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Bella Coola Courier Aug 26, 1916

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 '.  ll  V  Q>  'v.  ^f^lg^^\nituimuZj{^Myu^^f^uai^^li^u.uui^f^  E| - i Use your fran-  lectors! $-%*������%  to "Boss Rule."   Now is your chance!  WEATHER REPORT FOR JULY.  Compiled by Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 66.   Minimum,' 51.  Highest Max. (31st) 81. Lowest Min. (7th) 42  Rainfall, 4. JO inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915) 34.33 inches.  VOL. 4���������NO. 45  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, JbGUST 26, 1916.  $1.00 a Year  Allies Offensive in  Macedonia Delayed  ���������London, Aug. 24.���������British artillery has checked advanced  . skirmishers of Central Powers  in sector of Struma front, thirty-  five miles north-east of Saloniki.  On Doiran front, situation unchanged. Greek command at  Seres called to arms all reservists. Second contingent of Italian troops has landed at Saloniki.  . Saloniki, Aug. 24.-Allies offensive in Macedonia is being  delayed until the Russian forces  arrive, eighty thousand expected  Allied aviators fiying'over Bulgarian lines dropped hundreds of  thousands of hand bills detailing  the successes gained by Russian  troops inGalicia and Bukowiria.  ' Bulgarian troops ignorant of  *���������' these facts.   Athens, Aug. ~28.���������Germany  and Bulgaria have given written  ' undertaking to Greece that their  " troops will not enter Kavala,  Drama and Seres. These are  most important towns in eastern  Macedonia, being ceded to Greece  at the close of the Balkan\vaf.  Roumania Preparing  to Enter the War  Amsterdam, Aug. 24.���������Roumania is preparing for war according to' Dr. Lederer, Bucharest' correspondent, there js  ground for some'uneasiness as  to attitude of Roumania. The  outward life of the city is greatly  changed, all signs in public life  indicate everybody preparing  for eventualities and country  getting ready for war.  Saloniki, Aug. 24���������The king of  Roumania received the German  andAustrian ministers to Bucharest in private audience Monday.  Germans Launch  Gas Attacks  Petrograd, Aug. 24.���������Germans  resumed the offensive yesterday  south of Brody, where the Russians are attempting to approach  Lemberg from the north-east.  . In', the'region south of Kreve the  enemy launched gas attacks, but  were repelled With heavy losses.  Moi-e than one hundred bombs  were dropped by the enemy on  the railway station at Manvichi.  . >>���������-  On the Western Front  Paris, Aug. 2.4���������German troops  attacking the French lines south  of Estrees on the Somme front,  gained some points in thetrench-  ,es recently captured by French  troops. The attack was launched  after a period of intense artillery  . preparation... .Noi:th.;.pf. S.pmme  the Germans violently bombarded the French first line.        /   .  Serbians Capture  Petrograd, Aug. 25���������Russians  captured two Turkish regiments  on the Caucasus front. Allies  offensive in the Balkans is developing with added impetus.  Paris reports Serbians on the  aggressive on the mountain ridge  along the western end of the  front, where they stormed and  captured a hill three miles northwest of Ostrovo Lake. Bulgarians took this position in their initial drive on Allies left flank.  London, Aug. 24.���������Two heavy  (assaults on positions newly won  'by British south of Thiepyal on  Trieste to be Converted  Into a Second Verdun  London, Aug. 25.���������Germans  intend to convert' Trieste into a  second Verdun. German engineers have arrived at Trieste and  are overhauling entire defenses  within ten miles of city.  On the Somme front in the vicinity of Guillemont, Germans  last night launched strongattack  in an effort to regain lost ground,  the attack "repulsed and enemy  sustained heavy losses. .  Neither Bulgarians or Entente  forces on the Macedonia front  attempted vigorous offensive in  action yesterday. ' Successful  operations were carried out by  the Serbian troops in the Mori-  choro section, sixty miles northwest Saloniki. Serbian troops  captured 150 yards of Bulgarian  trenches near Kaimakcalam.  East coast of England visited  last night by hostile aeroplanes.  -Paris. Aug. 25.���������After intense  bombardment of Soyecourt wood  Germans attacked with hand  grenades the French positions.  Roumania Causes Anxiety  Berlin, Aug. 25.���������Government  circles here, though none too optimistic, view the Roumanian  situation calmly, taking the at-  titude.that its Roumania's next  move. Central Powers have now  done everythingpossible to meet  Roumania's views.  Deutschland Arrives Safely  London, Aug. 25���������German submarine Deutschland arrived at  her home port, having travelled  4200 miles on the homeward trip.  Stormy seas' were encounterd,  but the submarine, her engines  working faultlessly, behaved excellently. Bremen departed for  America a week ago.  Boston, Aug. 25.���������North German Lloyd liner Willehad, which  had been in refuge since outbreak of war, slipped out of harbor early today, presumably for  New London, Conn. Officials  claim change made to reduce  dockage charges and denied reports any connection of Wille-  had's movements and the expected arrival of the Bremen.  King of Bavaria Seriously III  Pai'is, Aug. 25.���������King Lud wig  III, of Bavaria, has been stricken  with apoplexy, his condition is  grave. The king is 73 years, old.  Somme fi-oht, were made" last  night by the. Germans, by first  attack the enemy gained,temporary footing, but were immediately driven out, suffering very  heavy losses.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  S. S. Camosun was away behind her schedule time the last  trip. She did not arrive until  two o'clock Monday morning and  then proceeded directly to the  cannery to unload stores and  empty cans and take in several  thousand cases of salmon.  The enterprising citizens who  turned out in the darkest hours  of the night to welcome her arrival had .their pains for nothing.  It is said, that one wagon load  of ladies on its way to the wharf  upset in the ditch, but as .no  damage was done the incident  only added to the interest of the  trip.  ��������� The steamer departed at 9 o'clock ia the forenoon. The passenger list was light.  A. R. Neale, provincial horti-  culturist, is paying our valley a  welcome visit. He is "accompanied by Mrs. Neale. They arrived oh Fred Hendrick's launch  from Ocean Falls on Friday last  week.   '  Dui'ing these degenerate times  it is gratifying to see that there  are yet men and women who are  not afraid to traverse the thirty  miles or more of our valley on  foot as this energetic couple are  doing.  Mr. Neale is engaged in making a survey of the agricultural  development and crops of the  Guanar Saugstad, fishery ofli-  cer at Rivers Inlet, came in on  the Camosun last Sunday fora  week's visit with his family.  He was in too much of a hurry  to reach his home at Hagensborg  to call at the Courier office,  which we deeply resent. ,c  W. E. Gallienne has returned  from a business trip to Ocean  Falls. He seems very much impressed with the activities carried  oivat that rising town.  Misses Ruth and Anna Nord-  schow, Miss K. B. Hallowes and  Frank Broughton have just returned from an extensive trip to  the remotest parts of the settlement. Mr. Marvin, the firewarden of these regions, acted as  guide, counsellor and friend, and  convoyed them safely as far as  the Ratcliff place on Stillwater.  They had air the exercise that  any reasonable set of persons  could.desire in fighting mosquitoes and dodging bears. They  met several grizzlies on the trip,  but as both the bears and the excursionists concluded to attend  strictly to their own affairs and  not, interfere in the plans of each  other they separated without exhibiting any harsh feelings. And  now both Frank and the girls are  safely back enthralling their  friends with tales of great adventures.  PROVINCIAL ELECTION  Your influence and suppoit is respectfully requested.  T. D. PATTULLO.  Liberal candidate for Prince Rupert Riding.  settlement.  He will address the farmers at  a meeting at the Colony Hall,  Hagensborg, Saturday, Sept. 2.  It is to be hoped that no business  of any kind will keep any farmer  or' their women-folks .within 20  miles of the hall, away from the  meeting.- ��������� ������������������ v    ..?  v Let everybody show their interest and appreciation of the  work the government is doing  to develop agriculture by attendr  irig-  '' ������������������.';________ -,.. ,������������������ '���������'���������-:  . An, American power launch  conveying a number of young  ladies from Seattle on pleasure  bent, paid our port a visit a  couple of days last week. They  are exploring.the beauties of the  Britislv Columbia coast and intend to go as far as Portland  Canal.  They were so well satisfied  with their trip in here that they  promised to repeat it next year.  The trail to the Interior sustained a break in it at Geo. Turner's place at the'Great. Slide.  The river has washed it out causing great inconvenience, to several pack trains on the way. Tom  Engebretson and others were  held up'some time,before they  could' construct a.temporary trail  around.the. break.  The Ratclff boys have been  busy since the occurrence in  making a permanent trail which  by now is very probably completed.       ���������, ,'���������  ,'������������������.������������������������������������,  )The run of Cohoe salmon is on  in earnest. The bright weather  of.the week has no doubt also  been effective in bringing about  catches averaging about 100 fish  to the boat.  S. S. British Columbia came in  Thursday for a load of salmon.  British Columbia has the reputation of being a big game hunt  ers paradise. Every fall the  valiant Nimrods of other countries come here to slay the great  bears in their fastnesses, and no  doubt realize their reasonable  expectations.  But although Bella Coola is  probably as well situated from a  sportsman's point of view as any  other portion of , the province,  and although big game abounds  from the middle of the summer  untilQlate fall,'yet very few of  the hunters avail themselves of  these our excellent opportunities.  The bears are unusually numerous this summer,, especially  in the upper part of the valley.  Miss Lucille Johnson, a young  lady residing at Firvale, has met  nine already and the season is  only just begun. Frank Broughton and party met three on their  trip up the valley, and other  people have had similar experiences. A large proportion of  the bears encountered have been  grizzlies. , t'  Red Cross Concert  ,The concert on Saturday proved  a, great success, and resulted in  the addition of the satisfactory  amount of $30.00 to the Fund for  "our boys" at the front.  The hall was kindly lent.liy Mr.  and Mrs. Jacobsen; Mr. F. Johnson donated the lumber, and Mr.  Tenton the labor for the erection  of a platform; while Mrs. Noot  and her assistants decorated the  hall artistically and effectively.  By the time Mr. Brynildsen  ably commenced his duties as  chairman, the hall was filled to  overflowing. The program presented several novelties, and  every item was thoroughly appreciated. .The younger children  of the tow.nsite 'marched and  sang admirably, showing careful  training and great enthusiasm.  