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The Abbotsford Post Nov 2, 1923

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 3?6
VICTORIA
frorincial Library
/'UaiJSHKD IN IS. C. ON B. C. MADE PAPER.
\ol. XXVIJ., No. -1-.
Abbolsford, B.C., Friday, November^, 1023.
$1.00 P-ek Annum.
is*��JA^spraK.1 jrtwsjwu* ���;
e gCTs*caraBsrac^^igfcggffl��flRS^M
\I- - '-
r
ciol
I
IMPORTED   DIRECT FROli ENGLAND
ifiyhcf.it- Quality - Prices "Right
he PIONEER.STORE
R. DesMAZES
*A:ytOTRI'Ott��,ANI> WHATCOM  ISO A I)
i-touo  jG vvimtcom  Kond, Toi. 28M       Farmers 1912
����./ <<w
T'ff"-'1%?s^T'ffl'WJ,,wim||,|*'p^||tB^1
/#oHt /?.q; Report
Of Local Schools
Hughe'i.
3r    cent.
T    ,     ., ���   ���
!)i\\   L TonPi'.���.!!���,   P. A
'I of,;! n'.icr.ihii'ja,  21
ft1?. IK:   laics,  2.
Pi>vi\*cf       aliciulanca,       13~-Mina
Bailey.   Vera   Bailey,   Edward   Bed-
low,     Howard     Benedict,     William
mown,       Frances   Chapman,     Mary
Gam'-v.  \vpsley Ilay.    Kitty    llanos,
Ali.i.s   .:���;���: y,   Cnimio.   Keen, ��� Duncan
Id.       Joseph       MacDonald,
irK union.   YVillena   McPhee,
SV.mu.'t, Eva Ware,
niv. If. Teacher. C. McPhee:
No. c;i  roll. ."S;   per cent.  93.
Perfect  attendance���Perry  Huker,
Barbara   Brydges,    -Harry     Conway,
Lawrence     Gamoy.     Robert     Groat,
Flof.sie   Hum.   Stella   Jones,   George
Keen.    Charles        Millard,    Richard
Millard.   Marguerite' McGowan.   Harold   .McKinnon,     Christina     Rowles,
Trcne   Rowles.     Delia   Rukas,   Mary
Smith,   Sydney  Smith,   Caniillo  Tre-
thewey. Dorothy Taylor, Teddy Webster.   Bobby   Webster,   Walter     Mclnnes. . .
��� T eadcrs-   in .-��� Grade*' VII.���Grace.
'"iVutcli'lfdnyBtcil^
Kinnon.
Leaders in Grade VI'.���Barbara
Brydges, Robert /Webster, Dorothy
Taylor.
Div. I IT. Teacher, V. J. Evans.
No. on roll ?>"���: per rent. 1)0.
Pcifeet attendance���Vera Bedlow,
Georgia Cocgan, Roy Mills, Julia
Milchell. Elsie McDonald, George
McGowan. Flc&sie McNelly. David
Pco^o". Vicl^t tucker. Celinn  Row-
Ls.   Mr.:
t;i-.~   c:-
Mrs. Mc Gillivrmj
Buried Thursday
The J'uneral of Mrs. Duncan Mc-
Gillivray, who passed away in a Bellingham hospital last Thursday, was
hold on Sunday afternoon from Gillis' parlors, Sumas, to the Hazel wood
Cemetery, Rev. AV. Robertson officiating.
The funeral was very largely attended by sorrowing friends and relatives, which testified to the high
esteem and respect in which Mrs.
McGillivray was held.
The floral tributes were very
beautiful and many, coming iri' sympathy from friends and relatives residing in Washington and British
.Columbia, and the local lodges of
the L.O.L. and L.T.B. Intimate
friends acted as pallbearers, namely,
Messrs. R. McCrimmon, Wm. Fraser,
G. Ball, A. Marcey, John Fraser. Si1.,
and J. Cameron.,
Mrs. Duncan' McGillivray is survived by her husband, one son, John,
who resides in California, one brother. Mr.T~Dan. McKenzie ot Abbotsford, a brother and sister, liying at
-the^.oI^.b.pme.^Ca'li^Bjutou^ 'sJLE.I. J
.-'. brother and sister" in Ontario and
a sister in Montana.
Mr. and Mrs. McGillivray have resided in this district for many years,
nnd have-endeared themselves to    a
Provincial, House.
Is Now in Session
(By the Observer)-
Victoria, Oct. 31���With "the Olivci
administration mending its fences at
o\ei\v turn, with the newly organised
Provincial Pa;ty broadcasting its
cunont Issue of the "'-'e.trchliglit"
on evory mail, dealing with the alleged maladministration of P. G. I-J.
accounts, and with the "Conservative
and independent members having
thei"' aniuuilion trains in full swing
preparatory lo tho heavy artillery
bairage that is said to be due inside
of a week, tho fourth session of thc
Fifteenth parliament of the British
Columbia legislative assembly can be
said -to  bo in  full swing.
It was opened by His Honor, Walter C. Nichol on Monday afternoon
husband if present signs porlend anything, it is going to -bo tho last session of the present administration
before they decide to go to the country and ask the British Columbia electorate whether they are" worthy of
a return.
From all sides and from the whispers which the average member of
the Tress Gallery listens'to in .the
corridors, .the present session is" going to be an interesting -one. It always as the case when a government
has just about -reached .������the end of
their tether and are contemplating
an appeal to tho countryy. True,
the Oliver government : could continue to "carry on" until 11)25 but
this is a little out of the ordinary and
is rarely staged by any -government
unless the-premier of the'day and of
that particular province, Dominion
or nation deems it good politics to
cling to possible straws until"the last
moment.
Featuring the agenda'""-which has
been hinted at in the King's Speech,
is of-course the propos8d''nbolition of
the personal property ti��x. Rep res-,
entations have been macfe from time
to^ time i/'-'iring the^ paj^fpur years
by the 'lcatfihg'business""me"n"''pf the
province to have this class of revenue
eliminated.
It  is   generally   known   that  Hon.
. A Little Upset���Ccdidgc Not Waiting
���*���    *UrT'r*K<*tZl
���^ ���-. "��.
tie   S'.iior,     llovbert  Smiili.
:;nith. ITditli Taylcr.
Lraoe-a in  G'ado VL-���Von Bed-
V\".  /luvi   Diuip.ti.  Edith   Taylor.
I.r;-!fi---rs in Grad" V.--He-.-J)-i.*t
P;-'.:;!i, Eis'e McDonald, Maggie Slate:-
Div. IV. Toichsr, R. Archibald.
ro:* co:it.  03.2.1.
Pr'-'frft att^iulaccc���Tyy Bail.jy,
i.\':y(\ ralley, V.'esley Crut^'T.-s, ne"-
���'leo Dunham. Colin Emmer?on. Earl
���"airr.nl, Leslie Great, .Limes I-Tuteii-
���<--o-.i. Daryl Jus'ey, Marg.-ret Iivino,
L't'ii*-! .T'-.'iKson. Caroline Lei'-y, Cen-
ra'.l Mi-Kinnon. Connie Rci'h. Annie
J'iiVa��. Martin Slater, Gerald Thoru-
'.hvaite.
Lon.ierss in Grade IV.. Snr.���Ar-
ihur Snashall,'Carrie Leary, Gordon
Lay.
Jo'idc-s   in   Grade   IV.,   Jnr.���Ivv
B:'.:;.i"v,   Leah  Dooring.  Hflsn Rukas.
Div. V , Teacher, Miss V.  Hunt.
I'o. en ro*l 41;    per cent 93.3.
Perfect,     attendance���Mary     Bonnet",  .Liinrs   Chapman,  Thelma  Cru-
iiir:*.';. Henry Currio,    Thelma      Ga-
v.'.cy. Ei:--abeth Haddrell. Brjan Hay,
!:;.>       rem.       Robe:-t       Hutchison,
', h*-:-��;-s Irvine. Lyle Johnson. James
""""'���'on.-ild.       Margaret       McKinnon,
'"'ive   McNelly,  Jacque   Mills,   Helen
Piasloski,     George       Reith,     Selma
Schluter,   Bessie  Smith,       Margaret
. ftn'.-sh.'ill.  Petty Swift, Jackie Taylor,
Billy TayU r,     Beryl  White, ;. Eryine
Wiip.'ht, lacs Wahlman, Oliver Sliiip-
��� cini.
r��ule:a  in   Grade   IL���Mary  Ben-
ijetl,  George  Rollh, Orma Bryenton.
" f.rndoi-a     in     Grade     Hi;���Sylvia
lla.-'o:i.  Pe.'isie Smith,  Henry Curry.
L-v.  VI. Teacher, A. M.  Mutrie.
Lo. </-i  roll  40; per ecnL  'j;"i.3,1.
P..*n'.-."t a V. en dance���-lildltli Bar-
1 er, J.-arle Pousflold, Louis Gosling,
J(v.!ti L'ari-oway, Gilboi-t Hay, Betty
lrvina, Jimmy Leary, William Lee,
D*;:ii:,'i!!!i McGov.aii. Clarence Mc-
L::!ly. Archie McNelly, Donald Mc-
Nuil, Poi :'e:i McPliee. Patricia Mil-
h.i'i.!. J*T!'!i:t!.-> Aiiiia, Teddv P;a;;i-
F;-���'-(! Rr?vo3. May Rooiiey,
:(���**���*������;-:. Jiraniie .niiekfrr. Julia'
\.:>-vrr'c V/flisfcr. Ilarnl White,
V*.*:-:s!ii., Clyda Simpson.
'e.v'r.-T) !-i Gride-II ���JiJumiy Cal-
dcr,   D'-uglrfi  McGowan.
T..rr!do:-s \-.\ Grail". J, A���Patricia
MPir.-'l,   l..{;y   Broad.
if/;-I:-:-", in Grirln T. B���Teddy
Pi'asilo.;ki, Ausy. Rowles.
.... .....   ���.._��� .���    ���   John Hart, Minister of Finance,    has
host of friends,  who extend to    the i l*een willing to waive this channel of s^/fj-g, 2?, BtICC Died
bereaved  husband  and   son,   deepest i revenue  but the demands of his as
sympathy.
Schedule for Fall
Basketball Games
On Monrlav evening members of
'Im Frnspr Villey Basketball League
met in the Bank of Montreal cham-
'lp"��s.
Boprrs^ntat-'vo^;   f'-nm   ChllUv/nck.
Mis-.ion   City  rvn:l   Abbotsford     wore
nrotont. and  the   following schedule
of games was drawn up.   '
Week
Sardis r��t Mls*-'on City, Chilliwack
at   ^1'bnfsfn-rl.  Nov.   in   to  24,
Mif-.c-irn CHy at OhiBwack, Abbots-
ferd at Sa-dia. Nov. 9.H  to Dec.  1st
Mission citv nt /-bbotsford. Chilli wnck n.t Sard'.s. Dec. 3 to Sth.
Chllliv.-ack at Mif;s;.-.-> Cify. Sardis
at AbbofpfoH,  Doc.  m  lo  l~A}\.
Abbotsrord at Chilliwack. .Mission'
City -*r Sard'-4. Ti^-   17 to 9. (th. j
/���l-'xif'jfp.r-c" at  Mlss'.-in Citv, Sard
at rin'lliw."ck. .Tan   7 to'12th.
Th" myr  rni-otin- of     Ihr  Lca-ue   i,-;J ,JV,-,";r
will  It hold  in  Abbc-L-iford on  Jan-
uarv SHi.
A mre.'ing of tho Abbotsford
r'mkolba;! Leagno was held on Tup--
day, v.-iion prrau��r--'-'iie-i!.s worn vn.-.r'n
for fh.i procurino- of (lie Harrop Hall
for bnskotii.i!!. fhrco pvnni"cs and
two afternoons of each I'-^el.-, .\ rrn-
nhifien wiis passed (n ask Mr C.
Spring fo act ns roach anil ma.!nir',r.
It was deculed   to get  the hall
shape as soon as    noss'ihlo so-   that
->rad.'SGs miglit begin.
sociatcs   in   tlie   cabinet   have   been
too strong.
Then, again there is the proposed
introduction"--of the amendment to
the hours of work which will apply
especially to tho lumber and allied
industry. Major R. J. Burde, M. C
independent member for Alborni, lias
tried hard  to secure this legislation
On Sunday Morning
The death occurred in the M.-R -A.
Hospital on Sunday niornhr.r of Mrs.
Ti3. Brice of Vancouver, who iiad be-in
visiting her daughter, Mrs.  G. Trus-
sln  of Abbotsford.
Death  was- dim to bloodpoisnning,
caused by a    prick     'of    a     needle,
on the books and during each"session \ Deceased was a widow, 02 years    of
since 1920 ho has succeeded in cut-j age, and is survived by her daughtov.
ting   down   tho   majority   against   it "Mrs." Trussle,  living here, and  three
to the extent that    last fall the slim [ other daughters living in Vancouver
majority  of  four was    recorded     a-3 one son in'New" Westminster and one
gainst tho amendment.    With a view'sister, Mrs. Stabner, of Vancouver,
of stealing certain thunder from tho?     The funeral'was held    from Bow-
Alborni   member     tho     government] ell's undertaking parlors, New West-
now intend to introduce tho measure'minstei-,  at  2:30   on  Tuesday  after-
themselves.    To offset, to a certain'noon,  interment   being  made  in   the
extent,   the  protests  of  the  lumber-! family plot in    Ocean    View    burial
men and paper pulp operators," the! park,
government proposes to place an em-3 ':-��� ���
Mr. Waitie Buys
Grocery Business
Mr. F. J.# R. Whitchelo has dispos-
?d of the grocery department of his
store to Mr. Waftie of Vancouver,
who already has taken over the business. Mr. Whitchelo will continues
ia the drygoods, boots and shoes and
crockery, and intends to incrense the
stock in these lines.
Mr. Wattie and wife and family,
four daughters and one son, will take
up  residence   in   Abbotsford.
Mr. J. H. Johnson, who has been
employed in Mr. F. J. R. Whitehelo's
store, has returned to Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown of Vancouver
were the guests of Mrs. A. Mclnnes
on   Sundav.
bargo c:i all logs gathered from vro-i f}JfJ  fim'tP' R&WfJpnt
vincial   limits   and   prewired' for   ex-lUUi/  * l"ie  AhdbUiefll
. p?.rt- - Died- on Saturday
.__       Another feature v/au 'lie cl'\-iY no-j ���..	
���'jtwoeu J. B. rierihue.  iiininr Liberal i     Mr. G.  Dods, an otd  time resident
i member for Victor'a, and Mrs. Mary <or' Abbotsford and district d>ed at h's
i. liberal    member    from i homo in Sumas    on    Saturday    ias\ I
'^aZtixrjx'&Zttz^*.
���7^N
������"??"""
Vancouver, in the opening of the de
bate rn the sprcTh from the Throne
who:) a difference of opinion was nx-
Drofsed   on   thc  merits of  lhe  ("oast
Range Steel    Company.      Mr. Cleri-
after an illness of-several  months. JS
Mr.  Dods --was' for nmny years e.u- \\
ployed on  the bridge    g'mg of    l.lics 11|
G NMt. and  was  very    well     knnwa :��!
1
in Abbotsford.    At l':30 p.m. the greatest
sale of ALUMINUM WAF'E   (guaranteed
for
jC. \s
years)
jver held   outside of   the
wcif know* ��� j   large cities, will take place at this store.
hero.
Nov.
Coming Events
-Concert and dance, L. O. L
'i.
A ,,���������
T ,.1
:t,
Li.Mney
and L.T.n. r.odges ("Orange Hall).
Nov. (I���Whist, drive, Rohokah Lodge
(Masonic  Hull).
Nov.   0���Provincial     Party     Public
meeting  (Theatre Hall).'
Nov.   1 0���- Poppy   Day.
Nov. in���Sale of home cooking,
(GnvAtiy Block). ���
Nov. 11���Memorial Services, Hazel-
wood Cemetery.
Nov. 12 ��� (Thanksgiving Day) Armistice festivities, mas'iuerado
dance of the CI. 'W.  V. A.
Nov.'!*)���Thank Offering' Meeting
of. the W. M. Society in the Presbyterian Church.
