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Westward Ho! Jul 31, 1886

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 BI-WEEKLY,
No. 14.
NANAIMO, BRITISH   COLUMBIA, J U L Y 3 1 th ,    1S86.
Vol. II.
n —wm •^3.-Mpar3/--jfc,gg»mg
WESTWARD HO!
PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY
An Old Story,
When the spring was  beginning, and
Mayday was nigh,
On a country girl spinning the King
cast his eye;
Fair flourish the roses anear the court
wall,
But the rose of the hedges is fairest of
all.
"Let me hide my fool's face 'neath a
lying tombstone.
For the world's gone a-Maying, I mope
here alone."
Said the jester, who sat on the steps of
the throne.
But the Wossoms will fade which the
thoughtless have torn.
And the cheeks of a maid will grow
withered and worn.
Why should there for such a small
matter be woe,
Since each hedge and each village such
roses will show?
"King! goto your wine; pretty maiden!
go moan:
When its meat hath been mumbled we
leave the picked bone."
Said thc jester, who sat on the steps of
the throne.
Yet a peasant is grinding a knife sharp
and strong,
And silently winding his way through
the throng—
Then the dogs must be driven from
licking the gore
Of a monarch struck down at his own
palace door.
"Though her name be a gibe and her
altars o'erthiown
In the end Gossip Justice will seize on
her own,"
Said the jester, who sat on the steps of
the throne.
—Edward Sydney Tylee in Temple Bar.
WHITE PAPER  MUST <UO.
A tf large lhat It In Responsible for the
Failure of sight.
An article in the Popular Science
Monthly calls attention to the prevalent
deterioration of the human sight in the
present day, and holds that it is mostly
due to the reading of black letters on
white paper. This is said to be ruining the sight of the people of all reading nations. Lord Bacon long ago said
that the rays of the sun are reflected by
a white body and absorbed by a biack
one. Hence the shape of the letters
in an ordinarily printed book are not
received on the retina by a spontaneous diaect action of that organ. The
surface of the paper is reflected, and
the letters are detected only by a dis-
ctiminating effort of the optic nerve.
This effort annoys the nerve, and when
long continued exhausts Its susceptibility. The human eye cannot long
lustain the broad glare of the white
surface without injury. The injurious
effects of long-continued gazing on an
expanse of white are well known, as
witness the prevalence of ophthalmia
in Egypt, caused by continued looking
on the vast areas of white sand in that
country, and the snow blindness which
afflicts travellers in Alpine regions.
There are many thousands of shades
of the elementary colours from which
paper manufacturers could select tints
more agreeable to the eyes and less
fatiguing than the dazzling white which
is now used almost without exception
for book printing.
HAPPY DAYS GONE,
An Alleged £"a Whei Ii Didn't Bankrupt (lie
Living rn Burn the Drad,
Tho preparation of the dead and
fun?n>ls seventy years ago were of the
primitive kind. The name of undertaker was a word unknown outside of a
few. All cabinet-makers made coffins
and the sextons of churches prepared
the male dead for burial, and dug die
graves for all; it was one of the most
important perquisites of his office.
Paupers now are prepared far better
than the best of people were more than
fifty yeais ago. Coffins were without
any lining, and a handful of the sofW
shavings were saved for a pillow, with
a piece of coarse muslin tanked over it.
The body was dressed in a cambric
muslin shroud, embellished with the
edges cut in round pointed figures hy a
stamp by the shroud-mnker. A ni»ce
ot muslin covered over it. This was
called a winding sheet. Coffins w°re
mostly made of wild cherrv, hnlf-inoh
boards, with raised lids—the sides and
ends stained red with cam-wood whisky
stain, and rubbed off with shavings
which soon dried. The lid was polished
with beeswax, which was applied with
a hot smoothing-iron, The wax when
cold was scraped off and polished with
a stiff brush, and the coffin was finished.
Ice was unknown as a preserver, and
little war- used or put up. And in hot
weather the dead could not be preserved long, not more than one night,
so [that persons dying at night were
buried the next afternoon. As newspapers were published only once a
week, notices of the funerals w«re
giveu by written invitations, or circulated by the friends. The adult dead
were borne on a bier, and the roffins
of small children were carried under
the arm of the coffin-maker, who, with
the clergyman, walked in advance of
the general processiou.
Gamblers aod Army Officers.
One of the brakemen on the Overland, in discussing the tricks of the
fellows who work the trains, said last
night: "It is often charged that railroad men stand in with the sharps, but
they don't do anything of the kind. I
know most of them, and have known
them for years, but I can't go round
punching passengers in the ribs and
telling them to look out. I did that a
few times and got the worst of it, and
besides that, I have noticed that sometimes the passengers came out ahead.
We had an army officer on board once
last fall, and he cut the heart out of
one of Doc Bragg's men, in a poker
game, and I've known others to beat
them at their own games. The boys are
usually very careful about getting in
with army officers. You can generally
tell an officer by his outfit, but not
always. They're worse than the sharps,
especially after they've been out here
for a few years. The boys have a
superstition as to them which is funny.
They think if they play with one with-
out knowing who he is that their luck is
gone forever. I knew one fellow who
killed himselt- after trying for twenty-
four hours to skin an officer, thinking
he was a stockman. The officer said
something finally about being on a furlough, and the sharp never smiled
after that. No, we can't stop the
thing."—Laramie, Wyoming Letter.
There are thirty-four coffin factories
in the United States, and they turn out
an average of 150 ooffins and caskets a
day. The largest factory is in Cincinnati.
Under Suspicion.
Customer (to d.ug dtrk)—What Jrj
you charge for arsenic?
Drug Clerk (suspiciously)—What do
you want it for?
Customer—I an a French candy
manufacturer.