Miss Brevik played beautifully  several piano solos, entirely captivating her audience. Mrs.  Jacobsen sang a pretty love song,  which touched our hearts. Mr.  Atkins, our ever popular baritone, sang several, charming  songs which were received with  the usual acclamation. A delightful selection of choruses was  given by the Misnes Clayton,  Gibson, Kilpatrick & Macdonald,  each of \vhom represented'���������'the  central character'���������' of a chorus.  Miss Clayton also sang a pretty  solo, and Mrs. Noot a rollicking  sol.dier song.: The; first part of  the program concluded with a  gipsy camp scene���������forest, tent,  fire and moonlight making a  pretty, setting for the gipsies.  Mesdames Macfarlane, Jacobson  andNoot, Miss Thorsen, Messrs.  Johnson, ��������� Olsen and Levelton  acted the part of gipsies to perfection. Having finished their  songs the gipsies produced from  their tents a varied assortment  of articles which were auctioned  off by T, Levelton. V  An animated scene followed;  the audience munched the apples  they bought and vigorously out  bid each other; thegipsies'distri-  buted the goods sold while the  various "girls"���������the Quaker girl,  the Dutch girl, the Farm girl,  the School girl, the Irish girl,  the Highland lassie, the Red  Cross'nurse and "Canada" herself, disposed of bouquets, of  flowers.  After the sale,-the program  proceeded smoothly to the closing  farewell song. The accompanists were Mrs. Atkins, Miss Brevik and Miss Thorsen. After a  vote of tharks to the chairman, '  a pleasant evening was concluded by the singing of God Save L  Our King.  The thanks of all the members  of the Bella Coola Auxiliary are  due to everyone of those, not  forgetting the children,' who so  wholeheartedly worked for "our  boys" at the front.  ��������� The prohibition issue is not  lost sight of in this in many-respects very interesting campaign  Last Saturday night the second prohibition rally in the valley was held at the Colony Hall,  Hagensborg. Despite the damp-  1 ness of the atmosphere and'the  moonless evening, practically  every voter of the surrounding  settlement turned out to hear  Rev. H. Sageng and C. Carlson  explain the pending Prohibition  Act.  Through the advertisements"  of the liquor interests assailing  the Act as appearing in the newspapers, a number of tin- voters  had received the impression that  it was very defective and not  .worthy of a vote. It was gratifying, to note that when the meeting was over evidence was not  lacking that every voter left the  hall firmly resolved to vote for  the Prohibition Act.  Another prohibition meeting  addressed by the same speakers  will be held at 4 o'clock this afternoon at the Lower Bella Coola  School.      .  The Hagensborg Sunday School  held a highly appreciated and enjoyable picnic on the grounds at  Mr. Fosback's residence last  Sunday. While the sky was  overcast the weather was all  that could be desired and it is  safe to say that every" child ��������� for  many miles around was present,  not to mention nearly everybody  else who could muster any kind  of conveyance.  Rev. H. Sageng conducted an.  open air service in the forenoon,  assisted by P. Fredland arid H.  O. Hanson.  Service concluded, the ladies  brought out the usual abundance '  of refreshments of which everybody partook with every sign-of  satisfaction. The rest of the day.  was spent by the young people ���������  playing games and the older discussing the topics of the day.  fflljurdr Nnfe    a  Sunday School  Church Service.  10:45 a.m.  7:30 p.m.  I  j Preacher:  t Rev. Hans Sageng, A. B.  h ��������� All Are Welcome. j>  ���������-���������w.v*::-w*.- \h  sj  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  Saturday] August 26,  19)0  The Courier  | mediately followed by a trip to1  ; Seattle. !  Published Wkkkkv at Bella Coola by j 5. Failure of Mr. Bowser as.  tub Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd. , tjie ehief law oflicor of the prov- :  l-~. ���������-      ine'e to make any efforts to gath-,  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  1  Year   $1.00  G Months    i   0.75  3 Months    0.50  United States  1  Year $1.50  United Kingdom  1  Year $1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving Uieir copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  For Advertising Rates,  Apply  at  Office.  To Correspondents��������� While unobjectionable anonymous communications will !��������������� published, tlio  name and addii">sof evvry wntorof such letters  must be sriven to the editor. ,  The Editor reserves the rii?ht to refuse pnbli-  cntiun of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  "������ahui uupult suuwma rat Irx.  SATURDAY, AUGUST 27, 1916.  The Evidence Is  ���������   Strengthened.  It is necessary once more to  refer to the alleged plugging episode in the Vancouver by-election.  It will be remembered that although the Conservatives had information of the coming and the  arrival of toughs from Seattle  foi\the purpose of plugging in  the   election,, no   arrests   were  made. . The pluggers were per-,  mitted to land in Vancouver, remain  in town  and   supposedly  carry out their violation of law  and return to their lair unmolested.     The  Conservatives with  Crtis-weapon in hand against the  Liberals  of   corruption of  the  ballot on an unprecedented scale  made no outcry, did not use it  as a means to defeat the Liberal  candidate  in   Victoria a week  later, nor did they refer to the  matter at all until the Liberals  began to  prosecute one Peter  .  Annance' for   violation  of   the  Election Act.  Then a legislative commission  to investigate was appointed by  the legislature, composed of a  majority of Conservative members, whose sole concern was to  in criminate the Liberal campaign  organization. The chief witness  of the Conservatives was John  L. Sullivan, a leader among a  certain element in Vancouver  and a prominent Conservative.  The result of the inquiry, according to the Conservatives,  was that the Liberals were guilty of "plugging" and had hired  John T. Scott to do the dirty  work for them. The Liberals on  the other hand are fully convinced that it is all a scheme on the  part of the Conservatives to discredit the Liberals in !the eyes  of the voters of the province.  The evidence is accumulating  that the view of the Liberals is  the correct one.  ��������� These,are the several points  that throw suspicion on. the Conservatives,--as near as we can recall them from memory:    ^   i. Inactivity of the Conservatives to prevent-the plugging  and arrest the pluggers.  2. Failure to use the evidence  in their possession in the Victoria by-election campaign.  3. Advertising in the Conservative press that John T. Scott  would be arrested on return to  this province, thus preventing  his'return from Seattle to give  evidence.  4. A visit of John L. Sullivan  to Mr. Bowser at Kamloops; im-  or more evidence and bring the  wrong-doers to justice.  While the Liberals are actively  engaged in endeavoring to bring  Scott back fr'f-m Seattle, the  Conservatives do nothing. They  confine themselves to saying that  some Liberals want Scott back  while other Liberals are opposed.  But, nevertheless, the Liberal  executive committee have passed  a unanimous resolution that  every effort must be made to  bring John T. Scott to the province.  The Conservatives are equally  unanimous in doing nothing to  bring him back, although it is  admitted on all hands that Scott  can give valuable and very likely  conclusive evidence in the matter.  6. The" latest evidence connecting the Conservatives with  the vote-plugging is a telegram  from Mr. Scott's lawyer in Seattle to Sullivan, begging that  money be sent or else Scott may  decide to return and cause  trouble.    The money was sent.  The telegram is as follows:  Seattle, July 27.  John L. Sullivan,  Hotel Irving, Vancouver. B. C.  Send money at once. Scott  sore and threatensUvreturn and  expose whole election scandal.  Clancy out of city. What shall  1 do?   Letter following. ��������� ������  Vanderveer.  This brings the whole matter  pretty close-to the Conservative  camp.  . O    ��������� O        O     . O. ���������:, O  The Political Outlook.  The day of election is now  drawing very near. The struggle  between the contending forces  in this campaign has been energetic: The voters have been-,af-  forded ample opportunity in almost every part of the province  to become informed on the issues  of the day by the chief exponents  of both the great parties. There  should, therefore, at this time  be no intelligent voter in doubt  of his duty as a citizen of a self-  governing province.  We will,admit that a person's  ���������,������, ,1111,-jflst;  LABEfc  duty is not always as clear as  might be desired. We are all of  us more or less blinded by self-  interest.  But at'the present time^ more  than in times of peace and pros-  Jn this election; an economical  government is the-n?ain  issue,  i and both Liberals and Conserva-  ! tives should be agreed on that,  i    It is generally unsafe to fore-  i  tell the outcome of an election.  We are apt forjudge the result  by our own biassed preferences;  but in this instance in reading  the reports of the meetings held  by the different parties throughout the province there is no doubt  in our minds but what this our  perity, it should become possible  for us all to rise above our own  comparatively small interestsand  take broad views of the needs of  the country as a .whole. The  prospect of a $3 per day job  should not so influence our vote  that we should forget that now  is the time for self-sacrifice on  the part of every true patriot,  and retrenchment the duty of  the government.  This spirit is the only one that  will bring prosperity back to the  province, and in turn to all of  its people. If is said that Nero  played the fiddle while Rome  was, burning; we will not be  much better if we, forgetting  our country's needs, try to enjoy  ourselves while distress caused  by war and hard times are prevalent.  Therefore let us face the task  before us resolutely and- with  fortitude, each man unmindful  of the consequences to his own  personal interests in loyalty to  his land, so vote that the welfare  of the province be his sole objective.'  The Courier believes that just  now this can be obtained'only by  the election of a Liberal government; not because the Liberals  as such, are better than'' Conservatives; but because at this time  there must be a change.  Because of its many mistakes  in the past years, the present  administration must be rebuked  and another party, with a clean  slate; placed in power.  A support of the government  means approval of its methods  and deeds with their consequences; and that can not, in our  opinion, be entertained for a  moment;  There should be no party lines  province will, on September 14,  redeem itself and give itself a  government which will bring it  out of a rut created by a party  <  corrupted by''a long lease of  power.  o    o .���������  o    o   . o  Manson's Estimate of the  Common People.  