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The Abbotsford Post Oct 28, 1921

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 Vol. XXII., No. 23  With which is incorporated "The Huntingdon Star"  4.BBOTSFORD, B, b>  FRIDAY, OCTOBER, 28, 1921.  ( ���������"���������������������������-���������������������������������������*  $1.00 per Year  MAJOR HUlinu OF Al/llHHNI  CALLS  FOR lfOl>'.SNCI<KAMN<J  ER S  Our. slock- of  hosiery is. no>n  omplele.  and Girls' Slo-I.inqs in  moot and silk.  VICTORIA, Oel.,27.���������The imm.m-  ;ity enjoyed by Hon. Mrs. Ralph  j Smith from any criticism as' a mem ���������  |!Air or the cabinet, since her ajjjtoinf-  nient to that of a    minisfer    without  PERSONALS  M,'r,  wcro  Wednesday.  and -Mrs.  visitors to  F. J.   R.  Mission,  Whitchelo  ���������City    on  FLAXDFRS   POPPY   FOR  AIliMISTICK  DAY  Madame 10. Guerin    known  ... :;      ��������� '-'^'     wiLiiuiiL       Reeve McCallum has'been appoinr-  portfolio, was9on.led yesterday after-,e(1 to-t!le Executive Committee of th.'������  noon when Ma-jor    Richard J. Hurde,    People's   Prohibition   Association    '  VI        I . I ft \ffillf\ri"   f. K .i - .. .1._ ���������   i _ '     .  I ry our  Mcalher Mixture Stocking  Miss  Carlaw and-  Vancouver were  the  and Mrs...].  VV. Gray,  end.  Miss    -Jones of  guests   of  Mr.  over the week-  R.DESMAZES  "   ���������:'        Tel. 16  M. C, levelled'; a    broadside    against  tho   lady     member     for     Vancouver  winch   required   liffle   interpretation  Tlio member for Alberni- was speaA-  int;- in (he debate on the reoly to tho  I speech.' While promising v.ipport to  jtho ftoyernment against any attempt  I of a want pf confidence    vote made  for political-purposes, AV'ijyr Burde  , launched a criticism against Premier  i Oliver-'and his associates which h.pfd i    the- members 'Void' crowded  salaries       Mr.  F.  B.   stacey  "The-   Uninn,^  -.���������during, the ninety .  himutr-s he occu- ! candidate- in the pSsen   electio       il  pieo the f oor/ . The former    officer ; hold  a' meeting  in   ������"e    Abhotsfo���������  wide flnn2'?  '���������<**?������"<>������  "'".d    a {Theatre on Wednesda    eveui  g n^x  .Wide fiohl,    touching on the    beaver   A1' ������"���������" -     -~ ���������-     ������������������ -    y-  The L 0. O. P. are giving a whist  drive  next   Wednesday  evening.  Mr.  j. McCallum  Albert   Lee's   store.  is    clerking    in  All supporters    and    friends of tV  Meighen government are asked to bo  I present,    it is understood that then,  j will be several other  ��������� speakers    Address the meeting. v  scandal,-the-liquor warehouse purchase his contempt for certain efforts raised by a ministerial association whose members-' he described as  "gospel    fakirs,"    theP. G. E.,    t'ie| ��������� .  ���������  anuui- iot  the 1st    Monday  in November so  ,,   -������������������ ������������������ as the  loppy -Lady  of     Prance is a  visitor  jin Canada.    She is the originator aud  founder of the ,  international  Poppv  '���������Day,  which, through"    hard, work" is  .being established throughout "the" Allied nations to take place    Armistice  Day.    Sentiment in     Canada  "in this  desire to honor the'  fallen is    even  stronger than ever before. The Great  War Veterans of Cuna-da saw in the  -, poppy idea- the    means "of." achieving  | two  worthy objects:, "     ;  1.  The    inauguration     of the cus-  ��������� torn of wearing a poppy as a memorial  flower on    Armistice    Day    and  thus cherish in    perpetuity the memory of the sacred dead.  1     2.    Extending much needed assis-  lance    to    the    orphan     children of  Prance  by  purchasing at a ' reason-   .  able    price    the    product    of *. .their  handiwork.  A'poppy to be worn by everyone  on Armistice Day is the -aim of the  W. A. and G. VV. V. A. of Abbotsford. , ���������    ���������  THE  SALE OF LIQUOR  - ,'-. i^-.,  The report of the resolutions committee came before' -yesterday's -ses-  -sionof the prohibition convention in  K~~8t^r+'A3iiii'6*^^^}i&r(;lfi- ^Vancouver:  Mr/ D. S. Curtis, New Westminster,  in speaking on" the resolution, urged  a more united front and the abolition of party politics in any shape or  form from the covention.  ' "The reason prohibition was - defeated in British Columbia," declai  ed one speaker, "was that there arj  too many prohibitionists���������of a sort.  There are too many that* can not ~'et  outside their political party even in  the interests , of prohibition.' I  .  ..The   resolution   dealing  with  government  financial  policy  in  hectibn with the liquor business  ���������finally  approved.     Copies of it  be . sent to    every    member   of  House.  .Resolution for   A'icloria  The resolution adopted Wednesday  morning   follows:  gov  hlic liquors  for beverage;  "We further point out to the  ernment:  "I.    That alcoholic beverage is    a  moral, physical, and   economical  evil  Calls for. Housecleanhi"'.  Major Burde, has rarely bepn  heard to better;.effeet ..than was" the  case yesterday,',-and while he kept  the House and*, galleries convulsed  , with his-inimitable., manner of address, there was a-serious'-.tone un- - - ��������� ... ������������������������������������������,,���������,-��������� Ior [lle w el.  as^estimated.r'b'y-Vthe be3*.med^cai;anir!������TO"g^ which.,prdm-,'end, and.called on M/r. J. Downie'on  RmonHf.-p- 'a,.ti,nw-t\r '   ���������oi.'^^i-i.'-i- -.^rY;59&"troul^e-.lor^������he^governnient.un='' Sunday last" "to" 'reiiew'old' '^rmi-WnY  ,less, as'he -declared; the Premier'saw ahces:      ! ~ - ..4cquaini,,  I the handwriting on    the-   wall'   and  | as to give   plenty of ' time for    the  Armistice  dance,    Nov.   11th   ' Will  each member put'forth a    special effort, to be present at this meeting.  ..  I    'Gen.    J. Duff    Stuart' of. ' Vancouver was in Abbotsford for the week-'  A school meeting of the Matsqui  ratepayers will be held at the A, T.  T. and M. Co.'s office on the 2nd; a  meeting of the Sumas ratepayers on  the 3rd in the Alexandria- Hall; a  meeting of the Abbotsford ratepayers in the school on the 4th;'to vote  on the -school question' of increased  school area, and a vote will be taken'.  As this is a most important matter it  is hoped that all voters 'will ' turn  out.  scientific authority, atid" the't" such  truth is rightly taught in our public  schools.    The government ought not,  to traffic in this'evil - fori  th^rrfore  profi;  I "2. That it is impossible for the  government to sell liquor in the amount obviously contemplated and intended by the public estimates above  quoted without, causing very great-  poverty and distress;  "3.    That    there    exists    in    this  province a serious    condition of unemployment and    financial    distress  which must necessarily be aecentua'.-  will, ed if the government persists in sel-  tho   ling liquor in  the quantities contemplated  by the government estimates.  ! '   "4.    That every dollar taken in by  the  government    from   the sale    of  liquor means a    dollar    less for    the  purchase of clothes, food and neces-  home  cleaned house.  the  con-  V.'tiS  j The lady cabinet minister appear-  .ed to enjoy the gallant major fror<i  the West coast when he started out,  but this could "not "be said when he  mentioned her absence' at the last  session at times when social legislation was up for discussion and a vote  aud then again when he brought out  the peculiar coincidence that tho J  election expense statements filed bv.  Mrs. Smith- and Mr.    James ' Ramsay I "', ,Ba.ynes ij&kl  ' J"  dollars and ' Abbotsf������rd and  The old pool room and the two  small stores next the Abbotsford Hotel have been rented, it is understood, and the main question is with  many people as to whether it is  ^atons, Simpson's, Spencer's or  Woodward's that will occupy it. You  know as much about it as the Post  does and that is all rumor  "Whereas  the  Government.   Liquoi   , ��������� ..  v.......v..,, ..  Act-provided that before distributing   siti^s lo the detriment    of the  any profits from the    sale of   liquor  and of trade in the province;  ���������by  the  government  there shall  first       "r     That the true  be taken a sum, to be determined by  government  to  follow  ���������Xlie    Ueutenant-Governor-in-Council,. the plebiscite in    1920,    is that    the  for  .the    creation,    of    a    "reserve"  amount of liouor to be sold    should  against loss m administration of the  be stnCtiy  limited     to  a    minimum  act  or by reason ot its repeal;    and   quantity with the theory of modern-  /���������.Whereas tne net  profits  remaining   Mon  and strict  government    control  alter creating  the said  reserve    ari>  jn {ne province "  required by the Government    Liquor j ' '  Act to be divided one-half thereof to       ,,���������   ,,   J^���������'   .' ''e*'<!e"/- /  the    municipalities  of the   .province'    .MV ������' ������" B"chani:n of ,N;w ,W������st-  mmstor    v;ns    unanimously    elected  and one-half thereof to be paid into  the Consolidated Revenue Pund^for  the public service of the province;  and  president of the People's Prohibition  Association at the previous afternoon  sessfon. Mr. D. iS. Curtis', as a member of    the    nominating    committee.  Whereas in the annual estimates proposed the name of Mr. Buchanan  of the revenue and    expenditure    of and Kpoke strongly in its support.  the province for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1922   (being nine and  ���������a half months' period of operation by  the Government    Act)   the    govern-  tn'ent has    estimated its    one-half of  the said profit's  (after providing for  reserve aforesaid)    as the    sum    of  '$2,.")00,000, which, added to an eqinl  amount  for    municipalities,    is  $5,-  000,000 for nine and a half months,  or a sum equal to $6,6G6,������48 per annum, exclusive of reserve; and  ates-are necessarily based    upon fig-  "Whercas the government    estim-  ures' supplied by the Liquor Control  Board, or indicate the policy    which  the  government requires  the Liquor  Control Board to fellow in    the   sab;1  of liquor in   tremendous    quantities  and upon a scale which    can   not b" ���������  any stretch    of the    imagination  compatible with  moderation.  Condemns   Principle.  "Now therefore be it resolved that  this annual convention of the British Columbia Prohibition Association  strongly condemns the principle Oo  obviously adopted by the government  of profiting from  the    sale of alco  Othpr officers  of  the association  elected were: First vice-president  Norman G. Gull. Vancouver: second  vice-president Mrs. J. A. Gillespie.  Vancouver; third vice-president. W.  N. Mitchell. Victoria: fourth vice-  pre.'ddent, J. R. Colley, Katnloops,  treasurer, Mr. W. II. Leckie, Vancouver.  Comniitfi������e of One Hundred.  M.nmbers of the executive committee of the surrounding districts are:  IT. T. Thrift.  White Rof.k:  G. H.  W.  Asbwell.   Chniiwaok:    Reeve   MoCal-  Tum...Abbotsford:  S.  L. Carson. Chilliwack;  H.F.Page.    Matsqui;   "Mrs.  Street, Chilliwack: C. H. Evans. Sar-i  dis.-'E. N. Wells'. Sardis;   Mrs. T.   H. I  Padden,     Huntingdon:     Mrs     L.  J.  Solloway,  Mission   City;     T   J   Cox,  be , Mission" City, besides    many    others  from all over1 British Columbia.  were exactly identical in  cents.    '  ���������Suggesting  that   some  as well as congratulation was forthcoming to Mr. Speaker and that    the  "Premier's case calls more for sympathy   than      congratulation,"      Major  Burde    declared:    "No    one sensible  of the atmosphere..in this    chamber  and in the^corridors can fail to be impolicy for the  pressed  with  the, evident sharpening'  in  view     oi   of political axes, the grinding of stilettos and the clear    rapping of hammers."  Referring .to the criticism levelled  at Che  conduct of members on    the  final night of the last session, Major  j'Bruce  declared that  while doubtless  there may have .been some members  who went straight home to their own  fir-asides  and   cogitated     upon     hew  great a  figure they  had cut"   during  the session,  there had  been    others  who;   liking   amusement   had   visited  I the cabarets and a road  house.    