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Bella Coola Courier Aug 12, 1916

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 E| m % Use your fran-  lectors! ?"<=������*������>':  &^<*>������.va we jy     pufc an en(j  to "Boss Rule."  Now is your chance!  WEATHER REPORT FOR JULY.   ^  Compiled by Mr. C. If. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 66������   Minimum, 51.  Highest Max. (31st) 81. Lowest Min. (7th) 42  Rainfall, 4.10 inches.  Rainfall for the year (1915) 34.33 inches.  VOL. 4���������NO. 43  BELLA COOLA, B. C, SATURDAY, JbGUST 12, 1916.  _$J.00_a_Ycar  T-  '}���������  Bridgehead of  Gorizia Captured  Italians Capture 8,000 Prisoners  Homo, via London, Aug. 8.���������  The war office today announced  the capture of the Gorizia bridgehead by the Italians. It is said  that the city is being shelled to  drive out the Austrians. More  tlvui eight thousand, prisoners  were taken Oon August 6.  ' The Gorizia bridgehead was  one of the most important defensive positions of the Austrians  along the Isonzo front. Gorizia  is 22 miles northwest of Trieste.  Lines Pushed Forward  London, Aug. 8.��������� The British  pushed forward their lines at  places east of Trones Wood, on  the Somme front, last night, the  war office announcedtoday.  (Official.) Determined attacks  on the British lines north and  northeast of Pozieres yesterday  were repulsed. The Germans  ��������� succeededin entering the British  lines at one or two places, but  were driven out.  French Capture  German Trenches  Paris, Aug. 8.���������Late yesterday  the French captured a line of  German trenches between Hem  Wood and the Somme. One hundred and ten prisoners and ten  machine guns were captured.  The French made progress south  of the Thiaumont works, and  captured some houses in the western part of Fleury.  Russians Drive  Austro-Germans Back  Petrograd, Aug. 8.���������South of  the Dneister river, in the direction of Tyszienca, the Russians  have driven the Austro-German  forces back alongthe whole line  for a breadth of fifteen miles.  The russians have captured the  town of Tlumaeh, as well as the  region to the east of the Dneis-  terriverand the ridge of heights  there. ��������� Cossacks are pursuing  the enemy southwest of the Kol-  omea and Stainslau railway in  Galicia.  The total number of prisoners  taken by the Russians in the battles on the Sereth river on Aug.  5 and 6, the official statement  adds, was 166 officers and 8,451  men. The Russians in this region are advancing.  Chasing Turks  Across Desert   ^���������  London, Aug. 8���������British troops  pursuing the Turkish force defeated last week at Romani have  caught up with the Turkish rear  guard six miles east.of Katia,  about 30 miles east of the Suez  Canal. A bomb attack by aeroplanes over Port Said and Suez  inflicted little material damage  and caused slight casualties.  Jottings of Bella Coola and District  S.' S. Camosun, with a number  of passengers for here, arrived  in port Sunday afternoon.   "  ' Miss Belle Grant of Victoria/  is at present visiting with her  parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. Le C.  Grant, Aytoun Ranch.  Mr. 1). Robinson, representing  Ames, Holden������ McCready, Co.,  Ltd., the wholesale shoe firm of  Vancouver, came upon Sunday's  steamer and is spending the  week in town.  J. R. Morrison is home again  after completing some work for  the government at Safety Cove  and Namu. He will not be resting very long, though as next  week will see him off to the upper part of the valley.  In this connection it may be  stated that it is the intention to  start the projected government  works in the different parts of  the district as soon as men become available.  The last few days of ��������� fine  weather have enabled the farmers to store nearly the whole of,  their hay crop so that some men  can now be spared for road work  and othev-publie works.  Separate Peace Wanted  London, Aug. 8.���������Count Ka-  rolyi, as the head of the opposition party, will make a vigorous  effort this month to force a sep-  ��������� aration of the Austrian and Hungarian armies so that Hungary  may sue for a separate peace,  according to a letter received  here from the Morning Post's  correspondent at Buda Pest.  ,  Liberals Hold Big Meeting  at Merritt  Merritt, Aug. 8.���������Mr. Brewster and ex-Mayor Walters, the  Liberal candidate in Yale, were  the chief speakers at a political  mass meeting held in the Rex  Theatre. A crowd of about 4000  persons were present, and the  meeting lasted until midnight.  Mr. Brewster assailed the present government on a number  of points, and suggested clearing out.the lot as the only solu-  of a bad state-of affairs.,, ������������������  Mr. Walters discussed'the agricultural credit system and, expressed the fear that present act  would not be administered fairly.  The party went from here to  Princeton, 72 miles. ,  Split Ticket Plan Favored  Victoria, ,Aug. 9���������A new political movement in Victoria is being-  organized by ^.he business element in the city who wish to  avoid a onesided legislature in  the event of either party making  a clean sweep of the country. A  committee is working hard with  a view to campaigning in the interests of two men on each of  the party tickets.  Hon. Alex. Stewart and Reginald Hayward are the two Conservative candidates endorsed,  while H. C. Brewster and John  Hart are the Liberal selections.  Positions Found for  Invalided Soldiers  Prince Rupert, Aug. 9. The  soldiers from Northern British  Columbia who have been invalided back, find positions as a general rule. They have hot long to  wait.    ��������������������������� ��������� v. '    ���������  Arthur Noble, who went out  as a member of Prince Rupert's  original contingent, and who lost  an eye at Festubert, is now serving in the customs department.  Sergt. James Neville, whose  experiences in France unfitted  him from further duty, has been  appointed to a post in the fisheries at Rivers Inlet. .  Edward Biddle, severly wounded *at Festalberti is now keeper  of the Hoi land Rock beacon, off  the mouth of the Skeena river.  And so with a number of other  men unfitted for further duty at  the front, positions have been  found i'or them readily.  Misses Addie and Janet Gibson  returned last Sunday from a  visit to Victoria. They were accompanied by their brother Rev.  John  Gibson, who.is spending  wilderness to blossom and bear  fruit. His nearest neighbor is  still thirty miles distant from his  ranch.     '  .    ,,  Miss E. Heffron came up on  last Sunday's.steamer from Victoria, and will spend a few weeks  h'ere visiting at the home of Rev.  W. H. Gibson.   Peter Oveson and Walter Rat-  cliff, two of our long-time resi7  dents, left'last Sunday to join  tlieir regiment the American  Legion encamped at Calgary.'  Their safe and speedy return  after the task completely finished  is the wishes of their- many  friends.    "   The second,anniversary of the  war was observed by a large  audience at the Mackenzie school  last Sunday evening. The Reverends W. H. and John Gibson  occupied the platform and gave  appropriate addresses: Mr. A.  Atkins^gave one of his usual  finely rendered solos. He was  ably accompanied by Mrs. Atkins  on the organ. The simple, tasty  program was highly appreciated.  ��������� Despite the fact that the run  of Sockeye salmon virtually  proved a failure, this season's  fishing promises to become a  record breaker at Bella Coola. ^  ���������The local cannery has been  full capacity.  No reports are to hand for  Namu or Kimsquit, but both  these places have done fairly  well.           , RED CROSS CONCERT  .. and ..  SUPERFLUITIES SALE  A concert in aid of the Red  Cross Fund will be held in the  Hotel Hall on Saturday, August  19th, at 7:30,p. m. An excellent  program is being arranged.  Admission, 25 cents.   ���������  During the,Interval there will  be a Sale by Auction of "Superfluities." Will everyone look  for some superfluous object for  disposal? Every imaginable kind  of article will ba welcome, from  diamonds to doughnuts! Such as  superfluous jewelry; dishes and  dolls; chairs, chickens and curios;  butter and bearskins; flowers,  fruit and vegetables; bicycles and  baby buggies���������in fact, anything  and everything!  All articles for sale to be left  in charge of Mrs. Jacobsen.  The 103rd Battalion, of which  Oden Peterson, son of P. K.  Peterson, is a member, has arrived safely in England. c-  Preparations nre now fully under way for the holding of the  4th Annual Exhibition at Prince  Rupert, and the dates for the  same have been fixed for Sept.  20, 21 and 22 next.  . A Call to the Colors.  The fishing season' is now practically ended and the crops are  mostly gathered, so that now a  great many, more men can be  spared in the' defense of our  country and the principles it, is  fighting for.  The country is appealing for  more men of military age to come  to its aid. Bella Coola has sent  a large quota of men' already to  tl e front, but we believe more  are still available. Now is the  chance to both serve the country  and to see the most stining of  events in the far off countries of  the world at the same time.- Enterprising and adventurous men  should quickly avail themselves  of this opportunity from which  they in after lifb.will reap gu������t  benefits.       c   <^  The 238th Forestry Battalion  now recruiting at Prince Ruptit  is sending out the following appeal:  To the youth of the land who  has been looking about for s< me  form of service'to his Empire  without experiencing the hand-  PROVINGrAIl.ELECTION'  Your influence and support is respectfully requested.  T. D. PATTULLO.  Liberal candidate for Prince Rupert Riding.  .        it   . ..   ,. ships and hazards ol trench life,  lhe Directors hope thctthev ,���������  ,,    ,     ,       .   ,     ,,        ,. .,  .,,        . ,. . I'nvro the hardened dwellers ol the  wil receive, as in previous years} yl    .,,     ,,.,        ,  , j      .'.lUftorthland there.has now ccme a  ie earnest co-operation or alio-\v  ' .  "���������    ������������������ .     ���������',.. *       .,  ,     ���������    V     , .  ,���������\<g-reat opportunity to perform the  terested in thedeve opmontoi s������fc\. ,..f   ���������     . '���������.,.,  TA- . ��������� .  <-.      j_;i     ,.,.,. nTsWie^typft of-military sen ue.  ';n/rnewsi^irestry Battalion, tl.e  2s38i.h,' will,.without doubt, touch  [responsive chords in the patriot-  f(  the week here visiting friends  and relatives after ah absence of  several years. He.returns again  tomorrow to his field of missionary work at. Skidegate, Queen  Charlotte Island.   < ���������,  R. Owens and A. E. Owens arrived in town last Sunday, They  have accepted positions at the  Johnson- sawmill and will ho,  doubt find their new place so  congenial that they will become  permanent .residents. Mrs: A.  E, Qwens accompanied her hus--j  band. ��������� '  Adolph Schilling, a settler from  Kleena.Kleene in the interior,  arrived^in, town this week withI  a train^ij horses for his year's;"  su'pply of provisions.;  He is another of those sturdy  pioneers who penetrate beyond  the settlements into the remote  placees and hews the way for  civilization and who makes the  unable to take care of all the  pinks brought in and was forced  to limit thenumberof fish from  each fisherman.  