Some years ,'ago at one of Mr.  Manson's meetings in Bella Coola  complaint was made by one of  the settlers that the people had  no voice in the matter of the expenditure of public funds in the  valley.  Mr. Manson grew quite impa-  patient that such an unreasonable complaint should be made  and told the humble but daring-  settler that the people knew  nothing of how roads, wharves  v.  and bridges should be*built, and  that the government was, in its  superior wisdom, fully competent to deal with these matters  without any suggestions from  the common herd.  It is no stretch of imagination  to assume that the common  people would, if given an oppor  tunity, have displayed better  judgment in the conduct of public works in the,yalley than that  which Mr. Mahson; and through  him the government have shown.  It is hoped that with the change  of government the arrogance and  indifference to the reasonable  requests of the people will be a  thing of the past; and that respectful and careful consideration, will be given to the suggestions of people most familiar  with existing conditions.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,  PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  "MADE   IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orders  We believe it is no evidence of  conceit on our part to say that  the arguments put forth by the  author of these articles are such  that we feel fully competent to  refute them and would be" glad  to do so if it would be just to the  advertiser whose money has been  accepted by the publisher.   '  We will leave it to the good  judgment of the reader to pass  upon the arguments set forth  and only suggest to' them that  they, bear in mind the sources  from whence they come.1  It strikes,us that the anti-prohibitionists are' taking more  trouble than is necessary in trying to expose the hollowness of  the Prohibition Act. If it is as  imperfect as claimed and if the  consumption of liquor will be  greater after its enactment than  now it would, in our opinion, be  just as well for the liquor element to save its $300,000 or more  of campaign fund and just sit  back and let the Act become law  and watch the result. Just as  soon as the people find out what  a farce it is, they will not be  slow to have it repealed ai d the  trade would have a lease of existence that would extend for  generations.  Gentlemen, you are too anxious; you are over-reaching yourselves; the common sense of the  people will beabletolook through  the falsity of your arguments  and banish your traffic at the  polls.  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., WANT MEN to represent"  of 1493 SEVENTH AYE. W., VANCOUVER, B.C., thenHn different parts of  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nursery stock,  for spring ^(1917) delivery. The work is pleasant and remunerative. Honest, energetic men only are needed. We particularly  want a good man at Bella Coola and for coast points, also a man  on the G. T. P..Railway. ��������� "���������       "  (<$&.  3QE  DWC  HOE  Mr. Manson Not Popular.  It will probably surprise some  of our readers to learn that in  spite of the shutting out of the  Liberals from any representation  in the last legislature through  the strength of the government,  Mr.: Manson did not have more  than 27 majority in the last election.  It must be remembered that  at the time both the people and  the government had plenty of  money and the government was  lavish in the expenditures.  There was very little discontent among the people, and the  popularity of the government  was at its height. And yet in  the face of these very favorable  circumstances Mr. Manson's  hold upon the people was so  slight that his majority was of  the narrowest. It is not hard to  predict that this majority will  be entirely wiped out in ,T,his  election and Mr. Pattullo"el������efed  to succeed him. The Hon.;Wm.  Manson will be defeated.  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.     L&mOSUll      Leaves  Vancouver every  Thursday at.9 p.m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  "  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St.,, Victoria.  30E  HOE  ������  View of part of the British trenches on the French front where  heavy fighting has been going on recently.    It shows  British soldiers protected by a screen of brush.  I  The Position~bf the Editor.  The editor'of this paper in  justice to himself wishes it to be  known that he is in no way responsible, for the articles criticizing the. Prohibition Act, which  have appeared on the third page  for some weeks past.  )W  ������-\\>  wm  WkIjtj |>vl  ft  m  |������.4l������l i)  ���������J  \h  1  ��������� v-  JJfG  i  >\.t  Saturday, August 26,  1916  BELLA! COOLA COURIER  Act Is Wrongly Named.  " This Act is called "The British  Columbia Prohibition Act." The  name is a misnomer and a coun-  .terfeit in almost every respect.  It does not prohibit the sale of  liquor in the Province, or the importation of liquor into the Province.   It does prohibit the sale  of0liquor in the way it is sold at  pre'sar.t,  but it provides other  methods of sale, purchase, and  place of consumption.  Does Not Suppress the  Liquor Traffic.  Read the opening words (Preamble) which state, "It is expedient ,to suppress the liquor  traffic." Why these words are  used it is hard to explain, be  cause, by the provisions of this  Act the sale and use of liquor is  not suppressed. The effect of  the Act will be to increase the  sale and use, of whisky, brandy,  rum, etc., and decrease the use  of beer and light wines. The  present license holders and vendors of liquor are legislated out  of business, but ampie provision  is made for the purchase and use  of liquor within the Province.  The citizens now interested in  the sale of liquor oppose this Act  because if it become law their  business will betaken from them  and transferred tg other people  in and outside the Province.  PECULIAR FEATURES  OF THE PROHIBI-  TION ACT.  Appears To Have Been Framed  ;   As A Direct Blow At  Workin'gmen.  Making war is the first business of all Canadians.  <t  ;5%  CLUB OFFER  *r>  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may hav<? the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.        -  ���������The Courier   .      .       .       . r    . $1.00    ~0 ,  ,  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal,Winnipeg  1.50  ~, *.-������.'   for  .   .  $1.50  $2.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers   ���������  for   .  .  $1.50  The Courier $1.00'  Canadian Countryman, Toronto       .     ".   1.50  Fanners Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg i.50  Ali three papers  for ,.   .   $2.50  V  $4.00  ���������J  SOLD BY ALL DEALERS  A few lines we specially  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs���������-  Jams and Jellies  Griffen & Skelleys   .  famous gold and  silverbar���������  Canned and dried  fruits  To the man of means, who is  accustomed to buy his liquors  by the bottle or case from the  wholesale store or retail shop,  the Prohibition Act means nothing, as he can still order his supply from a neighboring province  or the States, just as easily as in  the.past, the only difference beting that he will have, to pay a  higher cost, on account of'trans1  porlation charges.  To the working man, who is  accustomed to buy his liquor by  the bottle or glass, the Act  means, however, something entirely different. The ordinary  working, man is not given the  opportunity to lay by money sufficient to provide for his sending  away for a case of liquor, hence  he is under a handicap which  does not interfere with the rich  man. Then,'again, the working  .nan's usual beverage is beer,  md on shipments of this class  the freight rates are so high as  co make the price almost prohibitive for him.  Again, while  some  working  men are fortunate  enough to  occupy homes of their own, a  great  majority ' occupy houses  jointly with others.     A large  proportion   would  come 'under  the cterm   of   lodgers.     Many  Dthers also take boarders in order to help out the family income.'   All of this class would  find that the Prohibition Act" was  a distinct barrier to their enjoying their personal right to partake of a glass, of beer in their  own homes.   The Act provides  that a man may import liquor  freely for use in his own private  dwelling.   It so defines the word  "' dvv,elling ",'   however^jt.h.a t  householders who occupy premises jointly are not,allowed the  privilege of   having liquor for  their own private use.   The same  is true of lodgers personally, and  the families of those who keep  lodgers, where more than three  room  in a house.     As far as  homes where boarders are kept,  cheAct is explicit in stating that  the house is not a dwelling, and  that liquor  for beverage purposes may not be brought into  it. '  The above points cover phases  of the Prohibition Act which are  distincly to the disadvantage of  the working man, although they  mean nothing to the rich man.  A reading of the Act will show  many similar features of class  legislation of so open a character  as to lead the organized bodies  of labor, which have already  considered the Prohibition Bill,  to unanimously condemn the Act.  ���������Advt.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  pOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ~" Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Amsehta,  the Yukon Territory, the North-west 1 ehri-  ��������� TORIES and in a portion of the Province of  Hnmsu Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one yjars at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,UX arres will he leawd  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must he made by the  applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-AKcnl  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or le^al subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tiactup-  phed for shall be slaked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of t5 which will he refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating: the mine shall furnish  the: Atrent with sworn returns ucco'mtinK for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal minim; riifhts  are not beinsr operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights"  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottuwa, or to any Agent or Sub-Airent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W. CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  ��������� N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be puid for.���������3O09O.  BUSINESS CARDS  HOE  H LU  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealer's and ' trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual .jho'ise assures the highest market  price alwaysT  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  HOE  Dealers and Trappers  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  We publish below"'a few extracts of a letter from B. C.  Keeping, who formerly kept  school here for several years.  He is now with the forces in  France engaged as a physician.  