He  felated the action of the members of  the  Ministerial   Association   in   writ-  ir'g to country brethern and criticising such members and, he    averred,  there had  been-scandalous  ous letters sent broadcast.  L-.MVJ-.y-P. J.. R,. "WhitcheloTias return-  fed from- the "Dominion-convention' of-  the G.  VV. V: A. at Port Arthur, and"  a meeting, has     been    called  of all  ex-service men and- their dependents',  regardless     of     whether     they     are  members of the G.  VV. V. A. or'not.  to  lie  held  on     Wednesdy    evening,  November 2nd at 8 p. m. in the G. VV.  V. A. rooms to hear, the report of the  meeting.     As   questions' of    amalga-  i mation,   pensions,     re-establishment  'and soldier settlers are   some of the.  chief questions it is to be hoped that  there will be a large attendance.  Do not forget the meeting of    th'  Dr. Thomas- F. Saunders, formeriv  of Baynes Lake, B. C. has settled in  .. . , , -- will be ready for professional work as    soon    as he    has  consolatioi-u,D7a"agunVlP^aoreSiCie!1Ceand    ������^cc'   ladIes oT Matsqui, Sumas,     Hunting-  ,'   oVivpr^v   V   a fraduate of Queen's  don and Abbotsford on Tuesday next  thrPP vl;;  Kms.ston'  ������"t..  and  saw  at 2:455.    All  ladies are asked to be  three years service in     Prance    with   present.  the Imperial Forces    during the late!  -  war. He practised for 12 years at I Services will be held in St. Math-  Baynes Lake and has been attracted jews An&Hcan Church at Abbotsford  to Abbotsford by the beauty and ra- every SmuJay night at 7.80. - Rev. T  pid  development of the district ,w   TJ"'"~   "'"-  Rowe, vicar.  names of the  Premier-and  wife were raked into  Lions, he said.  ���������a n c  those  anonym-  Pven i.he  his good  allega-  The Abbotsford Brass Band is  hard at practise and intend to give  the people of Abbotsford a treat in  the near future in the shape of one  of the best concerts ever given in  Abbotsford.     Reserve   the   date.  .SKNTKXCKI)  TWO   VKAILS FOR  LIQUOR 8XOKK KOBHURY  Mark Robinson, no fixed ���������'address;  ; was sentenced to. two years in the  County Court at Vancouver yesterday  on a charge of attempting to break  into the government liquor-store at  Mission City,  B. g.  [ About a week ago Robinson was  'hca'rged with breaking ' into three  stores in the 9Q00 block in Point  Grey and was allowed to go on a  suspended sentence;. He was commanded to. report to the .provincial  police at stated periods. ' Robinson  failed to report and was/next heard  from at Mission City, where it was  alleged he had thrown a ���������rod:  through the window of .the liquor  store iu preparation to making an  entry.  Limited  ":^~-'~^'^^-"Miifamttiriwrii''itfftiiTf"  ajc=:=a^-af7?-r-c=a**>wry-^-Y* .HI        .' .-*-V  rMUJS TWO  THE AEBOTSFORjD POST  ^fm <u '*m j* mm  3^,-:;.;;  /YJ# ABBOTSFORD POST  J. A. BATES. Editor and Proprietor  ���������Published  Every  Friday  P RI DAY.   OCTOBER  2S,   111 2.1  Slyii Your \ume.  The following petition is going the  rounds:  We the undersigned citizens of the  Chilliwack Riding, hereby pledge  our Vote and Influence,to support  and Representative of a reputable  party running in the-above Riding in  the coming Federal Election, who  will pledge ;himself and his Govern-,  merit, if elected to carry out the following undertakings set foi-th heroin and that operations will be commenced on these undertakings aud  ���������carried to a satisfactory completion  within a very reasonable time a Tier  election day,  December (ith,  1U2 1:  1. To construct suitable river  bank protection on Nicomen Island  aud tlu Dominion Government bear  llu- full cost of this undertaking.  1. To brin^- in such legislation  that will prohibit tho shipment of  small fruits,from the United States  Into Canada until our small or simil-  fruits are/ripe and ready for shipment and that the dates for entry  from,United States be fixed from  year to year by, Order-in-Council, so  thab not any of the above mentioned United States fruit will be'allowed to enter Canada until small or  similar aniall fruit is ready for sale.  This we believe will place our fruit,  growers on an even footing with  the-. United States growers in supplying the Canadian market, as then-  small fruits are ready for market  about ten, days earlier than ours.  3. To build a'bridge, suitable for  vehicular traffic' over the Fraser.  River at Mission City, B. C. We itie  undersigned consider tlie consiriii--  tion of .such a bridge .necessary for  the  following reasons:   ���������  (a) To .give our farmers on the  Mission City side of the Fraser Riv-  "er a more convenient access to the  Canadian National Railway for the  distribution of their produce, especial  ly small fruits as a great many points  in our Prairie Provinces are only  reached .by"the above railway. This  would not only greatly benefit our  farmers, but also,.pur Government  owned railway which is in great need  of. more, business.  ���������(b) The construction of such a  bridge would allow a , freer interchange of trade between the extensive agricultural, districts on opposite  sides of. the Fraser, River,/ which  would greatly stimulate trade and  bring to a.much higher state of production.  (c)  As the    people on the    north  side of the Fraser River are in great  need of a suitable truck road to Vancouver, a bridgH    would    give    them  'easy access to the hard surface road  on the south side which .is now under  const ruction; thereby giving the  farmers cheap, motor truck transpor-  tatoin for their produce to the markets of the coast cities.  4'. That a dredge be placed on    the  Fraser  River,   between  the mouth  ol  jibe  Pitt    River    and    Chilliwack-.to  i care for the dyked lands, and to do  permanent     work,    such as    cutting  i out  the  bars,  etc.  You   will   bo     solicited     rogardinti  above so read  carefully.  exact figures you will be able to obtain in Ottawa;   This will be    wiped  lilli..  1 bog,- therefore', to urgently re-  iKSi x.uc Government to take , steps,  to protect this river bank during, the  low water of this Winter. It is really a very serious..and vital matter;  and we dare not-stand by, and allow  our investment- in?-the soldiers' settlement scheme to.be wiped.ouV as  ��������� well as allow the.property of several  hundred farmers'to. be placed in peo-  pardy,   if  not   wholly  destroyed;-  I have received a delegation representing all the Boards'of Tra;le,in the  i,ower Mainland, including- Vancouver, Westminster and the surrounding municipalities, earnestly plead-,  ing that action be taken along this  line. I therefore beg to' again state  thai I strongly and urgently, request  that some action be taken in this  malter.  Yours-truly,  MINISTER OF TRADE AND  S.-,>        COMMIJ1RCK.  " V/'   C-i  STFVFNK    AiMMlAI.S  TO   OTTAWA  Tho following is the" result of Hit.  Board of Trade appeal to the Minister of Trade and Commerce, Mr. Harry Stevens, of Vancouver, and  should be interesting to those who  are keeping tab on the progress thai,  is being made towards protection.  This appeal is dated October I Tin,  Re   Niroineii   Island  1 am addressing this to you as I  presume the Prime Minister and  most of the other Ministers will be  away. It refers to a matter under  tlu* Public Works Department, and  I presume you are acting in Mr. M',c-  Curdy's absence; it is of very grave  importance.  It appears that the Fraser River is  gradually eating away (In-, dyke and  bank of Nicomeii Island. Last, year  it broke through and flooded a very  large area. This may occur again ai.  any 'lime unle.-s.-i Lhe . river bank is  protected   from   erosion.  Up to me present, the P  Government has turned down all re-  quesls for assistance/ in this mailer.  We have offered to pay' half; the  Provincial Government, however, say  that protection of river banks is a  federal matter, though they are prepared to make provision for the dyke  after the river bank has been protected.  The great, importance of this matter will be better appreciated when I  tell you that should this bank .break  next year at a point where the erosion his been very great it will not  only wipe out a large portion of the  Island, but w.ill flood about lo.OOu  aditional acres on the mainland, as  the Island now acts as a sort of dyke  to the mainland.  Furthermore, we have invested on  this Island for soldiers settlement,  between $150,000 and $200,000. The  Mt. Lehman  Provincial  , MT. " LRHMIAN, Oct. 2 4.���������Mrs.  Graham, who has been visiting her  sister, Mrs. Lewis', for some weeks,  has.lel't for Los Angeles, whore she  ���������will spend some time with her  brother.  Mrs. Lindsay, former resident, is  visiting Mrs. Marsh. Mrs. Lindsay  makes her home in North Vancouver now.  Miss Winnifretl Home, of Murruy-  ville, spent the week-end with Miss  Agnes Macphail.  Mr. und Mrs. .las. Simpson, who  were married recently, are now in  their  new   home.  Representatives of the council  met a committee from the Women's  Institute to discuss mutters regarding'the improvement of the cemetry.  A meeting of the Directors and  Entertainment Committee of -the  Women's Institute was held in ���������lh?  home of Mrs. Jas...,, Forrester on Oct.  ii). Plans for the concert and  dance to be held on Dec. 9th > were  discussed and one sketch was.chosen.  Another one is' to .be selected.- These  with other items, will form an interesting programme.  Prom all indication the;-people of  Ward I. are making a generous response to the Alexandra Home appeal  for fruit and vegetables. Mr. M.  D. Morrison will begin collecting the  gilts on Oct.  2 6...  ' Mr. Wm. Bailey, Denhison, who  has been confined to bed for some  weeks, is now able to be up for a  short time each day.'. His good  neighbors'are holding a "bee" 'to  get his .potatoes-.harvested. .     --.   ..  We have always imagined window shopping is <��������� about, as unsatisfactory to a woman as drinking near  beer is' to a man.  " What we have to decide is this���������Are we going to continue the protective  system of this country'or are we not ? That is the question and that is  the whole question. And the great, big, necessary thing is that every voter  in this country from the Yukon to Halifax knows that this is the question  he or she is deciding when he or she votes in. this great.contest."  ���������ARTHUR MEIGHEN  THE vital issue in the coming election���������  in fact, the only issue���������is the Tariff,  and to every clear thinking Canadian  it should- be readily apparent that a Protective Fiscal Policy is absolutely essential  to stability, progress and development.  Every important country in the world  upholds Protection as an essential economic principle. Even Great Britain���������so  long the stronghold of Free Trade���������has  now adopted laws that constitute Protection of the most effective kind. In tact,  the present policy among most nations is  towards raising their tariff walls, not lowering them. In the face of these facts it  would be suicidal for Canada to do exactly  the reverse and discard the fiscal system  which has been responsible for its progress  during the past forty-three years.  Free Trade would mean death to Canadian Industry. It would1 also result i-n  the immediate closing down of Canadian  plants of foreign firms, with consequent  additional unemployment. There are to-day  650 American factories alone in Canada.  Similar proposed ventures would be abandoned.    New capital would refuse to come  to a Country lacking adequate protection  and present industrial enterprise would-be  promptly strangled by foreign competition.  The preservation of the home market by a  Reasonable Protective Tariff is- vital :to  both city- dweller and agrarian alike���������mow  as never before. More capital is urgently  needed for the development of Canada's  enormous resources, which will result in  a lessening oi unemployment and an increased population. More work and more  workers will produce an enlarged home  market for products of both city and farm,  and the exodus of Canadian men and  women���������and the dollars they earn���������will  be precluded.  The United States has slammed hep trade  door in the face of Canadian farmers by  adopting the Fordney Bill, and the farmer  is consequently now even more dependent  j.ippn the home market than in the past.,  Yet Crerar asks you to destroy that home  market by voting for Free Trade.  