The fishing for Cohoe salmon  will begin next week. "��������� '���������;  Some of the following canneries are. practically closed down  for the season, which has been  somewhat -'disappointing", compared with the large salmon pack  of last year.; In the list for th ose  that are still "operating the pack  is given up to July 30th:  Smiths Inlet  .  -   11,000 cases  Wadhams   -   -  ....' 7,000  Good Hope -   ���������  -     4,600  |.,  Brunswick -  ���������     5.800  Kildala-  -   -  -4,500  R. I. C.   -  ���������     6,000:  Beaver   -   -  ���������     5,500  Alert Bay   -   ���������  ���������j!   1,400  Shushartie -   ���������  ���������li    3,200 ,  The Bella Coola Cannery pack  up-to-date is 20,000 cases, and  the.plant is running now to its  influence others to make them^j  The Directors have arranged for  free transportation of exhibits  this year.  It is hoped that Bella Coola  will be able to send a creditable  exhibit this time also. The growing season has not, it is true,  been as favorable as in former  years, and that therefore the  produce has not attained the  usual high standard, but it may  be safely inferred that other  parts of the district have been  similarly affected and therefore  our exhibit will compare well  with others. ���������,'.-,'��������� ;���������"'  The Northern British Columbia  Index and Guide, published in  Prince Rupert, and compiled by  F. S. Wright, is one of the late  additions to our library.  It gives the plain, cold facts  without any exaggeration of the  resources of the part of our province of which Prince Rupert is  the commercial centre.  v. Every well informed person  should be especially well posted  in matters pertaining to districts  in his immediate vicinity. This  publication furnishes just the information every resident in this  part of the province should possess, and we commend it to the  favorable attention of our  readers.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. P. K.  Peterson on Aug. 5, a daughter.  th  in  the District, towards the,makirig  of the 191G Fair as great a sue,-:  cess as previous ones.  All interested are asked eith^ ism of-thousands of Canadians,  to make exhibits themselves cjr Judffing from the rate at which  applications are flooding into the  recruiting- depots all over the,  province, and to the headquarters at Ottawa, it will be a case  of hurry if a man is to catch a  place on this non-combatant  force.  ' There appears to he a certain  freedom and independence in this  type of service which is appealing to a hardy class of citizens,  and while the original intention  of Col. Smyth was to take only  bushmen, sawyers, millworkers  and lumbermen, the demand has  now become so keen from young  farmers, drivers," from soldiers  from other battalions, and from  different types of citizens, that  it has been decided to make the  qualfications broader in order  that others may catch a place in  the ranks.  While, owing to the special,  authorization of this battalion  its services do not include fighting,, its popularity seems to be.  due rather' to the fact that the '  men will .get a taste of active  lumbering, and that many of  those, who enlist will be able to  continue their regular trade,'  with all the honor of wearing  the khaki, and will accordingly  not be called upon to learn some  n e w business. Hundreds of  lumbermen and-teamsters who  step directly from the woods or  the farm into the 238th Battalion  will find that they will be able  to do the work required of them  Instead of the regular service'just as readily as though they  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)     j       Continued on page 2, column 3.  ���������'-* CZS).  m  .",'���������/  "~W  ���������     BELLA COOLA, COURIER  Saturday, August 12,   19)6  The ���������^  uner  | our credit is good and, therefore,  | he is,able th borrow more and |  j'uHi.isni:i)\Vjy)HC!.v at k'I.u.aCoola i������y ��������� plunge us still heavier in debt.    '  ;    II the voters approve ol   his.  mode oi' conducting their Lusi-  SUBSCR.PT.ON RATES: ^ ^ ^ ^.^ m ^ ^  Canuda t , "  i Year $1-00 the day is not iar distant when  G Montht        .'    0.75  3 Month.    0.50  United States  1  Year $1-50  ���������                       United Kingdom  I  Year $100  Subscriptions payable in advance.  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  Bent in as soon as possible.  ���������  Fur  Advertising  Rates,  Apply at  Office.  To ComiEspONDENTS���������While unobjectionable an  onymous communications .vill be: published, the  name and addiesiofovory writer of-such lettxjrs  must be given to the editor.  The Editor reservi-s the nsht to lefute publi  QAtwn ot any lcttci.    AH manujcniit at wiiter'b  risk.  "S������alus unpttU intprrma ritf kx.  SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 1916.  o  A "Business Administration."  c  ��������� The Premier says' he is conducting a business administraj  tion.    Let us examinejthat statement.    In the current year he is  spending $11,301,374 against an  estimated revenue of $5,94-1,015.  Is   there   another   province  or  state in the world where such a  condition  of affairs exists?   Is  there a reputable private business anywhere which spends two  - dollars for ever dollar it receives?  What would happen to it if it  did?    Its0credit would  be destroyed and it would crash into  bankruptcy."    Two big railroad  systems in Canada are in-financial  difficulties with,much less  proportionate    differences    between income and outlay.    This  year's deficit of the province increases the total discrepancy between revenue and expenditure  for the last five or six years to  some $22,000,000.    To fill this  , ' gaping hole the provincial debt  has  been   enlarged   by   nearly  $13^000,000 in  four   years and  $10,G00,09f/"more are being borrowed.    Is it any wonder that  our securities are being hawked  around for a little more than 80  cents on the dollar and that one  of the great New York banking  houses lately sent a representative to British Columbia to investigate its financial administration?  The per capita expenditures oJ  the various provinces ol Canada  are as follows: British Columbia,  %U. 13;���������"Albcrta, $6.87���������;��������� Saslcatclv  ewan, $7.16; Manitoba, $10.50;  Ontario,  $4.19;   Quebec,  '$4.11;  New Brunswick; $4.08; Nova  Scotia,'- $3.91; ,Prince  Edward  Island, $4.80.     The  per  capita  expenditure of  the   Dominion,  apart from the war outlay, is  about$24.    And thisiswartime,  when every public man. and economist   of   note  is   preaching  economy' and  thrift, when  authorities like Sir George Paish  sternly   warn   those   entrusted  with   the'., handling   of   public  funds that retrenchment is an  imperative necessity,, when every  banker points out that to avoid  serious trouble in the near future  the most rigid.caution is required  in the present ���������!--Victoria Times.  o    o     o  . o     6  The per.capita indebtedness of  the province is (we do not know  what the white population is)  between $75'and $100, and in  the face of this huge amount the!  premier assures the people that'  it will require the total revenue  of the province to pay interest  on our indebtedness or else taxes  will be' raised to such a height  that business men will shun the  province.  o    o     o     o    o  A Useful Member.  We noiice that Hon. William  Manson does not find it'below  thedignity of his 'new position  as a minister of the crown to go  about the" country peddling campaign literature.  On his trip up to Prince Rupert  last week, he was seen at the  different stopping places of the  steamer handing round three  namphlets entitled, "Plugging,"  "Premier's Promises Kept," and  "Premier's Speech, March 20,  1916."  Somehow in his ������exeossive  modesty he did not include in the  distribution that pamphlet on  '"What Mr. Win. Manson Has  Done for Prince Rupert," and  which proved so interesting on  its first appearance in his home  city. It may be that he reserves  this for the reading of the voters  at Prince Rupert exclusively.  We have had the privilege of  seeing one of these highly entertaining documents enumerating  Mr. Manson's services and may  describe it as one of those elucidating pieces of literature which  even "those who run may read."  Or to be more explicit, there is  nothing printed in it. Its pages  are blank.  They therefore describe Mr.  Manson's usefulness to perfection.  c     o    o    o    o  If Mr. Manson expects to be  elected on his record it is the  general opinion that, in case Mr.  Bowser is returned to power,  Mr. Manson will do the country  more good by staying at home  than by occupying a seat in the  legislature and a position as a  minister of the crown.  Because His record proves conclusively that Mr. Bowser, the  nitocrat, will do equally well or  bad, as the case may be, without  Mr. Manson's approbation.  Mr. Manson has not sufficient  originality, independence or convictions to plan or carry out  anything  for the good of the  province, or even if he has, he  will do nothing which he does  not believe is in accordance with  his master's views. He has the  greatest respect for Mr. Bowser's wisdom. He is a rubber  stamp of the most' pronounced  type.  His staying at home will not  affect, perceptibly, the carrying  on of the legislation or routine  business of the province, .and his  salary, indemnity and traveling  expenses would be saved.  o     o     o     o     o    '  t  The Kaiser is seemingly getting very tired of the war which  he so confidently launched two  years ago fully convinced that  he could end it af his own pleasure, lie is now assuring high  heavens and the neutral world  that he "did not will this war."  If he would, say"this kind of  a war," they who know the  circumstances under which it  was began would believe he told  the truth. -  A Call to the Colors  (Continued from Front Pago.)  had been soldiers all their lives.  The first duty of the 238th,  upon reaching England, will be  to,~join,the 224th Forestry Bat-  talion,������which is now engaged in  cutting down the __ historical  forests of Windsor to supply  l'oujih lumber for its hundred-  and-one odd uses at the front.-  Though the 238th Foresters  are intended for immediate duty  in September or early October,  in  Windsor Forest, they may  even be called upon to cross into  , Southern France to cut down the  1     " *���������  timber there, but wherever they  go it is an assured fact that they  will be one of the greatest services to the Empire which any  equal number of men will ever  be called upon to perform. It is  very true that the work of the  Foresters, though carried out  quietly and without ostentation,  is essential to the saving of the  Empire and it follows, as well,  that the hardy men of the north-  land and from the farms who  enlist with the unit will incur a  debt of gratitude,- which those  who remain behind will never be  able to repay in years to come.  Lieut.