It seems though from his letter  chat he does not think that caring  for the sick and the .wounded  quite exciting enough to his taste  and. he therefore intends to join  the fighting forces as soon as a  regiment in which his brother  is serving ai'rives in France.  Our best wishes follow our genial  friend.  "I have been as busy as a  beaver ever since the first oi  July. We have been receiving  and .evacuating nearly all the  time, day and night. Sleep was  a luxury^which :few of ,us were  able" to'partake of��������� hardly time  for eating. We handled a great  many; cases���������40 per cent more,  than any other unit (British or  Canadian)���������for so doing we were  complimented by Sir Douglas  Haig.  '1 must not omit to tell you  that the powers that "be have  seen fit to promote me to the  rank of lance-corporal.- I am in  charge, as ward master, of "R"  wai'd of 108 beds. T evacuate on  an average about 20 per day and  receive mostly every day as well.  This evening so far I received 9  stretcher cases and 14 walking  cases and am due to receive as  many more at any moment now.  "We have been making good,  substantial gains lately, the  French and Russians have done  very &well indeed too, both in  ground captured and prisoners  and guns taken. Things are  looking brighter for us every day  and I think the end must soon  be in sight.  "I saw where the Bella Coola  boys of the 102nd were home  bidding adieus to the folks before leaving for England. I  would dearly like to run up  against some of them over here.  I may, if the war lasts long  enough���������I hope it may not,  "Well, last night I got in  about a dozen more stretcher  cases, with diseases such as:  pleurisy, rheumatic fever, etc."  tazisss&^smgssszu  I HeMason&FiischPianq^  of lo-day will make plain our  privilege lo state with authority:  "NO FINER PIANO MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  CJ Let us attend your Victor Record  31  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & RiscH Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  ^JU^HAT person so happy and conten-  ___    ted as the prosperous farmer?  \)L/HAT person so independent?  \)17HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of the necessaries  of life ? ,       >  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard" times.  "THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  ���������*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  .irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable ; long warm summers with, sufficient  rainfall and mild wintets make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact ,was established ato the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm pro-  ' duce .from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  G=H  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  *"^ country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  Hfr^[CcQlfSl,i  Get"More Money" for your: Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and. other Fur bearers collected la ;oat section.  SHIP YOUR FURS DIRECT ������o"SHUBERT"the Uraest  house In liie World dealing exclusively in NORTH AMEBIC AN RAW FOBS  a reliable���������responsible���������safe Fur House with an unblemished reputation evxistiner for "more than a third of a century," a Ions successful record of sending Fur Shippers prompt. SATIS FACTORY  AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for "ITfct fefcubtrt *>W(jwr,"  the only reliable, accurate mark et report and price list published.  Write for tt-NOW���������������'��������� FREE  AD   C.UITRFRT   Inr   2527 WEST AUSTIN AVE.  . a. jnu de-k l, inc. Dept.c 67 Chicago, u^a.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable, in Advance.  |        CANADA.  One Year .'. .....$1.00  Six Months . .;  0.75  Three Months  0.50  ��������� . UNITED STATES.  One Year. .  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year .   .$1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK,  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find............  for Bella Coola Courier for....   . subscription  Name   P. Or;;.,.;v...................  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed ���������M  w-  BELLA  COOLA  COURIER  o    c  3orz  ^J 0  bscriDe  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  F  mice  Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  // will be io your interest to keep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  , this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.   ,  Duck Shooting Days are Coming:!  Can't you ftel it in your bones? Belter pay a hurry-up call to the Remington  UMC dealer and get ready for the "big drive." He'll hand you the right  "dope" so your good gnu will surely get its share of the feathered beauties.  Sportsmen who want black powder shells���������get the ''New Club!" It's a thirty year  old favorite���������and it must be "some shell" to make gojd for that length 'of tiine.  Comes in all stand.'ud loads, with the famous Remington UMC No. 2 Primer, and  thoroughly waterproofed. Made with the most modern machinery. Ceaseless  inspections and the finest materials, shot, wads, brass head and paper-stock guarantee  every "New Club" to shoot the way you want it to,  W?  If you want a fast smokeless  shell, try the steel-lined, aristocratic "Arrow" or "NitioClub"  ��������� sportsmen nickname them  "speed shells."   The smokeless  "Ri-Uiingloir1  is   also   \ny iiojnilar1  for   Ml  lounil   Held   on   tr.ip woik.  We'ic  piuwd  ol   tlitse   shells  and  their rccoul.  FSPORTSMENSN  HEADCU  iBihPK  I FIREARMS &.I  f A.VJAUNITIONJ  The dealer who shows the Red B.1I1  trade mark ot Remington UMC enn  till your eveiy fire nnn and ammunition netd.    Go to him. .  Remington Arm* Union  Metallic  Oartridgo  Co.  (Cnnliaclois Io the Hutiih  Imperial and Colonial Giiverninenti)  WINDSOR. ONT. 1C8 B.C.  London, Eng.    NswYork, U.S.A.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  Education in Farming.  The greatest problem before  the Department of Agriculture'  is how to impart to the farmers  the information necessary to  make the land produce more  nearly to its capacity. Very little  practical work is being done to  show how production may be  substantially increased.  We are therefore glad to note  thai, according to the Agricultural Journal issued by the provincial government, the Department  of Education have worked out  plans with reference to agricultural instruction' through the  public and high schools of the  poovihee. The theoretical knowledge will therefore be given  the young; 'and we acknowledge  Unit this is a great step forward  if the instruction be of practical  nature.  But some provision should also  be made to give--the pupils aistringent, probably more string  chance to carry out the theory in  practice, by giving them instruc-  ent than anything found in any  other legislation   of  a  similar  ,,   .      . ..    | kind."   The Merchants',Protec-  lion in the field, in the stable, (tiveAssocialion knows very well  in the poultry yard, etc. In that I uie'Act will prohibit,  way the information would be-j' The Association scorns to worry  come (irmly lodged in the mind ^ a great deal because it will not  and be remembered when oppor- \ stop importation from other pro-  lunilv comes to put it into prac-1 vinces.; The. famous (?) _ Merchants' Protective Association  tice.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on develop-  in inLs by reading the "Courier."  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. ' Do-not talk���������support home industries--talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  /and your community.  TW������  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B.C.  o  o  '���������                        ic'n               J  ,_  ,. .,, ,,������,-������,��������� ....IM.I.^MKI  1i 1  DISTRICT   OP   COAST���������RANGE   III.  Take Notice that Oliver T. Kellog, of  IlagensborK, B.C., occupation farmer,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:  Cominenoinjr ai a post, planted at the  south-westcorncrof Lot (j, thence east  and following the south boundary of  Lot f5. forty chains; thence south five  chains and fifty links to, the north bank  of the Noeek "River; thence westerly  and following the northerly bank of the  Noeek River fifty chains to the shore  of South llontin'k Arm; thence in a  northerly direction along said shore  line seven chains to the south boundary  .if Lot, fi; thence easterly and following  Hie south boundary of Lot (! ten chains  to point of commencement, containing  HO acres, more or less  OLIVER T. KELLOG.  Opportunity should also be  given the adult farmer to learn  what the later discoveries teach  in regard to agriculture. Short  courses given in the winter by  experts would solve the problem  and no doubt become popular.  Bated. June 21. 1010.  ���������hilyS--So|it.2.  urojUnw *  Editor, ,    .  -   Bella Coola Courier.  Sir,���������The Merchants' Protective Association seem to be very  much afraid that the Prohibition  Act.will not prohibit, we might  understand the anxiety of the  Association better if we knew  who the men are at the head of  it.and what their business is.,, I,  have no doubt whatever that  they are all engaged in the trade  that has cursed the land so long.  We know very well that all  laws are broken, and there is no  doubt at.all that there will be  violations of the Act, but to say  the Act will not prohibit is nonsense.  Senator Harry Corby, head of  one of the largest distilleries in  in Canada, said the B. C. Act is  most severe, that meant severe  on the liquor trade.  Lord Macnaghton of the Imperial Privy. Council, said of'the  Manitoba Act, from which the  B. C. Act is largely copied, "it  will not be necessary to go thro  the provisions of the .Act, it is,  enough to say they aro extremely  knows very well that had the  Act been framed to exclude the  importation from other provinces the Act could not become law.  It takes a Dominion Act to stop  importation.  The Act will abolish the open  bar and ,:the treating system,  also the sale or keeping of liquor  in wholesale or retail stores and  in clubs.'' This is prohibition up  to ^e limits of the proven powers of 'the province. This .the  liquor people vknow full well,  hence their opposition. L would  advise all to read the Act and  vote for it on Sept. 14.���������Yours  rtruly,        *L ,'  "** W.H.Gibson.  Ramsay Bros. & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS  OF  Biscuits :: Candy :: Macaroni  Milk and Nut  Chocolate Bars  Also Refiners of Syrup and  Packers of Molasses  'WE STAND BEHIND OUR GOODS"  *X������RXSW#*5l  ^  ^  Never Sold  InBulfc,  cheers and refreshes  at any hour of the day.  You get the most delicious tea when you  use  ^������&asg&������Haap&  M  TEA  r.KiimM������vw  HTH E two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" llama, Bacon,  Lard, 'etc., are:  FIRST���������       /,���������-;/���������'  ,  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under, government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  HAMS  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioners  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Ogilvie*s  Household Flour  ���������always, gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  .'