Drug Clerk (suspicions allayed)—
Oh, I beg pardon, sir; I though] p r-
haps you waiited to take it yourself.
Easiness is very fluctuating in Sout'i
Africa " Some time ago," says Mr.
Auberton, "a pair of good breeding
ostricheR stood at the market price of
£200, £250 and even £300 but h'6'v
(in i88<0 at not more than £50"- still
a sufficiently high price one would
think. Eggs and chickens used to
bring £5 to do, dut are now down to
less than half. The export of birds
(ostriches) to Australia wasfeared; so a
duty of £100 per pair was fixed on exportation, and that' hns, it Is said, prevented the growth of the trade. But a
menoply of that sort is not easily maintained. What are eggs good for ?—and
who has not heard of the incubator ?
Tn South Africa a» in all other colonies, whethea it is Baron Humber, or
Mr. Froude, or Mr. Aubertin, who
speaks, there isonly one voice repMrdlncr
thc G. O. M.: and that is a voice of
condemnation Just before leavin?
Caoertnn, Mr. Aubertin heard a rtols",
"Meetimg someone running from the
spot whence the noise came,I'asked hhti
what it all meant. 'Gladstone is out
- by telegram ' he shouted, with a broir'
grin and rushed on." Mr. Aubertin
was justified in asking, "Can it be so,
that wise statesmanship has excited
these adverse feelings towards an Imperial Premier, Minister of England, in one
of her colonies.
The Bucking, Bouncing BroRCho.
Victoria to Australia via Japan.
Ottawa, July 1 ?.—Randford Fleming has
sailed for England on behalf of the Canadian
Pacific railway, to confer with the Imperial
government and their Australian agent eon-
c.:rninrr th i esta'ili ihm ;nt of cable co mmunic
tion between Canada, Japan and Australia,
ard to ascertain the amount of annual subsidies which the colonies will guarantee Sir
Charles Tupper; also to receive instructions
from the Dominion government in connection
with a similar scheme. This is Fleming's
scheme, which the Imperial authorities promise to support. The idea is to lay a cable
from Victoria, B. C, thence to the Aleutian
Islands, thence to Yeddo, Japan, thence to
Hongkong and from thence to Australia.
It is asserted that a new and rich gold field
has been discovered in the Ultima Thule
known as Patagonia, and some speculation is
indulged in as to the beneficial effect which
the find must have upon the commerce of the
world by restoring to the precious metal a
velume and value proportionate to the growth
of the earth's business. V'e have heard of
similar rich discoveries before during the last
few years, but the new fields have always
turned out to be potter's fields—veritable
graveyards for hundreds of prospectors and
miners. Such are the geographical and climatic conditions of Patagonia that any gold
which nature may have hidden away there
will be found to be guarded by genii of no
good disposition.
The latest notion is a S. P. C. B.—
a Society for the Prevention of Cruelty
to Birds. Feminine members thereof
are expected not to wear birds on their
bonnets.
The monument reared to the memory of El Mahdi in the Soudan is a
tower of birch, whitewashed and bearing the inscription, "The Ambassador
of God."
After a diet of six weeks upon hot
water and beefsteak, a corpulent gentleman announces a remarkable change
in mental and bodily condition. He
is six inchess less in girth, indigestion
has vanished; he wears gloves and
shoes a size smaller; he has lost the
tsndency to take cold, and his muscles are daily hardening.—Chicago
Times.
A broncho Is a horse, He has four leijs
like the saw horse, but Is decidedly more
skittish. The broncho Is of gentb deportment and modest mien, but there isn't a r.^al
safe place about him. There is nothing m-an
about the broncho, though; he is perfectly
reasonable and acts on principle. All he
asks is to be let alone; but he does ask this
and even Insists on it. He is firm in this
matter, and no kind of argument can shake
his determination. There is a broncho that
lives out some miles from this city. We know
him right well. One day a man roped him
and tried to put a saddle on him. The broncho
looked sadiy at him, shook his head ai.d
begged the fellow as plain as could be to go
away and not to try to interfere with a broncho who mn simoly engaged in the pursuit of
his own happiness; but the man came on
with the saddle and continued to aggress.
Then the broncho reached out with his right
hind foot and expostulated with him so that
he died. When thoroughly aroused the broncho is quite fatal, and if you get close enough
to him to examine his cranial structure you
will find a cavity just above the eye where
the bump of remorse should be.
The broncho is what the oowboys call "high
strung." If you want to know Just how high
he it strung climb up on his apex, We rode
a broncho once. We didn't travel far; but
the ride was mighty exhilarating while it
lasted. We got on with great pomp and a
derrick, but we didn't put on any unnecessary
style when we went to get off. The beast
evinced considerable surprise when we took
up our location upon his dorsal fin. He
seemed to think a moment, and then he
gathered up his loins and delivered a volley
of heels and hardware, straight out from the
shoulder. The recoil was fearful. We saw
that our seat was going to be contested, and
we began to make a motion to dismount, but
the beast had got under way, by this time, so
wcbreathula silent hymn and tightened our
grip. He now went off into a spasm of tall,
stiff-legged bucks. He pitched up so high
that every time we started down we would
meet him coming up on another trip. Finally
he gave us one grand, farewell boost, and we
clove the firmament and split up through the
hushed ethereal until our toes ached from the
lowness of the temperature, and we could distinctly hear the music of the spheres. Then
we came down and fell, in a little heap, about
100 yards from the starting point. A kind
Samaritan gathered up our remains in a cigar-
box and carried us to the hospital. As they
looked pityingly at us the attending surgeons
marveled as to the nature of our mishap. One
said it was a cyclone, another said it was a
railroad smash-up; but we thought of the
calico-hided pony that was grazing peacefully
in the dewy mead and held our peace.—
Santo Fe Democrat.