Nov. 30.���Bazaar of the W. A. of
the   M.-S.-A.   Hospital.
hue, as v. member of ihe Victoria
Chamber of CommoT-i committors,
which has criHclsod the project, v;s.i
.in.-it as emphatic In his stuul wh 11.-5
JTi'H. Smith, who had accompanied
, ['^ an influential delegation fo tneo'! the
cabinet tills summer, spoke in favor
of the achoniR. Th.e u-.*v. result: of
Tuesday afternoon's debate was to
demonstrate that all was not.
with lhe proposal from a Llboi-a!
point, of view.
This afternoon Harry.Pooley morn
ber for Esquimau., is occupying the
floor. The situation is more interesting in view of the admission by
the government, organs last week
that the administration' is intent on Association was
eliminating Esquimau from the map 1 evening,  when
Deceased was *>���"> years of age, a Jj
native of Ontario, and is survived by j js
a wife and ten -sous, all residing at ;|
homo, except one, who is employed ��� <!
in   Vancouver. j jj
The funeral was lipid on Monday i 9
afternoon, servicer; at lhe home a no i $
graveside being conducted by Itc-v. j 8
\V. Robertson.' In
Interment was made in the Ha/ol-'l
wood cemetery. The pallbearers,
all friends and co-workers of Mr.
Dods. included Messrs. A. Gallant,
P. Hunil.MVsr.eud. H. Hawkins. W.
Evans, R. Nellson and T. Amuiid.son.
ft
AL
Oh,
H
Services will be' held In St. Math-
evv>ny H-utiday night at 7:30. Rev. A.
Harding priest, vicar.   .
A   mealing  of  the  Fruit  Growers'
Association   was     held   on    Tuesday
 ,. . ��� g,  when   thc   president,   W.  S.
and merging the district with Vic- i lliil-tonf, gave a report of thc nicet-
toria propei* and with, Cowichan. ing of the association which he hud
Having served in the legislature for j attended in Vancouver, at wli*-di
many years, one period under the old jit was decided that all accounts due
McMrldp governni";if and'twiee in on- 5 tiie berrygrowers would ho cleared
noslllo!)   fo   the   Brewster-Oliver  ail-Jun by the first of the year.
minist.rafinn,  Mr. Pooley is s!ripping I ���^ *^��^ ~���~. ���
for action against this i\vw move. Hr-H'is associates.    Should    Mr.  Wowser
5*v79c. and $1.79
Wc were fortunate in   getting an opportunity to put on this sale.
Values up to 50 cents for  .5c
Values up to $2.00 for-v. '-.-. ......79c
Values up to ��4.50 for ". .:$1.79
* No exchanges, no C. O.D.'s, no  Tele-
"phone Orders���CASH.
SALE STARTS AT 1:30 P. M.
^lw.L,^l^;.^^���^l:.^,^..i^.^x>^^AJ^^cxowl^.��A:^^^JL^^'JlaJvaa^i^^ll^
has a family record back of him for
his father served the people for scv~.
eral terms as a representative from
the same riding.
Tlie debate on the speech from the
Throne promises to go well into next
week.    Tt will all depend on the ac
tivities of the Opposition Leader o,ndinext week or so
and some of the Independents take i [
advantage- of the opportunity to! "
speak, there is one thing on the do-!
bate, no member is checked up for i
wandering far afield on any subject :
���much publicity will be given in the ,
dally   and   weekly   press   during   the
Limited
ABHOTSFOIWS "STORE OF QUALITY"
i.-��S2i* ;��\&2^}��KXXiUii&lA3UIMC*a&2niZ>
'HuXJCUBSD
a-��irrri tt^^j^^
uiMSWiniraiKiuiltH
MM��Mm��MlMIBllMM^^ ���������isod aHb^s-Loaay am  THE ABBOTSFORD POST  J. A. BATES, Editor and Proprietor  Published Every Friday  Member ol' IS.'C nnd Yukon Weekly Newspaper Assn.  "KIDAY, .NOVIOMBER   1,, J 923  ^  Docs Western Canada need more immigrants''. This is an open question in our mind  at the present time, but we are open to be  convinced that we are wrong. Three prominent members of our provincial government  havo been to the Old Country this year and on  their return have told us that we may expect a large number of new settlers during  tlie year 1925. By settlers we take it that  they are to go on the land. Poor devils!  What a bright future is ahead of them if  they invest their all in a piece of land. They  will in large numbers migrate to the cities,  stony broke; or to the United States where  the far away hills look bright and green,  and cast in their lot with the 133,851 who  left Canada last year for Uncle Sam2s dominions. Under ordinary circumstances all  Canadians would greet the new settlers wishing them prosperity, but under the present  conditions we can do nothing but extend to  them the hand of sympathy, trusting that  they will have better luck than many of those  now on the land. tl   ���������  The farmer these days, 110th withstanding  Mr. Barrow's tirade, is to be pitied. He is the  same industrious and saving fellow he always  was. In many cases he is making a poor living, through no fault of his own. His hay,  his 'grain, his potatoes, his fruit, his vegetables are not bringing to him-full returns for  his labors, let alone .interest on his money  invested. Not that he does not'have abundant crops, but the markets are so manipulated that he gets but poor returns. In this  district this year there are fruit growers, with  five and ten acres, years ago considered large  enough, who are this year out working at  other occupations. Why? Because when the  fruit returns came in they found they were  dollars in the hole instead of dollars'ahead.  They are good fruit growers too and know  their business from A to Z; and some of them  years ago were able to take a trip to Califor-  nia for the winter.     But them days are gone   we hope not forever, but they are gone, and  the future does not look any too bright.  Other products besides fruit are not yielding  th.e producer enough to keep the wheels������������������ of  industry going. Panning, today, is the worst  paid business in Western Canada, and particularly in the. Eraser Valley, and some other  Valleys that we know of in B. C. The new  settlers in the Peace River country are moving  out, according fo newspaper reports, because  they cannot market their farm produce to  advantage. Yet we are told that what we  need is more settlers���������more farmers.  The very men who are shouting in this  province for more settlers are not doing much  to help the farmer and fruit grower to market his product, and one of our ministers  would have all those who are not able to  make a living under the present conditions  sent out of the country. There would be a  big addition to the 133,000 going out if he had  his way.  The dumping act may not be to blame for  all thc bad luck of the fruit grower and farmer but it is responsible for a whole lot of it.  Last session one of our ministers in Victoria,  when the house was in session, lauded the  new anti-dumping act of the dominion government to the skies, and read Hansard to  support his argument.    w  When fruit���������strawberries��������� are selling at  $5.75 a crate in Winnipeg and the fruit grower here gets returns that he is dollars in the  whole on his last shipment it is time that our  minister of agriculture should be getting busy  and investigating why this is so. Our information, no later than this week, informs  us that strawberries were so high priced in  Winnipeg this year that the people could not  afford to buy them. Mr. Grant's market report will show the high price that fruit  brought.  ������������������ A similiar state of affairs will be found in  other lines of farming. This week a report  reached our office that a man owning 1G0  acres make $1000 on hay this year, but his  taxes were $1000. How is that for prosperity? What inducement is that for a new  farmer to come across the water and continent to settle on our land? He Would get experience with a vengeance if he attempted to  raise hay.  Our humble advice, and we offer it with all  the humility of a country editor, in a small  community, is for us to put farming on a  paying basis, even if the government has to  borrow money to do it, before we invite men  from England, Scotland or any other European country, Lo come here and hew out a  home on the land. Asking them to come here  under present conditions is worse than borrowing tlieir money to build railways then  taking over the railways.  There are members in the local legislature  ���������which meets this week in Victoria who come  from districts that are badly bitten this year,  and we would consider it their bounden duty  to bring before the government the great necessity for better marketing conditions, and  see if something cannot be done. Money is  loaned for other industries in this province,  but it is understood about $80,000 has been  loaned to the farmer'ol' 13. C. by the. Oliver  government.    Whew!  Of course, we do need more settlers in this  country, but what is the use of inviting others  to come and share thc misery and niisfor-  lune of not being able to get a just reward for  their labors. Jf we make the man on the land  prosperous by helping to look after his interests, we will not need to send high plenipotentiaries to the Mother country on a begging expedition for more settlers. The prosperity will be sent to relatives by the thousands from thc many English, Scotch, Irish,  and others, now settled'on our lands, and the  ���������glad tidings of how the people in the new  land arc-getting along wlil be more ably expressed than any speeches made by public  men and women. Further, when new settlers arrive here, nt the solicitation of friends  or relatives the glad hand can be extended to  them, knowing that greater prosperity awaits  them in their adopted province.  CAN TT BIO?  The weather has been so mild lately that one can  hardly believe Lloyd George is on this .continent.���������,  New' York Sun.  ,      TKOUI3LH  According to his wife it is' very hard on Lloyd  George to keep quiet. And indeed when you come to  think of it, he hasn't done much in the way of keeping quiet for some time. If it hasn't' been one  thing it has been another. He is very fortunate,  however, in having a wife who knows what to do  with him. "1 have tried to hold him down," she  told an audience in Toronto, "but it has really been  difficult." Difficult it has been no doubt; still it is  a job from which Dame Margaret probably derives  some   satisfaction.���������Stratford   Beacon-Herald.  Here is a concrete example of what th.e farmer is  up against. It is reported by one in the vicinity of  Endorby���������never mind the name, lie gives the exact figures: Kour years ago Uiis farmer received  CSvl a pound for butter fat, and his taxes that year  were $97. This year this farmer is receiving Slf  a pound for butterfat and his taxes on the same land  that was levied upon in 1919, are today $152.���������Okanagan   Commoner.  When Minister of Agriculture .Barrow jumped  into print in his tirade on the farmers of the Province, he started something. Mr. Barrow has been  asleep so long that his sudden awakening follow  ed by his impatient utterances against the farmer  class, will hardly win friends. He will hear about it  when the farmers have a chance to vote at tlie next  Provincial election.  Possibly the Hon. Mr. Barrow is taking this  method of hitting back at the farmers for what they  are saying about him. Possibly he thinks it profitable  to resort to the methods of his leader.  It is significant, however, "'that the Hon. Mr. Bow?  ser should be appealed to by ��������� the farmers in the  Northern section of the province for him to go north  and open the fall fairs. This' honor usually falls to  the Minister of Agriculture, or the Premier himself. This year,' however, Mr. Bowser was called  upon, and responded by going north and opening  many of the agricultural fairs, possibly this accounts  for the recent broadside shot by the Hon. Mr. Barrow.    Will he get away with it?���������Ex.  OKAXAGAN FRUIT  The Penticton Herald under the heading of "The  Complaint From Cowichan," says editorially: ���������  "The' Cowichan Leader asks why it is that Okanagan  fruit is apparently not obtainable in that district.  "The reason is very easy to find.  "Take soft fruits. The Coast wholesalers have  been able to purchase 'dumped' American fruit at  such' a,low price that the Okana.gan interests could  not compete and get a living price for their growers.  So they turned to the prairies where competition was  generally upon a more even basis.  "The P.O.13. Okanagan prices obtainable on the  prairies for peaches, 'cots and so forth this season  have invariably been much better than offered at the  Coast/ Naturally we feel that in the Interests of the  growers who are in urgent need of funds we must  sell where we could get the best price.  "No doubt, there are some Coast wholesalers who  are willing to foster the 'Made in B. C idea, but the  most of them, like the average type of mankind,  will  buy in the cheapest market.  "With tlieir big production and their 'desire to  keep the surplus away from their high-priced big city  markets, the Americans are generally in a position  to get rid of plenty of fruit into Western Canada at  any price at all, so long as it meets the cost of packing  and shipping.  ���������'We doubt if the cheap fruit the wholesalers buy  across the line means cheap .fruit for the ultimate  consumption���������hut that is another story."  Freckles and His Friends-You Can't Blame Him  By Blossei  In a country like this, with its magnit'ieierit distances and railway system of 20,000 miles of track,  tho time may never come when all level crossings  will be eliminated. With motor cars in usuo everywhere, there is no railway crossing so remote but that  a motorist may use it.  It isjiis business to see that he does go at a safe  moment. It is his business for two reasons: (1) Because it is the presence of mind and his car at that  time and place and not the coining of the train, which  creates the risk for a crash; and (2) because if there  should be a crash, he and his car wil! bo crushed and  not the train���������Brockvllle Recorder and Times.  Make  no  mistake about it,  boys. The  best investment  you can make is���������study.  \  TZW*  -      "itf ^"*l  Lloyd George's first public appearance in, Canada  was at the First Baptist. Church in Montreal on Sunday morning. it was a fitting commencement of his  tour of the dominion, and autoists', who have a tendency for Sunday travelling, would do well to copy the  British  commoner's  example.���������Guelph  Daily  Herald.  On Thursday afternoon, Oct. IS  a cjuiot but pretty wedding took  place at the home of the bride's parents, when Miss Flora Belle Gillis,  eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs.  Alexander Gillis, Mt. Lehman, was  united in marriage to Mr. John William Satchell, only son of Mr. and  Mrs. George Satchell, Mt. Lehman.  Rev. Thos. Oswald officiated. The  bride, daintly attired in a wedding  dress of sand crepe de chine, wa*  given in marriage by her father and  had as her attendant her sister, Miss  May Gillis, who wore,navy blue Canton crepe. Mr. Alexander Smith  supported the bridegroom. Following the bridal supper the happy  couple left on their honeymoon,  which will be spent in Seattle, and  took with them the best wishes of  the community. The; guests wero:  Mr. and Mrs. Geo.~������itcliell, Mr. and  Mrs. Chas. Gough and daughter of  North Bend; Mrs. McDonald and  Master Sinclair of Vancouver; Rev.  Thos. and Mrs. Oswald, Mr. and Mrs.  Hugh McDonald, Miss M. McLean,  Miss K. McLean, Mr. A.' Smith and  Mrs. H. Fowles, Jr. The many gifts  testified to the popularity of Mr. and  Mrs. J. W. Satchell in the district.  Mrs. John-. Craig of New Westminster is visiting hor daughter,  Mrs. E. Israel.  Guests at the home of Mr. and  Mrs. G. McCallum aro Mr. and Mrs.  McLeod of Vancouver.  'Mrs. Fearn, who has been living  in Sumas, Wash., for some months,  has returned to her residence here.  At the regular meeting of the  Ladies' Aid held on Oct. 17 it was  decided to arrange for the harvest  festival on Nov. 11, Thanksgiving  Sunday. Mrs. Forrester is convener  of the church decorations. It was  announced that the fund for the  church renovation is increasing fairly well and it is hoped there will  soon be sufficient funds on hand to  begin work. The next meeting of  the Aid will be on Nov. 7.  At. the Young People's Society  meeting on Oct. 13, Mr. Geo. Turner  wns chosen vice-president and Miss,  Ella Stevenson convenor of the missionary committee. The study of  the evening was "Equipment for  Service" led by Rev. Thos. Oswald.  A notable fact was that every, member took part. The Y. P. S. .social  committee will hold a Hallowe'en  evening on Oct. -26.  