.From- ������������������..������������������^'"''.-/.^..'.������������������;:  Saturday, August 26,   J 916  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  .Brynildsen  '*/  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General IVierchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  t:Sf  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    ������  t, \  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospe&ors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosT: suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour. 'Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices���������Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C.  .ii....iiiLi)iiu.iii'Bi.MmMmtJ..'imitMl>UUV,!l,'.la������tl?IMimmi<PiJ i Use your fran-  Electors: ���������$*&**������  to "Boss Rule."   Now is your chance!  WFATHER REPORT FOR JULY.  Compiled  by  Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 66.   Minimum, 51.  Highest Max. (31st)81. Lowest Min. (7th) 42  Rainfall, 4.10 inches.  Rainfall for the year  (1915)  34.33 inches.  VOL. 4���������NO. 45  BELLA COOLA, B.C., SATURDAY, JlbGUST 26,  1916.  $1.00  a Year  Allies Offensive in  Macedonia Delayed  London, Aug. 24.���������British artillery   has   checked   advanced  skirmishers of  Central Powers  in sector of Struma front, thirty-  five miles north-east of Saloniki.  On Doiran   front, situation unchanged.      Greek  command at  Sares called to arms all reservists.    Second contingent of Italian troops has landed at Saloniki.  Saloniki, Aug. 24.���������Allies offensive in Macedonia is being  delayed until the Russian forces  arrive, eighty thousand expected  Allied aviators flying over Bulgarian lines dropped hundreds of  thousands of hand bills detailing  the successes gained by Russian  troops in Galicia and Bukowina.  Bulgarian troops ignorant of  these facts.  Athens, Aug. 28.���������Germany  and Bulgaria have given written  undertaking to Greece that their  troops will not enter Kavala,  Drama and Seres. These are  most important towns in eastern  Macedonia, being ceded to Greece  at the close of the Balkan war.  Serbians Capture Hill  Petrograd, Aug. 25���������Russians  captured two Turkish regiments  on the Caucasus front. Allies  offensive in the Balkans is developing with added impetus.  Paris reports Serbians on the  aggressive on the mountain ridge  along the western end of the  front, where they stormed and  captured a hill three miles northwest of Ostrovo Lake. Bulgarians took this position in their initial drive on Allies left flank.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  Roumania Preparing  to Enter the War  Amsterdam, Aug. 24.���������Roumania is preparing for war according to Dr. Lederer, Bucharest correspondent, there is  ground for some uneasiness as  to attitude of Roumania. The  outward life of the city is greatly  changed, all signs in public life  indicate everybody preparing  for eventualities and country  getting ready for war.  Saloniki, Aug. 24���������The king of  R-mmania received the German  and Austrian ministers to Bucharest in private audience Monday.  Germans Launch  Gas Attacks  Petrograd, Aug. 24.���������Germans  resumed the offensive yesterday  south of Brody, whore the Russians are attempting to approach  Lemberg from the north-east.  In the region south of Kreve the  enemy launched gas attacks, but  were repelled with heavy losses.  More than one hundred bombs  were dropped by the enemy on  the railway station at Manvichi.  On the Western Front  Paris, Aug. 24���������German troops  attacking the French lines south  of Estrees on the Somme front,  gained some points in the trenches recently captured by French  troops. The attack was launched  after a period of intense artillery  preparation. North of��������� Somme  the Germans violently bombarded the French first line.  London, Aug. 24.���������Two heavy  assaults on positions newly won  by British south of Thiepval on  Trieste to be Converted  Into a Second Verdun  London, Aug. 25.���������Germans  intend to convert Trieste into a  second Verdun. German engineers have arrived at Trieste and  are overhauling entire defenses  within ten miles of city.  On the Somme front in the vicinity of Guillemont, Germans  last night launched strong attack  in an effort to regain lost ground,  the attack repulsed and enemy  sustained heavy losses.  Neither Bulgarians or Entente  forces on the Macedonia front  attempted vigorous offensive in  action yesterday. Successful  operations were carried out by  the Serbian troops in the Mori-  choro section, sixty miles northwest Saloniki. Serbian troops  captured 150 yards of Bulgarian  trenches near Kaimakcalam.  East coast of England visited  last night by hostile aeroplanes.  Paris, Aug. 25.���������After intense  bombardment of Soyecourtwood  Germans attacked with hand  grenades the French positions.  S. S. Camosun was away behind her schedule time the last  trip. She did not' arrive until  two o'clock Monday morning and  then proceeded directly to the  cannery to unload stores and  empty cans and take in several  thousand cases of salmon.  The enterprising citizens who  turned out in the darkest hours  of the night to welcome her arrival had their pains for nothing.  It is said that one wagon load  of ladies on its way to the wharf  upset in the ditch, but as no  damage was done the incident  only added to the interest of the  trip.  The steamer departed at 9 o'clock in the forenoon. The passenger list was light.  Roumania Causes Anxiety  Berlin, Aug. 25.���������Government  circles here, though none tco optimistic, view the Roumanian  situation calmly, taking the attitude that its Roumania's next  move. Central Powers have now  done everything possible to meet  Roumania's views.  A. R. Neale, provincial horticulturist, is paying our valley a  welcome visit. He is accompanied by Mrs. Neale. They arrived on Fred Hendrick's launch  from Ocean Falls on Friday last  week.  During these degenerate times  it is gratifying to see that there  are yet men and women who are  not afraid to traverse the thirty  miles Or more-of our valley on  foot as this energetic couple are  doing.  Mr. Neale is engaged in making a survey of the agricultural  development and  crops of  the  Gun mar Saugstad, fishery officer at Rivers Inlet, came in on  the Camosun last Sunday for a  week's visit with his family.  He was in too much of a hurry  to reach his home at Hagensborg  to call at the Courier office,  which we deeply resent.  W. E. Gallienne has returned  from a business trip to Ocean  Falls. He seems very much-impressed with the activities carried  on at that rising'town.  Misses Ruth and Anna Nord-  schow, Miss K. B. Hallowes and  Frank Broughton have just, returned from an extensive trip to  the remotest parts of the settlement. Mr. Marvin, the firewarden of these regions, acted as  guide, counsellor and friend, and  convoyed them safely as far as  the Ratcliff place on Stillwater.  They had all the exercise that  any reasonable set of persons  could desire in fighting mosquitoes and dodging bears. They  met several grizzlies on the trip,  but as both the bears and the excursionists concluded to attend  strictly to their own affairs and  not interfere in the plans of each  other they separated without exhibiting any harsh feelings. And  now both Frank and thegirls are  safely beck enthralling their  friends with tales of great adventures.  ers paradise. Every fall the  valiant Nimrods of other countries come here to slay the great  bears in their fastnesses, and no  doubt realize their reasonable  expectations.  But although Bella Coola is  probably as well situated from a  sportsman's point of view as any  other portion of the province,  and although big game abounds  from the middle of the summer  until late fall, yet very few of  the hunters avail themselves of  these our excellentopportunities.  The bears are unusually numerous this summer, especially  in the upper part of the valley.  Miss Lucille Johnson, a young  bid each other; the gipsies distributed the goods sold while the  various "girls"���������theQuakergirl,  the Dutch girl, the Farm girl,  the School, girl, the Irish girl,  the Highland lassie, the Red  Cross nurse and "Canada" herself, disposed of bouquets of  flowers.  After the sale, the program  proceeded smoothly to the closing  farewell song. The accompanists were Mrs. Atkins, Miss Bre-  vik and Miss Thorsen. After a  vote of tharks to the chairman,  a pleasant evening was conclud  ed by the singing of God Save  ady residing at Firvale, has met | Qur j^jng.  nine already and the season is  The thanks of all the members  only just begun.  Frank Brough- Qf ^ BeHa Coo]a Auxi]  ton and party met three on their  trip up the valley, and other  people have had similar experiences. A large proportion .of  the bears encountered have been  grizzlies.   Red Cross Concert  The concert on Saturday proved  a great success, and resulted in j  liary are  due to everyone of those, not  forgetting the children, who so  wholeheartedly worked for "cur  boys" at the front.  The prohibition issue is not  lost sight of in this in many respects very interesting campaign  Last Saturday night the.sec-  ' ond prohibition rally in the val-  , ,,        _. .    ,       |ley was held at the Colony Hall,  the addition of the satisfactory j Hagensborg>   Despite the damp.  amount of $80.00 to the Fund for. ness of the atmosphere and the  "our boys" at the front. I moonless   evening,    practically  The hall was kindly lent by Mr.  every voter of the surrounding  and Mrs. Jacobsen; Mr. F. John- settlement  turned  out to  hear  ' Rev. H. Sageng and C. Carlson  explain the pending Prohibition  Act.  PROVINCIAL ELECTION  Deutschland Arrives Safely  London, Aug. 25���������German submarine Deutschland arrived at  her home port, having travelled  4200 miles on the homeward trip.  Stormy seas were encounterd,  but the submarine, her engines  working faultlessly, behaved excellently. Bremen departed for  America a week ago.  Boston, Aug. 25. -North German Lloyd liner Willehad, which  had been in refuge since outbreak of war, slipped out of harbor early today, presumably for  New London, Conn. Officials  claim change made to reduce  dockage charges and denied reports any connection of Wille-  had's movements and the expected arrival of the Bremen.   King of Bavaria Seriously III  Paris, Aug. 25.-King Ludwig  III, of Bavaria, has been stricken  with apoplexy, his condition is  grave.  The king is 73 years old.  Somme front, were made last  night by the Germans, by first  attack the enemy gained temporary footing, but were immediately driven out, suffering very  heavy losses.  Your influence and support is respedfully requested.  T. D. PATTULLO.  Liberal candidate for Prince Rupert Riding.  settlement. I    The trail to the Interior sus-  He will address the farmers at; tained a break in it at Geo. Tur-  a meeting at the Colony Hall, ; ner's place at the Great Slide.  Hagensborg, Saturday, Sept. 2.-The river has washed itoutcaus-  It is to be hoped that no business j ing great inconvenience to sev-  of any kind will keep any farmer j eral pack trains on the way. Tom  son donated the lumber, and Mr. i  Tenton the labor for the erection !  