Exposing the Dangers ol Kissing.
An enemy to the kiss has appeared in
Washington, D. C, in the person of Dr.
Samuel S. Adams, who devotes seven columns
of the Journal of the American Medical Association to exposing the "Dangers of kissing."
Everything has its dark side. The dark side
of kissing, as viewed by Dr. Adams, is both
moral and physical. Among women and between children and adults it has degenerated
into an insincere, unmeaning and commonplace salutation, when it should be reserved
only as an index of affectionate feeling.
But the weight of the doctor's argument is
expended in showing the possible evils which
come from the promiscuous kissing of babies
and children by adults. Tuberculosis, diphtheria, infectious fevers, cancrum oris, rupture
of the tympanum—all are possible or actual
results of kissing. A veritable instance is
cited, in which the drum of the ear was ruptured by a kiss applied to the external auricular appendages! A kiss of such suction
force reminds one of Benedict's, which had
"such a clamorous smack that, at the parting,
all .he church did echo."
A gentleman writing from Dallas,
Texas, lays that the crops of this year
will add $200,000,000 to the valuation of that State.
There is said to be a lessend request
in this country for dress silks, and this
partially accounts for the increase of
importations.
The coral trade at Naples is at the
lowest point it ever reached, owing to
the disuse of the arcticle as a fashionable adornment.
f> Photographs have been taken of the
corona of the sun when the suu was
visible. Heretofore they have only
been secured when the sun was in
eclipse.
JOSEPH M. BROWN,
WATCHMAKER,
TX7ATCHES   AND    CLOCKS
vv     CLEANED AND  REPAIRED   AT   VERY    REASONABLE
RATES.
ALL   WORK   done  on
the premises.
Next door to James Brown's Tailoring Establishment.
FRONT STREET, NANAIMO.
tl Apl24.86
JAMES M. BROWN,
Merchant   Tailor.
Five Doors North of the Post-Office,
FRONT  STREET,  NANAIMO.
West of England   Cloths,
Tweedj, and Serges.
kJgTImported Direct. "^
ALWAYS ON HAND, FOR SALE AND
MADE TO ORDER.
TEMPERANCE HOUSE.
BASTION STREET, Opposite the Literary
Institute, Nnnaimo, B. C.
Mrs. J. K. Gilbert,
Having furnished this establishment with all
the necessaries appertaining to a
First Class Boarding and Lodging House
Can now accommodate Transient and Per-
maneat Boarders or Lodgers.
t^"Board and Lodging per week.... $6.00
Board and Lodging per day....  1.00
Board per week   5.00
Single Meals SO
Beds 50
ROCK BAY SHIP YARD.
GRAY & DUM3LET0N.
BUILDERS ANH DESIGNERS
—OK—
STEAMBOATS,    LAUNCHES   ND
SAILING VESSELS.
IMPORTERS  OF   MACHINERY   ANO  MECHANICS
TOOLS OF THE LATEST PATTERNS.
' gents for the New Improved Coal Oil Engines.
VICTORIA, II. «'.
Dr. L. T. DAVIS.
Graduate of Queen's University, Montreal,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
NANAIMO, B. C.
Office.—Smith's Building, Commercial St.
Office hours: 10 a.m. to 12; 2 p.m. t04p.n1;
6.30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
D. DAVIS.
S iort Bripge, Victoria Crescent,
Nanaimo.
BOOT AND SHOEMAKER.
Only First-* low. Material I'aed.
Na Cheap and Worthies* Goods Ktpt b, tho Above WESTWARD HO !
MAD KINGS.
SATURDAY July 31,  1886
The news comes to us that the commission appointed to investigate the
claims of the North-west insurgents have
heard Soo cases,andthat their labours are
,-. proaching completion. It is further
stated that Gabriel Dumont, whose
heroic conduct during the rebellion of
last year proved how valuable he would
have been as an ally, will receive a full
pardon and be reinstated in the possession of his property on the Saskatchewan. Whether the new Minister
of the Interior has had anything to do
with this or no we are not informed,
but it is more than probable that he has.
Such action on the part of the Government will go far to establish it in the
confidence of the people. We did not
at the time believe there was any just
cause for rebellion; but if there was,
and it has been discovered, all honor,
we say, to the Government that dares
to do right when it discovers that an
error has been committed. Every province of the Dominion has had its
baptism of blood, and although some
one in nearly every instance has been
immolated upon the sacrificial altar,
in every instance the Gods have been
propitiated, and good has flown from
evil.
Gladstone quite recently pointed
out that every reform in England has
been forced upon the attention of Parliament almost at the point of the bayonet. In the name of humanity and
justice let it not be said that British
Columbia was compelled to adopt a
course that could only be justified by
its ultimate success, in order to check
the despotic proclivities of its local
Legislature. No one at ail versed in
history—no student of human nature—
no one who has lived in and mingled
with the people of Vancouver District
can doubt for a moment that the
Smithe Government and Robert
Dunsmuir have sown the seeds of revolution that is as certain to bear its
awful fruit in this province as similar
legislation has borne in the others. If
we have appeared over-zealous in opposing that fatal mistake, it is not because we would welcome but because
we abhor and would avoid rebellion—
because the evil can be checked easier
in its incipient stage than after it has
grown powerful and relentless. The
Government's aetion in the matter of
Gabriel Dumont indicates that it is
disposed to govern by trust in the the
electorate and not by coercion—that it
is disposed to consider and to ameliorate ail well-founded grievances, and
we rejoice in the fact that an early
opportunity will be created for the presentation of our case in such manner
as may lead to the aversion of inter-
nicine strife in the next decade.
