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The Abbotsford Post 1914-09-18

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 ���������J-. ,J. ������,-.,���������.,���������������������  |-.:^':':'V;v%ft^iyyu!-^;:r.;.:;'  J  i  "  \H  With which is incorporated "The Huhtinr1, U^S^-'^t"  ,Vol. VIIL, No, .25  ABBOTSFORD,   B, C, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBERS-o, 1914  $1.00 per Year  r  ���������*\  That's, what you pay for and that's what you get  by  dealing with us.    We will  always make  it  a point to secure the best the market    can    supply  us   in  r  Groceries, Fruits, Canned  Prompt and careful delivery service to  all  parts of town.  i J  t  We are ALSO Sole Agents for  Purity Flour; We also  -������������������ andle Five Roses, Royal Standard and B. and. K. Flours  V  The Pioneer Store  J  SSEHHSnOT5B3BSJ3S!SmEB333Ha=  "I"'"*-"  "Wi"  NOTES OP THE FAIR  Among the guests at the fair was  Mr. S. A. Cawley M. L. A. of Chilliwack.  In the running race Walter Wells  was the winner; prize, the 'horse  laugh' on the others, and a bag of  gold.  PLEASED   TO   CORRECT   ERRORS  Should there be any errors in the  prize list published in this issue we  shall be pleased to correct same if  our attention is called to same.  THE DANCE WAS.A SUCCESS  Among the lady visitors to the  fair from Sumas were Mesdames McMillan Garrison, Post and Thomas.  ���������Never shove a man as you pass by.  It might not end right.  The Perriots performed in the big  black clouds; that's why the :rain-  drops were so big.  Mr. Percy Wilson    of    Chilliwack  was a visitor to the fair.  Mr. Malcolm of Huntingdon was a  visitor to the fair.  The pro-German editor of the joke  sheet of Whatcom county was seen on  the street, supported by B. von' Long-  feller.  A notice appeared on the walls  of the hall announcing the fact that  the government would carry on a  packing school in the district during  the; coming winter if enough encouragement were given by having the desired pupils. No one is too old to  learn apple packing. It is the mo.dern  way to ship apples and adds greatly  to th beauty of good apples, in other  "districts gray-haired men and young  men have stood side by side ia the  learning of the important facts of  how to pack apples well.      Those in  ��������� tending to take a course if a class  were started in Abbotsford should  ���������.-end their names in to the Horticultural department at Victoria or this  paper will undertake to send in any  names sent to the Abbotsford Post.  The dance given by the association  in the hall in the evening was a success, about 25 0 people dancing to the  music of a local orchestra.  The proceeds will add greatly to  the surplus funds-of the fair.  TELL  YOUR  FRIENDS  ABOUT  IT  The next big fair on this side of  the river in which we-are all interested is the Matsqui fair to be held on  Friday���������Friday is visitors' day and  Thursday is exhibitors' day.  In conversation with the secretary  Mr. A. Bates of Mt. Lehman on Saturday Sept 19, Mr. Bates stated that  the association had ample funds to  pay all prizes in cash which they intended to do, and he wished every  exhibitor to understand that he was  to get all his prizes in good hard  cash,'the same as other years.  Now Les get busy and see how many  prizes you c'an cjirry away from the  other fellows.  A large troiit was recently taken  in local waters by W. Cambell. The  fish is reported to have measured in  the neighborhood of thirty-six inches. We did not have the pleasure  of seeing .this rare specimen but the  information has been given to us as  being authentic.    Some fish.  The Huntingdon Merchantile Co.  is reported as selling oif their stock.  The Electric Lumber company of  Huntingdon has closed down indefinitely.  News comes easy this week L���������w  same as the May Day grab.  , Mr. Merryfield the reeve of Matsqui  opened the fair at 2 p. m in a few  well chosen words; while Reeve Munro ot Sumas ��������� closed 'the fair in the  hall.  Jupiter Pluvius .was present at the  Abbotsford fair, most of the day and  did some excellent' work in the way  ot exhibition rain, which was possibly  at times the best exhibition of rain  ever seen in Abbotsford.  Determination'to make the big fail  av.success did not however deter the  people from arriving with their exhibits, and with a pleasant smile even if wet through.'   ���������     "  On Thursday evening, the day,for  making the entries there was a crowd  at McCallum's office, waiting to have  their entry tickets "made out, and kept  a whole host of clerks busy. There  were over 600 entries, made on that  evening and the next morning some  2 00 more entries were made making  in all abuot 800 entries for a small  exhibition like Abbotsford which can  be considered .-"(ery good. Owing to  the' rain however' not" air the articles  were exhibited, as it takes pretty good  courage to go out in the rain to  collect articles for exhibition.  DIVISION A."���������Horses  Brood Mare with foal at foot: 1st  W. PI. Fadden, $10 donated by Henderson & Son; 2nd P. Smith, $3.00.  Colt, two years old, gelding or filly: 1st. W. Porter, $3; 2nd C. R  Crist,  $2.00.  Suckling foal: 1st, W. Porter, $10,  given by Henderson & Son; 2nd P.  Smith, $2.00  Team harnessed to wagon, 1st W.  Fooks $10, donated by Gernaey; 2nd  P. Smith.  Brood mare with foal at foot, 1st  W. H.  Fadden $5;  Colt, two years old, gelding or filly  1st. W: H. Fadden.     '  Suckling foal, 1st. W. H. Fadden  Team harnessed to   wagon,    IstO.  Hopkins, 155;  2nr G. Hancock,  $3. .  Single horse or mare in harness to  democrat, 1st, R. A. Baynes, $5.00.  Drivins;  Stallion, 1st, W. McNabb, $5; 2nd  J. Murray, $3.  ���������Brood mare with foal at foot, 1st,  Mrs. P. J. Wilson, $5: 2nd, L. DeLair  $3.00  Colt, two years old, gelding or filly  1st, J. Muray, $3; 2nd W. Fooks, $2  ��������� Colt one year old, gelding or filly,  1st, J. Murray, $3;  2nd, John Campbell, $2.  Suckling foal, 1st, J. F. Martin, $3;  2nd, Mrs. P. J..Wilson, $2.  Team, harnessed to rig, 1st, C. R.  Crist,  ?5.  Single horse or mare, in harness to  buggy, 1st L. DeLair, $5; 2nd, W.  Fooks, $3.  Saddle horse, under saddle, 1st. W.  Wells, $3.  Special  Best suckling colt, any breed, 1st,  J. Murray, donated by J. J. Sparrow,  $5.00  W VISION  I J.���������Cattle  Uolstein.and Grades  Cow, any age, 1st, E. P. Ruthig, $3  2nd, R. A. Baynes, $2.  Calf, 1st F. Nelles, $2.00.  Jersey and Grades  Cow, any age, 1st A. Harrop, $3;  2nd, W. Roberts, $2  Heifer, two years old, 1st, W. Roberts, $2; .  Calf, 1st, Geo. Zeigler, $2; 2nd, J.  Hutcheson, $1.  Shorthorns and Grades  Cow, any age.  1st,  R. A.  Baynes,  $3;  2nd, R. A. Baynes, $2.  Special  Grade Dairy Cow, any breed, value  $10, 1st, R. A..Baynes; Perfect Pantry, donated by F. J. Trapp' & Co.;  2nd,  E.   P.   llulhig,   donated' by    J.  J. Sparrow. Jj.Vi.0O, value.  Reel* Car tie  Best cow, 1st, L. DeLair,'$5.00.  1)1 VISON I).���������PIGS, lierkshires  Boar,  pure bred, any age,  1st, L.  DeLair, $4.  ��������� ,' Sow, any age,  1st, L. DeLair,  $4.  Yorkshire and Chester White  Boar, pure bred, anw age, 1st, T.  Jackson, $4.  Sow, any age, '1st-, L. DeLair, $4;  2nd, L. DeLair, $2.  Any other Breed'  . Sow any age, 1st, R. A. Baynes, $4;  2nd, L. DeLair,  Spring store pig, 8 months old^ 1st  R. A. Baynes, $4; 2nd, A. E. Brown,  $2.00  DIVISION E.���������Poultry.  Leghorn,   S. C. White,   lst,"E.  B.  De'La Giroday; $1.50; 2nd, E. B. De  La. Giroday, $1.00-  '. Wyandotte, white, 1st, C. B. Hill-  Tout, $1.50.  Minorca, black, 1st, J. Frith, $1.50  2nd, Mark Stain, $1.00  Rhode Island'Red, 1st, Mrs. H. Van  derhoof,'$1.50.  Orpington, Buff, 1st'Mrs. W. Bates,  $1.50;  Orpington, White, 1st, Mrs. Van-  derhooff, $1.50.  Hondeau, 1st, W.    Porter,    $1.50;  Geese, male and female; any variety, 1st W. Porter, $3; 2nd, D. Mc-  Gillivray, $2.  Ducks male and female 1st, Mrs.  I-I. Vanderhoof, $1.5 0; 2nd, Mrs. S.  J. Bates, $1.00.  Hen Eggs, best 12 white, 1st, Mrs,  Giroday, $2; 2nd, Geo. Parker, $1.00  * -Hen-.-Eggs,-.beat-A2'brown, 1st,-Mrs.  H. Vanderhoof, $2.00; 2nd,   , W.    H.  Fadden, $1.00.  DIVISION P.���������Dairy Produce and  Honey  10-lb rock of buter, value $7.75,  1st, W. McNabb, donated by H. Alanson,  butter taking first prize to be  DIVISION H.���������-Field Produce  Wheat, any variety, in sheave, ,1st  Mrs. Parker, $1.00; 2nd W. A. Hill-  Tout, 50 cents. , ?  Oats, any variety, in sheave, -1st,  Geo. Parker, $1; 2nd, W. A. Hill-Tout  5 0 cents.- ���������  Barley, any variety in- sheave, 1st,  W. A. Hill-Tout, $1.00 '  Rye, any variety, in sheave, 1st, E.  B. De La Giroday,$l; 2nd, W. A.  Hill-Tout, 5 0 cents.'  ��������� Mangold, best collection, three, 1st  Mrs. S. A. Parton, $1;'2nd,..Ei" Giroday, 50 cents.   .' ' ���������  White, carrots, five, 1st, W. Porter,.  $1; 2nd, W. A. HillTout, 50 cents.'    "  Beets,, sugar, three-2nd, \IWV ' H.  Fadden, 50 cents.  Corn, ensilage,.five,, 1st, J. "yYijKea  ny, $1.00 -   . ���������  DIVISION I,���������Fruit, Apples  Gravenstein, five, 1st/A.-McCallum  75 cents;. 2nd,. S. J. Bates, 50^ events. "  King of Tompkins,, five, lst,;',W. A.  Hill-Tout, 75 cents; 2nd, W. H. Fadden, 50 cents.   .  Northern Syy, five," lst.C. Bell, 75  cents; 2nd, W. Porter," 5,0.cents.  Ben Davis; five.'lst.W^Mc^ab, 75  cents; '2nd, W. A. Hill-Tout, 50.cents  Jonathan,; five, lst.-W. A. Hill-Tout  75 cents; 2nd. W. McNab; 50 cents.  Russett, any. variety-, five,' 1st, W.  H. Fadden, 7 5 cents;; 2nd, W.'Porter  50  cents. '  Crab Apples, Hyslop, five, lst.-Mrs.  D. "C. Blair, 75 cents;'" 2nd; W. A.  Hill-Tout; 505 cents.    '  Packed box of. apples, 1st, W. H.  Fadden, $2.00; 2nd, F..Nelles���������'$1.00  Pears  Pears, any variety, winter, five, 1st  W. H. Fadden, 7 5 cents; 2nd, W. McNab,  50 cents.* .       ���������* :      .  ,.:   Pears', any variety,, fall, ��������� five, 1st,  Li.'R. Authier, 75. cents;, 2nd,'C. Bell,  50 cents.    ... .  '< .       Plums  -Yellow egg plums, five,  2nd,    C.-.  Bell,' 50 cents.  Prunes, _-five, .1st,.  -C;    Bell,     75  come the'property of donor; 2nd, Mrs  cents;  2nd, L."R. Authier, 50-cents.  S.. J. Bates, $3.00     ,' - Grapes  5   lbs private  dairy butter,  value  ' . Packed, box1 of- grapes,- 5  lbs, 1st,  $7.75, 1st Mrs. A. Bousfield; 2nd, ,B'W.-Porter; $1.00; '  Nelson, $3.00 l ... '.-'-��������� ' ���������'/,... '.Berries  Honey in comb, 3sections 1st Mrs.)   .Strawberries^ 3 boxes, lst,^W. Por-  D. McGillivray, $1.5,0;  2nd, Mrs. W.  Porter, $1.00. :  3 lbs extracted honey, 1st, W. A.  Hill-Tout; 2nd, Sutherby Bros, $1.00  4 I'ull frames honey, 1st, W. A.  Hill-Tout, $3.00; 2nd, Sutherby Bros,  $1.00.  DIVISION G. Vegetables.  Celery, best display three bunches,  2nd A. E. Brown, 50 cents.  Cauliflower, two, 2nd W. A. Hill-  Tout, 50 cents.  Cabbage; pointed two, 1st. E. B. De  La Giroday, 75 cents; 2nd A. E.  Brown, 50- cents  Carrots, red, short, five, lst,A. McCallum, 75c; 2nd, Jas. Gillen, 50c.  Carrots, red y2 long, five, 1st, E. B.  La Giroday, 75c; '2nd, Wm. Roberts,  50 cents.  Beets, five, 1st, F. Matthews, 75c;  2nd, Mrs. Perley, 50c.  Citron, two, 1st Mrs. Perley, 75c;  2nd, R. A. Trethewey, 50 cents.  Pumpkin, two, 1st, W. Porter, 7 5c;  A. E. Brown, 50' cents.  Squash two,  1st, W. Porter,  75c;  ��������� Onions, five, 1st, W. Poiter,   7 5c;  2nd, Mrs. A. Bousfield, 5') cents  Parsnips, live. 1st, Mrs. Perley, 75  cents.  Turnips, five, Jst, W. H. Fadden,  "to cents; 2nd, J. Frith. 50 cents  Toinaioes.five. "Ist.Mrs. Swift, 75c;  2nd, I-lrs. Cougan, 50 cents.  Cuouuibers, five, lst.W. Roberts, 75  cents; 2nd.K. Parton, 50 cents.  Corn, five, '1st,Mrs. Perley, 75 cts;  2nd, Mrs.;!'. Cougan, 505 cents.  Green beans in pod,1st Mrs. Perley  75  cents;'2nd Mrs. F. Coogan,  50c.  Potatoes, best collection, any variety, Vi bushel, value $3.00, 2nd, value $2.00, 2nd, A. E. Brown, prizes  donated by G. C. Clark.  Potatoes,, white y2 bushel, 1st M.  Davenport, $3;   2nd W. Porter $2.  Potatoes, red y2 bushel, 1st. A. McCallum, $3; 2nd, J. J. Gatenby, $2.00  Collection of vegetables, value $3,  A. E. Brown, 2nd, W. A. Hill-Tout, $2  Tea donated by Malkin & Co., per B.  B. Smith.  ter,. $1;00.  .Blackberries, 3 boxes, G. Hay, $1.  DIVISION J.-'-Children's  Work  Cooking���������Boy or <?irl under 10 years  Best loaf white bread 1st Jean Alanson,  $1.50;- 2nd,  H.  Walters,  ?1.  Best half dozen biscuits, 1st, H.  Walters, 75 cents; 2nd, Jean Alanson,  50 cents. *  Best layer cake, 1st, JeanAlanson,  $1.00;  2nd, I. Fraser, 50. cents.  Best % doz. buttonholes. on linen  or cottcn cloth 1st,-C. McPhee, 75  cents.  Best mended three cornered tear,  1st, D. Norden. 75 cents.  Best piece' of hemstitching, 1st,  Jeanie Anderson, 75 cents; 2ndf C.  McPhee, 50 cents.  Writing, beginners to 2nd readers,  1st, R. Mains, 75 cents; 2nd, J. Anderson",- 50 cents.  Writing, 3rd and 4th readers, 1st,  R. Crist, -75 cents; 2nd,, D. Nordin,  50  cents.  Drawing, beginners to 2nd readers,  L. Banks; $1.00; ' 2nd, E. McMen-  emy, 75 cents.  Drawing, 3rd and 4th readers, 1st  D. Nordin, $1.00; 2nd C. Conroy, 75  cents. ������  Drawing, Snr. 4th and higher, best,  boy's or girl's special prizes, C. Conroy,   $2.50  Best loaf of bread, any. flour, 1st,  Mrs. D. Campbell, $2.00; 2nd, Mrs.  Matthews,  $1.  Ladies' Work  Best loaf brown bread, 1st, Mrs.  McMasters, $2.00; 2nd, Mrs. Eby, $1  Best currant laof, raised dough; 1st  Mrs. Kenny, $2; 2nd, Mrs. J. Anderson, $1.  Best half dozen buns, 1st. Mrs. W.  Bates, 2 lbs Nabob Tea; 2nd,-Mrs. W  McNabb, 1  lb Nabob Tea.  Best half dozen biscuits, 1st Mrs.  A. McCallum, 2 lbs Nabob Tea; 2nd,  1 tb Nabob Tea, Mrs. T. H. Walters  Best Fruit cake, 1st, Mrs. W. Roberts, 2 lbs Braid's Coffee; ?nd, 1 lb  (Continued on Page Three.)  ���������M&������HBbBM8m3gi&&mg38BSm  ������$$?M&$$im^%m THte ABBOTSFORD POST, ABBOTSFORD, B.  0.  _.    ..���������-.-* t\������.  THE ABBOTSFORD POST.  ^ Published Every Friday by The Post Publishing Company,  A weekly Journal devoted to the interests of Abbotsford and district  Advertising  rates   made   known  on   application  Our   Shibboleth���������Neither   for   nor   agin'   the   Government  FRIDAY,   SFPT.   3 8th,   1914  It looks as though the Germans,were in as pretty  a mess as ever was any nation in- the history of  modern times.    It will be right in to Berlin yet for  the allied armies for the Germans havo'-got so used  '''to running they will not know when to stop.  In another part of this paper we publish an account of a meeting held by the board of trade of  Mission City, asking that the Vancouver board of  trade of Vancouver deal 'drastically' with one certain Mr. Fee, for disloyalty to his country by stating, during times of war, that Candada should join'  a foreign country so that she could keep out of the  war trouble���������that it would add much to the prosperity of Canada.,  It is poor judgment to advocate such a thing at  the present time, and is indeed in very bad taste  It also shows that the gentleman is not keeping up  with the histry of modern times, or he should get  out and boost that the United States should come  and join Great Britain, break away from the ties  that makes them an independent country���������rconie  back home and join in hand with a country that is  doing them more good today than was ever dreamt  of.    In union there is strength.  ,    It is claimed that Germany was oneof the largest  manufacturing countries of the world  and  figures  are given to show that this is the case. These articles will still have to be manufactured to supply the  foreign trade, but not by Germany as her days for  supplying the foreign  markets are past  for  some  time to come.    They will have to be manufactured  by some other country.     The United States is making a big bid for much of this trade and are capable  of supplying the market to a very great extent; and  .Great Britain has as much as said 'go to it Uncle  Sam and we will see that your merchant ships are  protected on the high seas'    To back up this encouragement  Great  Britain has bottled up  in the  Baltic Sea the only real enemy that the merchant  ships   of   the   United   States   would   have.     Great  Britain is at this time as much of a protector to  the merchant ships of the United States as she is to  her own or to Canada's ships.    The United States  being a free and independent country according to  their own statementts, owing, allegiance to no one  country, by accepting the protection of Great Britain's navy in the carrying out of the commercial  progress of the United States is accepting a favor   ���������  from Canada's' motherland that unites us all very  closely.    What does the United States intend to do  to return this favor which means commercial pro's-,  perity to her���������forget her independence and come  join Canada and become a part of the Greatest Empire the world has ever known.  If Mr. Fee would get out and advocate a doctrine  such  as  the  above  and   lay  the  matter  fair  and-  square before those good American friends of his he  .   might get greater support in  his arguments,   and  ��������� would be doing the. American friends.of his a favor  ��������� which they possibly would never forget, 'for if this  . fatherly rotection is good in times of war a closer  relationship to John Bull, with the protection of his  navy for all time to come, should surely prove an  immense boon to a young country with a great future before it. Think it over Mr. Fee.  It is not our intention to enumerate the many  cold hard fact reasons, why Canada should not join  the United States���������they are many and important to  Canada, but the above should be convincing enough  to show that it is unnecessary to tell in what better position Canada is today than if she joined the  land of the Stars and Stripes.  If there are many young men going from Canada  to the United States to better their condition, there  are also many from,, he United States coming to  Canada to better their condition���������men of maturer  judgment who realize that the prairie lands of  Canada are under, present conditions much more  desirable than their former homes of the American  allegiance.  . . Canada ;is proud of her young men who have gone  to the United States to better their condition for  with bu few exceptions they have done well.  Some day they will come back wiser and better  men for having mingled with a great people.  ABBOTT'S WEEKLY MARKET REPORT  Markets have indeed been sluggish during the  past two weeks, The demand for fruits seemingly  has almost entirely vanished. This no doubt was  caused in plums and prunes by over supply as well  as money conditions. More plums and prunes have  been sold this year in this city than in any two combined years heretofore. At present a very large  amount of prunes are still hanging in Vancouver unsold. Many of these have been exposed tor. sale  to my knowledge fifteen days.  Most sections of the Fraser Valley have sent in  excellent quality, showing very little plum rot, while  a few have been very badly affected, but nevertheless the wholesaler has admitted on many different  occasions that the Fraser Valley has the goods if  they would be more particular in their grading, and  per shape, we would have no competition.      Your  packing, and put their fruits on the market in pro-  markets commissioner after spending a great deal of  time in making investigations in this line, has become thoroughly convneed that our valley can produce certain varieties that for quality have no equal  Mere will be said along this line in the final report  which  will  deal  with  the good and bad as found  on the market and the farm.  