-Colohel Smythe is now  on a tour of the western provinces establishing his recruiting  depots. In British Columbia, recruiting depots have been located  chiefly through the north country  where most of the' lumbermen  live, but a 'letter dropped to  Major J. 11. McMullin, Capt. G.  B. HullV.Capt. H. E. Tremayne,  Prince Rupert; or to the headquarters at Ottawa, will secure  any information required.  ��������� Recruits are not held in British  Columbia after their enlistment,  but arc forwarded to the Headquarters camp which is located  at the famous Jockey Club  grounds at' Ottawa.' Here the  necessary instruction is given  and all preparations made for an  early departure to the front. It  is well to throw out the suggestion that if any man is looking  for active fighting the 238th Forestry Battalion is not the unit  to join. .  o    o     o     o    o  A Chance of a Lifetime.  The 6th Company, Canadian  Engineers, a battalion for overseas service now forming with  headquarters at ^Vancouver, is  offering to men enlisting opportunities to learn  trades which  CLUB OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates.  The Courier  $1.00  Fanners Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50   ,   tor  $2.50  Both papers  .  $1.50  The Courier   .       .   '   .  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00   R   ,  . _���������    cloth papers  1.50 . ,       ior   .  $2.50  $1.50  The Courier $1.00  Canadian Countryman, Toronto       .      .1.50   All three papers  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50 '  '   $2.50  %,  $4.00  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  *!  a  Wholesale  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF "PRIDE OF THE WEST" ESXNDW  SHIRTS,   PANTS,   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  "MADE   IN    B. C."  Send for Catalogue  Prompl Attention Given Letter Orders  will be found useful on return  to civil life.  They 'are taught bridge building, building construction, road  building, use of explosives, geometry, construction of piers, derricks, incinerators, drains, water  systems, the use of the blocks  and tackles, knots, lashing and  splicing. Careful thinking men  who are going to enlist should  remember this. More men are  wanted, and wanted quickly for  the Engineers. Sixty men are  wanted immediately.  Men desirous of enlisting in  the Engineers should apply to  the Officer Cominandingaf Head-  ���������in."1  mw������ ,MJw������ii.mm'iviaj m:Ri������ugauL,'geK.  Chocolate Pie  m3  Grate Half of small  cake  of  chocolate, dissolve in one cup of  hot tf&ter, add I cup "Canada  First"   (Evaporated) Milk, dis-   <gp  solve 2 tablespoons corn starch in '^^  small amount of milk and xCater1,  add, i cup sugar, a pinch of salt  and the beaten >>okeK)f three eggs.    Stir well and cook  until thick.      Theruadd i teaspoonful vanilla.      Cool  well arid pour out irti baked shell.    Whip white of eggs  for frosting.     Set in.-hot o^en for a moment to brown  frosting.        !'���������''.  Aik your Grocer About "Canada First"���������-He knotos.  THE AYLMER CONDENSED MILK CO., LTD.  AYLMER,   ONTARIO  $  30E  30C  \������\  *0 ' ""    "  The British.supor-dreadnought Warspite, the most powerful warship in the British navy.  Below, the German.battleship Seydlitz, which was rendered practically useless by  British lire in the Jutland naval battle.  V?  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  u. 5.      Cd-HlOSUn      Leaves  Vancouver  every  Thursday at 9-p.m.       (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a. m.  S. S. "Coquitlam" sails from Vancouver fortnightly, carrying Gasoline^and Explosives, will call  at Bella Coola by arrangement. ������������������  For rates of Freights, Fares and other information, apply to  Head Office, Carrall St., Vancouver; or Geo. McGregor,  agent, 1003 Government St., Victoria.  7\l  0  i'( ml  Hi  ni  11-  r  I   J  4 s  'a5  - r f**1  r  ^ nl  fri <:'������  B''  !��������� ��������� Am  im  v,ffl  *<���������  ' ?m  ��������� <m  m  D i  ni  IN  W0  S%'3  ttft  'Saturday, August 12,  1916  BELLA} COOLA COURIER  3  quarters, North Vancouver, B. C.  The officers and non-commissioned officers school of Military  Engineering commenced on Monday, 31st July. , Anyone can join  this school and successful candidates will obtain a sergeant's  . certificate before going overseas,  A considerable number of men  have received commissions after  obtaining this certificate.  Labor Has Condemned  the Prohibition   -���������*���������  Act  Trades and LaborCouncilsof Coast  Cities Pass- Strong Resolutions-  Reasons Why Workingmen Should  Vote Against the Bill.  The Famous Drug Store  Evil.  Section 14 of the Prohibition  Act. This is the section which  caused so much discussion and  opposition in the Legislative Assembly, when the Act was introduced. It permits the sale of  liquor by any druggist in the  Province up to a quantity of five  gallons at any one time on a doctor's prescription, but there is  nothing to prevent this sale or  smaller sales, being repeated  many times in one day.  NOriS ��������� Under the Canada  Temperance ' Act (Scott Act)  claimed to be so effective, I en  ounces ia the largest amount a  druggist can sell at one time.  Organized labor has declared  its position with reference to the  B. C. Prohibition, Act with no  uncertain sound, the result of  close investigation of and keen  discussion on the Bill having resulted in the straight declaration  by the Coast labor bodies that  the Act should be condemned  and that the workingmen of  British Columbia should do all  in their power to defeat the  measure at the polls.  , The Vancouver Trades and  Labor Council, the most representative central labor organiza-  tion in British Columbia, at its  meeting on July 20th, passed a  strong resolution against" the  Act, the closing paragraph reading as follows:  "Resolved that the Trades  and Labor Council in Vancouver,  B. C, in harmony with representative bodies of organized labor  elsewhere places itself on record  as opposed to the British Columbia Prohibition Act and to the  principles involved therein."  In adopting the above resolution the Vancouver Trades Council was but following the steps  of the New Westminster Trades  and Labor Council which on June  14th passed the following resolution:  "Resolved that this Council  go on record as opposed to prohibition as contained in the proposed Bill, from an economic and  social standpoint and report this  decision to the, various unions  with the request that they help  to defeat the Bill."  The resolutions above noted  are in line with the action of the  Victoria Trades and Labor Council and the Prince Rupert Labor  Council.  WORKINGMEN HAVE A "KICK" COMING  A few lines we specially  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  Griffen & Skelleys  famous gold and  silverbar���������  '    Canned and,dried  fruits  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  St  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  &  The discussion in connection  with the passage, of these resolutions showed plainly that work,-  ingmen believe they have a just  "kick", in connection with the  Prohibition'Act/ It was,slated  that the measure is class legisla^  tion of the rankest type inasmuch  as it allows the man of means to-  secure all the liquor he desires  by importing it from outside  points, but at- the same 'time  places a handicap on' the work.-  ingm'an who can only afford to  buy his beer by the glass. This  argument is directly along the  line of the remarks by Mr. Parker Williams, Member for Newcastle, on discussion of the Bill  in the House, when he openly  declared the Act to be class legislation and stated that while he,  "would vote for Prohibition that  would prohibit he would never  have anything to do' with' such  lopsided; jug-handled imitation  such as the present Bill."  0  The Act is also objectionable  to   trade  unions   inasmuch   as  many of its  clauses  were declared to be un-British and.unfair. ' It was pointed out that  any person could tell & constable  that he suspected a man  had  liquor illegally in his possession.  On this information, and without  disclosing the name of the in-  informer,   the   constable   could  enter a man's house, break into  all the rooms, closets, etc., without a warrant.   Such provisions  were severly criticised by members of the labor councils as absolutely opposed to the British  idea that "A man's house is his  castle."  In taking the action they did,  the councils were also moved by  the feeling that they should support the large bodyof working-  men who are today either directly or indirectly engaged in connection with the operation of  jicensed premises. Itwasstated  that 3700 men are now thus employed and that 6000 persons are  dependent upon them for a living. This 'does not include over  1200 employees of licensed premises who are now at the front.  As the Prohibition Act would  mean that these men would be  thrown out of work, the councils  considered that legislation leading to such action, especially at  this time should be vigorously*  opposed. -  , Many delegates who took part  in the council discussions said  they were Prohibitionists. They  stated, however, that they were  opposed to the Act because it  was not a Prohibition Act in any  real sense of the term, provision  being made in it for the purchase  of liquor by importation or otherwise; just as freely as is now the  case. They plainly stated that  they did not consider a vote  against the Prohibition Act a  vote against the principle of Pro'-.  hibitionV'as'" to ���������their minds, the  passage of such an act as was  proposed would not in anyway  lessen the purchase or consumption of liquor. As a matter of  fact, although it might tend- to  decrease   the   consumption   of  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  f������0AL MINING KIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ** Maniiijua., Saskatchewan and Albert*,  the Yukon Teiikitoky. the North-west 'J'ebri-  ���������TOK1R3 and in u portion of the 1'kovince of  Hhitish Columbia, may be leased for & term of  twenty-one years ul an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,SOU acrva will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease ntUBt be made by the  applicant in person to the Auent or Sub-Atfent  of the district in which th? riKhls applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal subdivisions ol scc-  tions.and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be slaked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of $5 which will be refunded if the riRhtB  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  Hie Agent with sworn relurns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If. the coal mining rights  are not being operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to pur-  ehaso whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to lhe Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ultuwa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lards.  W. W. CORY.  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N.U.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30G90.  BUSINESS CARDS  _- *^.  