Considerable business was transacted at the regular meeting of the  Community. Club on Oct. 1.7. The  executive was authorized to arrange for speakers to deal with topics  relative to agriculture and who  would address the monthly business  meetings. Mr. J. P. Carr and Mrs.  (toy Lehman were appointed delegates.-to confer with representatives  from other clubs on the formation ol  a central committee. The organization committee were instructed to  bring in at the November meeting a  plan for a membership drive. It  was decided to hold the social events  on the first Friday of each month instead of the .third Friday as formerly and to h6*1 d a Hallowe'en party  on Oct. 31. for the,boys and girls or  Mt.   Lehman  and  vicinity.  Many are looking forward to the  lecture" on Shakespeare which Mr.  Francis Bursill, well known under  the nom-de-plume of Felix Penne. is  to give in the Orange Hall' on Oct.  24. He will illustrate his address  with many beautiful slides. This evening is being held under the auspices of the Literary and .Debating  Society.  The power of the . voice is the success of the telephone. It was in the-endeavor to transmit sound that  the telephone was invented, and the great factor of its development into an article of very common use is that  direct conversation may be carried on.   , ^  Because it enables one's personality to be sent is  the reason .that, the telephone promotes friendship and  intimacy, and brings about closer relations between those  in business. The pleasure of hearing the voice you  know makes long distance the casual practise of every  one.  British Columbia Tele'pfione Company  J. H. JONES  Funeral Director  AGENT   FOR   HEADSTONES  Phone Connection. Mission Ci y  VANCOUVKlt CONDITIONS  S1M1LIAK TO  PRAIRIES  For the sum of $6,250  the stad-  ������2?  On the train Medford w.ay Sub-  bubs got into a conversatin with a  stranger, who remarked: "I see you  are putting up a good many new  buildings."  "Yes,"   answered  Subbubs;, "new ��������� ium at Queens Park, Ne-w Westmin-  other centres in the very near future. J buildings^are the only kind we pui ster, will pass into the hands of the   ���������  The manual training started at tlie  three centres: White Rock, Hall's  Prairie and Cloverdale i? proceeding  very satisfactorily. Tt is expected  thai, it will be in operation this week  at Springdale and    Tynehead,     and  "We noticed that Vancouver City as  far as the perishable produce market  is concerned, is in a similiar fix to  the cities of the plains, with the exception of. potatoes and onions.  In the case of potatoes, our Vancouver correspondent tells of the result of united action on the part or  the Orientals. -  The onion market in the U. S. has  slackened and lower prices prevailed there this week; this was immediately reflected in Vancouver. We  heard that a wholesale house turned  down a car of onions bought at standard price, because it was not up'  to grade. This, in view of the fact  that these onions were accompanied  by a government certificate as to  grade. ���������  The apple market is dull and lifeless, due it is claimed to the action  of so-called independents quoting  under the Associated Growers' price.  It is a wonder that all fruit growers  do not put a stop to this practise on  uie part of the shippers they select  to sell their produce, as price shading  is no part of a salesman, unless the  quality of his goods warrant it.  If the old saw of "two can play at  the same game" was practised, every  grower would suffer severely, as  it stands now, the buyer is afraid to  buy ahead and all stability that could  be secured by unity is lost.  Some of the independents question  our right to refer to their underquoting. Are they afraid of the  truth? We would not be doing the  industry any good by silence.  Put Up Old Ones For Sale  Wm., Atkinson  General Auctioneer and Live  Stock   Specialist.  23 years among the Stockmen of  t>k������ F>aser Valley. . Am familar  with tlie'different breeds of live  9tock and their values.  Address   all communications  Box 34 Chilli'wacft, B. O'  to  Alex. S.Duncan  Barrister      Solicitor  Notlary Public  OFFICE  J. A. Gatherwood Baildir.K  Phono 800.1 P. 0. Box OO  MISSION CITY, B. O.  Constipation'sftemedy  roiiBt come from nature. Celery  King-is a mixture of medicinal  her&B anoJ reota that rids the system of impurities in a gentle,  natural way. An old and well tried  remedy���������30c arid 60c packages.  3ggpj������BS������.lWI������ll l..j^V,<Ua.;. }. ,}p .'���������, ��������� " ��������� ��������� ���������   ;  A Salesman's Cough  irritates hiscuBtomers���������and makeu  him inefficient and miserable.  Shilsh U the ideal remedy���������it is  not a bulky cough mixture  but a special formula proven successful for many years. A few  drops���������brings immediate' relief.  30c, 60c arid $1.20.  All druggists.  wmm  to.    \  J"* ������ - V r~?  THEABBOTHFOPJ) POST  ���������*������������������-j������"  =s  A. R. GOSLING  WHEN VOU WANT  House and  Sign Painling  and  General  House Repairs  Pharie 34X -    '     .P. 0. Box 31  ABHOT8KOKD,  1$. G.  A. E. HUMPHREY  B.C. Land Surveyor and  Civil Engineer  aoom   8   Hart   Block.   Chilliwack  Box    432. ..CHILLIWACK  .*���������������  Yarwoed & Durrant  BARRISTERS and  SOLICITORS  LAW OFFICE  OPEN    KVKIIY   K1)II>AY  AHBOTSKOKl),   B.   O.  Bsnasss&o-s���������-  ALAN M.'BROKOVSKI  AUCTIONEER and  VALUATOR  Auction Sales Concluded  SATISFACTION GUAKAN'JTKJSB  LIVE STOCK a Specials  p. 0. Box 94  TELL  "And I'll Tell the World."  Tell me not in mournful numbers  that life is but an empty dream  when tilings like these happen,  unci are recorded here for amusement.  It is a pity that some of the Mission trustees did not attend the gathering at Duncan last week, for if  they had they would, according to  reports firom other parts of the pro  vince, have been strong for domestic  science from now on. One of the  finest banquets ever given on Vancouver Island, and that is going some  was given the visitors at Duncan to  the Fathers of Education. All of the  daintiest part of the luncheon was  made by the girls attending the domestic science classes. You must be  assured that these dainties were good  because tho waitresses���������the high  school girls���������enjoyed eating the  "scraps". No cook wants to eat  her own cooking if she,can help it���������  she would rather eat some one else's  cooking, if she could; but just imagine eating the scraps left at a ban-  f|Uet���������who would eat them unless  they were really fine? Some one of  our trustees sure missed something  in his sweet little life all right by  not  going to -Duncan.    But such  is  life!   I  * *  That men were not equal to the  occasion, and never will be. Why?  ���������I'll tell you why?, Just the moment  women got the vote men should have  started to scream and jump on tables  at the sight of a mouse.  * *  In Vancouver people ��������� at lear.'t b's  of them���������do not believe that rain  water is soft,  because sometimes P  comes down awfully hard.  * *  The Hon Jacques Bureau. Minister  of Customs', is said to be on his way  to tho coast to expose the bootleggers  good job he don't depend on B.C. for  his vote next election if he does.  * *  That down in Victoria it Is a com  mon saying that. Pooley of Esquimau.'  will 'wake up some morning and find  himself���������no.���������his constituency missing. John O. don't like the way'he  Pooley's all the liquor facts together and shouts them out    at    public  meetings'.  * #  That Col. McRae of the P. P. will  tell an Abbotsford audience on the  nth why he puts Premier Oliver and  Mr. W. J. Bowser's picture both on  the same page.  you  them  in   the  quoted  you r  your  self,  you  PROVINCIAL PARTY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  Open Letter to Hon. John Oliver  '   ' Vancouver, Oe<-. 2C>, 1923.   *  The HON. JOHN OLIVER, *v    ,  Premier of British Columbia,  Victoria, B. C.  Dear Sir: ' ��������� , ,  .-  I enclose herewith for y������ur information copy of a pamphlet  SEARCHLIGHT No. 5, issued today by the Provincial. Party  of British Columbia. * If its contents be true, ,you, your colleagues, ��������� and Mr. Bowser, should, in common decency, retire  -from public life. If they are untrue, , you, should he given  the earliest opportunity"to refute' them.      For that    reason 1 send  you  this copy. '.,,'.  This is the fifth pamphlet which I have sent you within  ���������the last few months. Bach contains most damaging- cluirgos.  J'n one you are accused of conniving with Mr. Bowser, to prevent a proper investigation into the first P. 0. E. scandal; m  another with retaining Hon. John Hart as Minister of Finance  after he had used his ��������� position as a Minister 'of the Crown, wn.n  the technical protection of an incorporated company behind .  him for his private and personal gain, in connection with the  P. G. E. Ry., or which both he and yqu, are directors. On July.  20, 1923 and August 24, 1923, 1 addressed open letters to  requesting a reply to those charges and published  press.  To these you failed <<> mnke any answer.  On April'is of tliis year,    the   Salmon Arm    Observer  from your public    address in  that    city as follows:  "The Speaker defied Gen. McRne to debate any charges .. of  misdemeanor by the present govern mon t, any where, at any  time." ���������  Being anxious for that opportunity, f notified you by open  letter on April 30 that I would meet you in the city where you  had issued the cluillango, on a date which you were to select.'  In order that tho fullest opportunity might bo given you to  make your defence I ho Board oiJTrade of Salmon Arm undertook to",secure a hull to scat 2,500 people, and ' offered to put  on a barbecue and dance in connection with, tho event for the  further   entertainment *of those who   attended.  Von failed (o accept Hint, challenge also. I notice however,  by northern papers', that when confronted with this failure, at  your inootings, you stated you would meet me at a time to suit  own convenience, although I had studiously consulted  convenience by leaving the selection of the date to your-  1 recall that, you   made a   similiar   reply   when   asked    why  failed to moot the still unrofuted charges' of Mr. R. . T,  Elliot, on April 17, 1920, which were read in your presence  on the floor    ot ihe legislature. ^    ,  Instead, you and your s Attorney-General have contented  yourselves with slighting reference to. aiid'inuendoes ugainst  myself. Speaking in Ash Hall, Vancouver, Hon. Mr.  Manson was reported in the public press as saying with regard    to  hie.  "When we consider the various enterprises with which he  has been connected in the past, 1 am inclined to believe he is  hardly worth considering. The less said, the better, <T think.  However,      we shall   deal will    him when    the time    comes."  I promptly addressed- a letter to the Attorney-General, gave  him an outline "of all essential facts that could be recalled  about my career, arranged a public meeting at New Westminster," and invited him to meet nie there, and -unburden  himself of all the sinister facts "regarding myself in his possession. Following your example he failed to appear' at that  meeting, which I had called to allow him a chance" to establish  or withdraw his imputations.  The above incidents have forced me to the conclusion that  you, and your Attorney-General are common cowards, and  that your methods towards those who criticise your public acts  are of the contemptible character which a coward usually  adopts, namely, gossip and bluster. From the charges made  'against you, and your government you have sought safety in  silence. ' Your ally, Mr. Bowser, has done' the same, in the  public interest therefore I propose another course to force both  of you to recognize- your   responsibilities'.  The'present    charges against you    and your    government    in  SEARCHLIGHT No. 5,    which   I     send   by   registered    mail,     are  supported by the'affidavits of your own.   officials'.      They    reveal  either Incredible neglect of duty,   or    connivance    with    others    to  defraud and plunder    the    people   of     the     province.      You    are  asked  to    appoint a    Royal    Commission  charges.      If they are untrue    you    have  through such a tribunal, to    discredit the  to  vindicate   yourself.  1 In order that this may be done at a minimum' of expense to  the taxpayers, the Provincial Party offers to hear the cost of the  necessary audit. A previous offer by us' to pay for an audit  of the department of Industries in order to prove waste and  extravagance, was not accepted by your Attorney-General.'  I make this demand for a Royal Commission, on behalf of  20,000 enrolled members of the Provincial Party. But I make  it as well on behalf of the whole body of long suffering taxpayers, who, if these charges he true, are. being exploited by  professional politicians like yourself and your confederates. On  behalf of these taxpayers 1 warn you, that an attempt by you  to take power, at the coming session" of the legislature, to borrow more money on P. G. E. account, or to seek by the dissolution of the legislature, another term of office, before somo  adequate and impartial investigation is held, will be such an  outrage against public morals' that the electorate will show its  resentment   at   the first   opportunity.  to    investigate     these  a1   great    opportunity  Provincial    Party .  and  (Signed)  A. D. McRAE  AN APPEAL TO GOOD CITIZENS  Is it not high time that all loyal citizens.  regardless1 of party, insisted on our Provincial Gov-'  eminent either defending itself against the' charges  which have been hurled at it during the present year  or submitting its case to the electors for approval?  It is unthinkable that a government, which cannot  clear itself of these charges, can continue to administer the affairs of the province for another two  years. -  The fight, which the Provincial Party is making  for the return of honest and decent government to  British Columbia, is your fight. Are you in it?  The effort to clean up the political life of our province needs the assistance of every patriotic elector  ���������man and woman alike. Don't you feel that you  should take your part in this citizens' movement to  get rid of the professional politicians and 1$ a business government restore British Columbia to prosperity? Only by the  united efforts of the'right-thinking people will bring this about.  We do not ask much���������join the Provincial Party'uud help  select one of the best men as a delegate to tho BIG CONVENTION of the party to he held in Vancouver on DEC EM B 1.0 It 4th  It will be the first real citizens' political convention ever held  in British Columbia. Organizations are being formed in every  riding In thte province. Get in line with thousands of your fellow citizens and help put.this good government niovement-  "over thte top". If you arc still undecided as to the needs for  this yew political movement in our Provincial a Chili's, . GET  "SEARCHLIGHT NO. 5" AND READ IT. A post card to ihe  above address will bring i^to you as well as a membership  card, which you can sign and return if you think wo aro on the  right road.  Wo are on he eve of political deliverance in B. C. DO  YOU SHARE.    Communicate with  The Provincial Parly of British Columbia <  Room 29, Imperial Block, Vancouver, B. C.  NOTICE "TO MEMKERS���������Get your Searchlight. If yon are not  R-ettinf; your Seurchlig,"ht, notify .Headquarters Provincial Party of  K. C. AT ONCE.    '"  THE   ELECTRIC  CONTROL  OK THE SOLAR SYSTEM  How often when one looks at' a  chart of our solar system and sees  our sun and notes his sal.lelit.es from  small Mercury flitting' around-the  sun in eighty-seven -days to distant  Neptune who travels his course ��������� in  one hundred and sixty-four . years,  with each planet travelling in Us  orbit each a few million miles removed firom the other and all on the  same plane do we not wonder how  we avoid colliding with each othei  or falling into the Sun.  let- us consider the sun the centre  of our system and thc source of all  the power in it. The rays of sunlight are the secret of the control'  of its sattelites, the planets, and enable them to control theirs, the  moons. These rays of sunlight striking against the planets generate'el-  electricity. The rotation of the planets on tlieir axis cause, them to become giant generators. This electricity we call static, which is really  wild electricity; and what we call electric generating planecs are but el-  octric accumulating and controlling  planes, not generating. Electricity  then conies only from sunlight.,  ���������AVo know that all the planets have  a top and bottom axis or north and  south pole, these being positive and  negative, and we also know that like  repels like or positive repels' positive. This then is the secret that  liolds us in our oirbit, the pull of  gravity to the sun being offset by  tho repelling ' force of l.he magnetic  poles.  