I'l'lie ismiK-Keeper'N Pereeutage.
The apparent percentage of loss to
the keeper of a gambling house is small
and varies in the several games—roulette, faro and others carrying different
rates—but the real percentage is enormously in the bank's favour. The average player, if he wins several consecutive bets, becomes cautious, anticipates a change in luck, and ventures
his money accordingly. The resuit is
if his good fortune continues his winnings are small and unimportant. On
the other hand, let him lose continuously and he becomes excited. He
loses his head, and pursuing the same
line of argument that it is a long lane
which has no turning, he increases his
stakes. This policy, with continued
misfortune, ends in large losses. Thus,
when the bank is loser, it is for small
sums, but when winning the gains are
large.—St. Lpuis Republican,
Rulers Who Have Gone Crazy Before Louis
of Bavaria.
FAT   PEOPLE.
The late King Louis II. of Bavaria
was of a mad family. If accounts are
correct, his father was of Unsound
mind, and his brother is known to be
an imbecile.
Dr. Ball, in his "Lecons sur les Maladies Mentales," described a case of
insanity that very well fits the case of
King Louis. There is, he says a kind
of maniacal excitation and disordered
action of all the faculties, without any
clear derangement of intelligence.
Ideas are quickly flowing and exaggerated, bdt there is no incoherence.
The patients often show a remarkable
developmentt of certain intellectual
powers, especially in poetic or artistic
directions. Their minds sre filled with
speculations and new projects and the
moral sense is greatly weakened or perverted. Dr. Irelanfl finds another
royal illustration of this psychosis in
Mohammed Toglak, Sultan of India,
in the 14th century; and, as will show
later, it has plainly affected one of the
Czars of Russia, and very likely members of other royal families.
THE GERMAN  WRITERS
have given to this form of insanity the
name paranoia, and this was the diagnosis made by the late king's physicians. In earlier times there were
many royal families in whem mental
disease and decay showed itself, Uncontrolled exercise of power, the free
opportunity for tbe indulgence of every
appetite and caprice, stems surely to
bring on disease either in the individual himself or his descendants. In
modern times monarchs have to regulate their conduct and retrain their
passions more thnn formerly, and in
consequence royalty is a much more
healthful occupation than it used to
be.
In the Claudian Julian family, beginning with Julius Csesar himself and
ending with Nero, we have an almost
unbroken line of neuroses. Caesar himself was epileptic, but probably the
disease developed late in life, from exposure and excesses, and did not much
affect his health. Augustus, his grand-
nephew, had, it is believed, writer's
cramp; Julia, his daughter, seems to
have been little better than a nymphomaniac. She had an imbecile son.
Tiberius was a man naturally heartless,
cruel and licentious. In his latter
years he seems to have lost all moral
sense, and illustrated the most shameless sensuality and cruelty.
DOWN ON SLANG.
an Eastern Giri Graduate Who Was Dead
Against It.
"Mamie," said a grammar school
girl to a member of the graduating class,
"have you finished your esaay?"
"Oh, yes," gushed Mamie; "and it
is too lovely for anything—a princess
slip of wkite surah, tbe back cut off a
little below the waist line, and full
breadths of silk gathered in so as to
hang gracefully over the tournure, and
three bias ruffles on the—"
"Why, what are you talking about?"
interrupted her friend; "I mean, have
you finished writing your essay, you
know?"
"Er—no," said Mamie, her enthusiasm rapidly diminishing; "but I have
commenced it, and I wish the awful
thing was in Halifaxl"
"What's the subject?"
"The Curse of Slang."
"Gracious! isn't that a difficult
subject to write up?"
"Difficult! Well I should giggle;
I'll have to hump myself to get it
finished in time for the commencement,
and I've a good notion to let it slide.
I might shut up the professor's optic by
pleading illness, but I'm not that sort
of a hairpin. But come, waltz up inta
my room and look at my stnnning graduating harness. It'll paralyze you."—
Norrutown Herald.
I would ruther trust er dishones,
man den er rank fool, fur de dishones'
man mout take pity on me an' do
right, but de fool couldn't.—Arkansaw
Traveller.
Maine has an immense blueberry
crop this year, and the canning fac-
ories ate busy.
A Scientist Assert!) That They Have
Large Heads and Small Lanes.
Youth's Companion.
A correspondent, who, without any-
known organic or functional trouble, is
greatly incommoded by superlious fat
—he wrongly calls it flesh—requests an
article on the subject.
The condition is known as corpulence or obesity. It consists in a tendency to the formation and deposit of
fat. A certain amount of this deposit
is normal. It is an element of beauty,
rounding out the form. It lessens thc
effect of sudden changes of temperature. It is a reserve of nutriment, to
be drawn upon in emergencies, thus
saving the triuscles and other tissues.
Some persons inherit a tendency to
it. Some races are more liable to it
than others. Women are more so than
men. Both sexes are more inclined to
it after they are 40. There are individual cases of extreme obesity. A
boy at the age of 3 weighed 124 pounds;
a girl 182 at 13. A woman who was
thin and delicate at 18 died at 41 with
some eight inches of fat around her
body. The famous Daniel Lambert's
maximum weight was 739 pounds.
Much of the largest part of the body
in these persons was pure fat.
In all cases of obesity there is a deficiency of oxygen in the blood, either
absolutely or relatively to the amount)
of food. Excess of food tends to produce it, and yet some are corpulent on
a spare diet, Lack of exercise favors
It, by lessening the ovidation of the
tissues. It is also produced by diseases which diminish the . number of
the red blood corpuscles. It is the
latter that absorb oxygen from the inspired air and convey it to the tissues.