Tomatoes   have   been   too   plentiful  this  season,  Peaches offering today are  all  Yakirnas,  etc.���������  NOTICE  Strayed  unto my premises on the  Vye Road,, one year old steer, coior,  red, and white. -Owner can have  same ' by paying expenses^ If not  claimed within thirty days it will be  sold to defray expenses.  ARCHIE   EVERALL.  Huntingdon,'August 25th, 1914.  zssasi  no B. C.���������the Okanagan apparently being content  to allow these markets to again slip.from their  hands and use it only for'inferior class'of plums,  prunes, etc. If tlie Okanagan would hold these  markets for one straight year they would have no  trouble in getting their, prices, but when thoy shove  in' several cars and get the wholesalers handling  their goods and "immediately fail to supply the  'Tow" with the required goods the jobber is compelled to buy outside. This matter is. merely  touched upon for the purpose'of making a point  for our growers to consider so that they, will be  able and willing to guard against this method of  supplying a market. ...  The city markets were fairly well attended during the past week and managers claim  big sales.  The prices in the cities at present are as follows: Apples, 80c to $1.25; Pears. Bartletts, 80c  to $1.25; ���������     - -,  Some growers arc shipping in Bussock and Carl-  gean pears. This is very bad for these cannot  be sold. These are several weeks in advance of  their time and very immature.  Crabs, I-lyslop,  $1.50;  retailing at 5c per pound  Transeucent Crabs,  G5c to 80c.  Florence,   anything.  Peaches, Yakinias at 70c,  Okanagans sold Wednesday, at 70c.  Plums, Lombards 40c, Ponds 50c to UOc.  Italian   and   sugar  prunes   very  slow   at   50c  to ���������  60c,  one man selling five tons for $23.50 per ton  Blackberries,   $2.25       c-       .  Celery,  O. K. ,40c per dozen;  very fine but demand slow.  Kelowna Cants, plentiful; grading poor but the  quality excellent. These people apparently have .  not got the right variety, as many of them are  quite different to he "Yaks" We beliove there is  a great future for this industry, especially if they  can be produced cheap enough for to conio into  general use.  Saw some fine wealthies from Kelowna; free  from blemish, and would easily grade No. 1 These  were shipped in the ordinary apple box as orchard  run or loose pack. Many comments were made  as to the folly of this method of sending No.' 1  apples into markets. These will bring a much less  pricethan that saved in the co3t of- packing, and  grading, and the shipper will -no doubt find it out  to his sorrow that .it was a "penny wise and pound  foolish" policy.  Tomatoes and peaches are going to go up in  price next week while the tendency will be to  lower the price of apples. - Large shipments of  local apples are coming in; some very fine Graven-  steins and Wealthies, Cellina Pippin and Wolfe  Rivers are being offered.  Very large offerings, of poultry^and young pigs  which are bringing only a fair price.    Veal 15 c to   .  17c.  Dressed  hogs  lie;   live   8c.    Old  sheep,   12c  lamb 14c ' '  Potatoes   are   coming  in  too   plentiful   for  this  time of the year as they are not matured enough  for storing and owing to this they become "winded"  and  skin very  easily,   and  turn   green.    This  goes against the quality and consequently the price  is   $15   to   $2 0 per  ton.     Seveeral  cars have been  shipped east this season, and  owing to conditions  we   expect  spuds   will  be  a   good  price.   Farmers  are  advised  not  to  ship  potatoes in  consignment  Make  your  deal first.  DATES SET FOR (Mission  City  Sept 21 and. 23  ' FALL   EXHIBITIONS   Maple Ridge .........Sept -23 and 24-    jBurquitlam      Sept.   26.  ,    The following are the dates set for  Surrey       Sept ,22.  the Fall Fairs throughout the lower   '-a"S'ley       Sept   23  Mainland: ���������, Matsqui   Sept 24 and 25  ��������� /  APPEALS FOR POTATOES  (From the British Columbian)  There is always a time in the life of a person  when that person has a chance to "do unto others  as he would nave them do unto him" The time  is now ripe for the farmers of the Valley to take  aovantage of this chance and assist in some way  the Citizens' War Fund of the cities, says Markets  Commissioner  R.   C.  Abbott.  The League has placed their markets commissioner at the disposal of the citizens' committees  in New Westminster and Vancouver and he is  ready and willing to assist the farmers inany part  cf the Valley in arranging for the transportation  of produce, etc., to these funds.  In speaking to a representative of this paper Mr.  Abbott made a strong appeal for potatoes. Potatoes  will be the greatest quantity of any kind of 'produce needed and as the committeees have made arrangements  for storing these ' for the  winter the  markts  commissioner suggests  that all the  farmers in the Valley who are not connected up with  any local organization write him stating the quantity of potatoes they will give to these funds, he  would  then   be :able  to  complete  satisfactory  arrangements  in  the   different  districts  for  carload  lots.    If  this  could  be done  this would help out  the  transportation   companies  a  great   deal.    The  Fraser Valley crop of potatoes this year is estimated at  96,000 sacks   (undug)   or over 3000  cars.  If  each   former would  give  a  few we  should  be  able to meet the requirements easily.    Besides potatoes, the committees will need carrots, and turn-  ipe, etc.    Many growers at the present time have  a large quantity of apples that are affeected with  the apple scab and are relly not fitted for mrket-  ing purposes.    These put up in sacks or any kind  of a box would be very acceptable. The committees  will not object to donations of table corn, onions  table squash, cabbage, or any kind of vegetables.  The markets commissioner is ready to assist any  organization or individuals in this matter.  Address your correspondence for information to  R. C. Abbott, Markets Commissioner, F. V. D. L.,  Industrial Bureau, Vancouver, B. C. or Board of  Trade Rooms, New Westminster.  BBBiWWillHW^^  and receive the latest, most complete and  most reliable reports published in   British  ������������������.........- ���������-   Columbia.    -_--_-_--_���������_.  j  Rates: $3.00 Per Year; 25c Per Month  Daliy Province,     Vancouver, B. C.  President, Chas. Hill-Tout   Secretary, S. A. Morley  of Abbotsford, B. C.  Meeting Held First Monday of Each Month  W.lfce the secretary regarding manufacturing sites  with unexcelled shipping facilities and cheap power  or information regarding the farm and fruit lands of  "le district, and industries already established..,  Abbotsford  Livery, Feed and Sales Stables  When you require a comfortable rig;  one that, feels good and looks good;  ring up  CURRIE & McKENZIE  m  >      .".t'i  'M  ��������� **  '*  Insure your horses and cattle in  case of accident or death  A valuable Mare is worth insuring, so are  the other farm stock. See me as to cost  of this kind of insurance, which is very  reasonable'.  1  Abbotsford  .',f>r iwil. .,,114.-' I. r-v   Is?* fr^r :���������  J,     V if.*?.. ������.   ,   S'l v*  v  to  ^���������G,"ABBOT!?F6riD"'P0ST;'  'ABBOTbTt)iaTJ;"'B. "0."  ���������"~*"T/Jfr ���������^���������y-lr^g'rf a "fc������ grty/rsflfcy *  EX3TIB1TION WAS AN  UNQUALIFIED   SUCCESS  (Continued from page 1)  Braid's Coffee, Mrs.- S. A. Parton. ,  Best layer cake, 1st, Mrs. A. F.  Brown, 2 lbs Braid's Coffee; 2nd, 1  Braid's Coffee, Mrs. D. Caupbell.  Best }/2 doz doughuts, 1st, Mrs.  McMaster, 2 lbs Braid's Coffee; 2nd,  Mrs. Geo: Parkere, 1 lb Braid's Coffee.  .'.Best collection cookies, 3 kinds ���������  6 each, 1st, Mrs! Wooler, 2 lbs Nabob Tea; 2nd, Mrs. Swift, 1 lb Braids  Tea.  Best Collection canned fruit,,, 1st,  Porter, ?3. 2nd, Mrs. P. Firlotfe, $2  Best,collection of jellies, 1st, .Mrs.  ���������W. H. Fadden, 2 lbs Braid's Tea; 2nd  Mrs. W. A. Fraser, 1 lb Braid's 'Tea.  ���������  Best collection pickles    and    meat  sauces, 1st, G. Hay, 2 lbs Nabob Tea  THAT   LOOK  OF  SATISFACTION  is in the face of every man  fresh from his morning plunge.  But whether the plunge is a delight, or an unpleasant task to  hurry through, depends on  your bathroom. We can put in  all the new improvements and  fixtures, in your bathroom at  most reasonable prices.  WM. ROBERTS  Plumbing Shop rj  Old Creamery Olcl^r Abbotsford      ������  2nd, T:;'s: W. Porter, 1 Ib.Brai ! s Tea.  Eosi cllection  canned vegetables,'  Mrs.   \V.   H.   Fadden,   ?.1;   2nd,   Mrs.  W. Poriu.-,, S'i.  Best cjllocciou-'cooKi!itf,' plain <>r  fancy, value $15, White Cloud Washing Machine from McLenan & A1c-  Feely, donated through H. Alanson,  Mrs. Eby; 2nd, Case McLaren's Uuir  entia Milk,   Mrs. R.  Zeigler.  Tea in above prizes' donated  through B. B. Smith of the Pioneer  Store.  Best darning on sock or stocking,  1st, I-I. A. McGowan, GO cents.  Best patch on cloth, 1 st, Mrs. Zeigler. 50 cents. , .,-  Best half dozen buttonholes on  woolen cloth, 1st, Mrs. P. J. Wilson,  75 cents;  2nd, Mrs. Zeigler, 50 cents  Best hand made plain apron, 1st,  Mrs. 1-1. A. McGowan, 50 cents.  Best pair knitted socks,  1st,  Mrs.  shoes now in stock to be cleared out  at cost price, including English K Boots, tlie  regular price of which are $6.00, 6.50 and  7.50 for $4.50, $5.50 and $6.00 per pair.  Prices on other lines cut as low.  W.'  J.- Fraser,   75   cents;   -2nd, ' Mrs.  Dan fCrnery, JO cents.  Best crocheted bedroom . slippers,  1st, Mrs.-C. S. Loncy. ij0 cents'.  Ikisf piece ��������� of hemstitching, 1st,  Mrs. T. A. Swift, 7 5. cents.  Best embroidered centrepiece.' 1st,  Mrs. Swift.  Best embroidered cushion top, 1st,  Mrs. Swift, 75 cents. ���������   -  Best handpainted cushion top, 1st,'  Mrs. F: Nelles. 