Now let us consider what has taken place in the past years and then  we will understand why nothing is  going to happen in the future to  disturb our flight. As each and' all  of the planets aire controlled by the  sun and according to our density we  are attracted to it by gravity, but by  our rotation or length of day which  is the speed of our generatar wo  are repelled by the action of the red  and blue poles against those of the  sun. Then if we consider the size and  density of the planets and their position in relation to the sun and the  number of hours in which they revolve, then the length of day of  Venus aiul Mercury might be calculated. " ���������  Unless we' met another system  traveling east and revolving west  when positive and - negative would  collide it is no use speculating ou  what might happen for it all.happen-  ened years ago. All the . planets,  that is, all the star dust of that specific gravity collided and formed  the planets and would account for  their atmospheric condition, those  composed mostly of water and with  heavier atmospheres . found close  to the sun, water responding shown  by our tides; while the sattelites of  the planets' were caused by the forming of small bodies of the same  matter as that of which the planets  are formed in their orbit as with our  moon which . formed a small earth  of its own. When overtaken by the  gravity of the earth.it had sufficient  magnetic repulsion to prevent its  becoming a part of the earth. But  the gravity of the earth held it captive, making It a sattelite and in so  far as the solar system hi concerned  it is a part of the earth. As the  moon does not rotate on its axis and  "has no day.nor night we see that centrifugal force has' no part in holding  it from falling to the earth. Although  we are practically sure that our  sun rotatoes on its axis in twenty-  five days from watching the sun-  spots, we also know that if it lias an  orbit it is so great that it is- impossible to get trace of it. But we may  be sure that as each of our planets  is a solar system in miniature that  just so our sun is also a planet of  a more gigantic system and that  when we passed through the glacier  period our sun was in aphelion to its  sun. Now wo are returning ti  perihelion, do not be alarmed. Up!  Up!! We will travel, overtaking and  pasing systems, traveling in a great-  passing system, travelling in a greater orbit than ours���������being overtaken  and passed by others travelling inside of ours, as Mercury and Venus  overtake us, and we, Mars and  mighty Jupiter, guarded by the magnetic power of the sun's poles "until  at last-we float in the ^ ravs of the  Supreme Sun, God. Shall then the  earth quake and the rocks molt  with the fervent-heat, and the earth  be purged with fire?  H.S.C.  PLANS  TO   IMPROVE  TEACHING   SEItVICE  ..VltTOUIA, II. (.:.. Oct. 21".���������Hon.  Dr. ,1, D, MaeLean ������������������ announced, yesterday thai in future matriculation  curlificai.es would not he sufficient  [ualil'ication for he miraiii'cj of high  school students to normal schools. It  will be necessary lor students ent.or-  "ng normal school to take up the  iubjects of Canadian history, Cana-  Jian civics and British history and  geography, as well as the subjects  required  for" junior  matriculation.  The object of this stipulation, the  statement declares, is to improve he  standard of the teaching service.  University graduates will be required to attend normal schools for  two terms of 1 5 weeks each before  they can secure tlieir certificates. In  the past it has been .necessary for  them to attend only one term. Under the new plan in the first term  they will attend the normal and  model schools and during the. second term they will attend the university, one or two of the, high  schools of Vancouver being used as  model schools. A tuition fee of $10  ���������$20 each term���������will he cnarged.  During the past year the attendance at the normal school was GS9,  which' figure was 152 in excess of  that of the previous year. Of this  number 5G3 were granted certificates.  PLANT AVILL RESUME  BY    JANUARY    1  PORT COQUITLAM, Oct. 26.���������  Mr. C. G. Davidson, sales manager,  Mr. J. J. Sutherland, secretary-treasurer; Mr. L. P. Gregory, accountant, paid an official vi^it to the factory of the Gregory Tire & Rubber  Company on Monday. In reply to  a query as to the re-opening of the  plant they stated that at latest Jim.  1, 1924, would witness a "resumption  of activities and that on a much  larger scale than before. The shareholders had received a most encouraging and satisfactory financial report. The delay in resuming work  was intelligible if one reflected on  the financial and other readjustments which necessarily follows a  complicated, expensive and protracted law suit involving the very existence of the company. Mr! Sutherland predicted beneficient consequences to the city from tlie renewal  of operations willi augmentations  all around.'  A pessimist can go forward because he always has the brakes on  to keep  him from slipping back.  PROMISES /IX)  ABOLISH TAX  VICTORIA, Oct. 24.���������An, avowal  of party-polioy on several public issues was made last night, at tho annual meeting of the Victoria Liberal-Conservative party hy W. J.  Bowser, K. C, leader, of the opposition. Ho said that one of the first  steps of the Conservatives if rc-  turned to power would be the abolition of the ' personal property tax,  an issue recently in the public eye.  Mr. Bowser said that this tax was  not an equitable one and should give  way to the income tax. Ho outlined its history, stating that in  1888 it was established. When the  Conservative party came into office,  it was on the statute books. In 11)03  Hon. Mr. Tatlow, then minister ot  finance, increased the tax from one-,  half of one per cent, fo one percent.'  because of financial conditions. Two  years later this was ��������� reduced to  three-quarters of one per cent. Upon  Mr. Tatlow's retirmont, Mr. Bowser  assumed the finance portfolio, in addition to that of attorney-general and  reduced he tax to one per cent. When  the Brewster government assumed  the reins in 1917 the tax was doubled, at which figure it now stands.  ���������GRAVELLING  McLELLAN  ROAD  CLOVERDALE, Oct. 24.���������Municipal trucks' are engaged in gravelling  the new McLellan road east of the  Pacific Highway to the Hall's Prairie road. This section of the McLellan was in use as a detour during  paving operations on the Pacific  Highway this summer and was badly cut up by the heavy tratfic. Although the greater part of the traffic ceased wih.the" opening of the  .highway, no repair " work was carried out, and the surface remained  very rough. The material .which is  being put on at present is being secured from the Port - Kells pit, regarded as.being the source of the  most suitable gravel  in the district.  ALBERTA   WHEAT AVERAGE  an bushels to ache  Basing his opinion en returns a-  vailable at the present time, which  include a large number of yields of  more than 4 0 bushels to the acre,  John L. MacEarland, president of the  Alberta Pacific Grain Company, estimated that the yield per acre in  the entire province of Alberta for  this season's crop will be close to  35 bushels'. On this basis Mr. Mac-  Earl and believes that the total crop  for the province of Alberta will.be  between 175,000,000 and 200,000,-  000   bushels.  Not   Precisely   Gray's   Elegy  DURHAM, N. C.���������John King, a  farmer, last night found two of his  cows lying on the ground of their  pasture in a stupor. A veterinarian'  pronounced both animals beastly  drunk. A search for the cause led  to the discovery of a big moonshine  still in a secluded corner of the pasture. The cows had eaten a auan-  tity of the mash used for making  whiskey.  The curfew tolls the knell of parting  day,  The  happy  herd   winds, stowed,    a-  cross the lea;  The   ploughman     homeward     plods  his envious way,  For not a drop is left for such as he.  East fades the glimmering landscape  on the side,  COST  OK LIGHT        ^ \  Taking an a vera go- household  which uses say 20 K.W. lira. per  month tho rates in, the different  towns   work   out. as   follows.  Vernon      $2.24 ���������  Kelowna   2.lo  Penlictoii         3.05  Kamloops      2.85  Kelowna makes a flat charge* of  75 cents per month per meter and  then adds 7 cents per k.w. hour  for the light consumed...  But it is in the power rates that  the big difference is to be seen and  it is a well known face ' that cheap  power is one of the best inducements ,  any city can' offer to industries  which may he seeking new locations.  Taking for comparison' the monthly charge for power for a 5 h.p. motor using 100 k.w. hrf. per month  the rates work out as follows:  Vernon -. .'  S4.50  Kelowna      9.50  Penticton   ;*.      5.00  Kamloops         6.98    <  ���������Vernon News.  An apron is the Persian Royal  Standard. A Persian who was a  -blacksmith by trade raised a successful revolt, and his leather apron,  covered with jewels,, is still borne  is the highest in America.   ,  Well, 'old  man,  did  you  get   anything worth while for Xmas?  "Not a  drop."  H  ere an  dTh  ere  The total elevator capacity of  Port Arthur and Fort William will  reach 65,000,000 bushels by September of this year. By the end  of 1924 the elevator capacity is expected  to reach seventy millions.  Immigration returns of the Canadian Government for the first  five months of the present year  show a one hundred per cent increase in immigration from the  British Isles over the figures for  the same .period of last year.  The 1023 apple crop of the Okanagan Valley will amount to 4,020  cars according to the estimate of  W. T. Hunter, district horticulturist. This is an increase of 20 per  cent over last year -and a record  for the district. The apnle crop  for Kootenay and boundary districts will approximate 380,000  boxes.  A new high record of production was established by Canadian newsprint mills during May  with 110,252 tons, an increase  of nearly 10,000 tons over the month  of April and 15,750 over May of  last year. The daily production in  May was 4,084 tons, the highest in  the history of the Canadian industry. '  Following the opening of the  Banff-Winder mere Motor Highway,  Lieutenant Governor Nichol of  British Columbia and Randolph  Bruce were honored by the Kootenay Indians who mads them an  honorary chief and full chieftain  of their tribe^ respectively. The Indian celebrations were held at In-  vermere in the beautiful Windermere Valley.  Several new air stations are to be  opened in Ontario and Quebec in  the near future for the purpose of  extending the forest area to be patrolled by airplanes. A base is to  be established at Ramsay Lake near  Sudbury, and from this point all  Ontario work, will radiate; operations being carried on at Orient  Bay, Remi Lake and at least two  other substations not yet announced.  If the Canadian ore-war exports  of flour are considered as 100, the  Dominion's average export total  between 1921 and 1923 can be considered' as 207. Comparatively,  pre-war exports of the United  States being rated at 100, its present export is at the rate of 147.  This indicates that Canada has  more than doubled her export trade  in flour while the United States  has increased its trade by 47 per  cent. Before the war Canada exported 3,832,000 barrels, while at  present her exports average 7,885,-  000 barrels a year.���������"Journal of  Commerce."  Mr. Georges Delrue, one of tha  most important personages of  France arrived in Montreal by tha  S.S. "Minnedosa" to take up residence at St. Johns, Que. Georges  is two and a half years old and has  spent most of his Ufa with his grand  parents in Tourcoin, a small town,  on the border line of Belgium and  France. The journey from the old  homestead, via Antwerp, Georges  made alone but never out of sight  of the watchful eyes of the officials^  l'and servants of the company.  Major General Lord Lovett, a  passenger on the Canadian Pacifio  liner "Montcalm," and delegate to,  the British Empire * Forestry Conference; Ottawa, said in connection  with his investigations into Canadian forestry methods and applied  science, "England has but a small  forest area in comparison to Canada, nevertheless, her forests were  depleted two-thirds to meet tha  emergencies of the War, and now  we are determined to recover this  loss by practical reforestation. Wa  have been working at this for tha  last three years and expect to make  a completion of our work in an-������  other yean" _ -���������:-:::"���������-���������* xsod aHQ-moaav am  THE ABBOTSFORD POST  J. a: HATES, Editor and Proprietor  Published Every Friday  Member of 15. C. and Yukon UVcUly  Newspaper Assn.  I'MtlDAY, .NOVI0MI3I0K   1,   J92:i  Does Western Canada need more mimi-  rrants? This is an open question in our mind  at the present time, but we are open to be  convinced that we are wrong. Three prominent members of our provincial government  have been tol.he Old Country this year and on  their return have told us that we may expect a large number of new settlers during  the year 1925. By settlers we take it that  they are to go on the land. Poor devils!  What a bright future is ahead of them if  they invest their all in a piece of land. They  will in large numbers migrate to- the cities,  stony broke; or to the United States where  the far away hills look bright and green,  and cast in-their lot with the 133,851 who  left Canada last year for Uncle Sam4s dominions Under ordinary circumstances all  Canadians would greet the new settlers wishing them prosperity, but under the present  conditions we can do nothing but extend to  them the hand of sympathy, trusting that  they will have better luck than many of those  now on the land. n  Tlie farmer these days, notwithstanding  Mr. Barrow's tirade, is to be pitied. He is the  same industrious and saving fellow he always  was. In many cases he is making a poor living, through no fault of his own. His hay,  his'grain, his potatoes, his fruit, his vegetables are not bringing to him full returns for  his labors, let alone interest on his money  invested. Not that he does not'have abundant crops, hut the markets are so manipulated (hat he gets but poor returns, ln this  district this year there are fruit growers, with  five and ten acres, years ago considered large  enough, who are this year out working at  other occupations. Why? Because when the  fruit returns came in they found they were  dollars in the hole instead of dollars ahead.  They are good fruit growers too and know  their business from A to Z; and some of them  years asjo were able to take a trip to California for lhe winter.     But them days are gone  - we hope not forever, but they are gone, and  the future docs not look any too bright.  Other products besides fruit are not yielding  the producer enough to keep the wheels of  industry going. Farming, today, is the worst  paid business in Western Canada, and particularly in the Fraser Valley, and some other  Valleys that we know of in B. C. The new  settlers in the Peace River country are moving  out, according to newspaper reports, because  they cannot market their farm produce to  advantage. Yet we are told that what we  need is more settlers���������more farmers.  The very men who are shouting , in this  province for more settlers are.not doing much  to help the farmer and fruit grower to market his product, and one of our ministers  would have all those who are not able to  make a living under the present conditions  sent out of the country. There would be a  big addition to (lie 133,000 going out if he had  his way.  