commission step in and in  cases similar to Private Pat do  all that is possible to enable our  heroes to be independent. The  Commission'sobject of existence  is to restore the disabled man's  power to make his own way in  the world. The Commission acts  for the whole people of Canada,  as trustee for every soldier disabled in their service.  HTHE two principal reasons  ���������*���������   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  Burn������  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Proviiioner*  Vancouver     Edmonton  Hon. W. J. Hanna, Canadian  food controller, calculates that  food wasted in the garbage pails  of Canada each year through  carelessness and lack of kitchen  economy amounts to $56,000,000  per year, or about $7.00 per head  of population.  BUSINESS CARDS  HOE  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  0   P=  HOE  Watch Repairs  Send your watch to us for guaranteed repairs at lowest prices.  A price given before proceeding with'work. If not satisfactory, watch will be returned free  of expense.  O. B. ALLAN  Diamond Merchant���������Optician  Granville and Pender,Vancouver, B.C.  m  TheWiason & r\isch Piano  of to-day will make plain our  privilege to slate with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  f]T Let us attend your Victor Record  ^U mail orders- -our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  ri^r; i& Jri ������������-" =~ej- -Mr^-. &i Si-~.  ~-^���������������-:iW?:  ]    [  ^  ]    [  ^X/HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  ll/HAT person so independent?  1XTHAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola   farmers are independent',  they are strangers to hard times.  v ^fi:*'"*- it-  txr^^.'sR?1  View of a ranch in, Bella. Coola Valley.  ���������"THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  -*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  CZD  SUBSCRIPTION   RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscription* Payable in Advance.  CAInADA.  One Year $1-00  Six Months   0.75  Three Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. O   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  ������������������'';>���������   1 BELLA  COOLA COURIER  Saturdt  ay, A  Hon. Robert Rogers  ns  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  ��������� A distance of six hundred miles  are in a class by themselves  They have been tried and  tested for over Fifty Years  and have not been disappointing.  ASK YOUR MERCHANT FOR AMHERST  "HOME-MADE*' BRAND  Amherst Boot & Shoe Co. Ltd.  AH3HERST HALIFAX REGINAv  Dr. Clark of Red Deer Also Withdraws  A despatch from Ottawa says  that owing to the delay in carrying into effect the conscription  bill the Hon. Robert Rogers,  minister of public works, has resigned.  Seems like a graceful exit from  public office for the Hon. Bob.  And this after the, Royal ���������Commission had ���������- coated him with  a liberal application of the much  needed whitewash.  Dr. Michael Clark, the Liberal  member for Red Deer, Alberta,  announces his withdrawal from  politics. Ill health and aversion  to leadership of Quebec are some  of the reasons for his retirement,  also objects to the other party  being dominated by strong eastern corporation and protectionists interests.  It will be to your interest to \eep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������.  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  MUST CUT DOWN CONSUMPTION.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name ., before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to'  the country.    The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers-  opportunities for all.    Did not  know, is no excuse.    Investors  should keep posted on develop-y  meqts by reading the "Courier."  Canada and the United States  must cut down their normal consumption of wheat by 160,000,-  000 bushels to meet the needs of  Great Britain   and   the  Allies.  Hon. W. '3. Hanna, food controller,'estimates that to.feed Great  Britain, France, and the other  Allies, and the men at the front,  will'require 1,105,000,000 bushels of wheat.    This means that  at least 460,000,000 will have to  be imported- from   Canada and  the United' States.    There will  i under  normal   consumption   in  | these two countries only 300,000,-  j 000 bushels surplus for export,  and so by special efforts of food  conservation the people of United States and Canada will have  to make up a shortage of 160,-  000,000 bushels.  