King's policy���������if he has one���������will result  in the destruction of the Tariff.  "Meighen ptands four square for Reasonable Protection���������Protection for all  the people���������and asks for an overwhelming mandate to give both industry  end agriculture that assurance v/hich will spell prosperity for all. Individual prosperity depends upon National prosperity. Your personal interests  and Canada's very existence hang upon your vote.  li./"  In-all Hinds of-work, good''results require good implements kept in good condition. If the right sort of implement Is important to an individual workman, efficient  tools-f'or industry.and .commerce are necessary.  Telephone service is one. of the. tools of industry and  commerce in most common use and upon which much depends. . To transmit the vibrations of the human voice  from any point to any other point demands an expensive  mechanism of the highest order of scientific precision and  an efficient organization.    , .        , '  , '  t It is our aim to have the telephone, with the co-opera- '���������  tion of the public, the most dependable tool of industry. '  British Columbia Telephone Company  III WIBMIIIIIHIII  H Kit VI UK  STATION  CHEVROLET   :  "The Product of Experience"  JViadk in Canada '  .  The popularity of the Chevrolet "Four-Ninety" Touring   r  Car is based  on the completeness  of its  service and  its'  great operating economy under all traveling conditions,   j-  In equipment, appearance,  and  comfort  it  affords  all '  that experience has shown  to be  desirable in a modern  motor car. <?<  . Its balanced construction and valve-in-head motor  make it equal to all transportation needs at all times, it  less expense for" fuel, tires and general upkeep.  At its price Chevrolet "Four Ninety" Touring Car represents.the utmost in value, .'','"    '  $955 F. O. B. Mission City  STUART motors  CHEVROLET and DODGE AGENTS  Mission Cily, B. C.  Alex. S. Durcan  Barrister      Solicitor  Notary Public  .     OFFICE  J. A. Catherwood Euildm������  Phone SG01  P. O. Box G9  MISSION CITY, B. C  Wm. Atkinson  .rv'-ral Auctioneer and   Live  Stock   Specialist.  ASK   PRINCIPLES  OF CENSORSHIP  v23 years among1 the Stockmen  o'f'J  uhe    Pras'.'r   Valley.     Am' t'amilar.  with   the different  breeds   of  live  stock and their values.  Adlress   all  communications    tp  Box 34 Chilliwack, B. 0*  I  62  VICTORIA, Oct. 22���������A deputation  from the Ministerial associations of  the province waited upon the cabinet  this raornin.g for the purpose of  finding out the principles of the  rnovje censorship, how it is done and  what principle actuates the passing  of one film and the rejection of  another!  ���������M. A. MACDONALD  !     FORMALLY  RESIGNS  VICTORIA, Oct. 26.���������Mr. M. A.  Macdonald, M...L. A., of Vancouver,  who is contesting Burrard riding in  the federal election, has tendered  his' resignation to the Speaker of.,  the  House,.'  J  H,JONES  Funeral  Director  AGENT   FOR   HEAI>STO.VE.S  Phone Connection. Mission 1-y f  When a man is too lazy to wash  his fflcfi .he lets Ms whiskers grow;  A, gifl ad.ds. another coat of paint.  I    Tile incompatibility in most homes  1 Can,be   traced   to    the    inability to  njjtke fk. big enough income.  For   a Gao 1 SmokeTry  C, & Old Sport  CIGARS  :-:    '"     riGAR    fACTf1."1.-' 'i  ... . .     .       .       :!  ���������    )  a  K?K:*5l*ff,,J^*l'#"i! *%������������ IW  THE- .ABB&ESEdJflD 'POST1  01-^ 1 "1 T J     Our Lease expires November 15th, and rather than  ur Kent has been increased/>������# f^?^^ twice  -   ,    ��������� ���������      , i   ;  M , ;      what we have been paying, we have decided to vacate,  which only leaves us two weeks to dispose of our large Stock. As we had not anticipated this turn, We have  placed in Stock the most complete lines of all Fall and Winter Merchandise bought at the market's lowest  auotations, ever shown in Abbotsford. Now is your opportunity to get your winter's supplies at ridiculously low prices. Every thing must go and only two weeks to do it in. All articles are for Cash only, and every  article reduced to a price that will niove it. This is a genuine Sale, held for the reason stated above. As  the range in some instances is not large be here early. REMEMBER THE DATE, NOVEMBER 1st to 14th.  i\tiwr*mt-^--"'' ���������HiirMiiBrfcTrtiiiiiiuiii  iMiirtiiiiinrniriiHiiirnWTuriiTiruMi  ..���������,. t      --"���������-r-iri'MtWirtn  Emssvs  (vrperfione  Ladies' Corsets, a good quality; low Waist, all  sizes, Sale Price a ..pair. .    $1.25  DRY   GOODS-^  We have made our large business by handling Merchandise of Quality only. ,  FLANNELETTE  BLANKETS���������Soil    Downy  finish, size 11-4; white and grey at .'.$2.95  Flannelette in dark patterns, fine quality  M   per yard   '; 17$  Fine 'lieavy quality 9-4 Sheeting  Sale Price, per yard ....- 65$  .  i ���������   '  White'Quilts,-Medium.Size, sale price $2.35  Bed Comforters; fine quality, D. K. coverings,  Good size, Sale Price,  each    ..-$3.95  These are only a few Prices  picked at Random, but will serve  to give you an idea of'the values.  Be here early, everything must  go. SALE STARTS November 1st  and ends November 14th.  GROCERIES���������  TEA���������High Grade Bulk Tea, Sale Price40$  Blue Ribbon Tea, Sale Price   40$ a lb.  COFFEE���������Malkin's .Best  Coffee,-Sale.   55$  CANNED VEGETABLES���������  Tomatoes, Sale Price, per tin 17$  Peas, Sale Price, a tin   ".. 17$  Corn, Sale Price, a tin  17$  Beans, Sale Price, a tin    17$  iwii������r'iiiiriTinminmiirnflirriMmrmiiM^^ ���������n~t���������n������  BOOTS & SHOES���������  We do a very large Boot and Shoe Business  because we handle direct from the Manufacturer, such lines as McPherson's, Williams'  Nursery, Etc.  Ladies'   Fine    Black   and  Tan Kid   and   Cal-f Bals,  Welted Soles,  The finest qualities values  up to $15.00, ^  To Clear at $7.50  BAKING POWDERS���������  Malkin's  Best, 12 oz.  tin at  Golden Crust,  1.2 oz. tin   . .. ,  -20$  -10$  TOILET SO A PS-  Oatmeal,   S  for ..-.'���������  . . ... . ... ... . .25$  Opera,  3   for .25$  Palm Olive, 3 for  . ���������............. . -25$  Union Hand Cleaner, a tin  . ... ��������� ��������� ���������   ��������� '��������� ��������� -10$  CEREALS���������  2-Miniite Oats, a package   .... . ... ..... 10$  Krumble, a package  . . .'....... ........ 10$  -inrr-T"im-i��������������������������� n���������ii-r-i-r,���������-narnrr���������-n-ni  Values to $9.50  To Clear $5.00  Values  to $7.50  To Clear  at $3.95  Misses D. K. Chocolate Bals.., Williams Make,  Sizes 11 to 2, regular $8.50, To Clear $4.95  Misses Heavy School Boots,  Williams' Make  To Clear  ....................... ...$2,95  Boys' School Boots, Solid  Leather,   Williams'  Make, Sizes 1 to 5, Sale Price  ..���������....$3.95  Reductions in all Rubbers, Hip,    Knee    and  Thigh length.  All our Rubbers carry a guarantee.  Men's Fancy Ne?;ligee Shirts, sizes 14 to 17,  To Clear at. ....'".  $1-95 each  Men's Heavy Ribbed Underwear, Stan field's  N. B. Brand, all sizes, Sale Price, each $1.25  Men's Cotton Work Shirts, all qualities from  '$2.50 to $3.50 each. To Clear at ; $1.95  Men's Caps, Heavy Winter Weights,' New-  Stock, Values to' $4.50 for  . . . .' $2.95  Values to $3.50 for   ;.'..'��������� V,.'.'$1.95  Mule Skin Leather Work Gloves, sale . . 55$  Cotton  Gloves,  2  pair for    '. .'. . '25$  Fancy Silk Neck Ties, Sale Price, each 65$  Men's D. K. Tweed Pants, Well Tailored. Pelt  Loops, all sizes, to clear at S2.95  Men's Felt Hats, Brown, Grey and Black  To Clear  . .'      . . .:. .$1.95  We carry a full line of Men's Furnishings,  Sweaters, Raincoats, Mackinaw.^, Overall^  Etc., Etc.  Boys Odd Knickers, Strong Serviceable Tweed  Sizes 22 to 34, To Clear at $1.95  35$  $1.00  ���������Mii'MiHiHiri  LADY'S   WEAR���������  Ladies' Zimniorknit Bloomers. Pink and White  Sale  Price, each         -35$  Ladies'  Black and Tan  Co*ton  lius'!. sizes 9,  9 1.-2 and  1.0, Sale Price each..   .  Three for   Ladies' Vests, Heavy' Cotton  Sale  Price,  each   .. ... ............... -45$  Plaid Dress Goods,'3G'inches wide, ideal for  Children's Dresses, Sale Price, a yard . .45$  House Dresses, Sale Price for ....$1.35 up  Sweaters, Underwear, Silks, ami. everything-.ah  l!jjto-da(e Dry 'Woods Store carrier./.  All Ginghams, to clear at .......27$ a yard  Farmers'PhoiTe 1907  B. C. Phone 4  STORE OF QUALITY  ABBOTSFORD, B. C.  wm  wmmrnm ' THE -ABBflTSPOPJ> POST  6  Wiasm jMS.-g* j.TT,^*^������"y:^.'*3a<^>inx.'La^i*?J f.wsat.* 'vi^t ji  >^(i-������M*^f-|rt-v. *ii������.-^'������������ _.���������  iHI)WNHil  >j.aivT..t.|.ivrr*..  TJIK lOKDNLi'   TARIFF affects  the  whole, nation.  ������������������ I-    Dominion     wovorument     statistics  The Fordney Tariff of the United show that* the Fordney Tariff so'far  States, which as designed as a pro- affects our farmers that whereas  tective measure for the hem-fit of the L|l(jy |.)f!t ycar s0|(| tw0 million dol-  American farmer in his home market jiirs worth of fhoir products' south of  has produced a crisis not only in our n,,'. lino, (he total sales of farm pro-  Canadian politics but in our dailv (\n(,e wii] n,js yc,.ir j,,, - nearer fifty  life.     , ' million.     Hut this is hot all of it:  if  Eefore the imposition by the U������'it-,ji,e Fordcny Tnriff only meant the  i������d States of a new tariff on Unporta- loss of 0,ir American market it would  tions of rood products from all other no( ue as harmful as it is; its great-  countries  including Canada,   we lwd (ir effect is in piling up an excess sup-  almost as free access to American  markets for the products of our  farms as had the States of Illinois  or Washington, and    that,     without  ply of produce in, our home    market  which we cannot    possibly    consume  ourselves or find another out:el   for  with the result that the whole indus-  giving any return    advantage to    ei- (|.y  is demoralized and" prices sluiup  ther     manufacturers   or     producers 0��������� tnjs s\^c 0f the    boundary    out of  ��������� across the line.    Our wool, wheat,, ap- any ��������� possible comparison  with  prices  pies, potatoes, cattle, sheep, tobacco, on tj,e other side.    To. illustrate this  milk, flux    seed,    butter, eggs   -unci  it is 0���������|y necessary to point out  (ha  cheese moved south to rich aud huii- a g00(| ste(J|. js WOr(h ���������! cents ;i poum  gry markets to the extent of. nvo hun- at   Winnipeg or    C;ilg;ir>v   hut     th.  dred millions of dollars a eyar: these same.sieor    would be    worth 7    1-:  products" constituted    forty per cent. ceiltg a    poumi if |,'e    could    put    up  of oiir exports to the    United States  ror sa],, i)t Chicago--bnt (he Pordno\  and comamnded not only higiu-r prlc- Tariff prevents  that.  What  cs. than prevailed at home I ut the  advantage of the exchange situation  as well, for every American dollair  which our farmers brought into the  country as the result of sales in the  south had attached to it a premium  of from then to nineteen per cent.  American      farmers   protested   to  their government,that they were at a  .disadvantage   in   their   own   markets  owing to Canadian competition.    The  result was the   Fordney    Tariff  Bill  which has achieved the    desired    result;; it Was protected the    American  farmer from all  foreign competition  with which he was unable to contend.  There the    American    interest stops  and ours begins, lor the Fordney Tar  iff is the hardest    blow  which Cana-  -dlan farming has  received since the  abrogation  of the    Treaty of    Reciprocity with the United States by that'  country in  1868  in>    resentment   for  covert assistance rendered the Southern States by our Empire in tbe early  stages of'the American Civil War.   ,  Ever since that abrogation in IS06  and up to 193 1, Canadian statesmen  Can this b<* altered?    Certainly it  can   be.     Mow?     My entering into    it  Treaty of  Reciprocity with  the  United States.       Undoubtedly this would  adversely affect    some of our manufacturing   industries,   but   iK't  nearly  as much as they appear (or affect) to  fear.    On the other hand it would he  the greatest possible boon to agriculture.    .Without giving Reciprocity    a  trial  we cannot ascertain    just   what  its' effects would bo in regard to our  manufacturing     industry,     but   it  is  certain that the effect    would not. he  as disastrous as it has been pictured  by    highly    interested    parties    who  tremble at the very thought, cf    hav-  fiiK to lower j their    charges    by. so  much as one per cent., although their,  annual profits are closer to    twenty  or  thirty. i  All  talk   of annexation' in  connection with the topic of Reciprocity    is  purest nonsense, raked in   for politic-j  al capital.    Absolute proof of this is.  in the fact    that the    administration  which would have secured Reciproc-  o ror r ou���������  First of all, il can bring io you Hie NE\\S.of  your own home lown. Week after week, it  prints in detail the happenings of the community. Faiilifully it-sets forth the goings  and coinings of its people, giving careful attention to the homely little items thai are ig  nored in. the overcrowded dailies of Hie big  cil'jes...  It can furnish you with more interesting information about people you know, or used to  know, than could a dozen correspondents.  The one who writes lo you may know only a  few of your friends at home���������but your Home  Town Paper knows them all. It tells you  about people you are interested .in".  r  Finally, in a good businesssen.se, your Home  Town Paper is of valiic to you. It "keeps you  posted as to.the industrial and commercial  growth of a community which familiarity  may have caused you to neglect. Jt often reveals that keen people see, right in your home  town, a mine of golden opportunity. . The  moral is obvious���������.     '  \\\ S.   Fielding ���������-  trade  and that was to defeat Reciprocity by  any and all means necessary, proper  or   improper.  Whatever, else  it may    mean;  the  of both parties.had done their .best ity in lfn 1 was condemned by its op-,  to renew the reciprocal trade rela- P������nents in Ontario and the West as ;  -tions with our neighbor which-had Annexationist, and in Quebec as Ira-!  formerly been so beneficial'but had Perialist because of its navd" pro-  failed until the-Hon w. s i,'ioMiT.ir..S'"anime; both had but one object!  succeeded in   3 911.  In reviewing this theme of  relations with the United States    we  do so merely an*l entirely for the benefit of subscribers and in an.   absol- accomplishment of Reciprocity would  utely   independent   and   non political  mean  prosperity  to    eight    hundred  vein, unbiased in any way. The facts thousand Canadian farmers by provi-  stated are historical    and    undenied  ding a market for the    surplus pro-  except by persons politically interest- duction which we cannot use in- this  ed.                                                                 country.    It is to this end that    the  There can be no -doubt    whatever  farmers of the    prairies, of    Ontario  that the people of    Canada wore    in  and of the East are firmly organized  favor of Reciprocity with the United   for political action in    order to constates in 1911 or that the Laiirier ad- trol the next government of the Doin-  ministration     would    have    been re-  inin if not. actually to hold the. reigns  turned to put it through if it had not of power.    Whether they are right, or  been tor his loss of    support in    his   wrong we cannot actually know until  own Province of Quebec    where the  we have tested the   thing for    which  Nationalists     under     Bour.i-fa   and they  strive���������Farm and  Home.  Lavergne and the other elements of   lubscnbe tc  or your  AUBOTSFOIU)  POST  Abbotsford,   B.  C.  THOSK  WHO  DO  NOT  ADVERTISE AT ALL  Some men, and some businesses,  and professions do not advertise. We  have heard of one concern so determined not to come out into the light  that issued circulars to announce to  the public that "It is now and always  MUST  PROVIDE  WORK  FOR AlfJRVILl.K  SfiTTLRRR  re-  opposition to his administration combined all theiir forces to condemn him  for his Imperial activities and inclinations and for his creation of a. Canadian navy. Reciprocity waj not the  issue in Quebec. The result i\?is that  Canada lost the opportunity for reciprocal trade relations which her  leaders had been seeking foi fifty  years". ������.    .  Fortunately a Democratic (low  tariff or free trade J government under Wilson    came into power in    the  United States in 1912,    so that    the j     The truth,   of the    matter is  loss of better trade    relations    was  most  every  other  up-and-doinp   bus-lwas  carefully  . The commission which made an  investigation of conditions at Mer-  ville has submitted its reports. Briefly  their  recommendations are:  1. Deferment of first payments on  improved land.  2. Provision of road work rather  than  further cash advances!  3. Imperative necessity of providing better roads.  The report which is given below  is signed by Colonel I.atU. Rev.  Thos. Menzies, M. "L. A., and_ Mr.  Chas. Rogers.  1. Re agreement on sale between  L.S.B. and Settlers.  Settlers were    interviewed in per-  by the Land Settlement    Board    and ; cases as far as    we are    ablj to  that,  if    possible, an    extension     bo \ port,  granted for a period sufficiently long i     Wo are of the opinion that most of  to help settlers  become    established  the individual complaints can be ad-  on their farms before land payments1  justed between L. S. B. and Settler,  fall  due.  2.  Re  Further Cash Advances.  The consensus of opinion among  settlers is that in the-, majority of  cases, particularly on improved  farms, the debt against their farms-  is as great as they can oof-sihly  handle. Those on unimproved farms  are also anxious that their debt be >  kept down as low as possible.  If road    work    can    be    provided  throughout the. coming wintji',    set  CLEARING OUT TUBFRCULOSIS  IN  CATTLE  The accredited herd system put in  operation two years ago by the Heath  of Animals Branch of the Department of Agriculture at Ottawa has  been well received by the stockmen  of the country. It is confined to pure  bred cattle and is intended to rid as  rapidly as possible the disease of tuberculosis     from     Canadian     herds.  tiers are of the opinion that by work i n- ��������� ���������  i     ,.,     tr ,    .  ing part time    they can    make a liv-'-*Igure8 glVen ������lU by the V^^^  ing    and    still    do    a    considerable  amount of    improvement    on    their  son  or on  their own     farms.    State,  jof development,    condition, of farm  j lioldinga.    In  this way the    settlers  I has been   the policy of this house not nature of soil, and general oordilions   ca"   ������e.(  alo������S  without cash  advanc-  ,o advertise in any manjier," etc., etc '!examined, as well as    settlers finan-   e6>  wlll'<:h,  if given,  would   be piling  !     They  advertised  that  the  did  not cIaI .affa������rs wit������ regard to peym-nts   ������P more debt against their farms.  dv   ,tJ    , coming due and  the    possibility    of       6-  Re Roads,  i c vei  tse. settlers being in a   position to   meet       It is impossible to exaggerate the  that; their payments on stock    and    land   importance of a good system of roads  considered.     Settlors   throughout the area.    At the present  not. felt during Wilson's administra-  iness around them did advertise   ai..i  on lmPrrved f������rms    almost    without   time most of the roads are passable,  exception were ot the opinion that but as soon as wet weather sets in  for the first few years it would be some parts of the area will be inac-  inipossible to make more than a bare  cessible,  except  on     foot.       Settler^  im  tion. Under his guidance the Amer- the compelling force of modern mer-  ican tariff was so -low that Canada chandizing caused them in the least  practically    enjoyed all of the bene-, stand against the modern methods to-! living for    themselves and     families   along these roads are shipping ere a  fits of reciprocity    although  we had  advertise to  the    upblic    that   they  w'^'e they were making    further im-  in varying   quantities to the Cream-  rejected it, until the    advent of    the  didn't believe in advertising.  administration     under  Advertising, is the    chief force  Republican  Harding.  With  Harding came the    Fordney j I'-pers the most potent and most ec-  Tariff���������and the terrific slump in otir'on������niical   advertising   medium.  chief industry,  fanning.    With  poor! -:   OVER :$8 MILLIONS  G. R  provements    and   "bringing      their   ery a/id as this is a vital part of their  ]farms into a sufficiently    productive   livelihood,.provision for access is ab-  in  ewrv to make their payments on the   soultely   imperative,  commercial life today, and the news- land. -       I     rJ he committee would very strong-  many were of    the    opinion    that  ly       reconunend    a    comprehensive  they could  meet the  Lien .Votes due  scheme of road  improvement within  on stock as1 they    fell due, but could   the area; firstly, for the purpose    of  _,.���������., ���������0 <rnrmi,f, not, make the payments q<.\ land. Set-  providing access  to farms;   and  sec-  times and conditions confronting our 0\ KR -J8 MILLIONS ^     ;  tiers on  unimproved    fa.-mr, are not  ondly, for the purpose of    providing  farmers  their  buying capacity     was! SPF.VT ON P. C. 10.  in  a position financially to stay    on   work during the coming    winter, for  impaired to a greater extent than    it'     lnnaimiIA    n~,    . TT .  .     _    /their  farms    cantinually,     therefore  settlers.     Both  of    these are absol-  otherwise would  have  been  pvph   in'on i    7 ..     / ��������� ,    ���������     ~~.^ } J Cann0t get    sufficient     development  utely     essential   for  the    successful  otherwise would  have  been  even  in   30 last, the total amount    expended done to.put farms in    shape to pro-  continuance of the settlement  view of world conditions.   Prosperity m connection with the Pacific Great duce enough to make pavments1   on I     4. Miscellaneous"  in this agricultural country id natur-  Eastern  Railway,     the ���������  government time. *    .   . I     Several       individual     complaints  ally based unon the welfare of oivriown,<:d l!"e' w.as ?"38.652.703 03, ac-1 The settlers are an?;ious to obtain'were received from settlers regard-  farmers since' they and their seven p^X%^'"^"the^lSsl'tu e" n ������T/n" nl" eXtelS8,?h ������'" tlm������ fr������m ,?"?^u-6h m^n aS piioes '"f ,and-  K���������,. , ,,        ,        ���������       .  ���������       ,     ,    if     '      Oliver    to  the    legiaiatuie.  three  to  five years, for    commuice-   drainage, line    fences, etc., He. hut  billion dollar investment ir: land, The Premier also wpresented the re-i-mei,', of payments on the land, an.1 as these are of importance only to the order in which applications have  buildings and stock form the basis of Port setting torth a statement of ac- this committee, from their know- the individual concerned, and are ������een received.���������Department of Ag-  our whole    economic life;    ai'vthing  ?������"ts ,0', the railway as of June 30,  ledge of the    circumstances,    would   more or less of a private nature   we   ''^culture.    Vancouver respect fully urge that this ."question  are attaching    herewith to a supple-'  ���������   ,Le given very earnest    consideratiou   mentary report    dealing   With such       Safety    First:     The    fellow    who  J "j , . -���������      wears both, a belt and braces.  Director General show that thirty-  six herds had up to October 1, been  fully accredited. The breeds represented are the Ayrshire, Holstein,  Jersey, Shorthorn and Aberdeen Angus, tho dairy breeds predominating.  The accredited herds are widely distributed. Nova Scotia has 1: Quebec  9; Ontario 10; Manitoba 4 and British Columbia  10.  Besides the herds which have been  fully accredited there are at present  558 herds which have been tested  once or more in process of accreditation and 5 4 herds awaiting the first  test, making a total of 648 herds. As  the herds in this lot fulfil the necessary conditions, they become fully  accredited. The Inspectors of the  Health of Animals Branch are making as rapid progress as is possible  under the circumstances, taking in  the work and the great importance  of doing the testing carefully and  accurately rather than rapidly.  