75'cents.  Best fancy apron, 1st, Mrs. A. Nelson, 50 cents.-  Best Irish-crochet lace or insertion  1st, Mrs. W. McNabb, $1. .  Best pieced quilt, 1st, Mrs. F. Nelles,   $1.  Best  tatting,   1st,   Mrs.   McMaster,  $1.00  Best cross stitch, 1st, Mrs. W. Fook  50 cents. '.        "  Best collection of crochet, cotton oilmen, 1st, Mrs. W. H. Fadden, $1.00;  2nd,  Mrs. 1-J. Gazley,  50- cents.  Best piece eyelet embroidered, 1st,  Mrs. Swift, 75- cents.  Bosl piece of punch work, 1st, Mrs.  Giroday.  Best guest towels enibroiderel, 1st,  Mrs. A. Nelson.   ,  Dost pillow slip,'1st, Mrs. Swift, 50  cents.  DIVISION    L.���������Flowers.  Best fuchsia, 1st, Mrs. Trethewey,  I lb Nabob Tea.  Best Begonia, 2nd, ��������� I. lb Braid's  Tea.   Mrs.   W.   Roberts.  Best collection of pansics, 1st, Mrs.  Perley, 1. lb Braid's Tea.  Ucst dozen asters, 1st, Mrs. Matthews, t lb' Nabob Coffee.  Best'collection of annuals, 1st, Mrs.  Perley, $1.00.,  Best coHecUon grasses and wild  [lowers  by! children  under   16  years  2nd, Mrs. Fraser".-$1.00  Best half gallon of cream exhibited  inone quart and two pint bottles, 2nd  Mrs. W. H. Fadden, Scale.  Best gallon of milk in quart bottles  1st Mrs.' \V: H.- Fadden, Scale and  Milk pail or milk fever outfit,  The e.bove given by B. C. Dairymen  Association-.' .   .  Best loaf of bread from Royal  Standard'Flour 1st Mrs. Matthews, 1  bbl flour,-Royal-Standard; 2nd Mrs.  D. Campbell,.one-half bbl Royal Standard Flour.    !-.  Best loaf-of,bread made from Five  Roses Flour, 1st, Mrs; -E. Scotsvold, 1  bbl floirr, Five Roses; 2nd, Mrs. D.  Campbell, 1 sack of Five Roses Flour  Flour   donated  through        B.     B.  Smith of the'.Pioneer Store.  Special  Best 2 year old colt, any breed, 1st  J. Murray, .$5"'donated by Albertr'Lee  of the People's Grocery and Bakery.  THK  WOMAN'S INSTITUTE  Call and see this offering. You can not  possibly secure anything like the value for  the money elsewhere.  Abbotsford  :0E99  ���������MMronilMMBBWl-ijxWMHiMMMM^^  ABBOTSFORD, B. C  ���������nOMGnVKIBBMailKUiV  Strictly first-class in every respect.    The bar is  stocked with the best of wines, liquor and cigars,  RATES,  $1.50 TO  $2.00  PER DAY  A.J. HENDERSON & SONS  ������SES  PROPRIETORS |  eo3  BUTCHER  Pork, Mutton, }*eef, Veal, Pork Sausages,   Wieners |  and Balogna always on hand.     Fish every Thursday  The-Woman's'Institute had an-ex-  colleiiL exhibit-in one corner of the  room which was indeed a credit to  (he Institute, and considering the fact  that those who had charge of it were  also exhibitors to the rest of the fair.  The energy of the Institute should encourage every woman in the district  to belong. ��������� '   ������������������  ������IT.   LMHMAX EASY   WINNER  The staff at the C. P.' R. has been  reduced and Mr. Sanson is taking a'  holiday.  I  bo  ���������4������  Painter and Decorator  If yau want any artistic work in  Paiatiag,- 'Paperhanging and Dec-  oratiag giva us a call. v  Practical work  at practical prices  ��������� - -  Abkotsforl  ^Cl  one of the interesting features of  the Abbotsford fair was the game of  football between Mt. Lehman and the  Deroche boys. . Deroche did- well to  attend the fair considering the prospects for a rainy day when they started from home in the morning, but  then rain is one of the least to be  feared setbacks for footballers.  The game- was pulled off in the afternoon and was watched by a large  number of people, both interested in  seeing which of the visitors to. the  fair would win the day  From start to finish the game belonged to Mt. Lehman, and the captain of the Mt Lehman team should  be proud of his team, as if they improve as much accordingly as they  have done since they last played in  Mission City, they should stand a  good chance against the best in the  valley Some of the players are developing a speed on the field that will  before the season is over win for the  teams many games'..  The goals at the close of the game  stood 3 to nil, say it' slow and it will  not sound so, harsh, Deroche.      ��������� "  In the first half Auburn mdae'' a  score for Mt. Lehman; in the second  half the scorers were Auburn and  Lehman each with one.  Possibly the most brilliant playing  was during the second half whon Mt.  Lehman was playing up hill and kept  ilie nail clc^e to the Deroche goal all  tlie time. Deroche had a good goal  keeper cr Mt Lehman would havee  made a much larger score as there'  were shots innumerable stopped by  Deroche's goalkeeper Gough, and Kid  well played' star games each one- of  them. ���������  The Deroche boys seemed a htt.e  out of practice and probably liketne  Germans 'out of breath' but the boys  will undoubtedly win back.their.old-  time vigor and art'of playing as1 the  team advances.   "i  The following was the line up:  " Mt. Lehman���������Goal, J.' G.'Aitken.  Backs:   G.- Kidwell and A. Rucker.  Half Backs. C. Gough, H. Bose and  J. Patterson.  Forwards, N. Auburn, A. Lehman,  H. Ryder. J. Hay. and T. McPhee.  Deroche lineup:   Goal, Merman. ,  Backs C. Anderson, M. Devitt.  Half- backs, R. Taylor, G. Robinson  C. J. Cooper. ' ..  Forwards, D. Roche, B. Roche, G.  Gow, A. Knox, A. McLaughlin.   .  J. Heath of Abbotsford referred  the game to the satisfaction of both  sid.6S. '  ���������The baseball game between Abbotsford and Deroche ended in a scoreof  7 to 2 in favor .of Abbotsford. The  game was a short and interesting;one  and 'both sides played well.  Abbotsford. lineup: Pitcher L. DeLair.  ���������T. DeLair.c;  C. Fuller, lb;'E. Ryall,  2b; 'G. Beckett, 3b; J. Morrissey ss;  T.- Walters If; L. Laird cf;   M. Morgan'   rt- ���������.. ,  Lineup for Deroche: Taylor Pitcher  Devitt, Pitcher; Knox, Gow, Anderson, Lehman, Robinson, McLaughlin,  N. Rucker "  Art Ward umpired the game.  MISSION DOES NOT AGREE  WITH Ftild'S  IDEAS  A special meeting of the Mission  Board of Trade was held in the  b���������ard rooms on Saturday evening. A  letter from a Mr. Fee in one of the  Vancouver daily pepers was read and  discussed. " .  On motion it was decided to pass  the following motion and send it to  the Vancouver Board of Trade, of  which Mr. Fee is-a member:  "This board strongly resents the'  expressions,.of disloyalty to British  Columbia made by Mr. T. J. Fee -in  the Vancouver press and trusts the  Vancouver board of trade will take  decisive and drastic measures against Mr. Fee in the matter."  At a meeting of the Vancouver  board of trade held on Monday after  noon Mr. Fee was asked - to resign  from the board.  THE CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND  Funeral Director  Furnisher of Funeral Supplies  P&ene CsHHggtion. Mission City ������  ^���������smmmmmmmmmmmimmms^^mm^Mm  Absence makes the heart  grow fonder, we're told, but a  good portrait of the absent one  will keep the recollection much  more vivid���������and comfort many  a lonely hour of separation.  ��������� We make a specialty of portraiture and our studio is exceptionally equipped for' fine  portrait work.  The Royal Studio  Letter Heads, $3.00 per thousand  EXPRESS CO. WILL CARRY  DONATIONS GRATIS  The following circular has been received at the local office of the Dominion Express Company:  This company will carry free, donations of clothing, etc, for Valcartier  and other points when forwarded by  Canadian Relief Committee, representing Canadian Red Cross, St. John's  Ambulance Association Department  of Militia and Defence, shipments to  be billed prepaid, full express charges, properly certified by committees  Such vouchers must be in favor of relief committees. Other associations  public bodies or individuals making  application for free transportation  should be referred to Canadian Relief  Committee. The Canadian Northern  Express Company will refund its proportion  on  shipmenst to Valcartier.  Please give this information to  your "local newspaper, who will no  doubt be glad to publish it.  R. HELM, Supt.  The Brooke stock has been sold to  two coast meni  Mr. Yenny of the B.'C.-E. R. is on  holiday leave now and Mr. Scott of  Chilliwack is taking his place.  Mr. Gordon jnr. is now sojourning  in the south.  KILN DRIED Board Ends cam now  be obtained from the mill..���������Order  at once while tlie stock lastn. 92.50  for a large double wagon-box full doll vered Cheapest and best summer  wood you can buy.  Abbotsford Timber & Trading Co.  Reeve Cade has received instructions from the Hon. Chairman of the  Canadian Patriotic Fund, asking that  he call a meeting for the purpose of  forming a local branch of the Provincial organization. In respose to  this the Reeve has called a meeting  for Tuesday, September 22nd at 8 p.  m. in the council chambers, when all  interested are requested to be present.  The provincial office.of the Canad-.  ia'n Patriotic Fund is ,in the parlia-r  ment buildings at Victoria, the" Hon.  the Lieu.-Gov. :T. W. Paterson, being  the honorary chairman, Sir Richard  McBride is the provincial president  and Mr. F. . S. Barnhard, M. P. of  Victoria being the.honorary secretary  The Dominion officers are: Patron,  His Majesty the King; President; the  Field-Marshall His Highness , the-  Duke Connaught and of Strathearn,  K. G., K. T., K. P., G. C. B.., tc; The /  Honorary Secretary is Herbert B.  Aems', Esq.,' M. P. and the Hon.-Treas  is Hon. Wm. T. White, M. P., Minister of Finance.  . Similar branches to the one which  Tuesday's meeting is being called for  are being formed in all the cities and  municialities throughout the Province  in adition to which the various local  government agents are being asked  to act as receivers for the fund' in  unorganized districts.  At the very commencement of. the  war and as soon as Canadian soldiers  began to' mobilize for active service.  the question  arose as to  how their  families were to be maintained during their absence.      