eagle lives for 100 years. Hens  and pigeons live for 10 to 15  years. An elephant lives for 100  years. A crocodile Ifves for 100  years.  According to a statement just  issued, Canada's war expenditures to July :20th, 1917, total  $623,000,000, i n cl u d i n g esti m a'ted  amount of upkeep of troops in  France. The net debt of Canada on July 20th was $851,000,000.  Canada's present rate of war expenditure per day at home and  abroad is $850,000.  Ames Holden McCready Ltd.  Vancouver, B. C.  leading Wholesalers- in boots,  shoes and rubbers for men,  women and children.  ob Printing  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  ������������������ TOWN. Do not talk-support home industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  0 d  nor  m 12  Let us all try our best to save  ���������both in money and food.  Growth and Life of Animals.  A man grows for twentj7 years  and lives from 70 to 100 years.  A horse grows for five years and  lives for 30 years. . A cow grows  for four years and lives for 20  years. A lion grows for four  years and lives for 40 years.' A  dog grows ior two years and lives  from 12 to 14 years. A bear  grows for one year and lives for  8 years. An ass grows for five  years and lives for 30 years. A  sheep live.*? for 10 years. A fox  lives from 14 to 16 years.   An  Largest Manufacturers of Boots and  Shoes in Canada  Just a Few of Our Exclusive Specialties  THE GOAL EV'ERBEARING APPLE. The only everbearing  apple in existence. A delicious all-the-season fruit. Fine  tree, each, $1.00.  THE VANDERPOOL RED APPLE. The great export apple  and keeper.    Each, 50c.  THE ORENCO APPLE.    The best dessert apple.   Each, 50c.  THE YAKIMENE PEACH-APRICOT.   A remarkable combin-  : ation of the apricot and peach.    Hardy.    Each, $1.00.  THE VROOMAN FRANQUETTE WALNUT. Produces food  of great nutritious value on a -highly ornamental tree.  Each$l. ���������  THE SOUVENIR EVERBEARING RASPBERRY. The greatest everbearer.    Hundred, $14.00.  SPECIAL   SAMPLE    OFFER  We will send prepaid to your nearest station next Spring one of each of  these splendid trees and a dozen Souvenir Raspberries on receipt of a $5 00  bill, or C. O. D. $5.50.    Orders should be placed  NOW  for these or any  other of our well-known stock.    We do not ship into the interior in the Fall  N.B.���������It is MOST IMPORTANT that orders be sent in AT ONCE-the  stock must be reserved NOW.  The British Columbia Nurseries Co., Ltd.  1493 SEVENTH AVENUE WEST       .   .      VANCOUVER, B. C.  Nurseries at Sardls.  Get ready  for the Ducks  Sportsmen who use Remington UMC know  that every promise made for them is more than lived  up to.   It's a comfort to know that���������in the field.  THE "REMINGTON" a  smokeless shell is a winner at any trap or in any  field.  'R*"tifff������n>  "NtTRO CLUB" SMOKELESS Anotiter steel lined  shell of superb quality-  called the "speed" shell.  , Fgr a straight, swift punch, with no guess work, you'll certainly find  these shells.make good. Use them with your trusty Remington UMC Tump  Gun, and it will be a ghost, not a bird, that gets away from you.  For gair.e shooting���������a Remington UMC Rifle (all calibres)  ail metal'ics are indispensable���������if you want RESULTS.  We make cartridges for every known make of rifle.  4).  Ls  fspomrsMENSs;  iEADQl  UM'C  [PIRBARMB BrA  [AMMUNITION I  Go  to thedealer who shows this Remington UMC situ���������satisfaction  and every arm and ammunition need filled���������RIGHT.  th. -a*,  Remington U.M.C. of Canada  Limited  WINDSOR, ONT. 715  W77J'/,  w,  to.  ususi 25  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN ^  LEADING   DEALERS  IN  G en eral M e rc h  Dry Goods and Motions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING  AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest pos^  sible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ft   ������  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look o\'t\'  our stock. Nothing but the moA suitable articles are kept at prices thai  invite competition.  Paints -   Oils   - Varnishes  - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  [ Best Goods- Lowest Prices   LargestStot*  m  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B.BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA C00LA,Bc  vrfy  -������������lie  ���������* .-'^nliqr  ������   #%<  . ��������� -v Mty  V:    \%lL(  ,   y /ttato  ; , '-Slit'  (  '<  mm

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