of a platform; while Mrs. Noot  jand her assistants decorated the  1 hall artistically and effectively.  By the time Mr. Brynildsen  ably commenced his duties as  chairman, the hall was filled to  overflowing. The program presented several novelties, and  every item was thoroughly appreciated. The younger children  of the townsite marched and  sang admirably, showing careful  training and great enthusiasm.  Miss Brevik played beautifully  several piano solos, entirely captivating her audience. Mrs.  Jacobsen sang a pretty love song,  which touched our hearts. Mr.  Atkins, our ever popular baritone, sang several charming  songs which were received with  the usual acclamation. A delightful selection of choruses was  given by the Misses Clayton,  Gibson, Kilpatrick & Macdonald,  each of whom represented the  central character of a chorus.  Miss Clayton also sang a pretty  Through the advertisements  of the liquor interests assailing  the Act as appearing in the newspapers, a number of th*; voters  had received the impression that  it was very defective and not  worthy of a vote. It was gratifying to note that when the meeting was over evidence was not  lacking that every voter left the  hall firmly resolved to vote for  the Prohibition Act.  Another prohibition meeting  addressed by the same speakers  will be held at 4 o'clock this afternoon at the Lower Bella Coola  School.  or their women-folks within 20  miles of the hall, away from the  meeting.  Let everybody show their interest and appreciation of the  work the government is doing  to develop agriculture by attending.    An American power launch  conveying a number of young  ladies from Seattle on pleasure  bent, paid our port a visit a  couple of days last week. They  are exploring the beauties of the  British Columbia coast and intend to go as far as Portland  Canal.    -  They were so well satisfied  with their trip in here that they  promised to repeat it next year.  Engebretson   and   others  were'solo, and Mrs. Noot a rollicking  soldier song. The first part of  the program concluded with a  gipsy camp scene���������forest, tent,  fire and moonlight making a  pretty setting for the gipsies.  Mesdames Macfarlane, Jacobson  and Noot, Miss Thorsen, Messrs.  Johnson, Olsen and Levelton  acted the part of gipsies to perfection. Having finished their  songs the gipsies produced from  their tents a varied assortment  of articles which were auctioned  off by T. Levelton.  An animated scene followed;  the audience munched the applet  they bought and vigorously out-  held up some time before they  could construct a temporary trail  around the break.  The Ratclff boys have been  busy since the occurrence in  making a permanent trail which  by now is very probably completed.        The run of Cohoe salmon is on  in earnest. The bright weather  of the week has no doubt also  been effective in bringing about  catches averaging about 100 fish  to the boat.   S. S. British Columbia came in  Thursday for a load of salmon.  British Columbia has the reputation of being a big game hunt-  The Hagensborg Sunday School  held a highly appreciated and enjoyable picnic on the grounds at  Mr. Fosback's residence last  Sunday. While the sky was  overcast the weather was all  that could be desired and it is  safe to say that every child for  many miles around was present,  not to mention nearly everybody  else who could muster any kind  of conveyance.  Rev. H. Sageng conducted an  open air service in the forenoon,  assisted by P. Fredland and H.  O. Hanson.  Service concluded, the ladies  brought out the usual abundance  of refreshments of which everybody partook with every sign of  satisfaction. The rest of the day  was spent by the young people  playing games and the older discussing the topics of the day.  (Ehurrlt Noitr?  9  Sunday School  Church Service  10:45 a.m.  7:30 p. m.  ?  Preacher:  Rev. Hans Sageng, A.  All Are Welcome.  B.  ���������������><J<JKJ>'^it>'������^Ji>X������(l>>J  J  i BELLS COOLA COURIER  Saturday,  Augml 26,  /0/6  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  mediately followed by a trip' to  Seattle.  5. Failure of Mr. Bowser as  the chief law- officer of the province to make any efforts to gather more evidence and bring the  wrong-doers to justice.  1 ������ear ��������� ' $*'������������     While the Liberals are actively  C Months       0.75  3 Month*  0.50 engaged in endeavoring to bring  United States  1 Year $1.50  SUBSCRIPTION RATES i  Canada  ar;  ^LABEI.  *y&%j*i!  *!#W  1 Year.  United Kingdom  .$1.00  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address- should be  sent in as soon as possible.  Scott back from Seattle, the  Conservatives do nothing.- They  confine themselves to saying that  i  some Liberals want Scott back  duty is not always as clear as  might be desired. We are all.of  us more or less blinded by self-  interest.  But at the present time, more  than in times of peace and pros-  while other Liberals are opposed..  But, nevertheless, the Liberal] perity������[t should become possible  For Advertising  Rates,  Apply at  '   - Office.  To Correspondents���������While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  ���������  name and address of every writer of such letters  fnust be ffiven to the editor.  The Editor reserves the rifyht to refuse publi-  catiun of any letter.    All manuscript at writer's  risk.  "Dalits permit auprwita wit Ux.'  SATURDAY, AUGUST 27,1916.  The Evidence Is  Strengthened.  It is necessary once more to  ' refer to the alleged plugging* episode in the Vancouver by-elec-  -    tion.  It will be remembered that although the Conservatives had information of the coming and the  arrival' of. toughs from Seattle  ' for the purpose of plugging in  the   election,   no   arrests   were  made.    The pluggers were permitted to land in Vancouver,.remain  in  town   and  supposedly  ' carry out their violation of law  and return to their lair unmolested.     The  Conservatives with  this- weapon in hand against the  Liberals   of   corruption  of  the  .ballot"on an unprecedented scale  " made no outcry, did not use it  as a'means to defeat the Liberal  candidate   in   Victoria a  week  < later, nor did they refer to the  matter at all until the Liberals  began  to   prosecute  one Peter  Annance   for   violation  of   the  Election Act.  Then a legislative commission  to investigate was appointed by  the legislature, composed of a  majority, of Conservative mem-  executive committee have passed  a unanimous resolution that  every effort must be made to  bring John T. Scott to the province.  The Conservatives.are equally  unanimous in doing nothing to  bring him back, although it is  admitted on all hands that Scott  can give valuable and very likely  conclusive evidence in the matter.  6. The latest evidence connecting the Conservatives with  the vote-plugging is a telegram  from Mr. Scott's lawyer in Seattle to Sullivan, begging that  money be sent or else Scott may  decide to return and cause  trouble.    The money was sent.  The telegram is as follows:  .   Seattle, July 27.  John L. Sullivan,  Hotel Irving, Vancouver, B. C.  Send money at once.' Scott  sore and threatens to return and  expose whole election scandal.  Clancy out of city. What shall  I do?   Letter following.  Vanderveer.  ���������'This brings the whole matter  pretty close to the Conservative  camp.  for us all to rise above our own  comparati vely small in terests and  take broad views of the needs of  the country as a whole. The  prospect of a $3 per day job  should not so influence our vote  that v/e should forget that now  is the time for self-sacrifice on  the part of every true patriot,  and retrenchment the duty of  the government.  This spirit is the only one that  will bring prosperity back to the  province, and in turn to all of  its people. It is said that Nero  played  the  fiddle  while   Rome  in this election; an economical  government is the main issue,  and both Liberals and Conservatives should be agreed on that.  It is generally unsafe to foretell the outcome of an election.  We are apt to judge the result  by our own biassed preferences;  but in this instance in reading  the reports of the meetings held  by the different parties throughout the province there is ho doubt  in our minds but what this our  province will,^on September 14,  redeem itself? and give itself a  government which will bring it  out of a rut ^created by a party  corrupted by! a   long  lease of  power.  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER,  B. C.  Wholesale  DRY  GOODS AND MEN'S  FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF  " PRIDE OF THE  WEST"  BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE    IN    B. C.  Send for Catalogue  Prompt Attention Given Letter Orderi  Manson's Estimate of the  Common People.  Some years; ago: at one of Mr.  Manson's meetings in Bella Coola  complaint was made by one of  the settlers that the people had  no voice in the matter of the expenditure of public funds in the  valley.  Mr. Manson grew quite impa  was   burning;   we .will   not  be patient that ^uch an unreason.  We believe it is no evidence of  conceit on our part to say that  the arguments put forth by the  author of these articles are such  that we feel fully competent to  refute them and would be glad  to do so if it would be just to,the   .   advertiser whose money has been and watch the resu  consumption of liquor will be  greater after.its enactment than  now it would, in our opinion, Le  just as well for the liquor^.  ment to save its $300,000 or mote  of campaign, fund and just S;r  back and let the Act become law  The Political Outlook.  much better if we, forgetting  our country's needs, try to enjoy  ourselves while distress caused  by war and hard times are prevalent.  Therefore let us face the task  before us resolutely and with  fortitude, each man .unmindful  of the consequences to his own  up  personal interests in loyalty to  his land, so vote that the welfare  of the province be his sole" objective. '  The Courier believes that just  able complaint should be made  and told the humble but daring  settler that the people knew  nothing of how roads, wharves  and bridges should be built, and  that the government was, in its  superior wisdom, fully competent to deal with these matters  without any suggestions from  the common herd.   .  It is no stretch of imagination  to assume that the common  people would, if given an opportunity, have   displayed  better  accepted by the publisher  We will leave it to the good  judgment of the reader to pass  upon the arguments set forth  and only suggest to them that  they bear in mind the sources  from'whehce they come.  It strikes us that the anti-prohibitionists are taking more  trouble than is necessary in trying to expose the hoi low n ess of  the Prohibition Act. If it is as  imperfect as claimed and if the  It.  hist as  soon as the people find out wj,at  a farce it is, they will nol be  slow to have it repealed aid i|,e  trade would have a lease of existence that would exiend.fw  generations.  Gentlemen, you are too an?;.  