The reactors are always removed  from the herd at once and usually  are immediately slaughtered under  veterinary supervision. Applications  for tests have been coming in faster  than they could be dealt with. A  waiting list has therefore been formed and as soon as circumstances permit, the herds in this list will b^ tested, taking them as'far as possible    in  which affects  the  1021, duly audited bv a  Canadian  farmer fjrra  >n (  Ltlb} ABBOTSFORD POS1.  PA ON TMRlOW  Wr  and fare for Return Trip to  EL %*\e?  Who will the four lucky ladies be?    That will be up  to those who enter the contest to,say for themselves.  m  T!te candidates should get out and work mornirig-,  ; noon and night if they expect to win. They should get  their friends to help them. The contest editor will  accept every subscription sent in with the required  subscription price and the name of the contestant  should be marked on the coupon.  Any young lady has.a grarid chance of being the  lucky winner in her district and the Post will publish  tie votes of the leaders in each district weekly.  Remember that thexjonte.st will last for three weeks  only and it is up to every candidate to work hard all  the time. Any information required will be gladly  nimished by the contest Editor or his assistants iruor-  der that every candidate will have an equal chance of  success.   But it is up to the candidates themselves to  WORK HARD AND WIN  district'one ������  AJl that portion of Abbotsford Townsite and district lying west .of the  Riverside,Road and;north of Yale Iload.  DISTRICT   TWO  All that portion of Abbotsford   Townsite   lying east of the Riverside  Road and north of the Yale Road.  DISTRICT THREE  All   that   portion   of   Abbotsford    Townsite    and   district   east   of  Huntingdon Road and South of Yale Road.  DISTRICT FOUR  All'  that   portion   of   Abbotsford   Townsite, and    district   west   of  Huntingdon Road and south of the Yale Road. ���������_-;..,, *  NOTE���������Remember..ft is the.-.largest numbei\of voSs.iii.vJur   district  that'counts.. *"��������������������������������������������� \.r     .���������:     ..'.'. '���������  -������ ['"\     r;:'  l.  2.  O  4.  5.  C.  9.  RULES  OF   CONTEST  Every contestant   must be a bona-fide   resident of the district    hi which she is  competing. '  Kach coupon filled out must contain the name of contestant together wirh post-  on ice address with box numbers of rural route as the case may be.  A contestant.must compete only in the district, in which she resides"onlV, as a  contestant cannot compete for the prize iu more than one district.  Contestants must agree to abide by the decision of the contest editor as being  final in all cases. .-  ^     ���������   -���������: '������������������-'-���������  Cash or post office order or express orders must accompany, all subscriptions  sent in by contestants or their friends.  The votes received will be totaled each week and the standing of the candidates  in each district announced in the columns of^the Abbotsford Post.  The contest will positively close at 10   o'clock on Nov.   19tb.. 1921.    All   votes  received on the first mail the day following will be regarded as legal  No employee of the Abbotsford Post will be eligible to compete..  Each contestant to win the $25 and fare for return trip to Vancouver must  obtain at least 30,000 votes. Less than that number of votes will entitle  the winner to a proportionate amount of the ?25.00.  .  ENTRY BLANK  Contest Editor, Abbotsford ' Post���������Please enter my name in your  big popularity contest as outlined in the advertisement appearing In  the Post. I hereby agree to abide by the rules and regulations, of  the contest and agree to accept the decisions of the contest editor as.  final on ail questions.  NAME  ..  ADDRESS  DISTRICT NO.  The popularity of the various candidates will be determined by the  number of votes cast for them. Every new subscribtion to the Abbotsford Post will count as so many votes, based on the following table:  One Year's subscription .. .'.���������';  . 1,000 votes.  ,      Two Years'  subscription  ............... .. . .   2,500 votes  Three Years' subscription ......... . . .....*'..'.'.'. 3,000 voW  Five Years' subscription ........... ... ��������� ..,. . . . 5,000 votes.  Subscription blanks will be furnished to all candidates or'their friends-  and iiard work will be necessary to win the various prizes so that an  early start in the campaign should bring success. The Abbotsford Post  is anxious to know who is the most popular young lady in euch district  and hard work on the part of the candidates will help to solve this The  price oi the Abbotsford Post is one dollar per year in advance.  Subscriptions may be paid to Mr.* A. McCallum who will give receipts  and take the name of the candidate to which vote is to be ���������eiven- or may  be sent through mail to Abbotsford Post, Abbotsford, B. C. "  REMEMBER CONTEST BEGINS SATURDAY  OCTOBER 29TH, AND THE FIRST TEN SUBSCRIPTIONS PAID MR. McCALLUM, IF BEFORE 12  O'CLOCK NOON, ARE WORTH 5000 VOTES EACH  I Passes Judgment  On Nicomen Isldnd  Nicomen  Island is not.    worf"h shy  mg!  This is the ������������������ amazing, declaration  of Hon. John. Oliver, premier of British Columbia, reported to the Hoard  of Trade by M;r. U B. Lusby, chairman of a special committee which  has been working on this - matter  for "bout   two months.  The'' premier flatly , refused to  maive any expenditure on ininU protection work, .there or elsewhere,  Following this refusal, Hon. H. II.  Stevens was interviewed and he was  written Ottn'wa urging- thul in the  circumstances tlio Dominion government, assume the whole coat of this  work.  The only hone tho iNicomeu island farmers now have of being1 saved from extinction in the next freshet is in Ottawa which, ' while disclaiming responsibility, has already  offered to contribute generously, and  may yet come to the rescue unaided  by a stiff-necked proviciul administration.  Dyke- is Threatened  The  situation,     recapitulated     by  Mr.  Lusby, is briefly this.    The  Fraser river current, bus    badly    eroded  ft.he bank and the dyke is threatened.  Unless    tho    bunk is    protected,, the  dyke will inevitably collapse.    A wall  of raging  waters-will sweep across,  inundating the "whole of,   the lower  half of the Island and much of    the  upper, and fling, itself    against ��������� the  mainland with a possibility of breaking    through  the    Canadian  Pacific  Railway    embankment.    , Thousands  of acres' of the finest land in the province will be ruined. !  |    -The Nicomen    Island     people  are  only asking for a guarantee of then  bonds to put the dyke in repair,    so  far as the dyke 13 concerned.'    They  are asking however that the government take steps to protect the dyke.  How  Governments Stand.  The. work    necessary ti>       m-otect  the dyke falls into two    distinct sections.    One of these, the most.'expensive, is the dredging and conduction  of wingdams, and for this the Dominion government    assumes full  responsibility and will  bear the    whole  cost.    As a matter of fact,    the' government dredge is at present engaged  in  this  work  cutting    through  Mac-  donald's   bar.    Tho other section  of  Iho work is bank protection proper���������  uuittressiny  with     rock  and     brush.  The   Dominion  government does not  accept responsibility'for this but has  nevertheless  offered   to     be.ir     half  the cost: if the provincial government,  will bear the other half.    To this Mr.  Oliver replies that the provincial gov-  , eminent   has  no, responsibility    and  'that,  in  fact, under    recent    legislation .it .wold be illegal to' spend    any  money on such  work.  Premier Oliver's .Stand  Mr. Lusby recounted how his committee,' comprising . himself, Mr. P.  A. Murray, Mr. W. H.-lSIson "and Dr.  LknvweUyn Douglas, mad? a thorough inspection of, the island, and  were later accompanied by representatives of .the Mission Board cf Trade  and the Vancouver Board of Trade.'  A delegation representing these bodies1 and the fi. \V. V. A,, .provincial  command and Nicomen Island people  thou waited on Mr. Oliver.  Incidentally, in the course of their,  investigation's, they were shown con-'  elusive proof that Nicomen Island  land, brought to a high state of cultivation, produces a net "profit of as  much as $500 per acre,out of rhubarb aiid small fruits.  ���������   Mr. Oliver's reply to the delegation  was  that     Nicomen'  Island ���������, is ' nor.  worth the estimated cost of the work  necessary to save it from high water.  If it were his own, ho    would cultivate the high ridges,    use the lower'  lands   for  pasturage and" such   crops  us could be grown and removed dur- ,'  ing low wafer, and let. the-river have -  its way.     He added the    interesting,  opinion, according'"to Mr. Lusby that  the dyke is.not worth-30 cents.    ,      -  ���������   Ottawa,to the Rescue  ���������The  interview  with    Mr.1 Stevens,  the new  minister of trade and  commerce was much, more    satisfactory.  Mr. Stevens    wrote    to    the ' acting  prime minister urging that action he  taken in view, of    the fact that    the1  Dominion government has placed    a'  number of returned soldiers on    the1  island. -.  One estimate of the cost of'dredg-;  ing, construction  of    wingdams, and:'   "  mattrossing  is    $100,000.       Of  thatj  amount   the   Dominion     government;    ���������  assumes     $(>(),000  as    a    m:.i;ter of: .  course, and offers to put up half the'-  balance:   in     all,     $80,000     against.,  $20,000 the province is asked to pro--,  vide.' ���������' -  .  To the Electors of the Constituency  of the Fraser Valley:  Ladies and Gentlemen:    "    * ������������������."'���������-  Four years ago I "was nominated and  elected in this constituency as a Liberal Unionist  supporter of the Union Government formed by  Sir Robert Borden in Oct. 1917. To that Government I gave consistent and loyal support during  four sessions of Parliament and also gave my besL  attention to the needs and interests "of our own  electoral district as they appeared from Lime to  time.  1 had the honor of   introducing the first resolution proposing the fusion of the two parties supporting the Government which union was finally  consummated on Dominion Dav, 1920, under the  name of the National Liberal'and Conservative  Party of Canada.   To this united national party I  Jiave given my full allegiancaand whole hearted  support,   [have absolute confidence in the Rt.  Hon. Arthur Meighcn and fully   endorse the platform and policy of his Government.   I. believe the  Prime Minister is honest I v endeavoring lo reunite  a war stricken people and   effectually burv sectionalism.   His fiscal policy of an  adequate protection  for every Canadian industry needing it,  appeals lo me as not only wise and  statesmanlike  but as absolutely necessary in the interests of our  whole population in vicwYd' the general   upward'  trend of tariff legislation   Hie world over during  the last two years or since the signing of the armistice.  I have advocated on  the  floor of the House  greater  restriction of Oriental   immigration and-  believe the lime lias arrived when this policy can  be adopted without danger of internationafcomplications.  I have received and -accepted nomination as the  Government candidate in the approaching general election and-hope lo have the privilege of discussing Federal questions with you during the  campaign. If honored with your confidence'and  vote on thc.6lh.6t December! shall endeavor as  your representative to give effect to the foregoin?  general policy and also support all other measures which may promote the prosperity, the comfort and best life.of the Canadian people.  Very sincerely yours,  F. B. Stacey.  Chilliwack, Oct; lo, 1921. /  rHE ABBOTSPOPJ> POST  rY".  riS^^.T^.Z^^Z^TTri't^'r:i^%^^^ZT^^\^i>XUZ.^  THE  KOKDNLt'    TARIFF  affects the 'whole nation.  