Tho dumping act may not be to blame for  all the bad luck of the fruit grower and farmer but it is responsible for a whole lot of it.  .Last session one of our ministers in Victoria,  when the house was in session, lauded the  new anti-dumping act of the dominion government to the skies, and read Hansard to  support his argument.    \  When fruit���������strawberries��������� are selling at  $5.75 a crate in Winnipeg and the fruit grower here gets returns that he is dollars in the  whole on his last shipmeut'it is time that our  minister of agriculture should be getting busy  and investigating why this is so. Our information, no later than this week, informs  us that strawberries were so high priced in  Winnipeg this'year that the people could not  afford to buy them. Mr. Grant's market report will show the high price that fruit  brought.  A similiar state of affairs will be found in  other lines of farming. This week a report  reached our office that a man owning 1G0  acres make $1000 on hay this year, but his  taxes were $ltj()0. How is that for prosperity? What inducement is that for a new  farmer to come across the water and continent to settle on our land? He would get experience with a vengeance if he attempted to  raise hay.  Our humble advice, and wo offer it with all  the humility of a country editor, in a small  community, is for us to put farming on a  paying basis, even if the government has to  borrow money to do it, before we invite men  from England, Scotland or any other European country, to come here and hew out a"  home on the land. Asking them to come hereunder present conditions is worse than borrowing their money to build railways then  taking over the railways.  There are members in the local legislature  which meets tin's week in Victoria who come  from districts that, are badly bitten this year,  and we would consider it their bounden duty  to bring before tlie government the great necessity for better marketing conditions, and  see if something cannot, be done. Money is  l"i"cd  f~>r rrl'-r ir.rlii (ii      in thi~ prnviprf  yiTTO ������WdK"?E-g*a7*t "* >*Vfr-WUtt'fltf38g?g~  but. it is understood about $80,000 has been  loaned to the farmer ot B. C. by the Oliver  government.    Whew!  Of course, we do need more settlers, in this  country, but what is the use of inviting others  to come and share tlie misery and misfortune of not being able to get a just reward for  their labors, if we make the man on the land  prosperous by helping to look after his interests, we will not. need to send high plenipotentiaries to the Mother country on a begging-expedition for more settlers. The prosperity will be sent to relatives by. the thousands from'the many English, Scotch, Irish,  and others, now settled on our lands, and the  glad tidings of how the people "in the new  land' are getting along wlil be more ably expressed than any speeches ' made by public  men and women. Further, when new settlers arrive here at the solicitation of friends  or relatives the glad hand can be extended to  them, knowing that greater prosperity awaits  them in their adopted province.  Freckles and His Friends-You Can't Blame Him  CAN IT RIO?  Tho weather has hcen so mild lately that one can  hardly believe Lloyd (Jeorge is on this continent.���������  New York Sun.'  TltOLTIJliK  According to his wife it is' very hard on Lloyd  George to keep quiet.. And indeed when you come to  think of it, he hasn't done much in the way of keeping cjuiet for some time. If it hasn't heen one,,  thing it has heen another. He is very fortunate,  however, in. having a wife who knows what to do  with him. "1 have tried to hold him down," she  told an audience in Toronto, "but it has really heen  difficult." Difficult it lins heen no doubt; still it is  a job from which Uanio Margaret probably derives  some   satisfaction.���������Stratford   Beacon-Herald.  Here is a concrete example of what th.e farmer is  up against. It is reported by one in the vicinity of  TCnderby���������never mind the name.. He gives the exact figures: "���������"our years ago this farmer received  GS^1 a pound for butler fat, and his taxes that year  were $97. This year this farmer is receiving 37^  a pound for hutterfat and his taxes on the same land  that was levied upon in  agan   Commoner.  1919, are today $152  -Okan-  "Wlicn Minister of Agriculture .Harrow jumped  into print in his tirade on the farmers of the Province, he started something. Mr. Barrow has been  asleep so long that his sudden awakening follow  ed by his impatient utterances against tho farmer  class, will hardly win friends. lie will hear about it  when the farmers have a chance to vote at tlie next  . Provincial election.  Possibly the Hon. Mr. Barrow is taking this  method of hitting back at the farmers for what they  are saying about him. Possibly he thinks it profitable  to resort to the methods of his leader.  It is significant, however, 'that the Hon. Mr. Bowt  ser should be appealed to by ��������� the farmers in the  Northern section of the province for him to go north  and open the fall fairs. This' honor usually falls to  the Minister of Agriculture, or the Premier himself. This year, however, Mr. Bowser was called  upon, and responded by going north and opening  many of the agricultural fairs, possibly this accounts  for the recent broadside shot by the Hon. Mr. Barrow.    Will he get away with it?���������Ex.  OKANAGAN FRUTT  The Penticton Herald under the heading of "The  Complaint Prom Cowichan," says editorially: ���������  "The Cowichan Loader asks why it is that Okanagan  fruit is apparently not obtainable in that district.  "The reason  is. very easy to find.  "Take soft fruits. The Coast wholesalers have  been able to purchase 'dumped' American fruit at  such a low price that the Okanagan interests could  not compete and got a living price for their growers.  So they turned to the prairies where competition was  generally upon a more even  basis.  "The, P.O.B. Okanagan prices obtainable on the  prairies for peaches, 'cols and so forth this season  have invariably been much better than offered at the  Coast.' Naturally we feel that in the interests of the  growers who are in urgent need of funds we must  sell where we could'get the best'price.  "No doubt there aro some Coast wholesalers who  are willing to foster the 'Made in B. C idea, but the  .most "of them, like the average type of mankind,  will buy in  the cheapest market.  "With tlieir big production and their desire to  keep tlie surplus away from tlieir high-priced big city  markets', the Americans are generally in a position  to get rid of plenty of fruit into Western Canada at  any price at all, so long as it meets the cost of packing  and shipping.  ���������'We doubt if the cheap fruit the wholesalers buy  across the line means cheap . fruit for the ultimate  consumption���������hut that is another story."  By Blossei  In a country like this, with its magnificient distances and railway system of 20,000 miles of track,  the time may never come.when all level crossings  will be eliminated.' With motor cars in usue everywhere, there is no railway crossing so remote but that  a motorist may use it.  It is his business to see that he does go at a safe  moment.. It is his business for two reasons: (1) Because it is the presence of mind and his car at that  time and place and not the coming of the train, which  creates the risk for a crash; and (2) because if there  should be a crash, he and his car will be crushed and  not the train���������Brockvillo Recorder and Times.  Make no  mistake about it,  boys,  meat you can  make is���������study.  Thc best invest-  Lloyd George's first public appearance in Canada  was at the First Baptist Church in Montreal on Sunday morning. It was a fitting commencement of his  tour of the dominion, and autoists, who have a tendency for Sunday travelling, would do well to copy the  (Jnh        /������/in-ji*������*innftu'u        nvntviwln          f"|_ij,alpVi        llnlKf       I_T������������.���������1  MT. LEHMAN  On Thursday afternoon, Oct. IS,  a quiet but pretty wedding took  place at the home of the bride's parents, when Miss Flora Belle Gillis,  eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs.  Alexander Gillis, Mt. Lehman, was  united in marriage to Mr. John William Satchell, only son of Mr. and  Mrs. George Satchell, Mt. Lehman.  Rev. Thos. Oswald officiated. The  bride, daintly attired in a wedding  dress of sand crepe de chine, wan  given in marriage by her father and  had as her attendant her sister, Miss  May Gillis, who wore navy blue Canton crepe. Mr. Alexander * Smith  supported the bridegroom. Following the bridal supper the happy  couple left on their honeymoon,  which will be spent in Seattle, and  took with them the best wishes of  the community. The : guests wero:  Mr. and Mrs. Geo.""������itchell, Mr. and  Mrs. Chas. Gough and daughter of  North Bend: Mrs. McDonald and  Master Sinclair of Vancouver: Rev.  Thos. and Mrs. Oswald, Mr. and Mrs.  Hugh McDonald, Miss M. McLean,  Miss K. McLean, Mr. A." Smith and  Mrs. H. Fowles, Jr. The many gifts  testified to the popularity of Mr. and  Mrs. J. W. Satchell in Ihe district.  Mrs. John-. Craig of New Westminster is visiting her daughter,  Mrs. E.  Israel.  Guests at the home of Mr. and  Mrs. G. McCallum are Mr. and Mrs.  McLeod of Vancouver.  'Mrs. Fearn, who has been living  in Sumas, Wash., for some months,  has returned to her residence here.  At the regular meeting of the  Ladies' Aid held on Oct. 17 it was  decided to arrange for the harvest  festival on Nov. 1.1, Thanksgiving  Sunday. Mrs. Forrester is convener  of the church decorations. It was  announced that the fund for the  church renovation is increasing fairly well and it is hoped there will  soon be sufficient funds on hand to  begin work. The next meeting of  the Aid will be on Nov. 7.  At the Young People's Society  meeting on Oct. 13, Mr. Geo. Turner  wns chosen vice-president and Miss,  Ella Stevenson convenor of the missionary committee. The study of  the evening was ���������'���������"'Equipment for  Service" led by Rev. Thos. Oswald.  A notable fact was that'every member took part. The Y. P. S. social  committee will hold a Hallowe'en  evening on Oct. 26.  Considerable business was transacted at the regular meeting of the  Community Club on Oct. 17. The  executive was authorized to arrange for speakers to deal with topics  relative to agriculture and who  would address the monthly business  meetings. Mr. .1. P. Carr and Mrs.  Roy Lehman were appointed delegates to confer with representatives  from other clubs on the formation ol1  a central committee. TJie organisation committee were instructed to  bring in at the November meeting a  plan for a membership drive. It  was decided to hold the social events  on the first Friday of each month instead of the jthird Friday as formerly and to htfld a Hallowe'en party  on Oct. 31 for the,boys and girls of  Mt.  Lehman  and vicinity.  Many are looking forward to the  lecture on Shakespeare which Mr.  Francis Bursill, well known under  the nom-de-plume of Felix Penne. is  to give in the Orange Hall- on Oct  24. He will illustrate his address  with many beautiful slides. This evening is being held under the auspices of the Literary and .Debating  Society.  "Wonderful .indeed is the power or" (lid voice."  ���������Cicero.  The power of the . voice is the success of the telephone. It was in the endeavor to transmit sound that  the telephone was invented, and the great factor of its development into an article of very common use is that  direct conversation may be carried on.  ' ��������� Because it enables one's personality to be sent is  the reason that the telephone promotes friendship and  intimacy, and brings about closer relations between those  in business. The pleasure of hearing the voice you  know makes long distance the casual practise of every  one.  British Columbia Telephone Company  J. H. JONES  Funeral Director  AGENT   FOR   HEADSTONES  Phone Connection. Mission Ci y  VANCOUVER, CONDITIONS  SIMILIAR TO PRAIKIES  The manual training started at the  three centres: White Rock, Hall's  Prairie and Cloverdale ip proceeding  very satisfactorily. Tt is expected  that it will he in operation this week  at Springdale and Tynohead, and  other centres in the very near future.  We noticed that Vancouver City as  far as the perishable produce market  is concerned, is in a similiar fix to  the cities of the plains, with the exception of. potatoes and onions.  In the case of potatoes, our Vancouver correspondent tells of the result of united action on the part ot  the Orientals.  The onion market in the U. S. has  slackened and lower prices prevailed there this week; this was immediately reflected in Vancouver. We  heard that a wholesale house turned  down a car of onions bought at standard price, because it was not up'  to grade. This, in view of the fact  that these onions were accompanied  by a government certificate as to  girade. *  The apple market is dull and lifeless, due it is claimed to the action  of so-called independents quoting  under the Associated Growers' price.  It is a wonder that all fruit growers  do not put a stop to tliis practise on  the part of the shippers they select  to sell their produce, as price shading  is no part of a salesman, unless the  quality of his goods warrant it.  If the old saw of "two can play at  the same game" was practised, every  grower would suffer severely, . as  it stands now, the buyer is afraid to  buy ahead and all stability that could  be secured by unity is lost.  Some of the independents question  our right to refer to their underquoting. Are they afraid of the  truth? We would not he doing the  industry any good by silence.  Wm.   Atkinson  General Auctioneer and  Live  Stock  Specialist.  23 years ainvng the Stockmen of  bh^e . Fjpaser Valley. . Am familar  with tehe'diffarent breeds of live  stock and their values.  Address   all communications  Box 34 Chilliwack, B. G-  to  Alex. S.Duncan  Barrister      Solicitor  . Notary Public  OFFICE  J; A. Catherwood Building  Phone 800.1 P. O. Box 09  MISSION CITY, B. C.  Constlpatlon's&emedy  must cem������ fram nature. Celery  King'is a mixture of medicinal  herbs and rests that rids the system ������f impurities in a gentle,  natural way. An old and well tried  remedy���������30c and 60c packages.  A Salesman's Cough  irritates his-cuatomers���������and makes  him inefficient and miserable.  Shiloh ii the ideal remedy���������it is  not & bulky cough mixtu.re  but a special formula proven successful for many years. A few  drops-Jmnjrs immediate' relief.  30c, 60c arid $1.20.  All druggists.  Put Up Old Ones For Sale  On the train Med ford way Sub-  bubs got into, a conversatin with a  stranger, who remarked: "I see you  are putting up a good many new  buildings." For the sum of  ?6,250 the stad-  "Yes,"   answered   Subbubs;   "newiium at Queens Park, New Westmin-  buildings are  the only kind we pui ater, will pass into the hands of the  "-  rr'Jhli   T*l liii iliit   lit. - ���������?,T���������T    f.  THE ABBOTHFOril) POST  Pi  A. R  WHEN  VOU WANT  House and  Sign Painting  . and  General  House Repairs  Phinie'IMX - P- 0. Box 31  ABBOTSFORD,  H. G.  A. E. HUMPHREY  B.C. Land Surveyor and  Civil Engineer  aoom   0   Hart   Block.   ChlUlwnek  Box    432. -CHILLIWACK  BBSS  Mtm*M*m**m*������HMriaMi  3������  .t^^jsa;������a"95rK'*:!?.;*K*Sg*S5!5*^*5*5  r-  arwoodlDurrant  B ARRISTERS and  SOLICITORS  LAW OFFICE  OPEN   lOVKRV'FDlWAY  ABBOTSFORD,   B.   O.  ���������J r���������������������������  <A  ALAN M. BROKOVSKI  AUCTIONEER and  VALUATOR  Auction Sales Conducted  SATISFACTION GUARAN'JKM>  LIVE STOCK a Specials  p. 0. Bos 94  TELL ME  "And I'll Tell tlie World."  Tell me not in mournful numbers  that life is hut an empty tlream  when things like these happen,  and are recorded here for amusement.  