j_ _ .  :L -_ r*-;**!E7ir  I heivlason <Sr IxischPiano  0  "NO  n  of to-day will make, plain our  privilege to state with authority:  FINER  PIANO MADE!  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  u  mj=Let us Mend your Victor Record  J������ mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.       Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  JKMESiS?'?"*?^  HOC  Fur Sales Agency  1,nUrHAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  G00 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest- fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  HOC  Dealers and Trappers  \jl/HAT person so independent?  "VI7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of  the necessaries  of life?  Bella Coola  farmers are independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  '"THE REASONS for this enviable condi-  * tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable; long "warm summers with 'sufficient  ^rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops. < ���������  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley canied away  over twenty first prizes/    '-  health giving beer (the working-  man's usual beverage), it would  actually increase the consumption of whisky and spirits, a condition which was not for the best  interests of the workingman oi'  the province.   -  COPIES OF PROHIBITION ACT FREE  In order that the electors oi  British Columbia may become  thoroughly acquainted with the  provisions of the B. C. Prohibition Act, on which a referendum  vote will be taken in connection  with the provincial elections on  September 14, the Merchants'  Protective Association have prepared a pamphlet, giving the  full text of the Bill. Copies of  this booklet may be obtained,  free of charge, by addressing  the Secretary of the organization at. Room 24, Canada Life  Building, Vancouver.  ���������A'dvt;'-������������������'-.:'������������������r..'       -:--r;������������������;'".- ';'������������������.  OELLA COOLA and the surrounding  *���������* country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Coast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  "With What Measure Ye  .'���������v. .��������� /"'Mete."- .  Germany complaining of the  British blockade forgets the outrages in Belgium.  r=3  ,b  mmBsBam  Get "More Money" ior your Foxes  Muskrnt, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected in your section  SHIP YOtlll Fims IJIHECT ������o"SHUBEHT"lhe larfest  bouse In tlie World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMERICAN SAW FUIiS  a reliable���������responsible���������safe Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more than n third of a century." a lonK successful record of Bending Fur Shippers prompt,SATISFACTORY  AND PROKITAISL15 returns. Write for "Vbt bkvbut feWrotr.*,  the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.  Write Ior St-NOW-If������ FREE  A   Xi   QHITRPRT '!������>���������   25-27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.  A. tS. OriUDfcK.1, inc. D    t.C 67 CHICAGO. U.S.A,  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  ^Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year   Six Months    Three Months   ..$1.00  .. 0.75  .'. 0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year....: , ... $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year.  .$1.00  SUBSGRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO.,  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  LTD.  Enclosed please'find   for Bella Coola Courier for.....  . subscription  Name.  P. 0.  Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed o  'A  BELLA COOLA COURIER  ������^  . j  aoc  D  ONE DOLLAR  FQ& ONE YEAR  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasT: between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  ,  A distance of six hundred miles.  (Ciintimu;*] from Frm t Paf.)  a Temperance Rally will be held  in the Mackenzie School on Sunday evening at 7:30.  The election in the Prince Rupert district of which Bella Coola  forms a part, will be between T.  D. Pattullo and William Manson.  For some time past it was believed that there would be a  Socialist candidate in the field,  but none was nominated and it  will, therefore, be a straight  party fight, with Mr. Pattullo a  sure winner.  0. T. Kellog took out to the  Talleo cattle ranch a consignment of lumber and a team of  horses this week.   He and his  It Will be to your interest to kQeP WeH informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEMi  ADVERTISER  Now is the time to keep  your name before the  public. No manufacturer or wholesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  Ramsay Bros. & Co. Lid.  VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS  OF  Biscuits :: Candy :: Macaroni  Milk and'Nut  Chocolate Bars  { Also  Refiners  of Syrup  txm\  Packers of Molasses  "WE STAN3 BEHIND OUR GOODS"  partners are making''extensive  improvements on their property.  Get These Bulletins.    -  lira very short time the Department of Agriculture, Victoria, will have ready for distribution two new bulletins of great  interest,to dairymen.  The first of these bulletins to'  be ready will be one entitled,  "Buttermaking on the Farm"  jjy T. A. F. Wiancko, dairy instructor. The second one will  ���������be "The Care and Feeding of  Dairy Cattle" by S. H. Hopkins,  assistant live stock commissioner, which deals with the scientific care and correct treatment of  dairy cattle.  Anyone wishing to procure  copies of these bulletins should  write to the Publications Branch j  Department of Agriculture,- Vic- j  toria, and copies will be made as ���������  -soon as bulletins are ready.        '!  ������������������ 7 I  Northern British Columbia has  j  become quite a tourist Mecca.  Latest to hand gives the number  of travellers visiting Prince Rupert as, approximately, 4,500.  The reason suggested for the  large increase in travel north is  due to the war, as people do not  care to tour Europe jbst now.  Northern' British Columbia  and Southeastern Alaska offers  just as pretty, natural scenery  as is found anywheres on the  continent of Europe, and tourist  trade is sure to LA on an increase  in the future.   ������&*  ^  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTRICT   Ox"   COAST���������RANGE   III.  Take Notice that Oliver T. Kellog-, of  Iliigensborg, H. C, occupation farmor,t  intends to apply for permission to pur-'j  chase the following described land:  Commencing at a post planted at the  souUi-westcornerof Lot (i, thence oast  and following the -south boundary of  liol fi, forty chains; thence south five  chains and fifty miks to the north bank  of lhe Noeek River; thence westerly  and following the northerly bank of the  Noeek River fifty chains.to the shore  of South Kentink Arm; thence in a  northerly direction along said shore  line seven chains to the south boundary  of hot 0; thence easterly and following  the south boundary of Lot (> ten clui'iis  to point of commencement, containing,  30 acres, more or less j  OLIVER T. KELLOG.  Getting Big Game  is a serious-proposition  AND it's the man who equips himself with  the most modern fire-arms and ammunition  ���������Remington UMC���������who gets the bigges1.  bag with the least trouble, ioo years spent  in arms-making���������fifty years in ammunition-  making, with matchless resources and equipment certainly.show their results iii  i   hy * ��������� --" ������-���������������*������'  DEAL ESTATE booms in the  ���������cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to Hock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did .not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developing .its by reading the "Courier."  Dntcd, June 21, 1'tSU.  July 8--Si>pL.  &������  rating  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  DUILD UP' YOUR HOME  TOWN. Do not talk���������support home .industries ��������� talk is  cheap. The best/way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something.for yourself  and your community..  ^  tz  ������,  Wavar Sold  CnBulk.  cheers and refreshes  at any hour of the day.  You get the most de-  ' licious tea when you  use  TEA  We buy from the Factory and  sell to YOU direct. Largest  Plumbing Showroom West of  Toronto. Let us quote ^ou.  KYDD BROS., LIMITED  Vancouver; B. C.  Remngton   U (VJ C   Metallic.*  OF every calibre,'for all standard makes of  rifles.   Made so well we guarantee  any   rifle  using  them.  Play safe���������use Ren'iiiigton UMC���������tested,  tested and tested again before they leave,,  the factory. > '  Remington UMO .22'a  Rcminptoii UMC 2'J Cart. kIrcs,, short, long ami  lone lilie, me made with the same cure, n-, o-u  famous lliL'h Power Metal.ic-,. Get a box oi tw  ���������ind be tcidy for au hours fun at any tun ���������  Tho d.aler who displays tho Rod Bal  tr������rf������ mark of Remington UMC  '    Is up-to-doto.   Seo him:  Remington Arms Union  Eftoiallic GarlHdge Go.  /('uil/nufoia  to tlif   Uliti-ll    /lil.'llllf limi  (WlMlnl  , {1 H'ltlUh'tll* j l,t  WINDSOR, 0"T.  Lando", Gnglnnd    New York, U.S.A.   ��������� - -��������� *���������-���������'"*-j,T������jTiffrawtWitri  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA C00LA, B. C.  0  HOI  D     O  'THE two principal reasons  why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They   are   the   only  brands   produced  in  B. C. under govern-  ^   ment inspections^ -  Ask for "SHAMROCK"'.  Burns;  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at.home  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  -������'.TTt:-1K'.-^f10'-~/*1* L  -������������������   "������������������iiMinrrr,*"J*"  Ogilvie's  Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  etter order a bag now  HMMMMIMIMNnKI  J: From' '������������������  P. BURNS & CO., Ltd.  Packers! and  Provisioned  Calgary     Vancouver     Edmonton  Saturday, August 12,   l������\6  OB  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN 1895.  rymldsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  General Merchandise  <&  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Children's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes    ������    ������  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles  Settlers, Prospedtors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will.  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mosT: suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  Paints -  Oils - Varnishes - Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods -Lowest Psices   Largest Stock  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA C00LA, B.C.  t^miiwsaiMimmiiurimi Use your fran-  Electors! &*&%%  to "Boss Rule."   Now is your chance!  WEATHER REPORT FOR JULY.  Complied  by  Mr. C. H. Urseth, of the  Bella Coola Observatory.  Temperature: Maximum, 66.    Minimum, 51.  Highest Max. (31st)81. Lowest Min. (7th) 42  Rainfall, 4. JO inches.    .  Rainfall for the year (1915) 34.33 inches.  VOL. 4���������NO. 43  BELLA COOLA, B.C., SATURDAY, JIUGUST 12,  1916.  $1.00 a Year  Bri  Gorizia Captured  Italians Capture 8,000 Prisoners  Rome, via London, Aug. 8.