Dominion   ' Government  iatistics  The Fordney Tariff of the United  snow that-Mhe  Fordney Tariff so f,  ���������ir  States, which as , designed as a pro- affects, our, farmers ��������� that whereas  tective measure for the'benefit of the they |.',sl y <..,,. s0|(i (W0 million dol-  American farmer in his home market ]arK worth'of their products south, of  has produced a crisis not only in -.Mir (],(; |j���������0i nic total sales of farm pro-  Canadian-politics     but  in   our-dailv (]uf,0 wj]| this year be    nearer    fifty  life.  million.    But. this is not all of it:, it  ���������Before'the'imposition by the'Unit- (ne Fordeny TariTf only meant the  ed States of a new tariff on unporfa-' |0SS 0f 0lM. American market it would  tions of food products from all other noL oe as harmful as it is: if, great-  countries including Canada, we hmd (!r effect is in piling up an excess sup-  almost as free access to American niy 0f produce in our home market  markets    for    the    products ' of our which we cannot    possibly    consume  ���������farms as  had  the States of     Illinois  ourselves or find another outlet  for  or Washington,  and     that, - without  wjt|, tiu> ,.eault that the whole indus-  giving any return    advantage to    ei-  (,.v  \ti demoralized'unci  prices slump  . ther     manufacturers   or     producers 0n this side of the   boundary    out of  '���������across the line.    Our wool, wheat, ap- any  possible coiujipi ison  with  prices  pies, potatoes, cattle, sheep, tobacco,  on .the,oilier side.    To illustrate this  milk;  flux    seed,    butter, eggs    and  j( is on!y necessary to point, out tha  cheese moved south to rich and hun- a g0U(j s(ee|. is wor(|, .| cents -r( lKum;  gry markets to the extent of w/o hun-  a,   Winnipeg or    Cnig;iry.    but.    th.  dred millions of dollars a eyar; these  same steer    would be    worth 7    1-:  products1 constituted    forty pw cent. centg a   pound If lie . could    put    up  of oiir exports to the    United States  f0r sn](> .,, Chicago--.but the Fordney  and comamnded not only higher pric- Tariff prevents  that.  ea. than prevailed at home I i:t the  advantage of the exchange situation  as well, for every American dollair  which our farmers brought into the  country as the result of sales in the  south had attached to it a premium  of-from-then to nineteen per cent.  American farmers protected to  their government that they were at a  disadvantage in their own markets  owing to Canadian competition'. The  result was the Fordney Tariff Bill  which has achieved the , desired result; it Has'protected the American  farmer from all foreign competition  with which he was unable to contend.  There ,the American interest stops  and ours begins, for the Fordney Tar  iff is the hardest blow which Canadian farming has received since the  abrogation of the Treaty of Reciprocity with the United States by that  country in 1866 in resentment for  covert assistance rendered the South  Can this be altered?    Certainly it  can  be.    How?     By entering into    a  Treaty of Reciprocity with the  United States.       Undoubtedly this would  adversely affect    some of our manufacturing  industries,   hut   iK>t   nearly  (as much as they appear (or affect.) to  fear.    On the other hand it would be  the greatest possible boon to agriculture.    Without giving Reciprocity    a  trial  we cannot ascertain     just   what  its effects would be in regard to our  manufacturing     industry,     but  it  is  certain that, the effect    would not be  as disastrous as it has been pictured  by    highly    interested ��������� parties    who  tremble at the very thought, cf    having to lower > their    charges    by so  much aa one per cent., although their  annual profits are closer to    twenty  or   thirty.  All  talk  of. annexation   in  connection with the topic of Reciprocity    is  Oil���������  First of all, il can bring to you the NE"\\ S of  your own home town. Week after week, il  prints in detail the happenings of tho community. Faithfully it sets forth the goings  and coinings of its people, giving careful attention lo the homely litlle items llial are ig-  norcri in the overcrowded dailies ol' the big  cities.  ft can furnish you with more interesting information about people you know, or used to  know, than could a dozen correspondents.  The one who writes lo you may know only a  Jew of your friends at home���������but your Home  Town Paper knows them all. ft tells you  about people you are interested in.  Finally, in a good business sense, your Home  Town. Paper is of valiie to you. 11 * keeps you  posted as to.the industrial and commercial  growth of a community which familiarity  may have caused you to neglect. It often reveals that keen people see, right in your home  town, a mine of golden opportunity. The  moral is obvious���������  era States hv our Empire in the early Purest nonsense ���������ked J"   ������"ot' politic-j  stages of the American Civil War.   ,   al ca?ltal-    Absolute proof of this is,  Ever since that abrogation in 1366  in the ,ao(-    that the    administration  and up to 1911, Canadian statesmen v/hich would have secured Reciproc-  of both parties had    done their best itv in 19M  was condemned by its op-,  to renew the reciprocal    trade    rela- l)onents i'1 Ontario and the West as;  -tions   with  our   neighbor  which   had. Annexationist, and in Quebec as Ira-!  formerly been so  beneficial'but had  Perialist    because of its    navd pro-  failed until the������Hon.  YV^S. Fielding gramme;  both  uad    ,mt one    ob^ct  succeeded in   1911. and that was to defeat.Reciprocity by  "in reviewing" this theme ,of    trade any and a11  means necessary, proper  relations with the United States    we or  imPr������I>er.  do so merely an*l entirely for the ben- Whatever, else it may mean; the  efit. of subscribers and in an absol- accomplishment of Reciprocity would  utely independent and non political mean prosperity to eight hundred  vein, unbiased in any way. The facts thousand Canadian farmers by provi-  stated are historfcal and undenied ding a market for the surplus pro-  except by persons politically interest- duction which we cannot use in- this  ed. country. It is to this end that the  There can be no doubt whatever farmers of the prairies, of Ontario  that the people of Canada were in and of the East are firmly organized  favor of Reciprocity with the United for political action iu order io con-  States in 1911 or that the Laurier ad- trol the next government of the Doni-  ministration would have been re- In in if not actually to hold the reigns  turned to put it through if it had not. of power. Whether they are right, or  been for his loss of support in his wrong we cannot actually know until  own Province of Quebec where the we have tested the thing for which  Nationalists under Bour.i-fa - and they strive���������Farm and Home.  Lavergne and the other elements of    scribe to  or your  ABBOTSFORD  POST  Abbotsford,   B.  C.  opposition to his administration combined all theiir forces to condemn him  for his Imperial activities and inclinations and for his creation of a Canadian navy. Reciprocity was not the  issue in Quebec. The result ������as that  Canada lost the opportunity for reciprocal trade 'relations which her  leaders  had  been     seeking fos   fifty  THOSE WHO DO NOT  ADVERTISE AT  ALL  Some men, and some businesses,  and professions do not advertise. We  have heard of one concern so determined not to come out into the light  that  issued  circulars to announce to  must provide work  for mervillje settlers  . The commission which made an  investigation of conditions at Mer-  ville has submitted its reports. Briefly their recommendations are:  1. Deferment of first payments on  improved land.  2. Provision of road work rather  than  further cash  advances.  3. Imperative necessity of providing better roads.  The report which is given below  is signed by Colonel Latty. Rev.  Thos1. Menzies, M. "L. A., and Mr.  Chas.  Rogers. ~"  1. Re agreement on sale between  L.S.B. and Settlers.  Settlers were    interviewed in person  or on  their own     farms.    State  jef development,    condition, of farm, |  by the Land 'Settlement    Board    and : cases as far as    we are    abl^ to    re-  that, if    possible, an     extension    be' port.  granted for a period sufficiently long!     We are of the opinion that most of  to  help settlers become    established ' the individual complaints can be ad-  on their farms before land payments1 justed between L. S. B. and Settler,  fall  due.  yea rs. ������  Fortunately  a     Democratic     (low 'fc0 advertise in any niaiyier," etc.  tariff or free trade) government un-!     They advertised   that  the  did  not  der Wilson    came into power in    the   advertise!  the public that "It is now and always  I has been  t lie policy of this house not' nature of soil, and general! cordi'n'ons ' can   %e} along without casli  ad vane  2. Re Further Cash Advances.  The consensus of opinion among  settlers is' that in the . majority of  cases, particularly on improved  farms, the debt against their farms-  is as great as they can oos-sibly  handle. Those on unimproved farms  are also anxious that their debt be  kept down as low as possible.  If road work can be provided  throughout the coming wint-jr, settlers are of the opinion that by work  ing part time they can make a living and still do a considerable  amount of improvement on their  j holdings.    In  this  way  the    settlers  CLEARING'  OUT TUBERCULOSIS  IN CATTLE  etc.   examined, as well as    settlers finan-   e6>  which,  ������f given,  would  be piling  eial affairs with regard to payments   "P ���������ore debt against  their farms,  coming due and the    possibility    of  settlers being in a    position to    meet  3.   Re Roads.  It is impossible to  exaggerate the  United States in 1912,    so that    the j     The truth    of the   matter is    that: their payments on stock    and    land   importance of a good system of roads  loss of  better trade    relations     was   most  every  other  up-and-dolng   bus-jwas. carefully    considered.     Settlors   throughout the area.    At the present  not felt during Wilson's adnn'nistra-   iness around them did advertise    ai.vi  tion.    Under his guichuiee the Amer-  the compelling force of modern mer-  rejected it, until the    advent of  Republican     administration     under  Harding.  With  Harding came the    Fordney ' papers the most potent and most ec  Tariff���������and the terrific slump in our ' ononiical  advertising   medium,  chief industry,  farming.     With   poor;   , on improved farms    almost    without   time most of the roads are passable,  exception were of the.   opinion    that  but as soon as wet    weather sets    in  .     , for t-lie first few    years it    would lie  some parts of the area will be inac-  lcan tariff was so    low that   Canada ���������clmndmng caused  them  in the  least  impossible to make more than a bare  eessible,  except on     foot.       Settlers  practically    enjoyed all of the bene- t stand against the modern, methods'to. living for    themselves and    families   along these roads are shipping cream  fits of reciprocity    although we had  advertise to the     upblic * that    they  whi|e they were nicking    further im-  in varying   quantities  to the'creain-  ���������   ��������� the  clldii't believe in advertising. ���������provements    and   -bringing      their. ery and as this is a vital part of their  ..      ...      .  ������������������, , .  , , .   | farms into a sutliciently    productive  livelihood,, provision for access is ab-  Ad\ertismg is the    chief force,  in-.������w������ to make their payments on the   soultely   imperative,  commercial life today, and the news- land. "I     'J he committee would very strong-  many were of the opinion that ly recommend a comprehensive  they could meet the Lien Nrotes due scheme of road improvement within  on stock as1 they fell due, but could the area; firstly, for the purpose of  not make the payments c:i land. Set-  providing access to  farms;  and  sec-  times and conditions confronting our  OVER .'J8 MILLIONS  farmers  their  buying capacity     was! SPENT ON  impaired to a greater extent than    it  P. C. E.  tiers on unimproved     fa-inr, are not  ondly, for the purpose of    providing  in a position financially: to stay    on   work during the coming    winter, for  T.   their  farms    cantinually,     therefore  settlers.     