It is a pitv that some of the Mission trustees did not attend the gathering at Duncan last week, for if  they had they would, according to  reports firom other parts of the pro  vince. have been strong for domestic  science from now on. One of the  finest banquets ever given on Vancouver Island, and that is going Some  was given the visitors at Duncan to  the Fathers of Education. All of the  daintiest part of tho luncheon was  made by the girls attending the domestic science classes. You must lie  assured that these dainties were good  because tho waitresses���������the high  school girls���������enjoyed eating the  "scraps". No cook wants to eat  her own cooking if she,can help it-  she would rather eat some one else's  cooking, if she could; but just imagine eating the scraps left at a banket���������Who would eat them unless  they were really fine? Some one of  our trustees sure missed something  in his sweet, little life all right by  not.  going  to Ouncan.    But such  is  life!   !  * *  That men were not equal to the  occasion, and never wfu be. Why?  1"11 tell you why? Just the moment  women got the vote men should have  started to scream and jump on tables  at'thc sight of a mouse.  * *  In Vancouver people -at 'ear-'t Li's  0r them���������do not believe that rain  'water  is soft,   because sometimes  P  comes down awfully hard.  * *  The Hon Jacques Bureau, Minister  of Customs, is said {to be on his way  to tho const to expose the bootleggers  good job ho don't depend on B.C. for  his vote next election if he does.  * *  That down in Victoria it is a com  mon saying that Pooley of Esquimau  will 'wake up some morning and find  himself���������no.���������his constituency missing. John O. don't like the way' he  Pooley's all the liquor facts together and shouts them out    at    public  meetings.  * *  That Col. McR-ae of the P. P. will  tell an Abbotsford audience on the  !)th why he puts Premier Oliver and  Mr. W. J. Bowser's picture both on  the same page.  S^gMagi^gCBg>.jr--.Yi!igiamniviirMn'iri,������ac  j^������^SS:S?zr.r^.-an���������<i-i i������-i jj-mo.mmMnuurMiraaaf Bwaaci  PROVINCIAL PARTY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  Open Letter to Hon. John Oliver  ' Vancouver, Oct. 26,1923.   -  The HON. JOHN OLIVER,  Premier of British Columbia,  Victoria, B. C.  ' 1 enclose herewith for y������ur information copy of a pamphlet  SEARCHLIGHT No. G, issued loday by tho Provincial Party  of British Columbia. If its contents be true, you, your colleagues and Mr. Bowser, should, in common decency, retire  from public life. If they are untrue, . you should ��������� be given  thc earliest* opportunity'to refute    them.      For that    reason 1 send  you this copy. * ��������� -    .  This is the fifth pamphlet which I have sent you within  -the last few months. Each contains most ilsiiiiaft-iiijr ' charges,  l'n one you are accused of conniving with Mr. Bowser to prevent a proper'investigation into the-Tirst P. 0. 13. scandal; m  another 'with retaining Hon! John Hart as Minister of Finance  after he had used his position as a Minister of the Crown, wii.li  the technical' protection of an- incorporated company behind  him for his private find personal gain, in connection with the  P.' G. E. Ry., or which both he and yo.u, are directors. On July  20, 1923 and August 2*1, 1923, T- addressed open Jotters to you  requesting a reply to these charges and published them in the  press.  To these you fulled (o make any answer.  On* April la of this year, the Salmon Arm Observer quoted  from your public    address In that    city as follows:  "The Speaker defied Gen. Mcllae to debate any charges . of  misdemeanor by    the present    government,      anywhere,      at any  time." -  Being anxious for that opportunity, T notified you by open  letter on April 30 that 1 would moot you in thc city where you  had issued thc challnnge, on a date which you were to select.-.  In order that tho fullest opportunity might be given you to  make your defence, lhe Hoard of/"'rude of Salmon Arm undertook to,secure a hall lo scat 2,fi00 people, and I offered to put  on a barbecue and dance in connection with thc event for the  further   entertainment -of those who   attended.  . You fulled lo accept that challenge also. 1 notice however,  by northern papers', that when confronted with this failure, at  your nioetings, you stated you would meet me at a time to suit  your, own convenience, although I had studiously consulted  your convenience by leaving the selection of the date to yourself. 1 recall that you made a similiar reply whoa asked why  you failed to meet the still unrel'utcd charges' of Mr. R. T.  Elliot, on April 17, 1920, which were read in your presence  on the floor   of ihe legislature  Instead, you aud your ��������� Attorney-General have contented  yourselves with slighting reference to, and hmendocs against  myself. Speaking * in Ash I-fall, Vancouver, lion. Mr.  ���������Manson was reported in the public press as saying with regard    to  me.  "When we consider the various enterprises with which he  has been connected in the past, 1 am .inclined to belie've he is  hardly worth considering. The loss said, the better, ��������� I think.  However,      we shall   deal will    him when    the time    comes."  I promptly addressed- a letter to the Attorney-General, gave  him an outline ~of all essential facts that could be recalled  about my career, arranged a public meeting at New West- *  minster, and invited him to meet me there, and -unburden  himself of all the sinister facts regarding myself in his possession. Following your example he failed to appear at that  'meeting, which I had called to allow him a chance to establish  ' or withdraw his imputations.  The above incidents have forced me to the conclusion that  'you, and your Attorney-General are common cowards, unci  that your methods towards, those who criticise ' your public acts  are of the- contemptible character which a coward usually  adopts, namely, gossip and bluster. From' the charges made  'against you, and your government you have sought safety in  silence. Your ally, Mr. Bowser, has done , the same, in the  public interest therefore I propose another course to force both  of you to recognize- your   responsibilities'.  The present charges against you and'your government in  SEARCHLIGHT No. 5| which I send by registered mail, are  ��������� supported by the' affidavits of your own officials'. They reveal  either Incredible neglect of duty, or connivance with others to  defraud and plunder - the people of the province. You- are  asked to appoint a Royal Commission to investigate these  charges. If they are untrue you have a great opportunity  through such a tribunal, to discredit the Provincial Party . and  to vindicate   yourself.  In order that this may be done at a minimum of expense to  the taxpayers, the Provincial Party offers to hear the cost of the  necessary audit. A previous offer by us' to pay for an audit  of the department of Industries in order lo prove waste and  extravagance, was not accepted by your Attorney-General.  I make this demand for a Royal Commission on behalf of  20,000 enrolled members of the Provincial Party. But 1 make  it as well on behalf of the whole body of long suffering iv.x-  ' payers, who, if these charges be true, are being exploited by  professional politicians like yourself and your confederates. On  behalf of these taxpayers 1 warn you, that an attempt by you  to take power, at the coming session' of thc legislature, to borrow more money on P. G. E. account, or to seek by the dissolution of the legislature, another term of office, before somo  - adequate and impartial investigation is held, will be such an  outrage against public morals' that the electorate will show its  resentment   at   the first   opportunity.  (Signed) A. D. McRAE  AN APPEAL TO GOOD CITIZENS  Is it not high time that all loyal citizens.  regardless1 of party, insisted on our Provincial Government either defending itself against the charges  which have been hurled at it during the present year  or submitting its case to the electors for approval?  It is unthinkable that a government, which cannot  clear itself of these charges, can continue to administer the affairs of the province for another two  years. -*-���������  The fight, which the Provincial Party is making  for the return of honest and decent government to  British Columbia, is your fight. Are you in it?  The effort to clean up the political life of our province needs the assistance of every patriotic elector  ���������man and woman alike. Don't you feel that you  should take your part in this citizens' movement to  get rid of the professional politicians and bj*-'a business government restore British Columbia to prosperity? Only by. tho  united efforts of the'right-thinking people will bring this about.  We do not ask much���������join tho Provincial Party and help  seloct one of the best men as a delegate to the BIG CONVENTION of the party to be held in Vancouver on DECEMBER 4th  It will be the first real citizens' political convention ever held  in British Columbia. Organizations are being formed In every  riding in thte province. Get in line with thousands of your follow citizens and help put this good government movement-  "over thte top". If you aa'ostill undecided as to the needs for  this new political movement in our Provincial affairs, GET  "SEARCHLIGHT NO. 5" AND READ IT. A post card to ilia  above address will bring if* to you as well as a membership  card, which you can sign and return if you think we aro on the  right, road.     . v '  We are on he eve of political deliverance in B. C. DO  YOU SHAKE..   Communicate with '.."'.  The Provincial Parly qf British Columbia������  Room 29, Imperial Block, Vancouver, B. C.  NOTICE TO MXIMTBEKS���������Get your Searchlight. If you are not  getting your Searchlight, notify .Headquarters Provincial Party of  B. C. AT ONCE.  Till?   ELECTRIC CONTROL  Ol*1 Till" SOLAR SYSTEM  How often when one looks at' a  chart of our solar system and sees  our sun and notes his sattelites from  small Mercury flitting' around the  sun in eighty-seven days (o distant  Neptune who travels his course in  one hundred and sixty-four . years.  >with each planet travelling ' in its  orbit each a few million miles removed firom the other and all ou the  same plane do we not wonder how  we avoid colliding with each othei  or falling into the Sun.  let. us consider the sun the centre  of our system and the source of all  the power in it. The rays of sunlight are the secret, of the control  of its sattelites, the planets, and enable them to control theirs, the  moons. These rays of sunlight striking against the planets generate *ol-  electricity. The rotation of the planets on.their axis cause them to become giant generators. This electricity-we call static, which is really  wild electricity; and what we call electric generating planers are but electric accumulating and controlling  planes, not generating. Electricity  then  comes only from sunlight.  -.We know that all the planets have  a top and bottom axis or north and  south pole, these being positive and  negative, and we also know that, like  repels like or positive repels positive. This then is the secret that  holds us in our orbit, the pull of  gravity lo the sun being offset by  the repelling force of the magnetic  poles.  Now let us consider'what has taken place in the past years and then  we will understand why nothing is  going to happen in the future to  disturb our flight. As each and all  of the. planets aire controlled by the  sun and according to our density we  are attracted to it by gravity, but by  our rotation or length of day which  is the speed of our generator we  are repelled by the action of the red  and blue poles against those of the  sun. Then if we consider the'size and  density of the planets and their position in relation to the sun and thc  number of hours in which they revolve, then the length of day of  Venus and Mercury might be calculated. " ,    ���������   ,,  Unless we" met another system  traveling east and -revolving west  when positive and ��������� < negative would  collide it is no use speculating on  what might happen for it all happen-  enecl years ago. All the . planets,  that is, all the star dust of that specific gravity collided and form'ed  the planets and would account for  their atmospheric condition, those  composed mostly of water and with  heavier atmospheres , , found close  to the sun, water responding shown  by our tides; while the sattelites of  the planets' were caused by the forming of small bodies of the same  matter as that of which the planets  are formed in their orbit as with our  moon which farmed a small earth  of its own. When overtaken by the  gravity of the earth it had surficient  magnetic repulsion to prevent its  becoming a part of the earth. But  the gravity of the earth held it captive, making it a sattelite and in so  far as the solar system is concerned  it is a part of the earth. As the  moon does not rotate on its axis and  'has no clay nor night we see that cen*  trifugal force has' no part in holding  it from falling to the earth. Although  wc are practically sure that our  sun rotatoes on its axis in twenty-  five days from watching the sun-  spots, we also know that if it has an  orbit it is so great that it is impossible to get trace of it. But we may  be sure that as each of our planets  is a solar system in miniature that  just so our sun is also a planet of  a more gigantic system and that  when we passed through the glacier  period pur sun was in aphelion to its  sun. Now we are returning t������  perihelion, do not be alarmed. Up!  Up!! We will travel, overtaking and  pasing systems, traveling in a great-  passing system, travelling in a greater orbit than ours���������being overtaken  and passed by others travelling inside of ours, as Mercury and Venus  overtake us, and we, Mars and  mighty Jupiter, guarded by the magnetic power of the sun's poles "until  at last we float in the ���������> ravs of the  Supreme Sun, God. Shall "then the  earth (make and the rocks melt  with the fervent'heat, and the earth  be purged with fire?  H.S.C.  PLANT WILL RESUMN  BY    JANUARY    1  ������pir mih irnja  PORT COQUITLAM, Oct. 26.���������  ���������Mr. C. G. Davidson, sales manager,  Mr. J. J. Sutherland, secretary-treasurer; Mr. L. P. Gregory, ^ accountant J paid an official vidit to the factory of the Gregory Tire & Rubber  Company on Monday. In reply to  a query as to the re-opening of the  plant they stated that at latest Jam.  1, 192*1, would witness a "resumption  of activities and that on a much  larger scale than before. The shareholders had received a most encouraging and satisfactory financial report. The delay in resuming work  was intelligible if one reflected on  the financial and other readjustments which necessarily follows a  complicated, expensive and protracted law suit involving the very existence of the company. Mr. Sutherland predicted heneficient consequences to the city from tlie renewal  of operations with augmentations  all around.  A pessimist can go forward because he always has the brakes on  to keep, him from slipping back.  PLANS TO  IMPROVE  TEACHING  service  .VICTORIA, II. O.,' Oct. 20.���������Hon.  Dr. ���������). I), MaeLean announced yesterday that in future matriculation  certificates would not' be sufficient  liialification for he enrancu of high  school students to normal schools. It  ivill be necessary for, students cnter-  '"ng' normal school to take'up the  uibjects of Canadian history, Cana-  .lian civics and British history and  geography, as well as the subjects  required  for' junior  matriculation.  The object of this stipulation, the  statement declares, is to improve he  standard of the teaching service.  University graduates will be required to attend normal'schools for  two terms of 15 weeks each before  they can secure their certificates. In  tlie past it has been .necessary for  them to attend only one term. Under the new plan in the first term  they will attend the normal and  model schools and during the second term they will attend the university, one or two of the high  schools' of Vancouver being used as  model schools. A tuition fee of $*10  ���������$20 each  term���������will he cnarged.  During the past year the attendance at the normal school was GS9,  which figure was 152 in excess ' of-  that of the previous year. Of this  number 503 were granted certificates.  COST  OF  LIGHT  PROMISES /K)   ABOLISH TAX  VICTORTA, Oct. 24.���������An avowal  of party-policy on several public issues was made last night at the annual meeting of the Victoria Liberal-Conservative party by W. J.  Bowser, K. C, leader, of the opposition. Ho said that "one of the first  steps of the Conservatives if returned to power would be the abolition of the personal property tax,  an issue recently in the public eye.  