--  The war office today announced  thecaptureof the Gorizia bridgehead by the Italians. It is said  that the city is being shelled to  drive out the Austrians. More  than eight thousand prisoners  were taken on August 6.  The Gorizia bridgehead was  one of the most important defensive positions of the Austrians  along the Isonzo front. Gorizia  is 22 miles northwest of Trieste  Lines Pushed Forward  London, Aug. 8.���������The British  pushed forward their lines at  places east of Trones Wood, on  the Sommejront, last night, the  war office announced today.  (Official.) Determined attacks  on the British lines north and  northeast of Pozieres yesterday  were repulsed. The Germans  succeeded in entering the British  linesr at one or two places, but  were driven out.  French Capture  German Trenches  Paris, Aug. 8.���������Late yesterday  the French captured a line of  German trenches between Hem  Wood and the Somme. One hundred and ten prisoners and ten  machine guns were captured.  The French made progress south  of the Thiaumont works, and  captured some houses in the western part of Fleury.  Russians Drive  Austro-Germans Back  Petrograd, Aug. 8. ���������South of  the Dneister river, in the direction of Tyszienea, the Russians  have driven the Austro-German  forces back along the whole line  for a breadth of fifteen miles.  The russians have captured the  town of Tlumach, as well as thc-  region to the east of the Dneis  cer river and the ridge of heights  there.    Cossacks are  pursuing  the enemy southwest of the Kol-  omea and   Stainslau railway in  Galicia.  The total number of prisoners  taken by the Russians in the battles on the Sereth river on Aug.  5 and 6, the official statement  adds, was 166 officers and 8,451  men.    The Russians in this region are advancing.  Chasing Turks  Across Desert  London, Aug. 8���������British troops  pursuing the Turkish force defeated last week at Romani have  caught up with the Turkish rear  guard six "miles east of Katia,  about 30 miles east of the Suez  Canal. A bomb attack by aeroplanes over Port Said and Suez  inflicted little material damage  and caused slight casualties.  Joltings of Bella Coola and District  S. S. Camosun, with a number  of passengers for here, arrived  in port Sunday afternoon.  Miss Belle Grant of Victoria,  is at present visiting with her  parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. Le C.  Grant, Aytoun Ranch.  Mr. D. Robinson, representing  Ames, Hold en, McCready, Co.,  Ltd.," the wholesale shoe firm of  Vancouver, came up on Sunday's  steamer and is spending the  week in town.  Separate Peace  Wanted  London, Aug. 8.���������Count Ka-  rolyi, as the head of the opposition party, will make a vigorous  effort this month to force a separation of the Austrian and Hungarian armies so that Hungary  may sue for a separate peace,  according to a letter received  here from the Morning Post's  correspondent at Buda Pest.  Liberals  Hold  Big Meeting  at Merritt  Merritt, Aug. 8. Mr. Brews-  tor and ex-Mayor Walters, the  Liberal candidate in Yale, were  the chief speakers at a political  mass meeting held in the Rex  Theatre. A crowd of about 4000  persons were present, and the  meeting lasted untirmidnight.  Mr. Brewster assailed the present government on a number  of points, and suggested clearing out the lot as the only solu-  of a bad state of affairs.  Mr. Walters discussed the agricultural credit system and expressed the fear that present act  would not be ad ministered fairly.  The party went from here to  Princeton, 72 miles.  Split Ticket Plan Favored  Victoria, Aug. 9���������A new political movement in Victoria is being  organized by the business element in the city who wish to  avoid a one sided legislature in  the event of either party making  a clean sweep of the country. A  committee is working hard with  a view to campaigning in the interests of two men on each of  the party tickets.  Hon. Alex. Stewart and Reginald Hay ward are the two Conservative candidates endorsed,  while H. C. Brewster and John  Hart are the Liberal selections.  Positions Found for  Invalided Soldiers  Prince Rupert, Aug. 9. The  soldiers from Northern British  Columbia who have been invalided back, find positions as a general rule. They have not long to  wait.  Arthur Noble, who went out  as a member of Prince Rupert's  original contingent, and who lost  an eye at Festubert, is now serving in the customs department.  Serm. James Neville, whose  experiences in France unfitted  him from further duty, has been  appointed to a post in the fisheries at Rivers Inlet.  Edward Biddle, severly wounded at Festubert, is now keeper  of the Holland Rock beacon, off  the mouth of th" Skeena river.  And so with a number of other  men unfitted for further duty at  the front, positions have been  found for them readily.  J. R. Morrison is home again  after completing some work for  the government at Safety Cove  and Namu. He will not be resting very long though as next  week will see him off to the upper part of the valley.  In this connection it may be  stated that it is the intention to  start the projected government  works in the different parts of  the district as soon as men become available.  The last few days of fine  weather have enabled the farmers to store nearly the whole of  their hay crop so. that some men  can now be spared for road work  and other public, works. '"  wilderness to blossom and bear  fruit. His nearest neighbor is  still thirty miles distant from his  ranch.  Miss E. Heffron came up on  last Sunday's steamer from Victoria, and will spend a few weeks  here visiting at the home of Rev.  W. H. Gibson.   Peter Oveson and Walter Rat-  cliff, two of our long-time residents, left last Sunday to join  their regiment the American  Legion encamped at Calgary.  Their safe and speedy return  after the task completely finished  is the wishes of their many  friends.   The second anniversary of the  war was observed by a large  audience at the Mackenzie school  last Sunday evening. The Reverends W. H. and John "Gibson  occupied the platform and gave  appropriate addresses. Mr. A.  Atkins gave one of his usual  finely rendered soles. He was  ably accompanied by Mrs. Atkins  on the organ. The simple, tasty  pro-gram was highly appreciated.  full capacity.  No reports are to hand for  Namu or Kimsquit, but both  these places have done fairly  well.  ���������  RED CROSS CONCERT  .. and ..  SUPERFLUITIES SALE  Misses Addie and Janet Gibson  returned last Sunday from a  visit to Victoria. They were accompanied by their brother Rev.  John  Gibson,   who is  spending  A concert in aid of the Red  Cross Fund will be held in the  Hotel Hall on Saturday, August  19th, at 7:30 p. m. An excellent  program is being arranged.  Admission, 25 cents.  During the Interval there will  be a Sale by Auction of "Superfluities." Will everyone look  for some superfluous object for  disposal? Every imaginable kind  of article will be welcome, from  diamonds to doughnuts! Such as  superfluous jewelry; dishes and  dolls; chairs, chickens and curios;  butter and bearskins; flowers,  fruit and vegetables; bicycles and  baby buggies���������in fact, anything  and everything!  All articles for sale to be left  in charge of Mrs. Jacobsen.  The 103rd Battalion, of which  Oden Peterson, son of P. K.  Peterson, is a member, has arrived safely in England.  Despite the fact that the run  of Sockeye salmon virtually  proved a failure, this season's  fishing   promises   to  become  a|same have been fixed for Sept  Preparations are now fully under way for the holding of the  4th Annual Exhibition at Prince  Rupert,  and   the  dates for  the  record breaker at Bella Coola.  The  local  cannery  has  been  PROVINCIAL ELECTION  Your influence and support is respectfully requested.  T. D. PATTULLO.  Liberal candidate for Prince Rupert Riding.  unable to take care of all the  pinks brought in and was forced  to limit the number of fish from  each fisherman.  the week here visiting friends  and relatives after an absence of  several years. He returns again  tomorrow to his field of missionary work at Skidegate, Queen  Charlotte Island.  R. Owens and A. E. Owens arrived in town last Sunday. They  have accepted positions at the  Johnson sawmill and will no  doubt find their new place so  congenial that they will become  permanent residents. Mrs. A.  E. Owens accompanied her husband.           Adolph Schilling, a settler from  Kleena Kleene in the interior,  arrived in town this week with  a train of horses for his year'a  supply of provisions. ',!  He is another of those sturdy.]  pioneers who penetrate beyond j  the settlements into the remote j  placees  and   hews the way  for j up-to-date is  20,000 cases,  and  civilization and who makes the!the plant is running now to its  20, 21 and 22 next.  The Directors hope thLt they  will receive, as in previous years,  the earnest co-operation of all  interested in the development of  the District, towards the making  of the 1916 Fair as great a success as previous ones.  All interested are asked either  to make exhibits themselves or  influence others to make them.  The Directors havf; arranged for  free transportation of exhibits  this year.  It is hoped that Bella Coola  will be able to send a creditable  exhibit this time also. The growing season has not, it is true,  been as favorable as in former  years, and that therefore the  produce has not attained the  usual high standard, but it maybe safely inferred that other  parts of the district have been  similarly affected and therefore  our exhibit will compare well  with others.  The Northern British Columbia  Index and   Guide,  published  in  Prince Rupert, and compiled by  The fishing for Cohoe salmon ] F. S. Wright, is one of the late  will begin next week.  Some of the following canneries are practically closed down  for the season, which has been  somewhat disappointing compared with the large salmon pack  of last year. In the list for those  that are still operating the pack  is given up to July 30th:  Smiths Inlet  ���������    11,000 cases.  Wad hams    -   -  7,000     "  Good Hope -   -  4,600     "  Brunswick  -    -  5.800     "  Kildala    -   -   ���������  ���������     4,500     "  R. I. C.   -   -   -  6,000     "  Beaver    -   -   -  5,500     "  Alert Bay    -   -  1,400     "  Shushartie  -   ���������  3,200     "  The Bella Coola Cannery pack  additions to our library.  It gives the plain, cold facts  without any exaggeration of the  resources of the part of our province of which Prince Rupert is  the commercial centre.  Every well informed person  should be especially well posted  in matters pertaining to districts  in his immediate vicinity. This  publication furnishes just the information every resident in this  part of the province should possess, and we commend it to the  favorable attention of our  readers.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. P. K.  Peterson on Aug. 5, a daughter.  Instead of the regular service  (Continued on page 4, column 2.)  A Call to the Colors.  The fishing season is now practically ended and the crops are  mostly gathered, so that now a  great many more men can be  spared in the defense of our  country and the principles it is  fighting for.  