Both  of    these are absol-  .,        , ,,   . . VICTORIA, Oct.  27,���������Up to Sept.  cannot  get    sufficient     development  utely     essential  for  the     successful  otherwise  would  have  been even  in   30 last, the total amount    expended  clone to put farms in    shape to pro- continuance of the settlement  view of world conditions.    Prosperity  in connection with the Pacific Great  duce enough to make payments1    on |     4. ' Miscellaneous",  jn this agricultural country i3 natur-  Rastern  Railway,     the    government  time. " |      Several       individual     complaints  ally based    upon the    welfare of our'own1<rd  ];ne' was .?38.652,703 03, ac-1     The settlers are anxious to obtain'were received from settlers    regard  farmers since    they and    their seven  ������Z���������!r au^^t^^Lrl  nVr^'n��������� eJ?tens!^ ������'" tlmo *om " mg. such matters as    prices ,f land  . i rem.������r  unvpr     rn   hip     ine-mmr in a    im.o^  <������   ri.,���������  ,     *-...     ��������� ._   .,>..,..-     i.-^_     ^     -...       ,       ,   ^   ed, taking them as tar as possible  r:u,,1,u'  liU0>  waa  ���������P"������-B^.'������fl ������*. ac-1      nifi settlers are an:aous to obtain   were received from settlers    regard-  cording to a statement presented    by  if possible an extension or" time from   in? such matters as    prices ..f land  n   Premier Oliver    to  the     legislature. . tiiree to five years,  for    commence-  drainage, line    fences, etc., -tc.   but  I,   The Premier also wpresented the re-i mei.i-of payments on the    land, an.l  as these are of    importance    only to  The accredited herd system put in  operation two years ago by the Heath  of Animals Branch of the Department of Agriculture at Ottawa has  been well received by the stockmen  of the country. It. is confined "to pure  bred cattle and is intended to rid oh  rapidly as possible the disease of tuberculosis from Canadian herds.  Figures given out by the Veterinary  Director General show that thirty-  six herds had up to October 1, been  fully accredited. ' The breeds represented are the Ayrshire, Holstein,  Jersey, Shorthorn and Aberdeen Angus, the dairy breeds predominating.  The accredited herds are widely distributed. Nova Scotia has 1: Quebec  9; Ontario 10; Manitoba 4 and British Columbia  10.  Besides the herds which have been  fully accredited there are at present  558 herds which have been tested  once or more in process of accreditation and 54 herds awaiting the first  test, making a total of 648 herds. As  the herds in this lot fulfil the necessary conditions, they become fully  accredited. The Inspectors of the  Health of Animals Branch are making as rapid progress as is possible  under the circumstances, taking in  the work and the great importance  of doing the testing carefully . and  accurately rather than rapidly.  The reactors are always removed  from the herd at once and usually  are immediately slaughtered under  veterinary supervision. Applications  for tests have been coming in faster  than they could he dealt with. A  waiting list has therefore been formed and as soon as circumstances permit, the herds in this list will b^ test-  billion    dollar    investment in    land,  The Premier also ,y presented the re-i mei.i-of payments on the    land, an.l as these are of    importance    only to   "io order in which applications have  buildings and stock form the basis of  port setting Torth a statement of   ac-  this committee,    from    their    Know- the  individual    concerned, and     are   ,)een   received.���������Department   of   Ag-  our whole    economic life;    anything  c"l'nts of the railway as of June 30,  ledge of the    circumstances,    would more or less of a private nature, we' riciilture.  1021. duly audited by a    Vancouver  respectfully urge that this    niiesiioii are attaching    herewith to a supple-'   Le given very earnest    consideration mentary report    dealing    with  such       Safety    First:     The    fpllo^v    who  J ������ wears both a belt and braces,  I  which affects the  Canadian farmer fjrra#  ?l  11  IB  71.11 /  l<  TMA) ABBOTSFORD POST  PAGE THREW  and fare for Return Trip to  ancouver Free  Who will the fourlucky ladies be? That will; be up  to those who enter the contest to say for themselves.  The candidates should get out and work morning,  noon and night if they expect to win. They should get  their friends to help them. The contest .editor will  accept every subscription sent in with the required  subscription price and the name -of- the contestant  should be marked on the coupon.  Any young lady has a grand chance of being the  lucky winner in her district and the Post will publish  u e votes of the, leaders in each district weekly.  Remember that the conte.stvwi 11 last for three weeks  only and it is up to every candidate to work hard all  the time. .Any information required will be gladly  rurnished by the contest Editor or his assistants in order that every candidate will have an equal chance of  success.  But it is up to the candidates themselves to  WORK HARD AND WIN  DISTRICT OlNE  All that portion of Abbotsford Townsite and district lying west of the  Riverside,Road and.north of Yale Road.  DISTRICT   TWO  All that portion of Abbotsford   Townsite   lying,east of the Riverside  Road and north of the Yale Road.  DISTRICT THRIVE  All   that   portion   of   Abbotsford    Towiisite  Huntingdon Road and South of Yale Road.  and   district   east   of  DISTRICT FOUR  All   that   portion   of   Abbotsford   Townsite   and    district   wo.it   of  Huntingdon Road and south of the Yale Road. .���������_.,.  NOTE^-Rememberjtis the. 'largest number.of vobs.in-yimr   district!  ."* tfiat counts. '   \   r" C" ' ���������"-   ', .  ' '   . :/:ff   "     ~~~:  RUTJE3  OF  CONTEST  1. Every contestant    must be a bona-fide   resident of the district   In which she is  competing. ...'������������������'  2. Kach coupon filled out must contain the name of contestant together" with post-  office address with box numbers of rural route as the case may be.     l  3. A contestant must compete only in the district in which she  resides only, as a  contestant cannot compete for the prize in more than one district.  Contestants must agree to abide by the decision of the contest editor aa, being  final in all cases. - "-     ���������-���������-".'   ^:-  Cash "or post office order or express orders must accompany  all   subscriptions  sent in by contestants or their friends.  The votes received will be totaled each week and the standing of the candidates  in each district announced in the columns of the Abbotsford Post.  The contest will positively close at 10   o'clock on Nov.   19tt>    1921.- All   votes  received on the first mail the day following will be  regarded as legal.  No employee of the Abbotsford Post will be eligible to compete.  Each contestant   to win the $25   and fare   for  return trip to    Vancouver must  .obtain at least 3 0,000 votes.    Less than that   number of  votes   will' entitle  the winner to a proportionate amount of the $25.00.  4.  "5.  ENTRY BLANK  Contest Editor, Abbotsford ' Post���������Please enter my name in your  big popularity contest as outlined in the advertisement appearing .in  the Post. I hereby agree to abide by the rules land regulations of  the contest and agree to accept the decisions cf the contest editor as.  final on ail questions.  NAME  ADDRESS-  DISTRICT NO.  v.  The popularity of the various candidates will be determined by the  number of votes cast for them. Every new subscribtion to the Abbotsford Post will count as so many votes, based on the following table:  One Year's subscription 1,000 votes.  Two Years'  subscription   2,500 votes.  Three Years' subscription ......................... 3,000 votes.  Five Years' subscription ........... ...-.  5,000 votes.  Subscription blanks will be furnished to all candidates or their friends  and hard work will be necessary to win the various prizes so that an  early start in the campaign should bring success. The Abbotsford Post  is anxious to know who is the most popular young lady in eucu district  and hard work on the part of the candidates will help to solve' this] The  price ol the Abbotsford Post is one dollar per year in advance.  Subscriptions may be paid to Mr. A. McCallum who will give receipts  and take the name of the candidate to which vote is to be eiven; or may  be sent through mail to Abbotsford Post, Abbotsford, B.'.C.  REMEMBER CONTEST BEGINS SATURDAY,  OCTOBER 29TH, AND THE FIRST TEN SUBSCRIPTIONS PAID MR. McCALLUM, IF BEFORE 12  O'CLOCK NOON, ARE WORTH 5000 VOTES EACH.  Passes Judgment  On Nicomen Island  i  Nicomen Island is not.    worth saving!  ��������� This is the amazing declaration  of Hon. John Oliver, premier of British Columbia, reported ,to tho Hoard  of Trade by fM'.r. L. II. Lusby, chairman of a special committee which  has been working on this matter  for "bout   two   months.  ��������� The'" premier flatly refused"' to  'maim any expenditure on li'-ink protection-work, there or elsewhere,  Following this refusal, 1-Ion. H, J-i.  Stevens was Interviewed and he was  written'Ottawa urging that in the  circumstances the Dominion government assume the whole cost, of this  work.  The only hope (lie Nicomen Island farmers now have of being saved from extinction in (he next freshet, is In Ottawa which, while dis,-  cliiiining responsibility, has already  offered to contribute generously, and  may yet come to the rescue unaided  by a stilT-necked provicial administration.  Dyke is Threatened  The situation, recapitulated by  Mr." Lusby, is briefly this. The Fraser river current has badly eroded  the bank and the dyke is threatened.  Unless the bank is protected, the  dyke will inevitably collapse. " A wall  of raging waters will sweep across,  inundating the "whole of the lower  half of the Island and much of the  upper, and fling, itself against the  mainland with a possibility of breaking through Uie Canadian Pacific  Railway embankment. Thousands  of acres of the finest land in the province will be ruined.  ��������� The Nicomen     Island    people are  only asking for a guarantee of theii Imerce  bonds to put the dyke in repair,    so!  far as the dyke is concerned.    They !  are asking however that the government take steps to protect the dyke.  How   Governments Stand.  The work    necessary to      protect  i the dyke falls into two    distinct scc-  j tions.    One of these, the most expensive, is the dredging and contraction  .of wingdams, and for this the Dominion government    assumes full res-  jPonsibility and will  bear the    whole  " cost.    As a matter of fact,    the government dredge is at present-engaged  in  this  work  cutting    through   Mac-  douald's  bar.    The other sect ion  of  the work'is bank protection proper���������  mattrossing  with     rock  and ���������   brush.  The   Dominion  government does not  accept  responsibility for this.but. has ���������  nevertheless  offered   to     be.ir     half  the cost if the provincial government  will bear' the oilier half.,   To this Mr.  Oliver- replies that the provincial gov- '  eminent   has  no   responsibility     and f  that, in  fact, under    recent    legisla- '  tion it wold be illegal to spend    any  money on such  work. -     "'  Premier Oliver's Stand  Mr. Lusby recounted, how'his corii-  mittee,  comprising    himself,  Mr.-. F.  A. M'urray, Mr. W. H. Elso'u    and Dr.  Llcwwellyn    Douglas,    mad* a thorough inspection of the    island,    and  were later accompanied by representatives of the Mission Board of Trade  and  the Vancouver Board of Trade.  A delegation representing these bodies and    (be O. W. V. A.,  ..provincial  command and Nicomen Island people  then waited on Mr. Oliver.  Incidentally, in the course of their  investigations, they were shown conclusive proof that Nicomen Island  land, brought to a high state of cultivation, produces a net profit of as  much as $500 per acre .out of rhubarb and small fruits.  Mr. Oliver's reply to the delegation  , was that Nicomen Island- is ' not  worth the estimated cost of the work'  necessary to save, it from high water.  II" it. we're his own, he would cultivate the high ridges, use the lower  lands for pasturage and such crops'  as could be grown-and removed during low water, and let the river have  its way. Me added the interesting,  opinion, according to Mr.'Lusby that  the dyke is not worth1 30 cents'.  