In not a few instances   generous   minded   emloyers  offered to continue to' pay wages as  formerly   whole   or  in   part  to   the  families of the men who had been, in  their service. Many cases which were  unprovided for, however, came, under  local notice and' funds were started  in several of our'large cities-to care  for  such.    It  soon  became  evident  that while- certain districts could provide well for.the families within the  boundaries, there would be other cases,   equally, deserving, In   danger of  being  overlooked.    Hence  came the  demand for a- central or national fund  that would stand behind and consoli-.  date local effort and step in wherex  this fell short.  In ansewer to numerous requests  His Royal Highness the Governor-  General of Canada took the iniative'  in this matter, and the Canadian Patriotic Fund was organized, with His  Majesty the King as patron. It is a  body corporate by.virtue of an Act of  Parliament, and is empowered to collect, adminster, and distribute a fund  for the assistance in case of need of  the wives, children, and dependent  relatives of officers and men, resident ���������  in Candada, who, during the present  war, may be on active service with  tha naval and military forces of the  British Empire and Great Britain's  allies. This central body has a dlstin- ���������  guished list of vice-presidents and an  executive committee made up of lead  ing men from every Province of the  Dominion, and including representatives of both political parties and races.  The Canadian Patriotic Fund is gi- ���������  ven power by its charter "to establish  branches or local organizations elsewhere through Canada, and co-operate with any. association or organization elsewhere in any place in Canada,  for purposes similar to those of the  corporation" The first step in the  direction of united effort was taken '  when the Patriotic Fund Association  of 1900, which had administered relief during and since the Boer "War,  decided to dissolve and to turn over  its unexpended balance, amounting to  nearly $79,000, to the new fund.  Then local organizations that had already begun work in Montreal and  Toronto, asked to be admitted as bran  dies of the Canadian Patriotic Fund  and were duly accepted. A full  measure of autonomy is granted to  these local bodies, yet, for the' sake  (Continued on Page Four)  ���������<������*1       -       ,-. ��������� -,__...,  -   ������������������   I   n r- ��������� -���������-.     .  ���������    -        , OTHKKft  ^Xm.^^^':!7^y"nrV^^\^t&^"'^TT^\V!I  "^71WM.Kl*r-^rtu^r ww > jjjvsr  ���������xtfprvl"  F   ->    fri     ������w  "\r  ,._..,  y<-sr THE ABBOTSFORD POST, ABBbTSifoRb, &.  0.  THE ABBOTSFORD POST.  ,    , Published Every Friday by The Post Publishing Company  A weekly Journal devoted to the interests of Abbotsford and district  Advertising  rates  made  known   on   application  Our   Shibboleth���������Neither   for   nor   agin'   the   Government  a-Airta:  FRIDAY,   S10PT.   18th,   J 914  It looks as though the Germans were in as pretty  a mess as ever was any nation 'in- the history of  modern times. It will be right in to Berlin yet for  the allied armies for the Germans have got so used  to running'"they will not know when to stop.  Tn another part of this paper we publish an account of a meeting held by the board of trade ot  Mission City, asking that tho Vancouver board of  trade of Vancouver deal 'drastically' with one certain Mr. Fee, for disloyalty to his country by stating, during times of war, that Candada should join'  a foreign country so that she could keep out of the  war trouble���������that it would add much to the prosperity of Canada.  It is poor judgment to advocate such a thing at  the present time, and is indeed in very bad taste  It also shows that the gentleman is not keeping up  with the histry of modern times, or ho should get  out and boost that the United States should come  and join Great Britain, break away from the ties  that makes them an independent country���������come  back home and join in hand with a country that is  doing them more good today than was ever dreamt  of.    In union there is strength.  It is claimed that Germany was oneof the largest  manufacturing countries of the world and  figures  are given to show that this is the case. These articles will still have to be manufactured to supply the  foreign trade, but not by Germany- as her days for  supplying the foreign  markets arc  past  for some  time to come.    They will have to be manufactured  by some other country.     The United States is making a big bid for much of this trade and are capable  of supplying the market to a,very great extent; and  .Great Britain has as much as said 'go to it Uncle  Sam and we will see that your merchant ships are  protected on the high seas'    To back up this encouragement  Great Britain  has bottled up  in the  Baltic Sea the only real enemy that the merchant  ships   of   the   United   States   would   have.     Great  Britain is at this time as much of a protector to  the merchant ships of the United States as she is to  ��������� her own or to Canada's ships.    The United States  being a free and independent country according to  their own statementts, owing allegiance to no one  country, by accepting the protection of Great Britain's navy in the carrying out of the commercial  progress of the United States is accepting a favor  from Canada's' motherland that unites us all very  closely.    What does the United States intend to do  to return this favor which means commercial prosperity to her���������forget her independence and  come  join Canada and become a part of the Greatest Empire the .world has ever known.  If Mr. Fee would get out and advocate a doctrine  such' as the above and lay the matter fair and  square before those good American friends of his he  might get greater support in his arguments, and  would be doing the American friends.of his a favor  which they possibly would never forget, 'for if this  fatherly rotection is good in times of war a closer  relationship to John Bull, with the protection of his  navy for all time to come, should surely prove an  immense boon to a young country with a great future before it. Think it over Mr. Fee.  It is not our intention to enumerate the many  cold hard fact reasons^ why Canada should not join  the United States���������they are many and important to  Canada, but the above should be convincing enough  to show that it is unnecessary to tell in what better position Canada is today than if she joined the  land of the Stars and Stripes.  If there are many young men going from Canada  to the United States to better their condition, there  are also many from, he United States coming to  Canada to better their condition���������men of maturer  judgment who realize that the prairie lands of  Canada are under, present conditions much more  desirable than their former homes of the American  allegiance.  Canada lis proud of her young men who have gone  to the United States to,, better their condition for  with bu few exceptions they have done well.  Some day they will come back wiser and better  men for having mingled with a great people.  ABBOTT'S WEEKLY MARKET REPORT  Markets have indeed been sluggish during the  past two weeks, The demand for fruits seemingly  has almost entirely vanished. This no doubt was  caused in plums and prunes by over supply as well  as money conditions. More plums and prunes have  been sold this year in this city than in any two combined years heretofore. At present a very large  amount of prunes are still hanging in Vancouver unsold. Many of these have been exposed for sale  to my knowledge fifteen days.  Most sections of the Fraser Valley have sent in  excellent quality, showing very little plum rot, while  a few have been very badly affected, but nevertheless the wholesaler has admitted on many different  occasions that the Fraser Valley has the goods if  they would be more particular in their grading, and  per shape, we would have no competition.      Your  packing, and put their fruits on the market iu pro-  markets commissioner after spending a great deal of  time in making investigations in this line, has become thoroughly convneed that our valley can produce certain varieties that for quality have no equal  More will be said along this line in the final report  which will  deal  with  the good and bad as found  on the market and the farm.  Tomatoes  have  been   too   plentiful  this  season,  Peaches  offering today are all  Yakirnas,  etc.���������  APPEALS *OR POTATOES  (From the British Columbian)  There is always a time in the life of a person  when that person has a chance to "do unto others  as he would nave them do unto him" The time  is now ripe for the farmers of the Valley to take  aovantage of this chance and assist in some way  the Citizens' War Fund of the cities, says Markets  Commissioner  R.   C.   Abbott. -  The League has placed their markets commissioner at the disposal of the citizens' committees  in. New Westminster and Vancouver and he is  ready and willing to assist the farmers inany part  of the Valley in arranging for the transportation  of produce, etc., to these funds.  In speaking to a representative of this paper Mr.  Abbott made a strong appeal for potatoes. Potatoes  will be the greatest quantity of any kind of 'produce needed and as the committeees have made arrangements  for storing these - for the  winter  the  markts  commissioner  suggests that all  the  farmers in the Valley who are not connected up with  any local organization write him stating the quantity of potatoes they will give to these funds, he  would  then   be  able  to  complete satisfactory  arrangements  in  the   different  districts  for  carload  lots,    If this could  be  done  this would  help  out  the  transportation  companies' a  great  deal.    