The country is appealing for  more men of military age to Come  to its aid. Bella Coola has sent  a large quota of men already to  tie front, but we believe more  are still available. Now is the  chance to both serve the country  and to see the most stirring of  events in the far off countries of  the world at the same time. Enterprising and adventurous men  should quickly avail themselves  of this opportunity from which  they in after life will reap great  benefits.  The 238th Forestry Battalion  now recruiting at Prince Rupert  is sending out the following.appeal:  To the youth of the land who  has been looking about for seme  form of service to his Empire  without experiencing the hardships and hazards of trench life.  To the hardened dwellers of the  northland there has now ccme a  great opportunity to perform the  highest type of military sen ite.  The new Forestry Battalion, the  238th, will, without doubt, touch  responsive chords in the patriotism of thousands of Canadians.  Judging from the rate at which  applications are flooding into the  recruiting depots all over the  province, and to the headquarters at Ottawa, it will be a case  of hurry if a man is to catch a  place on this non-combatant  force.  There appears to be a certain  freedom and independence in this  type of service which is appealing to a hardy class of citizens,  and while the original intention  of Col. Smyth was to take only  bushmen, sawyers, millworkers  and lumbermen, the demand has  now become so keen from young  farmers, drivers, from soldiers  from other battalions, and from  different types of citizens, that  it has been decided to make the  qualfications broader in order  that others may catch a place in  the ranks.  While, owing to the special  authorization of this battalion  its services do not include fighting, its popularity seems to be  due rather to the fact that the  men will get a taste of active  lumbering, and that many of  those who enlist will be able to  continue their regular trade,  with all the honor of wearing  the khaki, and will accordingly  not be called upon to learn some  new business. Hundreds of  lumbermen and teamsters who  step directly from the woods or  the farm into the 238th Battalion  will find that they will be able  to do the work required of them  just as readily as though they  Continued on page 2, column 3. BELLA  COOLA COURIER  Saturday, August 12,  J$  The Courier  Published Weekly at Bella Coola by  the Bella Coola Publishing Co. Ltd.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Canada  ,1  Year ., $1.00  0 Month*   : 0.75  3 Months   0.50  United States  1 Year...: $l-'50  United Kingdom  1 Year. $100  Subscriptions payable in advance. ���������  Subscribers not receiving their copy  regularly please notify the management  at once. Changes in address should be  sent in as soon as possible.  our credit is good and, therefore,  he is able to borrow more and  plunge'us'still heavier in debt'.  If the voters approve of his  mode of conducting their business and his optimism holds out,  the day is not far distant when  it will require the total revenue  of the province to pay interest  on our indebtedness or else taxes  will be raised to such a height  that business men will shun the  province.  For Advertising  Rates,  Office.  Apply at  To Correspondents��������� While unobjectionable anonymous communications will be published, the  name and address of every writer of such letters  must be (riven to the editor.  The Editor reserves the rijrht to refuse publi-  catiun of any letter. All manuscript at writer's  risk.  "Sttlun jmuuli Buprruta est l?x."  SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 1916.  A "Business Administration/'  The Premier says he is con-  ducting a business administra-  .  tion. ' Let us examinecthat statement.-   In the current year he is  spending $11,301,374 against an  ��������� estimated revenue of $5,944,015.  - Is   there   another   province  or  state in the world where such a  condition of affairs exists?   Is  .   there a 'reputable private business anywhere which spends two  " dollars for ever dollar it receives?  What would happen to it if it  did?    Its .credit  would  be destroyed and it would, crash into  bankruptcy.    Two big railroad  systems, in -Canada are in financial  difficulties with' much less  proportionate    differences'-   between income and outlay.    This  year's deficit of the province increases the total discrepancy between revenue and expenditure  for the last five or six years to  some $22,000,000.    To fill  this  gaping hole the provincial debt  .has   been   enlarged   by   nearly  $13,000,000 in  four   years  and  $10,000,000 more are being borrowed.    Is it any wonder that  our securities are being hawked  around for a little more than 80  . cents on the dollar and that one  of the great New York banking  houses lately sent a representative to British Columbia to investigate its financial administration ?  The per capita expenditures of  the various provinces of Canada  are asfollows: British Columbia,  $34.18; Alberta, $6.87; Saskatchewan, $7.16; Manitoba, $10.50;  Ontario,  $4.19;   Quebec,  $4.11;  New Brunswick,  $4.08; Nova  Scotia,   $3.91; -Prince  Edward  Island, $4.80.     The  per capita  expenditure of   the   Dominion,  apart from  the war outlay,  is  about $24.    And this is wartime,  when every public man and economist   of   note   is   preaching  economy  and thrift, when  authorities like Sir George Paish  sternly 'warn   those   entrusted  with   the   handling   of   public  funds that retrenchment is an  imperative necessity, when every  banker points out that to avoid  serious trouble in the near future  the most rigid caution is required  in the present!���������Victoria Times.  o     o     o     o     o  The per capita indebtedness of  the province is (we do not know  what the white population is)  between $75 and $100, and in  the face of this huge amount the  premier assures the people that  A  Useful Member.  We notice that Hon. William  Manson does not find it below  the dignity of his new position  as a minister of the crown to go  about the country peddling campaign literature.  On his trip up to Prince Rupert  last wee'lj, he was seen at the  different stopping places of the  steamer handing round three  pamphlets entitled, "Plugging,"  "Premier's Promises Kept," and  "Premier's Speech, March 20,  1916."  Somehow in his- excessive  modesty he did not include in the  distribution that pamphlet on  "What, Mr. - Wm. Manson Has  Done for Prince Rupert," and  which proved so interesting on  its first appearance in his home  city. It may be that he reserves  this for the reading,of the voters  at Prince Rupert exclusively.  We have had the privilege of  seeing one of these highly entertaining documents enumerating  Mr. Manson's services and may  describe it as one of those elucidating pieces of literature which  .even "those who run may read."  Or to be more explicit, there is  nothing printed in it. Its pages  are blank.  They therefore describe Mr.  Manson's usefulness to perfection.  o     o     o     o     o   ���������  If Mr. Manson expects to be  elected on his record it is the  general opinion that," in case Mr.  Bowser is returned to power,  Mr. Manson will do the country  more good by staying at home  than by occupying a seat in the  legislature and a position as a  minister of the crown.  Because his record proves conclusively that Mr. Bowser, the  tutoerat, will do equally well or  bad, as the case may be, without  Mr. Manson's approbation.  Mr. Manson has not sufficient  originality, independence or convictions to plan or carry out  anything for  the good  of the  province, or even if he has, he  will do nothing which he does  not believe is in accordance with  his master's views. He has the  greatest respect for Mr. Bowser's wisdom. He is a rubber  stamp of the most pronounced  type.  His staying at home will not  affect, perceptibly, the carrying  on of the legislation or routine  business of the province, and his  salary, indemnity and traveling  expenses would be saved,  oooo-o  The Kaiser is seemingly getting very tired of the war which  he so confidently launched two  years ago -fully convinced that  he could end it at his own pleasure. He is now assuring high  heavens and the neutral world  that he ''did not will this war."  If he would say "this kind of  a-war," they who know -the  circumstances, under which it  was began would believe he told  the truth.  A Call to the Colors  (Continued from Front Page.)  had been soldiers all their lives.  . The first duty of the 238th,  upon reaching England, will be  to join the 224th Forestry Battalion, which is now engaged in  cutting down the historical  forests of Windsor to supply  rough lumber for its hundred-  and-one odd uses at the front.  Though the 238th Foresters  are intended for immediate duty  in September or .early October,  in Windsor Forest, they may  even be called upon to cross into  Southern France to cut down the  timber there, but wherever they  go it is an assured fact that they  will be one of the greatest services to. the Empire which any  equai number of men will ever  be called upon to perform. It is  very true that the work"of the  Foresters, though carried out  quietly and without ostentation,  is essential to the saving of the  Empire and'it follows, as,well,  that the hardy men of the north-  land and from the farms who  enlist with-the unit will incur a  debt of gratitude, which those  who remain behind will never be  able to repay in years to come.  Lieut.-Colonel Smythe is now  on a tour of trje western provinces establishing his recruiting  depots. - In Britisli Columbia, recruiting depots have been located  chiefly through the north country  where most 6f the lumbermen  live, but a letter dropped to  Major J. H. McMullin, Capt. G.  B. Hull, Capt H. E. Tremayne,  Prince Rupert; or to the headquarters at Ottawa, will secure  any information required.  Recruits are'not held in British  Columbia after their enlistment,  but are forwarded to the Headquarters camp which is located  at the famous Jockey Club  grounds at Ottawa. Here the  necessary instruction is given  and all preparations made for an  early departure to the front. It  is well to throw out the suggestion that if any man is looking  for active fighting the 238th Forestry Battalion is not the unit  to join.  00,000  A Chance of a Lifetime.  The 6th Company, Canadian  Engineers, a battalion for overseas service now forming with  headquarters: at Vancouver, is  offering to men enlisting opportunities to learn -trades which  f*  CLUB  OFFER  We have pleasure in announcing that we'have made arrangements with two of the leading weekly publications  so that our subscribers may have the best of reading at  substantially reduced rates. '  %  The Courier  $1.00  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50   for  $2.50    1  Both papers  .  $1.50  The Courier   ._  Canadian Countryman, Toronto  $1.00  1.50  $2.50  Both papers  for   .   .   $1.50  The Courier .... .$1.00  Canadian Countryman, Toronto . . 1.50  Farmers Advocate & Home Journal, Winnipeg  1.50  All three papers  for  .   ..  $2.50  %s  $4.00  =J  mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm  Mackay Smith, Blair & Co. Ltd.  VANCOUVER,  B.C.  DRY GOODS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS  Manufacturers  OF  "PRIDE OF THE WEST" BRAND  SHIRTS,   PANTS;   OVERALLS,   MACKINAW  Send for Catalogue  MADE    IN    B. C."  Prompt Attention Given Letter Order*  will be found useful on return  to civil life. '  They are taught bridge building, building construction, road  building, use of explosives, geometry, construction of piers, derricks, incinerators, drains, water  systems, the use of the blocks  splicing.; Careful thinking mei)  who are going to enl'ist .should  remember this. More men are  wanted, and wanted quickly f,  the Engineers. Sixty nic-ii '  w an ted immediately.  Men  desirous of. mi listing jE  the Engineers should :.|<|,!y't0  or  are  and tackles, knots, lashing and i the Officer Commanding at Head  SAVE  YOUR  MONEY  FOR THE  Dominion War Loan  TO BE ISSUED IN SEPTEMBER.  By purchasing a bond you will help  -to WIN THE WAR and obtain for  yourself an investment of the highest  class yielding a most attractive rate  of interest.  .  DEPARTMENT OF  FINANCE  OTTAWA.  Chocolate Pie  *A-  Grate half of small cake of "*������*  chocolate, dissolve in one cup of Jjtf  Hot w&ter, add 1 cup "Canada *^  First" {Evaporated) Milk, dis- J*  solve 2 tablespoons corn starch in  small amount of milk and vaster,  add 1 cup sugar, a pinch of salt  and the beaten y*okeK>f three eggs. Stir well and cook  until thick. Thenvadd 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Cool  well and pour out in.baked shell. Whip white of e#>s  for frosting. Set in,hot erven for a moment to brown  frosting.  Ask your Grocer About "Canada First"���������He ^nonm.  THE  AYLMER   CONDENSED   MILK   CO.,   LTD.  AYLMER,    ONTARIO  )--y xzi jPK Vra .;-������������������'k-*-**  in  H  ' A-  @S^  HOE  DWC  lOt  The British super-dreadnought Warspite, the most powerful warship in the British navy.  Below, the German battleship Seydlitz, which was rendered practically useless by  British fire in the Jutland naval battle.  UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C., LTD.  REGULAR FREIGHT  AND PASSENGER SKKVK'K  BETWEEN  BELLA COOLA and VANCOUVER  S. S.   "CamOSUn^   Leaves   Vancouver   every  Thursday at 9 p. m.        (Victoria day previous.)  Leaves Bella Coola Sundays a.m.  S. S. "COQUITLAM" sails from Vancouver i'������rl-  nightly, carrying Gasoline and Explosives, will i"lil  at Bella Coola by arrangement.  |v I"  11    For���������rate8 of Freights,  Fares and other iufnrrnnli<";. ,.-,,..������������������,  Head Office, Carimll St.,  Vancouver; or Gk������- M*',,M''  agent, 1003 Government St., 'Victoria.  iy  4  14  1 1  J  s  4  *i Saturday: August 12,   1916  BELLAj COOLA  COURIER  H  ; 1  4  3  *  4  carters, North Vancouver, B.C.  The officers and-non-commissioned officers school of Military  P^ineering commenced on Mon-  riav 31st July. Anyone can join  this'school and successful candi-  Lt*s will obtain,a sergeant's  certificate befo're-going overseas,  /considerable number of men  have received commissions after  obtaining this certificate.  Labor Has Condemned  the Prohibition  Act  Trades and Labor Councils of Coast  Cities Pass Strong Resolutions-  Reasons Why Workingmen Should  Vote Against the Bill.  The Famous Drug Store  Evil.  Section 14 of the Prohibition  Act.   This is. the section which  caused so much discussion and  opposition in the Legislative Assembly, when the Act was introduced.   It permits  the  sale of  ���������liquor by any  druggist  in  the  province up to a quantity of five  gallons at any one time on a doctor's, prescription, but there is  nothing to prevent this sale or |  smaller   sales, , being   repeated  many times in one day.  NOTE -���������Lfnder ,. the   Canada  Temperance   Act   (Scott   Act)  claimed  to be so effective, ten  ounces is the largest amount a  druggist can sell at one time.  Organized labor has declared  its position with reference to the  B. C. Prohibition Act with no  uncertain sound, the result of  close investigation of and keen  discussion on the Bill having resulted in thestraightdeclaration  by the Coast labor bodies that  the Act should be condemned  and that the workingmen of  British Columbia should do all  in their power to defeat the  measure at the polls.  The Vancouver Trades and  Labor Council, the most representative central labor organization in British Columbia, at its  meeting on July 20th, passed a  strong resolution against the  Act, the closing paragraph reading as follows:  "Resolved that the Trades  and Labor Council in Vancouver,  B. C, in harmony with representative bodies of organized labor  elsewhere places itself on record  as opposed to the British Columbia Prohibition Act and to the  principles involved therein."  In adopting the above resolution the Vancouver Trades Council was but following the steps  of the New Westminster Trades  and Labor Council which on June  1.4th passed the following resolution:  "Resolved that this Council  go on record as opposed to prohibition as contained in the proposed Bill, from an economic and  social standpoint and report this  decision to the various unions  with the request that they help  to defeat the Bill."  , i  The resolutions above noted  are in line with the action of the  Victoria Trades and Labor Council and the Prince Rupert Labor  Council.  WORKINGMEN HAVE A "KICK" COMING  A feu) lines we specially  recommend  Great West Tea  Duerrs���������  Jams and Jellies  Griffe.n & Skelleys  famous gold and  siiverbar���������  Canned and dried  fruits  LEESON, DICKIE, GROSS & CO., Ltd.  Wholesale Grocers Vancouver, B. C.  J  The discussion in connection  with the passage of these resolur  tions showed plainly that workingmen believe they have a just  "kick", in connection with the  Prohibition Act. It was stated  that the measure is class legislation of the rankest type inasmuch  as it allows the man of means to  secure all the liquor he desires  by importing it from outside  points, but at the same time  places a handicap on the work-  ingman who can only afford to  buy his beer by the glass. This  argument is directly along the  line of the remarks by Mr. Parker Williams, Member for Newcastle, on discussion of the Bill  in the House, when he openly  declared the Act to be class legislation and stated that while he  "wouid vote for Prohibition that  would prohibit- he would never  have anything to do with such  lopsided, jug-handled imitation  such as the present Bill."  The Act is also objectionable  to   trade   unions   inasmuch   as  many  of its   clauses  were  declared to be un-British and unfair.    It was  pointed   out  that  any person could tell a constable  that  he suspected  a  man   had  liquor illegally in his possession.  On this information, and without  disclosing the name of  the in-  informer,   the   constable   could  enter a man's house, break into  all the rooms, closets, etc., without a warrant.    Such provisions  were severly criticised by members of the labor councils as absolutely opposed to the British  idea that "A man's house is his  castle."  In taking the action they did,  the councils were also moved by  the feeling that they should support the large body of working-  men who are today either directly or indirectly engaged in connection with the operation of  licensed premises. It was stated  that 3700 men are now thus employed and that 6000 persons are  dependent upon them for a living. This does not include over  1200 employees of licensed premises who are now at the front.  As the Prohibition Act would  mean that these men would be  thrown out of work, the councils  considered that legislation leading to such action, especially at  this time should be vigorously  opposed.  Many delegates who took part  in the council discussions said  they were Prohibitionists. They  stated, however, that they were  opposed to the Act because it  was not a Prohibition Act in any  real sense of the term, provision  being made in it for the purchase  of liquor by importation or otherwise just as freely as is now the  case. They plainly stated that  they did not consider a vote  against the Prohibition Act a  vote against the principle of Prohibition, as to their minds, the  passage of such an act as was  proposed would not in any way  lessen the purchase or consumption of liquor. As a matter of  fact, although it might tend to  decrease   the   consumption   of  SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING  REGULATIONS  fOAL MINING RIGHTS of the Dominion, in  ^ Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ai.bekta,  the Yukon Tekkitory, the North-west Terri-  ��������� TORIKS arid in a portion of the PROVINCE of  British Columbia, may b<; leased for a term oC  twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1 an  acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be leased  to one applicant.  Application for a lease must be made by the  applicant in person to the Aj?ent or Sub-As?ent  of the district in which the rights applied for  are situated.  In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or lejsal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be staked out by the applicant  himself.  Each application must be accompanied by a  fee of So which will be refunded if the ritchts  applied for are not available, but not otherwise.  A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate of five cents per ton.  The person operating the mine shall furnish  the Apcent with sworn returns accounting for the  full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay  the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights  are not bein������ operated, such returns should be  furnished at least once a year.  The lease will include the coal mining: rights  only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be  considered necessary for the working of the mine  at the rate of $10.00 an acre.  For full information application should be  made to the Secretary of the Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  w. w. cony,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N. B.���������Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for.���������30690.  BUSINESS CARDS  o_  HOE  Fur Sales Agency  600 dealers and trappers of B. C,  Yukon and Alaska have taken advantage of our Fur Sales Agency for 3 years.  Our sealed bid plan whereby 15 or 20  of the biggest fur buyers in the world  bid on your fur instead of one individual house assures the highest market  price always.  We hold sales monthly, but will advance 75 per cent, of value on receipt,  sending balance immediately after sale.  Our commission is only 3 to 4 per cent.  LITTLE BROS. FUR SALES  AGENCY, LTD.  54 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  HOE  Dealers and Trappers  .;^.:..\ii-_in  TheMason Q? riischriano  of to-day will mat\e plain our  privilege to state with authority:  "NO  FINER   PIANO  MADEl"  SOLD DIRECT BY THE MANUFACTURERS  1������  I  Let us attend  your Victor Record  jJ  mail orders���������our service is intelligent  and guaranteed.        