ous; you are over-reaching ycuf.  selves; the common sense of the  people will be able to look through  the falsity of your arguments  and banish your traffic at the  polls.  now this can be obtained only by judgment in the conduct of pub  the election of a Liberal govern  ment; not -because the Liberals  ���������   , ���������     ���������  >     ��������� - '(  The day of election   is now as such, are better than Conser  be'rs, whose sole concern was to  incriminate the Liberal campaign  organization. . The chief witness  of the Conservatives was John  ��������� L. Sullivan, a- leader among a  certain element in Vancouver  and a prominent Conservative.  The result of the inquiry, ac-  r cording   to   the Conservatives,  wasThat the Liberals were guilty of "plugging" and had hired  John T. Scott to do the dirty  work for them.   The Liberals on  the other hand are fully convinced that it is all a scheme on the  part of the Conservatives to discredit the Liberals in the eyes  of the voters of the province.  The evidence is accumulating  that the view of the Liberals is  the correct one.  These are the several points  that throw suspicion on the Con-  .; seryatives, as near as we can recall them from memory:  1.- Inactivity of the Conservatives to prevent the plugging  and arrest the pluggers.  2. Failure to use the evidence  in their possession in the Victoria by-election campaign.  3. Advertising in the Conservative press that John T. Scott  would be arrested on return to  this province, thus preventing  his return from Seattle to give  evidence.  4. A visit of John L. Sullivan  to Mr. Bowser at Kamloops, im-  drawing very near.  The struggle  between the contending forces  in this campaign has Been energetic.    The voters have been afforded ample opportunity in almost every part of the province  to become informed on the issues  of t'he day by the chief exponents  of both the great parties.   There  should,  therefore, at this time  be no intelligent voter in doubt  of his duty as a citizen of a self-  governing province.  We will admit that a person's  vatives; but because at this time  there must be a change.  Because of its many mistakes  in the past years, the present  administration must'be rebuked  and another party, with a clean  slate, placed in power.  A support of the government  means approval of its methods  and deeds with their consequences; and that can not, in our  opinion, be entertained for a  moment.  There should be no party lines  THE BRITISH COLUMBIA NURSERIES CO. LTD., want mpn *  tf 1493 SEVENTH AVE. W., VANCOUVER, B. C, them inmorLlZn^t  the Province in the sale of their well-known hardy nur-erv meek  for spring (1917) delivery. The work is' pleasant and remunera.  tive. Honest, energetic men only are needed. We panicularlv  want a good man at Bella Coola and for coast points, also a man  on the G: f. P. Railway.  m  "^^liwiwi ��������� i  View of part of the British trenches on the French front where  heavy fighting has been going on recently.    It shows  British soldiers protected by a screen of brush.  Mr. Manson Not Popular.  It will probably surprise some  of our readers to learn that in  spite of the' shutting'out of the  Liberalsfrom any representation  in the last legislature through  the strength of the government,  Mr. Manson did not have more  than 27 majority in the last election.  It must be remembered that  at the time both the people and  the government had plenty of  money and the government was  lavish in the expenditures.  There was very little discontent among the people, and the  popularity of   the   government  was at its height.   And yet in  the face of these very favorable  circumstances   Mr.   Manson's  hold   upon   the  people  was  so  slight that his majority was of  the narrowest.    It is not hard to  predict that this majority will  be  entirely wiped   out in  this  election and Mr. Pattullo elected  to succeed him.    The Hon. Wm.  Manson will be defeated.  The Position of the Editor.  The editor of this paper in  justice to himself wishes it to be  known that he is in no way responsible for the articles criticizing the Prohibition Act, which  have appeared on the third page  'for some weeks past.  0  lie works in the valley than that  which Mr. Mahsoh and through fn  him the government have shown.  |U  It is hoped that with the change  of government the arrogance and  indifference to the reasonable  requests of the people will be a  thing of the past; and that respectful and careful consideration will be given to the suggestions of people most familiar  with existing conditions.  HOE  =D������H  HOE  <U  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  u. O.      VxdJIlOSUn      Leaves   Vancouver  every  Thursday at 9 p.m.        (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apr.lv U>  ? WSE0/?'-Carrall St-  Vancouver; or Geo. McGrk<;<-k.  agent,  1003 Government St., Victoria  hoe  30E  SAVE  YOUR  MONEY  FOR THE  Dominion War Loan  TO BE ISSUED IN SEPTEMBER.]  By purchasing a bond you will help  to WIN THE WAR and obtain for  yourself an investment of the highest  class yielding a most attractive rate  of interest.     -  DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE  OTTAWA. Saturday, August 26,   1916  BELLA; COOLA  COURIER  Act Is Wrongly Named.  This Act is called,"The British  Columbia Prohibition Act." The  name is a misnomer and a counterfeit in almost every respect.  It does not prohibit the sale of  liquor in the Province, or the importation of liquor into the Province.   It does prohibit the sale  0f liquor in the way it is sold at  present,  but it  provides other  methods of sale, purchase, and  place of consumption.  Does Not Suppress the  Liquor  Traffic.  Read the opening words (Preamble) which state, "It is ex-'  padient to suppress the liquor  traffic." Why these words are  used it is hard  to explain,  be  cause by the provisions of this  Act the sale and use of liquor is  not suppressed.     The effect of  I the Act will be to increase the  sale and use of whisky, brandy,  rum, etc., and decrease the use  of  beer and  light wines.    The  present license holders and vendors of liquor are legislated out  of business, but ample provision  is made for the purchase and use  of liquor within the Province.  The citizens now interested in  the sale of liquor oppose this Act  because if it become law their  business will betaken from them  and transferred to other people  in and outside the Province.  PECULIAR FEATURES  OF THE PROHIBITION ACT.  Bill Appears To Have Been Framed  As A Direct Blow At  Workingmen.  Making war is the first business of all Canadians.  f  CLUB  OFFER  ;%  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of* the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier   .       .     ' .       .       . $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg   1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .        $1.50  The Courier   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  .50  The Courier . . . . . $1.00  Canadian Countryman, Toronto . . 1.50  Fanners Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg   1.50  $4.00  All three papers  for   .   .   $2.50  J  SOLD BY ALL DEALERS  A few lines We specially  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  GrifTen & Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������  Canned and dried  fruits  LEES0N, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  To the man of means, who is  accustomed to b,uy his liquors  by the bottle or case from the  wholesale store or retail shop,  the Prohibition Act means nothing, as he can still order his supply from a neighboring province  or the States; just as easily as in  the past, the only difference being that he "will have to pay a  higher cost, on account of transportation charges.  To the working man, who is  accustomed to buy his liquor by  the bottle or glass, the Act  means, however, something entirely different. The ordinary  working man is not given the  opportunity to lay by money sufficient to provide for his sending  away for a case of liquor, hence  he is under a handicap which  does not interfere with the rich  man. Then, again, the working  .nan's usual'beverage is beer,  md on shipments of this class  che freight rates are so high as  io make the price almost prohibitive for him.  Again,   while   some   working  nnen  are   fortunate   enough  to  occupy  homes  of their own, a  great   majority   occupy  houses  jointly  with  others.     A  large  proportion   would   come   under  che   term   of    lodgers.      Many  jthers also take boarders in order to"help out the family income.    All of  this class would  find that the Prohibition Act was  a distinct barrier to their enjoying their personal right to partake of a glass of beer in their  own homes.    The Act provides  that a man may import liquor  freely for use in his own private  dwelling.    It so defines the word  ''dwelling",     however,    that  householders who occupy premises jointly are not allowed the  privilege of   having  liquor for  their own private use.   The same  is true of lodgers personally, and  the families of those who keep  lodgers where more than three  room  in  a  house.      As  far as  homes where boarders are kept,  che Act is explicit in stating that  the house is not a dwelling, and  chat  liquor   for  beverage  purposes may not be brought into  it.  The above points cover phases  of the Prohibition Act which are  distincly to the disadvantage of  the working man, although they  mean nothing to the rich man.  A reading of the Act will show  many similar features of class  legislation of so open a character  ���������is to lead the organized bodies  of labor, which have already  considered the Prohibition Bill,  to unanimously condemn the Act.  ���������Advt.  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  f-OAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,  the l okon Tekkitoky, the North-west Territories and in a portion of the Province of  liRiTisii Columbia, may be leased for a term of  twenty-one years at an annual rental of U an  acre. Not more than 2,560 ucres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in pertson to the Agent or Sub-A|?ent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land muBt be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract ap-  plied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  ��������� Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of Jo which will be refunded if the rights  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  !ie Perso" operating the mine shall furnish  the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coul mined and pay  the royalty thereon. Jf the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  ' furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights-  only, but the leBaee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of rVirninion Lands.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.~ Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30C90.  TheMason & Ixisch Piano  of to-day will maf\e plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADE!"