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The Abbotsford Post 1919-08-29

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 /^  -^A-iiUii.     .^iJC^ AV-.  m*."Wl,*S^!C, .i-y-l-^^-r.  ���������'"-'vrr   f '>���������* ^^.<  With which is incorporated "The Huntingdon Star"  Vol..XVIII., No. 15.  :rasas  4BB0TSF0RD, B, C.  FRIDAY, AUG  29. 1919  tlie man who has had his repairs done at the  and he will tell yon1 that he had much better satisfaction  ���������GOT GOOD VALU IS FOR HI'S MONEY; and that is  what we give all our customers.  Oxy-Acetylene Welding a Specialty  CARS FOR HIRE  S.KRAVOSKI, Proprietor  Farmers' Phone���������One short, one long, one short  PERSONALS  a-  B. C; Long Distance���������80  PLAN  TO DRAIN LARGE  AREA IN MATSQUI  ��������� A huge .drainage scheme, affecting  4 000 acres of Matsqui farming land  was laid before the owners by the  engineers at the Gi fiord Hall on Monday and was confirmed with complete  consent by the parties interested. 'It  'will cost $35,400 to complete. Over  ���������ninety landowners, chiefly farmers,  attended the meeting called by Mr.  A.' E. Wilinot, dyking commissionei,  This was examined and accept plans  ���������for the drainage of the area concerned, which is practically all lands a-  longside the old Matsqui Creek or  slough, from Abbotsford down to the  Fraser dyke.  Mr. Colin B. Sword was chairman,  and in the absence of Mr. Wilmot the  ��������� details of the project were explained  Mr. ,C. Cartwright engineer in charge  who stated that the cost of making  the seventeen miles of new ditches,  and the clearing out of the old  sloughs would be under ten dollars  per acre. Benefitted higher lands  less affected would be levied in proportion to their interest, as Classes  B and C they pay 50 arid 25 per cent  respectively,.  The cost would be met by adding  to the dyking tax covering a period  of twenty-nine years with interest at.  about 7 per cent. This would mean  practically one dollar per acre for  thirty years.  At the request of the meeting Mr.  A. .Cruickshank gave the history of  this effort to make their holdings  fully  profitable.  Before Matsqui was dyked, all the  land of this prairie was covered by  five or six feet of water when tho  Fraser rose in the summer. When  the water went off the sloughs and  creeks were naturally scoured clean.  After the dyke was built these drains  were filled with dead water, freshets  carried, down silt and gradually the  ���������sloughs filled up.  These conditions ��������� were getting  worse each year, until now there was  a great deal of land behind the dykes  that was valueless. Where good crops  'were raised years ago the ground was  too soft t'o work at all. There were  men present who had helped him to  undertile a quarter section- many  years ago, and  now those tile  out  1{> M���������Residence Phone  petition made to recover their drainage under the Ditches and Watercourses Act.  Now their position is that 10,000  acres are under the Matsqui dyking  area. This whole district is liable for  damage if ihe court so decided,  hut  if the owners of the 4000 acres directly affected  bore  the cost of this  new scheme it would be cheaper for  all, as two years' delay and law costs  would  be  saved, and  the  estimated  cost of this scheme, viz., $35,400," is  less than one year's rental value of  I'tlie lands involved    It was not only,  a business proposition that this time  and worry be saved, but it was another chance for the Matsqui people  to show that community spirit that  i'had always distinguished them.    By  an unanimous vote the people decided to adopt the scheme,'"and tenders  ���������will be called immediately for tho engineering contract.  The breaking, up of the Stewart  ranch for returned soldiers has  brought the project to a head. Many  'acres on this ranch and the adjoining highways have been covered with  water in times of heavy rains, and a  thousand acres of land, hitherto, useless, will now be rendered arable by  this improvement.  Mrs.  Walters and  children  arc  way camping at lloundary Bay.  Mr. Well's brother has bought the  place formerly occupied by Mr. Clarence McCallum and has moved from  Vancouver.,,  Misi; Thelma Nelson !c-fi mi Sun-  d;;.y lor Mcrritt where she will ic-  siinio her duties in her Tchoo'..  The Missionary Society is sending  a box of clothing about the middle  of Sepcember and donations of cast  off clothing,will-be' acceptable,  c Mrs. Thomas of Mission City was  a visitor to Abbotsford this week,  and the guest of Mrs.  Uoberts.  Mrs. Longleffow has taken a trip  to North Dakota. "'���������' ���������  Mr. Teddie Barrett has been appointed postmaster and*', will' take  charge at the beginning of the month  Mrs. Hunt gave a party on Wednesday afternoon c for her little  daughter.   Flossie.    She     and  THE N10XT MKUf'iNf,'  The next meeting of Uio Board of  Trade will ho held on Tlui'-*:d.':y dp::<  nnd at 'the close ai t\u> mooting- i'  agricultural society will arrange meters regarding the fair. As'this is  likely to be the final meeting-of I lie  society before'l ho show a large attendance is requested'.  The prize lists arc now in tne  hands of the secretary and president  and list will appear in tho Post next  Friday. Some very good' prizes are  offered and the fair will from pros-  em appearances be as great <fsuccess  as on former occasions.  l.e sure to get a list and help to  swell  the  number  of  exhibits  ������1.00 per Year  SBXT UP FOR TRIAL  Mr. Louis I-I. DcLasalle made n  Hying trip to Abbotsford last  Friday.  Albert Davenport paid Abbotsfou'i  a visit  this  week.  Talbot, alias ��������� Martin, or Martin a-  ias Talbot,-for whom the good people oT Ml. Lehman hunted the woods  for several days this week, appeared  before Magistrates ^jerryfield and  Kerr litis morning at the local court  house and was sent up for trial, Constable Lehman accompanying him to  Now Westminster, after the ��������� court  proceedings. Only the. witnesses and  those directly interested were allowed in the court house, the cvsq  being held in camera.  He was    captured    on    Thursday  morniug  ne.ar  Gilford by  Conscablc.s  Le'j'.han   and   Fionner  and   tak v.i   to  the. Abboisforo jail where he remain-,  ed over night.  It is just possible that the authorities have now in their possession a  much wanted man, for many other  matters which may turn up.  her  Mrs.  from  .her  COUCNIL   BUYS   ROCK   CRUSHER  At a special meeting of the council held on Saturday last, it was de-  cidede to buy a rock crusher for the  municipality of  Mission.  vfriends had a, good time.  Mrs. John McCallum'Sssister,  Homewood  and ,her little  boy  Vancouver are holidaying  with  'this week. .-    ���������  Mrs. Crawford had a short' visit  from her sister Miss Bates of Mon-!  treal. Miss Bates is a nurse and was  with the soldiers who came recently to Vancouver. She left on Saturday for the east. '  Mrs.- Kidd and children left on  Wednesday morning for their homo  in Vancouver after spending two  weeks in Abbotsford.  . Mrs. Weaver from Collingwood W.  is visiting friends in Abbotsford this  week.  Mrs., McMenemy' spent Wednesday  in  Mission City with Mrs. Thomas.  The Huntingdon Sunday School  held their annual picnic at Bellrosc  last Saturday. 'Some Abbotsford people, spent the day with them.  Mrs. Robinson-Frazer is holidaying with the Martin's at Sardis!  Master Sidney Swift celebrated  his seventh birthday on Monday and  entertained a few of his little playmates.  Mr. and Miss Carlson from Glover  spent Sunday with Evelyn McMenemy.  Mr. and Mrs. Alanson and family  visited in Abbotsford Thursday, the  guest* of the Misses Steede.  Mr. Colin and Miss Ina Fraser  motored  to  Vancouver  on  Wednes-  1 have just placed in Stock shipments of new Fall and  Winter Goods, which were purchased early, at prices considerably Jess than now prevailing. As the assortments  are not large, it therefore follows that the early buyers  will get the advantage.  GREAT WAR  VETERANS  ELECT OFFICERS  lets were feet below thos. level of the ^contained songs from  silt in the sloughs. All tills time tliey  were paying a dyking tax:  Then they discovered .that under  the dyking act the dyking Inspector  ���������has power to sue -and be sued, and  was liable for damages caused to  property if he failed to keep it clear  of water. They went to Victoria and  demanded that their, drainage bo restored as before the dyke, and were  told that they could compel the drain  ing of the sloughs. . They also found  that the dyking inspector had no  power to raise funds other than the  maintenance charges, so the attorney  general's advice was taken,    and    a  Miss Plawn of Vancouver is visiting with the McPhee girls this week  day evening to attend the marriage  of a cousin at a large church wedding.  The Ladies Aid held their meeting at the home of Mrs. Alex. McCallum pn Wednesday afternoon and  had a large gathering.  Mrs. Shore visited in town this  week.  A surprise party was given to Mr.  and Mrs .Thome Sr. on Wednesday  evening,1 when in the neighborhood  of fifty friends gathered to spend  the evoning with them before their  leaving for England. A very pleasant time was spent with Rev.  Robertson as chairman.The program  Mr. Thorne, Sr.  Mr. Brown, Mr. McGowan, Mrs. and  Miss Hunt, Mrs. Thorne, Jnr., and  Mrs. Parton; recitations< from Miss  Margaret Hutchinson, Vera' Hunt,  Mrs. Parton, Flossie Hunt, Mrs.  Fraser gave an address to Mr. and  Mrs. Thorn, Mr. Thorne replying.  Refreshments were served, Mr. Weir  Sr. and Mr. C.has Bell acting in this  case as masters of ceremonies, dressed : in little white caps and towel  over their arm. The singing of Auld  Lang Syne and wishing to Mr. and  Mrs. Thorne a pleasant and safe trip  and safe home, closed a splendid evening.  J.    R.  An. enthusiastic meeting of the G.  W. V. A. was held on Tuesday evening last with a very large attendance  The association is in a very thriving condition and tho reports as to  membership and finances were.very  satisfactory. A campaign to secure  100 members is now under way and  is assured.  The next move will be to permanent rooms after which the Ladies  Auxiliary will be formed.  Already the association has accomplished a lot of material results in  matters pertaining to the welfare of  of   soldiers   and   their   dependents.  The officers are:  President���������Comrade     F  Whitchelo.  First-Vice President���������Comrade  Bennett.  Second Vice-President���������Cormncle  E. Pool.  Secretary-Treasurer���������Comrade R.  Weir.  Executive Committee���������Comrades  P. Howard, Kirkby, E. Poolcy and E.  Barrett.  The meetings are held the second  and third Tuesdays of each month,  and the fundamental principles are,  First, the protection of the wives,  mothers and dependents of those who  paid the supreme sacrifice; and secondly, the welfare and protection of  each returned comrade, and it be-  'hov-es every returned comrade to join  the association.  The  KV d. [Vi Cl U U SS^' if^^^maBammsaa.  W? *?��������� ko ���������SiBB'ijBiiassWJB'Swraa    RBSO.'"        w   li.isswreasaasKBJmBw  QBSSKBKwgmnvuuvsBSBftl   -:������v , jteBEfloanaRTEDuajcoM  Btsax*sriWJxassBi<K  Mr. Hunt nad family were visitors  to Mission City yesterday.  Flannelette     Blankets,     white  and  grey,  a  pair   ������4,85  Ladies' Underwear, separate  pieces and combination, ' all  sizes from   50? up  Hosiery of all kinds  Men's Stetson Hats, a complete  range.  Boys' School Boots, sizes 1  to  5  at     Jji'l.iJf}  guaranteed  special.  Don't overlook    your    Fruit  Jars.    Stock is complete   ;  Pickling  Vinegar yiul Spices  Soap,   Kcyal   Crown,   Sunlight,  Golden West, per case ....$(1.7%  Butlerick  Patterns for1 September.  All School Requirements  Scribblers Drawing Pa.is.  Pencils, etc., etc.  KWffiawBgMnBjBMg^itg)iiiij������tuji������!iCTirMi������i|iaaiui.'.'.)���������  Canada Food Board Licence No. 8-19707  li.   C.  Phone,  4 Farmers'  Phone   1007  W������i***������nzKjj:\m uuuanvwturw������aj������rtt������vspigxMm&K".m  FALL FA . PAGE'TWO  32  3;.!  3 4  h<s  37  38  3 i)  4U  '5 J  42  4 3  .4'I  4S  4 0  47  48  49  CO  CU  51.  52.  53.  54.  5 5.  56.  57.  58.  59.  60.  61.  62.  03  64.  65.  66  67  68  69.  70.  71  72  73.  7 4-.  75.  76  79.  SO.  81.  82  S3.  84  85  86  87  89  90  91  92  93  94  (Continued from  Page Three)  Best Map of IL C, 3rd Reader..'....-. 1.00  Best Map of Canada, 4th Reader.. ..'1.00  Host, display from Individual school~  garden   plot  ,'. .,.   1.00,  WOAIHX'S LIST���������Cooking;  Loaf of White  Bread  ......  ' :7 5  Loaf of Graham or Whole Wheat  Broad   , J '   .75  Loaf   of   Currant  Bread      .75  Loaf of  Rye  Bread, .' 7,5  Loaf  ol   Corn   Broad    ,     .75  Loaf  of Nut   Bread :...75'  Onc-haM .dozen   Rolls' 75,  Ouo-half   dozen   Buns    7 5  One-half dozen Soda Biscuits  7 5  One-half dozen B.-powder Biscuits    .75  Cakes,   Etc.  Fruit   Loaf    '. ,75  Layer Cake  57  Loaf or Sheet Cake  75  One-half  dozen   Cookies        .7 5  One-half dozen Oatmeal Cookies 75  One-half dozen  Ginger Snaps  75 -  iss . 1st.  One-half dozen Doughnuts, ^.  ��������� .75  One-half  dozen  Cream  Puffs   7 5  Apple  Pie , 7 5  Lemon   Pie 75  Cream Filled Pie  7 5  Fruit   Salad    , 7 5  Vegetable Salad       .7 5  Collection of Canned Fruit    1.50  Collection of Jellies  nv   1.50  Collection  of  Jams  ..: '.   1.50  Collection    of    Pickles    and    Meat  Sauces   ,   1.50  Collection of Canned Vegetables ....  1.50  Sewing, Etc. ;  Darning on Sock or Stocking  75  Mended three-cornered tear 7 5  Patch on Cloth ...v..^ 7 5  One-half doz. Buttonholes on linen    .75  Pair of Knitted Mitts   L00  Pair of Men's  Socks .'.   1.00  Handmade  Bedspread   .'. ,   1.00  Baby's Jacket in Wool  ;.   1.00  Embroidered  Baby's Jacket     1.00  Baby's Booties in Wool    1.00  Embroidered Baby's Booties ..���������:   1.00  Bedroom Slippers  T   1.00  Hand-made  Shawl     1.00  Knitted Ladies'  Sweater  ,.... 1.00  Knitted Man's Sweater   1.00  Piece of Hemstitching  ,   1.00  Handmade   Curtain      1.00  White  Centre-Piece   .   