According to Quain, very corpulent
peqr.le have large   hearts   and small
iungs.    This may help to explain the
deficiency  of  oxygen.     It has also |
quite recently been proved that women 1
have fewer, by many millions, of red
blood corpuscles than men.   This too,
may be one reason for their greater j
tendency to corpulency.
As the muscles become infiltrated
with fat, they are weakened. Hence
corpulent persons are apt to be indis- j
posed to active exercise. For the same j
reason the heart is rendered feeble and
is easily disturbed. The deficiency of
oxygen tends to the formation of uric
acid, and hence to the production of
gout. The very corpulent are specially liable to various forms of congestion, and acute diseases are apt to have
an unfavorable course.
In treating the corpulent regard must
be had to the fact that their heart is
weak. The main reliance for reducing
the obesity is on diet and exercise.
Thc latter increases the power of the
blood to take no oxygen. The more
oxygen one can receive the better, if
kept well within the person's strength
and the capacity of a weakened heart.
The diet should contain but little fatty
or starchy food, and much animal food
—lean meets, fish, but not the richer
kinds; also, fresh fruits, vegetbbles,
and bread, with only a moderate allowance of butter. Alkaline water is believed to be helpful.
• »»
How to Edit a Paper.
Probably more people think they are endowed with ability to edit a newspaper than
almost anything besides. The trial for one
week would possibly convince them of their
mistake. The following hint from the Dawson (Ga.) Journal may be of use to some people who think of embarking upon thc sea of
journalism;
"Editing a paper is a pleasant business—if
you like it. If it contains much political
matter, people won't have it. If the type is
large, it don't contain much reading matter,
If we publish telegraph reports, folks say
they are nothing but lies. If we omit them,
we have no enterprise or suppress them for
political effect. If we have a few jokes, folks
say we are nothing but raltleheads. If we
omit jokes, folks say we are nothing but
fossils. If we publish original matter, they
damn us fornot giving selections. If we give
selections, people say we are lazy for not
writing more and giving thorn what th<:y have
not read in some other paper. If we give a
complimentary notice, \vj are censured for
being partial. If we don't all hands say we
are a great hog. If we insert an article
which pleases the ladies, the men become
jealous and vice versa. If we remain in our
office attending to our business, folks say we
are too proud to mingle with othcr fellows.
If we go out, they say we don't attend to our
business,"
JAMES    HAHVET,.
Xtjfensiimo asul Wellington.
l-ii;;i)riii-of En rlish,Eastern ami American
1.YjL Mm ML \? £a MjL
j*ar
A. E. Johnston.
T. W. Glahobn.
IMMENSE STOCK, PRIME GROCERIES, FRESH PROVISIONS.
Nane vmo   <&.  C^b.e:m.&in■la^,
WHARFINGERS & % .TSSIOH MERCHANTS,
Importers and Dealers in Groceries, Provisions, Grain, Feed,!
3ay and General Farm Produce, invite inspection of their!
large and carefullv selected stock of the above line of good*
i.ow on view at tneir new store, Bastion Street, under the
Foresters' Hall, Nanaimo. Agents for P. 0. S. Company's
line of San Francisco and Portland steamers, P. N. Company*
East Coast steamers, B. C. Express Company, and Saanich
Lime. In stock, KurtZ*8 Gi^aiPS. The trade sup.'
plied with the above celebrated Uigurs at Victoria prices.
THE CELEBRATED EASTERN LIGHT OIL;
In stock, the quality of which we guarantee. Also Fish Oil,
Shingles (sawn and split), Nails', in any size and quantity.
Orders solicited and goods delivered free of charge to any(
part of the city or vicinity. We make a Specialty in Tea
and Coffee, the latter we roast and grind daily.
i CO.,
E. PIMBURY
 DISPENSING	
Chemists and Druggists
Commercial St., nSTanaimo, B. C
All possible cave ia taken to avoid low priced drugs and
chemicals, it being of the first importance to the sick that
preparations used in compounding medicine should be of
the required official strength. Physicians and others can depend upon having their prescriptions faithfully compounded.
A set of chemical apparatus is kept for the purpose of testing
the purity of drugs.     Tlie largest  assortment in  the city or
Patent Medicines,  Perfumery, Sponges,
Hair Brushes, Combs, Tooth Brushes
Toilet Soaps, Pure Drugs,
In fact all articles usually found in first-class drug stores
A     LARGE     STOCK     OF1
BOOKS    AND    STATIONERY
ALWAYS  03ST HANIi
NANAIMO
ttn Nt
Estaolishecl IS1/"©.
m «in STATIONERS
A Full Stock of Goods in our Line
iauIAN PERIODICALS
To order at Publisher's rates with Premiums, etc.
'$*£**
, B. G.
%
v3
mfi   Burlaw    \j       ii   .k'jicM ^.str     **xfir
- u<    *imat Bvu»l ^^r 'innC ,*. wis  W
Dealer in ail clnsses of
GROCERIES AND DRY GOODS
Highest Cash Price Puid for
FURS. SKINS and. HI3DE3S
1 Subscribe
Now
For
Westward Ho!
Published Every
WEDNESDAY
AND
SATURDAY.
A Live Readable
[Newspaper.
The Paper for the People,
Local
Provincial
Canadian
British
General
The News of the Day.
Price:
ONLY 50 CENTS
FOR  8 MONTHS
WESTWARD HO! will be delivered by the carrier as above
TO ANY
Part of the City or Vicinit y
50 cents for Three Months.
Apply to the   Carrier:
James Cowie.
W. A. HOHHE,
General Blacksmith and Wagon Maker.
BASTION' STREET, NEARTtlE'oi b BASTION NANAIMO.
-.rocttrsd the services of .1 fir.,;-:'.-5= t'orw-nlioer, I am now prepared to fill »ll
Orders wi'lr Promptitude and dispatch.