The  Fraser Valley crop pf potatoes this year is estimated at 96,000 sacks   (undug)   or over 3000  cars.  If  each   former  would  give  a   few  we  should, be  able to meet the requirements easily.    Besides potatoes, the committees will need carrots, and turn-  ipe, etc.    Many growers at the present time have  a large quantity of apples that are affeected with  the apple scab and are relly not fitted for mrket-  ing purposes.    These put up in sacks or any kind  of a box would be very acceptable. The committees  will not object to donations of table corn, onions  table squash,  cabbage, or any kind of vegetables.  The markets commissioner is ready to assist any  organization or individuals in this matter.  Address your correspondence for information to  R. C. Abbott, Markets Commissioner, F. V. D. L.,  Industrial Bureau, Vancouver, B. C. or Board of  Trade Rooms, New Westminster.  NOTICE  Strayed unto my premises on the  Vye Road, one year old steer, color,  red and white.' ��������� Owner can have  same by paying expenses. If not  claimed within thirty days it will be  sold to defray expenses.  ARCHIE   EVERALL.  Huntingdon,-August 25th, 1914.  no B. C.���������the Okanagan apparently being content  to allow these markets to again slip from their  hands and use it only for"inferior class of plums,  prunes, etc. If the Okanagan would hold these  markets for one straight year they would have no  trouble in getting their prices, but when they shove,  in several cars and get the wholesalers handling  their goods and immediately fail to supply the  "row" with the required goods the jobber is compelled to buy outside. This matter is, merely  touched upon for the purpose of making a point  for our growers to consider so that they, will be  able and willing to, guard against this method of  supplying a market.'  The city markets were fairly well attended' during the-past week and  managers claim  big sales.  The prices in the cities at, present are as' follows: Apples, 80c'to $1.25; Pears. Bartletts, SOc  to $1.25;  Some growers are shipping in Bussock and Carl-  gean pears. This is very bad for these cannot  be suld. These are several weeks in advance of  their time and very immature.  Crabs, Hyslop,  $1.50;  retailing at 5c per pound  Transencenf Crabs,  G5c to 80c.  Florence,   anything.  '     Peaches, Yakirnas at 70c, Okanagans sold Wednesday at 70c.  Plums, Lombards 40c, Ponds 50c to 60c.  Italian   and   sugar  prunes  very  slow  at   SOc  to ���������  60c, one man selling five tons for $23.50 per ton  Blackberries,  $2.25 "  Celery,  O. K.  40c per dozen;  very lino but demand slow.  Kelowna Cants, plentiful; grading poor but the  quality excellent. These people apparently have  not got. the right variety as many of them are  quite different.to he'"Yaks" AVe bellove there is  a great future for this industry, especially if they  can be produced cheap enough for to como into ..  general use.  Saw some fine wealthies from Kelowna; free  from blemish, and would easily grade No. 1'These  were shipped in the ordinary apple box as orchard  run or loose pack. Many comments were made  as to the folly of this method of sending No. 1  apples into markets. These will bring a much less  pricethan that saved in the cost of- packing, and  grading, and the shipper will no doubt find it out  to his sorrow that.it was a "penny wise and pound  foolish" policy.  Tomatoes and peaches are going to go up in  price next week while the tendency will be to ���������  lower the price of apples. ' Large shipments of  local apples are coming in; some very fine Graven-  steins and Wealthies, Cellina Pippin and Wolfe  Rivers are being offered.  Very large offerings., of poultry,'and young pigs  which are bringing only a fair price.    Veal 15c to    .  17c.  Dressed  hogs   lie;   live  8c.    Old sheep,   12c  lamb 14c ���������  Potatoes  are   coming  in  too  plentiful   for  this  time of the year as they are not matured enough   ���������  for storing and owing to this they become "winded"  and  skin  very  easily,   and turn  green.    This  goes against the quality and consequently the price  is  %li>  to  $20 per ton.    Seveeral  cars have  been  shipped east this season, and owing to conditions  we  expect   spuds   will   be   a   good  price.   Farmers  are  advised  not  to  ship  potatoes  in  consignment  Make your deal first.  =s������  r ,''''���������������������������; I  DATES'SET FOR ���������   (Mission  City  Sept 21' and 23  FALL   EXH'IIUTIONS   Maple Ridge : Sept 23 and 24      . I Uurquitlam       Sept.   26.  .The following are the dates set for   Surrey    :    Sept   22  the Fall Fairs throughout the lower   l-angley    '    Sept   23  Mainland: .Matsqui  ���������.  Sept 24  and 25  / ' /  ^^simm^^m^mm^m^^E^^missMisMim^mt  TJW-SI  and receive the latest', most complete and  most reliable reports published in British  '���������_____ ���������   Columbia.    _--_-----__-_-i  Rates: $3.00 Per Year; 25c Per Month  Daliy Province,     Vancouver, B. C.  President, Chas. Hill-Tout   Secretary, S. A. Morley  of Abbotsford, B.C.  Meeting Held First Monday of Each Month  Tv-ite the secretary regarding manufacturing sites  with unexcelled shipping facilities and cheap power  or ii, formation regarding the farm and fruit lands of  l^the district, and industries already established, k  /������  ���������������S\  Abbotsford  Livery, Feed and Sales Stables  When you require a comfortable rig;  one that, feels good  and looks good;  ring up  ���������J\4H'J  ���������i.'Vi'  ii ������ '���������  ,���������'<���������>���������   ,  i't:A  -A  Insure your horses and cattle in  . case of accident or death  A valuable Mare is worth insuring, so are  the other farm stock. See me as to cost  of this kind of insurance, which is very  reasonable.  -I  "il  J$ j  I ,���������*,'���������  ���������$���������-.:  ������;-,  #;7 ���������--  &'  fes  !THi2 Arii3OTS'FORD'p6STr'ABBOYsFO^0rBr  '-��������� >   Jo    ,_i.  T^������->-7  V ���������'.-Mi/H<������-l~"ff  EXHIBITION WAS AN  UNQUALIFIED  SUCCESS  (Continued from, page 1)  Braid's Coffee, ,Mrs.-. S. A. Parton.  Best layer cake, 1st, Mrs. A. K.  "Brown, 2 lbs Braid's Coffee; 2nd, 1  . Braid's Coffee, "Mrs. D. Caupbell.  Best y2 doz doughuts, 1st, Mrs.-  McMaster, 2 lbs Braid's Coffee; 2nd,  Mrs., Geo. Parkere, 1 lb Braid's Coffee.  f Best collection cookies, 3 kinds ���������  6 each, 1st, Mrs. Wooler, 2'lbs Nabob Tea; 2nd, Mrs. Swift, 1 lb Braids  Tea. ���������  Best Collection canned fruit,. 1st,  Porter, $3: 2nd, Mrs. P. Firlotte, $2  Best collection of jellies, 1st, Mrs.  ���������W. H. Fadden, 2 lbs'Braid's Tea; 2nd  Mrs. W. A. Fraser, 1 lb Braid's 'Pea.  Best collection pickles and meat  sauces, 1st, G. Hay, 2 lbs Nabob Tea'  2nd,- ?::'S. W: Porter, 1 lb.Brai :'s Tea.  fiost c-'llection canned vogiitables,  Mrs. W. H. Fadden, $.T; 2nd, Mrs.  VV. -Porto.1,, %i.  Best cjIIocliou'cooKiUt?,' plain t>r  fancy, value $1;"), White. Cloud Washing Machine from McLena'n & Mc-  Feely, donated through II. Alanson,  Mrs. lUby; 2nd, Case'McLaren's Laur  entia Milk,  Mrs.  R.  Zeigler.  Tea in ' above prizes ��������� donated  through B. B. Smith of the Pioneer  Store. ,       .   .  Best darning on sock or'stocking,  1st, U. A. McGowan,  50 cents.  Best patch on cloth', 1st, Mrs. Zeigler. 50 cents.,  Best half dozen buttonholes ' on  woolen cloth, 1st, -Mrs. P. J. Wilson,  7.5 cents; 2nd, Mrs. Zeigler, 50 cents  Best hand made plain apron, 1st,  Mrs. i-I. A." McGowan, 50 cents.  Best pair knitted socks,  1st,  Mrs.  THAT   LOOK  OF  SATISFACTION  is in the face of every man  fresh from his morning plunge.  ��������� But whether tho plungo is a delight, or an unpleasant task to,  hurry through, doponds on  your bathroom. We can put in  all the new improvements and  fixtures, in your bathroom at  most reasonable prices.  WM. ROBERTS  Plumbing Shop  Old Creamery fJld^r  Abbotsford  ggi ���������TyjMi* a xagu-  A  -    iHimtji iil.'Dl  r=r  mm  All shoes now in stock to be cleared out  at cost price, including English K Boots, the  regular price of which are $6.00, 6.50 and  7.50 for $4.50, $5.50 and $6.00 per pair.  Prices on other lines cut as low.  Call and see this offering. You can not  possibly secure anything like the value for  the money elsewhere.  Abbotsford  msBna  9������������:  =<E9&  eixESEEisssnsmsE&smmtmmsmBSESM^m  SS28BBS5SI  UMiaMHIMWWIH|ll������tf������aiMWWt������WW^  ABBOTSFORD, B. C  Strictly first-class in every respect.   The bar is  stocked with the best of wines, liquor and cigars,  RATES,  $1.50  TO   $2.00   PER   DAY  A.J, HENDERSON & SONS  PROPRIETORS |  ���������--������������������ ���������������������������Jinmffl  yvammimmmmmmmmi  BUTCHER  \V.. J.   Fraser,   75   cents;   2nd.   Mrs,  (Dan Emery, .30 cents.  Best ere dieted  bedroom    slippers,  1st, Mrs. .G.S. Lonoy. 5 0 cents.  .    lie's!  piece of    hemstitching,     Jst,  Mrs. T. A. Swift, 75. cents.  Best embroidered centrepiece. 1st,  Mrs. Swift.  Best embroidered cushion top, 1st,  Mrs. Swift, 75 cents.  Best liaudpaiuted cushion top, 1st,  Mrs.- F. Nelles. 7 5 'cents.  Boat fancy apron, .1st, Mrs. A. Nelson, 50 cents.  Best Irish crochet lace or insertion  1st, Mrs. W. McNabb, $1.'.  Best pieced quilt, 1st, Mrs. F. Nelles,  $1.  Best- tatting, 1st, Mrs. McMaster,  $1.00  Best cross stitch, 1st, Mrs. W. Fook  50 cents.  Best collection of crochet, cotton or  linen, 1st, Mrs. VV. I-J. Fadden, $1.00;  2nd, Mrs. 1-1. Gazley,  5 0 cents.  Best piece eyelet embroidered, 1st,  Mrs. Swift, 75 cents.  Bost piece of punch work, 1st, Mrs.  Giroday.,  Best guest towels enibroiderel, 1st,  Mrs. A. Nelson.  Best pillow slip,'1st, Mrs. Swiff, 50  cents.  DIVISION    L.���������Flowers:  Best fuchsia, 1st, Mrs. Trothowcy,  1 lb Nabob Tea. '  Best Begonia, 2nd, -1. lb Braid's  Tea.   