1.00  Colored. Centre-Piece   1.00  Collection of Crochet Work   1.50  Piece of Hardnger  _    1.00  Piece  of  Tatting   .'   1.00  Piece of Cross-Stitch Work ..a   1.00  Piece of Irish Crochet  :   1.00 c  Side-Borad   Scarf   .'.  1.00  Tea   Cosy    r   1.00  Hand-Painted Cushion Top    1.00  Fancy- Cushion  Top  ,  1.00  Knitting  in   Cotton   1.00  Corset Cover    1.00  Night  Gown    '. ' 1.00  .50  .50  .50-  ,.50  \i'jO  .50  .50  50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  ��������� .50  .50  2nd  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .75  .75  .75  .75  :75.  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  50  ' .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .75  .50  50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  THE ABBOTSFORD POST  95. Crochet" Yoke ' .".:l,:v..:..:.::y.v::........ 1.00 '-.50  ,96. Hand-made  Towela   1-00 .   .00  ���������'97. Hand-made 'Pillow., Covers,,.:  1-00 .50  98. 'Hand-made1 Handkerchief 75 .-50  99. Harnd-made Fancy Basket 75      .50  100. Fancy-made'Apron; '. ,  1-00 ..j0'  101. Kitchen   Apron  ;..::..:.,..���������������������������'������������������ ������������������������������������-,������������������    -75 -?J  102. Child's   Dress   1-00   .   .o0  103. Pieced  Quilt    I'-50 ���������;*! .  104. Boudoir   Cap r 7:> ���������*"  105. Fancy.'.Bag 75- .o0  106. Scrap Book  ,. T 75 .o0  Paintings  107. Best Hand-painted/Picture    1-00 .50  108. Best Hand-painted  Vase .., 1-00 .50  109. BeBt Ha'nd-pai.nted Cake Plate,....  1.00 .o0  110. Best hand-paint'd'Cup and Saucer  1.00 .5 0,  111 Best hand-painted Dinner Plate....  1-00 .50  DIVISION 1C���������FINE ARTS  1. Photographs.Collection Local V'iews$  ;75 $  .50  2. Pyrography*    ���������   -75 .50  3. Landscape Painting   (in  oil)    75 .   .;>0  4. Landscape  Painting   (water  color)     .7 5 .50  5   Fruit or  Flowers  Painting   (water  '       color)' : : : -    -75 .50  7. Drawing in Pencil or Crayon  :,   .75 .ou  8. Wood   Carving    '- 75 .TT0  9. Woodwork���������some useful article ....    .75 -aO  SPECIAL PRIZES  '   1   By William Elliott���������Fortius year's best Foal  sired  by  "Giaour":'   1st,   $10.00;   2nd,   $5.00.  2. By J. A. Morrison���������For best Draft Foal of  19.19,' any breed:   $5.00.  '  3. By   Canadian   Explosives   Ltd.���������Sweepstakes  for best  5-lbs of private Dairy Butter:   $5.00.  3(b). Best 25-lbs of Commercial Potatoes: 1st,  $3.00;   2nd,   $2.00. _  4. By Hudson Bay Co.���������Best Dairy Cow:  $u.00.  4(b).  Best collection of Grains, grown  in Matsqui Municipality, 25 lbs. each, three varieties: $5.00  5. By W. H. Malkiri & Co.���������5 lbs Malkin's Best  Coffee for the best Jam and Jelly, one quart each.  6. By Brackman Kerr Co���������������������������Goods to amount of  $5.00 for the best sack Oats grown in Matsqui  Municipality.. ���������  7. By King-Beach Mfg. Co.���������Best Layer Cake,  Three tins,'4 lbs. each of' Best Jam.  7{b), Best half dozen Oatmeal. Cookies, 2tius 4  lbs each of best Jam.  8. By Brown Bros., Seedmen���������Best three plates  of  Apples,   distinct . varieties   (5   each):   $3.00   in  goods.  9. By Cooper-Seldon Co., Clayburn���������-Best Assortment of Pickles: $3.00 in goods.  10. By Wm.. Rennie &  Co.���������Best collection  of,  Vegetables, grown Prom    Rennie's    Seeds:     $5.00  worth of Seeds.       .  11. By Western Grocers���������For best Feild, Roots,  "Mangels and Turnips,.,-14 each:   5 lbs  Great West  Tea.  12. By Vancouver Milling Co.���������For best Loaf  of White Bread:  1st, $3.00 in goods; 2nd, $2.00 in  goods.  13. By David Spencer & Co.���������For best Fruit  Cake:   One- Silver  plated   Sugar  and.  Tea   Spoon  Holder.'  14. By "Farm and Home", Vancouver���������One year  subscription to Farm and Home to each of the  following. The best Cock, Cockerel, Hen and Pullet  any breed;  and the best homegrown Mangle, Turnip and  Carrot Seeds:   One year's subscription.  v~zr?  A handsome tribute to' Lord  Bhaughnessy was paid by the C.P.R.  shareholders At the annual meeting  to-day. Mr. Huntly R. Drummoad  moved the following resolutions:  Resolved:���������That there be inscribed  in the record of this meeting an expression of the appreciation of the  shareholders of the great service rendered to the Company and to the Dominion of Canada by the Rt. Hon.  ' Lord Sliaughnessy who has recently  retired from the Presidency and assumed the Chairmanship of the Company.  The .oxrtstanjding' position held by  thc Canadian Pacific Railway not only In the markets of the world but  also in the respect and affection of  the 'Canadian', people' provides the  greatest of all tributes to the genius with which Lord Shaughuessy has  directed the affairs of the Company,  but the shareholders cannot let this  occasion pass without the further  tribute of their thanks for the services  he has rendered during the thirty-aix  years with which he has been associated with this onterprise.  Through Ijord Shaughnessy's fin-  Bttclalskill and executive ability, an  immense transportation system has  been built up and consolidated with  such efficiency and economy that the  Canadian people have enjoyed efficient service at moderate rates, have  Been their resources developed beyond all expectation and have been  encouraged durfcmg normal years by  a steady flow of Immigration, while  the financial returns of the Company  Itself have amply justified the confidence placed by investors in Canadian industry and management.  It is particularly gratifying to the  shareholders that under Lord  Shaughnessy's Presidency tho Canadian Pacific Railway Company should  iwt only have rendered sxich signal  services to the cause of the Allies  during the recent Great War, buf  should also have maintained its efficiency and financial standing in the  face of the difficult conditions created by that war. The shareholders  consider it clue largely to hla far-  sslghted policy that under such circumstances the Canadian Pacific  Railway Company should not only  liave required no assistance from  jjthe Canadian Government but should  actually from Its reserves have been  able, to provide substantial, aid to  that Government in. maintaining the  ���������nigh standard of Canadian credit.  The 'shareholders1 deeply appreciate ��������� and honour the ..spirit-of, self-  sacrifice with which Lord Shaughuessy maintained the arduous duties  of the Presidency during the. anxious  years of the war in spite of physical  disabilities.1 They rejoice that ..these  disabilities, have been ameliorated  ar.d that with renewed vision he. can  once more enjoy tbe beauties of.'that  Canadian, ^landscape which the Canadian Pacific Railway has made' accessible to the world."  ' When the prospect of peace enabled him to hand over the more, active duties of the Presidency : with  clear conscience to a younger man,  it was with genuine pleasure' that the  shareholders heard of Ix>i^ Shaughnessy's decision to remain as Chairman of the Company, hot .only, because they realized that the, Company  would thereby!continue to haye the  benefit of his counsel, and advice, but  also because they are proud' to retain  as their titular head one who is held  in such universal honour:  ���������The shareholders trust that the indomitable spirit which has. been so  characteristic of Lord Shaughnessy's  whole splendid 'career will 'be rewarded with many years yet to come  of health", prosperity' and happtnese.  Moyed by:  Huntly R. Drummond.  Seconded by:  Colin Campbell.  Lord Shaughnessy replied:  I appreciate most heartily.; and  thank you, Mr. President and fellow  shareholders, for the complimentary  remarks referrine to myself in the  President's address, and in the Resolution adopted by the meeting. I  would be lacking in candour if I failed to admit great pride in the progress of the Company during my Presidency and in its present splendid  position, physically , and financially,  and equal pride in the faith and confidence of the shareholders who, with  marvellous unanimity responded to  calls for new ,capital,.by auhscribiag  for additional issues'of stock, erea  on occasions wtoen In. deference, to  popular clamour the issue price was  1*63 favourable   to   th������ eubscrtbera  than it might properly have bom  My predecessors, Lord Mount Stephen and Sir William Van Home,  who carried the responsibilities ol  the Chief Executive through the periods'of construction and the first  few years of operation, had a most  difficult task as is well-known to our  senior colleagues on the Board of-Directors, Mr. Angus, Sir Edna and -Osier and Mr. Matthews, but it was my  good fortune to become President  just.when the tide was turning and  when Canada was coming into her  own.   .     .-.  The expansion in the country's  business and the consequent increase  of traffic compelled capital expenditure on a. large scale to furnish improved transportation facilities present 1/ required and to anticipate the  future, and the money for these purposes was provided year by year  from 1900 to the outbreak of war.  Tlie policy of your Directors was  .bold and forward.  Tlhere was never any hesitation,  and looking back over that period  they are justified in the conviction  that few,.if any mistakes were made,  and that conviction is, I am sure,  shared by the great body of the Canadian people and of the Company's  shareholders.  It was fortunate indeed that  when the time arrived to transfer tho  responsibilities of Chief Executive to  younger and more vigorous shoulders your Directors had available for  the post a man so capable, so energetic, so conscientious and so well  versed in matters relating to the.  Company's policy as the new President, Mr. Beatty. I shall not hurl  back at him such compliments as he  paid me in great profusion, but I may  be permitted to say that he enjoys  the complete confidence and respect  of the Directors and of the Canadian  people. The shareholders' interests  could not be in safer hands.  After so many years of business  and personal association it was  somewhat of a wrench to my fellow-  Directors as it was^o'me to alter our  relations by permittinig uie to retire  from the Presidency, but they felt aa  I did, aad an I hope you feel,- that it  was beat for the future of the Com*  pany.  TELEPHONE  There was a picture in the papers recently of;, Enid  Bennett, movie star, using the telephone. Miss Bennett  :is a fine actress, and she surely "knows how to use a telephone, but in this illustration she had her face, turned  away from the transmitter. Perhaps she was posing, but  it might have suggested to some, one that her method was  the proper one when telephoning.  When you telephone, talk directly into the instrument  with your lips an inch or so from the transmitter. When  you will have1 to talk in an ordinary tone, and the person  at the other end will be able to hear you distinctly.  BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE Co.  Limited  -*, ���������>���������?" ���������������������������  ��������� irfo-i  Electric Sicrlbzg and Lighiing  NJO car hss a' better starting and  ^ liohtinrr system than that now  available to purchasers of Ford Cars.  It is n Fcfd product, built into the  . motor��������� ���������  ���������a positive starter as reliable as  the motor itself:  -t���������a powerful lighting system,  uniform under all engine speeds.  On the open models���������Touring Cars  and Runabouts���������it is OPTIONAL  ��������� EQUIPMENT.  On closed cars���������Sedans and  Coupes ���������it, is STANDARD  EQUIPMENT. '  On all models the Ford Standard  Magneto also ��������� provides ignition  independent cf the batteries.  See the Ford car with this new  equipment.  Fcrd Runabout ������060;  Touring ?5;o  On open mochls the Elecrr-c Starting and Lighting  Equlpinct i.> {iiuo extra.  Coupe ?<575; Sedan $1175 (closed model prices include Electric Starting and Li������nt:r.g Cquiprncr.-J.  These prices are F. 0.13. Ford.^Or.t. and do  not include the War Tax. 115  <:������������������  ARGITT MOTORS, Ltd., Dealers, Mission City  Additional Special Prizes  L5. By C. M. Baynes & Co.,  Matsqui: Best pen of Poultry  any Breed: 1st, $3 in goods;  2nd; $2 in goods.?  16. By Farmers' Institute, of  Matsqui: For best Pig sired by  Farmers' Institute Boar: 1st,  $5.00;  2nd, $3.00; 3rd, $2.00.  17. By Matsqui Agricultural  Association: For the best shod  Horse, shod by any blacksmith  in Matsqui Municipality: 1st,  '$8.00;  2nd, $2.00.  Total Loss, Too  A Toronto minister says that the  modern stago has lost its soul.  Wc always thought they'd lose  something valuable put of those stage  costumes some day.  Dr.G.A.PolIard  Dentist  J,   jO.   Jv/n.Jjuik;  Funeral Dire:';}:  AGENT   FOR  HEADSTONES  Phone Connection. Mission City  wz  :'.->r  ������������������S  436 HASTINGS Street, W.  (Over  C.P.R. Tick.  & Tel.  Ofllcee)  VANCOUVER - B.C.  It .Is always well to -write or phone  for  appointments  L. DASH WOOD- ME  BARRISTER  and  SOLICITOR  809 Rogers Bldg. Vancouver  OoiKaeel, J. Milton Price.  YOU CAN AVOID  OPERATIONS  *For    Appsndicitis    and Gall Stones  through the use   of ..HEPATOLA,   a  medicine recognized    as far    better.    <jSjj������$Bs|  safer than operations.    $5.50    treat-    j^|������|||  ment. '  Sole Manufacturers  ���������      MRS. GEO. S. ALMAS  524 4th Avenue, North, Saekatooon  ���������StWUy.'..'^"R:-W.-Kwr-i*.t.tt������ii.^  3^|pSi  ^ /"-'  I  tf  THE .ABBOTSFORD POST  PAGE THREE  <****'���������������*���������' *��������� ������������������������ "���������"*���������''" >' '^������������������ "���������'''��������������� nn^gijMimMiii ��������� - ' '���������' - tw >'���������  liirt������d*fl������iHliw������fc,iLn i i ������wrw  r������    i   ;^fV.  ' (**  latsqui Fair-Prize List  DIVISION A.-���������HORSES.  All Stock must be owned by Exhibitor, at.least.six  months previous to Show /   ��������� ���������  Heavy Draught, 1500 lbs. and Upwards  Class   ���������;��������������������������� ... 1st.  i. Brood mare,*.