DONALD    SMITH,
Notary Public. Conveyancer, Accountant, and Real Estate Agent,
RENTS AND DEBTS COLLECTED,
AGEATT AT NANAIMO FOR
Phcenix  Fire  Insurance Company of London.     Established  187a.     Losses paid ovs
?14,000,000 Sterling.
Commercial Union Insurance Company of London, Capitn1,"?i2,5oo,ooo.
'   URK8   ACCEPTER   AT  CVnWKSt   RATES   <»F  PBEMIIIJf,
OFFICE—COBNEB OF CnHMBW I W. AN:> Wit IRP BTRWTS,
NsnaimOr 8. 0,
IDENTICAL   HOTEL,
NORMAN SMITH,
pnopiFTriR.
VICTORIA  "RESCEVT,     NANAIMO.
ft. M.Hn.siE.
Painter, Grainer, ^iMer, hazier,
Paper-Hanger,   Sisrn-Writer  and    Musician,
Cor. Wallace and CarnnbeH Sts.  Nanaimo.
NANAIMO   BREWERY.
MILL STREET, NAN.MMO.
JOHN    MAHRER,
PROPRIETOR,
T.   D.   JONES   &   CO.
(DIAMOND DRILL PROSPECTING COMPANY,)
Are open to receive applications for Borings f jr Coal 011, Coal
and other Minerals—BY CONTRACT.
ADDRESS
T.    D.   JONES   &   CO.,   NANAIMO.
NEWCASTLE HOTEL.
COMOX ROAD, NANAIMO.
H.     P.   SMITH,    Proprietor.
rbe bestjqualifies of WINES, LIQUORS and CIGARS dispensed
at tlie Bar.
OLD   FLAG   INN.
Near tht Mechanics' Institute, and only three minutes walk from Steamboat Landing,
NANAIMO, V. I.
J. E. JENKINS, Proprietor.
SUPERIOR ACCOMMODATION FOR TRAVELLERS.
The Bar is well Supplied with the best of
WINES,   LIQUORS,   AND   CIGARS.
ROYAL HOTEL AND RESTAURANT.
The   Largest    and  Best   Hotel in
the  City.
MEALS AT ALL HOURS.
Oysters, etc., Supplied at any Time.
A First Class] FRENCH COOK has charge of  the Cuisine
R.    WATKINS,
PROPRIETOR.
JOHNHOOPEE,
VICTORIA CRI5CINT.
SADDLER   AND    HARNESS   MAKER.
Drtss Making is carried on in connection with the above business
Special attention is invited to a select assortment of Hand Painted VelTtt
suitable for brackets, etc.
J.   T.   O'BEIEN,
Albert Street Nanaimo, B. C.
Teaming and Droying Done on Short Notice.
LOOK OUT
-IN NEXT ISSUE FOR-
MB——
Carthevv's   I:  '\
John Carthew,
COMO", II. C.
c. c. Mckenzie,
Land Agent, Custom's House Broker. Conveyancer f nccunfanf
OFFICE—VICTORIA   CRESCENT.
May be found la the Office at other Hours, but always between If ji. in. and 1 p. m,
Town Lots and Farms or Sal el
'Money to Loan on Mortgage] af Low Rates.
DEW DROP HOTEL,
HALIBURTON STREET       -      -      -      NANAIMO."
George Maker, Proprietor.
First class aecommodation'/or regular Boarders and Lodgers,! and the 'Travelling P.ubllc
MEALS:
Breakfast, 6:30 to Si   Dinner, is to 2;  Supper, sycjto 6:30,
NONE BUT THE BEST BRANDS
or
Llsuere, Wliwi, Mm, Porter and Cigars Dispensed at tho Bar.
The Lansdowne Brewery.
H. Rosewall, Proprietor.
Comox Road.
ALE and PORTER.
NEW   BTJTCHKK   SHOP.
COSMOPOLITAN   MARKET.
Commercial Street, next door to the Miners' Exchange Hotel, Nanaimo.
E.   QUENNELL,
Having opened at above, will keep constantly on hand an assortment of
MEATS  AND  VEOI ?'! AIlTrS,
Aad hopti to receive a continuance of the patronage so liberally bestowed d "in^ the'pas
ten years.
Maata' etc., delivered to all parts of the City free of charge
THE   NANAIMO   PHARMACY.
G.   H.   BLAKEWAYj
Dispensing Chemist and Druggist, Bookseller and S'aiioncr.
VICTORIA CRESCENT, NANAIMO, Ti. C.
Chriitmai aad New Year's Cards at Blakeway's Drug and Stationer'
Store.
lyPRICES TO SUIT THE TIMES.*^a
EDWARD       TJGECES,
Long   Bridge,   Nana:mo.
STRONG  BOOTS AND SHOES FOR WINTER WEAR
MEN'S, WOMEN'S AND CH XD .
CHEP  FOR   CASH,
PROVINCIAL  HOTEL
VICTORIA   CRESCENT.
Under the present management this fine Hotel has been refitted rnrrl re-painted
in !  now afTurdi
FirsI'dsM Meals and Accomodations for Travellers and llio General Public.
The Bar is Supplied  with tire best of
WIHKS,     LIQUORS,     AMI    CIGARS.
BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISES.
J. B. JOHNSON,     Proprietor.
ORIENTAL       OTEL,
Victoria Crescent.
. A EASSON, Proprietor.
The Bar, which has been recently beautified, will always be found well stocked with th«
best brands  uf
WINES,   LIQUORS,   AMI    (WARS;
A well supplied RESTAURANT in connection with the above.
G.   MONTGOMERY,
Corner Albert and Commercial Streets,
DEALER   IN'
Groceries,     Fruits,   Vegetables,     Cigars1,     Tobacco
Candies, etc.