Mrs.   \V.   Roberts.  Best collection of pansios, :1st, Mrs.  Perley, 1 lb Braid's Tea.  Best dozen- asters, 1st, Mrs. Matthews, I lb Nabob Coffee.  Best collection of annuals, 1st, Mrs.  Perley, $1.00.,  Best collection grasses and wild  (lowers  by' children  under  16   years  2nd, Mrs. Fraser'���������$.! .00  Best half gallon of cream exhibited  inone quart and two- pint bottles, 2nd  Mrs. W. 1-1. Fadden, Scale.  Best gallon of milk in quart bottles  1st  Mrs.   Wj  H.  Fadden,   Scale  and  Milk pail or milk fever outfit,   '  ' The e.bove given by B. C. Dairymen  Association-.  Best loaf of bread from Royal  Standard'Flour 1st Mrs. Matthews, 1  bbl flour,-Royal Standard; 2nd Mrs.  D. Campbell, one-half bbl Royal Standard Flour.    ���������;-.  Best loaf of bread made from Five  Roses Flour, 1st, Mrs:E. Scotsvold, 1  bbl floirr, Five Roses;. 2nd, Mrs. D.  Campbell, 1 sack of Five Roses Flour  Flour   donated' through       B.     B.  Smith of the'.Pioneer Store.  Special  Best 2 year old colt, any breed, 1st  J. Murray,.$5"-donated by Albert Lee  of the' People's Grocery and Bakery.  THIO WOM INS INSTITUTE  'V  The Woman's Institute had an excellent'exhibit-in one comer of the  room which was indeed a credit to  Iho Institute, and'considering the fact  that those who had charge of it were  also exhibitors to the rest of the fair.  The energy of the Institute should encourage every woman in the district  to belong.  MT.   LHHMAN   EASY  WINNER  The staff, at the C. P. R. has, been  reduced and Mr. Sanson is taking a  holiday.  ,  MISSION DOES NOT AGREE  WITH   FKIfl'S   IDEAS  Painter and Decorator  If yau want any, artistic work in  Pamtiag, Paperhanging and Dec-  aratiag give us a call. ..  Practical work  at practical  prices.  gtedys Ave.  - - -  A^otsferfj;  qgg,*TI IIIIIIIIIIB HH,l^fllllll"ll"ll"'^^'w"',muloBnl[l���������'111  Funeral Director  One of the interesting features of  the Abbotsford fair was the game of  football between Mt. Lehman and'the  Deroche boys. Deroche did- well to  attend the fair considering the prospects for a rainy day when they started from home in the morning, but  then rain is one of the least ��������� to be  feared setbacks for footballers.  The game-was pulled.off in the afternoon and was watched by a.large  number of people, both interested in  seeing which of the visitors to the  fair would win the day  From start to finish the game belonged to Mt. Lehman, and the captain" of the Mt Lehman team should  bo proud of his team, as if they improve as much accordingly as they  have done since they last played in  Mission City, they should stand a  good chance against the best in the  valley Some of the players are developing a speed on the field that will  before the season is over win for'tlie  teams many games..  The goals at the close of the game  stood 3 to nil, say it slow and it will  not sound so harsh, Deroche.  In the first'half' Auburn mdae'' a  score for'Mt. Lehman; in the second  half the scorers were Auburn and  Lehman each with one.  Possibly the most brill'iant playing  was-during the second half whan Mt.  Lehman was playing up hill and ke'pt  iho nail ilrse to-the Deroche goal all  the time. Deroche had a good goal  keeper cr'Mt i^ehman would havee  mads a much larger score as there  were shots innumerable stopped by  De'roche's goalkeeper Gough, and Kid  well played-star games each one of  them. ���������  The Deroche boys seemed a htLe  out of practice and-probably liketne  Germans 'out of breath' but the boys  will undoubtedly win back.their old-  time'vigor and art'of playing as'the  team advances.    '  The following was the line up:  Mt.- Lehman���������Goal, J.' G. Aitken.  Backs:   G: Kidwell and A. Rucker.  Half Backs. C. Gough, Ii. Bose and  J. Patterson.  Forwards, N. Auburn, A. Lehman,  I-I. R'yder. J. Hay. and T. McPhee.  Deroche  lineup:   Goal, Merman. .  Backs C. Anderson, M. Devitt.  -   Half; backs, R. Taylor, G. Robinson  C. J. Cooper:  Forwards, D. Roche, B. Roche, G.  I Gow, A. Knox, A. McLaughlin.- ,'  ' J. Heath of.    Abbotsford    referred  the game to'the.satisfaction of both  sides.  The baseball game between Abbotsford and Deroche ended in a scoreof  7 to 2 in favor-of Abbotsford'. The  game was a short and interesting one  and both sides played well.  Abbotsford lineup:  Pitcher L.  DeLair. ....  ���������T: DeLair,c;  C. Fuller, lb;-E. Ryall,  2b; <G. Beckett, 3b; J. Morrissey ss;  T. Walters -If; L. Laird cf;   M. Morgan,  rf. "  Lineup for Deroche: Taylor Pitcher  Devitt, Pitcher; Knox, Gow, Anderson, Lehman, Robinson, McLaughlin,  N. Rucker -  "Art Ward umpired the game.  A special meeting of the Mission  Board of Trade was held in the  bdard rooms on Saturday evening. A  letter from a Mr. Fee in one of the  Vancouver dally pepers was read and  discussed.  On motion it was decided to pass  the following motion and-send it to  the Vancouver Board of Trade, of  which Mr. Fee is a member:  "This board strongly resents the  expressions of disloyalty to British  Columbia' made by Mr. T. J. Fee in  the Vancouver press and trusts the  Vancouver board of trade will take  decisive and drastic measures against Mr. Fee in the matter."'  At a meeting of the Vancouver  board of trade held on Monday after  noon Mr. Fee was asked to resign  from the board.  THE CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND  Furnisher of Funeral Supplies  Pbsne CsHnggtion. Mission City  Letter Heads, $3.00 per thousand  EXPRESS CO. WILL CARRY  DONATIONS   GRATIS  riiirrrtn *r���������������������������- -**"*- wvjtAmwamuuKtuMiw^  Pork, Mutton,' }*eef, Veal, Pork Sausages,   Wieners  and Balogna always on hand.     Fish every Thursday  Absence makes the heart  grow fonder, we're told, but a  cgood portrait of the absent one  will keep the recollection much  more vivid���������and comfort many  a lonely hour of separation.  ' We make a specialty of portraiture and our studio is exceptionally equipped for fine  portrait work.  The Royal Studio'  The following circular has been received at the local office of the Dominion Express Company:  This company will carry free, donations of clothing, etc, for Valcartier  and other points-when forwarded by  Canadian Relief Committee, representing Canadian Red Cross, St. John's  Ambulance Association Department  of Militia and Defence, shipments to  be billed prepaid, full express charges, properly certified by committees  Such .vouchers must be in favor of relief committees. Other associations  public bodies or individuals making  application for free transportation  should be referred to Canadian Relief  Committee. The Canadian Northern  Express Company will refund its proportion  on  shipmenst  to Valcartier.  Please give this information to  your'local newspaper, who will no  doubt be glad to publish it.  R. HELM, Supt.  The Brooke stock has been sold to,  two coast men.  Mr. Yenny of the B. C. E. R. is on  holiday leave now and Mr. Scott of  Chilliwack is taking his place.  Mr. Gordon jnr.  in the south.  is now sojourning  KILN DRIED Board Ends cam now  be obtained from the mill���������Ordw  at once while the stock lastn. $2.50  for a large double wagon-box full delivered.. ...Cheapest and best suwnmar  wood you can buy.  Abbotsford Timber & Trading Co.  Reeve Cade has received instructions from the Hon. Chairman of the  Canadian Patriotic Fund, asking that  he call a meeting for the purpose of ,  forming a local branch of the Provincial organization. In respose to"  this the Reeve has called a meeting  for Tuesday, September 22nd at 8 p.  'm. in the council chambers, when all ,  interested are requested to be present.  The provincial office of the Canadian Patriotic Fund is in the parliament buildings at Victoria, the Hon.  the Lieu.-Gov. T. W. Paterson, being  the honorary chairman, Sir Richard  McBride is the provincial president .  and Mr. F: .S. Barnhard, M. P. of  Victoria being the honorary secretary  The Dominion officers are: Patron,  His Majesty the'King; President; the  Field-Marshall His Highness the  Duke Connaught and of Strathearn,  K. G., K. T., K. P., G. C. EL, tc; The  Honorary Secretary is Herbert B.  Aems', Esq.,' M. P. and the Hon.-Treas -  is Hon. Wm. T. White, M. P., Minister of Finance.  Similar branches to the one which *  Tuesday's meeting is being called for  are being formed in all the cities and  municialities throughout the Province  in adition to which the various local '  government agents are being asked  to act as receivers for the fund in  unorganized districts.  At the very commencement of the  war and as soon as Canadian ^soldiers    _  began to' mobilize for active service  the question  arose as" to  how their  families were' to be maintained during their absence.      In not a few in- .  stances   generous   niinded .emloyers  offered to' continue to' pay wages as  formerly   whole   or   in   part   to   the  families of the men who had been.in  their service.'Many cases which were,  unprovided for, however, came under  local notice and funds were started  in several of our'large cities-to care  for  such.    It   soon   became  evident  that while, certain districts could provide well for the families within the  boundaries, there would be other cases,   equally  deserving,  In   danger  of  being  overlooked..   Hence came  the  demand for a central or national fund'  that -would stand behind and consoli-,  date local effort and step in wherev  this fell short. <  In ansewer to numerous- requests  His Royal Highness the    Governor-  General of Canada took the iniative'  in this matter, and the Canadian Pa-    .  triotic Fund was organized, with His  Majesty the King.as patron.    It is a  body corporate by virtue of an Act of  Parliament, and is empowered to collect, adminster, and distribute a fund ..  