-with ,foal at. foot  $3.75  2. Colt, two. years;old,.gelding or .filly 3.75  '3. Colt,  one year ......v. : 2.25  4. Suckling...foal ��������������������������� , .  2.25  5. Span ;horses, mares or geldings in   .    ,  .harness ...i... 3.75  Roadsters  2nd  S2.00  1.50  1.50  1.50  2.00  $2.00  1.50  1.50  1.50  1.50  ': 2.00  2.00  2.00  6. Brood mare, with foal at foot  $3.75  7. Colt, two years, gelding or filly .... 3.75  8. Colt, .one year  '.  2.25  9. Driving team, in harness  2.25  10. Saddle.horso  --'  2.25  11'. Heavy draught stallion, registered 4.00  12. Roadster stallion, registered  ........ 4.00  ,13. Single driving horse in harness .... 3.75  Goneral Purpose  14. Mare or gelding, any ago , $3.00  $2.00  15. Team in harness, 1300 lbs or under 3.75    2.00  DIVISIONB.���������CATTLE  (Certified pedigrees to ho produced for bulls)  Short Horn  -Bull, (pure bred, 2 yrs and.upwards $3.75.  2. Bull, pure bred, under 2 years ....  2.2G'  3. Cow, any ago   2.25  4. Heifer, 2 years   1.50  5. Heifer,  1   year     1.50  G.  Calf    : ......  1.50  $2.00  1.50  1.50  .75  .75  .75  llolsteins  . 7. Bull, pure bred,2 yrs and upwards $3.75  8. Bull, pure bred, under 2 years  2.25  9. Cow,   any   age    ,  2.25  10. Heifer, 2 years  1.50  11. Heifer, 1 year    1.50  12. Calf 1, ,.--, 1.50  Jerseys  13. Bull, purebred, 2 yrs, and upwards $3.75  14. Bull, pure bred, under 2 years  2.25  15. Cow, any age  '. :  2.25  16. Heifer, 2 years  ,  1.50  17. Heifer,  1 year   1.50  18. Calf ..:  1.50  Herefords  19. Bull, pure bred, 2 yrs and upwards $3.75  20. Bull, pure bred; under 2. years .... 2.25-  21. Cow, <any -age     .2.25,  22. Heifer,. 2 . years  1.50  Guernseys-  Class     ������������������- 1st.  23. Heifer, 1 year  $1-50  24. Calf   , .$1.50  25. Bull, pure bred, 2 yrs and upwards 3.75  26. Bull, pure bred, under.2 years.old.. 2.25  27. Cow, any age  -  2-25'  28. Heifer, 2 years  1-50  29. Heifer,  1  year     1-50  30. Calf    '.   1-50  Ayrshires  31. Bull, pure bred, 2 yrs and upwards$3.75-  32. Bull, pure bred, under 2 years .... 2.25  33. Cow,  any  age v��������� 2.25  34. Heifer, 2 years ^  "1.50  35: Heifer,' 1 -year     1.50  36.  Calf      1.50  DIVISION O.���������SHEEP  1. Ram, two shears and over  .$1.50  2. Ewe, two shears and over ....���������...<.... .15.0  3. Ram/shearling ..._  1.50  4. Ewe, shearling  _ , ��������� 1-50  5. Ram.'.:lam,b. 75  6. Ewe lamb ,. *.., ..."     -75  7. Three ewes  (pen)     2.25  8. One ram, ..three ewes, .different ages  (in pen). Sweepstake ���������::.���������..-..:......... 3.75.  DIVISION D.���������-PIGS  > BerksMres  1. Boar, pure bred, six mos. and over$3.00  2. Sow, six months and over  ,.... 3.00  3. Sow, and litter   . 3.00  Yorkshire and Chester White  4 Boar, pure;bred, six mos. and:.over$3.00  5. Sow, six months and over   3.00  6. Sow and.litter  3.00  . Any Other Breed  7. Boar, pure bred, six mos. and over$3.00  8. Sow, six months .and over   3.00  9. Sow and.litter  _  .3.00  10. Spring Store pig, 8 mos., and any  breed    ,  3-00  $2.00  1.50 '  1.50  ��������� .75  .75  .15  $2.00  1.50  1.50  . .75  .75  .75  $2.00  ���������1.50.  1.50  " ;,75'  . *  2nd ,  $  .7.5 '  .75  2.00  2.00  1.50  ,75J  .75  -' .75-  $2.00  1.50  1.50  .   .75  ,-.75  .75  \ .75  .75  .75  ;75  . .50  .50  1.50  1.50  $1.50  1.50  1.50  $1.50  ���������1.50  .1.50  $1.50  1.50  1.50  1.50  DIVISION E.���������POULTRY  Entries by single birdft as cock,,.hen, cockerel and  pullet.    Birds  entered   singly, may ..compote  in  Pens.    Pen  to consist  of one  male and three  females.  Coops supplied by Association.  Plymouth Rock (Barred)  1. Cock ,. $1.00 $ .50  2. Hen   1.00 .50  3. Cockerel  1.00 .50  4. Pullet   1-00 .50  5. Pen  2.00 1.00  Plymuotho Rocks (Any Other Variety)  6. Cock    ���������. .!_...-., $1.00  $     .50  7. Hen    -  LOO       .50  8. Cockerel���������..  ..1.00 ...  .50  9. Pullet ..��������� 1-00       .50  Class 1st.      2nd  10. Pen  ;....r.....   ..-. ..��������� -.2.00    1.00  Wyandotte (White)  11. Cock _     ...,....$1.00 .50  12. Hen  .���������... ���������.....--.'   1-00 -50  13. Cockerel   1-00 .50  14. Pullet  --  1-00. ,5������  15   Pen                                                      2.00 1.00  Wyandotte (Any Other Variety)  16. Cock - $1.00 $  -50  17. Hen ., - -���������-  1-00 -50  18. Cockerel -  1.00 .50  19. Pullet -  1-00 -50  20. Pen   ..> ,... ��������� 2.00 1.00  a  Rhode Island Reds   ..  Class Is*-  21. Cock $1.00  Hen- -. - '- ..,  LOO  Cockerel    .' :  1-00  22.  23.  24.  25.  1.00  2.00  26.  27.  28.  29.  80.  31.  3,2.  33.  34.  35.  36.  37.  38.  39.  40.  i  41.  42.  43.  44.  45.  46.  47.  48.  49.  50.  00  00  Pen  ....:.:   Orpington  (Any Variety)  cock  ...:' .' ...$1.00  Hen     Cockerel      puiiet .���������:,:.-: ,  1-00  Pen   '.'.,...." ���������' ���������. 2.00  Leghorns (White)  Cock   "I..-- .��������� $1.00  Hen    :  L00  Cockerel   .-. : :  1-00  Puiiet  : :  1-00  Pen   ." -  2.00  Leghorns (Any Other Variety  Cock-   .'  '������������r -. $1.00.  Hen ....<  100  Cockerel    '..'  1;00  Pullet  : "....' :.:  ::..:...:. 100  Pen      ,....-"..." 2.00  Minorcas (Black or White)  cock ' : ?i.oo  Hen   ,. :   ���������;  1-00  Pork������rf>l     1.00  Puiiot '....." : r..,  i-oo  Pen. ...:,...: .-".K "...-.;���������-.'.;  2:00  Games (Any, Variety) .  Cock   .v.'. '.'- $1-00  Hen  .....:   LOO  Cockerel    -  I-00  Pullet ....r,:....:.: :r.l  1.00  Pen '. : "..."."..   ""���������" 2.00  2nd  %  .50  '".5 0  ���������50  1.50  , i'.oo-  $ ..5 0  ' [.5 0  :.50  ��������� '.50  1.00  ' .50  ���������'.50  -'.50  , 1.00  $.50  ���������    .50  ,:, .50  .50  1.00  $  .50  .50  .50-  .50  1.00  .50  .50  .50  .50  1.00  ������  DIVISION   F.���������DAIRY,  PRODUCE   AND   HONEY  1. 10-lb.. Crock.Dairy. Butter ���������.:.... $2.25  $.1.00  2. 1-ib. Private Dairy .Butter -....,   3. 5 lbs. Private Dairy;Butter  :.... 1  4. Honey in .comb, 3 .sections   5. 3 'lbs: Extracted. Honey '--.-. :'.   DIVISION G.-r-VEGETABLES  1. Celery,-red,   3 . ..".....,���������.-������ .........$  2., Celery,', white, 3 ..:........ u :  3. Cauliflower,   2. '.:   .. .���������--   4. Cabbage, -round, 2 , -   5. Cabbage; pointed', 2 ...���������: --.  6. Cabbage,  red,  round,  2   7. Cabbage, red, pointed, 2 ...: .....  8. Cabbage,  savoy, .2.  t  9. Carrots, red, short,/5...... k���������  10. Carrots,  red. 1-2 long,. 5.   11. Beets,   lr2.long,  3,,.,.'.   12. Beets, round,  3���������;   13. Citron, .2    ;   14. Pumpkin,.2.   :   15. Squash,.2., ...........v. ;-  16. Vegetable, marrows, 2   17: Onions, red,  5   18. Onions,. white, ,5..v ������������������-  19. OnionB; yello^r, .5 ������������������  20. Collection ofv.onions ...  21. Onions,  pickling, .1. quart .'   22. Parsnips,   5    .'..'..,........  23. Turnips, .table,  5. .'.-.-...-....'v..:........'   24. Tomatoes,..5 ���������- .....' ......'.'._..........  25. Cucumbers,, garden, 5 .....  26. Cucumbers, t frame, or. greenhouse....  27. Cucumbers,'.pickling," 12 '_...."_..'..".".'..'.'  