Wood, and Coal Promptly Belivered to any part of the City.
FREQUENT    CONSIGNMENTS     OF    FRE^T    FRUIT. WESTWARD HOI
SATURDAY July 31,1886
Home News.
City, Island, And Province.
DISTRESSING ACCIDENT.
Explosion on Board the Queen of the
Pacific.
IS MEN JHORRIBLY BURNED.
On Thursday the s.s. Queen of the
Pacific (Capt. Alexander) was lying
under the shutes taking on her cargo
of Vancouver coal when an explosion
occurred, supposed to be the result of
the
THE IGNITION  Of COAL  DUST.
The ventilation of the ship bunkers
was imperfect.    Two  lighted lamps
were in the hold, but it is probable
that the coal dust was ignited by some
careless smoker dropping a match or a
cigar from the deck above the shute.
There was nothing to show that gas
was present!  but it should be remembered that one p ct of gas mixed with
fine coal dust can produce a violent
explosion.    The first intimation that
was given   of the accident was the
spectacle of four men, stripped to the
waist,  black as Erebus, rushing along
Wingfield Crescent with outstretched
arms and agonizing gesticulations, the
skin dropping from their limbs at every
step. We were hurried on to the wharf,
however, to find one poor fellow burned
to a crisp, sitting almost naked on the
planks graoning with agony.   He was
covered with oil and flour, a blanket
thrown around him, and dispatched to
the Hospital. On board ship the scene
was heartrending ;   five poor fellows
were  severely  burned.    They   were
lying  abaft   the  officers   messroom,
and on the stairs leading to the hurricane deck, their faces, hands and limbs
were literally flayed; but they were Tro*
jans, scarcely a murmur escaped them,
Occasionally a hoarse moan would escape, or their limbs would twitch convulsively, but each seemed to feel for
his fellow sufferer, even in the midst of
hell.   As rapidly as possible the sufferers were dressed, blanketed and sent
to the Hospital.
The captain, officers and crew vied
with each other in relieving the sufferers. Sheets, blankets—everything
was given with a lavish generosity.
Mr. S. M. Robins and Mr. McGregor, of the V. C. Coal and Land
Company, were early on the scene, and
offered every assistance in their power.
They went down Into the improvised
cockpit.and remained until the last man
was sent up.
Dr. O'Brian was the only surgeon on board.
The other men rushed up to TV Cluness'
office. He could not be found, but his office-
door was broken open, and Drs. Davis and
Renwiek proceeded to dress Ihe men as rapidly as possible, until Dr. Cluness arrived.
COUNCILLOR WIBB,
who was early on thr wharl, had proceeded
to the Hospital, and had everything ready
for the men on their arrival. Until evening
all the physicians in town and many private
citizens thronged the new fever ward were
the patients ware placed, administering every
possible comfort to the afflicted. Mr. Paw-
son was notably active, as were Messrs.
Webb, Wolfe, Manson, W. L. Jeffrey, Rob-
son, Anderson, Metcalfe, Williams, Abrams
and many others. The house steward and
Mrs. Mitchell were very assiduous, and Mrs.
Pwason, Mrs. Anderson, Mrs. Stirtan, Mrs.
O'Conneil and many other ladies rendered
valuable assistance.
Two of the victims were such favourites
with the men that they refused to allow them
to be carried to the Hospital in a stage, but
bore them all the way on litters. It was a
day for the gold that are in men's hearts to
show itself, and it was found under the most
forbidding exteriors, We shall never forget
the womanly tenderness and tearful sympathy
of one stalwart man who deessed the second
engineer's burns, and who seemed slighted that
he himself had not been the victim in his
friend's stead. The first mate, after four or
five hours hard work for others, modestly
slated that he had a slight burn. (The whole
forehead, eyebrows and nose.)
Having seen that the men had every comfort provided, Captain Alexander sailed at
sunset. The following is a list of the victims as nearly as can be ascertained:
Crew of the Queen of the Pacific—
W. A. Allison, ist Assistant Engineer;
Jas. Coffee, A. B.; R. Parle, A.B.;
Jas. Jackson, Walter Lender, Frenchy,
Priestly.
Port Townsend—Hans Hanson.
Seattle—Johnson, Cady, McDonald
Geo. Watah.
Since the above Wis in type 'one of our
staff interviewed Mr. Crow, who was injured,
and he stated that as he was about to descend
from the upper deck "a car-load of coal was
dumped into the steamer and immediately after it struck the iron shute it took fire and
hence the explosion.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS
U It A M) REGATTA.
EXCURSION TO VICTORIA.
THE FAST and COMMODIOUS
• and Popular Steamer AMELIA will
leave Nanaimo ou THURSDAY MORNING, at 3 o'clock for Victoria, to witness a
REGATTA at the GORGE. It will be
illuminated with hundreds of lights and blue
lights. Sir John Macdonald and Lady will
be present at thc Gorge- The Brass Band
of H.M.S. Triumph will play during the
evening; also, a party of Glee Singers will
aid in the entertainment. Fare for round
trip, $3 75-
NOTICE.
»LL PERSONS OWING AC-
H COUNTS to the Estate of JOHN
WHITFIELD are hereby notified to pay
the same to the undersigned.
C.  C.  McKENZIE,
Victoria Crescent.
Bankrupt Sale!!
 OF THE	
WHITFIELD
STOCK!
WITHOUT RESERVE FOR CASH
ONLY
Comprising
A FINE LOT OF tadies,
Mens, Missel »nd Child-
, _      ,ens Boo(s and   Shots,
Closing and Underclothing, Hats, Jewellery, Leather, etc.,
J. E. EULMEB,
Manager
Subscribe
Now
For
Westward Hoi
Published Every
WEDNESDAY
AND
8ATUEDAY.