Write for Catalogue  Mason & Risch Ltd.  738 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.  health giving: beer (the working-  man's usual beverage), it would  actually increase the consumption of whisky and spirits, a condition which was not for the best  interests of the vvorkingman or  the province.  COPIES OF PROHIBITION ACT FREE  In order that the electors of  British  Columbia   may  become  thoroughly acquainted with the  provisions of the B. C. Prohibition Act, on which a referendum  vote will be taken in connection  with the provincial elections on  September  14,   the  Merchants'  Protective Association have prepared  a   pamphlet,   giving the  full text of the Bill.    Copies of  this booklet  may   be  obtained,  free of charge,   by   addressing  the Secretary of  the organization  at  Room 24,  Canada Life  Building, Vancouver.  Advt.  "With What Measure Ye  Mete."  Germany complaining of the  British blockade forgets the outrages in Belgium.  \X7HAT person so happy and contented as the prosperous farmer?  \li7HAT person so independent?  \A7HAT ambition more noble than to  be a producer of   the necessaries  of life?  Bella  Coola   farmers are  independent;  they are strangers to hard times.  HTHE REASONS for this enviable condi-  *��������� tion of affairs are obvious to anyone  who knows the Bella Coola Valley.  The land is fertile and needs little or no  irrigation. The climate is mild and enjoyable; long warm summers with sufficient  rainfall and mild winters make for excellent crops.  Large and small fruits, garden and field  crops are grown to the best advantage.  This fact was established at the Prince  Rupert exhibition last year when farm produce from Bella Coola Valley carried away  over twenty first prizes.  czo|  DELLA COOLA and the surrounding  country possesses wonderful wealth  in timber, as yet almost entirely undeveloped, and perhaps at no other point  on the Northern Ceast is there the same  opportunity for a remunerative investment as in a saw mill at Bella Coola.  mm&M  Get "More Money" for your Foxes  Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,  Marten and other Fur bearers collected In your section  SUM' YOUK I-'UHSDIltECT to "SH U11ERT" the largest  bouse In (be World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMERICAN RAW iilkS  a reliable���������responsible���������sale Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more thnn a third of a century," a lonK successful record of send in K Fur Shippers prompt ATI S FACTORY  AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for"IT(K ftliubtrt febipptr."  the only reliuble. luvunite market report and price list published.  Write lor it-NOW���������it's KKEE  AR   9MIIRFRT   Ir.^   25-27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.  . d. onuoLM, inc. D������Pt.c������7 Chicago,u.sjv.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES OF  BELLA COOLA COURIER.  Subscriptions Payable in Advance.  CANADA.  One Year $1.00  Six Months   0.75  Three Month.s  0.50  UNITED STATES.  One Year  $1.50  United Kingdom and the Continent.  One Year $1.00  SUBSCRIPTION BLANK.  BELLA COOLA PUBLISHING CO., LTD.  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  Enclosed please find subscription  for Bella Coola Courier for   Name   P. 0   Tear out and mail today, with amount of subscription enclosed  *i 'I^KfcaaamaBSMsaamWTW^  ^TOfl^J^^IB^^  *?  ii\i.*<liv    11  : -Mkv-.  ���������}������&���������?  3 *. =ti.������7. .j  fc-  ������  ' it'SiTij.'t'" v  was*  *���������?��������������������� **/8  sKWn. - a  .���������>        5  In������'"i>'s  C    i ���������     a  j-|R  ii ill  IIP  ml  BELLS COOLS  COURIER  o  D  r  ��������� ini  _>  ,      ,                                           -   |    ���������       |         HI ���������       ���������  6  jF  ���������&  &  ONE DOLLAR  'OR ONE YEAR  (Continued from Front" Pace.)  a Temperance Rally will be-held  in the Mackenzie School on Sunday evening at 7:30.  The election in the Prince Rupert district of which Bella Coola  forms a part, will be between T.j  D. Pattullo and William Manson.'  For some time, past it was believed   that  there  would   be a  Socialist candidate in the field,  but none was nominated and it  will,   therefore,   bev a   straight  party fight; with Mr. Pattullo a  sure winner:     '     '  partners are making extensive  improvements on their property.  The Courier is the only  newspaper published on  the mainland coasl between Vancouver and  Prince Rupert.  A distance of six hundred miles.  // will be to your interest to i\eep well informed regarding the  happenings throughout  the Northern section of  this Province���������  THE "COURIER"  GIVES THEM.  ADVERTISERS-  Now is the time to keep  your,, name before the  public. No manufacturer or whoiesalehouse can  afford to let slip the opportunity of increased  sales that public advertising brings.  0: T. Kelldg took out-to'the  Talleo cattle ranch a consignment of-'lumber.:- and a team of  horses   this week.    He and his  Ramsay Bros. & Co. Ltd  VANCOUVER, B. C.  MANUFACTURERS  OF  Biscuits :: Candy :: Macaroni  ���������Milk and Nut  Chocolate Bars  Also  Refiners of Syrup and  Packers of Molasses  WE STAND BEHIND CUR GOODS"  Get These Bulletins.  In a very short time the Department of Agriculture, Victoria, will have ready for distribution two new bulletins of great  interest-to'dairymen../���������������������������  The first of these bulletins to  be ready will be one entitled,  "Buttermaking on the Farm"  by~ T. A. F. Wiancko, dairy instructor. The second one will  be "The Care and Feeding of  Dairy Cattle" by S, H. Hopkins,  assistant live stock commissioner, which deals with the scienti-  fic care and correct treatmen t of  dairy cattle.  , Anyone   wishing   to   procure  copies of these bulletins should  s?s*  write to the Publications Branch  Department of Agriculture, Victoria, and copies will be made as  soon as bulletins are ready.  Northern British Columbia has  become quite a tourist Mecca.  Latest to hand gives the number  of travellers visiting Prince Rupert as, approximately, 4,500.  The reason suggested for the  large increase, in travel north is  due to the war, as people do not  care to tour Europe just now.  Northern British Columbia  and Southeastern Alaska offers  just as pretty^ natural scenery  as is found anywheres on the  continent of Europe, and tourist  trade is sure tjo be on ah increase  in the future.1'  VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT  DISTRICT   OP   COAST���������BANOE   IH.  Take Notice that Oliver T. Kcllog, of  Hagensborg, B. C, occupation farmer,  intends to apply for permission to purchase tho following described land:   '  Commencing at a post planted at^the  south-west corner of Lot 6, thence east  and following the south boundary of  Lot 6, forty chains; thence south five  chains and fifty links to the north bank  of the Noeek.River; thence westerly  and following the northerly bank of the  Noeek River fifty chains .to the shore  of South Bentink .Arm; thence in a  northerly direction along said shore  line seven chains, to the south boundary  of Lot 6; thence easterly and following  the south boundary of Lot 6 ten chains  to point "of commencement, containing  30 acres, more or less  OLIVER T. KELLOG.  Dated, June 24. 1916.  July C--Sept. 2.  iirrri-* - "=*"  DEAL ESTATE booms, in the  cities have come and gone.  People are beginning to flock to  the country. The North-West  Coast of British Columbia offers  opportunities for all. Did not  know, is no excuse. Investors  should keep posted on developments by reading the "Courier."  9  nnting  You are judged by the  stationery that you use.  Let us do your job printing.   We will do it right.  Getting Big Game  is a serious  proposition  AND it's the man who equips himself with  the most modern fire-arms and ammunition  ���������Remington UMC���������who gets the bigges*.  bag with the least trouble, ioo years spent  in arms-making���������fifty years in ammunition-  making, with matchless resources and equipment certainly show their results in  'em/ngtoji  Rem ti&ton   UMC    Metallic?  OF ever}' calibre/for all standard makes of  rifles.   Made so well we guarantee   any   rifle   using   them.  Play safe���������use Remington UMC ���������tested,  tested and tested again before they leave  the factory.  Remington UM0.22's  Remington UMC 22 Cartridges; short, long nud  long rifle, are made with the same care as our  famous High Power Metal:ic.s. Get a box or t-.v-  and be ready for an  hour's fun at any tiui'-  Tho dealer who displays tho R������d Ball  trado mark of Remington UMC  Is up-to-date..   See him.  ftamlngion Arms Union  ftioialiic Cartridge Co.  (Contractors .to'the Uritish   hn^tial and Cdoni.i  Governments.J Ik  WINDSOR,  ONT.  London, England    New York, U.S.A.  ahJ"*" ��������� '*-'** '���������'���������'  ���������" .i-Tir������M.ri rwiwrnimrwiwii I  DUILD-UP YOUR HOME  v TOWN. Do not talk���������support home industries���������talk is  cheap. The best way to show  that you are in earnest is to  practise it.  Support the "Courier" and you  are doing something for yourself  and your community.  We buy from the Factory and  sell to YOU direct. Largest  Plumbing Showrroom West of  Toronto. Let us quote you.  KYDD BROS., LIMITED  Vancouver, B. C.  e Lourier  $1 a Year  Published every  Saturday at  BELLA COOLA, B. C.  O     t ���������mr i     o  "THE two principal reasons  t   why   you   should   buy  "Shamrock" Hams, Bacon,  Lard, etc., are:  FIRST���������  There is none better.  SECOND���������  They are the only  brands produced in  B. C. under government inspection.  Ask for "SHAMROCK"  Burns;  HAMS  LARD  BUTTER   EGGS  and keep your money at home.  ADVERTISE IN THE "COURIER"  rxrrtc&Wnu KiLmmcttmjf. g  Ogilvie's  Royal Household Flour  always gives satisfaction  Better order a bag now  From  Saturday, August 12; /^  ESTABLISHED AT BELLA COOLA IN  [sir,  Brynildsen  LEADING   DEALERS   IN  ' ��������� ���������      ��������� . :'...'...���������::.������������������'       ' I  General Merchandise  Dry Goods and Notions  Staple and Fancy  Groceries  HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE  CAMP. HEATING  AND COOK STOVES  Large and well assorted stock  of Men's, Boys' and Chadren's  Clothing, Shirts and Underwear  We carry the largest and most  up-to-date stock of Men's,  Women's and Children's Shoes  in all styles at the lowest possible price. Men's Furnishings  to suit individual tastes     ������  HUB  tararnwn  Tents-Pack and Riding Saddles,  Settlers, Prospectors, Hunters, Trappers, Campers and Land-Seekers will  find it to their advantage to look over  our stock. Nothing but the mo������ suitable articles are kept at prices that  invite competition.  p. burns & CO., Ltd.  Packers and Provisioners  Calgary     Vancouver ���������   Edmonton  Paints -  Oils  - Varnishes  -   Stains  Crockery and Glassware of all kinds  Patent Medicines of all descriptions  Best brands of Flour.     Feed and Grain of all sorts  kept on hand.    Prompt service  Best Goods���������Lowest Prices   Largest Sto(*  RAW FURS BOUGHT AND SOLD  B. BRYNILDSEN & CO., BELLA C00LA, B.C.

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