28. Corn, white,. .5-.......n...+���������..���������   29. Corn,, .yellow,   5   '... .'i...l.....   30. Rhubarb,  5 .1.*.., "..^--  31. Lettuce,   Leaf,  2   32. Lettuce,...head,  2  ...,...,..., ������������������  33. Green Beans in pod, 12 ..,...-.   34. Wax Beans in pod, ,12    ,  35. Pole.Beans in pod,:12   .36. Gren^Peas, in pod, 21,......;..   37. Brussels,.,Sprouts, 2. heads   38. Spinach +...-..'.��������� .'....'...'..:.'....\.....  39. Potatoes, early, named variety, 8���������  40. Potatoes,, late," named',variety,   8..  41. Potatoes,. Rochester .Rose, 8...".".."   .  42. Potatoes, Carman, ,8  -   43. Potatoes,���������Money ;Maker, 8   44. Potatoes, Goii Coin,-"8".'..l   45. Potatoes, .Uncle,Sam, 8    46. Potatoes,..Colored,   8   47. Potatoes,...white,..8   48. Potatpea,. jargest^S.- .��������� ,   49. Potatoes, collection  of 5,    named  [,.  variety, 5 each.............. ��������������������������������������������� 1-50    1.00  .75  .50  .75  .75  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50'  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .'50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  !50  .50  .50  .50  .50  50  ,50  ,50  ,50  .50  ,50  .50  ,50  .50  .50  ,50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25-  .25  .25  -.25  .25  .25  .25  ".25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  25  25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25.  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  -.25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8...  9.  10.  11.  12.  13.  14.  15.  16.  17.  18.  19.  20.  21.  22.  23.  24.  25.  26.  27.  28.  29-  DIVISION H.���������FH3LD PRODUCTS  Wheat, fall," 1 bushel  $  -75  Wheat, spring,",,! bushel 7 5  Sheaf of Wheat, 100.0. head's ../. -    -75  Oats, white,  1 bushel .."���������    -.75,  bushel ..:     -75  100.0, heads     -75  bushel - 75  Oats,  Sheaf  Peas,  Peas,  Peas,  black,  1  of Oats,  blue,   1  white, 1 bushel .;!   grey,. 1  bushel. ..........  Vetches,, 1-2. bushel... ...........  Mangolds,, globe*,  2 _,:.._:   Marigolds, long red, 3  ..  MangQlds, ,any .other variety  Beets,, sugar, 3    Turnips! Swede, .3   Turnips, .any variety, 3  ...,-  Carrots, red,s 5    Carrots, white, 5  f   Cabbage, 2. '...*   Pumpkins, 2 r   Kale,  2   Corn, ensilage, 5 stocks  ..., 50  Corn, full,  5  ears  .'....'. 50  Bale  hay,   timothy    r 5 0  Bale hay,  clover 50  Bale hay,.mixed .: , 50  Beans,' white,   10 lbs. 7 5  Beans, brown, 10 lbs 7 5  Beans, any other variety', 10 lbs .  .75  .75  .75  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  1 0  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  ,.25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .50  .50  .50  DIVISION I.-r-FRUITS,  FLOWERS and   APPLES  .     , Apples,  1. Gravenstein,   5     2. King of Tompkins,  5  3. Wealthy,  5 ,....   4. Northern: Spy,  5 ,.-....  5. Winter Banana, 5 ........  6. Grimes Golden, 5 .....  7. Ben Davis, 5 T  8. Black Ben Davis, 5  9.  ...$  ���������v  .75  .75  .75  .75  .75  .75  .50  .50  Canada Red; 5     '.50  .50  .50.  .50  .50  .50'  .50  .25  .25  .25  Class 1st.  10:' Delicious,   5    :....'   .00  ,11.   Fameuse,   5    - 5 0  12. Golden Russet,  5 :      .50  13. Hubartson,   Nonsuch,   5     .50  .   14.  Wolf  River,   5   ..-. !'.., 50  15. Maiden  Blush,   5   ., 50  1(1.  Ulcnheini   Orange, ,5 50  17. Jonathan, ' 5    .' '..     .00  3 8.  Baldwin,   5   .., , -.     .50  19. Spitzenbcrg,   5 00  20. .Winosap,   5    , 50  21. Mcintosh .Red,   5. 50  22. Pewaukce,  5  , .��������� 50  23. Rhode Island   Greening,   5    '. 50  24. Red   Creek   Pippin,   5 , 50  25. Any  other  varioty,   fall,. 5  '.. , 50  '. 26. Any other variety, winter,  5      '.05  27. Largest,   any   variety,   5    v...    .50  28. '2'Packed bxs. apples, Northern Spy  1.50-  . 29.  2Packed  bxs.  apples, King of T.C.  1.50  30. '2.Packed .bxs. of apples,'Wealthy:.:. 1.50  31.'2  Packed  bxs.  apples, Gravenstein  1.50  .. 32., 2  Packed  bxs.  apples, any  variety  1.50  33. 2   Packed   bxs  apples,  any  variety  1.50  Crab Apples,  34. Hyslop,   12    ' '.     .50  35. Martha,   12    " 50  36. Martin, 12  :.-. 50  37. .Montreal Beauty,  12, ,      .50  38. Any other variety, 12  '    .50  39. Two Packed bxs. Crab Apples-:.......  1.50  Pears  40. Bartlett,   5   ....; 50  41. Winter  Nellis,   5    : .'    .50  Class ������   1st.  42. Duchess  D'Angouliene,  5   .-. 50  43. Any other variety, fall, 5  "...    .50  44. Any other variety, winter,  5   50  45. Two bxs. packed Pears any variety 1.50  Peaches  46. Yellow,   5     '  -50  4 7. White,   5      .50  48.  Grapes, white, 4 bunches  : 50  ;   49.  Grapes,  colored,  4  bunches  50  ��������� 5 0. Two boxes packed peaches ...,  1-50  Plums *  '" 51.  Damson, 5  o0  ��������� 52. Two boxes plums or prunes  .'.  1.50  53. Italian Prunes, 12  ., 50.  54. Yellow Egg.   12 50  , 55. Pond's Seedling, 12  50  56. Any other variety,  12  ' 50  57. Strawberries, halC box, any variety     .50  58. Blackberries, half box, any variety     .50  Flowers  59. Specimen Geranium, scarlet ...., 75  60. Specimen Geranium, white  75  61. Specimen Geranium, other variety.".     .7 5  62.- Specimen Fuschia, single  75,  6 3.wSpecimen  Fuschia,   double , '..     -75  64. Specimen, hanging basket  -    .75  65. Specimen   Begonia    75  66. '  67. Specimen Fern  .,...., 7o  68. Specimen. Foliage  Plant        .75  69. Collection  Dahlias.... 75  70. Collection Gladiolas  75  71. Six Show Dahlias  1    '.50  72. Six Cactus  i 50  73. Six single .dahlias   '- 50  74. Six  pompom   dahlias   50  75. Six   Gladiolas    ; 50  76. Six varieties Sweet Peas, 4 each ....    .50  77. One bunch white swet peas   50  78. One bunch colored sweet peas 50  79. Six varieties Pansies, 2 of each 50  80. Six  asters   , : 50  81. Six  Phlox   ,���������     -50  82. Six Stocks  50  83. Collection   Perennials         -75  84. Collection   Annuals    75  ' 85. Collection Roses, 3 distinct varieties     .50  86. Best six rcses distinct variety ���������      -75  87. Collection of Carnations       -50  88. Collection   Nasturtiums    50  89. Collection Wild Flowers by   School  Children    .': 75     .50  division j.���������ladles' work  children:s list  .    1 Boy or Girl under 12 years of age  Sewing  1. Best Hand Hemming   $  .75  2. Best Hemstitched Handkerchief 75  3. Best darning on Sock or Stocking    .75  4. Dressed Doll (handsewing)    1.00  ,   Class lst-  5. Plain Pinafore   1-00  6. Plain  Apron     1-00  7. Scrap   Book     1-00  8. A useful article made in wool   1-00  CHILDREN'S LIST���������(Boy or Girl)  Sewing���������12 to Id years old  9. Best plin clothea dress  -   1-00  10. Best embroidered article ,   1-00  11. Best hemstitched Tray Cloth     1.00  12. Best Crocheted lace, any kind  75  ,13. Best piece of Crochet, any kind 75  14. Best half doz. Buttonholes on linen ' .75  15. Best patched irregular tear  7 5  16. Best darning on stocking or sock 75  Cooking  17. Best loaf of White Bread  75  18. Best half dozen Biscuits  75  19. Dost Apple Tie  , \\  20. Best  Layer  Cake  7������  21. Best   Loaf   Cake    75  22. 