Mr. Bowser said that this tax was  not an equitable one and should give  way to the income tax. He outlined its history, stating that in  1888 it was established. When the  Conservative party came into office  it was on the statute books, l'n 190!]  Hon. Mr. Tatlow, then minister of  finance, increased tlie tax from one-  half of one per cent, to one per cent.'  because of financial conditions. Two  years later this was reduced to  three-quarters of one per cent. Upon  Mr. Taflow's refirment, Mr., Bowser  assumed the finance portfolio, in addition to that of attorney-ireneral and  reduced he fax to one per cent. When  the Brewster government assumed  the reins in 1917 the tax was doubled, at which figure it now stands.  GRAVELLING  McLELLAN  RO.\I>  -CLOVERDALE, Oct. 24.���������Municipal trucks are engaged in gravelling  the new McLellan road east of the  Pacific Highway to the Hall's Prairie road. This section of the McLellan was in use as a detour during  paving operations on the Pacific  Highway this summer and was badly cut up by the ' heavy traffic. Although the greater part of thc traffic ceased will the" opening of tlie  .highway, no repair work was carried out, and the surface remained  very rough. The material .which is  being put on at present is being secured from the Port Kells pit, regarded as being the source of the  most suitable gravel in the district.  ALBERTA   WHEAT AVERAGE  35 BUSHELS TO ACRE  Basing his opinion en returns a-  vailable at the present time, which  include a large number of yields of  more than 4 0 bushels to the acre,  John L. MacFarland, president of the  Alberta Pacific Grain Company, estimated that the yield per acre in  the entire province of Alberla for  this season's crop will be close to  35 bushels'. On this basis Mr.' MacFarland believes that the total crop  for the province of Alberta will be  between 175,000,000 and 200,000,-  000   bushels.  Not   Precisely   Gray's   Elegy  DURHAM, N. C.���������John King, a  farmer, last night found two of his  cows lying on the ground of their  pasture in a stupor. A veterinarian  pronounced both animals beastly  drunk. A search for the cause led  to the discovery of a big moonshine  still in a secluded corner of the pasture. The cows had eaten a 'quantity of the mash used for making  whiskey.  The curfew tolls the knell of parting  day,  The  happy  herd   winds,  stewed,    a-  cross the lea;  The  ploughman     homeward     plods  his envious way,  For not a drop is left for such as he.  East fades the glimmering landscape  on the side,  Taking -an average household  which uses say 20 K.W. lira. per  month the rates in tho different  towns  work  out  as   follows.  Vernon  - ;��������� ?2-24  Kelowna :  2-1'^  Penticton      3-6^  Kamloops   ,2.85  Kelowna makes a flat charge of  75 cents per month per meter and  then adds 7 cents per k.w.' hour  for the light consumed. ,  But it is in the power rates that  the big difference is to be seen and  it is a well known fact that cheap  power is'one of the best inducements  any city can offer to industries  which may be seeking new locations.'  Taking for comparison the monthly charge for power for a 5 h.p. motor using 100 k.w. hri?. per month  the rates work out as follows:  Vernon  .-  $4.50  Kelowna ...!....'     9-50  Penticton ���������     5-00  Kamloops    -      6.98  ���������Vernon News'.  ' -An apron is the Persian Royal  Standard. A Persian who was' a  -blacksmith by trade-raised a successful revolt, and his . leather apron,  covered with jewels, is still homo  is the highest in America.  - Well, 'old man,  did you get   anything worth while for Xmas?  '    "Not a drop."  H  ere an  dTh  ere  The total elevator capacity of  Port Arthur and Fort William will  reach 65,000,000 bushels by September of this year. By the end  of 1024 the elevator capacity is expected to reach seventy millions.  Immigration returns of the Canadian Government for the first  five months of the present year  show a one hundred per cent increase in immigration from the  British Isles over the figures for  the same .period of last year.  The 1923 apple crop of the Okanagan Valley will -amount to 4,020  cars according to the estimate ox  W. T. Hunter, district horticulturist. "This is an increase of 20 per  cent over last year -and a record  for the district. The apnle crop  for Kootenay and boundary districts will approximate 380,000  boxes.  "A new high record of production was established by Canadian newsprint mills during May  with 110,252 tons, an increase  of nearly 10,000 tons over the month-  of April and 15,750 over- May of  last year. The daily production in  May was 4,084 tons, the "highest in  the history of the Canadian industry.  Following the opening of tha  Banff-Windermere Motor Highway,  Lieutenant Governor Nichol of  British Columbia and Randolph  Bruce were honored by the Kootenay Indians who made them an  honorary chief and full chieftain  of their tribe; respectively. The In-,  dian celebrations were held at In-  vermere in the beautiful Windermere Valley.  Several new air stations are to be  opened in Ontario and Quebec in  the near future for the purpose of  extending the forest area to be patrolled by airplanes. A base is to  be established at Ramsay Lake near  Sudbury, and from this point all  Ontario work, will radiate; operations being carried on at Orient  Bay, Remi Lake and at least two  other substations not yet announced.  If the Canadian ore-war exports  of flour are considered as 100, the  Dominion's average, export total  between 1921 and 1923 can be considered' as 207. Comparatively,  pre-war exports of the United  States being rated at 100, its present export is at the rate of 147.  This indicates that Canada has  more than doubled her export trade  in flour while the United States  has increased its trade by 47 per  cent. Before the war Canada exported 3,832,000 barrels, while at  present her exports average 7,885,-  000 barrels a year.���������"Journal ol  Commerce."  Mr. Georges Delrue, one of the  most important personages of  France arrived in Montreal by the  S.S. "Minnedosa" to take up residence at St. Johns, Que. Georges  is two and a half years old and has  spent most of his life with his grand  parents in Tourcoin, a small town,  on the border line of Belgium and  France. The journey from the old  homestead, via Antwerp, Georges  made alone but never out of sight  of the watchful eyes of the officials  and servants of the company.  Major General Lord Lovett, a  passenger on the Canadian Pacifio  liner "Montcalm," and delegate to,  the British Empire Forestry Conference, Ottawa, said in connection  with his investigations into Canadian forestry methods and applied  science, "England has but a small  forest area In comparison to Canada, \ nevertheless, her forests were  depleted two-thirds to meet the  emergencies of the War, and now  we are determined to recover this  loss by practical reforestation. We  have been working at this for the  last three years and expect to make  a completion of our work in an-,  other year." .   _��������� ' THE ABBOTSFORD;BOST  waBxasmacmwinmaaamaai'^^.  service  Always prompt, polite seryi.ec.;?it Wliite's Biil!eherSlidpJ  "'fj'U(.'ii.f.ait'/!iVi.ibn' u'dUiriilly gbj\yit]p an iip-(;o-(iai;e:Colti Stor-' |  ||', age J-ei'yice as wc give. We;always want you to'^et what ,.f  ���������M ..iyoii :i.'.a.y l'dri Our sqrvicc;is at your command. ' ' ��������� J J J  m-:. ..,.-. . ..._..��������� .i,.:'.....^:.'u..:.-. ;,:...,.....���������.���������.'/���������' ;������������������.-:������������������. v".   ���������-��������������������������� s  AH{M)'!,8^H)E������^;i\I;EAT^*5.A:RiO���������;^l  ������'(<i;  &T--B.- "C.   Phono���������������������������������������������(II.  'M'"V'\ Far'nioris'������������������.Phone,.1.30!)  Si  ���������CLAYBURN':.  T:iixis:W60\������we:-^/j; j,.   ���������-  ���������.." ���������   'Hailowe'eii Pmiy  ^isaB3ttgaaEjmaaaBH^.n������-re������,������,i������^  >r.������������������������������������������ : ' ��������������������������� " ������������������'���������'   '<���������������������������?,'.  ..Another famous      .football Jpi.ayer !���������'  hus'^eon vusKJgnod to! Clayv-iirM foot- .[������������������':���������''.'��������������������������� :; v P ������������������ .,' ��������� '  ���������, ���������������������������'������������������-.':'.      :--''--,':.' ',,  baili.oara in^.he parser, of- a" baby '">,"��������� TJie .Hallowe'en .party, given by the  boy-who���������"' varrived utyiikP -.''hbnio'������������������ 6T rVl,x^- Boy*j ���������to.th.e; Jgii'Is JoP the -Wy-  Alr. a is dy Mr v. ���������Tho:ii:i:(' ���������'Ca.'.rns-J'-ii'Oii'' oiia-'Tllub 'of: th'o'.Q.- Gyyi.*'T.'in.; 'ho,  Sunday 'a at; : i '* iV -riractiinng ;;: tli'tj v^arish' -Rally���������.on-''-:.';.'*Thursday -.-evening.-  gisto'd   kUiic Already.   ���������������������������.',"���������'..���������.'���������'      " ���������  ' ;s, ^'���������-Ui a 'great Hucycsy.    Spooky '-gam as  wore .'��������� playe(l,'.'.;-fprtun'es.:,J,old'';.hyJt.iie  wileh.Jand di'terj ro'i*r.osiinioiiQ.".,-..".'.11 a.cV-  ', The* hall ;W<i,s:^ prettily;;,! ml    appro-  ���������ft'l'isa.  ���������IGC&  SI:������'*;  ���������    y     -v.-*i;,<<ii|jMw*",-;pm'V ���������������������������.:,  ,;*'S^ wWrr/*Ii-^'po^iif������; i i!K^)y" iliicoriifel. ,with-; ".���������"everything'"  ...      ly^^^H^i, r/ib&^^tOt^ | su-^o.siivo <:,f;,Ha.llp^'fenJ,:.,������������������' -j-: ,  ar.v���������������������������st,ori;-j; were :t<ikcii:J.owa;'tt>> !,ao;ov-1 ���������:,;���������.--.��������� :;,.;       '��������� ���������-,"' '    :''j"'V\ ��������� ���������'<?": -������  ;-Miii-ation  of- aTl^viuluopH -^Hrinmbly j J-V.':   'jJ/P    ;J J ^ OllfUl-DeCid  ������������������(5f-'l.h<}-i'.!a'nudi:in'.''Daughter!<'."Lei:gue'''at i'' ,' ";     '.   -���������-:-���������',, ; J-V :,;.-.  ���������������������������',.- .... '���������������������������.; ������������������.������������������'   ,S     ! -<      .���������;:'-.������������������������������������':'���������.'���������*;���������'��������������������������������������������� J.oseph,���������'���������.M'oora,.;:;'.iiv-���������hnclp'filov  a ��������� nieoluig, luii.d   in   Pie  city v.council  chamber lawi.eveiling.J.  i>; bachelor',, ������'l  .v.oji.i's of "age,--- was* I' ou ii VI. dead 'on;:'Saturday at his. homo' at,SVra.ifou:    An  V. C. McMillan, acting in , con "tine- jiuquer,!,: info the death, was made: ���������"'by  ticnr With.: ihe grand-^coniicil of,the lCoi'on^  .������������������.:���������-",���������.   _,,. ���������"��������������������������� -,,i���������i ,    i,.,i���������> ���������. ������������������y.6i'.(ii(.;t; being, ;V death  from    natural  league!, -was. instrumental in', bringing  the.yga.th.ering. tog.e.th'er. Ho..nr.uly;ali  address; explaining tha^vtho": league  while an auxiliai'y .to . ;,tlie! ; Native  'SonsJo't'.'Cahiidfi,���������'.:���������.���������"���������.opora.i:e'd under its  CailftCK.. ���������.':;   -:���������.;������������������' .v.-.- ;: . ;,..  J-v.Tho (lecRfifKHl was "form ally a ;,co.a:  miner by dccu'pafion, Jjut"was farin-  ing'oii;a. little ranch' at the time of  his rloath. !; ';.jj'-Jt '<   .;���������'���������";'';.;'".',-.'.',���������;    .    ..        ���������". i'Tlifj'  oiily  rcmaiiting: i'eia,l;i\*-ns' arc,  own j'harte'r, gran tod- by, i'edcral ..pn'r-yajinpther and .sister v residing a,tL;  ���������M^3 inJ^ii^laiii] by\Mea]":in,;.:one:Of' the best^'makers.-'-p  mi  : ,���������-'.;];RJC-EfjA;(JS'.'.-KiQHT���������������������������Clips and.���������.Saiicors -'arc':���������;S-2.0!)  U'uozm;,J-1.' ;rj;v tefJ ''������������������$ 1 "2r>-';-.tp.:*S.-25".'-.'-a  -dozen.; :-'������������������;��������� ^iPlatfei'S,-,  vPricfiS/J: J.:>:J'J;.v;'     JJyJ ���������Jy-J:j'^ ...jj'";:.::-;.j 'J.;.'������J^i':..J;;...;:J;:-V:-Jj;-..-..v;;  ' '^v-,j'';fiii*;i:. 0-5;'!������^yJSX 2J01V--"Lot' WkHqyou -"a-iiHcs. ''  -'J'.: v.'.'v;v; J. v"! J;.. vv ���������'. .��������� ^: ��������� v>J0ir.yy ois r ^  m  . .;-... ti.WE; YOU .A ������������������GOOl);I).A'..n.Y-;.c'pVy;*-J-: ;.���������-. :���������;:;      ,;.;:JJ J:;  :'���������''Jialvo :iier.'.better" by propervinilklvprpducins"foodvj' ���������   ''"��������� ���������.-;-,'  ,;. X)i;r���������/���������d'airy .I'ootls'Var.e not ������������������oxcbil'edyanywhereJgee us- for potter re'-;  'etf-ivO'D/^"''  liameut.y' ,,:.',y' -y; -; ' '���������������������������'. J'  '���������-,. Toy-..establish'.;a': true ���������'���������pi'ide Janipng  CanadianywomenJ'oi; the land of their  birth/'to foster, national ideals in art,  ..literature, and'-' music, and to generate ii consciousness ��������� that: the dom'iii-  ioh'.s" 'dostiiiy ��������� is the; greatest in the  -future, '-were-'-sta'te'dyto be the aims- of  tlieJ.iocly.������������������;       ..;���������:;:,.; '-''y-.::- -   :y;,������v.  verpool,  Enghuid.; y >:Jy"':;-/ -J-        -  . Theyfiuieral 'was helii.;ou ;W*ediies-  (la'y-,- from   Gillis'   parlors, Sumas,v.-.'to  I he llazcl wood ���������''.:��������� Cemetery,-'.,, Mr.. ) S;  Cood: ol'Kilgard  offiemtingj.-:'*.  JNCOItt'ORATIOrV  MAT:i'ERS  JOrahgo'y'Cpiicert.Ja.hd . Dance', .yon  [j * Mond.ay,;Koyy:'5>-.: in ������������������';the;- Orange ��������� Hal ly.  3!>.\^-ally���������g'oodv'pi-ograniine and other  a'ttrajtioiis.      -[',  ';,:'��������� " -:y-v;;'"; '-��������������������������� ��������� .���������;;'���������:  1-vJ.S  lyrxPLi  Esst'udeneAvemie  -,VV.VV.-.;,y.y:;;/,!;,V.,;:;V ,,. ;, ;,;..u,;v.:...... -. ,..;..|j;|  Missy Pratt  is .'yisiliiip,-'. in; Vancpu-  \*ev.'' '-"'���������" r;"."':'"     ."'': '-.������������������������������������      ?y;y... -������������������ ���������,';"���������"���������'- '-'vj''y y  .���������Mri/.a'iid"'.'^!.!'^. Thorny Sr; aud:;Mr;  "scsaiBagcMassCTJwraMaaBaueatTO^ j ;ii)(i   Mi'S.   TllOj.'n,   Jl'.,    Visited   ill: Vail-  couvci''���������"last.'.week.- ;;   v/v   ;":v     ' vv  ���������:&ER8&NAm,  Mis.  G,  Zeigler  ��������� has    gone ' tp;  VanpouViv.-ooa a lea days' visit.  vy'Mrs.;;A.;;B.y;Frasoi- *of yVantniiver  -is Llie/gucstyof liersisterjMrsyl-r. Mc-  :KiiiiK)ny;y :;'.:.-.:J- v-j" ;.��������� ���������'."-:,  ;';;''^Mrsy Zeigler;-of :MissionvCity:;has  . been .visit ing. Mrs.:G;.;N.vZeiglei-.,: *'������������������'  .-..;'; 'Mrs.' ���������Oi.-rs. li'i-aser   returned   ; thi:iij:';: Mv.'-V: J. :R. Whitchelo :and' d'augl  week !':Oi������i: tier 'honie near.���������;���������...Oti.awai;|'':.l'ev;,:' :PiiyIis; visited" Vancouver  vwlierevahe jsas i>ofiu visiting tho past  ���������J'JRP'L'.Y '��������� TO.-'.-?.���������"."{���������.".' ;J  .'JREl.jLKst'SyOP.EN1- LETTER  ".;: "Children': "and���������.������������������;fools should'tipvor  l)lay.:jwiUr,;aluir])-'ddgo'('.l;.:.l.6bls'',;.'-.;a'iic'i;-it  ���������mig.iity'iilsp be.Vadcled.";. thatv";wh'e'ii a  man ���������jsvstdjve-ahgry;;'he'-'Hliqui(rjhev'er.  startytp; cally dpwn y a'yconfenipprn.ry;  Ih'-'-ou'r last.;iss.ue.;wo:;did.j]ot coniiPci  .t.hoy|)royinjial.,j;-goyeriimcnty.iih'd   tho  $nOOj,li(:iuiC!\ Tho^Ncws will have.;toi-  learn  to vrcahyety  J; This "paper .was  referriiigJ/iyAbbbtsford." ��������� Ck)iiie,:iiow:  News; cool  (!o\vii.y Givo ;thd. niatter-ip  HI. (le; thought and "see: .iusfywherey oii"  r-ta:nd. .    ;is: it possible .rldjyou" fhih.1-:  that tIio -batik/might ha,ye1,p still pay  a 'provincial ilicenco, and J aiso a yil-'  lagcjiceucn should ;;Ab!)nl:sfor:d'y.;b':  incorporated?;  .;>'������������������ This":: is;: y'merely v."  J u irges tion.. J J. ��������� :"y o u J v Tha ;e nre; p t J i s r  .-hinj^,.;:al)ru^y.i.hi:i;j.y incorporation  which your; young mind; does ���������������������������appear  to ������������������bo nbletovfathom. ry;  lour moatns. -.    ,._:-;  .      y.y..  '.jMr.'-'-a'iu!   Mrs: .���������'Griffith's havp m6vrJfroin  an; extended-; visit ���������'���������'.in. the '-East,'  '.evr;to: Seattle.-. .- ; ���������.���������������������������'������������������  ������������������^McKKi's.'. <:0'i(l'i!v -iti-1    Haroldjvyal-  -. ier's:-";iiy; vish.iiVg Uiciv ;������������������li'vihe'     here  '., fvv;m 'up.ilia coast, y :':.y'y'  :A ba:-y- sou.'v.-a������ .;bpi;n. at the home  '���������'of. M: ���������v-..:ii('i: ���������������������������TaTK.   