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  ^TT  Let us attend  your Victor Record  -"    mail Orders nnr ;i=rvirp  i������ inlf>Iliorpnt  and guaranteed.  -our service is intelligent  Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C  BUSINESS CARDS  n=  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  301  Dealers and Trappers  Xj&T'HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \X7HAT person so independent?  \]|/HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  HTHE REASONS for this enviable condi-  -*��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters 'make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits,- garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This -fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  "ItAlways  *\  We publish below a few extracts of a letter from B. C.  Keeping, who formerly kept  school here for several years,  lie is now with the forces in  France engaged as a physician.  It seems though from his letter  that he does not think that caring  for the sick and the wounded  quite exciting enough to his taste  .md he therefore intends to join  the fighting forces as soon as a  regiment in which his brother  is serving arrives in France.  Our best wishes follow our genial  friend.  "I have been as busy as a  heaver ever since the first 01  July. We have been receiving  md evacuating nearly all tlu  time, day and night. Sleep wat  a luxury Which few of us wort  able to partake of- hardly turn  for eating. We handled a great  many cases-- 40 per cent more  than any olher unit (British or  Canadian) for so doing we were  complimented   by   Sir   Douglas  Ilaig.  "I must not omit to tell you  that the powers that be have  seen fit to promote me to the  rank of lance-corporal. I am in  charge, as ward master, of "R"  ward of 108 beds. I evacuate on  an average about 20 per day and  receive mostly everyday as well.  This evening so far I received 9  stretcher cases and 14 walking  cases and am due to receive as  many more at any moment now.  "We have been making good,  substantial gains lately, the  French and Russians have done  very well indeed too, both in  ground captured and prisoners  and guns take'n. Things are  looking brighter for us everyday  and I think the end must soon  be in sight.  "I saw where the Bella Coola  boys of the 102nd were home  bidding adieus to the folks before leaving for England. I  would dearly like to run up  against some of them over here.  I may, if the war lasts long  enough���������-1 hope it may not.  "Well, last night I got in  about a dozen more stretcher  cases, with diseases such as:  pleurisy, rheumatic fever, etc.  T>ELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  Gef'More Money" for your Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected in your section  SHIP YOUR FURS DIRECT to "SUUKERT" the largest  house la the World dealing exclusively In NOKTII AMEKICAN HAW FUfcS  a reliable���������responsible���������sale Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more than a third of a century," a lonsr successful record of sending Fur Shippers prompt. SATIS FACTORY  AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for"1Fbt feUubtrt febipprr,"  the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.  Write lor it-NOW-li'n FREE  25-27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.  C 67 CHICAGO, U.SJV.  A.B.SHUBERT,Inc.^  " v  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Threk Months  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name.  P. O.  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed stop.'*- ������  SB?*  Jfel'  Ite  5*^  5a  eftr*  itei  ���������w  - ji.   <MI -��������� %  was {  Saturday, August 26,  /  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 18i)r,  ONE DOLLAR  FOR ONE YEAR  Duck Shooting: Days are Coming f  Can't you feel it in your bones ? Better pay a hurry-up call to the Remington  UMC dealer and get ready for the'' 'big drive.'' He'll hand you the right  ' dope'' so your good'gun will surely get its share of the feathered beauties.  Sportsmen who want black powder shells���������get the "New Club!" It's a thirty year  old favorite���������and it must be "some shell" to make good for that length of time).  Comes in all standard loads, with the famous Remington UMC No. 2 Primer, and  thoroughly waterproofed. Made with the most modern machinery. Ceaseless  inspections and the finest materials, shot, wads, brass head and paper-stock guarantee  every "New Club" to shoot the way you want it to.-  The denier who shows the Red Ball  ���������If you want a fast smokeless  shell,'try the steel-lined, aristocratic "Arrow" or "Nitro Club"  ��������� sportsmen nickname them  "speed shells." The smokeless  "Remington" is also very, popular  for all round field or trft'p work.  We're proud, of these shells and  their record.  PBPORTSMEKfeK  flHEADQUARTERSP  ���������A"ii:wc" ������������������������������������  [FIREARMS 6>/l  [AMMUNITION j  trade mark of Remington UMC can  fill your every fire arm and am munition need.    Go to him.  Remington Arms Union  Metallic   Cartridge   Oo.  (Contractors to the British     ;  Imperial and Colonial Governments)  WINDSOR, ONT. 168 B.C.  London, Eng.    New York, U.S.A.  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland eoasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles  It will be to your interest to keep Xj0tl^- informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufactur-  . er or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  PEAL ESTATE booms in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  Education in Farming.  The greatest problem before  the Department of Agriculture  is how to impart to the farmers  the information necessary to  make the land produce more  nearly to its capacity. Very little  practical work is being done to  show how production may be  substantially increased.  We are therefore glad to note  that, according to. the Agricultural Journal issued by the provincial government, the Department  of Education" have worked out  plans with- reference to agricultural instruction -through the  public and high schools of the  poovince. .The theoretical knowledge will therefore -be given  the young; and we acknowledge  that this is a great step forward  if the instruction be of "practical  nature. ���������        . '  But some provision should also  be made to give the pupils a  chance to carrj' out the theory in  practice, by giving them instruction in the field, in the stable,  stringent, probably more stringent than anything found in any  other legislation of a similar  kind." The Merchants' Protective Association knows very well  in the poultry yard, etc.,   In that! the.Act wilI prohibit.  way the information would be-1   The Association seems to worry  come firmly lodged in the mindjagTeat deal because it will not  and be remembered when oppor- i stop importation from other pro-  tunity comes to put it into prac-ivinces-     The famous  (?)  Merchants'   Protective   Association  tice.  ' Opportunity should also be  given the adult farmer to learn  what the later discoveries teach  in regard to agriculture.'- Short  courses given in the winter by  experts would solve the problem  and no doubt become popular.  Editor,  Bella Coola Courier.  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  L  ob Printing  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  . DISTRICT   OP   COAST���������RANGE   HI.-,  Take Notice that Oliver T. Kellog-, of  Hagensborg-, B. C.,-occupation farmer,  intends to apply for permission to* purchase the following described land:  Commencing at a post planted at the  south-west corner of Lot 6, thence east  and following the south boundary, of  Lot 6,' forty chains; thence south five  ���������chains and fifty links to the north bank  of the Noeek River; thence westerly  and following the northerly bank of the  Noeek River fifty chains to the shore  of South Bentink Arm; thence in a  northerly direction along said shore  line seven chains to the south boundary  of Lot 6; thence easterly and following  the south boundary of Lot 6 ten chains  to point of commencement, containing  30 acres, more or less  -    . OLIVER T. KELLOG.  Dated, June 24, 1916.  July 8-Sept. 2.  rV.^  DUILD UP YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the ' 'Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  cheers^and refreshes  at any hour of the day.  You get the most delicious tea when you  use       *~        '  v-2  .   Sir,���������The Merchants' Protective Association seem to-be very  "much afraid that the Prohibition  Act wi|l riot prohibit,'we might  understand "the anxiety of the  Association  better if we knew  who the men "are at the head of  it,and what their business is.    I  have "no. doubt   whatever ;.tH,a������  they are all engaged .in, thetrade  that has cursed the land so long.  We  know 'very, well that all  laws are broken, "and there is no  doubt at all that there will be  violations of the Act, but to say  the Act will not prohibit is nonsense.  Senator Harry Corby, head of  one of the largest distilleries in  in Canada, said the B.C. Act is  most severe, that meant severe  on the liquor,trade.  Lord Macnaghton of the Imperial Privy Council, said of the  "Manitoba Act, from which the  B. C. Act is largely copied, "it  wilfnot be necessary to go thro  the provisions of the Act, it is  enough to say they are extremely  knows very well that had the  "Act been framed to exclude the  importation from other provinces the Act courd not become law.  It takes a Dominion Act to stop  importation.  ;  The Act will abolish the open  bar and the. treating system,  also the sale or keeping of liquor  in wholesale or retail stores and  in clubs. This is prohibition up  to the limits of the proven powers of the province. This the  liquor people; know full well,  hence their opposition. I would  advise all to read the Act and  vote for it on Sept. 14.���������Yours  truly,  -.        W.H.Gibson.-  B.BryniIdsen&Co.  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND  COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  Ramsay Bros. & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS  OF  Biscuits :: Candy :: Macaroni  Milk and Nut .  Chocolate Bars  Also Refiners of Syrup and  Packers of Molasses  WE STAND BEHIND OUR GOODS"  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������    &  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  ftoiwrSold  in Bulk.  saum   TEA  The Courier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  iir������TirH liiiiitMrriiimnrrr  30E  u Lq  TTHE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Settlers, Prospedors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the moft suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  OgilvieV  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  Burns;  BACON  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers and  Provisioned  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Paints -   Oils   - Varnishes   -  Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  I Best Goods���������Lowest Prices- Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA COOLA, B.C  dtff

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