'Best half dozen  Cookies  75  23. Best Home-made Candy   ,      -75  2 4.' Best exhibit of general work from  any school in Matsqui Municipality  1st. $3.00;   2nd, $2.00;   3rd.  $1.00.  2 5.  Best collection  of  leaves  of  B.  C  trees, properly pressed and mounted       loo  26. Best collection of native weeds,  ferns, grasses, properly pressed and  mounted   ..��������� ������������������  1-00  27. Best collection of insects properly-  named  and   mounted   1-00  28. Writing,   Beginners   to   II.   Reader  1.00  29. Writing, 3rd and 4th Readers........  1.00  30. Drawing, Beginners to 2nd Reader  1.00  31. Best Drawing from  Design  or ob  ject,  3rd and  4th  Reader ..:.    1.00  (Continued on Page Four)  2nd  .25  .2 5  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  '.2 5  .25  .25  .25  .2o  .2.5'  .25  .25  .25  !25  .75  .75  '.75  .75  .75  ���������'.'75  .25  .25  .25  .25  ��������� .25  .75  .25  .25  2nd  .2������  .25  .25,  .50c  .25  .25  .25  .25  .75  .25  "..7 5  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  ;25  .25  .25  .25  .25  '.50  .50  .25  .50  .25  .25  .25  1^   .  ���������t  %  .50  .50  .50  .50  2nd  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  ,50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .60  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50 ' g/FtfUV ���������XV'.-'-'i  '"PAGE SIX  *HB ABBOTSFO&X) POST!', A&Mt&FOM), B. &  TAYLOR'ft HUMPHREY'  THAN THE BEEF, PORK,-VEAL and other Fresh Meats  ,s> Purchased Horn  WHITE & CARMICHAEL  Successors to C. Sumner  GIVE US A TRIAL FOR A MONTH AND BE CONVINCED  It., V.   Phono.   41.  Faruiors'  Phone  190 9    .  'Abbotsford, B.C.  License No. 9-12-923  you  should  Your Buildings against Fire. Because rebuilding costs 100 per  cent more than a few years ago. Yet Insurance rates have not  increased.  H. 0. HARTLEY, Abbotsford, B. C.  Representiiur Board  Companies Only  nasns  THE ABBOTSFORD  POS  Published every Friday  J.  A.   BATES,  Editor  FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1919  The P. C. E. according to Premier  Oliver's report of what Sir Richard  McBride is suposed to have said to  him was first instituted in order that  not a Liberal would be elected to  tlie provincial legislature; now the  premier Avants the Dominion government to take it over so that the  Liberal government in B. C. can rs-  main in power after the next elect-  Ion. Poor Oliver, we can see-his  horror-stricken face when Sir Richard in his smiling way told John  this story. Sir Richard always did  poke a lot of fun at Premier Oliver,  who always professed to be an innocent farmer not up to the political tricks. Now it would appear  that' Honest John tried to pull Sir  Richard's leg so that he could use  his information afterwards to the dis  advantage of the McQride-Bowser  government and its members. When  Premier Oliver says "as Sir Richard  McBride assured me personally"  Premier Oliver knows that there is  no means of proving that he is not  intimidating tho truth.  The n-al truth about the v/ho'e  matter is that Oliver has made a  big muddle of .ie ? G. E. affair ������rd  wants to.get rid of his bungle. Wo  'heard enough'last session in the  legislature' from one of John's o.vn  followers to realize that there is a  fetate of rottenness somewhere and  that somewhere is not wholly in the  McBride-Bowser camp. Every time  John tolls it, it gets worse.  Tt is necessary to make the muscles  in (he body .move ,<ust more- than  sligutly before perfect rest can be  obtained. Some of the macadamized  highways do not cause a car to jostle  on its springs for miles. Then the  position of riding becomes strained  and there is not the rest in the trip  ���������that the rough road  gives."  Of course this is after the war  and we have people with all kinds  of pet theories, and it may be that  our premier has a pet theory which,  belongs to both ho and Cole. No  doubt many of our readers can easily  distinguish the difference between  riding on the pavements in our cities  and on the Dewdney Trunk road and  have felt that 'restful feeling' after  a trip from New :"VVestmintser over  either the Dewdney Trunk or the  Yale road.  Rest means health, so no doubt  our government is thinking deeply������-in  the interests of the people. You must  ���������recognize the fact that we have two  doctors in the provincial cabinet and  that has had its influence on the premier.  Tho Good Roads League is going  from one place to another forming  branches of the Good Roads League  the object of which is to agitate for  good and better roads in the province  Good roads meets with the approval  .of all who dr-vo over them these  ���������days, and that means two-thirds or  the people.  Last session the provincial legislature had mapped out a grand road  improvement programme-, but the  government'has talked'all the high  hopes away and any road improvement will apparently vanish like the  good intentions promised in the flowery words we have heard.  ,    '  But the other day as ye editor  perused the automobile section of a  great daily it suddenly, dawned that  possibly there was method in the  madness and folly of neglecting the  roads'of the province the way it is  done. Premier Oliver ' wants'a very  healthy people in B. C. and that may  be the reason he is" not giving us  better roads. Here is the little article  which' suits the case.  "Kasior Riding on Jtougb fjond''  Do you want a cool restful ride in  your machine? Then don't pick out  one of (lie 'smoothest buolevards in  I lie city and motor around for several  hours.  For, according to V. A. Cole, sales  manager for Zbindcn-Wood Motor  Company, the most restful rido is  obtained from tho gravel or dirt  roads where there is a considerable  movement of the car on its springs.  It's just like sitting in a chair,  rnys Cole. Who ever heard of :.'  "��������� ������������������������������������s"ii becoming thoroughly rested  !���������;.' p.it'uig in a straight-backed chair.  C>e the winie person a rocking chair  which bumps over the cracks in the  ���������i'nrr a fid c:;uscs the muscles to move  (lining the motion in order to retain  th". bni'rii.-e. and he will be satisfied  to remain there.  Attacks   on   McKenzio   King���������Queer  place, Toronto! People out. here  who como from Ontario must ba1  ���������sometimes a little ashamed of their  chief city, says the Vancouver Sun.  It grows rapidly in area and wealth  but intellectually it is as hopelessly  stagnant as Thibet.  The way the selection of Mackenzie King for the Liberal leadership  has been received is a case In point.  His qualifications for the office are  not discusse-d at all. The only thing  Toronto can see, is that a majority  of the delogates from Quebec to the  convention voted for him. Therefore  the way to beat him is to appeal to  race and religious prejudice, to set  up a howl about the French.and the  ������������������Pope.  