A Live Readable
Newspaper.
Price:
ONLY 50 CENTS
F0R3MOlsrTI*9
Apply to the   Carrier:
Charlei Van Houten.
FIRE!
If you wish to insure your property
you cannot do better than call upon
Mr. W. K. Leighton, agent for the!
Liverpool and London and Globe and
the iEtrta Insurance Company of Haft*
ford, Conn. Risks are accepted at
current rates. *
tt.  CRAIG,
Blacksmith.
Horses Shod with Scientific Accuracy by a SMITH
of many years' experience.
Waggons of all Kinds Made to Order.
REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE AT LOW RATES.
GENERAL BLACKSMITHING DONE WITH
EXPEDITION AND ACCURACY,
BASTION STREET, NANAIMO, B. C.
Notice.
a. m. Johnston a Co.,  have   been
»ppointed Agents for the
•KITISH COLUMBIA FIBEISSl UAME
COMPANY,
to act for Nanaimo and vicinity, and
are now ready to accept risks,
M. H. Cowan,
Secretary and Treasurer.
Victoria, Mav 11 st, I Be**.
Ladiei' Fashionable Bazaar.
Mrs. J. C. McGregor,
VICTORIA   CRESCENT.
THE PRINCIPAL DRESS-MAK-
«     ing and Millinery Establishment in the
City.   Carries a large assortment of—
HATS, BONNETS,
FLOWERS, LACES,
SILKS, FANCY GOODS,
AND
LADIES'  APPAREL.
Employs tho Largest Force of Skilled Assistants of auy Dry House in town.
Agent for the "WHITE"'Sewing Machine
PALACE RESTAURANT
AND
CHOP HOUSE.
OYSTERS,  CHICKENS,   GAME,
and every Delicacy  in Season.
Served at all hours and in the best style.
FIRE!
Liverpool and London and Globe
Insurance.
iETNA INSURANCE CO.
OF HARTFORD, CONN.
 0	
RISKS ACCEPTED AT CURRENT RATES.
W. K. LEIGHTON,
Agent.
HIRST BRO'S,
—:o:—
COMMERCIAL ST.,  NANAIMO.
—to:—
The above Firm carry a Full Stock
of Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardware,
Agricultural Implements, Jewelry, Cutlery and Fancy Goods, &c.,
IMPORTED DIRECT.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS IGlOTPu,
SUGARS""^ltra lar8e importation of finest grades sold I
inbarrels or smaller quantities at Lowest Possible Prices.
Island &PorttandFlo\w
HAMS AND BACON,
Teas and. Canned Goods.
Full aasortment direct from packers.
BUTTER, CHEESE, FRUITS
AND VEGETABLES,
A large and varied stock of Clothing sold cheap for cash.
The Farmers' Store, Comox.
The Cresoebt Store, Nanaimo.
ARTHUR BULLOCK,
DRY GOO
Go to Arthur Bullock's, the leading and fashionable dry
goods house of Nanaimo, where the public will find a large
and complete stock of Dry Goods, Millinery and Men's Fur.
niahing Goods. Being a direct importer from the European
and Eastern markets, I am enabled to offer Goods at moei
reasonable rates. My stock of Millinery is now most complete, and I can show a more fashionable and stylish class of
goods than any other house in British Columbia. Some
elegant styles in
OAKS k DOLMANS
IHS IN FUNNELS AND BLANKETS.
Terms Cash. ARTHUR BULLOCK, Orescent Stow.
AGENT NORTH BRITISH AND MGAHTIIE INSURANCE COMPANY.
Jas. Abrams.
D. J. MoLbml
Walter wilson,
IMPORTER OF
Stoves, Grates, Ranges, Pumps,
Lead Pipe, Zinc, Etc.
AND MANUFACTURER OF
TIN, COPPER, ZINC AND SHEET IRON WARE.
huSO METAL ROOFER.
UEPAIHINU HOSE AT SHORT NOTICE.
COMMERCIAL STREET, NANAIMO.
VANCOUVER CLOTHING HOUSE,
Jsis. j^-"bra.nas <5s Co.
Large and complete stock ot Men's, Youths', Boys' and Ohikbwofo
OVERCOATS
ULSTERS.
QOAKTTTV, QUALITY AND CHEAPNESS NEVER BEFORE EQUALLED IN
NANAIMO.
Shirts, Collars, Gloves, Gents' Furnishings, Mitts, Ties, anu
Braces are Specialties.     A direct importation of a large
lot of Underclothing, also a large parcel of French
HAND-MADE SHOES AND GERMAN SLIPPERS
Never before introduced into this Market.
NO TROUBLE TO SHOW GOODS.
Farmer's Market.
E. HODGSON, Proprietor.
COMMERCIAL STREET,
NANAIMO.
Having purchased the above POPULAR MARKET from Mr. David
Hoggan, I will keep constantly on
hand a full assortment of
MEATS   AND VEGETABLES
Orders for Hotels, Families and
Shipping supplied at short notice, and
delivered free of charge.
Dealer in Horses, Cattle, etc. "^3
DISCOUNT FOR
CASH.
We have lately received a large—in
fact the largest, cheapest, and best line
of
ENGLISH MERINO
UNDERCLOTHING,
from $1.50 a suit upwards.
A large and well selected stock of
English clothing from $15 to $22  per'
suit.   We have the largest stock  of
white and colored shins, hats, caps,
and ties, boots and shoes in Nanaimo.
f§TTh<; above goods will be sold
at five per cent, discount for cash.
COME ONE ! COME ALL I
JAMES ABRAMS & CO.

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