I toy    Scliliiior   ;on  ;7uf>-sc; iy,;-���������0(".:m,j:.v;'. -lilij vTliis  is .the  .'...fii'.sti'.l.ttkv.'s'bii, .Ui.e.vi'eiuaintier.,01'. ihe  ; ''aihily   heiiig   il.uuji; jr;;,v ; therpl'cro  vhf'ie' ,'iv.-.'.s ii!ii-;:h -: ro.id'.oius..'...        -.:j;;>.;  ; Avi '-!'!>!:>���������:.������������������meeting of tlie Provincial  "Parry.ol' p. CJ will ha;  held.in    i,li.e;"  I-'*r'i.rr.c-j!:.Ti'al.l'.'on Friday cvriniiig,.Nby-:  -embe-.-* fuh, at S ji. in. J  Anibiig';.the;  ; s))Galcvr;;   -.yiyo will   (1 iyctikjv i iid  jiriii^  'ycinai':V'?t;'i'''Ui:i^  ���������.' Mai   CU>.:>.- A.   D.' McRae,   Com. v Ny  Lewis" and.    Mr.  '5.  0. Stewart. J All  are given a ���������special invitation to    at-.  ������������������tendj'"   ; . J'"-  ;; ���������' ' :JJ';  Mrv Met !>:,.r and  two sons of Van-:  tri-ve;'   --'K:tt*(!   al.   tho  lusnie  of  Mr.'  a-':' '���������"������������������.���������;; :-���������.   ,'t.  .i. Tv-'annt'tfa  on Sunday,  y.jv*   f.-.i'i   y.'-'K.   Ware ��������� ������������������('oiielaml  of  ;,or-h .'V.irii.-diiver    wore    the   guestsJ:f;"-c?hmen;.syhad been served.,  ovvjivtii.o  v,-0'-i:-������JM������1  of ,s Mr. and Mrs.  I:;  W'i's. -.      !'toin he:e they wentybn'  to'-' .Chi.Uiwu'-k.  . '-y  Mr.-'Angus' Mclnnes of' Wyaif Bay  vii-'led, his hoi-!,;: ii;.*;-r> during the  y,-fiok.;.'.J. v ������������������ yvv"  Miss Aiirn'oMirdy. who is t<\ach-  ingiij. t.J)f>. ���������.iubii--'-o Hchoo!, Brat!ner:'  v;aii th:-; ���������::iHi.it. ;;i' Mrs. A. II. .I'ries't  over the WeeK-ond. ;��������� .  Mr. and. Mrs. lOby and Mr. and  ���������Mrs-Kcriiyih.. nioto'red to Bellingham  on  Tuesday evening.  "A qnio.y oveniii/j; of games ana  miisic J-;is ������������������enjoyed at; the Men's  .-Clirb'on Mcntlay. Next week the  ���������lv.jrhlar hn'siness" meeting will ;be  hc;d, y.-l!v'ji phia^ for the entertainment..for tho winter, months .will b3;  "made. ���������'     . ^ ;  A fire which brook out in tho  camp of the A. L. M. & D. Co. last  Snluvoay iilq'ht' caused quite an ex-  pjter.ieni; and I'm" a ���������lime threatened  to  do .'dam ago. ������������������-'������������������  T.'iero was a !3'*'!������rt attendance at.  the' ."Old Time" dance held in. the  .Poplar Mall on Friday evening last...  Mrs. mcLenahan and Mrs. A. Morrow-��������� vipii.p.d .'l.u>i!i!ighujn. on Saturday-  ... i'.Ir.'i, "t'x-ady Ii; visiting'in Vancoii-  \o". ��������� '"  ���������  The K^'-iU'.- y fl-ib met. at the  ;'���������.;!:;'.! I\. IvlcMvneiny on  vfr -!:':o:i. anu  hud a  most  i ;iiave only .'met "you once. That  ou -was '.wheivi'i calle,dJfor.a friend ywlio.  Tuesday.J ���������;��������� v. ���������;   :Vv        vj was at your    office, -ityjniigiit-1 v: or  Mrs.; Knox, who Ji.as.yjustyreturii':d y1!jisii:;;not :be construed as; a frieiid-  tyeall which.ever yoh':.'iik'e.-''But you:  have .never ,yet had . the courtesy', to  ���������retu.riir'it; "and-1 -am;;'.: just "asvAvell  pleased... ������������������   .;;'������������������������������������        -������������������-. '--J' * VJ:  .;.;..V.ou:'- gaveyyoury:;-::' letter .,the  right  name,, "open letter."   ..But you, omit-  !*'v:ii"  oi  rl" i 5 r-..���������-���������" py  Vi'1.!!.!*  P. Ii. PI"-  i-U-'r   -Us:  v !>'*"'i   i,-.   I".-  Pr-r :."-n. .!' i:  '��������������������������� ���������;, !-.-:i of Mr. nnd Mrs.  v.-iv chof',0-1 o:t t!i������ p.B.C.  ':-���������-���������'.- !i*ari wiiieii will coni-  tp'ii'./ f.oinniitition atrainsi.  :��������� uf ihf WiTiloru ,c>i.a.tes,.  Iir-h! h) r'f-rPancl,  '���������-.'.���������   (Katu-.'('ay).  Con-  , !  |:,:-. ,;���������'.���������!. :;:;������������������: *i .;.  \ ��������� i ,;.', t' V..-, t \ }\ ,\ ;  A! ' V    ,\ ,'���������   ������������������  : ���������'    ��������� .,"    I';,  '!i'. .!. ,P ;;,'.!  In;n.;((���������.,. .;.; rsi.ii,������������������ ii  l;rr>;o )���������*!'".  !.;!;.���������'vy of  du  from '!>;��������� v!  \-U-tn] a .-'-.I  of ("'h.i'rnnra.1'  M"    ',-<<���������.���������������������������:  is.':��������� the;guest of her sister;: Mrs. ,.T. A,.  McGcvyan. J J; vyv:'."."���������'? J.',"y, "yyv vv ��������� 'V;y ���������'.'���������  :J-Mrv Prank. Elliptt of .Vancouver is  rer.owiiig 'acquaintances vin   : Abbofs-  "f0v-dvjjy-;j;ry;,;.v v.:;JV::-..y-v-J.;:,;V;vy  JvMrs. Mossman is visitiiigvin: Van- ! 't^v toysee^tliapl received,ay paper,  cb'u'vev: and Ladysmithv: Mi-.-Mossmah ���������}]3X}& l'P tptlio time 'of writing and Jl  spantHhe-week-end/jh Uieveity." '.,; i j'.ayp Just, returned: from the Post^.Of-  ; v*Mr.-B.yGladwin YisitedyVaucouvori fi(:e 'l.'-have -not been favored :;w.ith a  Te:iGrit!yvy';;j;..'"'.' ';'"vyjv: ���������;    '"'. v vj copyof; it., ���������'.. I'vwas given a /copy by  vJ'Mrs.: Edwards/ vyho: has: been visit- fa Jriendyor'possiblyvT; vshouldv vnpt  ;hiyryprr;rriotheiv Mrs. Zeigler.yhas re- j have ..seen the :maiiy: pleasant; admis-  tin'Tiod :to her home, in JVancpiiver. v. | siens- you have inade: tp me/ ' . v v  ^J''A'J:'ai;d.;ivIrsJSmith-and four"chil-; :. .But Ivhave rcoine: tp,;thiiik;..:t-Iiat-:dis-'  ^.Jr-v'.'J'f'J':r!i''cAtliabascaj;-wei:e.---'Jth'e''yre- ���������"fl'"i;';p'h^.iiRss.'':'is-y'a.;;-ji)'6:r.ty-y  ccn t ��������� ������ii03::i;: of /Mr;' and Mrs. P.: S. | 'niake aiprAhy'ocherinan ."Vvhen" :it a rt^  Ti-ora'. ���������   y'.jy   .-.        .'.';;''": -.'v J: :j iu$ :i- paper in a towny    \rould have  J-'.'/. ��������� '��������� e-y rinjoyable time was spent | called on a contemporary;--/And it  at tre'-'-lvint. drive in the. Orange Hall j-would have been; 'to your.; i.dvsnt.afjb  c-i^ri-'o;:*-  evening. First prizes were j then.,  wo:: by krs. White and 'Mr. T. C.j ' Ycn "''ail to see anytljnr" that  C':;o:,-un. .'Consolation prizes went toys f.-'���������have., accomplished. I.-mads;'if. 'pos-  Mrs. Ii.. McNeil". ". and v Mrs. .Baker. ���������! sihle for yon to ..'come'v ro'- Abbpt:;-'  i>f:ncing' was   indulged   in   after   re-ii'or('' ��������� hnf whether that "s.r,o;;;c'i) ing  j in my favor.or'not" I will   'Icxtve foi  ' crhe;-j: to decide.  "nioss-^oversc  T>���������..',    "'      li       .-.      -^      .f. _ _. .V  tees were 'appointed-'to--' .arrange, for  the running of a candv stall at the 1 *���������''' ir������:vi u">"��������� ���������uruAVi?. city: and��������� ,fu--tli-  *!;nz;i.i.ir of the, W. A. of the-.'.M.-S.-A.���������! ov yGu (wri l "I'-pear to' bo able to  Hps'nital. h-uii the r.?x>ss ���������oflj.'.or (he.Porit out.  .Mrs..���������'Alans'on  and..daughters -������������������ . of i ,   in;^'kinf; you, ,n;r,   -lar.ilie    kind  Mission City .'visited, at the home, of! 'h^.ipryyou havo said i.iv y::Ur "open  y,Momorial iorvicesywill ;be. he'd n'  HaxelSvood ".'-Cemetery, ;St.v: Nichoia?:  on Sunday,; P'ovember. 1 ll;h, vat" J.'.':  o'clpck in niempry yof Jfalien.;.heroP~  andyto decnv;).tc';the^:graves, of thos-,  who died .since returning 'hpiue..',froc  ���������thp^yar."' '-'yyy;Jv y-y y'-y ���������:-������������������--/_;i- .;���������������������������":  ���������"iThp" Reeve' aud:yj : Councihnpn o:'  Matsriui vand .Sumas: yyMunicipalitie'-  have b'eeh';..as!icd'Vto attend. ��������� -���������  ���������AIAIT; 'yC.ON'WV'VGTv  At i.iie .regular, meeting of tho Wv-        t. .  era'Club of the C. G. I. T. commit-   .   /G" re!cr l-'.'he '  i'c.!j';..���������.   it is ii. C. 'yrown, not import  *���������> r\  u;d  com in f  the,  from you   I  am  1  am, '-���������'������������������������������������  Years truly,   ..'.-.'J.   A.  BATES.  ,y,:SEALBD.;'iyi'"ND!i:rfS.-addreKK^d--(''  thp..lJostma.-ittiry General J yiilV-be.-7're':'  ceived at Or; a way until noon on  Friday, "the :2;*r<!  No'VCinber."���������1023  for the coiive'yance of-vHis .MajestyV  Mails, on a proposed    Contract    fo;  lour . years,: twelve   times   per 'wee!:  on. the route.between  iVWiOts.forfiy  and Haflway Station  (e.P.).  from the 1st January next.  Printed ho!ices oonraiiiirig furtho  hifprnialion a?, to- eou''di!ion:-:'f6f. pro:-  pos>:d.' Contract r.iay   .be sesn    aiu!  joauk foiins-bf Tender, may be obf.ain-  od; at the Tost Office-'of;''Abbotsford.  '���������>. C. and at tlie office of trio Distric.i,  F.u^orintendont -of Posi; ���������Soi'vioe.  District   Suju-rintentleut':!   Office,  : Vancouver,  S.  C-    y. ���������''���������''  - 12th  October,': 1;������2'3.-���������'".'���������-  J.  F: ..MURRAY,"���������  :,.::,-.   v District Superintendent.  Mrs.;  B.  Nelson   on .Tuesday.-';  ,  Mr.  H. McKinnon: was homo front  Stave  Falls on Sunday. '���������-.-.. v  'J.Mr. vU- . Weatherby   was   a.   visitor-  in;Vanoouevr at the week-enc!. j  Riovyart of  Mission -last week.           i| ... ���������"". ' .-'""'   .'~''r''wl"'"'...~^'*"^^    ^"^^"i.^,...... .      ;������������������-*a        **���������^  -..': Mr.'- Moore of trat-jc".    lias taken | .���������'������������������: .��������� : p-^?,i--vf'?-jr-!������:7-r*������ n. f   'ri:'A'Tir^-jr nn'--?i"/t'  over, the, shoe -repairing shop recent-   ������ J '   ..'.       ������~ Ja-O*' r^ ������.!'���������','^L/t'/xjU t'/k������\i Ji   -Kj ������^ ���������. Jti .'������������������ ^U.  iy.oociipiecl������������������ by Mr.    Toller,  moving in.  A song service will .beheld in tho   ||  na   is   s  v -!-fe  Presbyterian       Church   on     Sunday   *  avoiuug..  specia l  hymns   .will   bo  3  siing by .'������������������the- entire congregation, and   |     M'  ^olos v/i!,l, i-e    .given by 'Mrs. Horn.   |     ^g__  Mr.: Downie  and   other. 'uiembei-'si  of.,'g  the ! choir. " '., ��������� ���������."  . :  ,:   On Saturday      afternoon the:"first  practise of  the Junior choir of ;  the  Presbyterian  Sunday .School will  be  lie'd. i-i the Church.      All    girls and . ^  boys' interested are asked  to;aftend.: ������  ,\ very enioyable young people's |]  party way held at. the honie.of Miss- f,  Bett V-'e:;t last Frida evening.'* '��������� i  On.Sun.dny eveningafter the regii- j  :':i.r Chprch. sorvioc Ptev. ,W. Robert- \  prn offfrtated at the cliirstening- (if {  the : infant son of Mr.' and Mrs.  .fame:; Downie. the Utile fellow re-  ftp.ivins the name of .Ceorgo. Thoma- I  !.:>-.��������� nie. .After, f.h-j 'ceremony, the !  oh-is-filing oakr; was cut and ro- l  frrr.ilMi.c'ii*i served to the friends j  nr.-;r.;.'"t. Mrs.'fj. F.'V/hiio a^s^tod :  ihe  hooio'L-s   with   the  ���������       1  |..-������������a. a.  t .���������������  ft,-88  68 C4 J.  WIll.be ;he!d.in;th^: \  ������������������i  ������������������m  !v- ������������������.'���������':i.���������-'-^;;W     i-;*-v.;���������.."���������'"   ;u^���������^^.i:���������;:������������������.^^.~."y;:;;:^?^^^^^SSV/v,^    ;   1  :������  ���������m  m  M  ������3S  ;:>. -CENTRAL MEAT MARKET  EL*ssn3si^Ea=?zs^a  ssKi,. s3=n������ieia?^??Trsrr.   swnsc-t:;  tj^vHaSi^i^s^Cfas   : ������^*~^>���������^**^���������T^~^^n**l���������Trrr^?^*r-'WO-iBGr������r\ '��������� ViS^ezs^^^r^^:*,    Slif^::^  Football Team  :    "���������', [Wins'"atLangley  ������Sit  display. Eckardtvin goal was, not  bothered very much but he rose to  the occasion .'whenever .necessary-.'  For IJangley the most effective man  was J. Oswald who threatened several times. Langley was without  their usual goalie, but the substitute  ���������JiM  i~C  >'i'''>S.  te(t-\neHJ>$iw'.eii Party on  :-0'vr,   :,{   (!!���������>   :.f.-S -  "���������.<���������������������������".'��������� i:ur     ir.ivrov--:-  !'-vil':'i:in    rrr-m  . Tv;i\ r-".'!''-:  ���������   (kei ���������  ho;ii,.:-,   thb-, j  "-���������v. art    and    Mrs.!  '���������"������������������-- ,     f  '-:���������-.��������� n  of  Xi>-.v West-       Mrs'. A. E. Kelly entertainr*<i ;  ���������-'. a  liojiilny ai  his   delightful       children's.    ��������� Paliowt;"c:i   J  f .** ��������� *   1.  Si.    k .Si ^^.^"i- V  (  1  o  n  '���������TTT-*������Mn  -J 9  A  f$7  V 9  1!   la  also  rnpl'iiriicj  a  ��������� n-;-l  ph^'ipanis.  Wednesday Eveninp [i  1  ���������AT  S P. M.  (ftom Fif������*er Tuller Kecord)  The   local   football .team'   -under  their newmonol^rani       and manage-  ment, as tlie Mission City --"C^ .47th ���������  j      d. a good   game.  Batt. team, started their    923-24'sea     -A ���������'Vancouver ..Refer  son   with  a bang .011  Saturday last,  when  they travelled  to Langley ana  handed out a  severe; beating-to the  . I j Langley. team.  'Bj league  game  for Mission    and     the  I j team relurnecl with a victory by the  I! score of *1 to 0. Local fans were  K :' wondering' what, a light forward line  II could do agnin-it. the heavy Langley  11 defense, hut apparently the forward  11 line never played better together or  ������ I used  such jud.^nien.t as  they did on  ?alnrd.iy.      The oliort. ininshig game  ���������.������������������Jn'oh they adopiod so'n spelled de-   feat for the    ...prwisition    and    whim j -                     '          .  Hamilton  )i:.',������-;;..-<i   lo'D.  Callifoi'd, he ��������� P.1SCORD GKAr?,T MOVEMPir-M  look- tlie 'ball through    and beat the J ���������  party  on  Wednesday-evening.  The  decorations   wore  carried   on!  rH Sii-iilh has rolurned Jin IPillowe'en favors, wilh jminin- *,  ii. fshio. hav'nj:- ,: r>m-1 kins predorninal in<:. Dninlv r-'f"-'-- fi  ��������� in the. Palniyr fjchool j monls were served and a mo.-,i enjoy-  jj  :C  -���������-I  j ;j.l������!f: evening was spent 10 game*-.} and   ti.  i   <"i;!i  a   na;--,!y acci-) danoing,   etc. '   ���������      ��������� !|  ' in  the camp'of th^}     Thor-Q   present   wore     Mb',3    Fni'iy   j;  '"..  v.h-n h;   :'.;.-. -ed pCo"'-y-      Miss     CaniiHe     TroP'O^-v,   |j  !���������; Tliobna Yr-rw-ood. Miss M.*i'''  ���������r'i. Miss Muriel Wright, ���������  :;o:i Ciirran,    Mi^s l.Iln.3      S:i:  Major ('eneral A. D. Mcllae, C. B.r Coiriman  Her N. ia'.wis, R. N., Mr. B. G. Slcwarl and oih  yrs v,i!i (li.scu.ss jiic alius a-ul    objects    of      tlie  PUOVI.XCIAL PARTY. ������ '  ' '  ee by name of  Poland gave first class satisfaction  to everybody.    Trainers Bowie    and  ���������m,id  wiC-ti,o  fir������t   J'  Grant accompanied  the team and  ihi.s  was the first   ^ere  always   handy  with   the   mod-  cine chest.      The iiex-t game is wpii  Clayburn   on   the   Mission     Grounds  on November 10th. ���������  ,,.  The league schedule to date is as  follows:  ��������� ���������   ��������� P W. L.  D. P.  Langley 2 ,1 10     2  Mission ,.1 ] 0     0     <j  Clayburn ..1 0 ��������� 1     n     i; .  '���������'?>V'I  m  ,v?.-.v'l  ���������m  'Wi  m  ".  1  ::ioo     lr  k'.i  rin   .'.���������'  m?  "f Van  *���������-;���������-vor ;��������� :\  v,-nr-   i:'*-  over tho  ���������' '.Vlr.s. .Davis al  7yeUn;;T   Iw  Pniley,    Miss  Margie  Sua-  jl \   was  sol'id  flHwWhoiit,   ami  tho' new J last-'year," an in^aP'of"'^'^^  !-':;- (shall, Miss Edith Taylor. ^fi^^i^^'^Wv^^piSl^S Rogers    gave a    splendid   000  bushels.  goalie v/itli a high one from lhe  eighteen, yard lino.- Sorm afterward, O. CalUford 'got away and easily .boat the -coai'fl from close up.  Just before half lime, . D. Galliford  paused a ���������fast-uno i'rotii the win*; and  C. Galliford ro-iivortod with his  head. Afier half i.i:*r-.; ihe forward:'!  eased up and kiior r.-.i v.. Oalilford  again scorod. Thi.*re v/ero two new  faces on  liio forward   lino,  bsing on  Records for grain liandling are lining established this year by \\\������ Pan-  dian National Railways on Uia we.-;.'  era region. The average d-'"lv 01 ���������  loadiiiffs' this year aro "ncrl'v 2;j)  c-irs higher than onria- the'^a-.i'  pe.i-.'r.-J of lsai year, and thoui-;'! ��������� n-���������.'���������/-'���������  n-ent of grain along 0. N.���������'"[> Mq *i  ntarlcd nearly threa v/ce'/a 1-,'e ���������y'l: P  year over -13,500 cars had been'i-jV-  ed between  Sept.       1st and  Ocic! ���������  am  I  !0i'  their first trial. N. Fiiio-ct and .Alv'in I ^t.ili  of  fh'a  year.     Pouvcen :   ih"'r>  Rnghes, both Fliowod i.r.i romarkab'y | date;;  a  total   of ���������C2.7f!.i,'fl0fi- hi-:;i-<''���������'<.  veil,  using if.'-o.'l   jiingnient and  p:;;-j w;:s   leaded   against. 5 7.;~ 7 L' OOo" >v-  sing very ei'i'ooviv--iy.       '.i'he  dei'enc:>   shels in  the corresponding period of  5,000,-,

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