Fortunately for Mr. King this sort  of thing, though rather nauseating,  will not cost him any votes. All  the voters who follow ���������' the white  horse,  are Tories  anyway.  Party Politics���������It will be noticed  that Mr. Rogers in his call to his  own party speaks of himself as a  "Liberal-Conservative",thus acknowledging the virtue of a coalition and  his own, membership in one. There  is no law of public service or political  activity which says that the Confederation coalition shall be the last one  in Canada. The present Unionist  government has been tested in war.  It is on trial as a, reconstruction administration, and must yet be judged  by its. works as a government in time  of peace. The majority of the people  of Canada are judging the ministry  today and will judge it on election  day on what they believe to be Its'  ���������record, not because the ministers formerly belonged to one party or the  other. Conservatives do not seem to  be asking Sir Robert Borden to get  rid of his Liberal colleagues, and to  replace them with Conservatives.  They appear to be pleased when he  finds a capable man of either party  to fill an important vucancy. We have  not noticed much anxiety on the  people at large to learu whether Sir  Henry Drayton and Dr. Tolmie were  formerly Liberals or Conservatives  --���������Vancouver Province.  JJV-KLKOTIONS OCT. 27  Ottawa, Aug. 26.-���������The first contested federal by-elections hold since  before the war will take place on  October 27 next. The government  has fixed this date, for holding the  elections to fill the eight vacancies  now existing in the federal representation.  (Late Henderson & Taylor)  CIVIL ENGINEERS & SURVEYORS  Box 11 Abbotsford, B. C. Phone 3IX  Send   your   address   to j  T.' M. TIBBUTT.  ���������  Agent   for   the  Aladdin Lamp  The  best,  Lamp  to   be had  REMEMBER  A   trial   menus   No   Expense.  NO  TKOUITLE.       NO OBLIGATION  ABBOTSFORD,   B.   C.  GOOD ROADS LEAGUE  AT   ABBOTSEORB  Abbotsford, Matsqui and Sumas  swung into the B. C. Good Roads  League on Friday evening last when  at Abbotsford there was organized an  Abbotsfordaiul District Branch of tho  Good Roads League, with Mr. B. II.  Smith, pioneer merchant of Abbotsford, as president, and Mr. Geo. H.  Kerr, president of the Hoard of  Trade, as secretary-treasurer. Over  twenty members wore enrolled, these  being representative of the business  framing and municipal interests of  the town and district.- There was a.  large attendance at tlie meeting,  which had been called under the  auspices of tlie Board of Trade.  Reeve A. McCallum of Matsqui and  Reeve Fooks of Sumas were elected  -vice-presidents, and Mr. F. B. Sfacey  M. P., hon. president. Directors  were named as .follows: For'Abbots-  ���������ford, A. Lee and W. L.' Longfellow;  for Matsqui: Coun. Aish and Coun.  Phi:iney;for Sumas: Angus Campbell  and   Coun. Lamson.  V/hat effective work the league  had already done to promote good  roads was enlarged upon by Aid. o.  J. Johnston of New Westminster, a  director of the league, who in a  capital speech brought prominently  into view the need for organization  and the value of impressing upon the  governments concerned that the people of the districts as a unit were  behind -propor provision for improving the main highways, and for hard  surfacing such sections as carried  interr-provincial and international  traffic.  ��������� Mr'. P. Gomery, uf Vancouver,  showed the importance of vision and  how if improved highways were to  be obtained it was necessary to have  a starting point, which it was the  ai'm^of the Good Roads League to pro  Tide, that not only the sentiment of  the people bo organized for good  roads, but practical measures taken  to support the projects which farsight had conceived. The time had  come when the development of the  country was more than ever intimately bound up with the improvement  of highways to meet the modern con-  editions  of  transportation.  The treasurer of the league, J. W.  Cunningham, explained the details of  the  organization of a branch.   ���������  Coun. Phinney, Dr. Swift,.Mr. Hill  secretary of the Abbotsford and Dis-'  trict Board of Trade, Mr. Thorn, a  new settler from Alberta and Capt.  Whitchelo, who moved the organization of a league and promised support to obtain a representative membership.  GETTING READY FOR THE  NEW FERRY BOAT  More piles are being driven at the  Mission and Matsqui side of the  ferry landing in the getting ready  for the new ferry boat which is to  be put on the Mission-Matsqui run,  at an early date. The new boat is  to be 90 feet long and wider than  the present ferry. The engines are  now being placed in her at New  Westminster. The boat was built by  the. Yarrows at Victoria.  It is not many years since tho  present ferry was put on the new  service between Mission and Matsqui  but the traffic has grown since that  day and the larger ferry m������uns that  with tlie coming of the automobile  business has grown. It is hoped the  the new ferry will take care of the  traffic until a bridge is built which  should be within the next five years.  The present ferry will be taken to  the Agassiz run.  Our bread comes 'fresh from the oven  each morning,, but we don't let it remain-here ."long, we proceed at once to  distribute on prompt schedule time.  Use Lee's Pure Food Bread and save  .lie hot job of baking'bread during the  warm days. .-..  'Place your order-with  us for that  Wedding. Cake, or any other delicacies.  License  Xo.  8.28538  License  No.   5-1088  ALBERT   LEE,   Grocer   and   BaKer  ,iMi<Bimni  SSfi  mn������mi������t������yijrfr^_.g=it������  SKeSHKEft?'  /jgiimx PiMWMnr  ���������ftumhwiiaifca  ^  See me now about that Insurance  e      o  ������      ���������  TLa LC * 9 ������LAC.������  au  I have a large; andJSsplendid supply of  .Raspberry Ganes for sale at low prices.  Finest, quality. [J$  Abbotsford  On .the claim that it is "Cheaper Advertising" than  newspaper advertising, a good many unnecessary advertising schemes are sold to business men.  The plans for buying are usually made in the home at  the warm fireside, not when the family is on an amusement jaunt.  Supplementary advertising includes all advertising  outside of newspaper advertising.  i !  Farmers' and Travelers  trade solicited.  Newly Furnished  Thoroughly Modern  M.'  MURPHY,  PROPRIETOR  HUNTINGDON, B?C.  HIGH  SCHOOL TEXTS  Junior Grade:  Cornish's Chemistry; Hall and  ���������Knight's Algebra; Hall and Stevens'  ���������Geometry (Canadian edition); Alexander's Selections; Latin and  ���������French texts as in Preliminary Grade  Matriculation Class:  Mathematical texts as in Junior  Grade: Waddoll's School Chemistry;  vSiepmann's Primary French Course,  Part II.  ���������r^u&^tmn*rmrr������rmrr*������ZZZ������Znn^^w!f^^  Tt isn't the rent  keeps him moving.  a man pays;  Now is the time to get your supply of Butter Wrappers for  summer months.  Get them at BATES' PRINTING OFFICE.  W^^^^^^^^^m^^^Mimi^^^^m^mm  .=$&*

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