Ottawa to the Rescue-  The  interview with    Mr.1 Stevens,  the new  minister of trade and com-  '  was much more satisfactory.  Mr. Stevens- wrote to the acting  prime minister urging that action h<-  taken in view of    the fact that    the1  Dominion government has placed a'1  number of returned soldiers on the;  island.  One estimate of the cost- of ,'dredg-;  ing. construction of wingdams, and'1  mattrossing is $100,000. Of thatj'  amount (he Dominion government-.'  assumes $00,000 as a mr.r.tor of:  course, and offers to put up half ,the  balance; in all, $S0,000 against.,  $20,000 the province is asked to pro--,  vide.  To the Electors of the Constituency  r of the Fraser Valley: ;"      \  Ladies and Gentlemen:     ���������    *���������  Four years ago I was nominated and  elected in this constituency as a Liberal Unionist  supporter ol' the Union Government formed by  Sir Robert Borden in Oct. 1917. To that Government I gave consistent and loyal support during  four sessions of Parliament and also gave my best  attention to'the needs and interests "of our ovvi\  electoral district as they appeared from time to  time.  I had the honor of   introducing the first resolution proposing the fusion of thetwo parlies supporting the Government which union was finally  consummated on Dominion Day, 1920,  under the  name of Hie National Liberal "and Conservative  Party of Canada.   To this united national parly I  Jiave given my full aliegiance.and whole hearted  support,   lhave absolute confidence in  the Rt.  Hon. Arthur Meiglicn and fully   endorse the plab  'form and policy of his Government.   1. believe the  Prime Minister is honestly endeavoring lo reunite  a war stricken people and   effectually  bury sectionalism.   His fiscal policy of an  adequate protection  for every Canadian  industry  needing it,  appeals lo me as not only wise and  statesmanlike  but as absolutely necessary in the interests of our  whole population In vicw'of the general   upward  trend of tariff legislation   the world over during  the last two years or since the signing of the armistice.  J have advocated on the floor of the Mouse  greater restriction of Oriental'" immigration and.  believe the jime has arrived when tin's policy can  be adopted without danger of inlcrnational^com-  plica lions.  I have received and accepted nomination as the  Government candidate in the approaching general election and hope to have the-privileged of discussing Federal questions with von clurinff the  campaign. If honored with your confidence'and  vote on the 6lh of December I shall endeavor as  your representative to give effect to the foregoing  general policy and also support all other measures which may promote the prosperity, the comfort and best life of the Canadian people.  Very sincerely vours,  Chilliwack, Oct. 15, 1921.  F. B. Stacey.  t  STOIEKSBSBcIig^^ ���������TG  **  ^  / v*;;  \S  That tlio beat-ol" Meats can'be purchased at litis Store   r  We soled.;.our Meal' with'intelligence:   that':   why one  of our roasts make such a fine meal.   ,      -  Try one of our prime roasts and be convinced.  ' WHITE & CARMICHAEL  TTftt  AJSiJOTSPORD   N..ST,  ABBOTSFOBD,  8. i\  X E, PARTON. J  Still Going Strong  Having   bought  big, stock "  of new designs in Wallpaper  B.   0.   Phone   4 1.  Farmers'   Phone   I DOT  Abbotsford, B.C.  I  J,   J'or':coming, spring, I 'am cutting prices on stock in   hand  to make room for new goods.  Also have some paint at a  low  price. '  r  A/mOTSFORI),   R.   C.  We are iiT a position to put your battery  in excellent condition for the winter  months. If you have" your battery tested  and overhauled by us you can rest assured  that it will give you Al service.  We have a number of used cars for sale-  We call them "real snaps���������On easy terms.  A. E. HUMPHREY  (Late   Tiiylor   &    Humphrey)  B. C. Land Surveyor and  Civil Engineer  lloom   G .Hart   Block.   Chilliwack  Uox   432. eilllXlWACK  Don't forget our Specialties:  LATHE-WORK,  ACETYLENE- WELDTNG AND CUTTING  OVERHAULING and RE-CHARGING  OE  BATTERIES  ELECTRIC MOTORS   INSTALLED   AND  RE-WOUND  We guarantee all our work lo  be Satisfactory.  \ Yarwood & Dun ant  BARRISTERS and  SOLICITORS  LAW OFFICE  OPEN EVERY EDI DAY  ABR0TSKOR1), It. C.  Place   voitr order  now  COAL  At   present   prices  AIJIJOTSKOKI)  ./. W .COTTRELL  COAL AND TRANSFER  Building     Materials,  Lime,     I'IjsUt,  Cement <-.  PRICES RIGHT  Ceylon Black Tea, a lb., 45c, 3'for .., ,. $1.00  Superior Blend, Whole Roasl .Coffee, 55c for   45c  Royal Crown or'Golden West Soap  5 bars in  carton ... ,,���������:. ��������� 25c  Cabbage, a lb., 4c, 7 Jbs. for 25c  LllX, 1 lb. ..:..' .,..:..: : ".'....(:.: '... 25c  Our Bread, Fresh Daily, Large'Loaf, 3,for 25c:...  ALBERT LEE,  Baker and Grocer  r<r.  i\  A T. N. T. Explosive of great strength,  safety and freedom from noxious fumes  No Headaches  Take; advantage of the    Government    refund of  c$2.r>(), up to ten cases of powder, and blow  , ���������   -. your slumps  mwm  Insurance of all kinds  NOTARY PUBLIC  Marriage Licences Issued  REAL ESTATE-Moiwy to l,<nuion G'oml Farm Mortgrugrea  aiiiim  Abbotsford  Abbotsford Garage & Machine Shop  Limited  Phone, B.. C   7 ABBOTSFORD B. C. Farmers 1918  F. -V. HUNTINGDON  FEED and PRODUCE  ASSOCIATION  ABBOTSFORD  AUCTION MARKET  Firsl 'Saturday in  Each Month   .  al 1 p. m.  ALAN M. BROXQVSKI  Auctioneer  Of. McPhee's Stable  P. 0. Box 94  A FORTHER LIST OF  ecials  FOR WEEK ENDING NO VEMBER 5th  Kraft Cheese,  each  15c  Molasses, per tin  15c  Best Creamery Butter, 3 lbs. for  $1.40.  Golden West Soap, 2 pkls. for : 45c  While Wonder Soap, 7 for - 50c  A.G.ANDREWS  CASH   GROCER  AHROTSKORD,  min������iiiiiiim  B.   C.  iwimwn  ABBOTSFORD   AND  HUNTINGDON  ARROTlSlORD    BRANCH  Phones:  13. C. 27;   Farmers 19 08.  We sell Flour, Cereals, Butter, eggs.  We sell Poultry Feeds, Mill Feeds," Hay, Salt.  Head Office Huntingdon, B. C.  HUNTJXGDON RRANCH  P lionet-:  B. C. 14L; Farmers 1312  For Music in  Your Homes  These Long  Evenings  A  THE PASSING OF THE  COUNTRY MERCHANT  SEE  and    motor    traffic    improves. ��������� tho  truck from    the    city    delivers    tho  goods at the doors    of the    countrv  customer, probably  before tho country merchant  has an"opportunity of  soliciting.  There are    people  in    Abbotsford  probably some of them living on sal-  ..      ... ,   .    . .     .       .  ...,.   , ..   ,aries obtained   from  local    taxation,  tor this, not that he has fullilled his | including the merchants among the  duties to the^pubilc but for reasons j taxpayers, who patronize the mail or^  " " ~~    " ~ L"~" "" der house and the^city    firm who de  livers goods at their doors.    In    tho  Indications point to the fact that  in* the years to come the' country  merchant who has played such an  important part in the progress of this  province, wi.ll become a condition of  the. past, and there are many reasons  ItOHT. li.   MAXWHIiZj IS AGAIN  HEAD OF DOMINION G. W.  V. A.  PORT ARHTUR. Onl.. Oct. 22.���������  Robert IJ. Maxwell of Winnipeg will  continue another year as the president of the Great War Veterans' Association, it was decided on Thursday afternoon of the annual convention, and will be the first president  to receive nomination for his .-ervii:-  ������:S.  Tho name of ('. (\ AI'acNoil, Dominion secretary-treasurer, was also  placed in nomination, but Mr.. Mac-  Neil withdrew in I'nvor of the present  incumbent. T. Dace, Edmonton,  had no opposition in the nomination,  for first vice-president.  The Dominion '.executive w!ls appointed as follows: Cap!. Inn /Mackenzie, RI." P. P., British Columbia;  W. J. Botterill. Alberta; .Norman,  Saskatchewan; J. R. Bowler. Manitoba; Rev. C. E. Jenkins, Ontario; R.  Costigan, Quebec! S. Boyd Anderson,  New Brunswick; Prof. C. M. McMillan..   Nova   Scotia. ,  MAY ALTER KULE  OX JANUARY t  The road between the Fraser and  Abbotsford is in pretty fair condition now. Some good work has  been done on this road this summer  and fall.  VICTORIA, Oct. 28.���������-An amendment to the Highway Act will be  brought down in the Legislature by  Hon. J. H. King, Minister of Public  Works, designed io give more com-  Ipleto control and regulation of motor  ; vehicles as to loads and speeds, thereby obviating the damage now heiiu  done to roadways by too heavyilv  burdened ' vehicles. To effect this  aim a special official will be delegated to take charge of.that work.  It is also proposed to make the  change in the rule of the road become effective on New Year's Day at  0 a. m., it being considered that on  that, day and the day following there  will be" less traffic than ordinarily.  Expenditures for road work in  the iVlerviilo soldier settlement atea  near Courtonay will be immediately  provided for, Hon. Dr. King has announced. This will provide employment for the men and relieve their  existing plight. The work will be inaugurated at once under the direction of the district engineer.  COOPER SELBO!  CLAYIJURN,   II. C.  Edison Diamond  Point Machine,  ! Value $185  For $125  Canadian Gramophone  For  i  Stewart for $15  The crossing on Essendene Avenue  is undergoing repairs and it looks as  though an excellent -job is being  done,  HON. \V. J.'BOWSER ..  -  ADJOURNS!   DERATE  VICTORIA, Oct. 28.���������Hon. W. J.  Bowser, K. C, leader of the Opposition adjourned the debate yesterday  afternoon which means a full gallery  today.  entirely .outside of his store and over  , which  h'e has no control.  i     It is  .unnecessary to go into    de-  ails of the present taxation, but    to  point out. that today he is taxed     to  such an extent that the    mail    order  houses, not within the boundaries' of  the province, are severely cutting into the 15. 0. country merchants'  business.    The local merchant is unable  to compete with the mail order houses and sell goods of the same quality owing to the high cost of pulling  and keeping these goods on the shelves for sale.    People want to buy    in  the cheapest market, and are not always so concerned    about  the quality of the goods.these days as    they  are about what the cost may be.  i     On the other hand the    mail order  houses., most of which are in the east  place for mail order the overflow    of  their large stores, and use the mails  of the country to dispose of a certain  quantity of their goods that are not  in great -demand over    the    counter.  Buying   in     large     quantities   these,  goods cost less in the first place. Neither are the mail order houses over-  . burdened with taxation in this province, or any other province outside of  | the one in which the wholesale house  is situated.    Goods sent by mail may  be looked upon as 'clear velvet.'    But  (the main point is that these- Houses  do not contribute to our revenue    of  this province.  i     On the same basis the mail    order  houses  of this    province  break into  i the business of the country merchant'  interests of community building, we  ask, is tluit right. An instance was  called to attention, not a thousand,  miles from our own little town where  a member of a certain family worked in one of the town groceries,  while the parents patronized a Vancouver firm who delivered groceries  at their-door. Well, you have it as it  was pointed -out to us.  Over and above the present high  taxation which the country merchant has lo meet, the Oliver government is now devising ways and  means ol'jjetling more out of the  country merchant and the merchant  who has to purchase in small quantities. All over the province there,,  is big objection to this taxation. The  question is, can the small merchant  stand the burden and continue in  business? It is'a known fact that  I lie government requires money, but  Is  there not some    other way.  J  ���������and today, as t^he    roads get    better  THREE  RRIDGES  I5UILT  IN THREE DAYS.  Three bridges, one of them 400  feet long over the Kicking Horse riv-"  er, and over a mile of track were  constructed by the Canadian Pacific  Kail way engineers in the course of  three days' to meet the demands of  the traffic which will now be de-  touring around the Palisser tunnel  which is blocked by the recently  wrecked  freight   train.  '/v-;l  1' '-* I  1  ''!���������

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