for the assistance in case of need of.  the wives,  children,  and  dependent  relatives of officers and men, resident  .,  in Candada, who, during the present,  war, may be on active service with    ,  the naval and military forces of the    '  British Empire  and  Great Britain's   j  allies. This central body has a distin- ���������  guished list of vice-presidents and an   :  executive committee made up of lead   ���������  ing men from every Province of the  j  Dominion, and including representa-   '  tives of both political parties and ra-  i  ces.  The Canadian Patriotic Fund is gi- '���������  ven power by its charter "to establish  branches or local organizations else- ���������  where through Canada, and co-oper- ,  ate with any association or organization elsewhere  in any place in Canada  for purposes similar to those of the  corporation"      The first step in the |  direction of united effort was taken ]  when the Patriotic Fund Association ?  of 1900, which had administered re-j  lief during and since the Boer ."War,  decided to dissolve and to turn over  its unexpended balance, amounting to;  nearly  $79,000, to the    new    fund.:  Then local organizations that had a!-;  ready begun work in Montreal and:  Toronto, asked to be admitted as bran  cites of the Canadian Patriotic Fund  and were duly accepted. A full  measure of autonomy is granted to  these local bodies, yet, for the" sake  (Continued on Page Four)  ffWWOT  a'iagTOKm'Bi^^ J jr^^yTOeyy^gy-src^mWhiwntg-O  Tfo -"���������<���������������, a r rwi r-fyusc^^^ -> ^ ,**~jaiam  -tr-ar-v.<m      * rw ii"v~xnj:i        ������ r" <.vw t n >������ i   >)  *    f)jf|   a -IT* '* 7   W   *'������.-"'   1 , ���������������      ������     * crlfi    ABBOTSFORD   POST-   ABBOTSF0$&&,   B.   tf, ������  ���������?*-     .fc.       ���������������    -V"  ��������� ��������� '^*''"tiJ.:;,  ;-5 i"-;^'^'i't  '.;'. ';-'"���������--f'1'.'-"- l  -.;''!-'''"*'-lJV'4'j(-''V,  '''"'���������>; '���������������$'���������&  Mr.  to  the  day of  B. T.   Malcolm   was  Chilliwack   fair   on  this week.   ������   a visitor  Wednes-  Master Charles Malcolm, of Chilliwack, was in Huntingdon Wednesday in charge of his father's store.  Mr. and Mrs. Skinner are still  holidaying in central British Columbia.  Mr.   Winson   took  Abbotsford Friday.  air  Messrs.  Malcolm  and Fraser were  visitors at the Abbots!orcl fair Friday.  how  Miss Ruth Murphy  guest this week Miss  Straiton,   11.   C.  has   as   he**  Straiton,   of  ev Dr. Draney, tho dentist who recently opened up practice in town in  the building adjoining the Aloxen-  dria hotel, makes a bid for you)  patronage. His work is first cias::,  and will compare favorably with the  best obtainable.  The proprietor of tho Alexandria  Hotel states that 'business in his line  has been exceptionally ,good during  tho past two weeks, there being a  large number of tourists and travellers in  tho district at  present.  Mrs.  Emily,  of Mrs.  Tuesday  Clark,   and   little   daughter,  of   Vancouver,   were   guests  Frasor Yorke on Monday and  of last week.  One individual in Huntingdon who  always seems busy is "Charley," tho  gonial proprietor of the pool room.  Daily .becoming moro popular with  tho boys and weekly increasing and  replenishing his stock of fresh candies, etc., his enterprise is being rewarded by a steady (low of trade.  Another pool table will shortly bo  installed and as soon as this is done  pool pricey will be reduced. We  wish him every success.  The Women's Institute of Upper  Sumas had'a splendid exhibit at the  fall exhibition at Ahbotsford Friday.  Sunday las|t being the anniversary of the opening of St. Paul's  Church, appropriate services ' were  conducted -by the Rev. Leslie Pidgeon  of Vancouver, in the evening. , On  the following Monday tlfe annual social'in connection with the event, was  held at which there was'a'large at  tendance.  HUNTINGDON UNION  SUNDAY-SCHOOL  The Huntingdon Union Sunday  School'meets every Sunday in the  n������WiSchool House  at 2.30  p.m.  All are  cordially invited.  A.  E. SKINNER, Sec.-Treas  Mr. B. T. Malcolm, who has recently acquired the general store business formerly conducted by Miss  Turnbull, has had the interion of the  building remodelled and the stocks  rearranged. A large sale will be  put on commencing on Wednesday,  September 23rd at which prices on  all lines of general, merchandise will  be cut in order to clear out this  stock. It is' the intention of the  proprietor to then replaco his stock  with  several  new  lines  of  goods.  THE CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND  (Continued-from Page Three)  of the fund, and determining  they shall be made payable:  - (b) Relief, for the investigation of  all claims' for aid, the determination  of ,the amount of' assistance which in  each case may reasonably .bo given  and for the close oversight of moneys paid out.  Ladies' auxiliaries are invaluable  in -visiting the soldiers' wives and  families, and .supplying the intimate  [���������personal touch which often proves  quite as necessary as financial assistance. ��������� ' ���������      "  .might be classed as follows:  (1) To, have 'a just claim on the  fund, it may be shown that at the  time of reporting for ' duty soldier  was actually residing in Canada and  was su porting the wife, family, or  dependent relative who now applies  for  aid.  (2) The fund recognizes as being  on the same basis, not only Canadian  Volunteers and Regulars, but also  British 'Army and Navy Reservists,  and Fronch, Belgian Servian, and Rus  sian Reservists, who, leaving dependents in Canada, may have gone to  join the colors. , ��������� These soldiers are  all fighting side by side for a common cause, and their families in Canada are entitled to equal consideration.  (3 Again, aid can be'granted only  while the soldier is-on'active service  It may commence however, as soon  as 'he gives up his employment or  leaves his homo, and bo continued as  long as he is with his regiment, allowing  reasonable  time  for. his   re  turn journey to Canada.  > (4) The names of families claiming help should'be transmitted to the  central executive for verification and  record.  Further information in regard to  the relief 'fund will bo given at the  meeting on Tuesday evening in the  council   chambers. . ,  Ottawa, Sept 13���������The B. C. Militia  has been ordered home.  -. London, September lf>���������The corrcs .  pondent of the Central News at Diep-  pe'nnder date of September 14, trans  mitts a report that the German-army  under General Von Kluck has been  forced to surrender.  Farmers' and Travelers  trade solicited.  Newly' Furnished  Thoroughly .Modern  M." MURPHY,  PROPRIETOR  HUNTINGDON,  B   C.  Adult  pirn.  ST. PAUL'S.CHURCH  Tne,Union Sunday" School and  ���������Bible   Class   meet   at  2:15  ''Public Worship at 3:15.  A   hearty    invitation - is- extend-  1 ' ei *' to   all to ���������; attend ' these - meet-  'Ihjjs. ���������  .. r     J.   L.  Campbell, 'pastor.   .  CHARLEY'S POOL ROOM  Huntingdon   .  Fast Tables- ,    Perfect Cues  , The Place' to Meet Your Friends  FIRST   CLASS   BARBER   SERVICE  Ask for our" Special Cigar at 5c Each  D. H. R. Draney  DENTIST  Dental   Parlors- next  to   Alexandria Hotel  r. ''Huntingdon,  B. C.  of uniformity, certain conditions have  been laid down and cordially accepted. It is very desirable that further  branch associations be formed, so as  to cover, if posible, the entire Dominion.  In launching a branch of the Canadian Patriotic Fund, great care  should be taken, by those who take  the lead, to make -the movement  broad enough to include the'largest  possible number of iniluential arid  active men and women of Jtlie community. No,small existing *��������� 'society,  however zealous, that has on its mem  bership only a portion of the.available material should-be'admitted-to  undertake, unaided, so -large an enter  prise. If contingents continue to. gc  to the front, there will be, in' every  patriotic community, -a large number  of families justly entitled to receive'  assistance from the'fund,* and- the  work involved, in collecting and administering the fund "'will be of such  importance-and magnitude as to require the active support of a large  and representative body of men and  women.  |    Each local branch should have the  i usual officers, together with an executive committee and at least two sub  committees,  viz:  (a) Finance, for the work of rais-  Those      entitled      to    assistance  ing locally  contributions in support  SUMAS MUNICIPALITY  HUGH McBRIDE  General Blacksmith  And Horsfishoer  Carriage and Repair AVork of  all Kinds  AatomGuile Repair Work  Satisfaction Guaranteed  Next to Alexandria Hotel    -  HUNTINGDON B. C  Road   By-Law,  No.   134  The Corporation of the District  of Sumas enacts as follows:  A road is hereby gazetted thirty  three feet on either side of the  following described line:  Commencing at a point'where the  east line of the south west quarter  of section 4, township 19, intercepts  the International Boundary line,  thence due north one mile to th''  north boundary line ot" sectior-  township 19  Passed  first,  second  reading, July 3rd, 1������"  Reconsidered. ���������  passed  5th ���������c'"       adopted  and  finally  j   \y   ~      .^eptember, '1914.  '      '.   WINSON    FRANK MUNRO  Clerk Reeve.  Certfied a true copy.  j/W. WINSON  C. M. C.  .4.  -   9,  '.'ad     third  When ordering your groceries don't forget that we can  supply you with everything you need. Your order, be it  large or small, will be appreciated,  PURITY FLOUR. We are sole agents for this  district for Purity  Flour.  ALBERT LEE, .'GRflCER M BAKER  m������msdmm^msemmMmmsmmm_  1  \ w  f  irmwmmm^/MMmmmnmMmmmm  mm  f^r-iJT  t&

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